NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020; Congressional Record Vol. 165, No. 116
(House of Representatives - July 11, 2019)

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        NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2020

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Levin of Michigan). Pursuant to House 
Resolution 476 and rule XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the 
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union for the further 
consideration of the bill, H.R. 2500.
  Will the gentleman from California (Mr. Peters) kindly take the 
chair.

[[Page H5595]]

  


                              {time}  1220


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the further consideration of 
the bill (H.R. 2500) to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2020 
for military activities of the Department of Defense and for military 
construction, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal 
year, and for other purposes, with Mr. Peters (Acting Chair) in the 
chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The Acting CHAIR. When the Committee of the Whole rose on Wednesday, 
July 10, 2019, a fourth set of en bloc amendments offered by the 
gentleman from Washington (Mr. Smith) had been disposed of.


                Amendment No. 21 Offered by Mr. Sherman

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 21 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of subtitle A of title XII, add the following:

     SEC. _. PROHIBITION ON USE OF FUNDS TO TRANSFER DEFENSE 
                   ARTICLES AND SERVICES TO AZERBAIJAN.

       None of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act 
     or otherwise made available to the Department of Defense for 
     fiscal year 2020 may be used to transfer defense articles or 
     services to Azerbaijan unless the President certifies to 
     Congress that the transfer of such defense articles or 
     services does not threaten civil aviation.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Sherman) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Chair, one programming note: At this point in the 
schedule, we were scheduled to deal with three Sherman amendments, No. 
20, No. 21, and No. 22.
  No. 22, also in the Rules Committee numbering No. 83, was included in 
an en bloc adopted by this House last evening.
  Amendment No. 20, Rules Committee No. 301, is not being considered at 
this time because it will be included in an en bloc that comes up later 
today.
  So we are now focused on No. 21, Rules Committee No. 82, and I rise 
in support of that amendment.
  Mr. Chair, on September 1, 1983, Korean Air Lines 007 was shot down--
269 casualties, including a Member of this House, Congressman Larry 
McDonald.
  On July 17, 2014, Malaysia Airlines number 17 was shot down--298 
casualties.
  If there is one thing this House can agree on, it is that we are 
opposed to shooting down--especially, deliberately shooting down--
civilian aircraft. And yet the Government of Azerbaijan has stated, 
with regard to flights going into Stepanakert Airport, that they 
envision the physical destruction of airplanes landing in that 
territory.
  This threat has been repeated several times by Azeri officials, and 
in times past, Azerbaijan has actually shot at civil airliners going 
into Stepanakert Airport. That is why this amendment is necessary. It 
prohibits the transfer of Defense Department articles to Azerbaijan 
unless the President can certify that the weapons being transferred 
will not threaten civilian aviation.
  It would be a tragedy if a civilian airliner were shot at or shot 
down as it landed or took off from Stepanakert Airport in the Republic 
of Artsakh. But if that, God forbid, ever happens, let it not be an 
American weapon.
  We are on notice that antiaircraft weapons transferred to Azerbaijan 
may very well be used against civilian aircraft. That is why it is 
necessary for us to have this provision.
  After 23 years of studying these issues on the Foreign Affairs 
Committee, I am not convinced that we should transfer any weapons, 
under any circumstances, to the Government of Azerbaijan until it comes 
to the table and resolves the Artsakh dispute. But, certainly, we 
should not, having been put on notice, transfer weapons that we cannot 
be sure will not be used to shoot down civilian aircraft.
  I am pleased to have the cosponsorship of this amendment by 
Representatives Speier, Schiff, and Pallone, and I believe that this is 
a necessary step. Because, as we provide weapons to countries around 
the world, we should not provide antiaircraft weapons that we believe 
might very well be used to shoot down our civilian aircraft.
  I would point out that the Stepanakert airport is located in the 
Republic of Artsakh, previously known as the Republic of Nagorno-
Karabakh, a historically Armenian territory that was lumped in with 
Azerbaijan by no less than Joseph Stalin in a deliberate effort to 
create ethnic tensions in the Caucasus to the benefit of the Soviet 
Union and in an effort to punish the Armenian people.
  The people of Artsakh established their independence decades ago, and 
whatever your view as to the status of that territory, you should 
support this amendment unless you believe it is appropriate to shoot 
down civilian aircraft.
  I urge my colleagues to support the amendment, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. WRIGHT. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. WRIGHT. Mr. Chairman, I stand in opposition to the amendment 
offered by Mr. Sherman that conditions defense transfers to Azerbaijan.
  Azerbaijan actively contributes to international security efforts. We 
see their forces working alongside coalition forces in countering 
terrorism in Afghanistan, in addition to contributing a logistics 
supply route vital to U.S. and coalition forces.
  Azerbaijan lies in a compromising position between two hostile 
forces: Russia and Iran. Our bilateral relationship and the incredible 
amount of support the Azeris have provided to U.S. missions in 
Afghanistan were strong indicators of how our partnership has grown 
since Azerbaijan first gained its independence in 1991. We must not 
limit our ability to provide reciprocal support to our friend and 
partner in a tumultuous region.
  Putin's history of utilizing military force against its neighbors, 
such as Ukraine and Georgia, forebodes his willingness to use the same 
methods against others that counter him.
  The United States Department of State is responsible for the review 
of sales and transfers of defense articles and services. They exercise 
this responsibility through an interagency process that assesses each 
possible arms transfer on a case-by-case basis. Mr. Sherman's amendment 
unnecessarily singles out Azerbaijan by placing an additional 
certification requirement on the State Department's armed sales review 
process.
  The length of time this amendment would add to the defense exports 
review process is detrimental in the event of an attack by militarily 
superior Russia against our security partner, Azerbaijan, while 
providing no added benefit to our bilateral relationship. This would 
include a lengthening of time in reviewing arms sales intended for 
Azeri forces operating in counterterrorism operations in Afghanistan.
  Nagorno-Karabakh is an Armenian-occupied territory inside the borders 
of Azerbaijan, which has undergone bitter conflict for two decades.
  The OSCE Minsk Group, co-chaired by the United States, has sought a 
peaceful solution to the conflict since 1992. By conditioning sales to 
Azerbaijan, the United States Congress would tilt the United States 
neutral position as a member of the Minsk Group and hinder resolution 
efforts in Nagorno-Karabakh. By taking sides, the trust that has been 
built up by the U.S. and Azerbaijan through the group's efforts would 
be gravely diminished, and the conflict would degenerate further.

                              {time}  1230

  The NDAA is not the appropriate vehicle for taking sides on a 
political issue, nor should it be used to influence a process that 
clearly lies within the jurisdiction of the Foreign Affairs Committee.
  This amendment is not required. The Department of Defense already 
adheres to the provisions of the Department of State's March 2019 
extension of section 907, which specifies that assistance to Azerbaijan 
will not be used for offensive purposes against Armenia.

[[Page H5596]]

  I oppose this amendment, which halts the positive momentum of our 
bilateral relationship, particularly with the arrival of U.S. 
Ambassador Lee Litzenberger in January of this year.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Sherman).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. WRIGHT. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
will be postponed.


         Amendment No. 23 Offered by Mr. Ted Lieu of California

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 23 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chairman, I rise to offer amendment 
No. 23 as the designee of Representative Gabbard.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of subtitle G of title XII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 1268. LIMITATION ON USE OF FUNDS FROM THE SPECIAL 
                   DEFENSE ACQUISITION FUND.

       Section 114(c) of title 10, United States Code, is amended 
     by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(4) Notwithstanding paragraph (3), none of the funds made 
     available from the Special Defense Acquisition Fund for any 
     fiscal year may be made available to provide any assistance 
     to Saudi Arabia or the United Arab Emirates if such 
     assistance could be used by either country to conduct or 
     continue hostilities in Yemen.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Ted Lieu) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chair, I rise to speak in support of 
the amendment offered by Representative Gabbard of Hawaii on the 
limitation on the use of funds from the Special Defense Acquisition 
Fund for Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates.
  This fund allows the U.S. military to preorder weapons for sale to 
foreign militaries and is intended to reduce wait times for weapons or 
related services.
  While this is normally a good way to prevent a long and detrimental 
wait for our allies to use weapons in self-defense, is it 
unconscionable that it be used to kill and wound civilians in an unjust 
war.
  Saudi Arabia and the UAE have, since 2015, been bombing schools, 
hospitals, buses, and other civilian targets.
  As of March of this year, nearly 18,000 people have been killed or 
injured by this bombing campaign since hostilities began in 2015, 
according to the U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights.
  Thousands more have been displaced by the fighting, and millions are 
faced with starvation, hunger, and disease.
  This has created a humanitarian crisis, destroyed water supplies, and 
created shortages in food and medical care.
  We have already passed a resolution seeking to end U.S. involvement 
in this slaughter, only to have the President veto it, while he 
continues to supply Saudi Arabia with U.S. missiles and bombs.
  This amendment will prevent the military from speeding supplies to 
Saudi Arabia and the UAE and will do much to alleviate the suffering of 
the people of Yemen.
  Mr. Chair, I ask that all Members support this amendment and end our 
involvement in this shameful war, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New York is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, I oppose this amendment prohibiting the use of 
funds from the Special Defense Acquisition Fund to provide assistance 
to Saudi Arabia or the United Arab Emirates if such assistance could be 
used in hostilities in Yemen.
  Nearly every Member in this Chamber has made it very clear that we 
are concerned about civilian casualties resulting from the conflict in 
Yemen. However, this amendment does not address that concern.
  The war in Yemen must end, but, as Iran continues to finance terror 
and help the Houthis, who have overthrown the government, the 
consequence will be utter devastation for the Yemeni civilians.
  Our assistance for the coalition opposing Houthi and Iranian terror 
in Yemen started in 2015 during the Obama administration when the 
Houthis overthrew a legitimate government, with Iran's assistance.
  The Houthis fired missiles against the coalition, with support from 
Iran, and the U.S. provided intelligence and logistical support in 
compliance with the Law of Armed Conflict.
  Iran poses a massive geostrategic threat in the area around Yemen, 
throughout the Middle East, and to the United States and many of our 
allies.
  Right now, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Yemen, and the 
U.S. share a common adversary in Iran.
  We cannot signal to Iran that their continued aggression will be 
tolerated. Iran's nefarious activities must be countered effectively.
  The coalition continues to face an onslaught of Houthi attacks on 
civilian targets, and the U.S. needs a nuanced approach that helps our 
Nation, our partners, and avoids civilian casualties.
  Instead, this amendment slams the door shut, crushing any opportunity 
to see the region and civilians protected.
  Have no doubt: The coalition will continue to purchase arms, 
including defensive weapons, from other sources that have no regard for 
how these weapons are deployed.
  As a result of this amendment, the war in Yemen will not end, nor 
will it assist the United States or our strategic allies in containing 
Iran's malign influence in the region.
  Mr. Chair, I urge Members to oppose this amendment, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, again, I urge my colleagues to oppose this 
amendment, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Ted Lieu).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
will be postponed.


         Amendment No. 24 Offered by Mr. Ted Lieu of California

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 24 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the appropriate place in subtitle G of title XII, insert 
     the following:

     SEC. __. PROHIBITION ON THE USE OF EMERGENCY AUTHORITIES FOR 
                   THE SALE OR TRANSFER OF DEFENSE ARTICLES AND 
                   SERVICES TO SAUDI ARABIA AND THE UNITED ARAB 
                   EMIRATES.

       None of the funds authorized to be appropriated or 
     otherwise made available by this or any other Act may be made 
     available to process a commercial sale or foreign military 
     sale, or to transfer, deliver, or facilitate the transfer or 
     delivery, of any defense article or service to Saudi Arabia 
     or the United Arab Emirates pursuant to any certification of 
     emergency circumstances submitted in accordance with section 
     36(b) of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2776(b)) with 
     respect to such countries, including any such certification 
     submitted to Congress before the date of the enactment of 
     this section.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Ted Lieu) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chair, I don't have any philosophical 
objection to supporting our allies.

[[Page H5597]]

Saudi Arabia and the UAE are still America's allies. But what I object 
to and what many of us in Congress object to is the bypassing of 
Congress in selling arms to Saudi Arabia and the UAE.
  On May 24, the Trump administration, through Secretary Pompeo, 
notified Congress that it was declaring a fake emergency to bypass 
congressional review of 22 arms sales to Saudi Arabia and the United 
Arab Emirates.
  How do we know this was a fake emergency? Because there is no 
emergency to the United States or to UAE or to Saudi Arabia regarding 
the war in Yemen.
  It is a horrific humanitarian problem. The Saudi-led coalition has 
killed countless civilians. But it is not an emergency that would 
justify weapons sales to Saudi Arabia and UAE that bypasses 
congressional procedure.
  And, in fact, it has been recently reported that the UAE is now 
pulling its troops out of Yemen. What kind of emergency is this that 
would require the bypass of Congress to sell arms to UAE and Saudi 
Arabia?
  In addition, we had a hearing in the Foreign Affairs Committee where 
the Trump administration official admitted that many of these arms 
would not even be ready for months, if not years, in order to be sold.
  So, it is unacceptable that the administration is trying to bypass 
Congress.
  What this amendment will do is simply say you cannot declare a fake 
emergency to bypass Congress to sell these arms. If you want to sell 
these arms to Saudi Arabia and UAE, you have to do it through the 
normal process.
  Mr. Chair, I request an ``aye'' vote on this amendment, and I reserve 
the balance of my time.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New York is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, I rise in opposition to this amendment, which 
would prohibit any funds from being used to process any arms sales or 
transfers to Saudi Arabia or the United Arab Emirates pursuant to 
emergency certification made under the Arms Export Control Act.
  The President's emergency certification of May 24 to move 22 arms 
sales as an emergency was to address increased threats from Iran to 
U.S. security interests and Iran's continued efforts to destabilize the 
region, which directly impacts our strategic allies.
  The Democrat majority had been holding onto arms sales through 
congressional notification requirements and abusing oversight power 
with the Arms Export Control Act. Some of these requests by the 
administration had been on hold for over a year, and there was no 
progress in determining why.
  We witnessed just last month, on June 19, Iran shot down a U.S. 
military asset, a drone over international waters, one of many examples 
of Iranian aggression toward the United States and other nations, many 
in that region surrounding Iran.
  There is no doubt that Iran is an increased threat.
  Mr. Chair, I urge Members to oppose this amendment, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Rhode Island (Mr. Cicilline).
  Mr. CICILLINE. Mr. Chair, I thank the gentleman for yielding and rise 
in strong support of the Lieu amendment.
  I am proud to be a cosponsor of this amendment, which will prevent 
the sale of weapons to the Gulf without undergoing the proper 
congressional notification process.
  This administration invented an emergency in the Middle East in order 
to circumvent the process of congressional review over arms sales, an 
egregious and legally questionable move, to put more weapons in the 
hands of regimes who are responsible for perpetrating horrific civilian 
casualties in Yemen, often with U.S. weapons.
  The administration briefed this body on Iran just days before the 
supposed emergency was declared, yet never mentioned anything at the 
time about an emergency.
  The administration claims that Iran poses such an imminent threat to 
our allies that emergency assistance is needed for Saudi Arabia and the 
United Arab Emirates to defend themselves, yet most of these weapons 
are offensive weapons and much of the sale will be delivered months or 
years from now.
  The logic doesn't make sense because there is no logic. This is an 
administration that has cozied up to Riyadh, sweeping aside gross human 
rights abuses, turning a blind eye to the Saudis taking a buzz saw to a 
Washington Post reporter, and supporting an intervention in Yemen that 
is causing famine, destruction, and mounting loss of life.
  Just because you don't like the process doesn't mean you get to 
ignore it. This action has implications far beyond this current sale, 
and if Congress doesn't reassert our proper role in the process, we 
risk giving up our authority in the arms sale process entirely.
  Mr. Chair, I strongly encourage my colleagues to support this 
excellent amendment.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, I just want to point out Chairman Engel has 
been approaching this issue in a little more of a surgical approach in 
looking at Federal law. I think that that would be the more appropriate 
tactic in being able to work together in a bipartisan fashion on this 
issue.
  This amendment, with all due respect to my good friend from 
California, is a little more of a sledgehammer. I think he would 
probably say that that would be true, unapologetically.
  I, though, would certainly encourage my colleagues, really, on both 
sides of the aisle, to be able to work together through concerns that 
others may have rather than passing this particular amendment.
  There has been a hold that has been placed for a very long time. And 
I would encourage any Members of Congress who are responsible for that 
hold or support the hold to articulate to us and to the administration 
exactly what the hold is, what the concerns are, and how we can work 
through it together.
  I hope that we all are in unanimity with concern over Iranian 
aggression in the Middle East. We are all in unanimity with concern 
when we see Iran--beyond the rhetorical calling us the great Satan--
pledging death to America, building a land bridge across the Middle 
East, supporting Assad in Syria and financing Hezbollah in Lebanon.
  And, certainly, there are the concerns with the movement in shipping 
lanes around Yemen, a conflict that the Houthis, in overthrowing a 
legitimate government, did with the backing of the Iranians.
  So, there are a lot of concerns that we have on our side of the aisle 
as it relates to Iranian aggression, and I hope that we can work 
together in dealing with those concerns that we all have as it relates 
to Iranian aggression.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chair, I agree Iran is a malign 
influence in the Middle East, but that doesn't mean the administration 
gets to bypass Congress in selling arms to Saudi Arabia and the UAE.
  Mr. Chair, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Washington (Mr. 
Smith).
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, I respect the gentleman's point 
about how we need to work towards an agreement to how Congress can have 
the most constructive role possible on arms sales.
  The concern here is the tendency of the White House to declare an 
emergency when they simply want to do something that we haven't allowed 
them to do. It is troubling because it takes us out of the process, so 
we need to find a way to make sure that they can't do that.
  It is not a huge mystery why these arms sales have been held up. We 
are concerned about Iran's malign influence. We are also concerned 
about the actions that Saudi Arabia has been taking in that region that 
could be stirring up conflict and making it easier for Iran to have 
that malign influence; quite specifically, killing civilians in Yemen 
in a way that generates sympathy, certainly, for the Houthis in Yemen 
but then sympathy for that side.
  So, we are worried about the way Saudi Arabia is conducting this war, 
certainly, and we are also worried about other actions by Saudi Arabia. 
Certainly, the murder of the journalist, Jamal Khashoggi, has not been 
answered for to this point.

[[Page H5598]]

  So, simply selling weapons to Saudi Arabia at this point is something 
that is going to take time and is going to raise questions.
  For the President to simply bypass us, taking us out of the process 
in that situation, I think, undermines our role.
  That is the purpose of this amendment, and I urge adoption.

                              {time}  1245

  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, I also think it is important to note that the 
United States has not engaged in direct hostilities in Yemen. We 
stopped the refueling of Saudi aircraft, so the activities have 
actually, in many respects, been walked back from what was historically 
known as being directly engaged in hostilities on the ground, which is 
just not the case here as it relates to the United States.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chair, this issue has bipartisan 
support, and I request an ``aye'' vote on the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, again, I would urge all of my colleagues to 
oppose this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Ted Lieu).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
will be postponed.


          Amendment No. 26 Offered by Mr. Smith of Washington

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 26 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I rise to offer amendment No. 
26 as the designee of Mr. Khanna.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the appropriate place in subtitle G of title XII, insert 
     the following:

     SEC. 12__. PROHIBITION ON SUPPORT FOR MILITARY PARTICIPATION 
                   AGAINST THE HOUTHIS.

       (a) Prohibition Relating to Support.--None of the funds 
     authorized to be appropriated or otherwise made available by 
     this Act may be made available to provide the following forms 
     of United States support to Saudi-led coalition's operations 
     against the Houthis in Yemen:
       (1) Sharing intelligence for the purpose of enabling 
     coalition strikes.
       (2) Providing logistical support for coalition strikes, 
     including by providing maintenance or transferring spare 
     parts to coalition members flying warplanes engaged in anti-
     Houthi bombings.
       (b) Prohibition Relating to Military Participation.--None 
     of the funds authorized to be appropriated or otherwise made 
     available by this Act may be made available for any civilian 
     or military personnel of the Department of Defense to 
     command, coordinate, participate in the movement of, or 
     accompany the regular or irregular military forces of the 
     Saudi and United Arab Emirates-led coalition forces in 
     hostilities against the Houthis in Yemen or in situations in 
     which there exists an imminent threat that such coalition 
     forces become engaged in such hostilities, unless and until 
     the President has obtained specific statutory authorization, 
     in accordance with section 8(a) of the War Powers Resolution 
     (50 U.S.C. 1547(a)).
       (c) Rule of Construction.--The prohibitions under this 
     section may not be construed to apply with respect to United 
     States Armed Forces engaged in operations directed at al 
     Qaeda or associated forces.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from Washington (Mr. Smith) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Washington.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, this amendment is a variation 
on a bill that this House passed and the Senate passed as well that the 
President vetoed that would cut off any U.S. support for the Saudi 
coalition that is fighting in Yemen.
  And I will agree with some discussion that came earlier that this is 
a complicated situation because we are concerned about the malign 
influence of Iran in the region. But the problem is the way the war has 
been conducted in Yemen.
  As I mentioned earlier on the previous amendment, the civilian 
casualties and the way the war has been conducted has undermined, I 
believe, our efforts to arrive at a peaceful solution and to begin to 
limit the Iranian influence in the region.
  I met with Saudi Arabian officials as they explained to me what their 
targeting strategy was, and how they were trying to mitigate civilian 
casualties, but I was not impressed because whatever they showed me on 
these pieces of paper, it has been well-documented that they bombed a 
school bus, killing a large number of children. They actually bombed a 
funeral, a funeral that had a lot of the key leaders in Yemen at it 
that were going to be responsible for negotiating a peace agreement. 
And on countless other instances they have bombed civilian targets.
  There is also a very aggressive blockade going on in Yemen that is 
having a devastating humanitarian impact.
  Now, I understand that Iran is also doing things that we should 
oppose. They are killing civilians; they are stirring up difficulties. 
But we are not supporting Iran. We are not responsible for that piece 
of it.
  But to the extent that we participate in helping Saudi Arabia, 
through intelligence sharing, through refueling, through a variety of 
different means, we are participating in the atrocities that are being 
committed on that side, and we should not be. It is not what is going 
to lead us to a peaceful solution.
  I also want to emphasize that this amendment, as did the bill that we 
passed, very carefully carves out the activity that we are engaged in 
in Yemen to counter violent extremist groups like al-Qaida and ISIS 
that have arisen in the region.
  We have a counterterrorism presence in Yemen. This amendment in no 
way restricts us from continuing that counterterrorism activity. This 
is focused on the civil war in Yemen.
  And it is worth noting that, as we get to the point now where Iran is 
involved, that is not the way it started. Basically, the Houthis in 
Yemen were an oppressed minority and suffered decades of mistreatment 
at the hands of whoever happened to be in charge in Yemen, which led to 
the revolt.
  Now, since that time, the Houthis have committed all manner of 
atrocities, as well as the war moved forward. But initially, this was a 
civil war that doesn't really have anything to do with the terrorism 
fight that we are doing. And I think it is incredibly important for the 
credibility of our foreign policy to clearly differentiate between our 
activities, our legitimate activities, in Yemen to stop those 
terrorists in Yemen who threaten us and threaten our allies in the 
region, and the activities of this broader civil war that, as I said, I 
believe, is merely creating more violence in the Middle East and 
empowering Iran by creating widespread sympathy across the board and in 
the United States for the Houthis and for the people in Yemen who are 
being the victims of these bombing attacks.
  The U.S. should step back from this. And if Saudi Arabia is the great 
ally that everyone has said they are, we should be able to have a 
conversation with them about how they change their actions, so we can 
be in a better position to support them and lead toward greater peace 
in the region and contain Iran. That is what we need to do.
  But the current policy isn't working, so this amendment makes it 
clear the United States is not supporting the Saudi-led coalition that 
is engaged in the civil war in Yemen, and I urge support.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, I claim the time in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New York is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, I completely support Congress' solemn duty 
under Article I of the Constitution to authorize the commitment of U.S. 
troops to foreign hostilities; but that is not the only issue here.
  This amendment attempts to block intelligence sharing to our 
strategic partners such as Saudi Arabia at a time when those partners 
have civilian targets that are actively being attacked by Iran-backed 
Houthi rebels.
  Intelligence sharing can help our partners protect their forces and 
their civilians. It can also help them ensure that they are hitting 
their correct targets, thereby minimizing civilian casualties.

[[Page H5599]]

  Additionally, the Iran-backed Houthis are stepping up its attacks on 
U.S. assets in Yemen. CENTCOM confirmed that the Houthis shot down a 
U.S. drone earlier this summer. If we cut off intelligence sharing with 
our strategic partners, it will certainly have repercussions that 
diminish our abilities to protect our own assets.
  There is reason that a bipartisan majority supported exempting 
intelligence sharing from the War Powers Resolution on Yemen that we 
considered earlier this year. It is because this type of cooperation is 
essential to U.S. interests in the region, including ensuring 
responsible conduct of the war in Yemen.
  It is important to point out that here, in this case with Yemen, the 
Houthis overthrew a government with the backing of Iran. Iran is the 
world's largest state sponsor of terror. They do many malign, 
nonnuclear, nefarious activities.
  While, for good reason, we give the most amount of attention to 
Iran's nuclear activities--they call Israel the Little Satan, the 
United States the Great Satan, and they pledge death to America in 
their parliament and on their streets and in their holidays--they have 
been attempting to build a land bridge to the west of the country.

  They have a much more growing influence within the government of 
Iraq. They have been propping up Assad in Syria. They have been 
financing rockets and other activities to support Hezbollah in Lebanon.
  When you look towards the Strait of Bab al-Mandab, and the area 
around Yemen, and the strategic advantage for Iran to be able to 
successfully help the Houthis in overthrowing this government and 
having long-term security, Iranian aggression has caused a realignment 
of different alliances within the Middle East.
  Many of these nations are looking at Israel differently than they 
used to because they are so concerned with Iranian aggression.
  I think what is most important for U.S. interests in the Middle East 
and, specifically, in Yemen, one, it is critically important, and as 
the gentleman said in his point, minimizing civilian casualties must be 
of a bipartisan concern. It should be one of international concern, 
most importantly, for innocent civilians who end up losing their life.
  Additionally, those who are cutting off access to humanitarian aid is 
also of great concern and great debate.
  So for myself, speaking for myself specifically, as it relates to 
Yemen, I am greatly concerned by the Houthis activities backed by Iran, 
and it is one that we should successfully be hoping that that 
aggression is pushed back to the point that Houthis are unsuccessful; 
that Iran is unsuccessful, and they are pushed back to their own 
country, back in a defensive posture, and we don't see further 
aggression in more countries.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, I have no further speakers and I 
am prepared to close.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Arkansas (Mr. Crawford).
  Mr. CRAWFORD. Mr. Chair, I rise in opposition to this amendment. As a 
veteran, and as a member of the House Intelligence Committee, I have 
had the privilege of seeing firsthand how intelligence supports U.S. 
foreign policy abroad and just how important our allies are when 
fighting our adversaries.
  Intelligence sharing relationships act as a force multiplier, 
ensuring the security of the United States and our allies. As we have 
seen time and time again, restricting such critical information sharing 
results in disastrous repercussions.
  Even as we debate this amendment, our strategic partners, such as 
Saudi Arabia, have civilian targets that are being attacked by Iran-
backed Houthi rebels. These same Iran-supported rebels pose a threat to 
U.S. military personnel in the region.
  Yesterday, this body debated an amendment tasking the ODNI to provide 
an annual report on civilian casualties.
  You know what helps minimize civilian casualties? Intelligence. 
Intelligence helps ensure that the correct targets are hit, while 
minimizing collateral damage.
  I am gravely concerned with the dangerous long-term implications of 
this ill-advised amendment. For this reason, I urge my colleagues to 
oppose the amendment.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, I am prepared to close. I reserve 
the balance of my time.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, who has the right to close?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Washington has the right to 
close.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, I yield myself the balance of my time.
  I would just encourage all my colleagues to oppose this amendment for 
reasons that were stated, hopefully, with great concern across this 
entire body on both sides of the aisle as it relates to Iranian 
aggression.
  We need to work together, really all around the world or wherever the 
United States can be of assistance to minimize civilian casualties, to 
get access to humanitarian aid.
  There is debate at times of who is responsible, but I think it is 
important for us to do a better job working together to achieve the 
results that are in the best interests of the United States, even 
though we have debates at times of the best way to get there.
  I encourage all Members to vote ``no.''
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself the balance of 
my time.
  I think the intelligence sharing point the gentleman from Arkansas 
made is very important. Let me say, there are multiple countries 
involved in this coalition in Yemen.
  In working with the UAE, for instance, they actually do take steps to 
minimize civilian casualties and are reasonably successful about it in 
the operations that they have conducted, both from the air and the 
ground.
  Saudi Arabia has not. And believe me, I certainly understood the 
malign influence of Iran and their relationship with the Houthis. But 
Saudi Arabia, time and time again, regrettably, has not used this 
intelligence sharing in a way that minimizes civilian casualties.
  I had cited the instances earlier of the school bus that was bombed; 
the funeral party that was bombed; the civilians who are continually 
hit. They are not using this intelligence sharing in a way to minimize 
civilian casualties. And I think we need to make a statement that they 
are going to have to change their ways before we continue to do this.
  On the broader issue, and that is really what Yemen is about for U.S. 
policy purposes, is Iran's influence in the region and, also, the role 
that Saudi Arabia plays in the violence. And the problem I have with 
the administration's policy right now is it would do nothing to contain 
what Saudi Arabia is doing, which only exacerbates the violence and 
creates openings for Iran. So we need to balance that.
  As far Iran is concerned, right now it is hard to say where the 
administration's policy is going. It is a maximum pressure campaign. We 
have seen Iran lash out since we abandoned the nuclear deal. They are 
now moving more in the direction of developing a nuclear weapon than 
they were before we abandoned the nuclear deal.
  The administration is now saying that they want to force Iran to the 
table to stop them from getting a nuclear weapon.
  We need a better policy in Iran. I urge support for the amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Washington (Mr. Smith).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. ZELDIN. Mr. Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Washington 
will be postponed.

                              {time}  1300


               Amendment No. 27 Offered by Mr. Cicilline

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 27 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. CICILLINE. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.

[[Page H5600]]

  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the appropriate place in subtitle G of title XII, insert 
     the following:

     SEC. 12__. REPEAL OF PROHIBITION ON TRANSFER OF ARTICLES ON 
                   THE UNITED STATES MUNITIONS LIST TO CYPRUS.

       (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) the direct sale or transfer of arms by the United 
     States to Cyprus would advance United States security 
     interests in Europe by helping to reduce the dependence of 
     the Government of Cyprus on other countries for defense-
     related materiel, including countries that pose challenges to 
     United States interests around the world; and
       (2) it is in the interest of the United States--
       (A) to continue to support United Nations-facilitated 
     efforts toward a comprehensive solution to the division of 
     Cyprus; and
       (B) for the Republic of Cyprus to join NATO's Partnership 
     for Peace program.
       (b) Modification of Prohibition.--Section 620C(e) of the 
     Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2373(e)) is amended 
     by adding at the end of the following new paragraph:
       ``(3) The requirement under paragraph (1) shall not apply 
     to any sale or other provision of any defense article or 
     defense service to Cyprus if the end-user of such defense or 
     defense service is Cyprus.''.
       (c) Exclusion of the Government of the Republic of Cyprus 
     From Certain Related Regulations.--Beginning on the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall not 
     apply a policy of denial for exports, re-exports, or 
     transfers of defense articles and defense services destined 
     for or originating in the Republic of Cyprus if--
       (1) the request is made by or on behalf of Cyprus; and
       (2) the end-user of such defense articles or defense 
     services is Cyprus.
       (d) Exception.--This exclusion shall not apply to any 
     denial based upon credible human rights concerns.
       (e) Limitations on the Transfer of Articles on the United 
     States Munitions List to the Republic of Cyprus.--
       (1) In general.--The policy of denial for exports, re-
     exports, or transfers of defense articles on the United 
     States Munitions List to the Republic of Cyprus shall remain 
     in place unless the President determines and certifies to the 
     appropriate congressional committees not less than annually 
     that--
       (A) the Government of the Republic of Cyprus is continuing 
     to cooperate with the United States Government in efforts to 
     implement reforms on anti-money laundering regulations and 
     financial regulatory oversight; and
       (B) the Government of the Republic of Cyprus has made and 
     is continuing to take the steps necessary to deny Russian 
     military vessels access to ports for refueling and servicing.
       (2) Waiver.--The President may waive the limitations 
     contained in this subsection for one fiscal year if the 
     President determines that it is essential to the national 
     security interests of the United States to do so.
       (3) Appropriate congressional committees defined.--In this 
     section, the term ``appropriate congressional committees'' 
     means--
       (A) the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on 
     Armed Services of the Senate; and
       (B) the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on 
     Armed Services of the House of Representatives.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from Rhode Island (Mr. Cicilline) and a Member opposed each will 
control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Rhode Island.
  Mr. CICILLINE. Mr. Chairman, the Republic of Cyprus is a strategic 
partner of the United States and has played a critical role in 
combating terrorism and nuclear proliferation in the Eastern 
Mediterranean region. The United States regularly participates in joint 
exercises with Cyprus, including annual multinational search and rescue 
and crisis management exercises, and we coordinate training programs 
for Cyprus in explosives management and disposal, cybersecurity, 
counterterrorism, and maritime safety and security.
  Through information sharing, training programs, and other 
international and regional security initiatives, the United States and 
Cyprus work hand in hand to combat terrorist activity in Europe and the 
Eastern Mediterranean region. The United States also works closely with 
Cyprus to stop the spread of weapons of mass destruction, and Cyprus 
has helped foster an effective international nonproliferation regime.
  In 2015, the U.S. joined Cyprus, as members of the Proliferation 
Security Initiative, in cohosting a regional nonproliferation workshop 
focusing on inspecting and identifying proliferation material.
  Yet despite the critical security partnership between our two 
countries, the United States has had an arms embargo in place against 
Cyprus since 1987. This policy was initially intended to prevent Turkey 
from using American weapons to occupy Cyprus and to provide space for 
reunification talks after Turkey's 1974 invasion of Cyprus and its 
subsequent occupation of the northern territory.
  However, more than 3 years since the embargo was first implemented, 
Turkey still has more than 30,000 troops occupying the northern 
territory of Cyprus, reunification talks have not produced intended 
results, and the U.S. is unable to maintain a full security 
relationship with a key partner in combating terrorism.
  Even today, Turkey continues to use its U.S.-backed military might to 
threaten Cyprus' energy exploration by continually harassing drilling 
vessels in its exclusive economic zone. And Turkey is not merely 
threatening the Republic of Cyprus, but significant American 
investments by ExxonMobil and Noble Energy and the interests of key 
U.S. allies in Greece, Egypt, and Israel, all of whom are partners with 
Cyprus on energy developments.
  The outdated and ineffective arms embargo forces Cyprus, an EU 
member, and one of only three countries with a status of forces 
agreement with Israel, to obtain defense articles from countries like 
Russia that seek to undermine U.S. interests in the region.
  We need to enact policies that strengthen our relationship with 
Cyprus and counteract dangerous elements in the region which threaten 
our national security interests and the interests of our allies and 
partners in the Eastern Mediterranean.
  Our inability to provide Cyprus with necessary equipment needed to 
defend its sovereignty and its economic interests threatens our own 
national security.
  Lifting the arms embargo will allow Cyprus to better establish itself 
as a frontline state for Western security interests, defend itself from 
external threats, and will ensure that Cyprus is no longer forced to 
seek assistance for its defense from countries like Russia. It will 
also make regional security cooperation smoother for the United States 
by making sure our partners can obtain compatible defense systems and 
training from the U.S. military.
  My bipartisan amendment would repeal the ineffective embargo and 
ensure that Cyprus has the equipment necessary to continue to help the 
U.S. combat terrorism and international crime, and protect significant 
natural gas finds and the infrastructure that can bring this energy 
source to Europe.
  The Senate has already taken up this issue and passed language to 
repeal the embargo with bipartisan support during its consideration of 
the NDAA. The House should follow suit and support passage of my 
bipartisan amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, Cyprus is a vital and strategic international partner, 
and we need to make sure we are treating it as such. I urge adoption of 
the amendment, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  I appreciate the comments of the gentleman from Rhode Island, and I 
want to agree in substantial measure with what he said about the 
progress that Cyprus has made both in countering Russian influence and 
in combating international money laundering and other issues on which 
we have been working with them. I do believe that, as the gentleman 
indicated, the embargo that has been in place since 1987 ought to be 
considered and looked at, and there ought to at least be considered a 
plan to gradually move away from that embargo if and as Cyprus 
continues to make progress in weaning itself off Russian weapons and 
the other priorities that we have with them.
  What I worry about is, all of a sudden, in a total of a 10-minute 
debate on the National Defense Authorization Act, that we come in and 
say, ``Okay, the embargo is gone; what has been in place since 1987, 
never mind anymore,'' without really thinking through the consequences 
and having that plan that helps us work with Cyprus to get to a better 
place.
  And I don't need to remind Members that this area is very complex, 
with a

[[Page H5601]]

number of actors that have intense interest in what happens in Cyprus 
and in the region. I am not saying that we don't move in that 
direction, but I am saying, to come here with a 10-minute debate and 
say, ``Okay, never mind what we have done since 1987'' is fraught with 
danger.
  So, for that reason, I must oppose this amendment. I appreciate the 
progress that is being made. I think it is important to look for ways 
to build on that progress, but for us to come in and say, ``Oh, never 
mind; we are going to upend something that has been in place for so 
many years'' would be dangerous.

  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. CICILLINE. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman for his thoughts. 
I would only say that the best way to assist Cyprus in weaning itself 
from the reliance of Russian weaponry is to lift the arms embargo, and 
this is something that both Cyprus and the United States have studied 
for a very long time. The best way to strengthen this partnership and 
alliance is to repeal this embargo.
  I would also like to take this opportunity to thank my colleague, 
Congressman Gus Bilirakis, for cosponsoring this amendment and for his 
leadership on this issue.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. CICILLINE. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BILIRAKIS. Mr. Chair, I rise today in strong support of the 
amendment put forward by my good friend, Representative Cicilline, to 
lift the antiquated and failed prohibition on defense article and 
service transfers to our Eastern Mediterranean ally--the Republic of 
Cyprus.
  In 1987, the U.S. Department of State placed the Republic of Cyprus 
on a list of countries to which sales and transfers of defense articles 
and services is prohibited under the International Trade in Arms 
Regulations. The reason for the prohibition has never been clear. 
However, it appears to have been imposed in the erroneous belief that 
it would somehow encourage Greek Cypriots and Turkish Cypriots to 
resolve the nearly 45-year division of the territory of Cyprus.
  Unfortunately, no progress toward a peaceful and just settlement has 
occurred since the prohibition was imposed in 1987. The lack of 
progress is due to Turkish stubbornness most recently demonstrated by 
Turkey's insistence on antiquated and obstructive stances, such as the 
Treaty of Guarantee, which would allow for future unilateral Turkish 
military interventions and is completely unacceptable and contradicts 
the governing principals of a European Union member state.
  It is time to lift the arms prohibition on the Republic of Cyprus. It 
is in the best interests of the United States for the Republic of 
Cyprus to look to the United States, and not any other nation, to 
procure its defense articles.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Rhode Island (Mr. Cicilline).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Rhode Island 
will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 29 Offered by Mr. Engel

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 29 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       In subsection (b) of section 1087--
       (1) redesignate paragraphs (7), (8), and (9) as paragraphs 
     (9), (10), and (11), respectively; and
       (2) insert after paragraph (6) the following:
       (7) An analysis of reasons for any disparity between third 
     party public estimates and official United States Government 
     estimates of civilian casualties resulting from United States 
     or joint operations, including with respect to each specific 
     mission, strike, engagement, raid, or incident.
       (8) A comparison of a representative sample of pre-strike 
     collateral damage estimates and confirmed civilian casualty 
     incidents for the purposes of developing possible 
     explanations for any gaps between the two and assessing how 
     to reduce such gaps.
       In paragraph (10) of section 1087(b), as redesignated, add 
     at the end before the period the following: ``, including an 
     analysis of the principal and secondary causes of civilian 
     casualties in a suitably representative sample of air 
     operations that includes both planned and dynamic strikes''.
       In paragraph (1) of section 1087(d), insert ``and the 
     Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the 
     Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of 
     Representatives'' after ``congressional defense committees''.
       At the end of subtitle G of title XII, add the following:

     SEC. _. AMENDMENTS RELATING TO CIVILIAN CASUALTY MATTERS.

       (a) Modification of Responsibility for Policy on Civilian 
     Casualty Matters.--Section 936 of the John S. McCain National 
     Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 
     115-232; 10 U.S.C. 134 note) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in paragraph (3)--
       (i) by inserting ``appropriate to the specific regional 
     circumstances'' after ``publicly available means''; and
       (ii) by inserting ``or in-person'' after ``Internet-
     based'';
       (B) in paragraph (5)--
       (i) in subparagraph (A), by inserting ``, including for 
     acknowledging the status of any individuals killed or injured 
     who were initially reported as lawful targets, but 
     subsequently determined not to be lawful targets'' after 
     ``operations''; and
       (ii) in subparagraph (B)--

       (I) by inserting ``or other assistance'' after 
     ``payments''; and
       (II) by striking ``necessary'' and inserting ``reasonable 
     and culturally appropriate''; and

       (C) in paragraph (7), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (D) by redesignating paragraph (8) as paragraph (10); and
       (E) by inserting after paragraph (7) the following:
       ``(8) uniform processes and standards across the combatant 
     commands for integrating civilian protection into operational 
     planning, including assessments of the optimal staffing 
     models for tracking, analyzing, and responding to civilian 
     casualties in named military operations of various sizes and 
     compositions, to include multinational coalition operations;
       ``(9) cultivating, developing, retaining, and disseminating 
     lessons learned about the proximate cause or causes of 
     civilian casualties, and practices developed to prevent, 
     mitigate, or respond to such casualties; and'';
       (2) by redesignating subsection (c) as subsection (d);
       (3) by inserting after subsection (b) the following:
       ``(c) Coordination.--
       ``(1) In general.--The senior civilian official designated 
     under subsection (a) shall develop and implement steps to 
     increase coordination with the Chiefs of Mission and other 
     appropriate positions in the Department of State in any 
     country with respect to which the policy required pursuant to 
     subsection (a) is relevant.
       ``(2) Matters for coordination.--The coordination required 
     by paragraph (1) shall include the following:
       ``(A) The development of publicly available means, 
     appropriate to the specific regional circumstances, including 
     an internet-based or in-person mechanism, for submission to 
     the United States Government of allegations of civilian 
     casualties resulting from United States military operations.
       ``(B) The offering of reasonable and culturally appropriate 
     ex gratia payments or other assistance to civilians who have 
     been injured, or to the families of civilians killed, as a 
     result of United States military operations.'';
       (4) by inserting after subsection (d), as redesignated, the 
     following:
       ``(e) Briefing.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this subsection, the senior civilian 
     official designated under subsection (a) shall brief the 
     congressional defense committees and the Committee on Foreign 
     Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs 
     of the House of Representatives on--
       ``(1) the updates made to the policy developed by the 
     senior civilian official pursuant to this section; and
       ``(2) the efforts of the Department to implement such 
     updates.''.
       (b) Modification of Annual Report on Civilian Casualties in 
     Connection With United States Military Operations.--Section 
     1057 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
     Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a), by striking ``congressional defense 
     committees'' and inserting ``appropriate congressional 
     committees''; and
       (2) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in paragraph (3), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting the following: ``and, when relevant, makes ex 
     gratia payments or provides other assistance to the victims 
     or their families, including--
       ``(A) whether interviews were conducted with witnesses and 
     survivors of United States lethal actions, directly or 
     through a third party or intermediary;
       ``(B) whether the investigation relied on public reports or 
     other nongovernmental sources; and
       ``(C) the process, criteria, and methodology used to assess 
     external allegations of civilian casualties, including the 
     sources of such allegations.'';

[[Page H5602]]

       (B) in paragraph (4), by adding at the end before the 
     period the following: ``, including any assistance and 
     support, as appropriate, provided for civilians displaced by 
     such operations'';
       (C) by redesignating paragraph (6) as paragraph (9); and
       (D) by inserting after paragraph (5) the following:
       ``(6) A list of allegations where the Department could 
     confirm United States military activity but could not confirm 
     civilian casualties due to lack of evidence, and any steps 
     taken to further corroborate the allegations.
       ``(7) A list?of allegations that the Department could not 
     fully assess in a Civilian Casualty Assessment Review (CCAR) 
     due to lack of information and any steps taken to obtain 
     additional information needed to conduct a CCAR.
       ``(8) A description of the specific criteria the Department 
     employed during the CCAR to determine that a civilian 
     casualty is more likely than not to have occurred.''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(f) Appropriate Congressional Committees Defined.--In 
     this section, the term `appropriate congressional committees' 
     means--
       ``(1) the congressional defense committees; and
       ``(2) the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and 
     the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of 
     Representatives.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Engel) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York.
  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chairman, I always view military policy as a measure 
of last resort in our foreign policy. When the American military is 
engaged anywhere in the world, it often comes at the cost of American 
lives and the lives of innocent civilians. These are the most tragic 
costs of war, one reason why we can never, ever be reckless in the use 
of military force.
  Civilian casualties are a tragedy. They also give extremist groups 
fodder to radicalize and recruit new fighters. We need to do everything 
in our power to reduce the number of civilian casualties. The Pentagon 
has made progress in this area thanks in part to new requirements 
Congress put in place. My amendment would build on this progress in a 
number of ways.
  First of all, it would help fill in the blanks when it comes to our 
own planning and reporting about civilian casualties. Right now, there 
tends to be a big difference between what the Defense Department 
estimates in terms of civilian casualties before a military strike and 
what the Department reports after and, again, a big difference between 
our official reporting and what NGOs report. My amendment would require 
a new analysis of these disparities to help figure out why we are 
getting it wrong ahead of time and why there is such a wide range of 
reporting after the fact.
  Secondly, while the Pentagon has done good work developing sound 
policies in this area, more must be done on implementation. My measure 
would improve consistent standards across all the combatant commands.
  Thirdly, this amendment will help improve the way we gather 
information about civilian casualties. It will establish new criteria 
and methods to assess allegations of casualties, and it will make sure 
we work more effectively with local populations.
  Lastly, we need to understand that the Defense Department needs to 
keep learning and adapting. My amendment would require standards for 
incorporating lessons learned so our policies and practices will 
continue to improve as time goes on.
  Because this is a learning process, I will say that this amendment 
won't give us a perfect policy. We need to keep working toward more 
comprehensive, responsible ways of preventing and addressing civilian 
casualties. We need to keep giving the Defense Department the tools it 
needs to do so. This measure will provide a few more of those tools, 
and I am glad the House is able to consider it today.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. STEFANIK. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from New York is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. STEFANIK. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Let me start off by being very clear on this issue: Our military 
forces aim for zero civilian casualties--zero--and one civilian 
casualty during a military operation is one too many. No one 
understands this better than our men and women in uniform who go 
through extreme efforts to continually avoid civilian casualties, and 
no committee understands this better than the House Armed Services 
Committee.
  So this amendment that we are discussing now is one of several that 
we have seen this year that unnecessarily expand and increase reporting 
on civilian casualties and allegations of civilian casualties caused by 
our men and women in uniform.
  I am disappointed that, once again, the majority chose to give up 
Defense Committee jurisdiction to another outside committee. So this 
amendment would, in effect, give an outside committee additional 
reporting on what amounts to ongoing and current military operations.
  To date, this has been the exclusive jurisdiction of the Defense 
Committee's. In fact, the civilian casualty frameworks that we are 
discussing today were put in place in previous NDAAs under the previous 
Republican majority on a bipartisan basis. We tried to work in 
additional edits to this amendment, given the importance of this issue, 
but those edits were refused by the majority, which is why we are 
debating this today.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. STEFANIK. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Nebraska (Mr. Bacon).
  Mr. BACON. Mr. Chairman, I appreciate the opportunity to speak on 
this.
  After serving 30 years in the Air Force and serving with multiple air 
operation centers, I know how hard our military works to get this 
right. Our military forces go through extreme measures to avoid 
civilian casualties.
  At any given time, combatant commanders have multiple boards, 
centers, cells, and working groups that are focused on reducing 
civilian casualties, in addition to the work of the various target 
development working groups.
  Additionally, there are significant and recurring legal reviews 
conducted as proposed targets are evaluated for compliance with the law 
of war by judge advocates, legal advisers, and target engagement 
authorities--and this is before any strike is even taken.
  To evaluate civilian casualties and allegations, military commanders 
look at and consider reports from all sources, including NGOs, credible 
media sources and outlets, and even social media.
  In addition to evaluating all these various reports, they look at the 
video surveillance that they have and other forms of data from their 
ISR assets, witness observations; they take human intelligence and 
other forms of intelligence.
  Of course, there are going to be differences in initial reporting--
and sometimes even months afterwards--between what DOD sees and what 
other groups are seeing, but this is war, and war is chaos. And our 
adversaries frequently also inflate civilian losses to further their 
aims.
  So my position is this. We have a great process in place. It is 
working. The military has given it their very best to get this right. 
The integrity of our military commanders is such that we can trust 
their effort with what they are doing now, and any discrepancies, they 
are acknowledged and they are investigated, and they try to get it as 
right as they can.
  To say our military does not take these allegations of civilian 
casualties seriously means you don't understand the policy, the 
process, and the level of effort that goes into avoiding these 
casualties in the first place. And investigating any allegations of 
civilian causalities in any post operation, they do their very best to 
get this right.
  Our military is working hard. They are trying to achieve our 
objectives. I stand in objection to the amendment.
  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chairman, let me say that I would respectfully remind 
my colleagues that the Foreign Affairs Committee has jurisdiction over 
authorizations for the use of military force, and military strikes are 
conducted under authority from the Foreign Affairs Committee. It shares 
jurisdiction.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. STEFANIK. Mr. Chairman, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.

[[Page H5603]]

  

  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chairman, this isn't an easy subject to deal with, but 
it cannot be swept under the rug. It is good that the Pentagon has 
taken steps in recent years to adopt stronger and more responsible 
policies when it comes to civilian casualties.

                              {time}  1315

  We need to keep pressing forward on this work to make sure we have 
the best information, to make sure this is a problem taken seriously 
and being dealt with, and to make sure the United States is behaving 
responsibly when these tragedies do occur.
  Mr. Chair, I ask for Members to support this measure, and I yield 
back the balance of my time.
  Ms. STEFANIK. Mr. Chair, in closing, again, I think it is important 
to note that as a matter of practice on the ground, we want zero 
civilian casualties, not only for law of war and ethical reasons but 
because our troops are often there to work alongside and protect 
civilian populations, so any unnecessary force creates additional 
enemies. One civilian casualty is one too many.
  But this amendment is unnecessary because there are already 
considerable policies in place and reporting that occurs to minimize 
any and all civilian casualties.
  This amendment is also unnecessary because there is, in addition, 
substantial and continued coordination that occurs between the DOD and 
the State Department, starting at the country team level and extending 
back to the Pentagon and Foggy Bottom, which also includes coordination 
with the National Security Council and the intelligence community.
  Again, we don't want to give up our jurisdiction on the House Armed 
Services Committee when we are talking about military operations and 
knowing that our troops do anything and everything they can to ensure 
there are zero civilian casualties.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to oppose this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Engel).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Ms. STEFANIK. Mr. Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York 
will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 31 Offered by Mr. Engel

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 31 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the appropriate place in subtitle D of title XII, insert 
     the following:

     SEC. 12__. REPORTS RELATING TO THE NEW START TREATY.

       (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that 
     the United States should seek to extend the New START Treaty, 
     from its initial termination date in February 2021 to 
     February 2026, as provided for under Article XIV of the 
     Treaty, unless--
       (1) the President determines and informs the appropriate 
     congressional committees that Russia is in material breach of 
     the Treaty; or
       (2) the Treaty is superseded by a new arms control 
     agreement that provides equal or greater constraints, 
     transparency, and verification measures with regard to 
     Russia's nuclear forces.
       (b) Prohibition on Use of Funds to Withdraw From the New 
     START Treaty.--Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
     none of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act 
     or otherwise made available to the Department of Defense for 
     fiscal year 2020 may be used to take any action to withdraw 
     the United States from the New START Treaty, unless the 
     President determines and so informs the appropriate 
     congressional committees that Russia is in material breach of 
     the Treaty.
       (c) Assessments From Director of National Intelligence.--
       (1) Relating to expiration of new start treaty.--Not later 
     than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
     the Director of National Intelligence shall submit to the 
     appropriate congressional committees an intelligence 
     assessment based on all sources of the national security and 
     intelligence implications of the expiration of the New START 
     Treaty without the United States and Russia having entered 
     into a new arms control agreement that provides equal or 
     greater constraints, transparency, and verification measures 
     with regard to Russia's nuclear forces. The assessment shall 
     be submitted in an unclassified form, but may contain a 
     classified annex, and shall include the following elements:
       (A) A description of the size and posture of Russia's 
     nuclear forces, including strategic nuclear warheads and 
     strategic delivery vehicles, as well as predicted force 
     levels through February 2026 under each of the following 
     potential scenarios:
       (i) The Treaty expires in February 2026 without such a 
     replacement agreement.
       (ii) The Treaty is extended until February 2026.
       (B) A description of Russia's likely response to an 
     expiration of the New START Treaty, including potential 
     changes to Russia's nuclear forces, conventional forces, as 
     well as Russia's willingness to negotiate an arms control 
     agreement on Russian non-strategic or tactical nuclear 
     weapons, short-and-intermediate-range delivery systems, 
     (including dual-capable and nuclear-only), and new strategic 
     delivery systems (such as the kinds announced by President 
     Putin on March 1, 2018) in the future.
       (C) An assessment of the strategic impact on United States 
     and Russian strategic nuclear forces if the Treaty is not 
     extended and such an agreement is not concluded, including 
     the likelihood that Russia pursues new strategic offensive 
     arms research and development programs.
       (D) An assessment of the potential quantity of Russia's new 
     strategic delivery systems (such as the kinds announced by 
     President Putin on March 1, 2018) between 2021 and 2026, and 
     the impact to strategic stability between Russia and the 
     United States as related to Russia's existing strategic 
     forces.
       (E) An assessment of the impact on United States allies if 
     the limitations on Russia's nuclear forces are dissolved if 
     the Treaty is not extended and such an agreement is not 
     concluded.
       (F) A description of the verification and transparency 
     benefits of the Treaty and a description of the Treaty's 
     impact on the United States' understanding of Russia's 
     military and nuclear forces.
       (G) An assessment of how the United States' confidence in 
     its understanding of Russia's strategic nuclear arsenal and 
     future nuclear force levels would be impacted if the Treaty 
     is not extended and such an agreement is not concluded.
       (H) An assessment of what actions would be necessary for 
     the United States to remediate the loss of the Treaty's 
     verification and transparency benefits if the Treaty is not 
     extended and such an agreement is not concluded, and an 
     estimate of the remedial resources required to ensure no 
     concomitant loss of understanding of Russia's military and 
     nuclear forces.
       (2) Relating to russia's willingness to engage in nuclear 
     arms control negotiations.--Not later than 180 days after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, the Director of National 
     Intelligence shall submit to the appropriate congressional 
     committees an intelligence assessment based on all sources of 
     Russia's willingness to engage in nuclear arms control 
     negotiations and Russia's priorities in these negotiations. 
     The assessment shall be submitted in an unclassified form but 
     may contain a classified annex, and shall include the 
     following elements:
       (A) An assessment of Russia's willingness to extend the New 
     START Treaty and its likely negotiating position to discuss 
     such an extension with the United States.
       (B) An assessment of Russia's interest in negotiating a 
     broader arms control agreement that would include nuclear 
     weapons systems not accountable under the New START Treaty, 
     including non-strategic nuclear weapons.
       (C) An assessment of what concessions Russia would likely 
     seek from the United States during such negotiations, 
     including what additional United States' military 
     capabilities Russia would seek to limit, in any broader arms 
     control negotiation.
       (d) Reports and Briefing From Secretary of State.--
       (1) Relating to nato, nato member countries, and other 
     united states allies.--Not later than 180 days after the date 
     of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State, in 
     consultation with the Secretary of Defense, shall submit a 
     report, which shall be in an unclassified form but may 
     contain a classified annex, and provide a briefing to the 
     appropriate congressional committees that includes--
       (A) an assessment of the likely reactions of the North 
     Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), NATO member countries, 
     and other United States allies to a United States decision 
     not to extend the New START Treaty or enter into a new 
     agreement with Russia to replace the Treaty that provides 
     equal or greater constraints, transparency, and verification 
     measures with regard to Russia's nuclear forces; and
       (B) a description of the consultations undertaken with such 
     allies in which the New START Treaty was raised, and the 
     level of allied interest in, recommendations on, or concerns 
     raised with respect to discussions between the United States 
     and Russia relating to the Treaty and other related matters.
       (2) Relating to ongoing implementation of the new start 
     treaty.--Not later than 60 days after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, and every 90 days thereafter until the 
     New START Treaty is extended or expires,

[[Page H5604]]

     the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of 
     Defense, shall submit a report, which shall be in an 
     unclassified form but may contain a classified annex, to the 
     appropriate congressional committees with an assessment of 
     the following elements:
       (A) Whether the Russian Federation remains in compliance 
     with its obligations under the New START Treaty.
       (B) Whether implementation of the New START Treaty remains 
     in the national security interest of the United States.
       (3) Relating to other matters.--Not later than 90 days 
     after the date of the enactment of this Act, and every 180 
     days thereafter until the New START Treaty is extended or 
     expires, the Secretary of State, in consultation with the 
     Secretary of Defense, shall provide a briefing to the 
     appropriate congressional committees that includes the 
     following elements:
       (A) A description of any discussions with Russia on the 
     Treaty or on a broader, multilateral arms control treaty with 
     Russia and other countries on the reduction and limitation of 
     strategic offensive arms, and discussions addressing the 
     disparity between the non-strategic nuclear weapons 
     stockpiles of Russia and of the United States, at the 
     Assistant Secretary level, Ambassadorial level, or higher.
       (B) The dates, locations, discussion topics, agenda, 
     outcomes, and Russian interlocutors involved in those 
     discussions.
       (C) An identification of the United States Government 
     departments and agencies involved in the discussions.
       (D) The types of systems, both nuclear and nonnuclear, 
     discussed by either side in such discussions as the potential 
     subjects of an agreement.
       (E) Whether an offer of extension of the Treaty for any 
     length of time, or to negotiate a new agreement, has been 
     offered by either side.
       (e) Report and Briefing From Secretary of Defense.--Not 
     later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this 
     Act, the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the 
     Secretary of Energy and the Secretary of State, shall submit 
     a report, which shall be in unclassified form but may contain 
     a classified annex, and provide a briefing to the appropriate 
     congressional committees that includes--
       (1) an assessment of the impact on the United States 
     nuclear arsenal and posture of the expiration of the New 
     START Treaty without the United States and Russia having 
     entered into a new agreement with Russia to replace the 
     Treaty that provides equal or greater constraints, 
     transparency, and verification measures with regard to 
     Russia's nuclear forces;
       (2) a description of the potential changes to the expected 
     force structure of the Armed Forces to respond to potential 
     changes in Russia's nuclear posture if the limitations in the 
     Treaty are no longer in force, and in the absence of such a 
     new bilateral or multilateral agreement, and an estimation of 
     expected costs necessary to make such changes to the force 
     structure of the Armed Forces;
       (3) a description, to be submitted jointly with the 
     Secretary of Energy, of potential changes to the 
     modernization plan for the United States nuclear weapons 
     complex, which anticipates the continued existence of the 
     Treaty, if the Treaty is not extended or such a new bilateral 
     or multilateral agreement is not concluded;
       (4) a description of the strategic impact on United States 
     and Russian strategic nuclear forces if the Treaty is not 
     extended or such a new bilateral or multilateral agreement is 
     not concluded; and
       (5) a description of potential changes regarding United 
     States nuclear weapons forward deployed to Europe and 
     regarding the nuclear deterrent of the United Kingdom and 
     France, if the Treaty is not extended or such a new bilateral 
     or multilateral agreement is not concluded.
       (f) Presidential Certification in Advance of Expiration of 
     New START Treaty.--Not later than September 7, 2020, if the 
     New START Treaty has not been extended, and if the United 
     States and Russia have not entered into a new treaty to 
     replace the New START Treaty, the President shall submit a 
     report, which shall be in an unclassified form but may 
     contain a classified annex, to the appropriate congressional 
     committees that contains the following elements--
       (1) an assessment as to whether the limits of the New START 
     Treaty on Russia's strategic nuclear forces advance United 
     States national security interests;
       (2) an explanation of how the United States will address 
     the imminent expiration of the New START Treaty, including--
       (A) a plan to extend the New START Treaty before it 
     expires;
       (B) a plan to otherwise retain the Treaty's limits on 
     Russia's nuclear forces; or
       (C) a plan to provide for the expiration of the Treaty, 
     including--
       (i) a justification for why the expiration of the Treaty is 
     in the national security interest of the United States; and
       (ii) a plan, including steps the United States military and 
     the intelligence community will take before February 5, 2021, 
     to account for the expiration of the Treaty and the failure 
     to replace it with a new agreement to maintain confidence in 
     United States nuclear deterrence requirements and a similar 
     level of confidence in intelligence information regarding 
     Russia's nuclear forces.
       (g) Department of Defense Reporting Requirements in Event 
     of Expiration of New START Treaty.--If the New START Treaty 
     expires before the United States and Russia enter into a new 
     arms control agreement to replace the Treaty that provides 
     equal or greater constraints, transparency, and verification 
     measures with regard to the Russia's nuclear forces, not 
     later than 30 days after such expiration--
       (1) the Secretary of Defense shall submit to the 
     appropriate congressional committees a report describing 
     changes to the expected force structure of the Armed Forces 
     and estimating the expected costs necessary to make such 
     changes; and
       (2) the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Energy 
     shall jointly submit to the appropriate congressional 
     committees a report--
       (A) describing the manner in which the current United 
     States nuclear modernization plan, which anticipates the 
     continued existence of the Treaty, will be modified without 
     the existence of the Treaty; and
       (B) including--
       (i) the information required to be submitted in the report 
     required by section 1043 of the National Defense 
     Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-81; 
     125 Stat. 1576);
       (ii) a separate 10-year cost estimate from the Department 
     of Defense to implement a nuclear sustainment plan; and
       (iii) a separate 10-year cost estimate from the Department 
     of Energy to implement a nuclear sustainment and 
     modernization plan.
       (h) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Appropriate congressional committees.--The term 
     ``appropriate congressional committees'' means--
       (A) the Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Committee on 
     Armed Services, and the Permanent Select Committee on 
     Intelligence of the House of Representatives; and
       (B) the Committee on Foreign Relations, the Committee on 
     Armed Services, and the Select Committee on Intelligence of 
     the Senate.
       (2) Intelligence community.--The term ``intelligence 
     community'' has the meaning given that term in section 3 of 
     the National Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 3003).
       (3) New start treaty; treaty.--The terms ``New START 
     Treaty'' and ``Treaty'' mean the Treaty between the United 
     States of America and the Russian Federation on Measures for 
     the Further Reduction and Limitation of Strategic Offensive 
     Arms, signed on April 8, 2010, and entered into force on 
     February 5, 2011.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Engel) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York.
  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chair, my amendment is something that really should be 
a no-brainer. It says we need to maintain strong and verifiable limits 
on Russia's nuclear forces.
  We all know that a robust nuclear deterrent has been a pillar of 
American security since the beginning of the Cold War, but so has arms 
control.
  Democratic and Republican administrations alike have used arms 
control agreements to constrain Russia's nuclear forces. These 
agreements have allowed us to keep eyes on the ground so we can confirm 
what the Russians are doing.
  They have stopped arms races. They have strengthened peace. I fear 
this administration wants to throw all of that out the window.
  The President's withdrawal from the INF Treaty is sending us down a 
dangerous path toward a renewed nuclear arms race. Don't get me wrong: 
Russia's violation of the INF Treaty is unacceptable, but the question 
is how we respond to it. Instead of using diplomacy and pressure to 
push the Russians back into compliance, the administration is following 
Russia's lead and walking away. This sends a terrible message and 
signals a broader ideological contempt for the value of arms control.
  Now the debate is shifting to New START. This treaty has won the 
praise of diplomats and defense and intelligence officials as a tool 
for advancing our national security interests. It allows us to keep a 
lid on competition with a hostile Russia. The New START Treaty places 
strong limits on Russia's strategic nuclear forces, meaning the nuclear 
weapons that can reach the United States.
  This treaty also gives us strong mechanisms to make sure Russia is 
holding up its end of the bargain. It provides unique insights into 
Russia's nuclear forces, information that would be impossible to 
replace. Indeed, up to this point, the State Department has certified 
that Russia is in full compliance with the New START Treaty.
  The clock is ticking. The New START Treaty is set to expire in a year 
and a half. It can be extended another 5 years until 2026, but only if 
the

[[Page H5605]]

United States and Russia agree to do so.
  My amendment sets out what should be a commonsense approach. It says 
that as long as Russia remains in compliance with the treaty, the 
administration should work to extend the New START Treaty unless the 
administration can complete a replacement agreement with equal or 
greater constraints on the Russians.
  We cannot accept anything less.
  The amendment also requires a series of reports from the 
administration on potential consequences if the treaty lapses and 
requires the President to present a plan to Congress on how to deal 
with these consequences.
  Like so many other aspects of its foreign policy, the Trump 
administration has sent confusing messages about extending the treaty. 
They recently called it ``unlikely,'' noting a desire to move beyond 
the existing arms control regime with Russia to tackle other issues 
like tactical nuclear weapons and China.
  Those are important issues, too. I agree with that. The United States 
should push ahead with a new arms control agreement, but in the 
meantime, we shouldn't throw out the baby with the bathwater. We should 
extend New START. After all, we cannot allow Russia free rein to expand 
its nuclear forces.
  What I hope this administration understands is that arms control is a 
critical tool in a much broader effort as we compete with Russia. Arms 
control reduces uncertainty. It creates patterns and predictability. It 
helps us make sure our forces and programs are tailored to deal with 
the challenges we are facing.
  Mr. Chair, I ask Members to support this amendment, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Ms. CHENEY. Mr. Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Wyoming is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Ms. CHENEY. Mr. Chair, I applaud my colleague's determination to 
ensure that the United States is doing everything possible to prevent 
the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Unfortunately, I think this 
amendment does not have that impact.
  We are engaged now in a situation with respect to New START, that it 
is a treaty that was designed, implemented, and adopted in a world that 
is very different from the one in which we live today.
  Those of us on this side of the aisle do not suggest, and are not 
suggesting, that we should withdraw from the treaty, so it is a little 
bit disingenuous for the amendment to suggest that no funds should be 
used to withdraw. We do not want to withdraw from the treaty. It is an 
important treaty. However, we also think we shouldn't blindly extend 
the treaty.
  In today's world, in which we know the treaty does not cover the 
types of weapons that the Russians are developing, nor does it cover at 
all the types of weapons systems that the Chinese are developing and 
deploying, we want to make sure that the United States is able to 
provide those kinds of restrictions across the board, not simply stick 
to a treaty that limits only particular types of weapons systems and 
only with respect to Russia.
  Mr. Chair, I oppose this amendment because I think it is very 
important that we not tie the President's hands, that we not send that 
message to the President and to our adversaries.
  I think the Russians would very much like to see this treaty extended 
as it is. They would very much like to not be constrained in the 
development of tactical nuclear weapons and the development and 
deployment of systems that aren't covered by the treaty.
  Those of us who are arguing in favor of ensuring the treaty covers 
all the threats would like to see a much more robust arms control 
system than the one that would be in place if we simply extended this 
treaty without considering the possibility of including the Chinese 
and the Russians. The administration, in fact, has said precisely that.

  The President has urged that the National Security Council look at 
ways that we can make sure the treaty covers all of our security needs, 
not simply extend it beyond the 2021 date.
  We think it is important that the President have that ability. We 
also think it is important that the Congress not send a message to our 
adversaries that we are simply urging the President to extend this 
treaty as is.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to oppose this amendment, and I 
reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chair, may I inquire as to how much time I have 
remaining.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from New York has 1 minute remaining.
  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chair, then let me split it. I yield 30 seconds to the 
gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. Keating), a well-respected member of 
the Foreign Affairs Committee and one of our subcommittee chairs.
  Mr. KEATING. Mr. Chair, I rise in support of Chairman Engel's 
amendment, inspired by a bipartisan New START bill, which is 
cosponsored by Mr. McCaul, the ranking member, and of which I am a 
proud cosponsor. It is a bill that urges extension of the New START 
Treaty.
  Russia's broad range of destabilizing influence is well known. We 
need to do everything we can to constrain Russia's arsenal to the best 
of our ability, and we have an effective tool in place.
  We have heard from so many leaders about why this is important, 
people who support this amendment, like General John Hyten, Commander 
of the United States Strategic Command.
  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chair, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
Massachusetts (Mr. Moulton).
  Mr. MOULTON. Mr. Chair, I want to point out that I agree with my 
colleague that this treaty is outdated, that Russia and China are 
developing weapons that exceed what is included here, but that is all 
the more reason why we need the time afforded by extending this treaty 
to develop a stronger replacement.
  We shouldn't do what Russia wants. That is why I oppose this 
President, which Russia wants.
  We need to have a stronger replacement for this treaty, and this 
amendment does exactly that. It gives us the time to get there while 
ensuring our safety in the meantime.
  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. CHENEY. Mr. Chair, may I inquire as to how much time I have 
remaining.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Wyoming has 2\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Ms. CHENEY. Mr. Chair, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Thornberry), my colleague, the esteemed ranking member of 
the Armed Services Committee.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  Mr. Chair, I simply want to make two points.
  One is that the Under Secretary of State for Arms Control is supposed 
to meet with her Russian counterpart on this issue next week. What are 
we doing? We come to the floor, and we want to tie her hands. We want 
to restrict her ability to negotiate with the Russians. That doesn't 
make any sense to me.
  There has been discussion about flaws in the treaty, how it has not 
kept up with changes in technology. Yet the House wants to come and 
say, ``Well, we think we ought to extend it anyway,'' giving the 
Russians a benefit that they don't have to give anything up for.
  It may be that we come to a point where we think extending New START 
makes sense. The Russians ought to participate in that as part of a 
negotiation, not a unilateral move for us.
  Secondly, I have to note more broadly in this bill that when New 
START was ratified, part of the agreement was, yes, we will go down to 
a lower number of nuclear weapons, but we are going to put increased 
investment into the nuclear weapons complex to make it more responsive, 
because with lower weapons, if something goes wrong, you have less 
margin for error.
  This bill before us cuts the requested funding from the nuclear 
weapons complex. It cuts funding requested for the Minuteman III 
replacement. It cuts in a variety of ways our attempt to have a strong 
nuclear deterrent.
  Ms. CHENEY. Mr. Chair, I am prepared to close.
  Mr. Chair, I would like to ensure that our colleagues recognize the 
limitations of the treaty that my colleague, Mr. Engel, is suggesting 
we extend.
  The treaty is insufficient with respect to the arms that it limits. 
The

[[Page H5606]]

treaty is insufficient with respect to the participants in the treaty. 
The treaty also has an insufficient verification regime.
  It is crucially important that we make sure that we arm those who are 
negotiating these treaties with the support that they need to conclude 
a treaty that fundamentally supports the security of the Nation.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to oppose this amendment, and I yield 
back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Engel).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Ms. CHENEY. Mr. Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York 
will be postponed.

                              {time}  1330


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in part B of House Report 
116-143 on which further proceedings were postponed, in the following 
order:
  Amendment No. 1 by Mr. Smith of Washington.
  Amendment No. 3 by Ms. Speier of California.
  Amendment No. 6 by Ms. Speier of California.
  Amendment No. 9 by Mr. Brindisi of New York.
  Amendment No. 10 by Mrs. Torres of California.
  Amendment No. 11 by Mr. Connolly of Virginia.
  Amendment No. 14 by Ms. Shalala of Florida.
  Amendment No. 17 by Ms. Omar of Minnesota.
  Amendment No. 19 by Mr. Smith of Washington.
  Amendment No. 21 by Mr. Sherman of California.
  Amendment No. 23 by Mr. Ted Lieu of California.
  Amendment No. 24 by Mr. Ted Lieu of California.
  Amendment No. 26 by Mr. Smith of Washington.
  Amendment No. 27 by Mr. Cicilline of Rhode Island.
  Amendment No. 29 by Mr. Engel of New York.
  Amendment No. 31 by Mr. Engel of New York.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the time for any electronic vote 
after the first vote in this series.


           Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Smith of Washington

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Washington 
(Mr. Smith) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 236, 
noes 193, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 438]

                               AYES--236

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Amash
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Stivers
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--193

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     McNerney
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen
     Timmons

                              {time}  1358

  Messrs. KEVIN HERN of Oklahoma and YOHO changed their vote from 
``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. TIMMONS. Mr. Chair, I was unavoidably detained. Had I been 
present, I would have voted ``nay'' on rollcall No. 438.


                 Amendment No. 3 Offered by Ms. Speier

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
California (Ms. Speier) on which further proceedings were postponed and 
on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.

[[Page H5607]]

  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 242, 
noes 187, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 439]

                               AYES--242

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Hollingsworth
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hurd (TX)
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Reed
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stefanik
     Stevens
     Stivers
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--187

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Stauber
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     McNerney
     Norton
     Palmer
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1404

  Ms. STEFANIK changed her vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 6 Offered by Ms. Speier

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
California (Ms. Speier) on which further proceedings were postponed and 
on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 231, 
noes 199, not voting 8, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 440]

                               AYES--231

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--199

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon

[[Page H5608]]


     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Lipinski
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Peterson
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--8

     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     McNerney
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1409

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 9 Offered by Mr. Brindisi

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York 
(Mr. Brindisi) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 243, 
noes 187, not voting 8, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 441]

                               AYES--243

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Bergman
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Bost
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Collins (NY)
     Connolly
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Davis, Rodney
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duffy
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gottheimer
     Graves (LA)
     Green, Al (TX)
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hunter
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McKinley
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mooney (WV)
     Morelle
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Reed
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Yoho

                               NOES--187

     Abraham
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cooper
     Craig
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Himes
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Larsen (WA)
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Luria
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McEachin
     McHenry
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Moore
     Moulton
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Porter
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Torres Small (NM)
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--8

     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     McNerney
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1414

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


         Amendment No. 10 Offered by Mrs. Torres of California

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
California (Mrs. Torres) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.

[[Page H5609]]

  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 225, 
noes 205, not voting 8, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 442]

                               AYES--225

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cummings
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--205

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brindisi
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Costa
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Golden
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kind
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McAdams
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schrader
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--8

     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     McNerney
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1418

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 11 Offered by Mr. Connolly

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Virginia 
(Mr. Connolly) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 247, 
noes 182, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 443]

                               AYES--247

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Amash
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hurd (TX)
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Turner
     Underwood
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Yarmuth
     Young

                               NOES--182

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney

[[Page H5610]]


     Cline
     Cloud
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Bilirakis
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     McNerney
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1423

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. CUNNINGHAM. Mr. Chair, during rollcall Vote number 443 on the 
Connolly amendment, I mistakenly recorded my vote as ``no'' when I 
should have voted ``yes.''


                Amendment No. 14 Offered by Ms. Shalala

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Florida 
(Ms. Shalala) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 251, 
noes 178, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 444]

                               AYES--251

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Bacon
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crenshaw
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Davis, Rodney
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duncan
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Gohmert
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Grothman
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Riggleman
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Stivers
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Yoho

                               NOES--178

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Wright
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Frankel
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     McNerney
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1427

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                  Amendment No. 17 Offered by Ms. Omar

  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Cox of California). The unfinished business is 
the demand for a recorded vote on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Minnesota (Ms. Omar) on which further proceedings were 
postponed and on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 219, 
noes 210, not voting 9, as follows:

[[Page H5611]]

  


                             [Roll No. 445]

                               AYES--219

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Amash
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cline
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Green, Al (TX)
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Grothman
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McBath
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Reed
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Speier
     Stanton
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--210

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Allred
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Axne
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Craig
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Fletcher
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Golden
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Gottheimer
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Houlahan
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamb
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Luria
     Malinowski
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Mast
     McAdams
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Moulton
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Panetta
     Pence
     Perry
     Peters
     Peterson
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sherrill
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Slotkin
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spanberger
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stevens
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Suozzi
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Wild
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     McNerney
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen
     Rogers (AL)


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1431

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


          Amendment No. 19 Offered by Mr. Smith of Washington

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Washington 
(Mr. Smith) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 243, 
noes 186, answered ``present'' 1, not voting 8, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 446]

                               AYES--243

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cloud
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallagher
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Gohmert
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Hollingsworth
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--186

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline

[[Page H5612]]


     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                        ANSWERED ``PRESENT''--1

       
     Amash
       

                             NOT VOTING--8

     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     McNerney
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1436

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 21 Offered by Mr. Sherman

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Sherman) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 234, 
noes 195, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 447]

                               AYES--234

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cline
     Clyburn
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Crist
     Crow
     Cummings
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Gohmert
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--195

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cloud
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Craig
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cuellar
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Luria
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Vela
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     Lamborn
     McNerney
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1440

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


         Amendment No. 23 Offered by Mr. Ted Lieu of California

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Ted Lieu) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 239, 
noes 187, not voting 12, as follows:

[[Page H5613]]

  


                             [Roll No. 448]

                               AYES--239

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Amash
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Burchett
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gaetz
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Hollingsworth
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mooney (WV)
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roy
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--187

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Mast
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Slotkin
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spanberger
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Cheney
     Crenshaw
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     Johnson (LA)
     McCarthy
     McNerney
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1445

  Messrs. CLINE and SMITH of Missouri changed their vote from ``aye'' 
to ``no.''
  Mr. ROY changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


         Amendment No. 24 Offered by Mr. Ted Lieu of California

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Ted Lieu) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 246, 
noes 180, not voting 12, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 449]

                               AYES--246

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Amash
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Biggs
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buck
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cline
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gaetz
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gosar
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Hollingsworth
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hurd (TX)
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mooney (WV)
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roy
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--180

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)

[[Page H5614]]


     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Curtis
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Mast
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--12

     Cheney
     Crenshaw
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     Johnson (LA)
     McCarthy
     McNerney
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1449

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


          Amendment No. 26 Offered by Mr. Smith of Washington

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Washington 
(Mr. Smith) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 240, 
noes 185, not voting 13, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 450]

                               AYES--240

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Amash
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Biggs
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buck
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cloud
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gosar
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mooney (WV)
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Posey
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roy
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Woodall
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--185

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cline
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crow
     Curtis
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Houlahan
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Mast
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sherrill
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Slotkin
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spanberger
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--13

     Cheney
     Crenshaw
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gaetz
     Higgins (LA)
     Johnson (LA)
     McCarthy
     McNerney
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1453

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


               Amendment No. 27 Offered by Mr. Cicilline

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Rhode 
Island (Mr. Cicilline) on which further proceedings were postponed and 
on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 252, 
noes 173, not voting 13, as follows:

[[Page H5615]]

  


                             [Roll No. 451]

                               AYES--252

     Abraham
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Barragan
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Bonamici
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clay
     Cline
     Clyburn
     Collins (NY)
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Davids (KS)
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Dunn
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Ferguson
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fletcher
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gottheimer
     Green (TN)
     Green, Al (TX)
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Marshall
     Mast
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Miller
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Palmer
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Perry
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Reed
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Riggleman
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roy
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Spano
     Speier
     Stanton
     Steube
     Stevens
     Stivers
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (PA)
     Titus
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Waltz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Young
     Zeldin

                               NOES--173

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bass
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bishop (UT)
     Blunt Rochester
     Bost
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Butterfield
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carson (IN)
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Clarke (NY)
     Cleaver
     Cloud
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Crawford
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Emmer
     Estes
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gallagher
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kind
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lee (CA)
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lynch
     Marchant
     Massie
     McCaul
     McEachin
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Moore
     Mullin
     Neguse
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Olson
     Omar
     Pence
     Porter
     Posey
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Ratcliffe
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Rutherford
     Scott, Austin
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smucker
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Tlaib
     Turner
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho

                             NOT VOTING--13

     Cheney
     Crenshaw
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gaetz
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill (AR)
     Johnson (LA)
     McCarthy
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1500

  Ms. WATERS, Messrs. JOHNSON of Georgia and BUTTERFIELD, Ms. ADAMS, 
and Mr. CUMMINGS changed their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Mr. PERRY changed his vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 29 Offered by Mr. Engel

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York 
(Mr. Engel) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 241, 
noes 183, not voting 14, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 452]

                               AYES--241

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Amash
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--183

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett

[[Page H5616]]


     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cline
     Cloud
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Luria
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--14

     Cheney
     Crenshaw
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gaetz
     Higgins (LA)
     Johnson (LA)
     McCarthy
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen
     Ryan
     Smucker


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1504

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 31 Offered by Mr. Engel

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York 
(Mr. Engel) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 236, 
noes 189, not voting 13, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 453]

                               AYES--236

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Posey
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--189

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--13

     Cheney
     Crenshaw
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gaetz
     Higgins (LA)
     Johnson (LA)
     McCarthy
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen
     Vela


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1509

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


               Amendment No. 32 Offered by Mr. Blumenauer

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 32 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of subtitle D of title XVI, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 16__. INDEPENDENT STUDY ON EXTENSION OF MINUTEMAN III 
                   INTERCONTINENTAL BALLISTIC MISSILES.

       (a) Independent Study.--
       (1) Requirement.--Not later than 30 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall 
     seek to enter into a contract with a federally funded 
     research and development center to conduct a study on 
     extending the life of Minuteman III intercontinental 
     ballistic missiles to 2050.
       (2) Limitation.--Of the funds authorized to be appropriated 
     by this Act or otherwise

[[Page H5617]]

     made available for fiscal year 2020 for the Office of the 
     Secretary of Defense, not more than 90 percent may be 
     obligated or expended until the date on which the Secretary 
     submits the study under paragraph (1) to the congressional 
     defense committees pursuant to subsection (d).
       (b) Matters Included.--The study under subsection (a)(1) 
     shall include the following:
       (1) A comparison of the costs through 2050 of--
       (A) extending the life of Minuteman III intercontinental 
     ballistic missiles; and
       (B) delaying the ground-based strategic deterrent program.
       (2) An analysis of opportunities to incorporate 
     technologies into the Minuteman III intercontinental 
     ballistic missile program as part of a service life extension 
     program that could also be incorporated in the future ground-
     based strategic deterrent program, including, at a minimum, 
     opportunities to increase the resilience against adversary 
     missile defenses.
       (3) An analysis of the benefits and risks of incorporating 
     sensors and nondestructive testing methods and technologies 
     to reduce destructive testing requirements and increase the 
     service life and number of Minuteman III missiles through 
     2050.
       (4) An analysis and validation of the methods used to 
     estimate the operational service life of Minuteman II and 
     Minuteman III motors, taking into account the test and launch 
     experience of motors retired after the operational service 
     life of such motors in the rocket systems launch program.
       (5) An analysis of the risks and benefits of alternative 
     methods of estimating the operational service life of 
     Minuteman III motors, such as those methods based on 
     fundamental physical and chemical processes and 
     nondestructive measurements of individual motor properties.
       (c) Submission to DOD.--Not later than 180 days after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, the federally funded 
     research and development center shall submit to the Secretary 
     a report containing the study conducted under subsection 
     (a)(1).
       (d) Submission to Congress.--Not later than 210 days after 
     the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall 
     submit to the congressional defense committees the study 
     under subsection (a)(1), without change.
       (e) Form.--The study under subsection (a)(1) shall be in 
     unclassified form, but may include a classified annex.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Oregon.

                              {time}  1515

  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chair, I yield myself 2 minutes.
  I would first begin by extending my congratulations to the chair and 
the committee for taking a hard look at this legislation to better meet 
the needs of the military and the taxpayer in long-term, stable, 
careful military policy. I think they have made tremendous strides. I 
would like to try to make it just a tiny bit better.
  Mr. Chair, we are looking at a Minuteman III extension on a land-
based intercontinental ballistic missile system, and I am proposing 
that we have a study as to whether or not we could be better served by 
simply extending the life of the existing system as opposed to new 
development.
  Frankly, there needs to be more attention by this Congress, and I 
appreciate the attention that the committee has given.
  The ICBM is the leg of the triad that raises the most questions. 
There has been a RAND study on the future of the ICBM force that found 
that a new alternative is very likely to cost two or three times more 
than incremental modernization.
  We are careening toward a $1.3 trillion or more investment in nuclear 
weapons that, frankly, do not help us for most of our national security 
challenges that we face now, weapons that we simply can't afford and 
can't afford to use.
  I think by trying to right-size the work that we are doing and by 
taking a hard look at this element with a study on extending the life, 
it is a reasonable, responsible, cost-effective effort. I strongly urge 
my colleagues to join me in supporting it.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. TURNER. Mr. Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Ohio is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. TURNER. Mr. Chair, this amendment's language is so wrong that it 
was resoundingly rejected in the Armed Services Committee by a voice 
vote. It is very basic and easy to understand as to why it was 
rejected.
  This missile, and it relates to a missile upon which there is a 
nuclear warhead, was put on the ground in 1973. Richard Nixon was 
President of the United States. The year before these were put in the 
ground, in December of that year, was the last time we were on the 
Moon, in 1972. This was just at the end of the Apollo program. This is 
technology that is incredibly outdated.
  If you think about the Apollo program and the Moon launch, you think, 
well, the next technology is the space shuttle. That launched in 1981, 
almost a decade after these were put in the ground. Even the space 
shuttle is retired, yet he wants to resurrect these.
  This is as ridiculous as saying, ``We are going to go to the Moon 
again. Let's go to the museum and pull out the Apollo mooncrafts. Let's 
just jigger them up again and put them up into space.''
  It is not going to work. This is absolutely irresponsible, but it is 
not really about just trying to extend this life, because this has been 
studied before. This would be a study of a restudy of a restudy of a 
restudy.
  In addition, this is not only a study. This delays the program.
  Everyone wonders why nuclear weapons cost so much. They cost so much 
because we delay and delay and delay. This will be another one of those 
that would just continue the prospects of our having a decaying of our 
nuclear deterrent and, in addition to that, increased costs as a result 
of increased delay.
  I know Mr. Blumenauer has been a very strong advocate against nuclear 
weapons. I understand his interest in trying to prohibit and thwart our 
efforts to modernize nuclear weapons, but if you look at what our 
adversaries are doing, what China is doing, what Russia is doing, it is 
absolutely irresponsible to say that a Richard Nixon-era missile that 
is in the ground, that has been there since we were last on the Moon, 
should just be refurbished and put back in the ground and expect that 
we are going to be safe.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chair, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Washington (Mr. Smith), the distinguished chair of the committee.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, three quick points.
  First of all, Richard Nixon era or not, I think we all agree that the 
missile right now is working. I certainly hope it is since we are 
relying on it as a key part of our nuclear deterrent.
  We have a lot of weapons systems. I mean, I am surprised that the B-
52 bomber is still functional, but it is.
  To imply that somehow because it is old, by definition, it doesn't 
work, I hope that is not true. In fact, I know it is not true because 
the current missile works perfectly fine and is a more than adequate 
deterrent.
  Second, the studies that have been done were trying to figure out if 
we could get away with keeping this missile for the entire projected 
80-year lifespan of its replacement. The studies have come back and 
said, no, it probably will not last 80 years. We have not studied 
whether or not it could last another 25 or another 50.
  That is the purpose of this amendment. That would save us money.

  Look, we need a nuclear deterrent. I don't believe the gentleman from 
Oregon--certainly, I don't--supports getting rid of our nuclear 
weapons. The question is, how many do we need? What does the deterrent 
look like? What makes sense?
  It is clear that this missile works now. If we did this study, it is 
quite reasonable to presume that it would work another 10, 20, 30 years 
from now. Then that money could be used for other defense priorities.
  This is to answer that question, which is very important.
  I will skip the third point.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chair, I yield an additional 20 seconds to the 
gentleman from Washington (Mr. Smith).
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, all I was going to say is that 
the voice vote in our committee was not overwhelming. I am the one who 
called the voice vote, and it was my sense that the amendment was 
agreed to in the committee, but it was not overwhelming. There was a 
large number of members of the Armed Services Committee who supported 
the proposal that Mr. Blumenauer is now making.

[[Page H5618]]

  

  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. TURNER. Mr. Chair, we should turn to the experts when we talk 
about how long this can be extended. This amendment would try to take 
this Richard Nixon-era missile to 2050. General Hyten, who is the 
person who is charged with having expertise with this, came before us 
March 28, 2019. This year, he said all studies have been done. This 
cannot be extended.
  The only reason this amendment is here is to try to delay doing what 
we need to do and what the experts say, which is not refurbish this 
missile but move forward with replacement.
  Mr. Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Utah (Mr. Bishop).
  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Mr. Chair, look, the Minuteman III has been a 
great deterrent and a great source of security for this country, but it 
is 46 years old. It was put in the ground when I was in college, and I 
can't even remember what I was doing in college.
  It has already been extended three times.
  As Mr. Turner said, the testimony in our committee said that we have 
studied this, and the conclusion was more study and more delay was not 
cost-effective.
  Look at the reality of the situation. If we move into a new system, 
we have to have the infrastructure to make that move so the system can 
be seamless going from place to place.
  If we pause in that reconstruction of infrastructure, what we do is 
stop the construction. Then, we have to start up again, which is why 
the cost continues to increase.
  There are parts of Minuteman III that are no longer being produced in 
the private sector, so the engineers at the Air Force logistics centers 
have to rejigger from old parts a new part. In fact, the blueprints in 
some cases are so old, they are not readable anymore.
  We have to move forward. This amendment stops us from modernizing our 
efforts. The GBSD has to move forward.
  Let's face it: The only reason it is not moving forward right now is 
because it doesn't have a cute name like Minuteman III. But it is our 
future. If we want something in our future, we cannot tolerate more 
delays. This amendment for another study does nothing more than delay 
what we can actually come up with, the new generation of what we need 
to defend this country.
  Mr. TURNER. Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chair, may I inquire as to the amount of time 
remaining.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Oregon has 1\3/4\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chair, my colleague has the right to close?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Ohio has 1 minute remaining and 
has the right to close.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chair, I yield myself 15 seconds to reassure my 
good friend from Utah that the Minuteman missile doesn't have to 
remember what it was doing in the past. It simply has to launch.
  To the notion that it is a Nixon-era weapon, we are flying B-52s, 
which are not just Lyndon Johnson but those are of the Kennedy era.
  Mr. Chair, I yield the balance of my time to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Garamendi), my good friend.
  Mr. GARAMENDI. Mr. Chair, I want to engage in a discussion because it 
is extremely important here.
  I thank my good friend, Mr. Turner, for raising some issues. Indeed, 
we might be better off going to the museum and getting the Apollo 
because the current Moon launch system isn't working too well, well 
over budget and well delayed. But the issue at hand has to do with 
these missiles.
  There is clarity that this can be delayed. In one of our hearings, 
General Clark said it can be refurbished once again.
  Other hearings have provided information that the key here is the 
command and control system, which is indeed antiquated and which indeed 
must be refurbished and rebuilt. We ought to spend our time on that.
  This amendment does not delay the ground-based system. What it does 
is it gives us the information so that we can make an informed decision 
about when to engage and spend the $100 billion to $150 billion on the 
new ground-based missile system.
  Mr. TURNER. Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chair, did my friend from California not 
completely exhaust the time allotted?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Oregon has 30 seconds remaining.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chair, I yield the balance of my time to the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Garamendi).
  Mr. GARAMENDI. Mr. Chair, if you are around here long enough, your 
mind can go in 1-minute sections, and I was right on the 1 minute and 
15. I will try to close very quickly on this in the next few seconds.
  Mr. Chair, this amendment doesn't stop the ground-based system from 
going forward. It simply gives us, the decisionmakers, the opportunity 
to make a very informed decision about when we must renew this system.
  There is clear evidence, clear discussion in various areas, that an 
additional period of time is available before we initiate and go full 
bore into the new ground-based system. Let's get information. Let's get 
knowledge.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. TURNER. Mr. Chair, I yield such time as he may consume to the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Thornberry).
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, it seems to me the studies that have been 
conducted make it clear that it makes no cost sense to try to extend 
the life of these missiles that have been in place for so long.
  I think what is really at stake here is whether the three legs of the 
triad upon which our defense has depended for so many decades are to be 
renewed, modernized, and remain credible.
  Each leg of that triad, the submarines, the air leg, and the missiles 
that we are talking about now, have unique characteristics. It is the 
three of them working together that has been so successful in making 
sure that our country has been protected and that no nuclear weapon has 
been used since the end of World War II.
  It is essential to modernize the land leg base of our triad to make 
sure that it stays credible, modern, and safe. That is why this 
amendment should be rejected.
  Mr. TURNER. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. TURNER. Mr. Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Oregon will 
be postponed.


               Amendment No. 33 Offered by Mr. Blumenauer

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 33 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:
       At the end of subtitle B of title XXXI, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 31__. INDEPENDENT STUDY ON THE W80-4 NUCLEAR WARHEAD 
                   LIFE EXTENSION PROGRAM.

       (a) Independent Study.--
       (1) Requirement.--Not later than 30 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Administrator for Nuclear 
     Security shall seek to enter into an agreement with a 
     federally funded research and development center to conduct a 
     study on the W80-4 nuclear warhead life extension program.
       (2) Limitation.--Of the funds authorized to be appropriated 
     by this Act or otherwise made available for fiscal year 2020 
     for the W80-4 nuclear warhead life extension program, not 
     more than $713,551,000 may be obligated or expended until the 
     date on which the Administrator submits the study under 
     paragraph (1) to the congressional defense committees 
     pursuant to subsection (d).
       (b) Matters Included.--The study under section (a)(1) shall 
     include the following:
       (1) An explanation of the unexpected increase in cost of 
     the W80-4 nuclear warhead life extension program.
       (2) An analysis of--
       (A) the future costs of the program; and
       (B) schedule requirements.
       (3) An analysis of the impacts on other programs as a 
     result of the additional funding for W80-4, including--

[[Page H5619]]

       (A) life-extension programs;
       (B) infrastructure programs; and
       (C) research, development, test, and evaluation programs.
       (4) An analysis of the impacts that a delay of the program 
     will have on other programs due to--
       (A) technical or management challenges; and
       (B) changes in requirements for the program.
       (c) Submission to NNSA.--Not later than 180 days after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, the federally funded 
     research and development center shall submit to the 
     Administrator a report containing the study conducted under 
     subsection (a)(1).
       (d) Submission to Congress.--Not later than 210 days after 
     the date of the enactment of this Act, the Administrator 
     shall submit to the congressional defense committees the 
     study under subsection (a)(1), without change.
       (e) Form.--The study under subsection (a) shall be in 
     unclassified form, but may include a classified annex.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Oregon.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment here that would deal 
with a study on the cost-effectiveness of the W80-4 Life Extension 
Program.
  We have been having these debates over the years before the committee 
on this issue of nuclear weapons. I am deeply troubled that we really 
haven't done a deep dive on the floor of the House in terms of the path 
we have been on.

                              {time}  1530

  I have settled, in the past, for trying to have some studies to 
determine whether or not what we are doing going forward is actually 
cost-effective.
  In this case, the father of this device, former Secretary of Defense 
Bill Perry, has argued that there is scant justification for spending 
tens of billions of dollars on new weapons. General Mattis has stated 
numerous times that he is not sold on the LRSO.
  I simply want to make sure that we know what we are getting into, 
what the costs are, in terms of some of the increases that are going 
forward.
  We need to do a better job of our oversight, our debate. These 
weapons have not been used, as the gentleman said, since the end of 
World War II. It is not at all clear that we needed to have the volume 
of weapons we had, the number of delivery systems. In fact, there is 
strong argument that we could have done a better job, or just as good a 
job, of deterrence with less. And there have been a whole host of 
problems in the past in terms of mismanagement, accident that we have 
narrowly avoided disaster.
  I think this is a small step forward, and I would respectfully 
request that the study be approved.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. TURNER. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Ohio is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. TURNER. Mr. Chairman, we are blazing along on the timeline of 
nuclear weapons and missile development where we had a missile that was 
last placed in the ground in 1973 during Richard Nixon's second term, 
after he was elected to a second term. We now have a 1980 Jimmy Carter-
era warhead.
  The analogy of the B-52 doesn't apply to this technology. The B-52 is 
a plane that has been in continuous flight. We are not talking about a 
plane that has been put in a hangar since Jimmy Carter. These are items 
that we don't use.
  Nuclear weapons are there as a deterrent to deter our adversaries. 
The only way we can deter our adversaries is to have them believe that 
any aggression against us would be matched with such overwhelming force 
that it would be at their great risk.
  To the extent that we allow our nuclear deterrent to degrade, which 
we have with Nixon-era missiles and Carter-era weapons, we lessen our 
overall security. Now, this is--again, it sounds like just a study. It 
is not really a study. It is a study of a study of a restudy of a 
restudy. This has been studied so much, in fact, it is on a bipartisan 
basis that this W-84 warhead needs to be refurbished, needs to be 
redone.
  Even the Obama administration had an analysis of all alternatives and 
concluded that the air-launched cruise missile and its warhead could 
not be sustained and had already experienced reduced survivability. 
Even the Obama administration said, Don't do this. They said, Move 
forward.
  Now, once again, this is not about a study. This is about stopping 
the ongoing efforts of a program. This is about holding moneys back so 
that we don't modernize our nuclear weapons. Again, China is moving 
forward; Russia is moving forward. But here we are, on the floor of 
Congress, trying to stop our ability to match and meet those who might 
wish to do us harm.
  This amendment needs to be defeated. This is an ancient 1980s Carter-
era warhead. Even the Obama administration agrees it needs to be 
replaced. We should not jeopardize its funding. Every time we do this, 
every time we stop and say, Let's study this, our costs go up and our 
risks go higher and our security gets lower.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chairman, how much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Oregon has 3 minutes remaining.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman 
from Washington (Mr. Smith), the distinguished chairman of the 
committee.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, this is a little bit smaller 
than what the gentleman from Ohio implied. We are stopping the funding 
of this program. Actually, what we are stopping is the additional $185 
million request that NNSA and the President requested in this budget on 
top of this. The missile would continue to be funded.
  This is a concern we had in committee. We talked about it and we let 
it go.
  But they have not really told us what they are going to do with this 
additional $185 million. And we have concerns, in addition to the 
concerns that Mr. Blumenauer raised about the efficacy of the program, 
about whether or not they are going to be able to execute this $185 
million and what their exact timeline is for the program. In fact, the 
Air Force recently said that they were delaying by a year or two 
certain steps in the development of this missile while saying they were 
also going to be able to still meet the ultimate deadline for 
deployment.

  But the specific $185 million that is expensed is an amount that was 
asked for in addition to what had originally been planned for FY20. We 
do not have an adequate explanation, in my view, and in Mr. 
Blumenauer's view, from DOD as to why they want that additional $185 
million, and that is the purpose of this. It is not studying the entire 
missile. It is saying, why are you accelerating the program and asking 
for this additional money? So I support this amendment.
  Mr. TURNER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Thornberry).
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I appreciate the gentleman yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, my understanding is that, in January of this year, the 
independent Office of Cost Estimating and Program Evaluation, which is 
part of the Department of Energy's NNSA, provided a report and an 
objective analysis of this program. Everything that they reported was 
that the program remains on budget as expected for the first production 
unit by fiscal year 2025.
  I think what has happened is that they have a greater opportunity, a 
greater need, to spend more money from 2019 to 2020 than they 
originally planned. Now, that can occur for several reasons.
  Number one, a program can start to move a little faster so you can 
make good use of money. Unfortunately, what sometimes happens is once 
you start looking into some of these very old warheads, you discover 
problems that need some resources in order to deal with those problems.
  Now, we can't really talk on the floor about the specific concerns 
with any particular warhead today because of classification. But the 
key point is, the overall funding program has remained consistent and 
perfectly within the guidelines of what was planned originally.
  Again, I am afraid that this amendment, like the last one, is delayed 
by study. We can study things to death,

[[Page H5620]]

but we have not done what we should to renew the three legs of the 
triad and the weapons which constitute our nuclear deterrence, and upon 
which our security depends. We have basically reached the point where 
we have no margin for error. We have to move ahead with submarines, we 
have to move ahead with the new bomber, we have to move ahead with the 
Minuteman III replacement, and we have to move ahead with the warhead 
replacement, not only to make sure they work, but to make sure the 
people around them are safe. That is the crucial point.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Garamendi).
  Mr. GARAMENDI. Mr. Chairman, with enormous respect to my colleagues 
who are opposed to this amendment, I think this amendment makes 
enormous sense. It is $185 million of additional money that has been 
requested in just the last couple of months to move this program 
forward.
  We ought to be very careful here because the NNSA is only 50 percent 
sure that it is a $12 billion program. That is on the upside, not on 
the downside. So we are talking about something very expensive.
  It is unfortunate that we have divided this extraordinarily important 
debate about the future of our nuclear systems into 5-minute segments. 
This ought to be a 5-hour debate on the floor. I see my colleagues 
nodding their head.
  A fundamental question is being asked here about where we are going 
with our nuclear enterprises. We do know this: We are in the midst of a 
three-party nuclear arms race. And this one is going to be extremely 
dangerous because the weapons are bigger; they are safer, to be sure, 
but they are more likely to explode; and, finally, they are going to be 
delivered by stealth technology.
  Sad, but true, we need a 5-hour debate on this entire thing.
  Mr. TURNER. Mr. Chairman, I understand that there are people who 
don't like nuclear weapons. I don't like nuclear weapons either, but I 
don't like nuclear weapons in the hands of other people. And, yes, 
there are those who say that we are in the middle of an arms race. But 
the reality is that we are sitting this one out. We are not in the arms 
race.
  When we are debating on the House floor about a warhead from the 
Carter-era and a missile from the Nixon-era and we can't even talk 
about moving forward on funding, there is no race here. We are sitting 
this out. But our adversaries are racing, and I am concerned about what 
they are doing. That is why this is important that this be defeated.
  But another aspect of this that is incredibly important is that this 
calls for an independent study. Independent: That is saying they don't 
trust the study that happened before. The study that happened before 
was the Obama administration. I think their answer was correct: We need 
to not study this and we need to move forward.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chairman, how much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Oregon has 45 seconds remaining.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chairman, let me just make three points.
  First and foremost, anybody who thinks that we are standing still and 
defenseless is not in the real world. We are spending billions of 
dollars on nuclear weapons and delivery systems. And, in fact, we are 
relying on a delivery system from the Kennedy-era with the B-52. So I 
say to the gentleman, don't tell me that we cannot move these items 
forward.
  Second, the gentleman does not have a good fix in terms of what is 
happening with the cost increases. This study is required to be able to 
have the additional money. If we can do the appropriate study and it 
makes sense, the money is there. But this is a step towards 
accountability and it is long, long overdue, and I hope we can start 
now approving this amendment.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the noes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Oregon will 
be postponed.


                Amendment No. 34 Offered by Ms. Frankel

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 34 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Ms. FRANKEL. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of subtitle G of title XII, add the following:

     SEC. _. PROHIBITION ON USE OF FUNDS FOR SHORTER- OR 
                   INTERMEDIATE-RANGE GROUND LAUNCHED BALLISTIC OR 
                   CRUISE MISSILE SYSTEMS.

       (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's February 1, 2019, 
     announcement of the decision of the United States to withdraw 
     from the INF Treaty, without proper consultation with 
     Congress, is a serious breach of Congress's proper 
     constitutional role as a co-equal branch of government;
       (2) United States withdrawal from the INF Treaty will free 
     Russia to deploy greater quantities of the SSC-8 missile to 
     the detriment of United States national security and that of 
     our allies in Europe and the Indo-Pacific region;
       (3) the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) alliance 
     makes critical contributions to United States national 
     security, and the failure to weigh the concerns of NATO 
     allies risks weakening the joint resolve necessary to counter 
     Russia's aggressive behavior;
       (4) as opposed to withdrawing from the INF Treaty, the 
     United States should continue to advance other diplomatic, 
     economic, and military measures outlined in the ``Trump 
     Administration INF Treaty Integrated Strategy'' to resolve 
     the concerns related to Russia's violation of the INF Treaty 
     and to reach agreement on measures to ensure the INF Treaty's 
     future viability; and
       (5) further, in lieu of withdrawing from the INF Treaty, 
     the United States should look at options to expand arms 
     control treaties to include China in an effort to limit its 
     short- and intermediate-range missiles.
       (b) Prohibition.--None of the funds authorized to be 
     appropriated by this Act or otherwise made available for the 
     Department of Defense for fiscal year 2020 may be made 
     available for the research, development, testing, evaluation, 
     procurement, or deployment of a United States shorter- or 
     intermediate-range ground launched ballistic or cruise 
     missile system with a range between 500 and 5,500 kilometers 
     until the following has been submitted to the appropriate 
     committees of Congress:
       (1) A report from the Secretary of Defense, jointly with 
     the Secretary of State and the Director of National 
     Intelligence, that includes--
       (A) a detailed diplomatic proposal for negotiating an 
     agreement to obtain the strategic stability benefits of the 
     INF Treaty;
       (B) an assessment of the implications, in terms of the 
     military threat to the United States and its allies in Europe 
     and the Indo-Pacific region, of Russian deployment of 
     intermediate-range cruise and ballistic missiles without 
     restriction;
       (C) identification of what types of technologies and 
     programs the United States would need to pursue to offset the 
     additional Russian capabilities, and at what cost;
       (D) identification of what mission requirements will be met 
     by INF Treaty-type systems; and
       (E) details regarding ramifications of a collapse of the 
     INF Treaty on the ability to generate consensus among States 
     Parties to the NPT Treaty ahead of the 2020 NPT Review 
     Conference, and assesses the degree to which Russia will use 
     the United States unilateral withdrawal to sow discord within 
     the NATO alliance.
       (2) A copy or copies of at least one Memorandum of 
     Understanding from a NATO or Indo-Pacific ally that commits 
     it to host deployment of any such ballistic or cruise missile 
     system on its own territory, and in the case of deployment on 
     the European continent, has the concurrence of the North 
     Atlantic Council.
       (3) An unedited copy of an analysis of alternatives 
     conducted by the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff and 
     the Director of Cost Assessment and Program Evaluation that 
     considers other ballistic or cruise missile systems, to 
     include sea- and air-launched missiles, that could be 
     deployed to meet current capability gaps due to INF Treaty 
     restrictions, and further to include cost, schedule, and 
     operational considerations.
       (c) Form.--The documents required by paragraphs (1), (2), 
     and (3) of subsection (b) shall be submitted in unclassified 
     form, but may contain a classified annex.
       (d) Rule of Construction.--Nothing in this section may be 
     construed to authorize the use of funds described in 
     subsection (b) for the research, development, testing, 
     evaluation, procurement, or deployment of INF

[[Page H5621]]

     Treaty-type systems in the United States or its territories.
       (e) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Appropriate congressional committees.--The term 
     ``appropriate committees of Congress'' means--
       (A) the congressional defense committees; and
       (B) the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and 
     the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of 
     Representatives.
       (2) INF treaty.--The term ``INF Treaty'' means the Treaty 
     between the United States of America and the Union of Soviet 
     Socialist Republics on the Elimination of Their Intermediate-
     Range and Shorter-Range Missiles, together with the 
     Memorandum of Understanding and Two Protocols, signed at 
     Washington December 8, 1987, and entered into force June 1, 
     1988.
       (3) NPT treaty.--The term ``NPT Treaty'' means the Treaty 
     on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, signed at 
     Washington July 1, 1968.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentlewoman 
from Florida (Ms. Frankel) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Florida.
  Ms. FRANKEL. Mr. Chairman, I think there are a few of us here in 
Congress who are old enough to remember a time when we actually did 
nuclear bomb drills in school. It probably would have been a futile 
action had there been a real attack.
  And although nuclear warfare is still an existential threat to all of 
us and our allies around the world, it has been arms control that has 
let us go about our lives daily without that worry of nuclear war: 
agreements like the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, known as 
the INF Treaty, signed in 1987 between the United States and the Soviet 
Union, which led to the elimination of thousands of United States and 
Russian nuclear missiles.
  In recent years, it has become apparent that Russia has been 
violating this treaty. And in response, in February, the Trump 
administration announced its withdrawal to the consternation of our 
European friends, giving both the United States and Russia freedom to 
produce more nuclear weapons.
  And it is the general consensus of the arms control community that we 
should be working with Russia to bring them back into compliance 
instead of adding to our nuclear arsenal and sidestepping NATO.

                              {time}  1545

  Once again, this administration is alienating allies who don't want 
to be targets for Russian attacks. The NATO Secretary General said, 
clearly: We do not intend to deploy new land-based nuclear missiles in 
Europe.
  In recent testimony before Congress, General Paul Selva, the Vice 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, stated: There are no military 
requirements that we cannot currently satisfy due to our compliance 
with the INF Treaty.
  In other words, the world has enough nuclear weapons to destroy 
civilization.
  It is clear that our withdrawal from INF has been driven by extreme 
elements in our administration who have made their careers out of 
destroying arms control agreements.
  To stop this nuclear escalation, my amendment would prohibit funding 
for missile systems noncompliant with the INF Treaty unless the Defense 
Department demonstrates an ally has agreed to host the INF missile and 
that we have exhausted all other diplomatic options.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment to prevent a dangerous 
and costly nuclear arms race. Enough is enough.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting Chair. The gentleman from Colorado is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  This is a dangerous amendment. The Trump administration withdrew from 
the INF Treaty because Russia had been cheating on this treaty for 
years. The only country that was in compliance with the INF Treaty was 
the United States, and we were handcuffing ourselves by putting 
limitations on our ability to respond to threats from Russia or China 
since we were the only country in the world complying with it.
  China was not a signatory to the INF Treaty. This was, like was said, 
signed 32 years ago. China was not the military power that it is today. 
It was not a party to this treaty.
  Going forward, I would love to see some kind of treaty between the 
U.S. and Russia and China, but that is not in the works if this 
amendment is passed. This ignores China.
  China has more missiles in the Pacific region than anyone else in the 
world. They have more, certainly, than the United States. So that is 
another flaw with this amendment.
  Russia has been cheating on this, and to say we are going to comply 
with the terms of the treaty regardless of what Russia does is to 
reward them for their cheating.
  One other key point that makes this a dangerous amendment is because 
it would prevent the testing necessary for the growth of our missile 
defense program. The INF Treaty that this would put us back into--in a 
backdoor kind of way--prohibits testing or deployment of missiles with 
the range of 500 to 5,500 kilometers. Those are the kinds of tests that 
we need to be able to do to test our missile defense systems.
  The Department of Defense stated, just a couple of days ago:

       Land-based missiles required to support ballistic missile 
     defense system flight testing also have ranges between 500 
     and 5,500 kilometers. Loss of target missile capability would 
     likely prohibit upcoming missile defense flight tests 
     requiring such target missiles.

  And they go on to say:

       This will limit the warfighter. It will limit our missile 
     defense capabilities.

  That is a dangerous thing.
  There is some dispute over whether allies like Israel would be 
included in this ban of test vehicles. I will leave that for another 
discussion, but it is a serious issue.
  It would certainly prohibit our testing of our missile defense 
systems between the range of 500 to 5,500 kilometers. That would 
cripple our growth of missile defense for the future. That doesn't make 
the world a safer place. It certainly doesn't make the United States a 
safer place.
  So, for all of those reasons, Mr. Chairman, this is a bad amendment, 
and I would urge that we reject it and vote ``no.''
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. FRANKEL. Mr. Chair, how much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Florida has 2\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Ms. FRANKEL. Mr. Chair, let me just respond by saying, according to 
the Department of Defense, there is nothing in this amendment that 
would impact missile defense test systems.
  Mr. Chair, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from New York (Mr. 
Engel).
  Mr. ENGEL. Mr. Chairman, I am pleased to support this amendment.
  There has been some misinformation out there about what this 
amendment would actually do, so let me just clear up a few things.
  This measure is a prohibition on the United States deploying a short- 
or intermediate-range ground-launched ballistic or cruise missile 
system--just the United States. It has nothing to do with any other 
country.
  We want to prevent an arms race. We want to push back on the 
President's careless and reckless approach to Russia.
  The INF Treaty has been a cornerstone of arms control for 30 years. 
Yes, we are clear about the threat Russia poses. Yes, Russia has 
violated this treaty again and again, which threatens transatlantic 
security and stability. This is no surprise, coming from Vladimir 
Putin.
  But we have to use every diplomatic tool at our disposal to try to 
salvage the treaty. Instead, the administration followed Putin's lead 
and walked away, and now Russia will feel totally unconstrained to 
start another arms race.
  So I know that the relationship with Putin and all kinds of things 
that Putin does, we have to be very, very wary about it, and I just 
think what the gentlewoman is doing is a commonsense approach to this.
  The United States can go back at any time and change our policy. And 
when it comes to Russia and Putin, we don't trust them. Trust and 
verify.
  I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chair, I would like to inquire how much time both 
sides have remaining.

[[Page H5622]]

  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Colorado has 2 minutes 
remaining. The gentlewoman from Florida has 1\1/4\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chair, I am going to make a brief statement and then 
yield to the gentleman from Ohio.
  First, let me say that this doesn't just put us back in the INF, 
which would be bad enough. This puts us in a worse posture than the 
INF. This amendment is more stringent on our ability to develop our 
defensive capabilities than the INF would be.
  Specifically, the INF has an exemption for interceptors; this does 
not. So we can't do interceptor tests. We could have under INF, but we 
can't under this amendment.
  And, also, there is an exception for ballistic missiles without 
warheads for testing our defenses. That is in INF; it is not in this 
amendment. This is worse than the INF, which is bad enough.
  I yield the balance of my time to the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. 
Turner).
  Mr. TURNER. Mr. Chairman, this is very basic. You cannot have a 
treaty with yourself. You must have a treaty with someone else. If that 
other person steps out of the treaty, you no longer have a treaty.
  Russia stepped out of the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty. 
The North Atlantic Council all came together and confirmed it. At the 
last NATO summit, every one of our allies confirmed it. The treaty is 
dead.
  To have a treaty, now, where the other side has stepped out and it is 
only us that is left and say, by statute, we are going to shackle 
ourselves so that we are going to stay there has no reflection on 
reality.
  Their violating the treaties aren't minor violations of the treaty. 
They have developed, tested, and deployed a weapon that violates the 
treaty. That means that they are once again deploying nuclear weapons, 
nuclear weapons for which we don't have a response.
  Our response doesn't necessarily have to be go field one. We can 
continue diplomacy. But legislation is not diplomacy. By legislation, 
we are going to say that the United States shall forever, as long as 
the legislation stays in, be tied to a treaty that the person on the 
other side already left and deployed missiles that are pointed at our 
assets, our military people, our men and women in uniform, and our 
allies. This is folly.
  Now, the Missile Defense Agency, by the way, issued a statement that 
says this affects our cooperation with Israel and our interceptor 
research with them.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Ms. FRANKEL. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Garamendi).
  Mr. GARAMENDI. Mr. Chair, oh, my, we definitely need 5 hours. This is 
extraordinarily important. In fact, it is the United States that 
terminated its role in the INF Treaty when President Trump pulled out 
of the treaty. Presumably, Russia is still in, although they are 
clearly violating the treaty. We lost whatever leverage there may have 
been.
  We are now in the midst of, what I said a moment ago, one more stage 
of a nuclear arms race. All of us better take a deep breath here and 
begin some serious negotiations, because this time it is 
extraordinarily dangerous.
  In addition to that, please understand that our allies on whose land 
these missiles may be placed are not in agreement that they should be 
placed there, and so there really is no plan for the deployment, let 
alone exactly how these missiles would be done.
  By the way, we clearly have alternative ways of delivering nuclear 
weapons: short-range, long-range, intercontinental ballistic missiles, 
and most every other way except no longer in a briefcase or in a 
projectile, fortunately.
  So it is not harmful to delay this. It is not harmful to make sure 
that our allies are in sync with us as to how they may be deployed.
  Ms. FRANKEL. Mr. Chair, how much time do I have remaining?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentlewoman from Florida has 15 seconds 
remaining.
  Ms. FRANKEL. Mr. Chairman, let me just say this.
  The Department of Defense says that nothing in this amendment would 
impact missile defense cooperation with Israel.
  I just want to end by saying: Enough is enough. Diplomacy, not more 
nuclear weapons.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Florida (Ms. Frankel).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Florida 
will be postponed.


                  Amendment No. 35 Offered by Langevin

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 35 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. LANGEVIN. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of subtitle B of title XXXI, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 31__. FUNDING FOR LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM RESEARCH AND 
                   DEVELOPMENT.

       (a) Increase.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated by this title for defense nuclear 
     nonproliferation, as specified in the corresponding funding 
     table in section 4701, for low-enriched uranium research and 
     development is hereby increased by $20,000,000.
       (b) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated by this title for atomic energy defense 
     activities, as specified in the corresponding funding table 
     in section 4701, for Federal salaries and expenses is hereby 
     reduced by $20,000,000.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from Rhode Island (Mr. Langevin) and a Member opposed each will control 
5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Rhode Island.
  Mr. LANGEVIN. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Chairman, my amendment funds ongoing efforts to assess the 
viability of using low-enriched uranium fuel in naval reactors, 
including those in aircraft carriers and submarines, something this 
Congress has supported for many years now.
  The United States has demonstrated strong leadership to minimize, and 
wherever possible all but eliminate, the use of highly enriched uranium 
for civilian purposes. Doing so reduces the risk of nuclear terrorism 
and makes clear that the accumulation of HEU is solely for nuclear 
weapons purposes, undercutting any nation's argument that they need it 
for anything else.
  Using low-enriched uranium, or LEU, in naval reactor fuel can bring 
significant national security benefits with respect to nuclear 
nonproliferation, lower security costs, and put naval reactor research 
and development at the cutting edge of science. Pursuing the 
development of LEU fuel offers the opportunity to achieve 
transformational progress on fuel technology.
  Additionally, unless an alternative using low-enriched uranium fuel 
is developed in the coming decades, the United States will have to 
resume production of bomb-grade uranium for the first time since 1992, 
ultimately undermining U.S. nonproliferation efforts.
  Using LEU for naval reactors is not a pipe dream. France's nuclear 
Navy already has converted from using HEU to using LEU fuel for its 
vessels. We must evaluate the feasibility of a similar transition for 
the U.S. Navy and take into account the potential benefits to the U.S. 
and international security of setting a norm of using LEU instead of 
nuclear bomb-grade material.

                              {time}  1600

  As America confronts the threat of nuclear terrorism and as countries 
continue to enrich uranium for naval purposes, the imperative to reduce 
the use of HEU will become increasingly important over the next several 
decades.
  As such, as I said, Congress has sought to advance these efforts in a 
bipartisan, bicameral way over the last several years by evaluating the 
potential of utilizing LEU fuel in reactors for U.S. Navy aircraft 
carriers and submarines.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.

[[Page H5623]]

  

  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chair, I claim the time in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Virginia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chair, I would like to point out that there have 
been multiple studies done on this.
  In 2014, the Department of Defense and the Department of the Navy 
pointed out the negative impacts that low-enriched uranium would have 
on the capability of the Navy.
  In 2016, another report, and I remind the folks here in the Chamber 
that this report was specific about saying the negative impacts that 
low-enriched uranium will have on the capability of our United States 
Navy.
  In 2018, letters from both the Director of Naval Reactors, Admiral 
Caldwell, and from the Secretary of the Navy, Richard Spencer, all 
stated the negative impact that low-enriched uranium would have on the 
capability of the Navy.
  We look, too, at the dollars that are being proposed to offset this. 
The $20 million reduction in the National Nuclear Security 
Administration would reduce salaries in that area by 15 percent.
  According to NNSA, this reduction would likely require a reduction in 
force to achieve this staffing level. They will let people go if this 
money is transferred to another study, a study that has been done 
multiple times in the past with the same outcomes, that this would have 
a harmful effect on the National Nuclear Security Administration.
  They also say that the amendment would negate recently implemented 
improvements in oversight and accountability and slow down the 
execution of critical nuclear security and safety programs.
  It would also affect weapons modernization and nuclear 
nonproliferation efforts. The same thing the gentleman from Rhode 
Island said that this bill is meant to address, it actually takes money 
away from the efforts that NNSA is putting forward.
  It also would inhibit physical security, cybersecurity, and 
environmental remediation programs.
  Not only has this study been done multiple times, but it would take 
money away from the critical elements that are being proposed that this 
study would seek to find out. Again, the conclusions have already been 
reached. The impact of LEU on the Nation's naval capability has already 
been identified.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. LANGEVIN. Mr. Chair, let me say that we can't fear the future. We 
must invest in research and development.
  I want to point out that the then-chair, the Naval Reactors Director, 
Admiral Richardson, testified before the House Armed Services 
Committee. He said, with current technology, ``the potential exists 
that we could develop an advanced fuel system that might increase 
uranium loading and make low-enriched uranium possible while still 
meeting some very rigorous performance requirements for naval reactors 
on nuclear-powered warships.''
  To address the concerns of my colleague, I want to mention that this 
House has already included $20 million for this research in the Energy 
and Water appropriations package that passed the House on June 19, 
which also included a $15 million increase to NNSA Federal salaries and 
expenses over fiscal year 2019.
  These spending levels have already been set by the House. This 
amendment simply matches the authorization level with the House-passed 
appropriations level.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chair, I remind the gentleman from Rhode Island that 
this is the National Defense Authorization Act. It is not another 
appropriations bill. This is specific to the use of these dollars here 
for these purposes specifically.
  Mr. Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from Virginia (Mrs. 
Luria).
  Mrs. LURIA. Mr. Chair, as a Navy veteran, I believe in focusing our 
limited resources toward efforts that will make our forces more 
effective, reliable, and efficient.
  I oppose this amendment that would decrease the National Nuclear 
Security Administration's budget by $20 million and allocate the money 
to a program to develop low-enriched uranium fuel for submarines and 
aircraft carriers.
  Drawing on my 20-year Navy experience in the supervision and 
operation of naval nuclear propulsion systems, it makes little sense to 
divert these resources. Our highly enriched uranium reactor design has 
successfully powered our submarine fleet, delivering a critical leg of 
our nuclear deterrent and our aircraft carriers, providing our unique 
sustained forward presence capability for nearly seven decades. There 
is no need for this amendment.
  Top Navy leadership and the Secretary of Energy clearly state that a 
low-enriched uranium design for naval nuclear propulsion ``would result 
in a reactor design that is inherently less capable, more expensive, 
and unlikely to support current life-of-ship submarine reactors.''
  Meanwhile, Admiral James Caldwell, Director of the Naval Nuclear 
Propulsion Program, says that investing in LEU would negatively impact 
reactor endurance, reactor size, and ship costs, and its success is 
``not assured.''
  I have no doubt that we could eventually develop a reactor design 
using LEU, but would it continue to meet our operational and strategic 
defense needs? No. It would make our platforms inherently less capable, 
less operationally available, and more expensive to operate. In turn, 
it would require more of these assets to accomplish the same 
objectives.

  If the genesis behind this amendment is to advance issues of 
nonproliferation, it makes little sense to draw down the budget of the 
very agency that is tasked with the security of nuclear weapons and 
nuclear fuel.
  I will conclude as I began. We need to commit our limited resources 
where they are most efficiently used to support our operational forces 
and our national defense. These dollars are best spent on the National 
Nuclear Security Administration.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. LANGEVIN. Mr. Chair, may I inquire how much time remains on both 
sides.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Rhode Island has 2 minutes 
remaining. The gentleman from Virginia has 45 seconds remaining.
  Mr. LANGEVIN. Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to support the 
amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I yield the balance of my time to the gentleman from 
Illinois (Mr. Foster), who is the House's only nuclear physicist.
  Mr. FOSTER. Mr. Chair, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Chair, I rise today as the only Ph.D. physicist in the U.S. 
Congress. During my career, I have designed and led the construction of 
giant particle accelerators and other nuclear equipment, led high-risk 
and successful R&D programs, and designed equipment using classified 
neutron transport codes.
  Because of its importance to national security and nuclear 
nonproliferation, I have studied at length the question of minimizing 
the use of highly enriched uranium in naval propulsion reactors. I 
received numerous individual and highly technical classified briefings, 
examined reactor core specifications, and visited the naval nuclear 
fuel fabrication facility in Virginia.
  I believe that continuing the research supported by this amendment is 
worth pursuing for the reasons given by my colleague.
  Several factors must be dealt with in determining the practicality of 
utilizing LEU in naval propulsion reactors, including the total energy 
and power deliverable by the core, the volume of the reactor, the 
enrichment level of the fuel, reactivity limits, and the heat transfer 
area required for a given power level.
  It is complicated, but a 2016 report by the JASON scientific advisory 
board concluded that using an optimized LEU design instead of the 
existing HEU design could result in a significantly more compact core. 
This would be a true operational advantage and one that we should not 
give up by abandoning this R&D program that has been going on for 
years.
  I close by pointing out that I am not alone in this. This is not only 
about optimizing submarine performance. As

[[Page H5624]]

pointed out by 35 Nobel Prize-winning scientists, it is crucial for 
nonproliferation that we set a good example for the rest of the world 
and not use weapons-grade uranium for applications where it is not 
required. Countries like France and others do not use weapons-grade 
uranium in their submarines and in carriers. We should set an example 
and do likewise.
  This R&D program will enable that possibility by continuing it for 
the next decade.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I rise today as the only PhD Physicist in Congress. During 
my career I have design and led the construction of giant particle 
accelerators and other nuclear equipment, led high-risk and successful 
R and D programs, and designed equipment using classified neutron 
transport codes.
  Because of its importance to National Security and Nuclear 
NonProliferation, I have studied at length the question of minimizing 
the use of HEU in our naval propulsion reactors.
  I received numerous individual and highly technical classified 
briefings, examined reactor core specifications, and visited the naval 
nuclear fuel fabrication facility in Virginia.
  I believe that the research supported by this amendment is worth 
pursuing, for the reasons given by my colleague.
  The reason is simple, that HEU is one of the most dangerous 
substances known to man, because it can be used to make a simple, gun-
type design nuclear bomb with a multi-kiloton yield.
  This is not true of LEU--low-enriched, non-weapons grade uranium.
  This distinction is important for the enforcement of Nuclear 
Nonproliferation. Since the detection of even minute amounts of HEU can 
and has been used as clear evidence of a weapons program in a nation 
that has allegedly committed to only peaceful uses of atomic energy 
based on LEU.
  Which is why the elimination of globally held stockpiles has been a 
U.S. policy objective for over 40 years, and recently supported by a 
letter from 35 Nobel Prize winners.
  But let's talk about the physics and reactor systems engineering.
  Several factors must be dealt with in determining the practicality of 
utilizing LEU in naval propulsion reactors, including total energy and 
power deliverable by the core, volume of the reactor, and enrichment 
level of the fuel, reactivity limits, and the heat transfer area 
required for a given power level.
  A 2016 report by the JASON Scientific Advisory Board concluded that, 
that using the existing HEU design, in order achieve the same total 
deliverable energy using LEU, the core would have to be approximately 
4.5 times larger.
  This does not mean, however, that you would need a reactor system 
with 4.5 times the volume, since most propulsion components scale with 
the power of the reactor, which would be unchanged in the conversion 
from HEU to LEU.
  The purpose of the R and D funding in this amendment is to develop 
and qualify a fuel element and reactor design the will result in a much 
more compact overall design.
  Although the exact improvement factor is classified and has been 
redacted in the public version of the JASON report.
  If the R and D program succeeds, it will verify the feasibility of 
using LEU in Naval reactors with smaller or no performance compromise.
  The independent JASON scientific review committee gave this R and D 
program a positive outlook.
  In a July 2016 report to Congress, the Office of Naval Reactors 
stated that, ``The advanced LEU fuel system concept has the potential 
to satisfy the energy requirements of an aircraft carrier without 
affecting the number of refuelings.''
  This would massively reduce U.S. consumption of Weapons Grade 
Uranium.
  The situation is more nuanced for submarines.
  The Virginia-class replacement propulsion plant is being targeted by 
this R and D program, with a decision time for transition to LEU of 
about 10 years from now.
  But such progress over the next two decades can only happen if we 
continue aggressively pursuing the R and D now.
  As the JASON report stated, ``If a decision is made soon to proceed 
with ELE-LEU development, then by the time the design of the Virginia-
replacement propulsion plant is being solidified in the 2030 time 
frame, NNPP will have a good idea of whether ELE-LEU will succeed. . . 
. [T]hen the Navy's final HEU core might be built as early as 2040.''
  If any of my colleagues would like to continue this conversation in a 
classified setting, I would be more than happy to answer any questions.
  I urge my colleagues to join me and vote yes on this critical 
amendment.
  Mr. LANGEVIN. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chair, in conclusion, I want to point to the 2016 
report that assessed that additional refuelings would increase Navy 
fleet operating costs by several billion dollars a year.
  Mr. Chair, as we are looking to rebuild the Navy, that means ships 
that will not get built. That will mean less operating capability. That 
will mean ships that need to be at dock for longer periods of time for 
maintenance and for refueling.
  A larger submarine reactor core, which is what DOD says would be 
needed for LEU, requires a larger submarine, and it makes those 
submarines less capable and less efficient.
  It also requires massive redesigns, so it interrupts existing 
submarine construction programs.
  All of those things have significant impacts on the capability of the 
Navy.
  Take the Virginia-class submarine reactor, which operates on a 33-
year ship expectancy. That would cut that by one-third, which means it 
would have to come back and be refueled again.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Rhode Island (Mr. Langevin).
  The amendment was agreed to.


      Amendments En Bloc No. 5 Offered by Mr. Smith of Washington

  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, pursuant to House Resolution 476, 
I offer amendments en bloc.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Kildee). The Clerk will designate the 
amendments en bloc.
  Amendments en bloc No. 5 consisting of amendment Nos. 20, 37, 38, 40, 
43, 47, 147, 148, 149, 150, 151, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 
159, 160, 161, 162, 163, 164, and 165, printed in part B of House 
Report 116-143, offered by Mr. Smith of Washington:


         amendment no. 20 offered by mr. sherman of california

       At the end of subtitle D of title XII, add the following:

     SEC. 12_. UNITED STATES ACTIONS RELATING TO RUSSIAN 
                   INTERFERENCE IN ELECTIONS FOR FEDERAL OFFICE.

       (a) Prohibition on Transactions Relating to New Russian 
     Sovereign Debt.--
       (1) In general.--Not later than 90 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the President shall issue 
     regulations prohibiting United States persons from engaging 
     in transactions with, providing financing for, or in any 
     other way dealing in Russian sovereign debt that is issued on 
     or after the date that is 180 days after such date of 
     enactment.
       (2) Russian sovereign debt defined.--For purposes of this 
     subsection, the term ``Russian sovereign debt'' means--
       (A) bonds issued by the Russian Central Bank, the Russian 
     National Wealth Fund, the Russian Federal Treasury, or agents 
     or affiliates of any such institution, with a maturity of 
     more than 14 days;
       (B) new foreign exchange swap agreements with the Russian 
     Central Bank, the Russian National Wealth Fund, or the 
     Russian Federal Treasury, the duration of which agreement is 
     longer than 14 days; and
       (C) any other financial instrument, the duration or 
     maturity of which is more than 14 days, that the President 
     determines represents the sovereign debt of Russia.
       (3) Requirement to promptly publish guidance.--The 
     President shall concurrently publish guidance on the 
     implementation of the regulations issued pursuant to 
     paragraph (1).
       (b) Determination of Russian Interference in Elections for 
     Federal Office.--
       (1) In general.--Not later than 30 days after an election 
     for Federal office, the Director of National Intelligence, in 
     consultation with the Director of the Federal Bureau of 
     Investigation, the Director of the National Security Agency, 
     and the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency, shall--
       (A) determine whether or not the Government of Russia, or 
     any person acting as an agent of or on behalf of that 
     government, knowingly engaged in interference in the 
     election; and
       (B) submit to the appropriate congressional committees and 
     leadership a report on that determination, including an 
     identification of the government or person that interfered in 
     the election if the Director determines that interference did 
     occur.
       (2) Additional reporting.--If the Director of National 
     Intelligence determines and reports under paragraph (1) that 
     neither the Government of Russia nor any person acting as an 
     agent of or on behalf of that government knowingly engaged in 
     interference in an election for Federal office, and the 
     Director subsequently determines that such government, or 
     such a person, did engage in such interference, the Director 
     shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees and 
     leadership a report on the subsequent determination not later 
     than 30 days after making that determination.
       (3) Form of report.--Each report required by paragraph (1) 
     or (2) shall be submitted in

[[Page H5625]]

     unclassified form but may include a classified annex.
       (c) Lifting the Prohibition on Transactions Relating to New 
     Russian Sovereign Debt.--The President shall immediately 
     suspend the prohibition on transactions relating to Russian 
     sovereign debt required under subsection (a) if, no later 
     than 90 days after the date on which a report required under 
     subsection (b) is submitted to the appropriate congressional 
     committees and leadership and no later than 120 days after 
     the most recent election for Federal office, whichever is 
     sooner--
       (1) the Director of National Intelligence has in its report 
     required under subsection (b) affirmatively determined that 
     neither the Government of Russia, nor any person acting as an 
     agent of or on behalf of that government, has knowingly 
     engaged in interference in the most recent election for 
     Federal office; and
       (2) Congress has passed a joint resolution certifying the 
     determination of the Director of National Intelligence.
       (d) Reimposing the Prohibition on Transactions Relating to 
     New Russian Sovereign Debt.--The President shall immediately 
     reimpose the prohibition on transactions relating to Russian 
     sovereign debt required under subsection (a) if, after 90 
     days following the date on which a report required under 
     subsection (b) is submitted to the appropriate congressional 
     committees and leadership or 120 days following the most 
     recent election for Federal office, whichever is sooner--
       (1) the Director of National Intelligence, in the report 
     required under subsection (b), has not affirmatively 
     determined that neither the Government of Russia, nor any 
     person acting as an agent of or on behalf of that government, 
     has knowingly engaged in interference in the most recent 
     election for Federal office; or
       (2) Congress has failed to pass a joint resolution 
     certifying the determination of the Director of National 
     Intelligence in its report required under subsection (b) that 
     neither the Government of Russia, nor any person acting as an 
     agent of or on behalf of that government, has knowingly 
     engaged in interference in the most recent Federal election.
       (e) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Appropriate congressional committees.--The term 
     ``appropriate congressional committees'' means--
       (A) the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs, 
     the Committee on Foreign Relations, the Committee on Finance, 
     the Select Committee on Intelligence, and the Committee on 
     Rules and Administration of the Senate; and
       (B) the Committee on Financial Services, the Committee on 
     Foreign Affairs, the Committee on Ways and Means, the 
     Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, and the Committee 
     on House Administration of the House of Representatives.
       (2) Appropriate congressional committees and leadership.--
     The term ``appropriate congressional committees and 
     leadership'' means--
       (A) the appropriate congressional committees;
       (B) the majority leader and minority leader of the Senate; 
     and
       (C) the Speaker, the majority leader, and the minority 
     leader of the House of Representatives.
       (3) Elections for federal office.--The term ``elections for 
     Federal office'' has the meaning given such term in the 
     Federal Election Campaign Act of 1971 (52 U.S.C. 30101 et 
     seq.), except that such term does not include a special 
     election.
       (4) Interference in elections for federal office.--The term 
     ``interference'', with respect to an election for Federal 
     office:
       (A) Means any of the following actions of the government of 
     a foreign country, or any person acting as an agent of or on 
     behalf of such a government, undertaken with the intent to 
     influence the election:
       (i) Obtaining unauthorized access to election and campaign 
     infrastructure or related systems or data and releasing such 
     data or modifying such infrastructure, systems, or data.
       (ii) Blocking or degrading otherwise legitimate and 
     authorized access to election and campaign infrastructure or 
     related systems or data.
       (iii) Contributions or expenditures for advertising, 
     including on the internet.
       (iv) Using social or traditional media to spread 
     significant amounts of false information to individuals in 
     the United States.
       (B) Does not include communications clearly attributable to 
     news and media outlets which are publicly and explicitly 
     either controlled or in large part funded by the government 
     of a foreign country.
       (5) Knowingly.--The term ``knowingly'', with respect to 
     conduct, a circumstance, or a result, means that a person has 
     actual knowledge, or should have known, of the conduct, the 
     circumstance, or the result.
       (6) Person.--The term ``person'' means an individual or 
     entity.
       (7) United states person.--The term ``United States 
     person'' means--
       (A) a United States citizen or an alien lawfully admitted 
     for permanent residence to the United States; or
       (B) an entity organized under the laws of the United States 
     or of any jurisdiction within the United States, including a 
     foreign branch of such an entity.


         Amendment No. 37 Offered by Ms. Jayapal of Washington

       At the end of subtitle A of title VI, add the following:

     SEC. 606. ANNUAL REPORTS ON APPROVAL OF EMPLOYMENT OR 
                   COMPENSATION OF RETIRED GENERAL OR FLAG 
                   OFFICERS BY FOREIGN GOVERNMENTS FOR EMOLUMENTS 
                   CLAUSE PURPOSES.

       (a) Annual Reports.--Section 908 of title 37, United States 
     Code is amended--
       (1) by redesignating subsection (c) as subsection (d); and
       (2) by inserting after subsection (b) the following new 
     subsection (c):
       ``(c) Annual Reports on Approvals for Retired General and 
     Flag Officers.--(1) Not later than January 31each year, the 
     Secretaries of the military departments shall jointly submit 
     to the appropriate committees and Members of Congress a 
     report on each approval under subsection (b) for employment 
     or compensation described in subsection (a) for a retired 
     member of the armed forces in general or flag officer grade 
     that was issued during the preceding year. The report shall 
     be posted on a publicly available Internet website of the 
     Department of Defense no later than 30 days after it has been 
     submitted to Congress.
       ``(2) In this subsection, the appropriate committees and 
     Members of Congress are--
       ``(A) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on 
     Foreign Relations, and the Committee on Appropriations of the 
     Senate;
       ``(B) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on 
     Foreign Relations, and the Committee on Appropriations of the 
     House of Representatives;
       ``(C) the Majority Leader and the Minority Leader of the 
     Senate; and
       ``(D) the Speaker of the House of Representatives and the 
     Minority Leader of the House of Representatives.''.
       (b) Scope of First Report.--The first report submitted 
     pursuant to subsection (c) of section 908 of title 37, United 
     States Code (as amended by subsection (a) of this section), 
     after the date of the enactment of this Act shall cover the 
     five-year period ending with the year before the year in 
     which such report is submitted.


         Amendment No. 38 Offered by Mr. Aguilar of California

       At the end of subtitle C of title V, add the following:

     SEC. 530. STUDY REGARDING SCREENING INDIVIDUALS WHO SEEK TO 
                   ENLIST IN THE ARMED FORCES.

       (a) Study.--The Secretary of Defense shall study the 
     feasibility of, in background investigations and security and 
     suitability screenings of individuals who seek to enlist in 
     the Armed Forces--
       (1) screening for white nationalists and individuals with 
     ties to white nationalist organizations; and
       (2) using the following resources of the Federal Bureau of 
     Investigation:
       (A) The Tattoo and Graffiti Identification Program.
       (B) The National Gang Intelligence Center.
       (b) Report Required.--Not later than 90 days after the date 
     of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit an 
     unclassified report in writing to the congressional defense 
     committees containing conclusions of the Secretary regarding 
     the study under subsection (a).


          amendment no. 40 offered by ms. porter of california

       At the end of subtitle E of title V, add the following:

     SEC. 550C. EFFECTIVE DATE OF RULE REGARDING PAYDAY LENDING 
                   PROTECTIONS.

       (a) In General.--Sections 1041.4 through 1041.6, 1041.10, 
     and 1041.12(b)(1) through (3) in the final rule published on 
     November 17, 2017 by the Bureau of Consumer Financial 
     Protection (82 F.R. 54472) related to Mandatory Underwriting 
     Provisions shall go into effect on August 19, 2019, with 
     regards to servicemembers, veterans and surviving spouses.
       (b) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) The term ``servicemember'' has the meaning given that 
     term in section 101 of title 10, United States Code.
       (2) The terms ``veteran'' and ``surviving spouse'' have the 
     meanings given those terms in section 101 of title 38, United 
     States Code.


       amendment no. 43 offered by ms. ocasio-cortez of new york

       At the end of subtitle B of title III, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 3__. FUNDING FOR DETONATION CHAMBERS IN VIEQUES, PUERTO 
                   RICO.

       (a) Increase.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 4301 for environmental restoration, 
     Navy, line 060, as specified in the corresponding funding 
     table in section 4301, for the purchase, deployment, and 
     operation of a closed detonation chambers of the dimensions 
     necessary to achieve a substantial reduction in open air 
     burning and open air detonation that will bring the practice 
     of open air burning and open air detonation to the lowest 
     practicable level, is hereby increased by $10,000,000.
       (b) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 4301 for Operations and Maintenance,

[[Page H5626]]

     as specified in the corresponding funding table in section 
     4301, line 460, Office of the Secretary of Defense for Admin 
     & SRVWIDE Activities is hereby reduced by $10,000,000.


         amendment no. 47 offered by mrs. torres of california

       At the end of title XI, add the following new section:

     SEC. 11__. REVIEW OF STANDARD OCCUPATIONAL CLASSIFICATION 
                   SYSTEM.

       The Director of the Office of Management and Budget shall 
     not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, categorize public safety telecommunicators as a 
     protective service occupation under the Standard Occupational 
     Classification System.


        amendment no. 147 offered by mr. fortenberry of nebraska

       At the end of subtitle C of title XII, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 12__. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON SUPPORTING THE RETURN AND 
                   REPATRIATION OF RELIGIOUS AND ETHNIC MINORITIES 
                   IN IRAQ TO THEIR ANCESTRAL HOMELANDS.

       (a) Findings.--Congress finds that--
       (1) the Nineveh Plain and the wider region have been the 
     ancestral homeland of Assyrian Chaldean Syriac Christians, 
     Yazidis, Shabak, and other religious and ethnic minorities, 
     where they lived for centuries until the Islamic State of 
     Iraq and Syria (ISIS) overran and occupied the area in 2014;
       (2) in 2016, then-Secretary of State John Kerry announced, 
     ``In my judgment Daesh is responsible for genocide against 
     groups in areas under its control, including Yezidis, 
     Christians, and Shia Muslims. Daesh is genocidal by self-
     proclamation, by ideology, and by actions--in what it says, 
     what it believes, and what it does. Daesh is also responsible 
     for crimes against humanity and ethnic cleansing directed at 
     these same groups and in some cases also against Sunni 
     Muslims, Kurds, and other minorities.'';
       (3) these atrocities were undertaken with the specific 
     intent to bring about the eradication and displacement of 
     Christians, Yazidis, and other communities and the 
     destruction of their cultural heritage, in violation of the 
     United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of 
     the Crime of Genocide signed by the United States on December 
     11, 1948;
       (4) in 2016, the House of Representatives passed H. Con. 
     Res. 75 expressing the sense of the House of Representatives 
     that the atrocities perpetrated by ISIS against religious and 
     ethnic minorities in Iraq and Syria include war crimes, 
     crimes against humanity, and genocide;
       (5) through joint efforts of the United States and 79 
     allies and partners, ISIS has been territorially defeated in 
     Iraq and Syria;
       (6) in July 2018, under the direction of Vice President 
     Pence, the Genocide Recovery and Persecution Response Program 
     partnered with the Department of State, the United States 
     Agency for International Development, and local faith and 
     community leaders to rapidly and directly deliver aid to 
     persecuted communities, beginning with Iraq;
       (7) Christians in Iraq once numbered over 1.5 million in 
     2003 and have dwindled to less than 200,000 today;
       (8) armed militia groups linked to Iran, operating 
     systematically in Sinjar and the Nineveh Plains, have 
     harassed and intimidated religious and ethnic minorities 
     thereby destabilizing northern Iraq and preventing local and 
     indigenous minorities to return to their homelands;
       (9) Iraqi religious minorities have faced challenges in 
     integrating into the Iraqi Security Forces and Kurdish 
     Peshmerga;
       (10) over 500 acres of productive agricultural lands in 
     eastern Ninevah Governate have been burned in cases of arson 
     in May 2019 alone, destroying significant wheat and barley 
     cultivation areas;
       (11) these agricultural resources are critical to northern 
     Iraq's livelihood, especially that of minority populations, 
     and continued crop arson prevents safe and prosperous return 
     of minority populations as well as complicates stabilization 
     efforts; and
       (12) facilitating the success of communities in Sinjar and 
     the Nineveh Plains requires a commitment from international, 
     Iraqi, Kurdish, and local authorities, in partnership with 
     local faith leaders, to promote the safety and security of 
     all people, especially religious and ethnic minorities.
       (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) it should remain a policy priority of the United 
     States, working with international partners, the Government 
     of Iraq, the Kurdistan Regional Government, and local 
     populations, to support the safe return of displaced 
     indigenous people of the Nineveh Plain and Sinjar to their 
     ancestral homeland;
       (2) it should be a policy priority of the Government of 
     Iraq, the Kurdish Regional Government, the United States, and 
     the international community to guarantee the restoration of 
     fundamental human rights, including property rights, to 
     genocide victims, and to see that ethnic and religious 
     pluralism survives in Iraq;
       (3) Iraqi Security Forces and the Kurdish Peshmerga should 
     work to more fully integrate all communities, including 
     religious minority communities, to counter current and future 
     terrorist threats; and
       (4) the United States, working with international allies 
     and partners, should continue to lead coordination of efforts 
     to provide for the safe return and future security of 
     religious minorities in the Nineveh Plain and Sinjar.


          Amendment No. 148 Offered by Mr. Foster of Illinois

       At the end of subtitle E of title XVI, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 16__. MODIFICATIONS TO REQUIRED TESTING BY MISSILE 
                   DEFENSE AGENCY OF GROUND-BASED MIDCOURSE 
                   DEFENSE ELEMENT OF BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE 
                   SYSTEM.

       Section 1689 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
     Fiscal Year 2017 (Public Law 114-328; 130 Stat. 2631; 10 
     U.S.C. 2431 note) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking ``, 
     when possible,''; and
       (B) in paragraph (3), by inserting ``, including the use of 
     threat-representative countermeasures'' before the period;
       (2) in subsection (c), by striking paragraph (8);
       (3) by striking subsection (d);
       (4) by redesignating subsection (e) as subsection (d); and
       (5) in subsection (d), as so redesignated, by striking the 
     last sentence.


          Amendment No. 149 Offered by Mr. Foster of Illinois

       Page 65, line 3, strike ``90 days'' and insert ``180 
     days''.
       Page 65, line 6, before the period at the end, insert the 
     following: ``and receives approval for such termination from 
     the committees''.
       Page 65, line 10, insert ``to multiple Federal agencies'' 
     before ``known''.


          Amendment No. 150 Offered by Mr. Foster of Illinois

       At the end of subtitle E of title XVI, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 16__. INDEPENDENT STUDY ON IMPACTS OF MISSILE DEFENSE 
                   DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT.

       (a) Study.--Not later than 30 days after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall seek to 
     enter into an agreement with the National Academy of Sciences 
     to conduct a study on the impacts of the development and 
     deployment of long-range missile defenses of the United 
     States on the security of the United States as a whole.
       (b) Matters Included.--The study under subsection (a) 
     shall--
       (1) consider whether security benefits obtained by the 
     deployment of long-range missile defenses of the United 
     States are undermined or counterbalanced by adverse reactions 
     of potential adversaries, including both rogue states and 
     near-peer adversaries; and
       (2) consider the effectiveness of the long-range missile 
     defense efforts of the United States to deter the development 
     of ballistic missiles, in particular by both rogue states and 
     near-peer adversaries.
       (c) Submission.--Not later than one year after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the 
     congressional defense committees the study under subsection 
     (a), without change.
       (d) Form.--The study shall be submitted under subsection 
     (c) in unclassified form, but may include a classified annex.


        amendment no. 151 offered by ms. foxx of north carolina

       At the end of subtitle F of title XII, add the following:

     SEC. _. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON EUROPEAN INVESTMENTS IN NATIONAL 
                   SECURITY.

       It is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) is 
     central to United States-European defense matters; and
       (2) military cooperation and coordination in Europe among 
     NATO member countries should complement NATO efforts and not 
     detract from NATO military system interoperability and burden 
     sharing among NATO allies.


          amendment no. 152 offered by ms. frankel of florida

       Page 904, after line 10, insert the following section:

     SEC. 1614. INTELLIGENCE ASSESSMENT OF RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN 
                   WOMEN AND VIOLENT EXTREMISM.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the 
     Director of National Intelligence, in consultation with the 
     Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of State, and the head of 
     any element of the intelligence community the Director 
     determines appropriate, shall submit to the appropriate 
     congressional committees an intelligence assessment on the 
     relationship between women and violent extremism and 
     terrorism, including an assessment of--
       (1) the historical trends and current state of women's 
     varied roles in all aspects of violent extremism and 
     terrorism, including as recruiters, sympathizers, 
     perpetrators, and combatants, as well as peace-builders and 
     preventers;
       (2) how women's roles in all aspects of violent extremism 
     and terrorism are likely to change in the near- and medium-
     term;
       (3) the extent to which the unequal status of women affects 
     the ability of armed combatants and terrorist groups to 
     enlist or conscript women as combatants and perpetrators of 
     violence;
       (4) how terrorist groups violate the rights of women and 
     girls, including child, early, and forced marriage, 
     abduction, sexual violence, and human trafficking, and the 
     extent

[[Page H5627]]

     to which such violations contribute to the spread of conflict 
     and terrorist activities; and
       (5) opportunities to address the security risk posed by 
     female extremists and leverage the roles of women in 
     counterterrorism efforts.
       (b) Classification.--The assessment required under 
     subsection (a) shall be submitted in unclassified form, but 
     may include a classified annex.
       (c) Appropriate Congressional Committees Defined.--In this 
     section, the term ``appropriate congressional committees'' 
     means--
       (1) the Select Committee on Intelligence, the Committee on 
     Foreign Relations, and the Committee on Armed Services, of 
     the Senate; and
       (2) the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, the 
     Committee on Foreign Affairs, and the Committee on Armed 
     Services, of the House of Representatives.


           amendment no. 153 offered by mr. gaetz of florida

       At the end of subtitle G of title VIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 898. REPORT AND STRATEGY ON TERMINATED FOREIGN 
                   CONTRACTS.

       (a) Report.--Not later than 90 days after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall submit 
     to Congress a report on contracts performed in foreign 
     countries for which the contract was terminated for 
     convenience because of actions taken by the government of, or 
     an entity located in, the foreign country that impeded the 
     ability of the contractor to perform the contract. Such 
     report shall include, for each contract so terminated--
       (1) the specific contract type;
       (2) the good or service that is the subject of the 
     contract;
       (3) the contracting entity within the Department of 
     Defense;
       (4) the annual and total value of the contract;
       (5) the foreign countries involved in implementing the 
     contract;
       (6) an identification of the government of, or entity 
     located in, the foreign country that impeded the ability of 
     the contractor to perform the contract;
       (7) the rationale, if any, for impeding the ability of the 
     contractor to perform the contract, and an analysis of 
     whether the rationale contradicted and requirements of the 
     Federal Acquisition Regulation;
       (8) the increased costs incurred by the Department of 
     Defense because of the termination; and
       (9) any additional information, as determined by the 
     Secretary.
       (b) Strategy.--The Secretary of Defense, in collaboration 
     with the Secretary of State, shall develop a strategy and 
     accompanying guidelines for contractors and other Federal 
     Government employees involved in the performance of 
     Department of Defense contracts in foreign countries to 
     ensure such contracts are not subject to interference, 
     contract meddling, or favoritism by government of, or an 
     entity located in, the foreign country. Not later than 90 
     days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
     Secretary of Defense shall submit to Congress a report on the 
     strategy and accompanying guidelines.


           Amendment No. 154 Offered by Mr. Gaetz of Florida

       At the end of subtitle J of title V, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 597. RECOMMENDING THAT THE PRESIDENT GRANT LIEUTENANT 
                   COLONEL RICHARD COLE, UNITED STATES AIR FORCE 
                   (RET.), AN HONORARY AND POSTHUMOUS PROMOTION TO 
                   THE GRADE OF COLONEL.

       (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
       (1) Richard E. Cole (in this section referred to as 
     ``Cole'') graduated from Steele High School in Dayton, Ohio, 
     and completed two years at Ohio University before enlisting 
     in the Army Air Corps in November, 1940.
       (2) Cole completed pilot training and was commissioned as a 
     Second Lieutenant in July, 1941.
       (3) On April 18, 1942, the United States conducted air 
     raids on Tokyo led by Lieutenant Colonel James ``Jimmy'' 
     Doolittle, which later became known as ``the Doolittle 
     Raid''.
       (4) Cole flew in the Doolittle Raid as Lieutenant Colonel 
     Doolittle's co-pilot in aircraft number 1.
       (5) For their outstanding heroism, valor, skill, and 
     service to the United States, the Doolittle Raiders, 
     including Cole, were awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 
     2014.
       (b) Recommendation of Honorary Promotion for Richard E. 
     Cole.--Pursuant to section 1563 of title 10, United States 
     Code, Congress recommends that the President grant Lieutenant 
     Colonel Richard E. Cole, United States Air Force (retired), 
     an honorary and posthumous promotion to the grade of colonel.
       (c) Additional Benefits Not to Accrue.--The advancement of 
     Richard E. Cole on the retired list of the Air Force under 
     subsection (b) shall not affect the retired pay or other 
     benefits from the United States to which Richard E. Cole 
     would have been entitled based upon his military service, or 
     affect any benefits to which any other person may become 
     entitled based on such military service.


        Amendment No. 155 Offered by Mr. Gallagher of Wisconsin

       At the end of subtitle E of title XII, add the following:

     SEC. _. REPORT ON ZTE COMPLIANCE WITH SUPERSEDING SETTLEMENT 
                   AGREEMENT AND SUPERSEDING ORDER.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the 
     President shall submit to Congress a report on the compliance 
     of Zhongxing Telecommunications Equipment Corporation (ZTE 
     Corporation) and ZTE Kangxun Telecommunications Ltd. (ZTE 
     Kangxun) (collectively, ``ZTE'') with the Superseding 
     Settlement Agreement and Superseding Order reached with the 
     Department of Commerce on June 8, 2018.
       (b) Form.--The report required by subsection (a) shall be 
     submitted in unclassified form and publicly accessible, but 
     may include a classified annex.


        Amendment No. 156 Offered by Mr. Gallagher of Wisconsin

       At the end of subtitle C of title II, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 2__. INCREASE IN FUNDING FOR NATIONAL SECURITY 
                   INNOVATION CAPITAL.

       (a) Increase.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 201 for research, development, test, 
     and evaluation, as specified in the corresponding funding 
     table in section 4201, for research, development, test, and 
     evaluation, Defense-wide, for Defense Innovation Unit (DIU) 
     Prototyping is hereby increased by $75,000,000 (to be used in 
     support of national security innovation capital).
       (b) Offset.--Not withstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 201 for research, development, test, 
     and evaluation, as specified in the corresponding funding 
     table in section 4201, for research, development, test, and 
     evaluation, Defense-wide, advanced component development and 
     prototypes, advanced innovative technologies, line 096 (PE 
     0604250D8Z) is hereby reduced by $75,000,000.


        Amendment No. 157 Offered by Mr. Gallagher of Wisconsin

       At the end of subtitle E of title XII, add the following:

     SEC. 1262. LIMITATION ON REMOVAL OF HUAWEI TECHNOLOGIES CO. 
                   LTD. FROM ENTITY LIST OF BUREAU OF INDUSTRY AND 
                   SECURITY.

       The Secretary of Commerce may not remove Huawei 
     Technologies Co. Ltd. (in this section referred to as 
     ``Huawei'') from the entity list maintained by the Bureau of 
     Industry and Security and set forth in Supplement No. 4 to 
     part 744 of title 15, Code of Federal Regulations, until the 
     Secretary certifies to Congress that--
       (1) neither Huawei nor any senior officers of Huawei have 
     engaged in actions in violation of sanctions imposed by the 
     United States or the United Nations in the 5-year period 
     preceding the certification;
       (2) Huawei has not engaged in theft of United States 
     intellectual property in that 5-year period;
       (3) Huawei does not pose an ongoing threat to United States 
     telecommunications systems or critical infrastructure; and
       (4) Huawei does not pose a threat to critical 
     infrastructure of allies of the United States.


          Amendment No. 158 Offered by Mr. Gallego of Arizona

       At the end of subtitle B of title V, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 520. REPORT ON NATIONAL GUARD AND UNITED STATES NORTHERN 
                   COMMAND CAPACITY TO MEET HOMELAND DEFENSE AND 
                   SECURITY INCIDENTS.

       Not later than September 30, 2020, the Chief of the 
     National Guard Bureau shall, in consultation with the 
     Commander of United States Northern Command, submit to the 
     congressional defense committees a report setting forth the 
     following:
       (1) A clarification of the roles and missions, structure, 
     capabilities, and training of the National Guard and the 
     United States Northern Command, and an identification of 
     emerging gaps and shortfalls in light of current homeland 
     security threats to our country.
       (2) A list of the resources that each State and Territory 
     National Guard has at its disposal that are available to 
     respond to a homeland defense or security incident, with 
     particular focus on a multi-State electromagnetic pulse 
     event.
       (3) The readiness and resourcing status of forces listed 
     pursuant to paragraph (2).
       (4) The current strengths and areas of improvement in 
     working with State and Federal interagency partners.
       (5) The current assessments that address National Guard 
     readiness and resourcing of regular United States Northern 
     Command forces postured to respond to homeland defense and 
     security incidents.
       (6) A roadmap to 2040 that addresses readiness across the 
     spectrum of long-range emerging threats facing the United 
     States.


          Amendment No. 159 Offered by Mr. Gallego of Arizona

       Strike section 852 and insert the following:

     SEC. 852. ASSURED SECURITY AGAINST INTRUSION ON UNITED STATES 
                   MILITARY NETWORKS.

       (a) Prohibition.--Except as provided in this section, the 
     Secretary of Defense shall

[[Page H5628]]

     only award contracts for the procurement of 
     telecommunications equipment and services for national 
     security installations in territories of the United States 
     located in the Pacific Ocean to allowed contractors.
       (b) Exception.--Subsection (a) shall not apply to contracts 
     for the procurement of telecommunications equipment and 
     services that--
       (1) do not process or carry any information about the 
     operations of the Armed Forces of the United States or 
     otherwise concern the national security of the United States; 
     or
       (2) cannot route or redirect user data traffic or permit 
     visibility into any user data or packets that such services 
     or facilities transmit or otherwise handle.
       (c) Waiver.--The Secretary of Defense may waive the 
     restriction of subsection (a) upon a written determination 
     that such a waiver is in the national security interests of 
     the United States and either--
       (1) a contractor that is not an allowed contractor would 
     not have the ability to track, record, listen, or otherwise 
     access data or voice communications of the Department of 
     Defense through the provision of the telecommunications 
     equipment or services; or
       (2) a qualified allowed contractor is not available to 
     perform the contract at a fair and reasonable price.
       (d) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Allowed contractor.--The term ``allowed contractor'' 
     means an entity (including any affiliates or subsidiaries) 
     that is a contractor or subcontractor (at any tier)--
       (A) for which the principal place of business of such 
     entity is located in the United States or in a foreign 
     country that is not an adversary of the United States; and
       (B) that does not have significant connections, including 
     ownership interests in, or joint ventures with, any entity 
     identified in paragraph (f)(3) of section 889 of the John S. 
     McCain National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
     2019 (Public Law 115-232; 132 Stat. 1918; 41 U.S.C. 3901 
     note).
       (2) National security installation.--The term ``national 
     security installation'' means any facility operated by the 
     Department of Defense.


        Amendment No. 160 Offered by Mr. Garamendi of California

       Page 891, after line 14, insert the following:

     SEC. 1609. DEMONSTRATION OF BACKUP AND COMPLEMENTARY 
                   POSITIONING, NAVIGATION, AND TIMING 
                   CAPABILITIES OF GLOBAL POSITIONING SYSTEM.

       Effective on June 1, 2019, section 1606 of the National 
     Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 
     115-91; 131 Stat. 1725) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (c)(2), by striking ``the date that is 18 
     months after the date of the enactment of this Act'' and 
     inserting ``December 31, 2020''; and
       (2) in subsection (d), by striking ``18 months after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act'' and inserting ``December 
     31, 2020''.


        Amendment No. 161 Offered by Mr. Garamendi of California

       At the end of subtitle A of title XXXV, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 35__. MILITARY TO MARINER PROGRAM.

       (a) Credentialing Support.--Not later than one year after 
     the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of 
     Defense and the Secretary of the Department in which the 
     Coast Guard operates, in coordination with one another and 
     with the United States Committee on the Marine Transportation 
     System, and in consultation with the Merchant Marine 
     Personnel Advisory Committee, shall identify all training and 
     experience within each of the Armed Forces that may qualify 
     for merchant mariner credentialing, and submit a list of all 
     identified training and experience to the United States Coast 
     Guard National Maritime Center for a determination of whether 
     such training and experience counts for credentialing 
     purposes.
       (b) Review of Applicable Service.--The United States Coast 
     Guard Commandant shall make a determination of whether 
     training and experience counts for credentialing purposes, as 
     described in subsection (a), not later than 6 months after 
     the date on which the United States Coast Guard National 
     Maritime Center receives a submission under subsection (a) 
     identifying a training or experience and requesting such a 
     determination.
       (c) Fees and Services.--The Secretary of Defense and the 
     Secretary of the Department in which the Coast Guard 
     operates, with respect to the applicable services in their 
     respective departments, shall--
       (1) take all necessary and appropriate actions to provide 
     for the waiver of fees through the National Maritime Center 
     license evaluation, issuance, and examination for members of 
     the Armed Forces on active duty, if a waiver is authorized 
     and appropriate, and, if a waiver is not granted, take all 
     necessary and appropriate actions to provide for the payment 
     of fees for members of the Armed Forces on active duty by the 
     applicable service to the fullest extent permitted by law;
       (2) direct the Armed Forces to take all necessary and 
     appropriate actions to provide for Transportation Worker 
     Identification Credential cards for members of the Armed 
     Forces on active duty pursuing or possessing a mariner 
     credential, such as implementation of an equal exchange 
     process for active duty service members at no or minimal 
     cost;
       (3) ensure that members of the Armed Forces who are to be 
     discharged or released from active duty and who request 
     certification or verification of sea service be provided such 
     certification or verification no later than one month after 
     discharge or release;
       (4) ensure the Armed Forces have developed, or continue to 
     operate, as appropriate, the online resource known as 
     Credentialing Opportunities On-Line to support separating 
     members of the Armed Forces who are seeking information and 
     assistance on merchant mariner credentialing; and
       (5) not later than one year after the date of enactment of 
     this section, take all necessary and appropriate actions to 
     review and implement service-related medical certifications 
     to merchant mariner credential requirements.
       (d) Advancing Military to Mariner Within the Employer 
     Agencies.--
       (1) In general.--The Secretary of Defense and the Secretary 
     of the Department in which the Coast Guard operates shall 
     have direct hiring authority to employ separated members of 
     the Armed Forces with valid merchant mariner licenses or sea 
     service experience in support of United States national 
     maritime needs, including the Army Corps of Engineers.
       (2) Appointments of retired members of the armed forces.--
     Except in the case of positions in the Senior Executive 
     Service, the requirements of section 3326(b) of title 5, 
     United States Code, shall not apply with respect to the 
     hiring of a separated member of the Armed Forces under 
     paragraph (1).
       (e) Separated Member of the Armed Forces.--In this section, 
     the term ``separated member of the Armed Forces'' means an 
     individual who--
       (1) is retiring or is retired as a member of the Armed 
     Forces;
       (2) is voluntarily separating or voluntarily separated from 
     the Armed Forces at the end of enlistment or service 
     obligation; or
       (3) is administratively separating or has administratively 
     separated from the Armed Forces with an honorable or general 
     discharge characterization.


     Amendment No. 162 Offered by Ms. gonzalez-colon of puerto rico

       Page 662, line 25, after ``commanders'' insert the 
     following: ``and the effects on preparedness to provide 
     support to States and territories in connection with natural 
     disasters, threats, and emergencies''.


     amendment no. 163 offered by ms. gonzalez-colon of puerto rico

       At the end of subtitle B of title III, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 3__. COMPTROLLER GENERAL REPORT ON ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP 
                   OF VIEQUES AND CULEBRA, PUERTO RICO.

       (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) the Secretary of Defense should explore all avenues and 
     alternatives to expedite the ongoing cleanup and 
     environmental restoration process in the former military 
     training sites located on the island-municipalities of 
     Vieques and Culebra, Puerto Rico;
       (2) the Department of Defense should work with the U.S. 
     Environmental Protection Agency, the Fish and Wildlife 
     Service, and the Government of Puerto Rico to ensure the 
     decontamination process is conducted in a manner that causes 
     the least possible intrusion on the lives of island residents 
     and minimizes public health risks; and
       (3) the Federal Government should collaborate with local 
     and private stakeholders to effectively address economic 
     challenges and opportunities in Vieques, Culebra, and the 
     adjacent communities of the former United States Naval 
     Station Roosevelt Roads.
       (b) GAO Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United 
     States shall complete a study and submit a report to the 
     congressional defense committees on the status of the Federal 
     cleanup and decontamination process in the island-
     municipalities of Vieques and Culebra, Puerto Rico. The study 
     shall include a comprehensive analysis of the following:
       (1) The pace of ongoing cleanup and environmental 
     restoration efforts in the former military training sites in 
     Vieques and Culebra.
       (2) Potential challenges and alternatives to accelerate the 
     completion of such efforts, including their associated costs 
     and any impact they might have on the public health and 
     safety of island residents.


     amendment no. 164 offered by ms. gonzalez-colon of puerto rico

       At the end of subtitle B of title X, insert the following:

     SEC. 10__. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE 
                   COUNTERDRUG ACTIVITIES IN THE TRANSIT ZONE AND 
                   CARIBBEAN BASIN.

       It is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) combating transnational criminal organizations and 
     illicit narcotics trafficking across the transit zone and the 
     Caribbean basin, particularly in and around Puerto Rico and 
     the United States Virgin Islands, is critical to the national 
     security of the United States;
       (2) the Department of Defense should work with the 
     Department of Homeland Security, the Department of State, and 
     other relevant Federal, State, local, and international 
     partners to improve surveillance capabilities and maximize 
     the effectiveness of counterdrug operations in the region; 
     and

[[Page H5629]]

       (3) the Secretary of Defense should, to the greatest extent 
     possible, ensure United States Northern Command and United 
     States Southern Command have the necessary assets to support 
     and increase counter-drug activities within their respective 
     areas of operations in the transit zone and the Caribbean 
     basin.


           amendment no. 165 offered by mr. gosar of arizona

       Page 408, line 7, strike ``and''.
       Page 408, line 10, strike the period at the end and insert 
     ``; and''.
       Page 408, after line 10, insert the following new 
     subparagraph:
       (C) ensure that the United States will eliminate dependency 
     on rare earth materials from China by fiscal year 2025.


  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from Washington (Mr. Smith) and the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Thornberry) each will control 10 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Washington.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Sherman).
  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Chair, I thank the chairman for including my 
amendment in the en bloc. This amendment is cosponsored by Chairwoman 
Waters.
  Russia interfered in our election. To date, our sanctions have been 
illusory. A few individuals have been told they can't get visas to 
visit the United States. They will never see Disneyland.
  This amendment provides real, serious sanctions on the Russian state 
by saying that no U.S. person can make additional purchases of Russian 
sovereign debt.
  It provides a mechanism for removing these sanctions. If the 
administration concludes that Russia goes just one election cycle 
without interfering in our election, and if Congress agrees with that 
conclusion, then these sanctions are lifted.
  Finally, the amendment narrowly defines interference in our 
elections. It makes it plain that if Russian television wants to 
editorialize or Putin wants to put out a press release, that is fine. 
Rather, it is interference in our election where Russia interferes with 
voter tabulation or voter registration processes, where Russia steals 
information for the purpose of influencing our election, or where 
Russian hackers use false flag communications pretending to be American 
spokesmen when they are not.
  We need a serious mechanism to punish Russia for what they did in 
prior elections and to deter them from interfering in our future 
elections. This amendment does that, and I am pleased to include it in 
the en bloc.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, I yield 1 minute to the distinguished 
gentlewoman from North Carolina (Ms. Foxx).
  Ms. FOXX of North Carolina. Mr. Chair, I thank the gentleman from 
Texas for yielding me time and including my amendment in the en bloc.
  Mr. Chair, I rise in support of the en bloc package. I thank Chairman 
Smith and Ranking Member Thornberry for their assistance on my 
amendment and thank the Rules Committee for recognizing the importance 
of this issue.
  My amendment sends a clear signal to the European Union on the 
importance of the primacy of NATO over our shared defense interests.
  As some European capitals push for the formation of a European Union 
army, my amendment expresses the importance of NATO centrality over our 
defense policy architecture and the necessity of military system 
interoperability and burden-sharing efforts among NATO allies.
  We all know that increases in European military capability must be 
made by our European allies to comply with their NATO obligations. 
Investments underway in the form of the PESCO pact and the European 
Defense Fund can risk system interoperability and present divergent 
spending priorities within our alliance. EU defense investments should 
take place under the NATO umbrella to ensure accountability and the 
guarantee of U.S. influence.
  Mr. Chair, I thank my colleagues again for their support of this 
amendment.

                              {time}  1615

  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the 
gentlewoman from Washington (Ms. Jayapal), my fellow Washingtonian.
  Ms. JAYAPAL. Mr. Chair, I thank the chairman for his leadership on 
this package.
  My amendment in this package would help curb the corrupt influence of 
foreign money in our politics.
  The Emoluments Clause of the Constitution already requires retired 
military officers who want to work for a foreign government to first 
receive permission from their service in the State Department and to 
disclose the nature of their work. My amendment would make the approved 
activities available to Congress and to the public.
  We still have a long way to go to constrain foreign influence 
peddling and corruption in Washington. We saw this with General Flynn, 
who concealed his work lobbying for the Turkish Government in a dispute 
with the United States in the 2016 Presidential election.
  We trust our retired military officials to speak in the best interest 
of the United States, and when they are being paid to further another 
country's agenda, we deserve to know.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to support this amendment package.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to the distinguished 
gentlewoman from Puerto Rico (Miss Gonzalez-Colon).
  Miss GONZALEZ-COLON of Puerto Rico. Mr. Chairman, I thank Ranking 
Member Thornberry and Chairman Smith for including my three amendments, 
amendments No. 162, 163, and 164, in this en bloc package.
  Amendment 162 requires the Department of Defense to review the 
effects on preparedness and support to States and territories in 
connection with natural disasters, threats, and emergencies prior to 
inactivating Army watercraft units.
  There are four of these vessels in Puerto Rico. They were 
instrumental during the recovery process after Hurricane Maria and 
conducted several recovery missions, including delivering food and 
other essentials to island municipalities and the Virgin Islands.
  This role should be taken into account as part of the review process 
prior to divesting any of the Army's watercraft systems, especially 
considering the multiple jurisdictions that have been recently impacted 
by natural disasters.
  Amendment No. 163 seeks to help us speed up the Federal cleanup and 
decontamination process in the former military ranges on the island 
municipalities of Vieques and Culebra. Specifically, my amendment 
directs the General Accounting Office to complete a study and a report 
to the congressional defense committees on the status of the process, 
including an analysis of the pace of ongoing environmental restoration 
efforts and potential challenges and alternatives to accelerate their 
completion. This comprehensive study will allow us to explore the most 
effective and secure methods to complete the cleanup process in Vieques 
and Culebra, which is vital to improve the quality of life of island 
residents.
  The last amendment, amendment No. 164, highlights the importance of 
the Department of Defense counter-drug operations in the transit zone 
and Caribbean basin. It expresses the sense of Congress that combating 
transnational organizations in the region, particularly in and around 
Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, is critical to national 
security of the United States, and that the Department of Defense shall 
work with the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of 
State and other relevant partners to improve surveillance capabilities 
and maximize the effectiveness of counter-drug operations in the 
region.
  That is the reason I strongly urge my colleagues to support this 
effort, and I thank you for including these three amendments in the en 
bloc package.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the 
gentlewoman from California (Mrs. Torres).
  Mrs. TORRES of California. Mr. Chair, for 17\1/2\ years, I worked as 
a 911 dispatcher.
  My average day consisted of handling incidents, such as coordinating 
police vehicle and foot pursuits, talking to suicide callers, 
negotiating with barricaded suspects, and talking to their victims.
  One call that has stayed with me and threw me into a political world 
that I never wanted to be a part of, I answered a call from a little 
girl who was

[[Page H5630]]

murdered at the hands of her uncle. I was her only witness. I heard her 
scream. I heard her head being bashed against the wall. I heard the 
five shots that ultimately took her life. Her last words: ``Uncle, 
please don't kill me. It's not my fault.''
  This work requires a lot of training and tough attitude to deal with 
critical emergencies. Unfortunately, the Federal Government currently 
classifies 911 dispatchers as clerical workers--secretaries. My 
amendment would finally recognize the critical work they do by 
reclassifying them as protective service occupations.
  This provision costs nothing, zero, but it would bring 911 
professionals, civilian workers--primarily single moms--the dignity 
that they deserve.
  Mr. Chairman, I urge its passage.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the distinguished 
gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Fitzpatrick).
  Mr. FITZPATRICK. Mr. Chair, I stand today in strong support of this 
bipartisan amendment which includes language from the 911 SAVES Act, 
H.R. 1629.
  Public safety telecommunicators play a pivotal role in coordinating 
effective responses to crises affecting our communities. By directing 
the urgent concerns of the public to law enforcement officials, public 
safety telecommunicators work to ensure emergency services are 
delivered where needed.
  Today, there are nearly 100,000 public safety telecommunicators 
serving in over 6,000 call centers across the United States. Their 
diligence, dedication to public well-being, and steady demeanor in the 
presence of turmoil is needed now more than ever.

  I am proud to partner with my colleague from California, a former 911 
dispatcher herself, Mrs. Torres, to ensure these dedicated public 
servants receive the ``protective service occupations'' classification 
from OMB which they deserve. We owe this to those who are often the 
first to respond to emergencies in our communities each and every day.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentlewoman from Florida (Ms. Shalala).
  Ms. SHALALA. Mr. Chair, I rise in strong support of the Torres 
amendment, No. 658, which recognizes the lifesaving work performed by 
our Nation's 911 call takers and dispatchers.
  Mr. Chairman, all of the emergency activities in my own district--the 
police, the fire, the emergency responders--strongly support this 
amendment, and so I want to stand with my colleagues on both sides of 
the aisle simply stating these professionals save lives. And more than 
giving 911 call takers and dispatchers the recognition they deserve, it 
would make the standard occupational classification system more 
accurate and, therefore, more useful as a statistical resource.
  I urge a ``yes'' vote, and I thank the gentleman for yielding me the 
time.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the distinguished 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Wittman).
  Mr. WITTMAN. Mr. Chairman, I would like to refer to my amendment, No. 
403, involving the Cable Ship Program.
  I know that there have been some issues pointed out concerning 
coastal commerce, and I look forward to working through those issues as 
the bill gets to conference.
  Mr. Chair, I yield the balance of my time to the gentleman from 
Connecticut (Mr. Courtney).
  Mr. COURTNEY. Mr. Chair, again, I just want to join my colleague from 
Virginia (Mr. Wittman), and I look forward to working with him in the 
conference committee to make sure that that question is resolved.
  Both of us understand the issue and, again, I look forward to a 
satisfactory result, which would make the real gist of the amendment 
move forward, which is to make sure we have cable ship capacity to 
protect our Nation.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, I don't have any more speakers, 
so I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the distinguished 
gentleman from Nebraska (Mr. Fortenberry).
  Mr. FORTENBERRY. Mr. Chair, I want to thank Congressman Thornberry 
for the time as well as his leadership, as well as the chair of the 
Armed Services Committee, because this is very important.
  Recently, I was looking at the photos of the young men and women who 
hang on the wall of my office. They died in Iraq--some of them I knew; 
some of the families I knew, some I didn't know; some I still stay in 
touch with.
  At this point, we have lost so much, we have given so much, it is 
hard to understand why further engagement is necessary. And yet, of the 
many injustices that remain, one, particularly, stands out.
  The dark twisted idealogy of ISIS decimated the religious minority 
communities, primarily of northern Iraq, almost 4 million persons. ISIS 
attempted to exterminate, to kill off Yazidis, Christians, and other 
minority populations.
  Now, since then, the Iraqi Army, with our support and with the 
support of an international coalition, has fought hard and fought ISIS 
off. They are gone but not yet exterminated.
  We have shifted substantial economic aid, but there is one more thing 
we should do: provide security in northern Iraq through the integration 
of the religious minorities into the Iraqi Government security forces, 
as well as the Kurdish forces.
  I thank both the chair and the ranking member for their support.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, I have no further speakers, so I 
reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I have no further speakers, and I yield 
back the balance of my time.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, I urge support of the en bloc 
package, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. SCOTT of Virginia. Mr. Chair, I rise today in opposition to 
Amendment No. 47, which directs the Office of Management and Budget 
(OMB) to reclassify public safety telecommunications officers, also 
called 911 dispatchers, as a protective service occupation in the U.S. 
Government's Standard Occupational Classification (SOC) system. This 
Amendment would have no direct effect on these workers' wages, 
benefits, or other resources; proponents of this reclassification have 
stated that ``the benefit of reclassification is recognition and 
respect.''
  The SOC classification system is a federal statistical standard used 
across agencies in data collection. According to OMB, ``[t]he SOC is 
designed exclusively for statistical purposes.'' Changes to the codes 
affect multiple data sources frequently used by policymakers, 
researchers, and employers, including the American Community Survey, 
the nation's largest household survey; the Current Population Survey 
(CPS), the key source of our monthly employment numbers; and the 
Occupational Employment Statistics (OES), the authoritative source of 
employment and wage information by occupation.
  A standing committee at OMB, the SOC Policy Committee (SOCPC), is 
responsible maintaining the accuracy of these codes using well-defined 
principles. The SOCPC undertakes a routine revision of the codes 
roughly once per decade; the process spans multiple years and 
``involves extensive background research, periods of public comment, 
review of comments, and implementation of revisions.'' During its 
latest revision, which began in early 2012 and was finalized in 2018, 
OMB specifically rejected comments requesting it reclassify 911 
dispatchers as directed in Amendment No. 47. In its response to public 
comments presented in the May 2014 Federal Register, the Obama 
Administration's OMB explained it ``did not accept these 
recommendations based on Classification Principle 2, which states that 
workers are coded according to the work performed. The work performed 
is that of a dispatcher, not a first responder.'' In 2016, the previous 
administration's OMB declined a similar request for reclassification. 
Based on the principles OMB's policy committee applies to determine SOC 
codes, 911 telephone dispatchers are already properly and accurately 
classified.
  Furthermore, the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), in a written 
communication with the Education and Labor Committee on April 26, 2019, 
reported that the change made by H.R. 1629, a bill identical to 
Amendment No. 47, would ``impact computer systems, training, 
documentation, and other processes'' and that ``[s]uch unplanned 
changes require time and resources to implement and could adversely 
affect other survey activities.'' Moreover, changes outside of the 
routine revision process would undermine the goal of data continuity, 
limiting data sources' usefulness for their key purpose of statistical 
analysis; create precedent for disrupting the standard SOC revision 
process; and undermine the SOCPC's authority as experts to apply the 
classification principles to determine what accuracy requires.

[[Page H5631]]

  Public safety telecommunications officers perform critical, 
challenging work. They deserve our honor and gratitude for their 
efforts. However, considering the many alternative ways policymakers 
could confer ``recognition and respect,'' as the proponents are 
seeking, there is little policy justification for this Amendment's 
approach to achieving that goal. In conclusion, mandating a change to a 
statistical code would not affect these workers' wages, benefits, or 
other resources--but it would disrupt data series continuity; require 
significant additional work for government agencies, researchers, 
employers, and others; and intervene in an official, routine government 
data-collection and statistical process.

Communications of April 26, 2019 From the Bureau of Labor Statistics to 
   the Committee on Education and Labor Regarding H.R. 1629 (Same as 
                           Amendment No. 47)


                     Questions related to H.R. 1629

       1. How will H.R. 1629 impact the current population survey 
     and occupational employment statistics?
       2. H.R. 1629 would require the Office of Management and 
     Budget (OMB) to implement a change in the Standard 
     Occupational Classification (SOC) system regarding public 
     safety telecommunicators. This requirement would alter the 
     existing process for periodically reviewing and updating the 
     SOC, which involves extensive background research, periods of 
     public comment, review of comments, and implementation of 
     revisions.
       Federal statistical agencies, including the Bureau of Labor 
     Statistics (BLS) are currently in various stages of 
     implementing the 2018 revisions to the SOC (https://
www.bls.gov/soc/socimp.htm), which the Office of Management 
     and Budget released in a November 28, 2017 Federal Register 
     notice (https://www.bls.gov/soc/2018/soc2018final.pdf). In 
     particular, the Current Population Survey (CPS) and the 
     Occupational Employment Statistics (OES) program are actively 
     using the 2018 SOC and any changes to the SOC structure would 
     impact computer systems, training, and documentation as well 
     as the systems of federal and other data users downstream, 
     such as the BLS Employment Projections (EP) program and the 
     Employment and Training Administration's Occupational 
     Information Network (O*NET).
       The CPS is a monthly survey with a sample of 60,000 
     households. CPS occupational and industry data are coded 
     according to the most detailed level of the relevant 
     classification system possible, accounting for factors such 
     as disclosure concerns for small occupations and the ability 
     to code occupations based on the detail provided by household 
     respondents. This CPS occupational coding system closely 
     aligns with the SOC, but provides data on about 530 
     occupations, compared with 820 in the full SOC. The Census 
     Bureau is responsible for applying occupational codes. An 
     overview of how they are implementing the 2018 SOC is 
     outlined here https://www.census.gov/content/dam/Census/
library/working-papers/2019/demo/sehsdwp2019-19.pdf. 
     Therefore, there is no guarantee that even if this change 
     were to occur, the Census Bureau would code at that level of 
     detail.
       The OES program could make the needed changes. The data 
     would show changes in the employment and wages for major 
     groups affected by the change in classification.
       2. Will this bill have an impact on wage class service 
     contracts?
       BLS is not involved in wage setting for service contracts. 
     To the extent that any published BLS data are used in such 
     wage setting, any changes to those data could impact wages.
       3. Will implementing H.R. 1629 be difficult for the BLS to 
     do?
       BLS uses the SOC in several surveys. Any changes to the SOC 
     structure would impact computer systems, training, 
     documentation, and other processes. Such unplanned changes 
     require time and resources to implement and could adversely 
     affect other survey activities.
       4. Are there plans for a revision of occupational 
     classifications?
       The SOC is revised periodically, with the interagency SOC 
     Policy Committee making recommendations to OMB for changes. 
     OMB has not officially stated when the next SOC revision will 
     occur, although some indications are that the next SOC will 
     be for the year 2028. If they follow past practices, OMB is 
     likely to publish an initial Federal Register notice 
     soliciting public comment around 2024. Detailed information 
     on the revision process for 2018 is made available here, 
     including a document called ``Revising the Standard 
     Occupational Classification'' which provided detailed history 
     on the revision process and guidance on submission of 
     suggestions for changes for the 2018 SOC revision.
       5. What other consequences are there if H.R. 1629 is 
     implemented?
       Implementation of H.R. 1629 would alter the existing 
     process for periodically reviewing and updating the SOC, 
     which involves extensive background research, periods of 
     public comment, review of comments, and implementation of 
     revisions.
       The revision process includes solicitations of public 
     comment in the form of Federal Register notices. During the 
     lengthy and comprehensive SOC revision process, the SOC 
     Policy Committee establishes interagency workgroups charged 
     with reviewing comments received in response to Federal 
     Register notices and providing recommendations to the SOC 
     Policy Committee. Guided by the SOC classification principles 
     and coding guidelines, the SOC Policy Committee reviews the 
     recommendations from the workgroups and reaches decisions by 
     consensus. This work process is established to ensure that 
     the review is conducted in alignment with the 2018 SOC 
     classification principles and coding guidelines, which are 
     available starting on page 10 of the 2018 SOC User Guide 
     (https://www.bls.gov/soc/2018/soc_2018_user_guide.pdf).
       In response to the May 22, 2014, Federal Register notice, 
     the SOC Policy Committee received and reviewed six comments 
     regarding 9-1-1 dispatchers. These dockets were reviewed 
     simultaneously by the SOC Policy Committee and grouped under 
     docket 1-0199 Dispatchers, Public Safety Telecommunicators. 
     The full SOC Policy Committee response to docket 1-0199 is 
     available at: https://www.bls.gov/soc/2018/
soc_responses_May_2014.htm.
       In response to the July 22, 2016, Federal Register notice, 
     the SOC Policy Committee received and reviewed over 4,000 
     comments regarding 9-1-1 dispatchers. The full list of 
     comments is available here. For comments related only to 9-1-
     1 dispatchers, filter the subject column for ``Police, Fire, 
     and Ambulance Dispatchers.'' The Office of Management and 
     Budget (OMB) makes public comments available from https://
www.regulations.gov/document?D=OMB-2016-0006-0001.
       During the revision process for 2018, a guiding 
     classification principle was added to emphasize the 
     importance of maintaining time series continuity, to the 
     maximum extent possible. Modifications to the structure in 
     intervening years may be inconsistent with this principle.

  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendments en bloc offered 
by the gentleman from Washington (Mr. Smith).
  The en bloc amendments were agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 39 Offered by Mr. Takano

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 39 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. TAKANO. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 733, insert after line 15 the following:

     SEC. 1092. PAROLE IN PLACE FOR MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES.

       (a) In General.--Any alien who is a member of the Armed 
     Forces and each spouse, widow, widower, parent, son, or 
     daughter of that alien shall be eligible for parole in place 
     under section 212(d)(5) of the Immigration and Nationality 
     Act.
       (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) parole in place reinforces family unity;
       (2) disruption to servicemembers must be minimized, in 
     order to faithfully execute their objectives;
       (3) separation of military families must be prevented;
       (4) military readiness must be the supreme objective;
       (5) servicemembers are given peace of mind, relived of the 
     stressful burden worrying about their loved ones; and
       (6) Congress reaffirms parole in place authority for the 
     Secretary of Homeland Security.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Takano) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. TAKANO. Mr. Chair, I rise today in support of my amendment that 
would preserve parole in place for the loved ones of our Active-Duty 
servicemembers.
  Parole in place allows military family members who have come to the 
United States illegally and are unable to adjust their immigration 
status to temporarily remain in the country.
  My amendment would preserve the parole in place program and reaffirm 
the DHS Secretary's authority to keep families together and to minimize 
disruption to our servicemembers through this vital program.
  Now, under parole in place, a servicemember and their prospective 
spouse, widow, widower, parent, son, or daughter is eligible for 
temporary protection under the Immigration and Nationality Act. This 
program is imperative to ensuring our troops are free of the burden 
that their loved ones will be subjected to deportation while they 
dutifully serve our Nation.
  The current administration is interested in scaling back the program, 
further waging a war against immigrants. Ending parole in place would 
be detrimental to the troops and the fabric of our Nation.
  Regardless of military branch, all servicemembers should be granted

[[Page H5632]]

peace of mind that their families are safe at home while they risk 
their lives abroad.
  Deployments are tough enough on our military families to endure, 
conflated with the looming shadow of deportation, the emotional toll is 
simply unbearable. Our troops must be consistently prepared and focused 
on protecting our freedoms. The least we can do is to protect their 
families.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. KELLY of Mississippi. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. KELLY of Mississippi. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  Mr. Chairman, this is an attempt to codify a 2013 USCIS memo 
establishing parole in place for unlawful aliens, spouses, children, 
and parents of Active-Duty forces.
  While I support the underlying rationale behind this amendment and 
also that policy, I cannot support this because it is too vague, broad, 
and ambiguous, and it does not accomplish the purpose for which it is 
intended. The purpose is to protect those servicemembers.
  Mr. Chairman, I will tell you what this does is we don't even ask the 
servicemember if they want that person here. So if the person is a 
victim of domestic violence, escaping a spouse who is following them, 
there is no provision to even ask the spouse: Do you want this person 
to be living close to you that you are trying to escape?
  It does not take into account any underlying crimes that that person 
may or may not have committed. Whether it is domestic violence, sexual 
battery, it puts the other servicemembers at risk when we don't.
  Mr. Chairman, specifically, the memo provided that these relatives or 
anyone who has ever served in the U.S. Armed Forces for any period of 
time, with or without regard to whether the discharge was honorable or 
dishonorable, is eligible to receive parole on a categorical basis.
  Mr. Chairman, we can't honor folks who have been dishonorably 
discharged. We are not honoring the rest of our soldiers when we honor 
just anyone.

                              {time}  1630

  In a 2013 meeting with the Obama administration, USCIS admitted that 
the servicemember is never contacted to determine whether he or she 
wants the unlawful aliens to receive parole in place.
  It admitted there is no process in place to verify that the 
servicemember actually served in the Armed Forces.
  The USCIS admitted that parole in place could be granted even if the 
servicemember was dishonorably discharged.
  It admitted that the servicemember could have felony convictions and 
his or her immediate relatives would still be eligible for parole in 
place.
  These felony convictions could be for domestic violence, sexual 
assault, all the things that we have come to despise and are trying to 
stamp out in our Armed Forces.
  USCIS admitted that, even in cases of divorce, a servicemember's ex-
spouse could be eligible for parole in place, and it admitted that 
unlawful alien relatives could still receive parole in place despite a 
past criminal record.
  This amendment does not fix any of those issues and could allow a 
relative, even if estranged from a servicemember, to be granted parole.
  Mr. Chair, I ask my colleagues to oppose this amendment, and I 
reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. TAKANO. Mr. Chair, I wish to respond to a couple of points that 
my colleague has tried to make.
  I want to stress that eligibility for this program does not mean 
finality. The Secretary of Homeland Security still retains final 
authority over whether parole in place will be granted.
  This is a program that is administered on a case-by-case basis and 
not categorically. This program has been in place for 9 years.
  I appreciate that my colleague has said that he agrees with the 
underlying policy. The underlying policy is that we want to give peace 
of mind to the men and women of our military who are laying their lives 
on the line for our country while their undocumented relatives at home 
may be under threat of deportation.
  We want to give them the peace of mind that their families could 
stay, with the final decision, on a case-by-case basis, being made by 
the Secretary of Homeland Security. Nothing is categorically mandated 
in my amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. KELLY of Mississippi. Mr. Chairman, I continue to oppose. Like I 
said, it is overly vague and broad. With the right words added to this, 
this could be something that works and that is helpful. But, in its 
current form, I can't support it.
  Mr. Chair, I continue to ask my colleagues to oppose this amendment, 
and I reserve the balance of my time.
  I have no further speakers, so when the gentleman is ready to close, 
I am ready to close.
  Mr. TAKANO. Mr. Chair, I have no further speakers, and I am prepared 
to close as well.
  Mr. KELLY of Mississippi. Mr. Chairman, I thank Mr. Takano, my friend 
from California, for entering this amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I do continue to oppose this amendment. But with that I 
just ask that he look at making it a little more finite and making it a 
little less vague, and with that I could support this amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. TAKANO. Mr. Chairman, let me just say that I believe that I have 
answered the main concerns of the gentleman from Mississippi.
  As I said, nothing in this amendment categorically says that 
eligibility means finality in terms of who is finally adjudicated to 
actually remain on a temporary basis, under temporary protected status.
  What this amendment does is what the gentleman has agreed to is the 
underlying policy, which is a humane policy, which is a policy that 
furthers the national interests of our country in assuring the peace of 
mind of our military servicemembers who have family members in our 
country who are undocumented.
  I don't think any American would begrudge someone who is putting 
their life on the line having the peace of mind that their family 
members are in this country under temporary protected status and that 
they are judged to have that status by the Secretary of Homeland 
Security on a case-by-case basis and that the Secretary remains in full 
control of the final decision.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Takano).
  The amendment was agreed to.


         Amendment No. 44 Offered by Mr. Ted Lieu of California

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 44 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of subtitle E of title X, insert the following:

     SEC. 10__. LIMITATION ON USE OF FUNDS FOR REIMBURSEMENT OF 
                   EXPENSES AT CERTAIN PROPERTIES.

       (a) Limitation.--None of the funds made available for the 
     Department of Defense may be obligated or expended to the 
     following properties or to an entity with an ownership 
     interest in such property:
       (1) Trump Vineyard Estates.
       (2) Trump International Hotel & Tower, Chicago.
       (3) Mar-A-Lago Club.
       (4) Trump Grande Sunny Isles.
       (5) Trump Hollywood.
       (6) Trump Towers Sunny Isles.
       (7) Trump Plaza New Jersey.
       (8) Trump International Hotel, Las Vegas.
       (9) The Estates at Trump National.
       (10) 610 Park Avenue, New York City.
       (11) Trump International Hotel & Tower, New York.
       (12) Trump Palace.
       (13) Trump Parc.
       (14) Trump Parc East.
       (15) Trump Park Avenue.
       (16) Trump Park Residences, Yorktown.
       (17) Trump Place.
       (18) Trump Plaza, New Rochelle.
       (19) Trump Soho, New York City.
       (20) Trump Tower at City Center, Westchester.

[[Page H5633]]

       (21) Trump Tower, New York City.
       (22) Trump World Tower.
       (23) Trump Parc, Stamford.
       (24) Trump International Hotel and Tower, Waikiki Beach 
     Walk.
       (25) Trump Towers, Istanbul Sisli.
       (26) Trump Ocean Club.
       (27) Trump International & Tower Hotel, Toronto.
       (28) Trump Tower at City Century City, Makati, Philippines.
       (29) Trump Tower, Mumbai.
       (30) Trump Towers, Pune.
       (31) Trump Tower, Punta Del Este, Uruguay.
       (32) Trump International Hotel & Tower, Vancouver.
       (33) 40 Wall Street, New York City.
       (34) 1290 Avenue of the Americas, New, York City.
       (35) Trump International Hotel, Washington
       (36) 555 California Street, San Francisco.
       (37) Trump Tower, Rio de Janeiro.
       (38) Trump International Golf Links & Hotel, Doonbeg, 
     Ireland.
       (39) Trump National Doral, Miami.
       (40) Trump Ocean Club, Panama City, Panama.
       (41) Albemarle Estate at Trump Winery, Charlottesville, 
     Virginia.
       (42) Trump International Golf Links, Scotland.
       (43) Trump National Golf Club, Bedminster.
       (44) Trump National Golf Club, Charlotte.
       (45) Trump National Golf Club, Colts Neck.
       (46) Trump International Golf Links, Ireland.
       (47) Trump Golf Links at Ferry Point, New York.
       (48) Trump National Golf Club, Hudson Valley.
       (49) Trump National Golf Club, Jupiter.
       (50) Trump National Golf Club, Los Angeles.
       (51) Trump International Golf Club, West Palm Beach.
       (52) Trump National Golf Club, Philadelphia.
       (53) Trump International Golf Club, Dubai.
       (54) Trump World Golf Club, Dubai.
       (55) Trump Turnberry, Scotland.
       (56) Trump National Golf Club, Potomac Falls, Virginia.
       (57) Trump National Golf Club, Westchester.
       (b) Waiver.--The President may issue a waiver to the 
     limitation under subsection (a) for costs incurred with 
     respect to the properties listed above if the president 
     reimburses the Department of the Treasury for the amount of 
     the cost associated with the expense.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Ted Lieu) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chair, the President ran for office 
on a promise of draining the swamp. He, in fact, personally has done 
exactly the opposite.
  My amendment is very simple. It simply prevents the President from 
profiting off of his own trips to his own properties.
  As you can imagine, when the President travels, he brings a large 
staff with him--for security, for press, for logistics, for other 
reasons--and then the American taxpayer ends up paying for the meals 
and lodging expenses of everyone associated with that trip.
  Up to this date, President Trump has spent 270 days at properties 
that he owns. Every time he does that, he or his family profits. That 
includes 99 days at Mar-a-Lago, 21 days at Trump International Hotel in 
D.C., 74 at Trump National Hotel Bedminster, and 59 days at Trump 
National Hotel Potomac.
  The General Accounting Office reports that the President spends an 
average of 3.4 million in taxpayer dollars every time he travels just 
to Mar-a-Lago.
  Not content to profit from the American taxpayer, the President has 
also, in fact, raised prices at his properties, at Mar-a-Lago and at 
Trump International Hotel in D.C. So, now, taxpayers are paying even 
more for lodging expenses associated with his staff.
  My amendment limits the use of Department of Defense funds at Trump-
owned properties, and it also includes a waiver where the President can 
still stay at these properties; he just has to reimburse the Treasury 
for the amount that the taxpayer is paying for his staff to stay there.
  Mr. Chair, with that, I respectfully request an ``aye'' vote, and I 
reserve the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. Members are reminded to refrain from engaging in 
personalities toward the President.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Colorado is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  We have had this discussion on emoluments, and I hope that my 
colleague saw the newspaper today. Here is the newspaper, The 
Washington Times, front page: ``Court rejects lawsuit over Trump 
business. Maryland, D.C. slammed down.''
  So, the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals has said one of the lawsuits 
out there is baseless.
  But there is actually more going on here. This is kind of an 
embarrassing amendment. I am sorry that we are even debating this. This 
is a blatantly political amendment.
  We are supposed to be here talking about providing the equipment and 
the training for our men and women in uniform, so they can preserve and 
save and keep our country secure, and this is just an attempt to 
embarrass the President.
  It is a political amendment. It is really not worthy of discussion in 
the National Defense Authorization Act, and I don't think we should be 
wasting our time on this. It is really not worthy of the American 
people either.
  Let me give an example on how silly and how ridiculous this amendment 
is. According to the language of this amendment, if the President goes 
to one of these properties and stays, like Mar-a-Lago down in Florida, 
I guess he could have Secret Service. They are not paid out of DOD 
dollars. They are paid out of Homeland Security dollars. But he 
couldn't take the people with him who carry the nuclear football or the 
communications people who keep him in touch with the command and 
control of our nuclear enterprise if, God forbid, there was some kind 
of crisis or emergency.
  This has not been thought out. It is totally ridiculous. Who would 
want to put a President of the United States through that kind of 
jumping through hoops and obstacles to fulfill his duties as Commander 
in Chief?
  I think it is ridiculous. It is not worthy of us.
  Mr. Chair, I urge a ``no'' vote, and I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chair, the gentleman across the aisle 
has mischaracterized this amendment.
  All of his staff can still travel with him. The President just has to 
reimburse the cost if it is at his own property, or he can choose to 
stay at a Ritz Carlton or a Holiday Inn or any other commercial 
property that he does not own.
  Mr. Chair, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman from Maryland (Mr. 
Raskin).
  Mr. RASKIN. Mr. Chair, ridiculous, ludicrous, absurd, all of this, 
right?
  Well, I guess the Constitution is absurd because the Founders of the 
Constitution took pains to build not one but two Emoluments Clauses 
right into the text of the Constitution.
  Article I, section 9, clause 8 says that no one who comes to work in 
this room, nor the President of the United States, can collect any 
present emolument--which means any payment--office or title of any kind 
whatever--the most absolute, categorical language you will find in the 
Constitution--of any kind whatever from a foreign prince, king, or 
government, without the consent of Congress.
  That is number one.
  Then, number two, in the domestic Emoluments Clause, the Founders 
wrote in that the President was limited to his salary, which could be 
neither increased nor decreased by this.
  My friend is waving the newspaper, and I can't wait to get to refute 
his point. He is going to have to read a little more deeply into 
judicial opinions if he is going to cite them on the floor of the House 
of Representatives, because this decision was simply that Maryland and 
the District of Columbia, whose attorneys general came forward to say 
that the President's receipt of emoluments at the Trump Hotel was 
damaging local business, did not have standing; and the court said it 
is up to Congress to decide this because they didn't have standing, as 
States, to hear it.

  It was not on the merits of the case, if you go back and look. It was 
about whether they had standing to bring it.
  We have got the standing because the Constitution of the United 
States says

[[Page H5634]]

that we are the ones whose consent is required before the President can 
decide to get rich in office.
  The Founders wrote a Constitution where the President and everybody 
in this room is supposed to be 100 percent loyal and faithful to the 
people of the United States of America, not to foreign governments.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chair, I yield the gentleman from 
Maryland an additional 30 seconds.
  Mr. RASKIN. This President spent 270 days at Trump-owned properties.
  Think about that for a second. What if Barack Obama had not only 
taken the press corps and the government with him to Martha's Vineyard, 
but made everybody stay at the Obama Hotel and he directed the 
government to spend taxpayer moneys at the Obama Hotel in Martha's 
Vineyard?
  There would be a revolution over on that side of the aisle.
  That is what is happening right here. Every time that President Trump 
goes to Mar-a-Lago, they are spending $60,000, estimated by the GAO, 
every weekend that they take government resources down there. And we 
pay it.
  It is wrong, and it is against the Constitution.
  Mr. Chair, I am totally in favor of this amendment.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chairman, how much time is remaining on each side?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Colorado has 3 minutes 
remaining. The gentleman from California has 1\1/4\ minutes remaining.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chair, I will make one brief comment and then yield 
the remainder of my time to the gentleman from Ohio.
  The President isn't in this to get rich. He has given up his salary.
  Mr. Chair, with that, I would like to yield the balance of my time to 
the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Gibbs).
  Mr. GIBBS. Mr. Chairman, since the beginning of this year, so much of 
our time in this Chamber has been used to move one messaging bill after 
another.
  Many of these bills are thinly-veiled attacks on the President, but 
this amendment goes above and beyond.
  Under this amendment, the Department of Defense is prohibited from 
staying at any property owned by President Trump or his family.
  To be clear, this is not a prohibition on the Department of Defense 
utilizing facilities owned by any President; this amendment is about 
Donald Trump, President Donald Trump. It explicitly names the President 
over 50 times. Fifty times in this amendment the President is named.
  This amendment says the DOD can't do for President Trump what it does 
for every President in the past: facilitate Presidential travel.
  This is a new low. In 2016, the GAO found the Department of Defense 
spent more than $2.8 million facilitating a 4-day trip for President 
Obama, which included a Florida vacation.
  While the bulk of the Department of Defense's spending on 
Presidential travel is airfare, the Federal employees who are staffing 
the trip need to eat and sleep.
  When you travel with President Obama, you can eat and sleep wherever 
is most convenient and most cost-effective, but when you travel with 
President Trump, you had better pack a sandwich and a sleeping bag, 
because you can't buy a hot meal or reserve a hotel room because 
everything is usually so full.
  This is an unreasonable restriction on the DOD and on this 
administration.
  The focus on who owns the facility instead of which facility meets 
the needs and mission of the Department is disgraceful.
  A number of people travel with the President and the Cabinet, and 
they need the flexibility to choose the best facilities. Placing 
unnecessary restrictions on these choices for political motivations 
impedes the Department's mission.
  As was just stated by my colleague from Colorado, this President 
donates his presidential salary to charity.
  And he doesn't have time to worry about what the Department of 
Defense is doing because he is making America better.

                              {time}  1645

  We have the lowest unemployment in decades. We have got wages going 
up. We have got a strong economy.
  He is working on trade deals. He is fighting for every worker out 
there, every farmer, every business; and I don't think he really has 
time; and it is about time that the other side of the aisle moves on 
and realizes who is the President of the United States, and the great 
things that are happening in this country, and not doing such juvenile 
tactics of restricting the Department of Defense to where they can go; 
because this would also include an employee of the Department of 
Defense not being able to use the expense account if something comes 
up.
  He has got assets all around the world. It might be more applicable 
to be at a Trump facility. He has got things in Istanbul, the 
Philippines, all around the world, and you never know. We shouldn't tie 
the hands of the Department of Defense. It is up to them to make those 
decisions, and not for us to put ridiculous restrictions on.
  So I sincerely urge defeat of this amendment for many of the reasons 
I simply have said. In the standards of this body, this is the lowest 
standard. We have gone to a new low.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chair, Department of Defense 
employees should not be staying at high-priced hotels.
  I yield 45 seconds to the gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Beyer).
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I strongly support my friend, Mr. Lieu's 
amendment.
  The Constitution bans the very self-dealing behavior that we are 
seeing this President engage in on a regular basis. President Trump 
illegally profits every time he and his staff visits his properties, 
every time he hosts foreign and domestic officials, every time he plays 
golf on his golf courses, all paid for by the American taxpayers.
  We are setting a dangerous precedent while those seeking influence 
and favor with the Trump administration merely spend more time at his 
properties with his name on them.
  Let's take a significant step to counteract the self-dealing, corrupt 
behavior, by banning taxpayer funds flowing through the Department of 
Defense to go into the President's pockets.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chair, I yield the balance of my time 
to the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. Cohen).
  Mr. COHEN. Mr. Chair, I just want to add my support to this. We have 
added these prohibitions on three other bills that have come through 
here, State, and Foreign Operations; Commerce, Justice, and Science; 
and Financial Services and General Government.
  It is in the Constitution. Moneys are not supposed to be spent there, 
and this is wrong. The country will go on with them staying at Hiltons 
or, as Mr. Lieu said, Ritz Carltons, or Holiday Inns, or even Red Roof 
Inns.
  I just say that this is the right thing to do, and I add my name as a 
supporter.
  Mr. TED LIEU of California. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Ted Lieu).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. GIBBS. Mr. Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 45 Offered by Mr. Raskin

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 45 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. RASKIN. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of subtitle E of title X, insert the following:

     SEC. 10__. LIMITATION ON USE OF FUNDS FOR EXHIBITION OF 
                   PARADE OF MILITARY FORCES AND HARDWARE FOR 
                   REVIEW BY THE PRESIDENT.

       None of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act 
     or otherwise appropriated for Fiscal Year 2020 for the 
     Department of Defense may be obligated or expended for any 
     exhibition or parade of military forces and hardware, with 
     the exception of the display of small arms and munitions 
     appropriate for customary ceremonial honors and for the 
     participation of military

[[Page H5635]]

     units that perform customary ceremonial duties, for review by 
     the President in a public or private exercise outside of 
     authorized military operations or activities.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from Maryland (Mr. Raskin) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Maryland.
  Mr. RASKIN. Mr. Chairman, I rise to offer an amendment that will save 
the American taxpayers millions of dollars, restore the appropriate 
focus of the July Fourth holiday as a universal, nonpartisan 
celebration of our Nation's independence, and ensure that taxpayer 
money is spent for public, nonpartisan purposes, not private, personal, 
and partisan ones.
  This amendment will ban military parades and shows organized at the 
personal request of the President that serve no other governmental or 
military purpose.
  What happened this last Fourth of July was a shameful, extravagant, 
and profligate display of quasi-monarchical pageantry which delighted 
the President and the political guests that he brought in on special 
tickets, but no one else.
  This year's July Fourth celebration, at the President's insistence, 
featured seven flyovers of 24 different military aircraft, including B-
2s, F-22s, F-35s, displays of ceremonial units, mobilization of tanks 
and other military equipment, all on the National Mall, an 
unprecedented Presidential speech in front of the Lincoln Memorial on 
the Fourth of July, and hundreds of thousands of dollars of fireworks 
that generated so much smoke that the fireworks could barely be seen by 
the people sitting on the Mall.
  And all of that was inspired by the President's observation of a 
similar military display when he was in Paris for Bastille Day.
  And guess who pays the price for all this? The taxpayers do. That is 
right. The National Park Service was forced to divert $2.5 million in 
park fees to help cover the costs for this event.
  The Washington Post estimated that the combined hourly rate of the 
seven flyovers of military aircraft, the B-2 Stealth Bomber, the F-22 
Raptors, and the F-35 Lightnings, would have cost at least $560,000 per 
hour. $560,000 per hour.
  The Defense Department said this week that it used money from the 
military services' training budgets to pay for these demonstrations 
ordered by the President's whim, and spent additional funds to 
transport the military equipment, which shut down traffic in Washington 
D.C. for most of the day.
  Just yesterday, we learned the District of Columbia spent $1.7 
million, an amount that, combined with police expenses for the 
demonstrations through the weekend, has wiped out funding intended to 
protect the Nation's Capital.
  And now the President is saying he wants to do it all over again next 
year on the Fourth of July, and into the foreseeable future. We 
obviously cannot allow that to happen.
  This amendment will save all of our money. It will depoliticize the 
Fourth of July, and call us back to its original, honorable purposes 
and the way we have always celebrated; and it will send a message to 
the executive branch that the Federal Government serves the people, not 
one person.
  We have no kings here. We have no queens. We have no monarchs. We 
have no royal pageantry.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. Members are reminded to refrain from engaging in 
personalities toward the President.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to this amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Colorado is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Just like the last amendment, this is not worthy of us as a body. We 
should be here debating the National Defense Authorization Act; how to 
equip and train our men and women in uniform so they can protect our 
country.
  This is a blatant, cheap shot against the President. It is just a 
political potshot, and it is really not worthy of us as a body.
  This is a very poorly-written amendment, on top of all that. I think 
we would all agree, we shouldn't have political displays by a 
Commander-in-Chief, or anyone in the government, for that matter, where 
public dollars are involved.
  But what about patriotic displays? Is there anything wrong with that?
  Let me give you a couple of examples of things that would be 
prohibited by this poorly-written amendment.
  Every year, you have the Army, Navy, and Air Force playing football 
against each other for the Commander's Cup. And especially when the Air 
Force and Navy play each other, they have these flyovers. They each 
have wonderful aviation capabilities, and they will do a flyover of the 
stadium, whether it is in Annapolis, or in my district in Colorado 
Springs.
  This is written so broadly, you couldn't have any kind of 
authorized--any kind of--where's the word--exhibition. You could have 
no exhibition of military arms.
  So if the President was attending that football game, you couldn't 
have the flyover. How silly is that?
  Or if a President goes to a change of command down at Fort Bragg, 
something like that, you couldn't have the military vehicles present 
there that would be present normally at a change of command.
  Mr. Chairman, those are just a couple of examples of how poorly 
written this amendment is.
  So I would say, let's reject it. Let's get serious. Let's get back to 
the business of talking about what our men and women in uniform need, 
and not take these silly potshots against the President.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. RASKIN. Mr. Chair, the hardworking men and women of the Armed 
Services certainly don't need a bunch of ceremonial pageantry paid for 
by the taxpayers simply because the President decides, upon a 
monarchical whim, that he wants to see one outside in front of the 
Lincoln Memorial.
  The gentleman from Colorado says that this is too broadly written. On 
the contrary, it is very specifically written. It would still permit 
ceremonial displays of units that have been traditionally used at 
ceremonies and events, such as the Presidential Salute Battery, the Old 
Guard, the Fife and Drum Corps, Blue Angels, Thunderbirds, and so on.
  What it will not permit is the President himself calling up for a 
private or public exercise outside of authorized military operations or 
activities, these kinds of exhibitions or parades.
  So if it is traditional, if it is something that the Army and the 
Navy have always done, if they think that there is a legitimate 
governmental function for it, yeah.
  But the President cannot simply snap his fingers and say I want to 
have some kind of display of all the military weaponry because that is 
what I saw when I was on the Champs Elysees, and I saw them on Bastille 
Day marching down the street.
  We know, and he has admitted publicly, that this was the genesis of 
the whole thing. He saw that, and he wanted that in America.
  Well, guess what? That is not how we celebrate the Fourth of July in 
America; and we certainly don't do it with Defense Department dollars, 
and we certainly don't do it with taxpayer dollars.
  If the President is so generous that he gives his salary back, even 
though he is collecting millions of dollars from all of the government 
expenditures down at the Trump Hotel and the Trump golf courses, and 
all of the foreign governments that are spending money over at the 
Trump Hotel--if he is so generous, then why doesn't he pay for it 
himself?
  The taxpayers should not have to pay for such a ludicrous display of 
the President's own vanity.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. Members are again reminded to refrain from engaging 
in personalities toward the President.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chairman, how much time is remaining on each side?
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Colorado has 3 minutes 
remaining. The gentleman from Maryland has 15 seconds remaining.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Gohmert), who is a member of the Committee on Oversight and 
Reform.

[[Page H5636]]

  

  Mr. GOHMERT. Mr. Chairman, I know my friend from Maryland to be a 
very smart person.
  But I also know, I was around when--and I had a 4-year Army 
commitment--when we went from draft to having all-volunteer. And I said 
back at the time, well, this means we are going to have to spend a lot 
of money recruiting, encouraging people, advertising to get people to 
join the military.
  In recent years, there has been so much anti-American sentiment, and 
polls are showing that it has been rising, that that does have an 
effect on recruiting.
  I was out there, it was a fantastic--it rained. That brought the 
temperature down, but it was fantastic. And I have already heard about 
two young people who said, I saw that on television. I was thinking 
about the military. I am now not thinking about it; I am joining.
  Now, just so you know--let's see, we spend, between the Army Active 
Duty and the Army Reserve, Army National Guard, Air Force Active Duty, 
Air Force Reserve, Air National Guard, Navy Active Duty, Navy Reserve, 
Marine Corps Active Duty and Marine Corps Reserve, actually $662 
million in 2015, but only $574 million in 2017. So it had been down 
from where it was in 2015. But this costs the military, it is projected 
around $1.2 million.
  I cannot imagine a more effective use of that money for showing 
people what they can be a part of if they join in the defense of this 
country.
  And, heck, when I was in the Army for 4 years, we had displays, 
Congressmen, Senators, they would show up, and we would have a parade 
for them.
  It seems kind of ridiculous to say we hate this President so badly, 
any Member of Congress, any Senator, you can go have a parade for you, 
but not the President. The President can't call up and say I am coming 
down; how about a parade; because under the language the gentleman has 
read, he can't ask for anything like that.
  He is the Commander in Chief of all of the military; and even in 
Washington's day, it was a good thing for the President to have a 
parade, to encourage people to build up American, pro-American 
sentiment.
  So it is not a bad thing, it is a good thing. This was money well-
spent. I can't imagine a better use of military funding. And the Park 
Services Director said, it was a boon for them. So it was a good use, 
and I would encourage a ``no'' vote on the amendment.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1700

  Mr. RASKIN. Mr. Chairman, I yield 15 seconds to the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Beyer).
  Mr. BEYER. Mr. Chairman, I would just like to add a personal 
perspective.
  I was raised in Washington, D.C., and I remember fondly my father and 
mother packing the six kids in the station wagon with the blankets, but 
it was never a partisan affair. It was about Democrats and Republicans 
and families in our Nation.
  I had hundreds and hundreds of my constituents at the Lincoln 
Memorial say that this was the most egregious display of personal ego 
they have ever seen.
  Mr. RASKIN. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Maryland (Mr. Raskin).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chairman, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Maryland 
will be postponed.


                Amendment No. 46 Offered by Mr. Huffman

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 46 
printed in part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. HUFFMAN. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of subtitle H of title X, insert the following:

     SEC. __. LANDS TO BE TAKEN INTO TRUST AS PART OF THE 
                   RESERVATION OF THE LYTTON RANCHERIA.

       (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
       (1) The Lytton Rancheria of California is a federally 
     recognized Indian tribe that lost its homeland after its 
     relationship to the United States was unjustly and unlawfully 
     terminated in 1958. The Tribe was restored to Federal 
     recognition in 1991, but the conditions of its restoration 
     have prevented it from regaining a homeland on its original 
     lands.
       (2) Congress needs to take action to reverse historic 
     injustices that befell the Tribe and that have prevented it 
     from regaining a viable homeland for its people.
       (3) Prior to European contact there were as many as 350,000 
     Indians living in what is now the State of California. By the 
     turn of the 19th century, that number had been reduced to 
     approximately 15,000 individuals, many of them homeless and 
     living in scattered bands and communities.
       (4) The Lytton Rancheria's original homeland was purchased 
     by the United States in 1926 pursuant to congressional 
     authority designed to remedy the unique tragedy that befell 
     the Indians of California and provide them with reservations 
     called Rancherias to be held in trust by the United States.
       (5) After the Lytton Rancheria lands were purchased by the 
     United States, the Tribe settled on the land and sustained 
     itself for several decades by farming and ranching.
       (6) By the mid-1950s, Federal Indian policy had shifted 
     back towards a policy of terminating the Federal relationship 
     with Indian tribes. In 1958, Congress enacted the Rancheria 
     Act of 1958 (72 Stat. 619), which slated 41 Rancherias in 
     California, including the Lytton Rancheria, for termination 
     after certain conditions were met.
       (7) On August 1, 1961, the Federal Government terminated 
     its relationship with the Lytton Rancheria. This termination 
     was illegal because the conditions for termination under the 
     Rancheria Act had never been met. After termination was 
     implemented, the Tribe lost its lands and was left without 
     any means of supporting itself.
       (8) In 1987, the Tribe joined three other tribes in a 
     lawsuit against the United States challenging the illegal 
     termination of their Rancherias. A Stipulated Judgment in the 
     case, Scotts Valley Band of Pomo Indians of the Sugar Bowl 
     Rancheria v. United States, No. C-86-3660 (N.D.Cal. March 22, 
     1991), restored the Lytton Rancheria to its status as a 
     federally recognized Indian tribe.
       (9) The Stipulated Judgment provides that the Lytton 
     Rancheria would have the ``individual and collective status 
     and rights'' which it had prior to its termination and 
     expressly contemplated the acquisition of trust lands for the 
     Lytton Rancheria.
       (10) The Stipulated Judgment contains provisions, included 
     at the request of the local county governments and 
     neighboring landowners, that prohibit the Lytton Rancheria 
     from exercising its full Federal rights on its original 
     homeland in the Alexander Valley.
       (11) In 2000, approximately 9.5 acres of land in San Pablo, 
     California, was placed in trust status for the Lytton 
     Rancheria for economic development purposes.
       (12) The Tribe has since acquired, from willing sellers at 
     fair market value, property in Sonoma County near the Tribe's 
     historic Rancheria. This property, which the Tribe holds in 
     fee status, is suitable for a new homeland for the Tribe.
       (13) On a portion of the land to be taken into trust, which 
     portion totals approximately 124.12 acres, the Tribe plans to 
     build housing for its members and governmental and community 
     facilities.
       (14) A portion of the land to be taken into trust is being 
     used for viniculture, and the Tribe intends to develop more 
     of the lands to be taken into trust for viniculture. The 
     Tribe's investment in the ongoing viniculture operation has 
     reinvigorated the vineyards, which are producing high-quality 
     wines. The Tribe is operating its vineyards on a sustainable 
     basis and is working toward certification of sustainability.
       (15) No gaming shall be conducted on the lands to be taken 
     into trust by this section.
       (16) No gaming shall be conducted on any lands taken into 
     trust on behalf of the Tribe in Sonoma County after the date 
     of the enactment of this Act.
       (17) By directing that these lands be taken into trust, the 
     United States will ensure that the Lytton Rancheria will 
     finally have a permanently protected homeland on which the 
     Tribe can once again live communally and plan for future 
     generations. This action is necessary to fully restore the 
     Tribe to the status it had before it was wrongfully 
     terminated in 1961.
       (18) The Tribe and County of Sonoma have entered into a 
     Memorandum of Agreement as amended in 2018 in which the 
     County agrees to the lands in the County being taken into 
     trust for the benefit of the Tribe in consideration for 
     commitments made by the Tribe.
       (b) Definitions.--For the purpose of this section, the 
     following definitions apply:
       (1) County.--The term ``County'' means Sonoma County, 
     California.
       (2) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
     of the Interior.
       (3) Tribe.--The term ``Tribe'' means the Lytton Rancheria 
     of California.
       (c) Lands to Be Taken Into Trust.--
       (1) In general.--The land owned by the Tribe and generally 
     depicted on the map titled ``Lytton Fee Owned Property to be 
     Taken into Trust'' and dated May 1, 2015, is hereby taken 
     into trust for the benefit of the Tribe, subject to valid 
     existing rights, contracts, and management agreements related 
     to easements and rights-of-way.

[[Page H5637]]

       (2) Lands to be made part of the reservation.--Lands taken 
     into trust under paragraph (1) shall be part of the Tribe's 
     reservation and shall be administered in accordance with the 
     laws and regulations generally applicable to property held in 
     trust by the United States for an Indian tribe.
       (d) Gaming.--
       (1) Lands taken into trust under this section.--Lands taken 
     into trust for the benefit of the Tribe under subsection (c) 
     shall not be eligible for gaming under the Indian Gaming 
     Regulatory Act (25 U.S.C. 2701 et seq.).
       (2) Other lands taken into trust.--Lands taken into trust 
     for the benefit of the Tribe in Sonoma County after the date 
     of the enactment of this Act shall not be eligible for gaming 
     under the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act (25 U.S.C. 2701 et 
     seq.).
       (e) Applicability of Certain Law.--Notwithstanding any 
     other provision of law, the Memorandum of Agreement entered 
     into by the Tribe and the County concerning taking land in 
     the County into trust for the benefit of the Tribe, which was 
     approved by the County Board of Supervisors on March 10, 
     2015, and any addenda and supplement or amendment thereto, is 
     not subject to review or approval of the Secretary in order 
     to be effective, including review or approval under section 
     2103 of the Revised Statutes (25 U.S.C. 81).

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Huffman) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. HUFFMAN. Mr. Chairman, this amendment is simple. It reflects a 
bill that passed the House earlier this year in March by a vote of 404-
21.
  I first introduced this bill in the 114th Congress. It was heard by 
the Natural Resources Committee, reported out favorably by unanimous 
consent. It was then reintroduced in the next Congress by my colleague 
Representative Jeff Denham, and it passed the House by voice vote. Then 
it was reported by the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs in October of 
2018. The bill was reintroduced again by me this Congress, and after 
passage in this House, it once again was reported out favorably from 
the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs just a few weeks ago.
  This amendment would take land owned by the Lytton Rancheria in 
Sonoma County in my district into trust as part of the Tribe's 
reservation for purposes of housing and economic development. It would 
permanently prohibit using these lands for casino gaming, and it would 
uphold a memorandum of understanding carefully negotiated between the 
Tribe and the County of Sonoma. It reflects an exhaustive stakeholder 
outreach process, extensive meetings, and negotiations between the 
Tribe, Sonoma County, and other local governments.
  This productive relationship is illustrated by support from the 
Sonoma County Board of Supervisors, who have jurisdiction over the land 
in question, and also the nearest local public service agencies, 
including the Windsor Fire Protection District and Windsor Unified 
School District. Even California Governor Gavin Newsom is in support of 
this bill. In fact, there is no elected official in the area that is 
impacted by this bill who is on record opposed to the bill.
  So I urge adoption of the amendment, and I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition for 
the process of what we are doing, not necessarily the substance of the 
amendment at hand.
  Since this bill had first been heard in our committee, there have 
been new voices that have been raised by the people of Windsor, 
California, which is the town located adjacent to the unincorporated 
area of the county in which this land transfer would take place. These 
residents have repeatedly contacted our committee asking that their 
voices simply be heard.
  Now, for whatever the reason was, we asked the committee to have one 
more hearing and allow these voices to actually be heard. For whatever 
reason, the majority on our committee decided to silence the voices and 
just ram this bill through the committee. The reason I and several 
others voted against it in committee and on the floor was simply 
because of the process that went through here.
  This, as has been mentioned, is not necessarily a new amendment. It 
is a bill, a bill that has passed this House and is sitting over in the 
Senate.
  It is certainly my hope that this does not portend a future in which 
those who make the agenda of the House consider the fact that the 
Democratic House will so incomparably and infrequently work with a 
Republican Senate that we now need to take every bill that has been 
passed in the House and turn it into another amendment and then attach 
it to the next big bill that happens to go through this process. 
Certainly, that is not what I think would be the best way going 
forward.
  Now, the last reason, the process for which I do object, is simply 
this bill does not belong on a National Defense Authorization Act. 
There is no defense nexus. This is transferring of lands from one area 
to Native Americans.
  Now, heaven knows, I have had all sorts of land issues and wildlife 
issues on the NDAA, but in each one of those there was a nexus to a 
training range, a military mission. There is no connection with this 
particular bill.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HUFFMAN. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman for his concerns.
  I won't relitigate the issue of whether the amendment is made in 
order. That has been decided. That is why we are here.
  With respect to the gentleman's concerns about local individuals who 
may have expressed opposition to the bill--and again, there is no 
official opposition, no local government agency, no local elected 
officials, but some individuals in the area have opposed the bill--I 
would just note, in the 115th Congress, when then-Chairman Bishop of 
the Natural Resources Committee supported the bill passing out of his 
committee and passing on the floor, the committee report itself noted 
those same individual voices of opposition.
  I will quote: ``Lastly, the committee has received a relatively large 
number of communications from the residents of Windsor in opposition to 
the bill.''
  There is no new opposition to this bill. It is the same individuals, 
and it is the same folks who the chairman at the time, himself, noted.
  So I would submit, Mr. Chairman, there is nothing new here. This bill 
has previously won broad bipartisan support, including from my friend 
from Utah, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HUFFMAN. Mr. Chairman, this amendment was culled out from the en 
bloc amendments. I am still not entirely clear why, but I think, to the 
extent that it deserves to be singled out and culled out, it is because 
it is a model for other land-to-trust bills that we sometimes see in 
this body. Rarely will you find a case where a Tribe negotiated more 
exhaustively in good faith and produced actual agreements with local 
government neighbors to the standard and to the level that we see 
in this case.

  This is a good piece of legislation broadly supported by the elected 
officials in the area and, in many cases, having already won the strong 
bipartisan support from Members in both the House and the United States 
Senate. I urge a ``yes'' vote, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BISHOP of Utah. Mr. Chairman, however one wants to spin whatever 
issue is here, had the Democratic majority on the committee scheduled 
another hearing to allow those voices to be heard, I wouldn't have 
objected then, nor would I have objected right now.
  The sad part is this is not necessarily the best of proposals. The 
checkerboard pattern that is created by this amendment is something in 
other amendments we have tried to do, to consolidate and get rid of 
checkerboard patterns and not create checkerboard patterns.
  But here is, still, the bottom line: This establishes a precedent--
this is not a precedent. We have done it before. But it establishes the 
wrong approach.
  The National Defense Authorization Act should be about military stuff 
and about the defense of this Nation. This is not even a tangible 
concept. This is something that has nothing to do with it. We do have a 
partisan Rules Committee that has decided to lure some people with 
partisan amendments to be

[[Page H5638]]

put in here, but it has nothing to do with the actual bill.
  We are going through a whole lot of amendments and taking a whole lot 
of time on the floor. The amendments to the NDAA should have something 
to do with the NDAA and not just pulling wandering bills that go all 
over the place and deciding to shove it on it just because there is a 
vehicle that happens to be going through this body.
  That is why I said I am not talking about the substance of the bill--
although there are some questions; I would have had my questions 
answered had there been another hearing for the new voices that want to 
be heard--but it is the process that we are going through. The process 
here is wrong. The process the Rules Committee did was wrong.
  We should not be talking about these kinds of issues and taking our 
time on these kinds of issues on an NDAA bill. So, as I said, my 
opposition is purely on process, and I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Huffman).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in part B of House Report 
116-143 on which further proceedings were postponed, in the following 
order:
  Amendment No. 32 by Mr. Blumenauer of Oregon.
  Amendment No. 33 by Mr. Blumenauer of Oregon.
  Amendment No. 34 by Ms. Frankel of Florida.
  Amendment No. 44 by Mr. Ted Lieu of California.
  Amendment No. 45 by Mr. Raskin of Maryland.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the time for any electronic vote 
after the first vote in this series.


               Amendment No. 32 Offered by Mr. Blumenauer

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Oregon 
(Mr. Blumenauer) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 15-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 164, 
noes 264, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 454]

                               AYES--164

     Adams
     Amash
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Courtney
     Cummings
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Himes
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Massie
     Matsui
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Speier
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Vargas
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--264

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Aguilar
     Allen
     Allred
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Axne
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bera
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brindisi
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cisneros
     Cline
     Cloud
     Clyburn
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davids (KS)
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     Delgado
     Demings
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fletcher
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Golden
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Gottheimer
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Haaland
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (AR)
     Hill (CA)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Johnson (TX)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kim
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kirkpatrick
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamb
     Lamborn
     Langevin
     Latta
     Lee (NV)
     Lesko
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Mast
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McEachin
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Mullin
     Murphy
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     O'Halleran
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Panetta
     Pence
     Perry
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouda
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Ruppersberger
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spanberger
     Spano
     Stanton
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stevens
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Suozzi
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Torres Small (NM)
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Veasey
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Wexton
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Cardenas
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen
     San Nicolas
     Underwood

                              {time}  1740

  Mrs. BUSTOS, Messrs. PHILLIPS, VEASEY, CORREA, Ms. JOHNSON of Texas, 
Messrs. COSTA, CISNEROS, CLYBURN, LIPINSKI, CRIST, SUOZZI, HIGGINS of 
New York, CROW, SCOTT of Virginia, BROWN of Maryland, and Mrs. DEMINGS 
changed their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Messrs. CARBAJAL, NORCROSS, and KRISHNAMOORTHI changed their vote 
from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


               Amendment No. 33 Offered by Mr. Blumenauer

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Oregon 
(Mr. Blumenauer) on which further proceedings were postponed and on 
which the noes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.

[[Page H5639]]

  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 198, 
noes 229, not voting 11, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 455]

                               AYES--198

     Adams
     Allred
     Amash
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brownley (CA)
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cohen
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Massie
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roy
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Vargas
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--229

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Aguilar
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Axne
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brindisi
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (MD)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cisneros
     Cline
     Cloud
     Clyburn
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Craig
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crist
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     Delgado
     Demings
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fletcher
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Golden
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Gottheimer
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Haaland
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lawson (FL)
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Luria
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McEachin
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Moulton
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Panetta
     Pence
     Perry
     Peters
     Peterson
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Ruppersberger
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Spanberger
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Swalwell (CA)
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Torres Small (NM)
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Veasey
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--11

     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     Johnson (GA)
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen
     San Nicolas
     Smucker
     Underwood


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1746

  So the amendment was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated against:
  Mr. SMUCKER. Mr. Chair, I was unavoidably detained. Had I been 
present, I would have voted ``nay'' on rollcall No. 455.


                Amendment No. 34 Offered by Ms. Frankel

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Florida 
(Ms. Frankel) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 215, 
noes 214, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 456]

                               AYES--215

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose (NY)
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--214

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Axne
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brindisi
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cisneros

[[Page H5640]]


     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Cooper
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Gottheimer
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Hill (CA)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamb
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Lipinski
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Luria
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Moulton
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Panetta
     Pence
     Perry
     Peterson
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouda
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sherrill
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen
     San Nicolas
     Underwood


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1752

  Ms. SHERRILL and Mr. GAETZ changed their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


         Amendment No. 44 Offered by Mr. Ted Lieu of California

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California 
(Mr. Ted Lieu) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 223, 
noes 205, answered ``present'' 1, not voting 9, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 457]

                               AYES--223

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--205

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crow
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kim
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamb
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Luria
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McAdams
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Peterson
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sherrill
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                        ANSWERED ``PRESENT''--1

       
     Amash
       

                             NOT VOTING--9

     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen
     San Nicolas
     Underwood


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1756

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 45 Offered by Mr. Raskin

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Maryland 
(Mr. Raskin) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This is a 2-minute vote.

[[Page H5641]]

  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 221, 
noes 207, not voting 10, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 458]

                               AYES--221

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Amash
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Peters
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sablan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--207

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brindisi
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kim
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Luria
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McAdams
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Peterson
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose (NY)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Sherrill
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Slotkin
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spanberger
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Torres Small (NM)
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--10

     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Higgins (LA)
     Jordan
     Norton
     Perlmutter
     Plaskett
     Radewagen
     San Nicolas
     Underwood


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1800

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 48 Offered by Mr. Pappas

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 48 printed in 
part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. PAPPAS. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of subtitle B of title III insert the following:

     SEC. 3__. PFAS DESIGNATION, EFFLUENT LIMITATIONS, AND 
                   PRETREATMENT STANDARDS.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 30 days after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Administrator of the Environmental 
     Protection Agency shall revise the list of toxic pollutants 
     described in paragraph (1) of section 307(a) of the Federal 
     Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1317(a)) to add per- 
     and polyfluoroalkyl substances to such list, and publish such 
     revised list, without taking into account the factors listed 
     in such paragraph.
       (b) Effluent Standards.--As soon as practicable after the 
     date on which the revised list is published under subsection 
     (a), but not later than January 1, 2022, the Administrator 
     shall publish in the Federal Register effluent standards 
     under section 307(a)(2) of the Federal Water Pollution 
     Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1317(a)(2)) for substances added to 
     the list of toxic pollutants pursuant to subsection (a) of 
     this section, in accordance with sections 301(b)(2)(A) and 
     304(b)(2) of such Act.
       (c) Pretreatment Standards.--Not later than January 1, 
     2022, the Administrator shall promulgate pretreatment 
     standards for per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances under 
     section 307(b) of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 
     U.S.C. 1317(b)).

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman from New 
Hampshire (Mr. Pappas) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New Hampshire.
  Mr. PAPPAS. Mr. Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chair, I offer this amendment on behalf of all the children and 
families across our Nation who have been impacted by the harmful 
effects of PFAS contamination.
  As of August 2017, the Department of Defense identified over 400 
Active and BRAC installations in the United States where there ``is a 
known or suspected release of PFOS/PFOA.''
  The Environmental Working Group estimates that 475 industrial 
facilities may be discharging PFAS directly into bodies of water, some 
of which are used as a drinking water source. It also estimates that 
more than 100 million Americans may be drinking PFAS-tainted water.
  This should be concerning to all of us because science has linked 
PFAS with developmental delays for children and serious health 
conditions, including cancer, immune system disorders, and thyroid 
problems.
  To date, however, the EPA has yet to act to set standards under the 
Clean Water Act. That is why this amendment is needed.
  In my home district in New Hampshire, we are grappling with this 
issue in a number of communities. In the town of Merrimack, industrial 
pollution from a manufacturer has contaminated drinking water that 
thousands relied on. At Pease Air Force Base on the seacoast, PFAS 
chemicals have been used by the military for decades and have been 
detected in the surrounding environment as well as private and 
municipal wells.
  My constituents have become far too familiar with the impacts of 
living in communities where these toxic chemicals are present. This is 
more than just a matter of tests, data sets, and parts per trillion in 
the abstract. The burdens of these chemicals are carried by real 
people. I hear their stories firsthand.
  A woman who has taken an active role on the front lines of this fight 
and who contacted my office recently

[[Page H5642]]

worked at Pease Air Force Base for almost 10 years. Her son was exposed 
to PFAS prenatally and for 5 years while attending preschool and 
kindergarten by drinking water from an affected well. He was sick often 
as a child, and his mother has ongoing concerns about his health and 
immune system stemming from that early exposure. Not only is her family 
dealing with these physical impacts, they are dealing with the 
uncertainty and lingering questions about the facts and difficulty with 
testing and diagnosis, and they are left to wonder if and when things 
may get worse.
  It is for reasons like this that I have been committed to advocating 
for families like these in my district and why I have joined the 
bipartisan PFAS task force to help come up with solutions.
  While there are countless questions we must answer, due to the 
relentless work of advocates, community leaders, and concerned 
citizens, the all too pervasive issue of PFAS contamination has been 
brought to light.
  The dedicated work of family, friends, and neighbors banding together 
to ask questions and demand answers has been critical, but it is time 
for much more than just that. It is time for us in Congress to take 
long-overdue action. It is time for us to push for stronger standards, 
invest in cleanup, and improve protections for those who have suffered 
from the effects of contamination.
  Today, with the support of my colleagues, we can do just that. This 
amendment takes a critical step in holding polluters accountable and 
establishing proactive limits for PFAS discharge as we work to curtail 
contamination and support families who have been exposed.
  By adding PFAS to the Clean Water Act's list of toxic pollutants and 
requiring EPA to set standards for discharges into our Nation's waters, 
we are providing the EPA with the additional tools it needs to tackle 
these toxic chemicals.
  There is nothing more important than safeguarding the health and 
well-being of our communities.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to vote for the adoption of this 
amendment, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SHIMKUS. Mr. Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Illinois is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. SHIMKUS. Mr. Chair, if this amendment were limited to the 18 per- 
and polyfluorinated compounds that EPA knows about and has rendered a 
judgment on, we would be having a different debate. Formulations like 
PFOA and PFOS, for example, have been studied and have already been 
taken out of commercial use.
  But this amendment, like others we will be debating, emotionally and 
politically requires severe action on an entire class of chemicals, 
maybe as many as 5,000 substances. It does so without due diligence and 
scientific inquiry.

  Nobody denies that there are real concerns and frustration in 
communities affected by PFAS contamination. My colleague has raised 
those concerns, and we certainly want to help those communities, 
especially those that host our soldiers, sailors, airmen, and marines. 
The use of firefighting foam in those areas has caused PFAS to enter 
into ditches and canals and seep into groundwater formations.
  But while we can and should take action to limit or even prohibit 
uncontrolled releases of PFAS-containing firefighting foam, we can't 
lose sight of why this foam is used in the first place. If you or your 
loved one are on a nuclear submarine that is carrying nuclear weapons 
under the Arctic icecap or involved in a fiery aircraft accident on the 
runway, you want the best firefighting foam available, not the second 
best.
  The concern of these communities needs to be addressed, but this is 
not what is happening in this process.
  Many of the compounds targeted by these amendments are parts of 
manufactured goods that when disposed of are not soluble in water.
  Let me highlight a couple that have been approved by the Food and 
Drug Administration to be inserted into the human body as medical 
devices. Yes, lifesaving PFAS-related chemicals have been approved by 
the FDA. They are in medical devices and have been approved to be 
inserted into the body.
  Mr. Chair, to the ranking member and to the chairman, the reason for 
the importance of going through regular order in the committee process 
is because we understand the chemicals. We deal with healthcare.
  As far as lifesaving equipment, we are going to go through a couple 
of those. Many recognize what a stent is. This stent is there to open 
up arteries, and it saves lives and allows people to live a normal 
lifestyle.
  This is one that was brought into my office a couple of weeks ago. 
Many more children than we would ever guess are born with holes in 
their heart. It is tough, but modern medicine and technology have 
allowed these children to lead and live normal lives.
  How? Well, there is a medical device that is part of these 5,000 
compounds of the PFAS community that saves these children's lives and 
allows the heart to repair itself, and they go on to live a normal 
life.

                              {time}  1815

  This is a National Defense Authorization bill, not a healthcare bill, 
not a chemical, science, EPA bill. So let's look at national defense.
  Here is the F-16, with all the components that have per- or poly-
fluorinated compounds as part of the F-16 platform. Do we really want 
to essentially ban all these parts that would eventually go into some 
landfill, and they are not soluble, and create a Superfund situation 
for the landfill into which they go?
  We have heard a lot from municipal landfills that are disposing of 
legal nonsoluble items in regulated landfills. Do we really want to 
place farm land under the Superfund designation because a farmer used 
wastewater treatment sludge as a fertilizer?
  That is why we must do our due diligence and go through regular order 
through the committee of jurisdiction.
  I serve as the ranking member on the Committee on Environment and 
Climate Change. It is our duty to have oversight over the USEPA; it is 
our duty to protect our communities; and it is our responsibility not 
to overreact.
  Chairman Tonko and I are actively engaged on this issue. As I have 
raised this, it is very complicated, but it is not impossible.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to reject these shortcuts and allow 
the committee process to work. That is the only way we can hope to 
address PFAS concerns without the significant unintended consequences 
this and these other amendments would create. Please vote against the 
amendment. Please allow bipartisan discussions to continue.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. PAPPAS. Mr. Chair, to close, I think it is critical that we give 
EPA the ability to set standards that are reasonable for PFAS that 
would protect public health.
  In passing this amendment, we can ensure that our government can meet 
its most basic guaranty: that everyone--servicemembers, their families, 
and civilians, alike--can have confidence that the water we drink, the 
natural environment all around us, is clean and safe. This amendment 
will ensure EPA sets standards for these toxic pollutants to protect 
public health and the safety of all Americans. It is beyond time for us 
and Congress to act to take serious action on PFAS, and I urge adoption 
of this amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from New Hampshire (Mr. Pappas).
  The amendment was agreed to.


           Amendment No. 49 Offered by Ms. Lee of California

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 49 printed in 
part B of House Report 116-143.
  Ms. LEE of California. Mr. Chair, I rise to offer amendment No. 49 as 
the designee of Mr. Khanna.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Strike section 1504 and insert the following:

     SEC. 1504. OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE.

       (a) In General.--Funds are hereby authorized to be 
     appropriated for fiscal year 2020 for the use of the Armed 
     Forces and other activities and agencies of the Department of

[[Page H5643]]

     Defense for expenses, not otherwise provided for, for 
     operation and maintenance, as specified in the funding table 
     in section 4302.
       (b) Reduction.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in 
     the funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in this section for operations and maintenance 
     for overseas contingency operations, as specified in the 
     funding table in section 4302, is hereby reduced by 
     $16,800,000,000.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentlewoman from 
California (Ms. Lee) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from California.
  Ms. LEE of California. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Pelosi), the Speaker of the House.
  Ms. PELOSI. Mr. Chair, I thank the gentlewoman from California for 
yielding and commend her for her extraordinary leadership in having a 
purpose and a mission to our national security. Her leadership on 
having an authorization for the use of military force has been 
unsurpassed in the Congress, and I thank her. I know she will have 
amendments to that effect this legislation, as well.
  Mr. Chair, I want to salute so many members of the Armed Services 
Committee, starting with Chairman Smith, for his relentless efforts to 
advance this strong bipartisan defense authorization legislation which 
honors the values of our country, strengthens our security, and 
advances America's leadership in the world.
  One week after our Nation celebrated the birth of our democracy, the 
Democratic House is proudly honoring that oath, the oath we take to 
support and defend the Constitution and to protect the American people. 
The Democratic majority is bringing forth responsible budgeting needed 
for safe, strong, and smart defense.
  This legislation keeps America strong with vital action to improve 
the economic security and well-being of our servicemembers and 
families, including a much-needed pay raise.
  It keeps America safe with critical steps to promote collaboration 
with our allies, harden our defenses against hostile foreign powers, 
and meet the challenges of the future, including the climate crisis, 
which is a national security issue.
  And it keeps America smart by reaffirming Congress' constitutional 
oversight responsibility over the President's military actions, 
including by prohibiting funding for the deployment a new low-yield 
nuclear missile warheads.
  We applaud Representative Ro Khanna and the many bipartisan 
cosponsors for their amendment to prohibit Federal funds from being 
used for any military force against Iran without congressional 
authorization.
  As I rise to support the bill, I also rise to support Mr. Khanna's 
amendment.
  The bill--getting back to the bill--also is about family. It is about 
survivor benefits. It protects children at the border who are facing an 
appalling situation that is beyond the pale of civilized behavior.
  I always say the same thing when people ask me what are the three 
most important issues facing the Congress. I say the same thing: the 
children, the children, the children.
  This legislation prohibits Department of Defense funds from being 
used to House unaccompanied children forcibly separated from their 
parents or legal guardian by Customs and Border Protection near the 
border or a port of entry. And it creates oversight, requiring DOD to 
submit a certification that any housing provided to unaccompanied 
children meets Department of Homeland Security standards, including 
those provided in the Flores settlement.
  We must take every action we can at every opportunity we find to end 
this situation of the children and improve the health, safety, and 
well-being of the children in custody.
  In coming weeks, we will advance Congresswoman Escobar's legislation 
to bring more accountability to the Department of Homeland Security and 
medical care standard legislation, led by Congressman Ruiz, to ensure 
the health and safety of children and/or adults in custody.
  We support our Members who have led visits to the Border Patrol 
stations to find the facts and who are leading the battle cry of action 
on behalf of America's values about what we stand for.
  So I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on this important 
legislation. Keep America strong. It is about a pay raise for our 
troops, survivor benefits, about protecting our children, in addition 
to, again, helping us honor our oath of office to protect and defend. I 
urge a strong bipartisan vote for this bill to uphold our values and 
strengthen America.
  Mr. Chair, I again thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself 2 minutes.
  Mr. Chairman, we have had a number of speakers over the course of the 
last 2 days talk about that this bill provides a pay raise. I just want 
to clarify that it does not.
  There is an existing formula which provides the military a 3.1 
percent pay raise. If we do nothing, they still get a 3.1 percent pay 
raise.
  Now, in the past, sometimes the Obama administration, for example, 
recommended a lower pay raise. Sometimes in Congress we have enacted a 
higher pay raise than the formula would require.
  But the key point is 3.1 percent is what the formula is. This bill 
does not change that in any way. If the bill passes, if it doesn't 
pass, the pay raise still goes in.
  I think the Speaker just indicated that she supported the amendment 
we are discussing now. Let's be clear. The bill before us cuts $17 
billion from the President's request. The amendment before us cuts 
another $16 billion from that.
  So all the folks who have come here and said it is not too much, it 
is not too little, it is just right, they have to vote against this 
amendment because this cuts an additional $16 billion.
  What is the effect of this $16 billion? It decimates counterterrorism 
operations around the world. All of this cut comes from operations and 
maintenance within the OCO, the overseas contingency account. That 
means we do not do as much to fight terrorists overseas.

  It hurts our ability, as another example, to train and help the 
Ukrainians fight the aggression that is occurring on their soil. Lots 
of people talk about standing up to the Russians. This amendment takes 
away the biggest factor in Ukraine that is helping push back against 
the Russian-backed insurgents. It decimates support for the Afghan 
security forces.
  Whether you think Americans should be there or not, we are trying to 
help you. Afghans defend themselves. This amendment takes that away.
  Real consequences in the real world, I think this amendment finally 
gets to where the direction of this bill is headed. Members should 
oppose it.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. LEE of California. Mr. Chair, I am pleased to offer this 
amendment with Representatives Khanna, DeFazio, Omar, and Pressley.
  What this amendment would do is freeze fiscal year 2020 defense 
spending in the NDAA to 2019 levels by reducing the overseas 
contingency operations account by $16.8 billion.
  Now, by restoring defense spending to the levels authorized in last 
year's NDAA, this increase would be even more modest than the $700 
billion top-line figure publicly embraced by the President just 9 
months ago before he reversed course and requested an outrageous $750 
billion.
  Mr. Chair, just last year, the Department of Defense failed its first 
ever agencywide audit, something that I have long called for, along 
with my colleague Representative Burgess.
  I want to thank Chairman Smith for including our bipartisan language 
on audit readiness to ensure that the DOD is acting to address waste, 
fraud, and abuse at the Pentagon and ensure that it has a plan in place 
so it can pass an unqualified audit.
  If the Department of Defense cannot even keep track of its current 
funding, it is truly outrageous that Congress would reward the Pentagon 
with a massive spending increase. This amendment is simply about 
reining in the bloated Pentagon budget.
  At the minute-by-minute level, American taxpayers are already 
spending nearly $2 billion a day at the fiscal

[[Page H5644]]

2019 NDAA enacted levels this amendment seeks to cut funding to.
  The $16.8 billion to the top-line funding level, what this amendment 
would do would require the fund to fund 6.8 million Head Start slots 
for 1 year, 1.63 million veterans receiving VA medical care for 1 year, 
and providing 7 million low-income children healthcare for 1 year.
  Acting White House Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney called OCO a slush 
fund and a sham when he served in Congress, and there is growing 
bipartisan support urging Congress to significantly cut OCO. That is 
why I urge ``yes'' on this critical amendment to rein in our out-of-
control defense spending.
  Mr. Chair, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Oregon (Mr. 
DeFazio), my colleague.
  Mr. DeFAZIO. Mr. Chair, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  Can you say ``slush fund''? OCO is basically a slush fund.
  The idea was, oh, we went to war--more than a decade ago--and we 
couldn't anticipate the expenses, so Congress passed an overseas 
contingency account. It is not very well supervised by Congress, and as 
you heard earlier, the Pentagon can't even account for the funds that 
go in there.
  But now, here we are. We can certainly anticipate what is going on 
next year and the year after with the Pentagon. Why isn't it going 
through the regular process within the Pentagon budget and with full 
scrutiny by the United States Congress and, God forbid, maybe even 
auditable? Imagine that.
  The only agency of the Federal Government which is unable to pass an 
audit is the Pentagon.
  About a decade ago, I got an amendment on the floor to require an 
audit, but it got taken out in a conference committee. What are they 
afraid of in accounting for the dollars they get? And this is the least 
accountable of all the dollars they get.
  This is a modest reduction, and it would restore funding to the 2019 
levels. You should vote for this amendment.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the distinguished 
gentleman from Colorado (Mr. Lamborn).
  Mr. LAMBORN. Mr. Chairman, if you care about our warfighters who are 
in theater tonight, this is the worst possible cut that we could give 
the Department of Defense.
  This says that overseas operations, where they are actually in places 
like Afghanistan or Syria or Iraq, we are going to take the dollars 
they are using to operate and stay safe and get the job done, and we 
are whacking one-third off of that budget. We are taking a meat-cleaver 
approach, not a scalpel. This is a meat-cleaver approach.
  Besides the things that the chairman mentioned that would be cut 
working with allies, intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
would be cut, ISR.

                              {time}  1830

  When our commanders have forces going out on a patrol, those patrols 
want overhead observation before them, over them, behind them. That is 
the kind of thing directly cut by this amendment.
  When the troops come back, and the equipment has to be refurbished 
and reset, that is cut by this amendment.
  Mr. Chair, this is a very poorly thought out amendment, and I would 
urge everyone to vote ``no.''
  Ms. LEE of California. Mr. Chairman, this is a modest approach that 
would ensure that Congress doesn't reward the Pentagon with even more 
money after it failed its first agency-wide audit last year.
  Recent polling shows that a majority of the public does not want 
defense spending increased. Nearly three-quarters of Americans would 
not support more of their tax dollars going to the Pentagon.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on this critical 
amendment, and we must move forward and at least begin to control this 
out-of-control defense spending and support this amendment. I ask for 
an ``aye'' vote.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Florida (Mr. Waltz).
  Mr. WALTZ. Mr. Chairman, this cut to the Overseas Contingency 
Operations budget, to the operations and maintenance account, is an 
attempt to back us out of the war on terror.
  We all want peace. We all want these wars to go away, but that 
doesn't mean we can just wish them away, that we can just cut an 
account by over a third and wish these wars away like the Obama 
administration tried to do in Iraq.
  The reality is we can either fight these wars in places like Kabul 
and Kandahar and Damascus and Baghdad, or this problem, particularly 
the terrorism problem, the extremism problem, will follow us home to 
places like Kansas City, San Bernardino, Orlando, New York, and others.
  It is irresponsible, in the midst of a war--and I remind my 
colleagues that we are in the midst of a war--to tie the Pentagon's 
hands by cutting these funds when we have special operators, as we 
speak today, as we are debating here today, in 72 countries, as we have 
more American servicemembers deployed overseas than the entire armies 
of the United Kingdom, Australia, and Canada combined, ensuring a 
liberal world order that has ensured the greatest period of prosperity 
since World War II that the world has ever known.
  Mr. Chair, this is an irresponsible amendment. We can have this 
debate over where we should be and how our servicemembers should be 
deployed, but to cut their funds in the middle of the war on terror and 
try to back us out of these wars because you disagree with them is the 
height of irresponsibility.
  We have a moral obligation to our servicemembers overseas. Mr. Chair, 
I urge my colleagues to oppose this amendment.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Lee).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Ms. LEE of California. Mr. Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from California will be 
postponed.


                 Amendment No. 50 Offered by Mr. Amash

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 50 printed in 
part B of House Report 116-143.
  Mr. AMASH. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of subtitle E of title X, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 10__. MODIFICATION AND REPEAL OF PROVISIONS RELATING TO 
                   MILITARY DETENTION OF CERTAIN PERSONS.

       (a) Disposition.--Section 1021 of the National Defense 
     Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-81; 10 
     U.S.C. 801 note) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (c), by striking ``The disposition'' and 
     inserting ``Except as provided in subsection (g), the 
     disposition''; and
       (2) by adding at the end the following new subsections:
       ``(g) Disposition of Persons Detained in the United 
     States.--
       ``(1) Persons detained pursuant to the authorization for 
     use of military force or the fiscal year 2012 national 
     defense authorization act.--In the case of a covered person 
     who is detained in the United States, or a territory or 
     possession of the United States, pursuant to the 
     Authorization for Use of Military Force or this Act, 
     disposition under the law of war shall occur immediately upon 
     the person coming into custody of the Federal Government and 
     shall only mean the immediate transfer of the person for 
     trial and proceedings by a court established under Article 
     III of the Constitution of the United States or by an 
     appropriate State court. Such trial and proceedings shall 
     have all the due process as provided for under the 
     Constitution of the United States.
       ``(2) Prohibition on transfer to military custody.--No 
     person detained, captured, or arrested in the United States, 
     or a territory or possession of the United States, may be 
     transferred to the custody of the Armed Forces for detention 
     under the Authorization for Use of Military Force or this 
     Act.
       ``(h) Rule of Construction.--This section shall not be 
     construed to authorize the detention of a person within the 
     United States, or a territory or possession of the United 
     States, under the Authorization for Use of Military Force or 
     this Act.''.
       (b) Repeal of Requirement for Military Custody.--
       (1) Repeal.--Section 1022 of the National Defense 
     Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2012 (Public Law 112-81; 10 
     U.S.C. 801 note).
       (2) Conforming amendment.--Section 1029(b) of such Act is 
     amended by striking ``applies to'' and all that follows 
     through

[[Page H5645]]

     ``any other person'' and inserting ``applies to any person''.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman from 
Michigan (Mr. Amash) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Michigan.
  Mr. AMASH. Mr. Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  The 2012 National Defense Authorization Act authorized the President 
to order the indefinite detention of American citizens arrested on U.S. 
soil without charge or trial.
  The NDAA says that:

       The Afghanistan AUMF, empowers the President to detain any 
     person who substantially supported associated forces of 
     terrorists.

  ``Substantial support'' and ``associated forces'' are not defined.
  Who could this cover? An American citizen living in Michigan makes a 
one-time donation to a nonviolent humanitarian group. Years later, the 
group commits hostile acts against an ally of the U.S. Under the 2012 
NDAA, if the President determines the group was associated with 
terrorists, the President is authorized to detain the donor 
indefinitely and without charge or trial.
  This compromise amendment guarantees that persons arrested on U.S. 
soil under the Afghanistan AUMF or the NDAA will be charged for their 
wrongdoing and will receive a fair trial. The government will be 
required to tell people detained on U.S. soil the allegations against 
them, and the government will have to make its case before a judge, 
just as the Constitution requires.
  President Obama pledged in signing the 2012 NDAA that he ``will not 
authorize the indefinite military detention without trial of American 
citizens,'' saying that to do so ``would break with our most important 
traditions and values. . . . ''
  But, Americans' constitutionally protected rights should not depend 
on Presidential promises or who is in charge. A free country is defined 
by the rule of law, not the government's whim.
  Mr. Chair, with that, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Texas is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, I have no other speakers other than 
myself, and I reserve the right to close.
  Mr. AMASH. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Washington (Mr. Smith), the chairman of the committee.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, this is an amendment that Mr. 
Amash, Ms. Lee, I, and others have worked on in previous years. It is a 
very simple principle.
  Certainly, with the 9/11 attacks, with the terrorism threat that we 
face, it is very real, and we need to make sure that our country is in 
a position to defend ourselves against that.
  But we also need to make sure that we protect the thing that gives us 
our greatest strength, and that is the rule of law in our Constitution. 
This amendment simply says you cannot use law of war detention against 
people in the United States of America.
  Our Article III courts have worked amazingly well throughout the 
history of this country. Through many conflicts and many threats, they 
worked very well to bring people to justice, lock them up, and protect 
us.
  In fact, there are hundreds of terrorists right now in U.S. prisons 
who were prosecuted under Article III of the Constitution.
  Article III and the history of the Supreme Court and other courts 
that have laid out the laws that give us the basic protections are 
essential to our liberty in this country.
  We can protect ourselves and maintain our basic liberties. That is 
what this amendment does.
  Mr. Chair, I appreciate Mr. Amash bringing it, and I urge support.
  Mr. AMASH. Mr. Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
California (Ms. Lee).
  Ms. LEE of California. Mr. Chair, I thank Mr. Amash for yielding me 
time and for his leadership on this issue.
  Let me also thank Chairman Smith for his tremendous leadership of the 
committee and for working with us on this critical amendment, as well 
as so many other amendments in this bill.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise in strong support of the Amash-Lee amendment to 
the National Defense Authorization Act.
  This amendment guarantees that persons arrested on U.S. soil under 
the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force or provisions under 
the 2012 NDAA will receive the due process that they deserve, as 
required by the Constitution.
  The 2012 NDAA codified worldwide detention authority that, as the 
ACLU said at the time, ``violates the Constitution and international 
law because it is not limited to people captured in an actual armed 
conflict, as required by the laws of war.''
  The Amash-Lee amendment would remedy that by repealing that provision 
and ensuring that we remain consistent with our fundamental values.
  Mr. Chairman, we should have no doubts that our Federal criminal 
courts can handle international terrorism cases, and indeed they have.
  The Department of Justice has charged, tried, and convicted more than 
200 defendants for international terrorism crimes in these very Federal 
courts.
  That is why I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on this critical 
amendment. I, again, want to thank Representative Amash and Chairman 
Smith for their leadership on this issue.
  Mr. AMASH. Mr. Chairman, may I ask how much time remains.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman from Michigan has 1 minute remaining.
  Mr. AMASH. Mr. Chairman, leaving these powers on the books is not 
only a dangerous threat to our civil liberties, but also undermines one 
of our strongest assets in trying suspected terrorists: Article III 
courts and domestic law enforcement.

  Since September 11, the Federal Government has successfully 
prosecuted hundreds of defendants charged with crimes related to 
international terrorism. Our Constitution works.
  Mr. Chairman, I want to thank my colleagues, Representative Barbara 
Lee and Chairman Smith, for joining me on this amendment. I urge all of 
my colleagues to support it, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Chairman, for some years now, there have been some people in the 
country who go around ginning up concern that Americans are going to be 
whisked out of their beds at night and taken to Guantanamo and left 
there indefinitely.
  This sort of scaremongering has been used to call attention to 
themselves. It has been used to raise money.
  As Chairman Smith noted, we have had some debates on this issue in 
the past. It had kind of died down when everybody realized that 18 
years after 9/11 it hadn't happened.
  Yet, there are still some out in the countryside who try to frighten 
people that, well, it could someday. Well, actually, it can't.
  Let me read three provisions, starting with the FY 2012 NDAA that 
said, ``Nothing in this section shall be construed to affect existing 
law or authorities relating to the detention of U.S. citizens, lawful 
resident aliens of the United States, or any other persons who are 
captured or arrested in the United States.''
  Now, that says nothing here affects any right of U.S. citizens or 
those captured or detained inside the United States. That was part of 
the law to begin with.
  Another part of the law to begin with says, ``The requirement to 
detain a person in military custody under this section . . . does not 
extend to citizens of the United States.''
  Well, we passed that in 2012. There were some concerns, so we come 
back the very next year and have a rule of construction that has been 
passed and signed into law.
  It says that:

       Nothing in that law or in the AUMF shall be construed to 
     deny the availability of the writ of habeas corpus or deny 
     any constitutional rights in a court ordained or established 
     by Article III of the Constitution for any person in the 
     United States when detained pursuant to an AUMF and who is 
     otherwise entitled to such writ or rights.

  So, we have belts, suspenders, ropes, pretty much anything you can 
think of, to make sure that no one inside the

[[Page H5646]]

United States, no U.S. citizen's constitutional right is affected. And 
it hasn't been. For 18 years this has not been a problem.
  So, I would suggest, Mr. Chairman, that it is not a problem now, that 
it is not something that we need to tinker with, especially with so 
many court decisions that have interpreted some of the legal issues 
related to detainees.
  In fact, we should push back against attempted scaremongering and 
reject this amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Michigan (Mr. Amash).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from Michigan will be postponed.

                              {time}  1845


      Amendments En Bloc No. 6 Offered by Mr. Smith of Washington

  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, pursuant to House Resolution 476, 
I offer amendments en bloc.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendments en bloc.
  Amendments en bloc No. 6 consisting of amendment Nos. 125, 126, 131, 
218, 251, 310, 382, 410, and 418, printed in part B of House Report 
116-143, offered by Mr. Smith of Washington:

         Amendment No. 125 Offered by Ms. Dean of Pennsylvania

       At the end of subtitle C of title VII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 7__. FUNDING FOR CDC ATSDR PFAS HEALTH STUDY INCREMENT.

       (a) Increase.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 1405 for the Defense Health Program, 
     as specified in the corresponding funding table in section 
     4501, for the CDC ATSDR PFAS health study increment is hereby 
     increased by $5,000,000.
       (b) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 301 for Operation and Maintenance, 
     Admin and Service-wide Activities, line 460, Office of the 
     Secretary of Defense, as specified in the corresponding 
     funding table in section 4301, is hereby reduced by 
     $5,000,000.


         Amendment No. 126 Offered by Ms. Dean of Pennsylvania

       Amend section 318 to read as follows:

     SEC. 318. REPLACEMENT OF FLUORINATED AQUEOUS FILM-FORMING 
                   FOAM WITH FLUORINE-FREE FIRE-FIGHTING AGENT.

       (a) Use of Fluorine-Free Foam at Military Installations.--
     Not later than January 31, 2023, the Secretary of the Navy 
     shall publish a military specification for a fluorine-free 
     fire-fighting agent for use at all military installations to 
     ensure such agent is available for use by not later than 
     December 31, 2024.
       (b) Prohibition on Use.--Fluorinated aqueous film-forming 
     foam may not be used at any military installation on or after 
     September 30, 2025, or before such date, if possible.
       (c) Waiver.--
       (1) In general.--Subject to paragraph (2), the Secretary of 
     Defense may grant a waiver to the prohibition under 
     subsection (b) with respect to the use of fluorinated aqueous 
     film-forming foam at a specific military installation if the 
     Secretary submits to the congressional defense committees, by 
     not later than 30 days prior to issuing the waiver--
       (A) notice of the waiver; and
       (B) certification, in writing, that the waiver is necessary 
     for the protection of life and safety.
       (2) Basis for waiver.--Any certification submitted under 
     paragraph (1)(B) shall document the basis for the waiver and, 
     at a minimum, shall include the following:
       (A) A detailed description of the threat justifying the 
     waiver and a description of the imminence, urgency, and 
     severity of such threat.
       (B) An analysis of potential populations impacted by 
     continued use of fluorinated aqueous film forming foam and 
     why the waiver outweighs the impact to such populations.
       (C) An analysis of potential economic effects, including 
     with respect to agriculture, livestock, and water systems of 
     continued use of fluorinated aqueous film forming foam and 
     why the waiver outweighs such effects.
       (3) Limitation.--A waiver under this subsection shall apply 
     for a period that does not exceed one year. The Secretary may 
     extend any such waiver once for an additional period that 
     does not exceed one year.


         amendment no. 131 offered by mrs. dingell of michigan

       Page 150, after line 5, insert the following new section:

     SEC. 324. PROHIBITION ON PERFLUOROALKYL SUBSTANCES AND 
                   POLYFLUOROALKYL SUBSTANCES IN MEALS READY-TO-
                   EAT FOOD PACKAGING.

       (a) Prohibition.--Not later than October 1, 2020, the 
     Director of the Defense Logistics Agency shall ensure that 
     any food contact substances that are used to assemble and 
     package meals ready-to-eat (MREs) procured by the Defense 
     Logistics Agency do not contain any perfluoroalkyl substances 
     or polyfluoroalkyl substances.
       (b) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Perfluoroalkyl substance.--The term ``perfluoroalkyl 
     substance'' means a man-made chemical of which all of the 
     carbon atoms are fully fluorinated carbon atoms.
       (2) Polyfluoroalkyl substance.--The term ``polyfluoroalkyl 
     substance'' means a man-made chemical containing a mix of 
     fully fluorinated carbon atoms, partially fluorinated carbon 
     atoms, and nonfluorinated carbon atoms.


          amendment no. 218 offered by mr. kildee of michigan

       At the end of subtitle B of title III, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 3__. COMPTROLLER GENERAL STUDY ON PFAS CONTAMINATION.

       (a) Study Required.--The Comptroller General of the United 
     States shall conduct a review of the efforts of the 
     Department of Defense to clean up per- and polyfluoroalkyl 
     substances (in this section referred to as ``PFAS'') 
     contamination in and around military bases as well as the 
     Department's efforts to mitigate the public health impact of 
     the contamination.
       (b) Elements.--The study required by subsection (a), shall 
     include the following:
       (1) An assessment of--
       (A) when the Department of Defense discovered that drinking 
     water sources used by members of the Armed Forces and 
     residents of communities surrounding military bases were 
     contaminated with PFAS;
       (B) after learning that the drinking water was 
     contaminated, when the Department of Defense notified members 
     of the Armed Forces and residents of communities surrounding 
     military bases that their drinking water is contaminated with 
     PFAS;
       (C) after providing such notification, how much time lapsed 
     before those affected were given alternative sources of 
     drinking water;
       (D) the number of installations and surrounding communities 
     currently drinking water that is contaminated with PFAS above 
     the EPA's advisory limit;
       (E) the amount of money the Department of Defense has spent 
     on cleaning up PFAS contamination through the date of 
     enactment of this Act;
       (F) the number of sites where the Department of Defense has 
     taken action to remediate PFAS contamination or other 
     materials as a result of the use of firefighting foam on 
     military bases;
       (G) factors that might limit or prevent the Department of 
     Defense from remediating PFAS contamination or other 
     materials as a result of the use of firefighting foam on 
     military bases;
       (H) the estimated total cost of clean-up of PFAS;
       (I) the cost to the Department of Defense to discontinue 
     the use of PFAS in firefighting foam and to develop and 
     procure viable replacements that meet military 
     specifications; and
       (J) the number of members of the Armed Forces who have been 
     exposed to PFAS in their drinking water above the EPA's 
     Health Advisory levels during their military service.
       (2) An evaluation of what the Department of Defense could 
     have done better to mitigate the release of PFAS 
     contamination into the environment and expose service 
     members.
       (3) Any other elements the Comptroller General may deem 
     necessary.
       (c) Results.--
       (1) Interim briefing.--Not later than 1 year after the date 
     of the enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General shall 
     provide to the congressional defense committees, the 
     Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of 
     Representatives and the Committee on the Environment and 
     Public Works of the Senate a briefing on the preliminary 
     findings of the study required by this section.
       (2) Final results.--The Comptroller General shall provide 
     the final results of the study required by this section to 
     the congressional defense committees, the Committee on Energy 
     and Commerce of the House of Representatives and the 
     Committee on the Environment and Public Works of the Senate 
     at such time and in such format as is mutually agreed upon by 
     the committees and the Comptroller General at the time of 
     briefing under paragraph (1).


           Amendment No. 251 Offered by Mr. Levin of Michigan

       At the end of subtitle B of title III, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 3__. DISPOSAL OF MATERIALS CONTAINING PER- AND 
                   POLYFLUOROALKYL SUBSTANCES OR AQUEOUS FILM-
                   FORMING FOAM.

       The Secretary of Defense shall ensure that when materials 
     containing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (referred to 
     in this section as ``PFAS'') or aqueous film forming foam are 
     disposed--
       (1) all incineration is conducted in a manner that 
     eliminates PFAS while also ensuring that no PFAS is emitted 
     into the air;
       (2) all incineration is conducted in accordance with the 
     requirements of the Clean Air

[[Page H5647]]

     Act (42 USC 7401 et seq.), including controlling hydrogen 
     fluoride;
       (3) any materials containing PFAS that are designated for 
     disposal are stored in accordance with the requirement under 
     part 264 of title 40, Code of Federal Regulations; and
       (4) no incineration is conducted at any facility that 
     violated the requirements of the Clean Air Act (42 U.S.C. 
     7401 et seq.) during the 12-month period preceding the date 
     of disposal.


        Amendment No. 310 Offered by Mr. Pappas of New Hampshire

       At the end of subtitle B of title III, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 3__. PROHIBITION ON USE OF PERFLUOROALKYL SUBSTANCES AND 
                   POLYFLUOROALKYL SUBSTANCES FOR LAND-BASED 
                   APPLICATIONS OF FIREFIGHTING FOAM.

       (a) Limitation.--After October 1, 2022, no amount 
     authorized to be appropriated or otherwise made available for 
     the Department of Defense may be obligated or expended to 
     procure firefighting foam that contains in excess of one part 
     per billion of perfluoroalkyl substances and polyfluoroalkyl 
     substances.
       (b) Prohibition on Use of Existing Stocks.--Not later than 
     October 1, 2023, the Secretary of Defense shall cease the use 
     of firefighting foam containing in excess of one part per 
     billion of perfluoroalkyl substances and polyfluoroalkyl 
     substances;
       (c) Exemption for Shipboard Use.--Subsections (a) and (b) 
     shall not apply to firefighting foam for use solely onboard 
     ocean-going vessels.
       (d) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) The term ``perfluoroalkyl substances'' means aliphatic 
     substances for which all of the H atoms attached to C atoms 
     in the nonfluorinated substance from which they are 
     notionally derived have been replaced by F atoms, except 
     those H atoms whose substitution would modify the nature of 
     any functional groups present.
       (2) The term ``polyfluoroalkyl substances'' means aliphatic 
     substances for which all H atoms attached to at least one 
     (but not all) C atoms have been replaced by F atoms, in such 
     a manner that they contain the perfluoroalkyl moiety 
     CnF2n+1_ (for example, 
     C8F17CH2CH2OH).


            amendment no. 382 offered by mr. turner of ohio

       At the end of subtitle B of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3__. AGREEMENTS TO SHARE MONITORING DATA RELATING TO 
                   PERFLUOROALKYL AND POLYFLUOROALKYL SUBSTANCES 
                   AND OTHER CONTAMINANTS OF CONCERN.

       (a) In General.--The Secretary of Defense shall seek to 
     enter into agreements with municipalities or municipal 
     drinking water utilities located adjacent to military 
     installations under which both the Secretary and the 
     municipalities and utilities would share monitoring data 
     relating to perfluoroalkyl substances, polyfluoroalkyl 
     substances, and other emerging contaminants of concern 
     collected at the military installation.
       (b) Public Communication.--An agreement under subsection 
     (a) does not negate the responsibility of the Secretary to 
     communicate with the public about drinking water 
     contamination from perfluoroalkyl substances, polyfluoroalkyl 
     substances, and other contaminants.
       (c) Military Installation Defined.--In this section, the 
     term ``military installation'' has the meaning given that 
     term in section 2801(c) of title 10, United States Code.


          Amendment No. 410 Offered by Mr. Kildee of Michigan

       At the end of subtitle B of title III, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 3__. DETECTION OF PERFLUORINATED COMPOUNDS.

       (a) Performance Standard for the Detection of 
     Perfluorinated Compounds.--
       (1) In general.--The Director of the United States Geologic 
     Survey shall establish a performance standard for the 
     detection of perfluorinated compounds.
       (2) Emphasis.--
       (A) In general.--In developing the performance standard 
     under subsection (a), the Director shall emphasize the 
     ability to detect as many perfluorinated compounds present in 
     the environment as possible using analytical methods that are 
     as sensitive as is feasible and practicable.
       (B) Requirement.--In developing the performance standard 
     under subsection (a), the Director may--
       (i) develop quality assurance and quality control measures 
     to ensure accurate sampling and testing;
       (ii) develop a training program with respect to the 
     appropriate method of sample collection and analysis of 
     perfluorinated compounds; and
       (iii) coordinate as necessary with the Administrator to 
     develop methods to detect individual and different 
     perfluorinated compounds simultaneously.
       (b) Nationwide Sampling.--
       (1) In general.--The Director shall carry out a nationwide 
     sampling to determine the concentration of perfluorinated 
     compounds in estuaries, lakes, streams, springs, wells, 
     wetlands, rivers, aquifers, and soil using the performance 
     standard developed under subsection (a)(1).
       (2) Requirements.--In carrying out the sampling under 
     paragraph (1), the Director shall--
       (A) first carry out the sampling at sources of drinking 
     water near locations with known or suspected releases of 
     perfluorinated compounds;
       (B) when carrying out sampling of sources of drinking water 
     under paragraph (1), carry out the sampling prior to any 
     treatment of the water;
       (C) survey for ecological exposure to perfluorinated 
     compounds, with a priority in determining direct human 
     exposure through drinking water; and
       (D) consult with--
       (i) States to determine areas that are a priority for 
     sampling; and
       (ii) the Administrator--

       (I) to enhance coverage of the sampling; and
       (II) to avoid unnecessary duplication.

       (3) Report.--Not later than 150 days after the completion 
     of the sampling under paragraph (1), the Director shall 
     prepare a report describing the results of the sampling and 
     submit the report to--
       (A) the Committee on Environment and Public Works and the 
     Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the Senate;
       (B) the Committee on Natural Resources and the Committee on 
     Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives;
       (C) the Senators of each State in which the Director 
     carried out the sampling; and
       (D) each Member of the House of Representatives that 
     represents a district in which the Director carried out the 
     sampling.
       (c) Data Usage.--
       (1) In general.--The Director shall provide the sampling 
     data collected under subsection (b) to--
       (A) the Administrator of the Environmental Protection 
     Agency; and
       (B) other Federal and State regulatory agencies on request.
       (2) Usage.--The sampling data provided under subsection (a) 
     shall be used to inform and enhance assessments of exposure, 
     likely health and environmental impacts, and remediation 
     priorities.
       (d) Collaboration.--In carrying out this section, the 
     Director shall collaborate with--
       (1) appropriate Federal and State regulators;
       (2) institutions of higher education;
       (3) research institutions; and
       (4) other expert stakeholders.
       (e) Authority for Transfer of Funds.--Of the funds 
     authorized to be appropriated by section 301, the Secretary 
     of Defense may, without regard to section 2215 of title 10, 
     United States Code, transfer not more than $5,000,000 to the 
     Secretary of the Interior to carry out nationwide sampling 
     under this section. Any funds transferred under this section 
     may not be used for any other purpose, except those specified 
     under this section.
       (f) Funding.--
       (1) Increase.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 301, as specified in the 
     corresponding funding table in section 4301, Total Operation 
     and Maintenance, Defense-Wide, Line 080, for the Detection of 
     Perfluorinated Compounds is hereby increased by $5,000,000.
       (2) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 101 for Procurement of Wheeled and 
     Tracked Combat Vehicles, Army, as specified in the 
     corresponding funding table in section 4101, for Bradley 
     Program (Mod) is hereby reduced by $5,000,000.
       (g) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) The term ``Administrator'' means the Administrator of 
     the Environmental Protection Agency.
       (2) The term ``Director'' means the Director of the United 
     States Geological Survey.
       (3) The term ``perfluorinated compound'' means a 
     perfluoroalkyl substance or a polyfluoroalkyl substance that 
     is manmade with at least 1 fully fluorinated carbon atom.
       (4) The term ``fully fluorinated carbon atom'' means a 
     carbon atom on which all the hydrogen substituents have been 
     replaced by fluorine.
       (5) The term ``nonfluorinated carbon atom'' means a carbon 
     atom on which no hydrogen substituents have been replaced by 
     fluorine.
       (6) The term ``partially fluorinated carbon atom'' means a 
     carbon atom on which some, but not all, of the hydrogen 
     substituents have been replaced by fluorine.
       (7) The term ``perfluoroalkyl substance'' means a manmade 
     chemical of which all of the carbon atoms are fully 
     fluorinated carbon atoms.
       (8) The term ``polyfluoroalkyl substance'' means a manmade 
     chemical containing a mix of fully fluorinated carbon atoms, 
     partially fluorinated carbon atoms, and nonfluorinated carbon 
     atoms.


         Amendment No. 418 Offered by Mrs. Dingell of Michigan

       Add at the end of subtitle B of title III the following new 
     section:

     SEC. __. COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH STATES TO ADDRESS 
                   CONTAMINATION BY PERFLUOROALKYL AND 
                   POLYFLUOROALKYL SUBSTANCES.

       (a) Cooperative Agreements.--
       (1) In general.--Upon request from the Governor or chief 
     executive of a State, the Secretary of Defense shall work 
     expeditiously, pursuant to section 2701(d) of title

[[Page H5648]]

     10, United States Code, to finalize a cooperative agreement, 
     or amend an existing cooperative agreement to address 
     testing, monitoring, removal, and remedial actions relating 
     to the contamination or suspected contamination of drinking, 
     surface, or ground water from PFAS originating from 
     activities of the Department of Defense by providing the 
     mechanism and funding for the expedited review and approval 
     of documents of the Department related to PFAS investigations 
     and remedial actions from an active or decommissioned 
     military installation, including a facility of the National 
     Guard.
       (2) Minimum standards.--A cooperative agreement finalized 
     or amended under paragraph (1) shall meet or exceed the most 
     stringent of the following standards for PFAS in any 
     environmental media:
       (A) An enforceable State standard, in effect in that State, 
     for drinking, surface, or ground water, as described in 
     section 121(d)(2)(A)(ii) of the Comprehensive Environmental 
     Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (42 U.S.C. 
     9621(d)(2)(A)(ii)).
       (B) An enforceable Federal standard for drinking, surface, 
     or ground water, as described in section 121(d)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
     Liability Act of 1980 (42 U.S.C. 9621(d)(2)(A)(i)).
       (C) A health advisory under section 1412(b)(1)(F) of the 
     Safe Drinking Water Act (42 U.S.C. 300g-1(b)(1)(F)).
       (3) Other authority.--In addition to the requirements for a 
     cooperative agreement under paragraph (1), when otherwise 
     authorized to expend funds for the purpose of addressing 
     ground or surface water contaminated by a perfluorinated 
     compound, the Secretary of Defense may, to expend those 
     funds, enter into a grant agreement, cooperative agreement, 
     or contract with--
       (A) the local water authority with jurisdiction over the 
     contamination site, including--
       (i) a public water system (as defined in section 1401 of 
     the Safe Drinking Water Act (42 U.S.C. 300f)); and
       (ii) a publicly owned treatment works (as defined in 
     section 212 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 
     U.S.C. 1292)); or
       (B) a State, local, or Tribal government.
       (b) Report.--Beginning on February 1, 2020, if a 
     cooperative agreement is not finalized or amended under 
     subsection (a) within one year after the request from the 
     Governor or chief executive under that subsection, and 
     annually thereafter, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to 
     the appropriate committees and Members of Congress a report--
       (1) explaining why the agreement has not been finalized or 
     amended, as the case may be; and
       (2) setting forth a projected timeline for finalizing or 
     amending the agreement.
       (c) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Appropriate committees and members of congress.--The 
     term ``appropriate committees and Members of Congress'' 
     means--
       (A) the congressional defense committees;
       (B) the Senators who represent a State impacted by PFAS 
     contamination described in subsection (a)(1); and
       (C) the Members of the House of Representatives who 
     represent a district impacted by such contamination.
       (2) Fully fluorinated carbon atom.--The term ``fully 
     fluorinated carbon atom'' means a carbon atom on which all 
     the hydrogen substituents have been replaced by fluorine.
       (3) PFAS.--The term ``PFAS'' means perfluoroalkyl and 
     polyfluoroalkyl substances that are man-made chemicals with 
     at least one fully fluorinated carbon atom.
       (4) State.--The term ``State'' has the meaning given the 
     term in section 101 of the Comprehensive Environmental 
     Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (42 U.S.C. 
     9601).

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman from 
Washington (Mr. Smith) and the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Thornberry) 
each will control 10 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Washington.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentlewoman from Michigan (Mrs. Dingell).
  Mrs. DINGELL. Mr. Chair, I rise to speak on two important amendments 
that have been included in this en bloc.
  Michigan has been hit very hard by this PFAS contamination. It is in 
our drinking water, groundwater, rivers, lakes, and ponds. We can't eat 
the fish that are being caught.
  These harmful chemicals are found in way too many places, and they 
are discovering more contamination sites each day.
  Just today, 100 new PFAS contamination sites were identified, with 
many sites registering PFAS levels above 100,000 parts per trillion. 
EPA's nonenforceable health advisory is 70 parts per trillion. And the 
more we test, the more we find.
  There are two amendments here. I was proud to work with Fred Upton,  
Dan Kildee, and Tim Walberg on legislation that is included in this en 
bloc that would require the Department of Defense to enter into 
cooperative agreements with States to mitigate PFAS contamination 
resulting from their facilities.
  Unfortunately, firefighting foam was used at more than 100 military 
bases and has impacted them and the surrounding communities across the 
country. We need an all-hands-on-deck response to the growing PFAS 
contamination at military facilities.
  Also included is a bipartisan amendment to protect our servicemembers 
from ever being exposed to harmful PFAS chemicals in MREs, Meal, Ready-
to-Eat.
  MREs are carried by our servicemembers in the field of operations or 
when engaged in training exercises. Our warfighters depend on MREs for 
their survival, so it is critical these food packages are completely 
safe. Currently, there is no prohibition on the use of PFAS chemicals 
in MREs, and they are in there.
  This bipartisan amendment would proactively correct this and simply 
prohibit the Defense Logistics Agency from using any food contact 
substances with PFAS to assemble or package MREs.
  I thank Chairman Smith for including both of these amendments.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the 
gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Kildee).
  Mr. KILDEE. Mr. Chair, I thank the chairman of the committee for 
working with me on addressing this PFAS contamination issue.
  Today, the House is taking historic action to address PFAS 
contamination that is hurting communities, including communities like 
the city of Oscoda in my district in Michigan.
  At the beginning of the year, I launched the bipartisan Congressional 
PFAS Task Force to bring together Members of Congress who are dealing 
with contamination in their districts. We wanted to work together on 
meaningful legislation to address PFAS and to protect public health.
  I am very pleased to stand here today, 6 months later, in support of 
these amendments. The package of amendments included in this en bloc 
will help address PFAS contamination and ensure people have access to 
safe drinking water.
  Included in the package are three of my amendments.
  The first would direct the U.S. Geological Survey to look for PFAS 
contamination around the country so we know where people are 
potentially exposed.
  My second amendment would require the Government Accountability 
Office to conduct a review of the military's response to PFAS 
contamination and its efforts to clean it up.
  Another amendment that I was proud to work on with my friend, 
Congresswoman Dean from Pennsylvania, is to end the use of PFAS by the 
military by 2025. This will protect servicemembers from being exposed 
to these dangerous chemicals.
  These provisions will mean fewer veterans, servicemembers, and 
families will face struggles like those in my district have faced. I am 
proud to see this come to the floor. I thank the chairman for his work 
on this.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the distinguished 
gentlewoman from West Virginia (Mrs. Miller).
  Mrs. MILLER. Mr. Chair, I rise today to speak about my amendment 
included in en bloc No. 11.
  Mr. Chair, my amendment would bestow the privilege of lying in honor 
in the rotunda of the United States Capitol to the last surviving Medal 
of Honor recipient of the Second World War.
  From the beaches of Normandy, across the seas of Japan, and into the 
deserts of Africa, the Greatest Generation fought selflessly to protect 
freedom around the world. It is our duty to honor the sacrifices they 
made to safeguard hope and liberty for all.
  The walls of this historic building have seen the most courageous 
members of our society. Americans from coast to coast come here to pay 
their respects to the heroes of our history, an ability that would not 
be possible without the responsibilities that fell on to our brave 
parents and grandparents.
  We must ensure our children and grandchildren remember those who 
worked to secure our Nation and freed the world from tyranny.
  When I started working on this, there were four. Now, there are only 
three

[[Page H5649]]

living recipients of the Medal of Honor who went above and beyond the 
call of duty during World War II, one of whom is a dear friend and West 
Virginia native, Hershel ``Woody'' Williams, who fought valiantly 
during the Battle of Iwo Jima.
  In this time of deep political divide, honoring our Nation's greatest 
heroes is something we can all come together and agree upon. I ask all 
Members to support my amendment to honor our Greatest Generation and 
preserve their legacy as defenders of freedom.

  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Panetta).
  Mr. PANETTA. Mr. Chair, today, I rise in support of an amendment to 
the underlying bill, the National Defense Authorization Act.
  The NDAA is a bill that articulates our defense priorities and 
secures our national interests. I am very, very proud and thankful to 
Chairman Smith and committee staff to have incorporated a number of 
provisions into this bill. Of particular importance, I am honored to 
have included a provision that improves privatized military housing.
  I think all of us can agree that it is imperative that the Department 
of Defense develop a holistic solution to remedy systemic privatized 
military housing issues and empower servicemembers and their families.
  I saw this need firsthand in my district while engaging with 
servicemember constituents throughout this past year. That is why I 
offered legislation that was included in the NDAA that enhanced 
transparency, communication, and accountability standards.
  The core elements of this bill, the Better Military Housing Act, 
included a tenant bill of rights, housing advocacy, and an improved 
work order system.
  This amendment that I am speaking about today adds two additional 
important provisions.
  First, it authorizes an additional $5 million for new military 
housing construction, utilizing the Army's high-performance and healthy 
living All-American Abode design.
  Second, it requires the Department of Defense to provide an 
accounting for the legal services available to servicemembers harmed by 
health or environmental hazards while living in privatized military 
housing.
  We must continue to prioritize the health and safety and the 
lifestyles of our servicemembers and their families. They serve us. 
Let's continue to serve them.
  I thank Chairman Smith, the committee, the professional staff, and my 
colleagues for their support on my amendments.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Levin).
  Mr. LEVIN of Michigan. Mr. Chair, I thank Chairman Smith for giving 
me these minutes to talk about two amendments that I have brought forth 
that are part of this en bloc.
  First is an amendment about PFAS, which we have heard a little bit 
about already. It is important to understand that our military is 
storing and planning to destroy millions of gallons of material that 
contain PFAS, which is a class of chemicals that contaminate drinking 
water and is linked to serious health problems.
  These materials must be destroyed for the sake of the health of our 
communities, but that needs to be done in a way that protects our 
environment, not in a way that causes us yet more harm.
  My amendment directs the Secretary of Defense to ensure that all 
incineration of materials containing PFAS is conducted in a manner that 
eliminates PFAS while also ensuring that no PFAS is emitted into the 
air in the process. It also sets clear guardrails for storage, 
byproducts, and appropriate facilities for disposal.
  I thank Mr. Khanna for cosponsoring this measure so we can protect 
our communities from further PFAS contamination.
  The second amendment I wish to address will help us understand the 
universe of defense contractors that have willfully violated Federal 
health, safety, and labor standards that protect American workers. 
American people work hard to build the infrastructure necessary to keep 
our country safe. We have a responsibility to honor that work by paying 
them fairly and keeping them safe, as the law requires.
  We have a responsibility to make sure that contractors taking Federal 
dollars are not recklessly neglecting the health, safety, and dignity 
of our working people. That is why this simple amendment is so 
necessary.
  I thank Congresswoman Haaland for cosponsoring this amendment, and I 
thank, again, Chairman Smith for all of his hard work.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, I yield 3 minutes to the distinguished 
gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Shimkus).
  Mr. SHIMKUS. Mr. Chair, I want to start talking about science and 
jurisdiction and why it is important to go through regular order.
  We just heard my colleagues talk about PFAS or PFOS or PFOA, three 
different things that mean three different things. What my colleagues 
have done is lumped them all into one category. If you eliminate one 
class of chemicals, you take the F-16 and you ground it. You have got 
Ethernet cables, fiber channel assemblies, round cable assemblies, 
shielded twisted pair, EMI.
  This is a National Defense Authorization bill, and the Rules 
Committee has allowed an amendment on the National Defense 
Authorization bill that would ground the F-16s without doing due 
justice to science and the committees of jurisdiction.
  There are a couple of other problems with the en bloc amendment.
  Again, this amendment requires action on all PFAS, all of it. There 
may be 3,000 to 5,000 different permutations of this chemical. All 
these substances are not alike.
  Also, EPA has said it knows little of the PFAS class and only has a 
valid tool to really identify 18 out of the 3,000 to 5,000 
formulations. If EPA can only identify right now 18, how do you 
identify 1,500 permutations of this chemical?
  Second, the amendment skirts scientific risk criteria and dismisses 
expert administration review, especially the provisions banning PFAS in 
MREs--we heard that--and containers.
  According to the Food and Drug Administration, I mentioned this 
earlier on another amendment, this would ban substances used in 
assembling and packaging, which there is no known safety concern. The 
FDA approves packaging for food, but we are going to ban packaging for 
food when it is the jurisdiction of the Food and Drug Administration, 
which is not the jurisdiction of HASC.
  Third, as drafted, these amendments could create confusion, 
overreach, and mismatched responsibility among Federal partners. The 
PFAS ban and the MRE language requires the Defense Logistics Agency to 
implement it, but MREs are sold at commercial grocery stores. So are we 
going to have the Defense Logistics Agency police PFAS MRE packaging in 
the local Piggly Wiggly or Walmart or other guns and knives stores?

                              {time}  1900

  The incineration provisions require the Secretary of Defense to 
administer and enforce requirements on incineration of items.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield an additional 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Illinois.
  Mr. SHIMKUS. So we have been attacking the administration of the 
Department of Defense saying they can't do their job, they don't meet 
the IG standards, and now we are going to put them in control of air 
emissions and clean air standards.
  That is what this does when you allow amendments to a bill that are 
not germane to the underlying committee.
  Last, provisions require the U.S. Geological Survey to come up with 
PFAS detection performance standards, instituting a nationalized 
sampling program at PFAS-contaminated sites and own the results. Yet 
the Environmental Protection Agency, which only has a minor ability to 
consult role, has statutory responsibility for cleanup sites. USGS will 
be messing around with and will be dependent upon the USGS to obtain 
its data.
  So it is the EPA that is responsible for cleanup, but we are going to 
give

[[Page H5650]]

the U.S. Geological Survey the responsibility.
  Many of these amendments are not germane to the defense authorization 
or have received process to ensure they don't create problems. Quality 
work in these areas would have followed regular order. Americans 
deserve that we are as careful doing our jobs as they are doing theirs. 
We mentioned this in the other amendment.
  I am working with Chairman Tonko to address perfluorinated compounds. 
It is a very difficult issue. We have experts in the majority; we have 
experts in the minority that deal with chemicals. This is not the place 
to do it, and I would ask people to vote against the amendment en bloc.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I urge adoption of en bloc No. 
6, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendments en bloc offered by the 
gentleman from Washington (Mr. Smith).
  The en bloc amendments were agreed to.


      Amendments En Bloc No. 7 Offered by Mr. Smith of Washington

  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, pursuant to House Resolution 476, 
I offer amendments en bloc.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendments en bloc.
  Amendments en bloc No. 7 consisting of amendment Nos. 166, 167, 168, 
169, 170, 171, 172, 173, 174, 175, 176, 177, 178, 179, 180, 181, 182, 
183, 184, 185, 186, 187, 188, and 189 printed in part B of House Report 
116-143, offered by Mr. Smith of Washington:


       Amendment No. 166 Offered by Mr. Gottheimer of New Jersey

       Page 686, after line 2, insert the following new 
     subparagraph (and redesignate succeeding subparagraphs 
     accordingly):
       (L) adversary actions that threaten freedom of navigation 
     on international waterways, including attacks on foreign 
     ships and crews;


       Amendment No. 167 Offered by Mr. Gottheimer of New Jersey

       Add at the end of title XIII the following:

     SEC. 13__. COOPERATIVE THREAT REDUCTION PROGRAM ENHANCEMENT.

       Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the 
     Secretary of State, shall submit to the congressional defense 
     committees and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House 
     of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of 
     the Senate a report regarding the Cooperative Threat 
     Reduction Program (established pursuant to the Department of 
     Defense Cooperate Threat Reduction Act (enacted as subtitle B 
     of title XIII of the Carl Levin and Howard P. `Buck' McKeon 
     National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2015 (50 
     U.S.C. 3701 et seq.)), including recommendations to improve 
     the implementation of such Program.


       Amendment No. 168 Offered by Mr. Gottheimer of New Jersey

       Page 779, line 14, insert ``Hamas, Hizballah, Palestine 
     Islamic Jihad, al-Shabaab, Islamic Revolutionary Guard 
     Corps'' after ``al Sham,''.


       Amendment No. 169 Offered by Mr. Gottheimer of New Jersey

       Page 306, line 2, strike ``or'' at the end.
       Page 306, line 3, strike ``and'' at the end and insert 
     ``or''.
       Page 306, after line 3, add the following new subparagraph:
       (D) anti-Semitism; and


          Amendment No. 170 Offered by Mr. Graves of Louisiana

       Page 603, after line 5, insert the following:

     SEC. 898. INDIVIDUAL ACQUISITION FOR COMMERCIAL LEASING 
                   SERVICES.

       (a) Extension.--Section 877(c) of the John S. McCain 
     National Defense Authorization Act For Fiscal Year 2019 (41 
     U.S.C. 3302 note) is amended by striking ``2022'' and 
     inserting ``2025''.
       (b) Audit.--Section 887(b)(1) of such Act is amended by 
     striking ``biennial audits'' and inserting ``audits every 
     five years''.


          Amendment No. 171 Offered by Mr. Graves of Louisiana

       At the end of subtitle I of title V, add the following:

     SEC. 584. ELIGIBILITY OF VETERANS OF OPERATION END SWEEP FOR 
                   VIETNAM SERVICE MEDAL.

       The Secretary of the military department concerned may, 
     upon the application of an individual who is a veteran who 
     participated in Operation End Sweep, award that individual 
     the Vietnam Service Medal.


          amendment no. 172 offered by mr. graves of louisiana

       At the end of subtitle D of title VI, add the following:

     SEC. 632. REPORT REGARDING MANAGEMENT OF MILITARY 
                   COMMISSARIES AND EXCHANGES.

       (a) Report Required.--Not later than 180 days after the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall submit 
     to the congressional defense committees a report regarding 
     management practices of military commissaries and exchanges
       (b) Elements.--The report required under this section shall 
     include a cost-benefit analysis with the goals of--
       (1) reducing the costs of operating military commissaries 
     and exchanges by $2,000,000,000 during fiscal years 2020 
     through 2024; and
       (2) not raising costs for patrons of military commissaries 
     and exchanges.


          amendment no. 173 offered by mr. graves of louisiana

       At the end of subtitle B of title V, insert the following 
     new sections:

     SEC. 520. NATIONAL GUARD SUPPORT TO MAJOR DISASTERS.

       Section 502(f) of title 32, United States Code, is 
     amended--
       (1) in paragraph (2), by adding at the end the following:
       ``(C) Operations or missions authorized by the President or 
     the Secretary of Defense to support large scale, complex, 
     catastrophic disasters, as defined by section 311(3) of title 
     6, United States Code, at the request of a State governor.''; 
     and
       (2) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(4) With respect to operations or missions described 
     under paragraph (2)(C), there is authorized to be 
     appropriated to the Secretary of Defense such sums as may be 
     necessary to carry out such operations and missions, but only 
     if--
       ``(A) an emergency has been declared by the governor of the 
     applicable State; and
       ``(B) the President has declared the emergency to be a 
     major disaster for the purposes of the Robert T. Stafford 
     Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act.''.

     SEC. 520A. REPORT ON METHODS TO ENHANCE DOMESTIC RESPONSE TO 
                   LARGE SCALE, COMPLEX AND CATASTROPHIC 
                   DISASTERS.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense, in 
     consultation and coordination with the Federal Emergency 
     Management Agency, the National Security Council, the Council 
     of Governors, and the National Governors Association, shall 
     submit to the congressional defense, the Committee on 
     Homeland Security of the House of Representatives, and the 
     Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs of 
     the Senate a report on their plan to establish policy and 
     processes to implement the authority provided by the 
     amendments made by section 520. The report shall include a 
     detailed examination of the policy framework consistent with 
     existing authorities, identify major statutory or policy 
     impediments to implementation, and make recommendations for 
     legislation as appropriate.
       (b) Contents.--The report submitted under paragraph (1) 
     shall include a description of--
       (1) the current policy and processes whereby governors can 
     request activation of the National Guard under title 32, 
     United States Code, as part of the response to large scale, 
     complex, catastrophic disasters that are supported by the 
     Federal Government and, if no formal process exists in 
     policy, the Secretary of Defense shall provide a timeline and 
     plan to establish such a policy, including consultation with 
     the Council of Governors and the National Governors 
     Association;
       (2) the Secretary of Defense's assessment, informed by 
     consultation with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, 
     the National Security Council, the Council of Governors, and 
     the National Governors Association, regarding the sufficiency 
     of current authorities for the reimbursement of National 
     Guard and Reserve manpower during large scale, complex, 
     catastrophic disasters under title 10 and title 32, United 
     States Code, and specifically whether reimbursement 
     authorities are sufficient to ensure that military training 
     and readiness are not degraded to fund disaster response, or 
     invoking them degrades the effectiveness of the Disaster 
     Relief Fund;
       (3) the Department of Defense's plan to ensure there is 
     parallel and consistent policy in the application of the 
     authorities granted under section 12304a of title 10, United 
     States Code, and section 502(f) of title 32, United States 
     Code, including--
       (A) a description of the disparities between benefits and 
     protections under Federal law versus State active duty;
       (B) recommended solutions to achieve parity at the Federal 
     level; and
       (C) recommended changes at the State level, if appropriate;
       (4) the Department of Defense's plan to ensure there is 
     parity of benefits and protections for military members 
     employed as part of the response to large scale, complex, 
     catastrophic disasters under title 32 or title 10, United 
     States Code, and recommendations for addressing shortfalls; 
     and
       (5) a review, by the Federal Emergency Management Agency, 
     of the current policy for, and an assessment of the 
     sufficiency of, reimbursement authority for the use of all 
     National Guard and Reserve, both to the Department of Defense 
     and to the States, during large scale, complex, catastrophic 
     disasters, including any policy and legal limitations, and 
     cost assessment impact on Federal funding.


          amendment no. 174 offered by mr. green of tennessee

       Page 380, insert after line 23 the following (and 
     redesignate succeeding paragraphs accordingly):

[[Page H5651]]

       (7) The availability and usage of the assistance of 
     chaplains, houses of worship, and other spiritual resources 
     for members of the Armed Forces who identify as religiously 
     affiliated and have attempted suicide, have suicidal 
     ideation, or are at risk of suicide, and metrics on the 
     impact these resources have in assisting religiously-
     affiliated members who have access to and utilize them 
     compared to religiously-affiliated members who do not.


         amendment no. 175 offered by ms. haaland of new mexico

       Page 699, after line 17, insert the following:

     SEC. 1075. HUMAN RIGHTS IN BRAZIL.

       No later than 180 days after enactment of the Act, the 
     Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of State shall jointly 
     submit a report to the Committees on Armed Services of the 
     House of Representatives and the Senate, the Committee on 
     Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives, and the 
     Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, including--
       (1) an assessment of the human rights climate in Brazil and 
     the commitment to human rights by the security forces of 
     Brazil, including military and civilian forces;
       (2) an assessment of whether Brazilian security-force units 
     that are found to be engaged in human rights abuses may have 
     received or purchased United States equipment and training; 
     and
       (3) if warranted, a strategy to address any found human 
     rights abuses by the security forces of Brazil, including in 
     the context of Brazil's newly conferred Major Non-NATO Ally 
     status.


         Amendment No. 176 Offered by Ms. Haaland of New Mexico

       At the end of subtitle G of title VIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 898. PROHIBITION ON CONTRACTING WITH ENTITIES LACKING A 
                   SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 270 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall 
     revise the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement 
     to state that the policy of the Department of Defense is that 
     the Secretary of Defense may enter into a contract only with 
     an entity that has an employee policy penalizing instances of 
     sexual harassment.
       (b) Debarment.--If an entity that does not have an employee 
     policy penalizing instances of sexual harassment seeks to 
     enter into a contract with the Department of Defense, the 
     Secretary of Defense shall initiate a debarment proceeding in 
     accordance with procedures in the Federal Acquisition 
     Regulation against such entity.


         Amendment No. 177 Offered by Mr. Hagedorn of Minnesota

       Add at the end of subtitle F of title VIII the following:

     SEC. 882. ACCELERATED PAYMENTS APPLICABLE TO CONTRACTS WITH 
                   CERTAIN SMALL BUSINESS CONCERNS UNDER THE 
                   PROMPT PAYMENT ACT.

       Section 3903(a) of title 31, United States Code, is 
     amended--
       (1) in paragraph (1)(B), by inserting ``except as provided 
     in paragraphs (10) and (11),'' before ``30 days'';
       (2) in paragraph (8), by striking ``and'';
       (3) in paragraph (9), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting a semicolon; and
       (4) by adding at the end the following new paragraphs:
       ``(10) for a prime contractor (as defined in section 
     8701(5) of title 41) that is a small business concern (as 
     defined under section 3 of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 
     632)), to the fullest extent permitted by law, require that 
     the head of an agency establish an accelerated payment date 
     with a goal of 15 days after a proper invoice for the amount 
     due is received if a specific payment date is not established 
     by contract; and
       ``(11) for a prime contractor (as defined in section 
     8701(5) of title 41) that subcontracts with a small business 
     concern (as defined under section 3 of the Small Business Act 
     (15 U.S.C. 632)), to the fullest extent permitted by law, 
     require that the head of an agency establish an accelerated 
     payment date with a goal of 15 days after a proper invoice 
     for the amount due is received if--
       ``(A) a specific payment date is not established by 
     contract; and
       ``(B) such prime contractor agrees to make payments to such 
     subcontractor in accordance with such accelerated payment 
     date, to the maximum extent practicable, without any further 
     consideration from or fees charged to such subcontractor.''.


          Amendment No. 178 Offered by Mr. Hastings of Florida

       At the end of subtitle B of title VIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 831. REPORTING ON EXPENSES INCURRED FOR INDEPENDENT 
                   RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT COSTS.

       (a) Reporting on Independent Research and Development 
     Costs.--Section 2372 of title 10, United States Code, is 
     amended--
       (1) in the second sentence of subsection (a), by striking 
     ``shall be reported'' and all that follows through ``indirect 
     costs.'' and inserting the following: ``shall be reported--
       ``(1) independently from other allowable indirect costs; 
     and
       ``(2) annually by the contractor to the Defense Technical 
     Information Center, who shall give access to the information 
     to the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
     Engineering, the Director of the Defense Contract Audit 
     Agency, and the Director of the Defense Management Audit 
     Agency.''.
       (b) Report to Congress.--Such section is further amended by 
     adding at the end the following new subsection:
       ``(f) Report to Congress.--Not later than March 31, 2020, 
     and biennially thereafter, the Under Secretary of Defense for 
     Research and Engineering, in coordination with the Director 
     of the Defense Contract Management Agency, the Director of 
     the Defense Contract Audit Agency, and the Defense Technical 
     Information Center, shall submit to the congressional defense 
     committees aggregate cost data on the independent research 
     and development programs of the contractor. The report shall 
     include--
       ``(1) an analysis of such programs completed during the 
     two-year period preceding the date of the report, including 
     the extent to which such programs align with the 
     modernization priorities of the most recent national defense 
     strategy (as described by section 113 of this title);
       ``(2) an estimate of the extent to which such programs 
     produced, or sought to produce, disruptive technologies or 
     incremental technologies;
       ``(3) with respect to each contractor subject to the 
     reporting requirement under subsection (a)--
       ``(A) a comparison of the total amount of independent 
     research and development costs submitted for reimbursement 
     under the annual incurred cost proposal of such contractor 
     and the amount reported to the Defense Technical Information 
     Center; and
       ``(B) a summary of any issues relating to the ownership or 
     distribution of intellectual property rights raised by such 
     contractor relating to an independent research and 
     development program of such contractor.''.
       (c) Report to GAO.--The Secretary of Defense shall submit 
     to the Comptroller General of the United States the first 
     such report required under subsection (f) of section 2372 of 
     title 10, United States Code (as added by subsection (a)), so 
     that the Comptroller General may perform a review of the 
     information provided in the report.


          Amendment No. 179 Offered by Mr. Hastings of Florida

       At the end of subtitle B of title VIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 831. REPORTING ON EXPENSES INCURRED FOR BID AND PROPOSAL 
                   COSTS.

       Section 2372a(a) of title 10, United States Code, is 
     amended--
       (1) in the second sentence, by striking ``shall be 
     reported'' and all that follows through ``indirect costs.'' 
     and inserting the following: ``shall be reported--
       ``(1) independently from other allowable indirect costs; 
     and
       ``(2) annually by the contractor to the Director of the 
     Defense Contract Audit Agency, who shall give access to the 
     information to the Principal Director for Defense Pricing and 
     Contracting.''.


          amendment no. 180 offered by mr. hastings of florida

       At the end of subtitle B of title VIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 831. REPEAL OF THE DEFENSE COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS 
                   BOARD.

       (a) Repeal.--Section 190 of title 10, United States Code, 
     is repealed.
       (b) Clerical Amendment.--The table of sections at the 
     beginning of chapter 7 of such title is amended by striking 
     the item relating to section 190.


          amendment no. 181 offered by mr. hastings of florida

       At the end of subtitle G of title V, insert the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 567. TRANSITION OUTREACH PILOT PROGRAM.

       (a) Establishment.--Not later than 90 days after the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense, in 
     coordination with the Secretaries of Veterans Affairs, Labor, 
     Education, and Homeland Security, and the Administrator of 
     the Small Business Administration, shall establish a pilot 
     program through the Transition to Veterans Program Office 
     that fosters contact between veterans and the Department of 
     Defense.
       (b) Contact.--The Secretary of Defense, and with respect to 
     members of the Coast Guard, the Secretary of the Department 
     in which the Coast Guard is operating when it is not 
     operating as a service in the Navy, shall direct the Military 
     Transition Assistance Teams of the Department of Defense to 
     contact each veteran from the Armed Forces at least twice 
     during each of the first three months after the veteran 
     separates from the Armed Forces to--
       (1) inquire about the transition of the separated member to 
     civilian life, including--
       (A) employment;
       (B) veterans benefits;
       (C) education;
       (D) family life; and
       (2) hear concerns of the veteran regarding transition.
       (c) Termination.--The Secretary shall complete operation of 
     the pilot program under this section not later than September 
     30, 2020.
       (d) Report.--Not later than 90 days after termination of 
     the pilot program under this section, the Secretary of 
     Defense shall submit a report to Congress regarding such 
     pilot program, including the following, disaggregated by 
     armed force:
       (1) The number of veterans contacted, including how many 
     times such veterans were contacted.
       (2) Information regarding the age, sex, and geographic 
     region of contacted veterans.

[[Page H5652]]

       (3) Concerns most frequently raised by the veterans.
       (4) What benefits the contacted veterans have received, and 
     an estimate of the cost to the Federal Government for such 
     benefits.
       (5) How many contacted veterans are employed or have sought 
     employment, including what fields of employment.
       (6) How many contacted veterans are enrolled or have sought 
     to enroll in a course of education, including what fields of 
     study.
       (7) Recommendations for legislation to improve the long-
     term effectiveness of TAP and the well-being of veterans.
       (e) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) The term ``armed force'' has the meaning given that 
     term in section 101 of title 10, United States Code.
       (2) The term ``TAP'' means the Transition Assistance 
     Program under sections 1142 and 1144 of title 10, United 
     States Code.
       (3) The term ``veteran'' has the meaning given that term in 
     section 101 of title 38, United States Code.


          amendment no. 182 offered by mr. hastings of florida

       At the appropriate place in subtitle E of title XII, insert 
     the following:

     SEC. 12__. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON THE ENDURING UNITED STATES 
                   COMMITMENT TO THE FREELY ASSOCIATED STATES.

       It is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) the United States has strong and enduring interests in 
     the security and prosperity of Oceania and the Western 
     Pacific region, including close relationships with the 
     countries of Palau, the Marshall Islands and the Federated 
     States of Micronesia, with whom the United States shares 
     Compacts of Free Association;
       (2) the United States and the Freely Associated States 
     share values including democracy and human rights, as well as 
     mutual interest in a free, open and prosperous Indo-Pacific 
     region;
       (3) the United States should expand support to the Freely 
     Associated States on issues of concern, including climate 
     change mitigation, protection of the marine environment and 
     maritime law enforcement;
       (4) the United States should expeditiously begin 
     negotiations on the renewal of the Compacts of Free 
     Association and conclude such negotiations prior to the 
     expiration of the current compacts in 2023 and 2024; and
       (5) the United States honors the service of the men and 
     women of the Freely Associated States who serve in the United 
     States Armed Forces.


          amendment no. 183 offered by mr. heck of washington

       At the end of subtitle F of title V, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 5__. INCLUSION OF INFORMATION ON FREE CREDIT MONITORING 
                   IN ANNUAL FINANCIAL LITERACY BRIEFING.

       The Secretary of each military department shall ensure that 
     the annual financial literacy education briefing provided to 
     servicemembers includes information on the availability of 
     free credit monitoring services pursuant to section 605A(k) 
     of the Fair Credit Reporting Act (15 U.S.C. 1681c-1(k)).


          amendment no. 184 offered by mr. heck of washington

       At the end of subtitle H of title X, insert the following:

     SEC. 10__. INTEROPERABILITY OF COMMUNICATIONS BETWEEN 
                   MILITARY INSTALLATIONS AND ADJACENT 
                   JURISDICTIONS.

       Not later than 12 months after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Department of Defense Fire and Emergency 
     Services Working Group shall submit to the congressional 
     defense committees a report that includes--
       (1) an identification of all military installations that 
     provide emergency services to areas outside of their 
     installations, make them aware of the Amtrak Passenger Train 
     501 Derailment in DuPont, Washington, and determine the 
     effectiveness of the communications system between that 
     military installation and the adjacent jurisdictions; and
       (2) an implementation plan to address any deficiencies with 
     interoperability caused by the incompatibility between the 
     Department of Defense communications system and that of 
     adjacent civilian agencies.


          amendment no. 185 offered by mr. higgins of new york

       At the end of subtitle H of title X, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 10__. SUPPORT FOR NATIONAL MARITIME HERITAGE GRANTS 
                   PROGRAM.

       Of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act for 
     fiscal year 2020 for the Department of Defense, the Secretary 
     of Defense may contribute up to $5,000,000 to support the 
     National Maritime Heritage Grants Program established under 
     section 308703 of title 54, United States Code.


          amendment no. 186 offered by ms. hill of california

       At the end of subtitle G of title VIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 898. DOMESTIC PRODUCTION OF SMALL UNMANNED AIRCRAFT 
                   SYSTEMS.

        The Secretary of Defense shall take such action as 
     necessary to strengthen the domestic production of small 
     unmanned aircraft systems (as defined in section 331 of the 
     FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 (Public Law 112-95; 
     49 U.S.C. 44802 note)), as described under Presidential 
     Determination No. 2019-13 of June 10, 2019.


       Amendment No. 187 Offered by Mr. Hollingsworth of Indiana

       At the end of subtitle C of title VII, add the following:

     SEC. ___. SENSE OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES ON INCREASING 
                   RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT IN BIOPRINTING AND 
                   FABRICATION IN AUSTERE MILITARY ENVIRONMENTS.

       It is the sense of the House of Representatives that the 
     Defense Health Agency should take appropriate actions to 
     increase efforts focused on research and development in the 
     areas of bioprinting and fabrication in austere military 
     environments.


      Amendment No. 188 Offered by Ms. Kendra S. Horn of Oklahoma

       At the appropriate place in title VI, insert the following:

     SEC. 6__. REDUCTIONS ON ACCOUNT OF EARNINGS FROM WORK 
                   PERFORMED WHILE ENTITLED TO AN ANNUITY 
                   SUPPLEMENT.

       Section 8421a of title 5, United States Code, is amended in 
     subsection (c)--
       (1) by striking ``full-time as an air traffic control 
     instructor'' and inserting ``as an air traffic control 
     instructor, or supervisor thereof,''; and
       (2) by inserting ``or supervisor'' after ``an instructor''.


      Amendment No. 189 Offered by Ms. Kendra S. Horn of Oklahoma

       At the end of subtitle D of title III, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 345. INSPECTOR GENERAL AUDIT OF CERTAIN COMMERCIAL DEPOT 
                   MAINTENANCE CONTRACTS.

       The Inspector General of the Department of Defense shall 
     conduct an audit of each military department and Defense 
     Agency (as defined in section 101 of title 10, United States 
     Code), as applicable, to determine if there has been any 
     excess profit or cost escalation with respect to any sole-
     source contracts relating to commercial depot maintenance 
     (including contracts for parts, supplies, equipment, and 
     maintenance services).
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentleman from 
Washington (Mr. Smith) and the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Thornberry) 
each will control 10 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Washington.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentlewoman from New Hampshire (Ms. Kuster).
  Ms. KUSTER of New Hampshire. Mr. Chair, I thank the distinguished 
gentleman from Washington for yielding.
  I was pleased to offer an amendment to H.R. 2500 to expand the 
liberal consideration standard given by discharge review boards and 
boards for the correction of military records to victims of military 
sexual trauma, to survivors of intimate partner violence and domestic 
abuse.
  Members of the Armed Forces who were victims of intimate partner 
violence have sometimes received less than honorable discharges because 
of behavior caused by their underlying trauma. This discharge status 
may exclude them from receiving veterans benefits, including services 
to help address their trauma.
  Less than honorable discharge statuses are associated with higher 
rates of homelessness and suicide. Simply put, these discharge statuses 
are retraumatizing, and survivors deserve better.
  My amendment would have ensured victims of intimate partner violence 
receive the same liberal consideration standard as other victims of 
sexual assault in the Armed Forces. All survivors should be believed 
and treated with compassion, regardless of the violence they 
experienced.
  I appreciate the willingness of the House Armed Services Committee 
staff to work with my team to try to get this provision included in the 
House NDAA. Unfortunately, due to budgetary rules, we were unable to 
find a path forward. A provision that mirrors my amendment was included 
in the Senate NDAA, thanks to the tremendous leadership of Senators 
Gillibrand and Ernst.
  Chairman Smith, when the House and Senate conferences our two bills, 
will you work with the Senate to see this provision included in the 
final conference bill?
  I yield to the gentleman from Washington (Mr. Smith).
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentlewoman from 
New Hampshire for her leadership on this issue, and I agree that it is 
a very important issue.
  Absolutely, we will work with the Senate to do our best to address it 
once we get to conference, and, again, I thank the gentlewoman for her 
work on this.

[[Page H5653]]

  

  Ms. KUSTER of New Hampshire. Mr. Chair, I thank the gentleman for his 
response.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
New Jersey (Mr. Smith).
  Mr. SMITH of New Jersey. I thank my good friend, the distinguished 
ranking member, for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, for years, books and articles have been written 
suggesting that significant research had been done at U.S. Government 
facilities, including Fort Detrick and Plum Island, to turn ticks and 
other insects into bioweapons. Now, a new book, ``Bitten: The Secret 
History of Lyme Disease and Biological Weapons,'' by Kris Newby, 
includes interviews with Dr. Willy Burgdorfer, the researcher who is 
credited with discovering Lyme disease. It turns out Dr. Burgdorfer was 
also a bioweapons specialist.
  The interviews combined with access to Dr. Burgdorfer's lab files 
reveal that he and other bioweapons specialists stuffed ticks with 
pathogens to cause severe disability, disease, even death to potential 
enemies.
  With Lyme disease and other tick-borne diseases exploding in the 
United States, with an estimated 300,000 to 427,000 new cases each year 
and 10 to 20 percent of all patients suffering from chronic Lyme 
disease, I believe Americans have a right to know whether any of this 
is true.
  If true, what were the parameters of the program?
  Who ordered it?
  Was there any accidental release anywhere or at any time of any of 
the diseased ticks?
  Were any ticks released by design?
  In the book, there is some talk of that happening at or near 
Richmond, Virginia. Can any of this information help current-day 
researchers--and this is most important of all--help current-day 
researchers find a way to mitigate and maybe even cure these diseases?
  It should be noted for the record that it was President Richard Nixon 
in 1969 who ordered the end to all bioweapons research, but we know 
that there were tick farms at Plum Island and Fort Detrick, like I said 
earlier, and other places where this research was done.
  We need to know. I encourage Members to read this book if they get 
the time, ``Bitten: The Secret History of Lyme Disease and Biological 
Weapons.'' Again, it may offer some clues as to how we combat this 
terrible epidemic of Lyme disease in the United States.
  My amendment tasks the DoD Inspector General to ask the hard 
questions and report back. The millions of people suffering from Lyme 
and other tick-borne diseases deserve to know the truth.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentlewoman from New Mexico (Ms. Haaland), a member of the committee.
  Ms. HAALAND. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of my amendment requiring 
reporting on human rights in Brazil in light of the Bolsonaro 
administration's dangerous actions.
  President Bolsonaro has said he wants to strip constitutional land 
rights from Brazil's indigenous people. He has openly stated that 
indigenous people should have been exterminated.
  His threats go beyond words. Bolsonaro's administration has already 
begun infringing upon the rights of indigenous people and other 
vulnerable groups.
  Despite this alarming behavior, President Trump named Brazil a major 
non-NATO ally. Congress can and must use its authority to direct and 
block funds and conduct oversight.
  The Bolsonaro administration must understand that increased U.S. 
cooperation is conditional upon respect for the rights of the people of 
Brazil, including indigenous people, Afro-Brazilians, women, and LGBTQ 
communities.
  Congress is watching, and we must demand accountability.
  Mr. Chairman, I also rise to support my amendment, which prohibits 
the Department of Defense from contracting with companies that do not 
have a sexual harassment policy.
  Now more than ever, people are empowered to speak up and change the 
culture in the workplace. Congress, the Department of Defense, and many 
other workplaces have or are implementing policies to hold perpetrators 
accountable. We must demand the same from those who do business with 
our government.
  In fiscal year 2017, the Department of Defense spent $320 billion on 
contractors. If these contractors are going to receive Federal dollars, 
they should be subject to the same accountability.
  My amendment will ensure that contractors have sexual harassment 
policies in place prior to signing on the dotted line. All workers must 
be protected in the workplace, especially when they are working to 
protect our country.
  I urge my colleagues to support workers and pass this amendment and 
pass the en bloc package.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the distinguished 
gentleman from California (Mr. McCarthy), our Republican leader.
  Mr. McCARTHY. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, on July 4, a 6.4 magnitude earthquake hit Ridgecrest, 
California. A day later, our Ridgecrest community experienced a 7.1 
magnitude earthquake.
  To put that in perspective, the Northridge quake that, 20 years ago, 
severely cost 60 lives and others and crippled Los Angeles was less 
than that.
  People felt this throughout southern California, but the epicenter of 
these earthquakes was located on the Naval Air Weapons Station China 
Lake.
  Hundreds of aftershocks have already occurred and are still 
occurring.
  The Navy announced that, due to earthquake-related damage, China Lake 
was not mission capable and that nonessential personnel had to be 
evacuated. This is significant because China Lake, along with 
neighboring installations, form a cornerstone of our national defense 
architecture that integrates all operational domains: air, land, sea, 
space, and cyberspace.
  The men and women who work here help test and develop the technology 
needed to equip our warfighters with the very best weapons and tools to 
ensure our military remains second to none.
  Now, my amendment, which I offered with Congressman Cook, was 
included in the en bloc package. It would authorize $100 million to 
help address China Lake's most immediate needs, and it requires the 
Department of Defense to develop a plan by October 1 to assess, repair, 
and modernize the infrastructure and facilities at China Lake and other 
installations in the R-2508 Special Use Airspace Complex that was 
damaged by the earthquakes.
  The extent of this damage is still being assessed, but we need to 
ensure that we are not only repairing this important base to address 
the threats facing our Nation today, but in the years ahead.
  Mr. Chairman, I want to be clear to my constituents in Ridgecrest, in 
Kern County, this amendment is just an initial step in helping China 
Lake and the communities I represent impacted by these earthquakes make 
sure they recover.
  Over the coming days, weeks, and months, I ask my colleagues in this 
Chamber and the U.S. Senate to join with me to ensure Ridgecrest, China 
Lake, and all communities impacted by earthquakes and natural disasters 
have our full support and are provided the resources they need to 
quickly rebuild and get back to normal.
  I also ask my colleagues to join me in thanking all the local first 
responders, the local, State, and Federal emergency response officials 
who have worked nonstop over the past several days to ensure our 
constituents affected in Ridgecrest were safe, have food and water and 
a place to sleep.
  Finally, I also want to thank the thousands of residents across our 
communities for their help, their actions, and their prayers for their 
neighbors in need.
  It is said adversity does not build character; it reveals it. 
Earthquakes can shake our foundations, but the residents of Ridgecrest 
should hold their heads high. In this time of adversity, their true 
character has shown and is an inspiration to all of us.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.

                              {time}  1915

  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Gottheimer).

[[Page H5654]]

  

  Mr. GOTTHEIMER. Mr. Chairman, I thank Chairman Smith, Ranking Member 
Thornberry, and all the Armed Services Committee members for all their 
hard work on this bill.
  I rise in support of the en bloc package, which contains four 
amendments I have introduced.
  Mr. Chair, Iran has engaged in reckless conduct, destabilizing the 
region, with their attacks on allied tankers near the Strait of Hormuz 
and with the support of terrorist organizations, including Hezbollah 
and Hamas. We must remain vigilant with Iran.
  My amendment ensures that the Defense Department reports on threats 
to freedom of navigation on all international waterways.
  My second amendment directs the Defense and State Departments to send 
recommendations to Congress to improve the Cooperative Threat Reduction 
Program. This will help eliminate nuclear material and prevent 
proliferation.
  My third amendment prohibits funds and support from going to foreign 
terrorist organizations, including Hamas, Hezbollah, Palestinian 
Islamic Jihad, al-Shabaab, and the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, 
by adding these to the prohibited list in section 1224 of this bill. We 
must stop terrorism in its tracks.
  Finally, brave Americans of every background have served in our Armed 
Forces, including Jewish American veterans who fought Nazis in World 
War II.
  My fourth amendment requires the Defense Department to question 
whether our Active Duty servicemembers have experienced anti-Semitism 
while bravely serving our country.
  Mr. Chair, I urge support for this bipartisan en bloc package of 
amendments.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the distinguished 
gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. Hill).
  Mr. HILL of Arkansas. Mr. Chair, I thank the chairman of the full 
committee, and I thank the ranking member for yielding.
  Today I rise in support of Mr. Rose's amendment to the National 
Defense Authorization Act. This amendment, which I cosponsored, takes 
the necessary steps to target bad actors responsible for the illegal 
trafficking of fentanyl into the United States.
  Across Arkansas, heartbroken families have told me their stories time 
and time again about how the opioid crisis has claimed the lives of 
their loved ones.
  According to the CDC, in 2017, more than 130 Americans lost their 
lives to opioid abuse each day, nearly half of those deaths 
attributable to fentanyl.
  We have a responsibility to stem the tide of this crisis. Targeting 
the source of the world's largest producers and distributors of 
fentanyl will begin to stop the flow of these drugs.
  Mr. Chair, I am grateful to Mr. Rose for this effort, which 
complements work that I have been doing over the past year with my 
friend, Senator Tom Cotton, to fight this plague.
  Mr. Chair, I thank the ranking member for yielding, and I urge a 
``yes'' vote on this en bloc package.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Rhode Island (Mr. Langevin).
  Mr. LANGEVIN. Mr. Chair, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of this en bloc package, and I would 
also like to speak in favor of en bloc package No. 10, which includes 
four of my amendments.
  The first would mandate that the President provide Congress with a 
copy of National Security Presidential Memorandums related to military 
operations in cyberspace.
  Congress has a vital role to play in ensuring that offensive cyber 
operations do not inadvertently undermine stability in cyberspace. 
Unfortunately, the White House has continuously stymied our efforts and 
attempts to conduct this constitutionally-protected oversight, refusing 
to provide important policy documents that took effect nearly a year 
ago.
  Ironically, I have largely supported the administration's more 
forward-leaning posture, but regardless of my feelings towards the 
underlying strategy, it is unacceptable that the White House continues 
to stonewall our attempts to oversee sensitive operations. This 
amendment will stop that obstruction.
  A second amendment ensures that new software acquisition pathways 
will include cybersecurity metrics. I strongly support updating how the 
Pentagon buys software, but it is important that we have explicit 
measures of the security of the code that we are buying.
  Now, I hope that this amendment will both drive the adoption of 
metrics related to common software weaknesses and lead to broader 
changes, such as increased use of type-safe programming languages.
  Finally, this package includes two amendments related to our Special 
Operations Forces.
  The first extends by 3 years a relatively new irregular warfare 
authority, which is designed to address threats in the gray zone below 
the level of armed conflict in order to gauge its use and 
effectiveness.
  The second would strengthen requirements that the Department notify 
Congress before exercising a counterterrorism authority referred to as 
127 Echo. This authority has proven its worth over the last decade, but 
I believe that we must continue to improve our rigorous oversight to 
ensure appropriate use.
  Mr. Chairman, I urge adoption of this en bloc package and my 
amendments in en bloc package No. 10.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the distinguished 
gentleman from Virginia (Mr. Riggleman).
  Mr. RIGGLEMAN. Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of my amendment, 
which directs the Secretary of Defense to develop a plan for a pilot 
program to train skilled technicians for placement in the defense 
industrial base, including critical shipbuilding skills such as 
welding, metrology, quality assurance, machining, and additive 
manufacturing.

  Mr. Chair, I would like to begin by thanking my friends, colleagues, 
and fellow Virginians, Representatives Luria, Wittman, McEachin, and 
Beyer, for their partnership on this amendment.
  Our Nation's defense industrial base is a critical aspect of our 
Nation's national security and economic prosperity. We must continue to 
adapt this industry to respond to the emerging challenges and global 
realities that face our country. One such challenge is training a 
workforce that can maintain the required tools and products our Armed 
Forces need.
  The Defense Industrial Base report to the President dated October 
2018 stated: ``Without concerted action that provides both a ready 
workforce and continuously-charged pipeline of new employees, the U.S. 
will not be able to maintain the large, vibrant, and diverse machine 
tools sector needed.''
  This amendment helps the Department of Defense close the gap in our 
Nation's workforce that threatens our global competitiveness and 
military capabilities. It will help America modernize its workforce and 
create a pipeline of new employees who support our security apparatus.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentlewoman from Oklahoma (Ms. Kendra S. Horn).
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chairman, I thank Chairman Smith 
for yielding.
  I rise today to speak about two amendments in this en bloc package 
that are critical to the Nation's security and good governance.
  The first is a bipartisan amendment that addresses the need for 
oversight and accountability in our national security infrastructure. 
This bipartisan amendment directs the IG to audit DOD departments and 
agencies to determine if excess profit and cost escalation on sole-
source contracts has taken place. This is important not only for our 
bases and maintenance, but it impacts our Nation's readiness.
  While we understand that contractors and suppliers need to make a 
profit, that doesn't mean that our taxpayer dollars should go to fund 
excess profits and escalations that are well outside of the norm.
  This good governance is reasonable and helps us to ensure our 
Nation's security while being good stewards of the taxpayer dollars.

[[Page H5655]]

  The second amendment in this en bloc package addresses our Nation's 
security in a different way: that of the air traffic controllers, who 
pay into their retirement throughout their career until they are forced 
to retire at the age of 56, many of whom are our Nation's veterans.
  Right now, we are experiencing a severe shortage of air traffic 
controllers across this Nation, and retired air traffic controllers are 
some of the most qualified supervisors and trainers. However, under 
current law, all FERS retirees either must work under 1.5 days per week 
or full-time, otherwise, they lose their Federal retirement.
  This amendment allows all retirees to simply retain their hard-earned 
retirement dollars that they have paid in, so we can train the next 
generation of air traffic controllers.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the distinguished 
gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. Stauber).
  Mr. STAUBER. Mr. Chair, I thank the chairman and ranking member for 
including my amendments in these en bloc amendments.
  Mr. Chair, my amendment is simple. It requires the Secretary of the 
Navy to create a report regarding the feasibility of doing maintenance 
work on naval vessels at shipyards other than shipyards in the vessel's 
home port.
  Currently, the Navy has a tremendous maintenance backlog, but under 
current law, there are certain restrictions that limit where naval 
vessels can undertake maintenance repair. Unless these restrictions are 
lifted, the Navy's backlog will only increase exponentially.
  At the same time, there are fully qualified shipyards in the rest of 
the United States, including the Great Lakes region, Gulf Coast, and 
Alaska, that can perform repair work for certain types of naval 
vessels. Yards such as Fraser Shipyards in Superior, Wisconsin, have 
the capacity and skills to do this work. They just need the chance.
  I know Fraser Shipyards and others are dedicated to the national 
security mission of the United States and would be an efficient and 
competent service provider, and I am certain Fraser Shipyards and 
others within the Great Lakes do not stand alone in this process.
  Although these vessels may not be homeported in these regions of the 
country, it should be within the Secretary's discretion to decide what 
types of vessels could be sent to such shipyards to help with the 
Navy's maintenance backlog. This could include noncombatant vessels, 
vessels with minimal crews, or other vessels that only need limited 
periods of time in shipyards for the repair work.
  The opportunity to create additional geographic repair centers 
presents the United States Navy an opportunity to diversify their 
industrial base, create resiliency, and improve our military readiness.
  Mr. Chair, I want to thank Congressman Duffy and Congressman Cox for 
cosponsoring this amendment, and I encourage all of my colleagues to 
support the en bloc amendment.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, I have no further speakers. I 
reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I have no further speakers on this en 
bloc package, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, I urge adoption of the en bloc 
package, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendments en bloc offered by the 
gentleman from Washington (Mr. Smith).
  The en bloc amendments were agreed to.


   Amendments En Bloc No. 8 Offered by Ms. Kendra S. Horn of Oklahoma

  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chair, pursuant to House 
Resolution 476, I offer amendments en bloc as the designee for Mr. 
Smith of Washington.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendments en bloc.
  Amendments en bloc No. 8 consisting of amendment Nos. 191, 192, 193, 
194, 195, 196, 197, 198, 199, 200, 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 
208, 209, 210, 211, 212, 213, 214, and 215 printed in part B of House 
Report 116-143, offered by Ms. Kendra S. Horn of Oklahoma:


          amendment no. 191 offered by mr. horsford of nevada

       At the end of subtitle C of title II, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 2__. INCREASE IN FUNDING FOR AIR FORCE UNIVERSITY 
                   RESEARCH INITIATIVES.

       (a) Increase.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 201 for research, development, test, 
     and evaluation, as specified in the corresponding funding 
     table in section 4201, for research, development, test, and 
     evaluation, Air Force, basic research, University Research 
     Initiatives, line 002 (PE 0601103F) is hereby increased by 
     $5,000,000.
       (b) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 301 for operation and maintenance, as 
     specified in the corresponding funding table in section 4301, 
     for operation and maintenance, Defense-wide, operating 
     forces, Special Operations Command Theater Forces, line 100 
     is hereby reduced by $5,000,000.


       amendment no. 192 offered by ms. houlahan of pennsylvania

       At the end of subtitle F of title VIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 882. POSTAWARD EXPLANATIONS FOR UNSUCCESSFUL OFFERORS 
                   FOR CERTAIN CONTRACTS.

       Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Federal Acquisition Regulation shall be revised 
     to require that with respect to an offer for a task order or 
     delivery order in an amount greater than the simplified 
     acquisition threshold (as defined in section 134 of title 41, 
     United States Code) and less than or equal to $5,500,000 
     issued under an indefinite delivery-indefinite quantity 
     contract, the contracting officer for such contract shall, 
     upon written request from an unsuccessful offeror, provide a 
     brief explanation as to why such offeror was unsuccessful 
     that includes a summary of the rationale for the award and an 
     evaluation of the significant weak or deficient factors in 
     the offeror's offer.


       amendment no. 193 offered by ms. houlahan of pennsylvania

       At the end of subtitle A of title VI, add the following:

     SEC. 606. CONTINUED ENTITLEMENTS WHILE A MEMBER OF THE ARMED 
                   FORCES PARTICIPATES IN A CAREER INTERMISSION 
                   PROGRAM.

       Section 710(h) of title 10, United States Code, is 
     amended--
       (1) in paragraph (1), by striking ``; and'' and inserting a 
     semicolon;
       (2) in paragraph (2), by striking the period and inserting 
     a semicolon; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following new paragraphs:
       ``(3) the entitlement of the member and of the survivors of 
     the member to all death benefits under the provisions of 
     chapter 75 of this title;
       ``(4) the provision of all travel and transportation 
     allowances for the survivors of deceased members to attend 
     burial ceremonies under section 481f of title 37; and
       ``(5) the eligibility of the member for general benefits as 
     provided in part II of title 38.''.


       amendment no. 194 offered by ms. houlahan of pennsylvania

       Add at the end of subtitle G of title XII the following:

     SEC. 1268. REPORT ON IMPLICATIONS OF CHINESE MILITARY 
                   PRESENCE IN DJIBOUTI.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall 
     submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report 
     that contains a comprehensive strategy to address security 
     concerns posed by the Chinese People's Liberation Army 
     Support Base in Djibouti to United States military 
     installations and logistics chains in sub-Saharan Africa and 
     the Middle East.
       (b) Matters to Be Included.--The report required by 
     subsection (a) shall include the following:
       (1) An assessment of the potential military, intelligence, 
     and logistical threats facing key regional United States 
     military infrastructure, supply chains, and staging grounds 
     due to the proximity of major Chinese military assets in 
     Djibouti.
       (2) An assessment of the efforts taken by Camp Lemonnier to 
     improve aviation safety in the aftermath of the recent 
     Chinese military targeting of American flight crews with 
     military-grade lasers.
       (3) An assessment of Djibouti's Chinese-held public debt 
     and the strategic vulnerabilities such may present if China 
     moves to claim the Port of Djibouti or other key logistical 
     assets in repayment.
       (4) A description of the specific operational challenges 
     facing United States military and supply chains in the Horn 
     of Africa and the Middle East in the event that access to the 
     strategically significant Port of Djibouti becomes limited or 
     lost in its entirety, as well as a comprehensive contingency 
     strategy to maintain full operational capacity in AFRICOM and 
     CENTCOM through other ports and transport hubs.
       (5) An identification of measures to mitigate risk of 
     escalation between United States and Chinese military assets 
     in Djibouti.
       (6) Any other matters the Secretary of Defense considers 
     appropriate.
       (c) Form.--The report required under subsection (a) shall 
     be submitted in unclassified form, but may include a 
     classified annex.

[[Page H5656]]

       (d) Appropriate Congressional Committees Defined.--In this 
     section, the term ``appropriate congressional committees'' 
     means--
       (1) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on 
     Foreign Relations, the Committee on Appropriations, and the 
     Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate; and
       (2) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on 
     Foreign Affairs, the Committee on Appropriations, and the 
     Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of 
     Representatives.


         amendment no. 195 offered by ms. jackson lee of texas

       At the end of subtitle C of title XXVIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 28__. REPORT ON CAPACITY OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE TO 
                   PROVIDE SURVIVORS OF NATURAL DISASTERS WITH 
                   EMERGENCY SHORT-TERM HOUSING.

       Not later than 220 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to the 
     congressional defense committees a report analyzing the 
     capacity of the Department of Defense to provide survivors of 
     natural disasters with emergency short-term housing.


         amendment no. 196 offered by ms. jackson lee of texas

       At the appropriate place in subtitle G of title XII, insert 
     the following:

     SEC. 12__. REPORT ON EFFORTS TO COMBAT BOKO HARAM IN NIGERIA 
                   AND THE LAKE CHAD BASIN.

       (a) Sense of Congress.--Congress--
       (1) strongly condemns the ongoing violence and the 
     systematic gross human rights violations against the people 
     of Nigeria and the Lake Chad Basin carried out by Boko Haram;
       (2) expresses its support for the people of Nigeria and the 
     Lake Chad Basin who wish to live in a peaceful, economically 
     prosperous, and democratic region; and
       (3) calls on the President to support Nigerian, Lake Chad 
     Basin, and international community efforts to ensure 
     accountability for crimes against humanity committed by Boko 
     Haram against the people of Nigeria and the Lake Chad Basin, 
     particularly the young girls kidnapped from Chibok and other 
     internally displaced persons affected by the actions of Boko 
     Haram.
       (b) Report.--
       (1) In general.--Not later than 90 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense, the 
     Secretary of State, and the Attorney General shall jointly 
     submit to Congress a report on efforts to combat Boko Haram 
     in Nigeria and the Lake Chad Basin.
       (2) Elements.--The report required under paragraph (1) 
     shall include the following elements:
       (A) A description of initiatives undertaken by the 
     Department of Defense to assist the Government of Nigeria and 
     countries in the Lake Chad Basin to develop capacities to 
     deploy special forces to combat Boko Haram.
       (B) A description of United States activities to enhance 
     the capacity of Nigeria and countries in the Lake Chad Basin 
     to investigate and prosecute human rights violations 
     perpetrated against the people of Nigeria and the Lake Chad 
     Basin by Boko Haram, al-Qaeda affiliates, and other terrorist 
     organizations, in order to promote respect for rule of law in 
     Nigeria and the Lake Chad Basin.


         amendment no. 197 offered by ms. jackson lee of texas

       At the end of subtitle F of title XII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 12__. BRIEFING ON DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PROGRAM TO 
                   PROTECT UNITED STATES STUDENTS AGAINST FOREIGN 
                   AGENTS.

       Not later than 240 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall provide a briefing 
     to the congressional defense committees on the program 
     described in section 1277 of the National Defense 
     Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91), 
     including an assessment on whether the program is beneficial 
     to students interning, working part time, or in a program 
     that will result in employment post-graduation with 
     Department of Defense components and contractors.


         amendment no. 198 offered by ms. jackson lee of texas

       At the end of subtitle A of title V, add the following:

     SEC. 5___. REPORT ON RATE OF MATERNAL MORTALITY AMONG MEMBERS 
                   OF THE ARMED FORCES.

       Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Secretary of Defense, and with respect to 
     members of the Coast Guard, the Secretary of the Department 
     in which the Coast Guard is operating when it is not 
     operating as a service in the Navy, shall submit to Congress 
     a report on the rate of maternal mortality among members of 
     the Armed Forces and the dependents of such members.


         amendment no. 199 offered by ms. jackson lee of texas

       At the end of subtitle A of title XVI, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 16__. REPORT ON SPACE DEBRIS.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 240 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall 
     submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report 
     on the risks posed by man-made space debris in low-earth 
     orbit, including--
       (1) recommendations with respect to the remediation of such 
     risks; and
       (2) outlines of plans to reduce the incident of such space 
     debris.
       (b) Appropriate Congressional Committees Defined.--In this 
     section, the term ``appropriate congressional committees'' 
     means--
       (1) the Committee on Armed Services and the Committee on 
     Science, Space, and Technology of the House of 
     Representatives; and
       (2) the Committee on Armed Services and Committee on 
     Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the Senate.


         Amendment No. 200 Offered by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas

       At the end of subtitle C of title XVI, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 16__. REPORT ON CYBERSECURITY TRAINING PROGRAMS.

       Not later than 240 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to the 
     congressional defense committees a report that accounts for 
     all of the efforts, programs, initiatives, and investments of 
     the Department of Defense to train elementary, secondary, and 
     postsecondary students in fields related to cybersecurity, 
     cyber defense, and cyber operations. The report shall--
       (1) include information on the metrics used to evaluate 
     such efforts, programs, initiatives, and investments, and 
     identify overlaps or redundancies across the various efforts, 
     programs, initiatives, and investments; and
       (2) address how the Department leverages such efforts, 
     programs, initiatives, and investments in the recruitment and 
     retention of both the civilian and military cyberworkforces.


         Amendment No. 201 Offered by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas

       At the end of subtitle C of title VII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 7__. INCREASED COLLABORATION WITH NIH TO COMBAT TRIPLE 
                   NEGATIVE BREAST CANCER.

       (a) In General.--The Office of Health of the Department of 
     Defense shall work in collaboration with the National 
     Institutes of Health to--
       (1) identify specific genetic and molecular targets and 
     biomarkers for triple negative breast cancer; and
       (2) provide information useful in biomarker selection, drug 
     discovery, and clinical trials design that will enable both--
       (A) triple negative breast cancer patients to be identified 
     earlier in the progression of their disease; and
       (B) the development of multiple targeted therapies for the 
     disease.
       (b) Funding.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated by section 1405 for the Defense Health Program, 
     as specified in the corresponding funding tables in division 
     D, is hereby increased by $10,000,000 to carry out subsection 
     (a).
       (c) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated for operation and maintenance, Defense-wide, as 
     specified in the corresponding funding table in section 4301, 
     for Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide is hereby reduced 
     by $10,000,000.


         Amendment No. 202 Offered by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas

       At the end of subtitle C of title VII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 7__. FUNDING FOR POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER.

       (a) Funding.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated by section 1405 for the Defense Health Program, 
     as specified in the corresponding funding table in such 
     division, is hereby increased by $2,500,000 for post-
     traumatic stress disorder.
       (b) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated for operation and maintenance, Defense-wide, as 
     specified in the corresponding funding table in section 4301, 
     for Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide is hereby reduced 
     by $2,500,000.


         Amendment No. 203 Offered by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas

       At the end of subtitle F of title V, add the following:

     SEC. 560B. SPEECH DISORDERS OF CADETS AND MIDSHIPMEN.

       (a) Testing.--The Superintendent of a military service 
     academy shall provide testing for speech disorders to 
     incoming cadets or midshipmen under the jurisdiction of that 
     Superintendent.
       (b) No Effect on Admission.--The testing under subsection 
     (a) may not have any affect on admission to a military 
     service academy.
       (c) Results.--The Superintendent shall provide each cadet 
     or midshipman under the jurisdiction of that Superintendent 
     the result of the testing under subsection (a) and a list of 
     warfare unrestricted line officer positions and occupation 
     specialists that require successful performance on the speech 
     test.
       (d) Therapy.--The Superintendent shall furnish speech 
     therapy to a cadet or midshipman under the jurisdiction of 
     that Superintendent at the election of the cadet or 
     midshipman.
       (e) Retaking.--A cadet or midshipman whose testing indicate 
     a speech disorder or impediment may elect to retake the 
     testing once each academic year while enrolled at the 
     military service academy.

[[Page H5657]]

  



         Amendment No. 204 Offered by Ms. Jackson Lee of Texas

       In section 235(a)(2)--
       (1) in subparagraph (H), strike ``and'' at the end;
       (2) redesignate subparagraph (I) as subparagraph (J); and
       (3) insert after subparagraph (H), the following new 
     subparagraph (I):
       (I) opportunities and risks; and


         Amendment No. 205 Offered by Ms. Jayapal of Washington

       Page 379, after line 2, insert the following new 
     subsection:
       (h) Funding.--
       (1) Increase.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 301 for operation and maintenance, as 
     specified in the corresponding funding table in section 4301, 
     for operation and maintenance, Defense-wide, administrative 
     and service-wide activities, Office of the Secretary of 
     Defense, line 460 is hereby increased by $5,000,000 (with the 
     amount of such increase to be made available for the Defense 
     Suicide Prevention Office and National Guard suicide 
     prevention pilot program under this section).
       (2) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 101 for procurement, as specified in 
     the corresponding funding table in section 4101, for 
     shipbuilding and conversion, Navy, ship to shore connector, 
     line 024 is hereby reduced by $5,000,000.
       Page 379, line 3, strike ``(h)'' and insert ``(i)''.


         Amendment No. 206 Offered by Ms. Jayapal of Washington

       At the end of subtitle G of title VIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 898. PROHIBITION ON CONTRACTING WITH PERSONS WITH 
                   WILLFUL OR REPEATED VIOLATIONS OF THE FAIR 
                   LABOR STANDARDS ACT OF 1938.

       The head of a Federal department or agency (as defined in 
     section 102 of title 40, United States Code) shall initiate a 
     debarment proceeding with respect to a person for whom 
     information regarding a willful or repeated violation of the 
     Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. 201 et seq.) as 
     determined by a disposition described under subsection (c)(1) 
     of section 2313 of title 41, United States Code, is included 
     in the database established under subsection (a) of such 
     section.


         Amendment No. 207 Offered by Mr. Jeffries of New York

       Page 817, after line 21, insert the following:
       ``(30) An assessment of the nature of Chinese military 
     relations with Russia, including what strategic objectives 
     China and Russia share and are acting on, and on what 
     objectives they misalign.''.


           Amendment No. 208 Offered by Ms. Johnson of Texas

       Page 145, lines 23 through 24, strike `` as the Secretary 
     considers necessary and appropriate'' and insert ``on an 
     annual basis''.


           amendment no. 209 offered by ms. johnson of texas

       Page 365, line 10, insert before the period the following: 
     ``, in a manner that addresses the need for cultural 
     competence and diversity among such mental health 
     providers''.


           amendment no. 210 offered by ms. johnson of texas

       At the end of subtitle B of title XXVIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 28__. INSTALLATION OF CARBON MONOXIDE DETECTORS IN 
                   MILITARY FAMILY HOUSING.

       Section 2821 of title 10, United States Code, is amended by 
     adding at the end the following new subsection:
       ``(e) The Secretary concerned shall provide for the 
     installation and maintenance of an appropriate number of 
     carbon monoxide detectors in each unit of military family 
     housing under the jurisdiction of the Secretary.''.


         amendment no. 211 offered by mr. joyce of pennsylvania

       At the end of subtitle G of title XXVIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 28__. REPORT ON PROJECTS AWAITING APPROVAL FROM THE 
                   REALTY GOVERNANCE BOARD.

       Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to Congress a 
     report describing the projects that, as of the date of the 
     report, are awaiting approval from the Realty Governance 
     Board. Such report shall include--
       (1) a list of projects awaiting evaluation for a Major Land 
     Acquisition Waiver; and
       (2) an assessment of the impact a project described in 
     paragraph (1) would have on the security of physical assets 
     and personnel at the military installation requesting the 
     Major Land Acquisition Waiver.


            amendment no. 212 offered by ms. kaptur of ohio

       Insert after section 554 the following new section:

     SEC. 5__. INCLUSION OF COAST GUARD IN DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE 
                   STARBASE PROGRAM.

       Section 2193b of title 10, United States Code, is further 
     amended--
       (1) in subsection (a), by inserting ``and the Secretary of 
     the Department in which the Coast Guard is operating'' after 
     ``military departments''; and
       (2) in subsection (f), by striking ``and the Secretaries of 
     the military departments'' and inserting ``, the Secretaries 
     of the military departments, and the Secretary of the 
     Department in which the Coast Guard is operating''.


       Amendment No. 213 Offered by Mr. Keating of Massachusetts

       At the end of subtitle B of title XII, add the following:

     SEC. _. MEANINGFUL INCLUSION OF AFGHAN WOMEN IN PEACE 
                   NEGOTIATIONS.

       As part of any activities of the Department of Defense 
     relating to the ongoing peace process in Afghanistan, the 
     Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of 
     State, shall seek to ensure the meaningful participation of 
     Afghan women in that process in a manner consistent with the 
     Women, Peace, and Security Act of 2017 (22 U.S.C. 2152j et 
     seq.), including through advocacy for the inclusion of Afghan 
     women leaders in ongoing and future negotiations to end the 
     conflict in Afghanistan.


       Amendment No. 214 Offered by Mr. Keating of Massachusetts

       At the end of subtitle D of title X, add the following:

     SEC. ___. ESTABLISHING A COORDINATOR FOR ISIS DETAINEE 
                   ISSUES.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 90 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the President, acting through the 
     Secretary of State, shall designate an existing official 
     within the Department of State to serve as senior-level 
     coordinator to coordinate, in conjunction with the lead and 
     other relevant agencies, all matters for the United States 
     Government relating to the long-term disposition of Islamic 
     State of Iraq and Syria (ISIS) foreign terrorist fighter 
     detainees, including all matters in connection with--
       (1) repatriation, transfer, prosecution, and intelligence-
     gathering;
       (2) coordinating a whole-of-government approach with other 
     countries and international organizations, including 
     INTERPOL, to ensure secure chains of custody and locations of 
     ISIS foreign terrorist fighter detainees;
       (3) coordinating technical and evidentiary assistance to 
     foreign countries to aid in the successful prosecution of 
     ISIS foreign terrorist fighter detainees; and
       (4) all multilateral and international engagements led by 
     the Department of State and other agencies that are related 
     to the current and future handling, detention, and 
     prosecution of ISIS foreign terrorist fighter detainees.
       (b) Retention of Authority.--The appointment of a senior-
     level coordinator pursuant to subsection (a) shall not 
     deprive any agency of any authority to independently perform 
     functions of that agency.
       (c) Annual Report.--
       (1) In general.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, and not less frequently than once 
     each year thereafter through January 21, 2021, the individual 
     designated under subsection (a) shall submit to the 
     appropriate committees of Congress a detailed report 
     regarding high-value ISIS detainees that the coordinator 
     reasonably determines to be subject to criminal prosecution 
     in the United States.
       (2) Elements.--The report under paragraph (1) shall 
     include, at a minimum, the following:
       (A) A detailed description of the facilities where ISIS 
     foreign terrorist fighter detainees described in paragraph 
     (1) are being held.
       (B) An analysis of all United States efforts to prosecute 
     ISIS foreign terrorist fighter detainees described in 
     paragraph (1) and the outcomes of such efforts. Any 
     information, the disclosure of which may violate Department 
     of Justice policy or law, relating to a prosecution or 
     investigation may be withheld from a report under paragraph 
     (1).
       (C) A detailed description of any option to expedite 
     prosecution of any ISIS foreign terrorist fighter detainee 
     described in paragraph (1), including in a court of competent 
     jurisdiction outside of the United States.
       (D) An analysis of factors on the ground in Syria and Iraq 
     that may result in the unintended release of ISIS foreign 
     terrorist fighter detainees described in paragraph (1), and 
     an assessment of any measures available to mitigate such 
     releases.
       (E) A detailed description of all multilateral and other 
     international efforts or proposals that would assist in the 
     prosecution of ISIS foreign terrorist fighter detainees 
     described in paragraph (1).
       (F) An analysis of all efforts between the United States 
     and partner countries within the Global Coalition to Defeat 
     ISIS or other countries to share intelligence or evidence 
     that may aid in the prosecution of members of the Islamic 
     State of Iraq and Syria and associated forces, and any legal 
     obstacles that may hinder such efforts.
       (G) An analysis of the manner in which the United States 
     Government communicates on such proposals and efforts to the 
     families of United States citizens believed to be a victim of 
     a criminal act by an ISIS foreign terrorist fighter detainee.
       (3) Form.--The report under paragraph (1) shall be 
     submitted in unclassified form, but may include a classified 
     annex.
       (d) Definitions.----In this section:
       (1) The term ``appropriate committees of Congress'' means--

[[Page H5658]]

       (A) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on 
     Foreign Relations, the Committee on the Judiciary, the Select 
     Committee on Intelligence and the Committee on Appropriations 
     of the Senate; and
       (B) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on 
     Foreign Affairs, the Committee on the Judiciary, the 
     Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, and the Committee 
     on Appropriations of the House of Representatives.
       (2) The term ``ISIS foreign terrorist fighter detainee'' 
     means a detained individual--
       (A) who allegedly fought for or supported the Islamic State 
     of Iraq and Syria (ISIS); and
       (B) who is a national of a country other than Iraq or 
     Syria.
       (e) Sunset.--The requirements under this section shall 
     sunset on January 21, 2021.


           Amendment No. 215 Offered by Ms. Kelly of Illinois

       At the end of subtitle H of title V, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 5__. REPORT ON TRAINING AND SUPPORT AVAILABLE TO 
                   MILITARY SPOUSES.

       (a) Report Required.--Not later than 180 days after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, the Under Secretary of 
     Defense for Personnel and Readiness shall submit to the 
     congressional defense committees a report that includes a 
     description of the following:
       (1) Financial literacy programs currently designed 
     specifically for military spouses.
       (2) Programs designed to educate spouses and service 
     members about the risks of multi-level marketing.
       (3) Efforts to evaluate the effectiveness of financial 
     literacy programs.
       (4) The number of counseling sessions requested by military 
     spouses at Family Support Centers in the previous 5 years.
       (b) Public Availability.--The report submitted under 
     subsection (a) shall be made available on a publicly 
     accessible website of the Department of Defense.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentlewoman from 
Oklahoma (Ms. Kendra S. Horn) and the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Thornberry) each will control 10 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Oklahoma.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to 
the gentlewoman from Pennsylvania (Ms. Dean).
  Ms. DEAN. Mr. Chair, I thank the chairman of the committee and I also 
thank the designee for yielding me this time.
  I am pleased to introduce two amendments to the National Defense 
Authorization Act that deal with PFAS contamination issues.
  The first amendment, amendment 125, provides an additional $5 million 
for the nationwide Centers for Disease Control and the Agency for Toxic 
Substances and Disease Registry PFAS health study, authorizing a total 
of $15 million for this critical research.
  We know that PFAS chemicals are linked to devastating health 
consequences and are present in 99 percent of Americans, but many 
questions remain unanswered. This study will help get the answers our 
constituents deserve and the solutions we need.

                              {time}  1930

  I thank Representatives Kildee, Fitzpatrick, Upton, Pappas, Boyle, 
Rouda, and others for cosponsoring this amendment.
  The second amendment, Amendment No. 126, phases out the Department of 
Defense's use of AFFF firefighting foam by 2025, reducing PFAS 
contamination and protecting our communities.
  The amendment also substantially limits the Department of Defense's 
ability to use waivers from 6 years to 1 year. Currently, the 
Department of Defense can use waivers that allow the use of AFFF 
firefighting foam up to 2035, almost a decade longer than this phaseout 
provision would allow.
  I thank, again, Representatives Kildee and Pappas for supporting this 
amendment.
  I also thank Chairman Smith and his extraordinary staff for working 
with me on these critically important issues.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I have no speakers, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to 
the gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Stanton).
  Mr. STANTON. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, few things are as patriotic--as American--as serving 
our Nation in the United States Armed Forces. My amendment, amendment 
No. 17, would ensure that noncitizens defending our country receive the 
resources they need to pursue the citizenship they have earned.
  Specifically, my amendment will modify the pre-separation counseling 
checklist administered to servicemembers to provide them an opportunity 
to request further information regarding expedited naturalization.
  Throughout history, many legal permanent residents have demonstrated 
their commitment to the United States by volunteering to serve their 
adopted country by putting on the uniform and joining the United States 
Armed Forces. Unfortunately, we have all seen reports that there may be 
thousands of deported U.S. veterans because they failed to apply for 
citizenship for a variety of reasons. Deporting these patriotic 
veterans does not reflect our American values.
  As a country that honors our veterans, we need to take the 
appropriate steps to ensure that those who volunteered to serve are not 
deported because they were unaware of the benefits available to them.
  My amendment provides a safety net that ensures noncitizen 
servicemembers who defended our country are aware of these benefits.
  Mr. Chairman, my amendment No. 14 allows veterans who are enrolled in 
their respective service's Wounded Warrior program to continue their 
enrollment in the Military Adaptive Sports Program for an additional 
year after separation.
  Currently, once a servicemember separates from the U.S. Armed Forces, 
they no longer qualify for their respective service's Wounded Warrior 
program. My amendment would change this by extending eligibility for an 
additional year during their transition to civilian life.
  It is reported that veterans, in their first year after separating 
from uniformed service, sadly, experience suicide rates at 
approximately two times higher than the overall veteran suicide rate. 
This is even higher for wounded veterans. My amendment looks to combat 
this devastating statistic by providing veterans with continued 
physical, psychological, and social rehabilitation during the first 
year of transition.
  Mr. Chairman, I encourage my colleagues to support this amendment 
package.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to 
the gentlewoman from Pennsylvania (Ms. Wild).
  Ms. WILD. Mr. Chairman, I rise today to urge my colleagues to vote 
yes on a bipartisan amendment to address the opioid crisis that affects 
our servicemembers so severely. And I thank my fellow Pennsylvanian and 
friend, Brian Fitzpatrick, for joining me in tackling this issue.
  This amendment would establish a partnership between the Department 
of Defense and academic health centers to work on three key areas:
  One, focused research on reducing our servicemembers' dependency on 
opioids;
  Two, the development of new methods of pain management and mental 
health strategies; and
  Three, partnerships with industry that would advance technologies for 
wounded servicemembers that will improve their day-to-day lives.
  The opioid epidemic is not and cannot be a bipartisan issue. It hits 
communities all across the country, regardless of ethnicity, race, or 
socioeconomic status. But the epidemic is spreading to our 
servicemembers at an alarming rate.
  Our servicemembers have unique challenges. Studies show that 15 
percent of servicemembers use opioids following injuries while 
deployed, which is almost four times the civilian average of 4 percent. 
As a result, addiction is higher among servicemembers than in the 
civilian population and is rising. Over a 3-year period, the percentage 
of misuse nearly tripled. That is why this amendment is so critical.
  Our servicemembers protect all of us and we can protect them by 
passing this amendment and curtailing the devastating addictions of our 
American heroes.
  Mr. Chairman, I urge passage of this amendment.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.

[[Page H5659]]

  

  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chairman, I am pleased to yield 2 
minutes to the gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Schneider).
  Mr. SCHNEIDER. Mr. Chairman, I thank my colleague from Oklahoma for 
yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of my amendment codifying the 
Boots to Business program and authorizing it for 5 years.

  The men and women who ably serve our Nation with honor deserve our 
support as they transition from military to civilian life. Many of our 
servicemembers have the temperament, drive, and skills to excel in 
small business. They excel as small-business owners and as 
entrepreneurs, but they oftentimes lack the industry-specific 
experience to turn their dreams into reality.
  The Boots to Business program helps bridge this gap by offering 
exiting servicemembers and military spouses a 2-day in-person course on 
business ownership, followed by more in-depth instruction through an 8-
week online course.
  Since the program launched in 2013, more than 50,000 veterans have 
participated.
  Earlier this week, the House Small Business Committee held a hearing 
on veteran entrepreneurship. We had the chance to hear from veterans 
who turned their careers as small-business owners successfully after 
benefiting from the programming and training provided by the Boots to 
Business program.
  Codifying this important program is a bipartisan effort, and I urge 
my colleagues to join us in support of the Boots to Business program 
and more opportunities for our veterans.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chairman, may I inquire how much 
time is remaining on each side?
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Stanton). The gentlewoman from Oklahoma has 3 
minutes remaining. The gentleman from Texas has 10 minutes remaining.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chairman, I am pleased to yield 2 
minutes to the gentlewoman from Washington (Ms. Schrier).
  Ms. SCHRIER. Mr. Chairman, I thank Representative Horn for allowing 
me to speak on these issues.
  Mr. Chairman, my amendment supports small businesses by directing the 
Secretary of the Navy to adhere to competitive procedures whenever 
possible. This will not only make it easier for smaller contractors to 
compete on an even playing field with billion-dollar corporations, but 
it is also good governance.
  Approximately 2,000 businesses provide support to the military and 
defense sectors in Washington State. In the last 3 years, businesses 
were awarded nearly $15 billion in related contracts.
  Our small businesses, many of which are owned by veterans, are a 
driving force in our economy, especially in Washington State. By 
ensuring contracts are awarded on a competitive basis, we can save the 
Federal Government millions of dollars in acquisition and sustainment 
costs.
  Also, for NDAA, I partnered with my friend and colleague, 
Representative Rick Larsen, to ensure communities facing the greatest 
risk of fire have equitable access to firefighting and emergency 
equipment.
  Two Federal programs, the Firefighter Property Program and the 
Federal Excess Personal Property Program, transfer excess Department of 
Defense property to the U.S. Forest Service, which then provides it to 
States for use in firefighting. This property includes trucks, tools, 
hoses, vehicles, and aircraft parts, as well as protective clothing.
  However, these programs do not currently distribute equipment based 
on need or risk, but rather on a first-come, first-served basis. This 
bill will allow for need to be taken into consideration when this 
equipment is available so that we can improve firefighting and 
emergency service capabilities where they are needed most.
  Lastly, I thank my colleague, Representative Stivers, for partnering 
with me to ensure that the Secretary of Defense is conducting research 
on the reproductive health of female servicemembers and making that 
research public. With our military forces diversifying, it is important 
that we address issues identified for improvement in that research.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chairman, I encourage my 
colleagues to support the en bloc package, as well as the NDAA upon 
final passage, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. Chair, l rise today to voice my support for 
my three amendments to H.R. 2500, the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 2020.
  My first amendment requires an annual update of the climate 
vulnerability and risk assessment tool by the Secretary of Defense. 
This tool will play a critical role in measuring the impact of climate 
change on our defense infrastructure, therefore we must ensure that it 
is routinely updated to reflect a rapidly changing climate.
  My second amendment ensures that cultural competence and diversity 
are integrated in the recruitment and retention efforts of mental 
health providers for our active duty service members. It is essential 
that these providers reflect the diversity of our troops and are 
culturally competent in their treatment services.
  My third amendment mandates the installation and maintenance of 
carbon monoxide detectors in all military family housing units. This 
will ensure that our armed services families are protected against the 
risk of carbon monoxide poisoning in their own homes.
  I urge my colleagues to support these amendments.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendments en bloc offered 
by the gentlewoman from Oklahoma (Ms. Horn).
  The en bloc amendments were agreed to.


   Amendments En Bloc No. 9 Offered by Ms. Kendra S. Horn of Oklahoma

  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chairman, pursuant to House 
Resolution 476, as the designee of the gentleman from Washington (Mr. 
Smith), I offer amendments en bloc.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendments en bloc.
  Amendments en bloc No. 9 consisting of amendment Nos. 216, 219, 220, 
221, 222, 223, 224, 225, 226, 227, 228, 229, 230, 231, 232, 233, 234, 
235, 236, 237, and 238 printed in part B of House Report 116-143, 
offered by Ms. Kendra S. Horn of Oklahoma:

         Amendment No. 216 Offered by Mr. Khanna of California

       At the end of subtitle B of title XXXI, add the following:

     SEC. 3121. AVAILABILITY OF AMOUNTS FOR DENUCLEARIZATION OF 
                   DEMOCRATIC PEOPLE'S REPUBLIC OF NORTH KOREA.

       (a) In General.--The amount authorized to be appropriated 
     by section 3101 and available as specified in the funding 
     table in section 4701 for defense nuclear nonproliferation is 
     hereby increased by $10,000,000, with the amount of the 
     increase to be available to develop and prepare to implement 
     a comprehensive, long-term monitoring and verification 
     program for activities related to the phased denuclearization 
     of the Democratic People's Republic of North Korea, in 
     coordination with relevant international partners and 
     organizations.
       (b) Offset.--The amount authorized to be appropriated by 
     this title and available as specified in the funding table in 
     section 4701 for weapons activities for stockpile services, 
     production support is hereby reduced by $10,000,000.


          Amendment No. 219 Offered by Mr. Kildee of Michigan

       At the end of subtitle G of title V, add the following:

     SEC. 567. TRAINING PROGRAM REGARDING DISINFORMATION 
                   CAMPAIGNS.

       (a) Establishment.--Not later than September 30, 2020, the 
     Secretary of Defense shall establish a program for training 
     members of the Armed Forces and employees of the Department 
     of Defense regarding the threat of disinformation campaigns 
     specifically targeted at such individuals and the families of 
     such individuals.
       (b) Report Required.--Not later than October 30, 2020, the 
     Secretary of Defense shall submit a report to the 
     congressional defense committees regarding the program under 
     subsection (a).


          Amendment No. 220 Offered by Mr. Kildee of Michigan

       At the end of subtitle B of title XXVIII, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 28__. LEAD-BASED PAINT TESTING AND REPORTING.

       (a) Establishment of Department of Defense Policy on Lead 
     Testing on Military Installations.--
       (1) In general.--Not later than February 1, 2020, the 
     Secretary of Defense shall establish a policy under which--
       (A) a qualified individual may access a military 
     installation for the purpose of conducting lead testing on 
     the installation, subject to the approval of the Secretary; 
     and
       (B) the results of any lead testing conducted on a military 
     installation shall be transmitted--

[[Page H5660]]

       (i) in the case of a military installation located inside 
     the United States, to--

       (I) the civil engineer of the installation;
       (II) the housing management office of the installation;
       (III) the public health organization on the installation;
       (IV) the major subordinate command of the Armed Force with 
     jurisdiction over the installation; and
       (V) if required by law, any relevant Federal, State, and 
     local agencies; and

       (ii) in the case of a military installation located outside 
     the United States, to the civil engineer or commander of the 
     installation who shall transmit those results to the major 
     subordinate command of the Armed Force with jurisdiction over 
     the installation.
       (2) Definitions.--In this subsection:
       (A) United states.--The term ``United States'' has the 
     meaning given such term in section 101(a)(1) of title 10, 
     United States Code.
       (B) Qualified individual.--The term ``qualified 
     individual'' means an individual who is certified by the 
     Environmental Protection Agency or by a State as--
       (i) a lead-based paint inspector; or
       (ii) a lead-based paint risk assessor.
       (b) Annual Reporting on Lead-based Paint in Military 
     Housing.--
       (1) In general.--Subchapter III of chapter 169 of title 10, 
     United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the 
     following new section:

     ``SEC. 2869A. ANNUAL REPORTING ON LEAD-BASED PAINT IN 
                   MILITARY HOUSING.

       ``(a) Annual Reports.--
       ``(1) In general.--Not later than February 1 of each year, 
     the Secretary of Defense shall submit to the congressional 
     defense committees a report that sets forth, with respect to 
     military housing under the jurisdiction of each Secretary of 
     a military department for the calendar year preceding the 
     year in which the report is submitted, the following:
       ``(A) A certification that indicates whether the military 
     housing under the jurisdiction of the Secretary concerned is 
     in compliance with the requirements respecting lead-based 
     paint, lead-based paint activities, and lead-based paint 
     hazards described in section 408 of the Toxic Substances 
     Control Act (15 U.S.C. 2688).
       ``(B) A detailed summary of the data, disaggregated by 
     military department, used in making the certification under 
     subparagraph (A).
       ``(C) The total number of military housing units under the 
     jurisdiction of the Secretary concerned that were inspected 
     for lead-based paint in accordance with the requirements 
     described in subparagraph (A).
       ``(D) The total number of military housing units under the 
     jurisdiction of the Secretary concerned that were not 
     inspected for lead-based paint.
       ``(E) The total number of military housing units that were 
     found to contain lead-based paint in the course of the 
     inspections described in subparagraph (C).
       ``(F) A description of any abatement efforts with respect 
     to lead-based paint conducted regarding the military housing 
     units described in subparagraph (E).
       ``(2) Publication.--The Secretary of Defense shall publish 
     each report submitted under paragraph (1) on a publicly 
     available website of the Department of Defense.
       ``(b) Military Housing Defined.--In this section, the term 
     `military housing' includes military family housing and 
     military unaccompanied housing (as such term is defined in 
     section 2871 of this title).''.
       (2) Clerical amendment.--The table of sections at the 
     beginning of such subchapter is amended by adding at the end 
     the following new item:

``2869a. Annual reporting on lead-based paint in military housing''.


          Amendment No. 221 Offered by Mr. Kildee of Michigan

       At the end of subtitle G of title XII, add the following:

     SEC. _. REPORT ON SAUDI LED COALITION STRIKES IN YEMEN.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 90 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter for two 
     years, the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the 
     Secretary of State, shall submit to the appropriate 
     congressional committees a report detailing the number of 
     civilian casualties caused by the Saudi led coalition in 
     Yemen, including an assessment of the coalition members' 
     willingness and ability to prevent civilian casualties.
       (b) Matters to Be Included.--Each such report shall also 
     contain information relating to whether--
       (1) coalition members followed the norms and practices the 
     United States military employs to avoid civilian casualties 
     and ensure proportionality; and
       (2) strikes executed by coalition members are in compliance 
     with the United States' interpretation of the laws governing 
     armed conflict and proportionality.
       (c) Appropriate Congressional Committee Defined.--In this 
     section, the term ``appropriate congressional committees'' 
     means--
       (1) the congressional defense committees; and
       (2) the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Select 
     Committee on Intelligence of the Senate; and
       (3) the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Permanent 
     Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of 
     Representatives.


         Amendment No. 222 Offered by Mr. Kilmer of Washington

       At the end of subtitle A of title XVI, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 16__. STUDY ON LEVERAGING DIVERSE COMMERCIAL SATELLITE 
                   REMOTE SENSING CAPABILITIES.

       (a) Study.--The Secretary of Defense, in consultation with 
     the Director of National Intelligence, shall conduct a study 
     on the status of the transition from the National Geospatial-
     Intelligence Agency to the National Reconnaissance Office of 
     the leadership role in acquiring commercial satellite remote 
     sensing data on behalf of the Department of Defense and the 
     intelligence community (as defined in section 3 of the 
     National Security Act of 1947 (50 U.S.C. 3003).
       (b) Elements.--In conducting the study under subsection 
     (a), the Secretary shall study--
       (1) commercial geospatial intelligence requirements for the 
     National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency and the combatant 
     commands;
       (2) plans of the National Reconnaissance Office to meet the 
     requirements specified in paragraph (1) through the 
     acquisition of both medium- and high-resolution data from 
     multiple commercial providers; and
       (3) plans of the National Reconnaissance Office to further 
     develop such programs with commercial companies to continue 
     to support, while also expanding, adoption by the geospatial 
     intelligence user community of the Department of Defense.
       (c) Submission.--Not later than 90 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the 
     congressional defense committees, the Permanent Select 
     Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives, 
     and the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate a 
     report on the study conducted under subsection (a).


         Amendment No. 223 Offered by Mr. Kilmer of Washington

       At the end of title XI, add the following:

     SEC. 1113. ASSESSMENT OF ACCELERATED PROMOTION PROGRAM 
                   SUSPENSION.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 90 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of the Navy shall 
     enter into an agreement with a Federally funded research and 
     development center with relevant expertise to conduct an 
     assessment of the impacts resulting from the Navy's 
     suspension in 2016 of the Accelerated Promotion Program (in 
     this section referred to as the ``APP'').
       (b) Elements.--The assessment required under subsection (a) 
     shall include the following elements:
       (1) An identification of the employees who were hired at 
     the four public shipyards between January 23, 2016, and 
     December 22, 2016, covering the period in which APP was 
     suspended, and who would have otherwise been eligible for APP 
     had the program been in effect at the time they were hired.
       (2) An assessment for each employee identified in paragraph 
     (1) to determine the difference between wages earned from the 
     date of hire to the date on which the wage data would be 
     collected and the wages which would have been earned during 
     this same period should that employee have participated in 
     APP from the date of hire and been promoted according to the 
     average promotion timeframe for participants hired in the 
     five-year period prior to the suspension.
       (3) An assessment for each employee identified in paragraph 
     (1) to determine at what grade and step each effected 
     employee would be at on October 1, 2020, had that employee 
     been promoted according to the average promotion timeframe 
     for participants hired in the five-year period prior to the 
     suspension.
       (4) An evaluation of existing authorities available to the 
     Secretary to determine whether the Secretary can take 
     measures using those authorities to provide the pay 
     difference and corresponding interest, at a rate of the 
     federal short-term interest rate plus 3 percent, to each 
     effected employee identified in paragraph (2) and directly 
     promote the employee to the grade and step identified in 
     paragraph (3).
       (c) Report.--The Secretary shall submit to the 
     congressional defense committees a report on the results of 
     the evaluation by not later than June 1, 2020, and shall 
     provide interim briefings upon request.


             Amendment No. 224 Offered by Mr. King of Iowa

       Page 817, line 21, before the period at the end, insert the 
     following:
       ``(30) An assessment of--
       ``(A) China's expansion of its surveillance state;
       ``(B) any correlation of such expansion with its oppression 
     of its citizens and its threat to United States national 
     security interests around the world; and
       ``(C) an overview of the extent to which such surveillance 
     corresponds to the overall respect, or lack thereof, for 
     human rights.''.


         Amendment No. 225 Offered by Mr. Kinzinger of Illinois

       At the end of subtitle C of title I, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 1___. PROVISIONS RELATING TO RC-26B MANNED INTELLIGENCE, 
                   SURVEILLANCE, AND RECONNAISSANCE AIRCRAFT.

       (a) Limitation of Funds.--None of the funds authorized to 
     be appropriated by this Act or otherwise made available for 
     fiscal year 2020 for the Air Force may be obligated

[[Page H5661]]

     or expended to retire, divest, realign, or place in storage 
     or on backup aircraft inventory status, or prepare to retire, 
     divest, realign, or place in storage or on backup aircraft 
     inventory status, any RC-26B aircraft until a period of 60 
     days has elapsed following the date on which the Secretary of 
     Defense certifies to the congressional defense committees 
     that--
       (1) technologies or platforms other than the RC-26B 
     aircraft provide capacity and capabilities equivalent to the 
     capacity and capabilities of the RC-26B aircraft; and
       (2) the capacity and capabilities of such other 
     technologies or platforms meet the requirements of combatant 
     commanders with respect to indications and warning, 
     intelligence preparation of the operational environment, and 
     direct support for kinetic and non-kinetic operations.
       (b) Exception.--The limitation in subsection (a) shall not 
     apply to individual RC-26 aircraft that the Secretary of the 
     Air Force determines, on a case-by-case basis, to be no 
     longer mission capable because of mishaps or other damage.
       (c) Funding for RC-26B Manned Intelligence, Surveillance, 
     and Reconnaissance Platform.--
       (1) Of the amount authorized to be appropriated in section 
     301 for operation and maintenance, as specified in the 
     corresponding funding table in 4301, for operation and 
     maintenance, Air National Guard, the Secretary of the Air 
     Force may transfer up to $15,000,000 for the purposes of the 
     RC-26B manned intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
     platform.
       (2) Of the amount authorized to be appropriated in section 
     421 for military personnel, as specified in the corresponding 
     funding table in 4401, the Secretary of the Air Force may 
     transfer up to $16,000,000 from military personnel, Air 
     National Guard for personnel who operate and maintain the RC-
     26B manned intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
     platform.
       (d) Memorandum of Agreement.--Notwithstanding any other 
     provision of law, the Chief of the National Guard Bureau may 
     enter into one or more Memorandum of Agreement with other 
     Federal entities for the purposes of assisting with the 
     missions and activities of such entities.
       (e) Air Force Report.--Not later than 90 days after 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of the Air Force shall 
     submit to congressional defense committees a report detailing 
     the manner in which the Secretary would provide manned and 
     unmanned intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance 
     mission support or manned and unmanned incident awareness and 
     assessment mission support to military and non-military 
     entities in the event the RC-26B is divested. The Secretary 
     shall include a determination regarding whether or not this 
     support would be commensurate with that which the RC-26B is 
     able to provide. The Secretary, in consultation with the 
     Chief of the National Guard Bureau shall also contact and 
     survey the support requirements of other Federal agencies and 
     provide an assessment for potential opportunities to enter 
     into one or more Memorandum of Agreements with such agencies 
     for the purposes of assisting with the missions and 
     activities of such entities, such as domestic or, subject to 
     legal authorities, foreign operations, including but not 
     limited to situational awareness, damage assessment, 
     evacuation monitoring, search and rescue, chemical, 
     biological, radiological, and nuclear assessment, 
     hydrographic survey, dynamic ground coordination, and 
     cyberspace incident response.


      Amendment No. 226 Offered by Mr. Krishnamoorthi of Illinois

       Page 387, after line 15, insert the following:

     SEC. 729. STUDY ON READINESS CONTRACTS AND THE PREVENTION OF 
                   DRUG SHORTAGES.

       (a) Study.--The Secretary of Defense shall conduct a study 
     on the effectiveness of readiness contracts managed by the 
     Customer Pharmacy Operations Center of the Defense Logistics 
     Agency in meeting the military's drug supply needs. The study 
     shall include an analysis of how the contractual approach to 
     manage drug shortages for military health care can be a model 
     for responding to drug shortages in the civilian health care 
     market in the United States.
       (b) Consultation.--In conducting the study under subsection 
     (a), the Secretary of Defense shall consult with--
       (1) the Secretary of Veterans Affairs;
       (2) the Commissioner of Food and Drugs and the 
     Administrator of the Drug Enforcement Administration; and
       (3) physician organizations, drug manufacturers, pharmacy 
     benefit management organizations, and such other entities as 
     the Secretary determines appropriate.
       (c) Report.--Not later than 1 year after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall submit 
     to Congress a report on the results of the study under 
     subsection (a) and any conclusions and recommendations of the 
     Secretary relating to such study.


      Amendment No. 227 Offered by Mr. Krishnamoorthi of Illinois

       In section 2815, relating to Assessment of Hazards in 
     Department of Defense Housing, after ``biocides,'' (page 
     1008, line 22) insert ``carbon monoxide,''.


      Amendment No. 228 Offered by Mr. Krishnamoorthi of Illinois

       Page 189, line 12, strike ``organizations'' and insert 
     ``organizations, including workforce development 
     organizations,''.


        Amendment No. 229 Offered by Ms. Kuster of New Hampshire

       At the end of subtitle C of title V, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 530. ADVICE AND COUNSEL OF TRAUMA EXPERTS IN REVIEW BY 
                   BOARDS FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS AND 
                   DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARDS OF CERTAIN CLAIMS.

       (a) Boards for Correction of Military Records.--Section 
     1552(g) of title 10, United States Code, is amended--
       (1) by inserting ``(1)'' after ``(g)''; and
       (2) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(2) If a board established under subsection (a)(1) is 
     reviewing a claim described in subsection (h), the board 
     shall seek advice and counsel in the review from a 
     psychiatrist, psychologist, or social worker with training on 
     mental health issues associated with post-traumatic stress 
     disorder or traumatic brain injury or other trauma as 
     specified in the current edition of the Diagnostic and 
     Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders published by the 
     American Psychiatric Association.
       ``(3) If a board established under subsection (a)(1) is 
     reviewing a claim in which sexual trauma, intimate partner 
     violence, or spousal abuse is claimed, the board shall seek 
     advice and counsel in the review from an expert in trauma 
     specific to sexual assault, intimate partner violence, or 
     spousal abuse, as applicable.''.
       (b) Discharge Review Boards.--Section 1553(d)(1) of such 
     title is amended--
       (1) by inserting ``(A)'' after ``(1)''; and
       (2) by adding at the end the following new subparagraph;
       ``(B) In the case of a former member described in paragraph 
     (3)(B) who claims that the former member's post-traumatic 
     stress disorder or traumatic brain injury as described in 
     that paragraph in based in whole or in part on sexual trauma, 
     intimate partner violence, or spousal abuse, a board 
     established under this section to review the former member's 
     discharge or dismissal shall seek advice and counsel in the 
     review from a psychiatrist, psychologist, or social worker 
     with training on mental health issues associated with post-
     traumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injury or other 
     trauma as specified in the current edition of the Diagnostic 
     and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders published by the 
     American Psychiatric Association.''.


        Amendment No. 230 Offered by Ms. Kuster of New Hampshire

       At the end of subtitle C of title V, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 530. TRAINING OF MEMBERS OF BOARDS FOR CORRECTION OF 
                   MILITARY RECORDS AND DISCHARGE REVIEW BOARDS ON 
                   SEXUAL TRAUMA, INTIMATE PARTNER VIOLENCE, 
                   SPOUSAL ABUSE, AND RELATED MATTERS.

       (a) Boards for Correction of Military Records.--The 
     curriculum of training for members of boards for the 
     correction of military records under section 534(c) of the 
     National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 (10 
     U.S.C. 1552 note) shall include training on each of the 
     following:
       (1) Sexual trauma.
       (2) Intimate partner violence.
       (3) Spousal abuse.
       (4) The various responses of individuals to trauma.
       (b) Discharge Review Boards.--
       (1) In general.--Each Secretary concerned shall develop and 
     provide training for members of discharge review boards under 
     section 1553 of title 10, United States Code, that are under 
     the jurisdiction of such Secretary on each of the following:
       (A) Sexual trauma.
       (B) Intimate partner violence.
       (C) Spousal abuse.
       (D) The various responses of individuals to trauma.
       (2) Uniformity of training.--The Secretary of Defense and 
     the Secretary of Homeland Security shall jointly ensure that 
     the training developed and provided pursuant to this 
     subsection is, to the extent practicable, uniform.
       (3) Secretary concerned defined.--In this subsection, the 
     term ``Secretary concerned'' has the meaning given that term 
     in section 101(a)(9) of title 10, United States Code.


        Amendment No. 231 Offered by Ms. Kuster of New Hampshire

       Insert after section 543 the following new section:

     SEC. 5__. POLICIES AND PROCEDURES ON REGISTRATION AT MILITARY 
                   INSTALLATIONS OF CIVIL PROTECTION ORDERS 
                   APPLICABLE TO MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES 
                   ASSIGNED TO SUCH INSTALLATIONS AND CERTAIN 
                   OTHER INDIVIDUALS.

       (a) Policies and Procedures Required.--Not later than one 
     year after the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
     Secretary of Defense shall, in consultation with the 
     Secretaries of the military departments, establish policies 
     and procedures for the registration at military installations 
     of any civil protection orders described in subsection (b), 
     including the duties and responsibilities of commanders of 
     installations in the registration process.
       (b) Civil Protection Orders.--A civil protection order 
     described in this subsection is any civil protective order as 
     follows:
       (1) A civil protection order against a member of the Armed 
     Forces assigned to the installation concerned.
       (2) A civil protection order against a civilian employee 
     employed at the installation concerned.

[[Page H5662]]

       (3) A civil protection order against the civilian spouse or 
     intimate partner of a member of the Armed Forces on active 
     duty and assigned to the installation concerned, or of a 
     civilian employee described in paragraph (2), which order 
     provides for the protection of such member or employee.
       (c) Particular Elements.--The policies and procedures 
     required by subsection (a) shall include the following:
       (1) A requirement for notice between and among the 
     commander, military law enforcement elements, and military 
     criminal investigative elements of an installation when a 
     member of the Armed Forces assigned to such installation, a 
     civilian employee employed at such installation, a civilian 
     spouse or intimate partner of a member assigned to such 
     installation, or a civilian spouse or intimate partner of a 
     civilian employee employed at such installation becomes 
     subject to a civil protection order.
       (2) A statement of policy that failure to register a civil 
     protection order may not be a justification for the lack of 
     enforcement of such order by military law enforcement and 
     other applicable personnel who have knowledge of such order.
       (d) Letter.--As soon as practicable after establishing the 
     policies and procedures required by subsection (a), the 
     Secretary shall submit to the Committees on Armed Services of 
     the Senate and the House of Representatives a letter that 
     includes the following:
       (1) A detailed description of the policies and procedures.
       (2) A certification by the Secretary that the policies and 
     procedures have been implemented on each military 
     installation.


        Amendment No. 232 Offered by Ms. Kuster of New Hampshire

       At the end of subtitle C of title XXVIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 28__. IMPROVED RECORDING AND MAINTAINING OF DEPARTMENT 
                   OF DEFENSE REAL PROPERTY DATA.

       (a) Initial Report.--Not later than 150 days after the date 
     of the enactment of this Act, the Undersecretary of Defense 
     for Acquisition and Sustainment shall submit to Congress a 
     report evaluating service-level best practices for recording 
     and maintaining real property data.
       (b) Issuance of Guidance.--Not later than 300 days after 
     the date of the enactment of this Act, the Undersecretary of 
     Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment shall issue service-
     wide guidance on the recording and collection of real 
     property data based on the best practices described in the 
     report.


        Amendment No. 233 Offered by Ms. Kuster of New Hampshire

       At the end of subtitle E of title V, add the following:

     SEC. __. STRENGTHENING CIVILIAN AND MILITARY PARTNERSHIPS TO 
                   RESPOND TO DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE.

       (a) Study.--Not later than one year after the enactment of 
     this legislation, the Comptroller General of the United 
     States shall submit to Congress a report on partnerships 
     between military installations and civilian domestic and 
     sexual violence response organizations, including--
       (1) a review of memoranda of understanding between such 
     installations and such response organizations,
       (2) descriptions of the services provided pursuant to such 
     partnerships,
       (3) a review of the central plan, if any, of each service 
     regarding such partnerships, and
       (4) recommendations on increasing and improving such 
     partnerships.
       (b) Civilian Domestic and Sexual Violence Response 
     Organization.--In this section, the term ``civilian domestic 
     and sexual violence response organization'' includes a rape 
     crisis center, domestic violence shelter, civilian law 
     enforcement, local government group, civilian sexual assault 
     nurse examiner, civilian medical service provider, veterans 
     service organization, faith-based organization, or Federally 
     qualified health center.


         Amendment No. 234 Offered by Mr. LaMalfa of California

     SEC. __. SANTA YNEZ BAND OF CHUMASH INDIANS LAND AFFIRMATION.

       (a) Short Title.--This section may be cited as the ``Santa 
     Ynez Band of Chumash Indians Land Affirmation Act of 2019''.
       (b) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
       (1) On October 13, 2017, the General Council of the Santa 
     Ynez Band of Chumash Indians voted to approve the Memorandum 
     of Agreement between the County of Santa Barbara and the 
     Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians regarding the 
     approximately 1,427.28 acres of land, commonly known as Camp 
     4, and authorized the Tribal Chairman to sign the Memorandum 
     of Agreement.
       (2) On October 31, 2017, the Board of Supervisors for the 
     County of Santa Barbara approved the Memorandum of Agreement 
     on Camp 4 and authorized the Chair to sign the Memorandum of 
     Agreement.
       (3) The Secretary of the Interior approved the Memorandum 
     of Agreement pursuant to section 2103 of the Revised Statutes 
     (25 U.S.C. 81).
       (c) Land to Be Taken Into Trust.--
       (1) In general.--The approximately l,427.28 acres of land 
     in Santa Barbara County, CA described in paragraph (3), is 
     hereby taken into trust for the benefit of the Tribe, subject 
     to valid existing rights, contracts, and management 
     agreements related to easements and rights-of-way.
       (2) Administration.--
       (A) Administration.--The land described in paragraph (3) 
     shall be a part of the Santa Ynez Indian Reservation and 
     administered in accordance with the laws and regulations 
     generally applicable to the land held in trust by the United 
     States for an Indian tribe.
       (B) Effect.--For purposes of certain California State laws 
     (including the California Land Conservation Act of 1965, 
     Government Code Section 51200, et seq.), placing the land 
     described in paragraph (3) into trust shall remove any 
     restrictions on the property pursuant to California 
     Government Code Section 51295 or any other provision of such 
     Act.
       (3) Legal description of lands transferred.--The lands to 
     be taken into trust for the benefit of the Tribe pursuant to 
     this Act are described as follows:
       Legal Land Description/Site Location: Real property in the 
     unincorporated area of the County of Santa Barbara, State of 
     California, described as follows: PARCEL 1: (APN: 141-121-51 
     AND PORTION OF APN 141-140-10) LOTS 9 THROUGH 18, INCLUSIVE, 
     OF TRACT 18, IN THE COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, STATE OF 
     CALIFORNIA, AS SHOWN ON THE MAP SHOWING THE SUBDIVISIONS OF 
     THE CANADA DE LOS PINOS OR COLLEGE RANCHO, FILED IN RACK 3, 
     AS MAP 4 IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. 
     THIS LEGAL IS MADE PURSUANT TO THAT CERTAIN CERTIFICATE OF 
     COMPLIANCE RECORDED DECEMBER 5, 2001 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 01-
     105580 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. PARCEL 2: (PORTION OF APN: 141-
     140-10) LOTS 1 THROUGH 12, INCLUSIVE, OF TRACT 24, IN THE 
     COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS SHOWN ON THE 
     MAP SHOWING THE SUBDIVISIONS OF THE CANADA DE LOS PINOS OR 
     COLLEGE RANCHO, FILED IN RACK 3, AS MAP 4 IN THE OFFICE OF 
     THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. THIS LEGAL IS MADE 
     PURSUANT TO THAT CERTAIN CERTIFICATE OF COMPLIANCE RECORDED 
     DECEMBER 5, 2001 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 01-105581 OF OFFICIAL 
     RECORDS. PARCEL 3: (PORTIONS OF APNS: 141-230-23 AND 141-140-
     10) LOTS 19 AND 20 OF TRACT 18 AND THAT PORTION OF LOTS 1, 2, 
     7, 8, 9, 10, AND 15 THROUGH 20, INCLUSIVE, OF TRACT 16, IN 
     THE COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS SHOWN ON 
     THE MAP SHOWING THE SUBDIVISIONS OF THE CANADA DE LOS PINOS 
     OR COLLEGE RANCHO, FILED IN RACK 3, AS MAP 4 IN THE OFFICE OF 
     THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY, THAT LIES NORTHEASTERLY 
     OF THE NORTHEASTERLY LINE OF THE LAND GRANTED TO THE STATE OF 
     CALIFORNIA BY AN EXECUTOR'S DEED RECORDED APRIL 2, 1968 IN 
     BOOK 2227, PAGE 136 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY. THIS 
     LEGAL IS MADE PURSUANT TO THAT CERTAIN CERTIFICATE OF 
     COMPLIANCE RECORDED DECEMBER 5, 2001 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 01-
     105582 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. PARCEL 4: (APN: 141-240-02 AND 
     PORTION OF APN: 141-140-10) LOTS 1 THROUGH 12, INCLUSIVE, OF 
     TRACT 25, IN THE COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, STATE OF 
     CALIFORNIA, AS SHOWN ON THE MAP SHOWING THE SUBDIVISIONS OF 
     THE CANADA DE LOS PINOS OR COLLEGE RANCHO, FILED IN RACK 3, 
     AS MAP 4 IN THE OFFICE OF THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY. 
     THIS LEGAL IS MADE PURSUANT TO THAT CERTAIN CERTIFICATE OF 
     COMPLIANCE RECORDED DECEMBER 5, 2001 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 01-
     105583 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS. PARCEL 5: (PORTION OF APN: 141-
     230-23) THAT PORTION OF LOTS 3 AND 6 OF TRACT 16, IN THE 
     COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, STATE OF CALIFORNIA, AS SHOWN ON THE 
     MAP SHOWING THE SUBDIVISIONS OF THE CANADA DE LOS PINOS OR 
     COLLEGE RANCHO, FILED IN RACK 3, AS MAP 4 IN THE OFFICE OF 
     THE COUNTY RECORDER OF SAID COUNTY, THAT LIES NORTHEASTERLY 
     OF THE NORTHEASTERLY LINE OF THE LAND GRANTED TO THE STATE OF 
     CALIFORNIA BY AN EXECUTOR'S DEED RECORDED APRIL 2, 1968 IN 
     BOOK 2227, PAGE 136 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS OF SAID COUNTY. THIS 
     LEGAL IS MADE PURSUANT TO THAT CERTAIN CERTIFICATE OF 
     COMPLIANCE RECORDED DECEMBER 5, 2001 AS INSTRUMENT NO. 01-
     105584 OF OFFICIAL RECORDS.
       (4) Rules of construction.--Nothing in this section shall--
       (A) enlarge, impair, or otherwise affect any right or claim 
     of the Tribe to any land or interest in land that is in 
     existence before the date of the enactment of this Act;
       (B) affect any water right of the Tribe in existence before 
     the date of the enactment of this Act; or
       (C) terminate or limit any access in any way to any right-
     of-way or right-of-use issued, granted, or permitted before 
     the date of the enactment of this Act.
       (5) Restricted use of transferred lands.--The Tribe may not 
     conduct, on the land described in paragraph (3) taken into 
     trust for the Tribe pursuant to this section, gaming 
     activities--
       (A) as a matter of claimed inherent authority; or
       (B) under any Federal law, including the Indian Gaming 
     Regulatory Act (25 U.S.C. 2701 et seq.) and regulations 
     promulgated by the Secretary or the National Indian Gaming 
     Commission under that Act.

[[Page H5663]]

       (6) Definitions.--For the purposes of this subsection:
       (A) Secretary.--The term ``Secretary'' means the Secretary 
     of the Interior.
       (B) Tribe.--The term ``Tribe'' means the Santa Ynez Band of 
     Chumash Mission Indians.


         Amendment No. 235 Offered by Mr. Lamb of Pennsylvania

       At the end of subtitle B of title II, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 2__. MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURY PREVENTION RESEARCH.

       (a) Program Required.--The Secretary of Defense shall carry 
     out a program on musculoskeletal injury prevention research 
     to identify risk factors for musculoskeletal injuries among 
     members of the Armed Forces and to create a better 
     understanding for adaptive bone formation during initial 
     entry military training.
       (b) Funding.--
       (1) Increase.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 201 for research, development, test, 
     and evaluation, as specified in the corresponding funding 
     table in section 4201, for research, development, test, and 
     evaluation, Army, applied research, medical technology, line 
     040 (PE 0602787A) is hereby increased by $4,800,000 (with the 
     amount of such increase to be made available to carry out the 
     program on musculoskeletal injury prevention research under 
     subsection (a)).
       (2) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 101 for procurement, as specified in 
     the corresponding funding table in section 4101, for 
     shipbuilding and conversion, Navy, ship to shore connector, 
     line 024 is hereby reduced by $4,800,000.


         Amendment No. 236 Offered by Mr. Lamb of Pennsylvania

       Insert after section 713 the following new section:

     SEC. 713A. DEMONSTRATION OF INTEROPERABILITY MILESTONES.

       (a) Milestones.--
       (1) Evaluation.--To demonstrate increasing levels of 
     interoperability, functionality, and seamless health care 
     within the electronic health record systems of the Department 
     of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs, the Office 
     shall seek to enter into an agreement with an independent 
     entity to conduct an evaluation of the following use cases of 
     such systems:
       (A) By not later than 18 months after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, whether a clinician of the Department 
     of Defense can access and meaningfully interact with a 
     complete veteran patient health record from a military 
     medical treatment facility.
       (B) By not later than 18 months after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, whether a clinician of the Department 
     of Veterans Affairs can access and meaningfully interact with 
     a complete patient health record of a member of the Armed 
     Forces serving on active duty from a medical center of the 
     Department of Veterans Affairs.
       (C) By not later than two years after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, whether a clinician in the Department 
     of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs can access 
     and meaningfully interact with the data elements of the 
     health record of a veteran patient or member of the Armed 
     Forces which are generated when the veteran patient or member 
     of the Armed Forces receives health care from a community 
     care provider of the Department of Veterans Affairs or a 
     TRICARE provider of the Department of Defense
       (D) By not later than two years after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, whether a community care provider of 
     the Department of the Veterans Affairs and a TRICARE provider 
     on a Health Information Exchange-supported electronic health 
     record can access a veteran and active-duty member patient 
     health record from the provider's system.
       (E) By not later than two years after the enactment of this 
     Act, and subsequently after each significant implementation 
     wave, an assessment of interoperability between the legacy 
     electronic health record systems and the future electronic 
     health record systems of the Department of Veterans Affairs 
     and the Department of Defense.
       (F) By not later than two years after the enactment of this 
     Act, and subsequently after each significant implementation 
     wave, an assessment of the use of interoperable content 
     between the legacy electronic health record systems and the 
     future electronic health record systems of the Department of 
     Veterans Affairs and the Department of Defense, and third-
     party applications.
       (2) Submission.--The Office shall submit to the appropriate 
     congressional committees a report detailing the evaluation, 
     methodology for testing, and findings for each milestone 
     demonstration under paragraph (1) by not later than the date 
     specified under such paragraph.
       (b) System Configuration Management.--The Office shall--
       (1) maintain the common configuration baseline for the 
     electronic health record systems of the Department of Defense 
     and the Department of Veterans Affairs; and
       (2) continually evaluate the state of configuration, the 
     impacts on interoperability, and shall promote the 
     enhancement of such electronic health records systems.
       (c) Regular Clinical Consultation.--The Office shall 
     convene at least annually a clinical workshop to include 
     clinical staff from the Department of Defense, the Department 
     of Veterans Affairs, the Coast Guard, community providers, 
     and other leading clinical experts to assess the state of 
     clinical use of the electronic health record systems and 
     whether the systems are meeting clinical and patient needs. 
     The clinical workshop shall make recommendations to the 
     Office on the need for any improvements or concerns with the 
     electronic health record systems.
       (d) Clinician and Patient Satisfaction Survey.--Beginning 
     October 1, 2021, on at least a biannual basis, the Office 
     shall undertake a clinician and patient satisfaction survey 
     regarding clinical use and patient experience with the 
     electronic health record systems of the Department of Defense 
     and the Department of Veterans Affairs.
       (e) Annual Reports.--Not later than September 30, 2020, and 
     annually thereafter, the Office shall submit to the 
     appropriate congressional committees a report on--
       (1) the state of the configuration baseline under 
     subsection (b) and any activities which decremented or 
     enhanced the state of configuration; and
       (2) the activities, assessments and recommendations of the 
     clinical workshop under subsection (c) and the response of 
     the Office to the workshop recommendations and any action 
     plans to implement the recommendations.
       (f) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) The term ``appropriate congressional committees'' means 
     the following:
       (A) The congressional defense committees.
       (B) The Committees on Veterans' Affairs of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate.
       (2) The term ``configuration baseline'' means a fixed 
     reference in the development cycle or an agreed-upon 
     specification of a product at a point in time. It serves as a 
     documented basis for defining incremental change in all 
     aspects of an information technology product.
       (3) The term ``interoperability'' means the ability of 
     different information systems, devices, or applications to 
     connect in a coordinated and secure manner, within and across 
     organizational boundaries, across the complete spectrum of 
     care, including all applicable care settings, and with 
     relevant stakeholders, including the person whose information 
     is being shared, to access, exchange, integrate, and use 
     computable data regardless of the data's origin or 
     destination or the applications employed, and without 
     additional intervention by the end user, including--
       (A) the capability to reliably exchange information without 
     error;
       (B) the ability to interpret and to make effective use of 
     the information so exchanged; and
       (C) the ability for information that can be used to advance 
     patient care to move between health care entities, regardless 
     of the technology platform in place or the location where 
     care was provided.
       (4) The term ``meaningfully interact'' means that 
     information can be viewed, consumed, acted upon, and edited 
     in a clinical setting to facilitate high quality clinical 
     decision making in a clinical setting.
       (5) The term ``Office'' means the office established by 
     section 1635(b) of the Wounded Warrior Act (title XVI of 
     Public Law 110-181; 10 U.S.C. 1071 note).
       (6) The term ``seamless health care'' means health care 
     which is optimized through access by patients and clinicians 
     to integrated, relevant, and complete information about the 
     patient's clinical experiences, social and environmental 
     determinants of health, and health trends over time in order 
     to enable patients and clinicians to move from task to task 
     and encounter to encounter, within and across organizational 
     boundaries, such that high-quality decisions may be formed 
     easily and complete plans of care may be carried out 
     smoothly.
       (7) The term ``TRICARE program'' has the meaning given that 
     term in section 1072 of title 10, United States Code.


          Amendment No. 237 Offered by Mr. Lamborn of Colorado

       At the end of subtitle E of title XVI, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 16__. REPORT AND BRIEFING ON MULTI-OBJECT KILL VEHICLE.

       Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
     Engineering shall submit to the congressional defense 
     committees a report, and shall provide to such committees a 
     briefing, on the potential need for a multi-object kill 
     vehicle in future architecture of the ballistic missile 
     defense system. Such report and briefing shall include the 
     following:
       (1) An assessment of the technology readiness level of 
     needed components and the operational system for the multi-
     object kill vehicle.
       (2) An assessment of the costs and a comprehensive 
     development and testing schedule to deploy the multi-object 
     kill vehicle by 2025.
       (3) An assessment of whether the multi-object kill vehicle 
     was considered in the redesigned kill vehicle program re-
     baseline as a replacement for future ground-based midcourse 
     defense system kill vehicles.
       (4) A concept of operations with respect to how a multi-
     object kill vehicle capability could be employed and how such 
     capability compares to alternative ground-based midcourse 
     defense system interceptors.

[[Page H5664]]

  



          Amendment No. 238 Offered by Mr. Lamborn of Colorado

       In section 355, strike subsection (c) and insert the 
     following:
       (c) Limitation.--
       (1) In general.--None of the funds authorized to be 
     appropriated in this Act for fiscal year 2020 shall be 
     available to enter into a global household goods contract 
     until the date that is 30 days after later of the following 
     dates:
       (A) The date on which the Commander of United States 
     Transportation Command provides to the congressional defense 
     committees a briefing on--
       (i) the business case analysis required by subsection (b); 
     and
       (ii) the proposed structure and meeting schedule for the 
     advisory group established under subsection (a).
       (B) The date on which the Comptroller General of the United 
     States submits to the congressional defense committees the 
     report required by paragraph (2).
       (2) GAO report.--Not later than February 15, 2020, the 
     Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to the 
     congressional defense committees a report on a comprehensive 
     study conducted by the Comptroller General that includes--
       (A) an analysis of the effects that the outsourcing of the 
     management and oversight of the movement of household goods 
     to a private entity or entities would have on members of the 
     Armed Forces and their families;
       (B) a comprehensive cost-benefit analysis; and
       (C) recommendations for changes to the strategy of the 
     Department of Defense for the defense personal property 
     program.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentlewoman 
from Oklahoma (Ms. Kendra S. Horn) and the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Thornberry) each will control 10 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Oklahoma.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to 
the gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. Lynch).
  Mr. LYNCH. Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of the en bloc amendment 
that includes my amendment to reestablish the Commission on Wartime 
Contracting.
  As the chairman of the Subcommittee on National Security, I can say 
with great confidence that the Commission on Wartime Contracting has 
been a solid and a reliable partner in congressional oversight of 
military spending.
  From 2008 to 2011, the Commission on Wartime Contracting held 25 
hearings and issued 8 reports on critical oversight on issues including 
contingency contracting in Iraq and Afghanistan and embassy security in 
those countries.
  The bottom line is that the Commission on Wartime Contracting found 
tens of billions of dollars in waste, fraud, and abuse, and recommended 
ways to improve our overseas contingency contracting process.
  Despite the Commission's mandate having ended in 2011, today we 
continue to expend billions of reconstruction dollars overseas with 
little assurance that taxpayers or our sons and daughters in uniform 
are getting the full benefit of those expenditures. In fact, in many 
cases, we know that they are not. As the Special Inspector General for 
Afghanistan Reconstruction recently noted, many of our projects there 
are of questionable value or are at serious risk of failure and require 
continued, sustained oversight.
  Reauthorization of the Commission on Wartime Contracting will provide 
additional oversight to help us avoid the wasteful mistakes of the 
past.
  In closing, I thank Chairman Smith, Ranking Member Thornberry, and 
the gentlewoman from Oklahoma (Ms. Kendra S. Horn) for supporting my 
amendment.

                              {time}  1945

  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, I have no speakers here at this time, and 
I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chair, I am pleased to yield 2 
minutes to the gentleman from Nevada (Mr. Horsford).
  Mr. HORSFORD. Mr. Chair, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  I am honored to stand to propose an amendment to the National Defense 
Authorization Act, which is an opportunity to improve the security of 
the American people and modernize defense policy to meet the demands of 
emerging security threats.
  For the first time in years, House Democrats finally have the chance 
to voice our priorities for national defense. That is why I am happy to 
introduce this amendment, which will increase by $5 million the Air 
Force University Research Initiatives.
  This program provides Department of Defense grants to competing 
universities, including those in Nevada like the University of Nevada, 
Las Vegas, and the Desert Research Institute, and gives our best and 
brightest minds the opportunity to do the research necessary to develop 
advanced defense technology.
  Throughout U.S. history, it has been our continued research and 
innovation that has secured America as the world's greatest power. My 
amendment transfers money from Special Operations Command theater 
forces, which is already robustly funded, and, instead, invests in the 
wars of the future.
  As security threats advance and change with weapons of modern war, we 
must remember that innovation and development made us number one. We 
must invest in programs that prepare our servicemembers to respond to 
the threats of the 21st century.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chair, the last speaker made a comment that this is the first 
time in many years that House Democrats have an opportunity to put 
their priorities on a defense bill. I realize the gentleman is new to 
this body, but that statement is simply not true.
  Last year, the House Armed Services Committee reported the bill to 
the floor by a vote of 60-2. There were more Democratic amendments made 
in order under the Rules Committee last year on the floor than there 
were Republican amendments. The bill passed the House with 351 votes.
  It has been a hallmark of the Armed Services Committee to work in a 
collaborative way and to give every member of the committee and, 
ultimately, of the House the opportunity to make an imprint on the 
nature of this bill.
  The reason I have to take a moment is just to contrast that with what 
has happened this year. Both the vote coming out of committee and the 
fact that of the contested amendments--in other words, of those 
amendments where there was some disagreement, some debate, and a 
potential vote. There were about 60 Democratic amendments, and there 
was exactly one Republican amendment.
  That limits the ability of the minority to shape the outcome of the 
final bill. So the gentleman's statement has led me to want to 
emphasize the difference this year versus prior years. I think it is 
too bad, but I hope that at some point in this process, we can return 
to that collaborative process.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Washington (Mr. Smith).
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, I appreciate the gentleman's 
comments, and I think he is absolutely right in the first half, and 
absolutely wrong in the second half.
  I would disagree with my colleague's comments that Democrats have not 
had an opportunity to contribute to the process. We have in the past. 
We worked in a bipartisan way.
  It is, however, not true that this year everything is different. 
Something was different, but not what I believe the ranking member 
said. That is that we did include a large number of Republican 
provisions, certainly in committee by the amendment process, and on the 
floor.
  The one sort of stark number here is, on the floor, we have not had a 
large number of Republican amendments. There are a couple of reasons 
for that. Number one, we have, I think, 15 or 16 en bloc packages, and 
there are a large number of Republican amendments contained in that en 
bloc package.
  But as far as standalone amendments, there are a couple of problems. 
One, traditionally, and this has happened to us as well, we had a lot 
of our more controversial amendments, unless the majority party--at the 
time, the Republicans--thought it was to their advantage to have us 
vote on something that made us look bad, then they would let it in. 
Otherwise, they wouldn't.
  We kind of did the same thing. If there were amendments that we 
didn't want, we didn't keep them. We did allow for Republican 
priorities.
  The reason, however, that there are fewer Republican amendments than 
in

[[Page H5665]]

the past is because, for a long time, it has been the minority party's 
plan this year to not support this bill. This is not a new thing. This 
has been a debate.
  As I mentioned yesterday, the reason for that was purely partisan. 
And it is traditional. I have been working as a legislator long enough 
to know that when Members are in the minority, they want the majority 
party to fail. So whatever bill they are bringing up, the minority 
tries to defeat it to gain leverage.
  The Armed Services Committee has traditionally been different from 
that. We don't do that on this bill. We work together in a 
collaborative process to create the bill.
  But this year, the minority party decided to treat the defense bill 
like every other bill: We are in the minority. We want the bill to 
fail.
  The evidence of that is that I have worked with a lot of Members to 
try to get amendments straightened out in Rules. On one in particular, 
we worked with Representative Stefanik.

  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chair, I yield an additional 1 
minute to the gentleman from Washington.
  Mr. SMITH of Washington. Mr. Chair, she didn't like the way we did 
it, so she wanted to fix it. It had to do with the Under Secretary for 
Intelligence and the title. It is kind of irrelevant what it was, but 
we worked with her, and we got it solved.
  We had it ready to go, and she pulled it today. She said she didn't 
want to do it.
  As I understand it, the reason was that she didn't want to feel 
obligated to vote for the bill because we had cooperated and worked 
with her. Well, how obnoxious of us to do that.
  The games that are being played here are not primarily being played 
by us.
  Let me say to this body that I am 100 percent committed to 
maintaining the bipartisanship of this committee, and what happened 
this year won't change that at all.
  I will say, in the past, the Republicans have not been as kind. We 
had a Member who voted against the bill in committee a few years back. 
He found out the next year that he got nothing in the bill because 
voting against the bill was not allowed. We had a lot of Members vote 
against it this year. I am not going to do that. We are going to keep 
working together.
  I want everyone listening to know that we on the Democratic side are 
not the ones being partisan in this bill.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chair, I appreciate the comments of Chairman Smith about the 
bipartisan contributions in the past, and that was the primary point I 
wanted to make.
  I do disagree with him about one key point. It was certainly never my 
intention, and I do not believe the intention of any member of the 
Armed Services Committee, to oppose this bill from the beginning.
  As a matter of fact, as I indicated yesterday, for many of us, it was 
a very challenging decision on how to vote with the bill coming out of 
committee, not because there weren't serious, substantive 
disagreements--there were--but there was hope that it was possible to 
bridge those disagreements so that there could be some bend on both 
sides to get to our traditional sort of bipartisan vote on the floor.
  What definitely changed and is unprecedented is to have one 
substantive, contested Republican amendment allowed on the floor--one--
versus 60 Democratic amendments. Those numbers speak for themselves. 
There has been, other than the one amendment on low yield--Mr. Turner 
yet to come--no other opportunity by Republicans on a contested issue.
  There have been en blocs, Republican and Democratic, absolutely. That 
is the way it is every year. But as far as standalone debates where it 
is contested, there has been one opportunity for Republicans to improve 
this bill. That has been disheartening because it makes it much more 
difficult for people on this side of the aisle to get to where we can 
support this bill.
  I share the chairman's commitment. This is not about us. This is 
about the troops. Our commitment is to work through every step of 
whatever it takes to get to a point that we can do good by the men and 
women who serve. That is the objective here.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentlewoman from Ohio (Ms. Kaptur).
  Ms. KAPTUR. Mr. Chair, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding to me.
  Mr. Chair, the amendment that I offer aims to expand the Department 
of Defense's authority to work with the Coast Guard on youth science, 
technology, engineering, and math programs.
  For several years, I have worked closely with the U.S. Coast Guard to 
engage on youth STEM programs. Earlier this year, the Coast Guard came 
to me and acknowledged that to continue our efforts, they needed new 
authority and advice. The specialties these dedicated public maritime 
servants rely upon daily is rooted in science, technology, engineering, 
and mathematics, yet they do not have the authority to engage beyond 
volunteer status in their communities to build special capabilities in 
young people for the future.
  Meanwhile, the Department of Defense offers excellent examples of the 
benefits of such programming and holds the respective experience in 
successful applications, such as the STARBASE program.
  Now more than ever, the future of our country, our very prosperity 
and security, depends on an effective and inclusive STEM education-
reliant workforce. That begins with our youth.
  Basic STEM concepts are best learned at an earlier age and are 
central prerequisites for career technical training, advanced college-
level and graduate study, and success in various workplaces.
  Given the Coast Guard's mission of coastal defense, maritime law 
enforcement, and maritime operations, the Coast Guard, too, has a 
vested interest to advance STEM youth exposure.
  With my amendment, we can invest in the future of America's youth and 
the Coast Guard itself by expanding the Department of Defense's ability 
to work with the Coast Guard on youth STEM programming to transfer 
know-how. I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Mr. Chair, I have no further speakers at this time, 
and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chair, I encourage my colleagues 
to support the en bloc package, as well as the NDAA upon final passage, 
and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendments en bloc offered 
by the gentlewoman from Oklahoma (Ms. Kendra S. Horn).
  The en bloc amendments were agreed to.


  Amendments En Bloc No. 10 Offered by Ms. Kendra S. Horn of Oklahoma

  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chair, pursuant to House 
Resolution 476, I offer amendments en bloc as the designee of the 
gentleman from Washington (Mr. Smith).
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendments en bloc.
  Amendments en bloc No. 10 consisting of amendment Nos. 239, 240, 241, 
242, 243, 244, 245, 246, 247, 248, 249, 250, 252, 253, 254, 255, 256, 
257, 258, 259, 260, 261, 262, 263, and 264, printed in part B of House 
Report 116-143, offered by Ms. Kendra S. Horn of Oklahoma:

       Amendment No. 239 Offered by Mr. Langevin of Rhode Island

       Page 392, line 6, strike ``and''.
       Page 392, line 16, strike the period at the end and insert 
     ``; and''.
       Page 392, after line 16, insert the following:
       (H) cybersecurity metrics of the software to be acquired, 
     such as metrics relating to the density of vulnerabilities 
     within the code, the time from vulnerability identification 
     to patch availability, the existence of common weaknesses 
     within the code, and other cybersecurity metrics based on 
     widely-recognized standards and industry best practices, are 
     generated and made available to the Department of Defense and 
     the congressional defense committees.


       Amendment No. 240 Offered by Mr. Langevin of Rhode Island

       At the end of subtitle C of title XVI, add the following:

     SEC. 1633. NATIONAL SECURITY PRESIDENTIAL MEMORANDUMS 
                   RELATING TO DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE OPERATIONS IN 
                   CYBERSPACE.

       Not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the President shall provide the congressional 
     defense committees with a copy of all National Security

[[Page H5666]]

     Presidential Memorandums relating to Department of Defense 
     operations in cyberspace.


       Amendment No. 241 Offered by Mr. Langevin of Rhode Island

       At the end of subtitle A of title XII, add the following:

     SEC. _. EXTENSION OF AUTHORITY FOR SUPPORT OF SPECIAL 
                   OPERATIONS FOR IRREGULAR WARFARE.

       Section 1202(a) of the National Defense Authorization Act 
     for Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91; 131 Stat. 1639) is 
     amended by striking ``2020'' and inserting ``2023''.


       Amendment No. 242 Offered by Mr. Langevin of Rhode Island

       At the end of subtitle D of title X, insert the following:

     SEC. 10__. MODIFICATION OF SUPPORT OF SPECIAL OPERATIONS TO 
                   COMBAT TERRORISM.

       Section 127e of title 10, United States Code, is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a), by inserting ``authorized'' before 
     ``ongoing''; and
       (2) in subsection (d)(2)--
       (A) in subparagraph (A), by inserting ``and a description 
     of the authorized ongoing operation'' before the period at 
     the end;
       (B) by redesignating subparagraph (C) as subparagraph (D);
       (C) by striking subparagraphs (B) and inserting the 
     following new subparagraphs after subparagraph (A):
       ``(B) A description of the foreign forces, irregular 
     forces, groups, or individuals engaged in supporting or 
     facilitating the authorized ongoing operation who will 
     receive the funds provided under this section.
       ``(C) A detailed description of the support provided or to 
     be provided to the recipient of the funds.''; and
       (D) by adding at the end the following new subparagraphs:
       ``(E) A detailed description of the legal and operational 
     authorities related to the authorized ongoing operation, 
     including relevant execute orders issued by the Secretary of 
     Defense and combatant commanders related to the authorized 
     ongoing operation, including an identification of operational 
     activities United States Special Operations Forces are 
     authorized to conduct under such execute orders.
       ``(F) The duration for which the support is expected to be 
     provided and an identification of the timeframe in which the 
     provision of support will be reviewed by the combatant 
     commander for a determination regarding the necessity of 
     continuation of support.''.


         Amendment No. 243 Offered by Mr. Larsen of Washington

       At the end of subtitle H of title X insert the following:

     SEC. ___. CHINESE LANGUAGE AND CULTURE STUDIES WITHIN THE 
                   DEFENSE LANGUAGE AND NATIONAL SECURITY 
                   EDUCATION OFFICE.

       (a) Increase.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 301 for operation and maintenance, as 
     specified in the corresponding funding table in section 4301, 
     for operation and maintenance, Defense-Wide, Defense Human 
     Resources Activity, line 220 is hereby increased by 
     $13,404,000 (with the amount of such increase to be made 
     available for Chinese language and culture studies within the 
     Defense Language and National Security Education Office).
       (b) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 101 for procurement, as specified in 
     the corresponding funding table in section 4101, for other 
     procurement, Army, Installation Info Infrastructure MOD 
     Program, line 63 is hereby reduced by $13,404,000.


         Amendment No. 244 Offered by Mr. Larsen of Washington

       Page 724, line 18, insert ``, universities,'' after 
     ``agencies''.
       Page 724, line 24, insert before the semicolon the 
     following: ``, and by providing such best practices with 
     grantees and universities at the time of awarding such grants 
     or entering into research contracts''.
       Page 724, after line 24, insert the following new subclause 
     (and redesignate the subsequent subclauses accordingly):

       (VI) a remediation plan for grantees and universities to 
     mitigate the risks regarding such threats before research 
     grants or contracts are cancelled because of such threats;


         Amendment No. 245 Offered by Mr. Larsen of Washington

       At the end of subtitle H of title X, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 10__. MODIFICATION OF PROHIBITION ON AVAILABILITY OF 
                   FUNDS FOR CHINESE LANGUAGE PROGRAMS AT CERTAIN 
                   INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER EDUCATION.

       Section 1091(b) of the John S. McCain National Defense 
     Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232; 
     132 Stat. 1997) is amended--
       (1) by striking ``None of the funds'' and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(1) In general.--None of the funds''; and
       (2) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(2) Transition plan .--The Secretary of Defense shall 
     develop a transition plan for each institution of higher 
     education subject to the limitation under paragraph (1). 
     Under the transition plan, the institution may regain 
     eligibility to receive funds from the Department of Defense 
     for Chinese language training by developing an independent 
     Chinese language program with no connection to a Confucius 
     Institute.''.


         Amendment No. 246 Offered by Mrs. Lawrence of Michigan

       Page 733, after line 15, insert the following:

     SEC. 1092. LESSONS LEARNED AND BEST PRACTICES ON PROGRESS OF 
                   GENDER INTEGRATION IMPLEMENTATION IN THE ARMED 
                   FORCES.

       The Secretary of Defense shall direct each component of the 
     Armed Forces to share lessons learned and best practices on 
     the progress of their gender integration implementation plans 
     and to communicate strategically that progress with other 
     components of the Armed Forces as well as the general public, 
     as recommended by the Defense Advisory Committee on Women in 
     the Services.


         Amendment No. 247 Offered by Mrs. Lawrence of Michigan

       At the end of subtitle H of title X, insert the following:

     SEC. 10__. STRATEGIES FOR RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION OF WOMEN 
                   IN THE ARMED FORCES.

       The Secretary of each of the military departments shall--
       (1) examine successful strategies in use by foreign 
     military services to recruit and retain women; and
       (2) consider potential best practices for implementation in 
     the United States Armed Forces, as recommended by the Defense 
     Advisory Committee on Women in the Services.


            Amendment No. 248 Offered by Mrs. Lee of Nevada

       At the end of subtitle C of title VII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 729. UPDATE OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE REGULATIONS, 
                   INSTRUCTIONS, AND OTHER GUIDANCE TO INCLUDE 
                   GAMBLING DISORDER.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense, in 
     consultation with the Secretaries of the military 
     departments, shall update all regulations, instructions, and 
     other guidance of the Department of Defense and the military 
     departments with respect to behavioral health to explicitly 
     include gambling disorder. In carrying out this subsection, 
     the Secretary shall implement the recommendations of the 
     Comptroller General of the United States numbered 2 through 6 
     in the report by the Comptroller General titled ``Military 
     Personnel: DOD and the Coast Guard Need to Screen for 
     Gambling Disorder Addiction and Update Guidance'' (numbered 
     GAO-17-114).
       (b) Military Departments Defined.--In this section, the 
     term ``military departments'' has the meaning given that term 
     in section 101(8) of title 10, United States Code.


            amendment no. 249 offered by mrs. lee of nevada

       Page 353, line 19, strike ``leadership of''.
       Page 353, line 23, insert ``(a) Leadership.--'' before 
     ``Subsection''.
       Page 356, after line 15, add the following:
       (b) Authority.--Paragraph (1) of subsection (b) of such 
     section is amended by adding at the end the following new 
     sentence: ``The Office shall carry out decision making 
     authority delegated to the office by the Secretary of Defense 
     and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs with respect to the 
     definition, coordination, and management of functional, 
     technical, and programmatic activities that are jointly used, 
     carried out, and shared by the Departments.''.
       (c) Purposes.--Paragraph (2) of subsection (b) of such 
     section is by adding at the end the following new 
     subparagraphs:
       ``(C) To develop and implement a comprehensive 
     interoperability strategy, including pursuant to the National 
     Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020 or other 
     provision of law requiring such strategy.
       ``(D) To pursue the highest level of interoperability (as 
     defined in section 713 of the National Defense Authorization 
     Act for Fiscal Year 2020) for the delivery of health care by 
     the Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans 
     Affairs.
       ``(E) To accelerate the exchange of health care information 
     between the Departments in order to support the delivery of 
     health care by both Departments.
       ``(F) To collect the operational and strategic requirements 
     of the Departments relating to the strategy under subsection 
     (a) and communicate such requirements and activities to the 
     Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information 
     Technology of the Department of Health and Human Services for 
     the purpose of implementing title IV of the 21st Century 
     Cures Act (division A of Public Law 114-255), and the 
     amendments made by that title, and other objectives of the 
     Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information 
     Technology.
       ``(G) To plan for and effectuate the broadest possible 
     implementation of standards, specifically with respect to the 
     Fast Healthcare Interoperability Resources standard or 
     successor standard, the evolution of such standards, and the 
     obsolescence of such standards.
       ``(H) To actively engage with national and international 
     health standards setting organizations, including by taking 
     membership in such organizations, to ensure that standards 
     established by such organizations meet the needs of the 
     Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs 
     pursuant to the strategy under subsection (a), and

[[Page H5667]]

     oversee and approve adoption of and mapping to such standards 
     by the Departments.
       ``(I) To express the content and format of health data of 
     the Departments using a common language to improve the 
     exchange of data between the Departments and with the private 
     sector, and to ensure that clinicians of both Departments 
     have access to integrated, computable, comprehensive health 
     records of patients.
       ``(J) To inform each Chief Information Officer of the 
     Department of Defense and the Chief Information Officer of 
     the Department of Veterans Affairs of any activities of the 
     Office affecting or relevant to cybersecurity.''.
       (d) Resources and Staffing.--Subsection (g) of such section 
     is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (1), by inserting before the period at the 
     end the following: ``, including the assignment of clinical 
     or technical personnel of the Department of Defense or the 
     Department of Veterans Affairs to the Office''; and
       (2) by adding at the end the following new paragraphs:
       ``(3) Cost sharing.--The Secretary of Defense and the 
     Secretary of Veterans Affairs, acting through the Department 
     of Veterans Affairs-Department of Defense Joint Executive 
     Committee, shall enter into an agreement on cost sharing and 
     providing resources for the operations and staffing of the 
     Office.
       ``(4) Hiring authority.--The Secretary of Defense and the 
     Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall delegate to the Director 
     the authority under title 5, United States Code, regarding 
     appointments in the competitive service to hire personnel of 
     the Office.''.
       (e) Budget Matters.--Such section is amended by adding at 
     the end the following new subsection:
       ``(k) Budget and Contracting Matters.--
       ``(1) Budget.--The Director may obligate and expend funds 
     allocated to the operations of the Office.
       ``(2) Contract authority.--The Director may enter into 
     contracts to carry out this section.''.
       (f) Reports.--Subsection (h) of such section is amended to 
     read as follows:
       ``(h) Reports.--
       ``(1) Annual reports.--Not later than September 30, 2020, 
     and each year thereafter through 2024, the Director shall 
     submit to the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of 
     Veterans Affairs, and to the appropriate committees of 
     Congress, a report on the activities of the Office during the 
     preceding calendar year. Each report shall include the 
     following:
       ``(A) A detailed description of the activities of the 
     Office during the year covered by such report, including a 
     detailed description of the amounts expended and the purposes 
     for which expended.
       ``(B) With respect to the objectives of the strategy under 
     paragraph (2)(C) of subsection (b), and the purposes of the 
     Office under such subsection--
       ``(i) a discussion, description, and assessment of the 
     progress made by the Department of Defense and the Department 
     of Veterans Affairs during the preceding calendar year; and
       ``(ii) a discussion and description of the goals of the 
     Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs 
     for the following calendar year.
       ``(2) Quarterly reports.--On a quarterly basis, the 
     Director shall submit to the appropriate committees of 
     Congress a detailed financial summary of the activities of 
     the Office, including the funds allocated to the Office by 
     each Department, the expenditures made, and an assessment as 
     to whether the current funding is sufficient to carry out the 
     activities of the Office.
       ``(3) Availability.--Each report under this subsection 
     shall be made publicly available.''.
       (g) Conforming Repeal.--Section 713 of the National Defense 
     Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2014 (Public Law 113-66; 10 
     U.S.C. 1071 note) is repealed.


           amendment no. 250 offered by mrs. lesko of arizona

       At the end of subtitle C of title I, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. __. AIR FORCE AGGRESSOR SQUADRON MODERNIZATION.

       (a) Sense of the House of Representatives.--It is the sense 
     of the House of Representatives that--
       (1) it is critical that the Air Force has the capability to 
     train against an advanced air adversary in order to be 
     prepared for conflicts against a modern enemy force;
       (2) in order to have this capability, Air Force must have 
     access to an advanced adversary force prior to United States 
     adversaries fielding a 5th-generation operational capability; 
     and
       (3) the Air Force's plan to use low-rate initial production 
     F-35As as aggressor aircraft reflects a recognition of the 
     need to field a modernized aggressor fleet.
       (b) Report.--
       (1) In general.--No later than 6 months prior to the 
     transfer of any low-rate initial production F-35 aircraft for 
     use as aggressor aircraft, the Chief of Staff of the Air 
     Force shall submit to the congressional defense committees, 
     and the Member of Congress and the Senators who represent 
     bases from where aircraft may be transferred, a comprehensive 
     plan and report on the strategy for modernizing the organic 
     aggressor fleet.
       (2) Elements.--The report required under paragraph (1) 
     shall include the following elements:
       (A) Potential locations for F-35A aggressor aircraft, 
     including an analysis of installations that--
       (i) have the size and availability of airspace necessary to 
     meet flying operations requirements;
       (ii) have sufficient capacity and availability of range 
     space;
       (iii) are capable of hosting advanced-threat training 
     exercises; and
       (iv) meet or require minimal addition to the environmental 
     requirements associated with the basing action.
       (B) An analysis of the potential cost and benefits of 
     expanding aggressor squadrons currently operating 18 Primary 
     Assigned Aircraft (PAA) to a level of 24 PAA each.
       (C) An analysis of the cost and timelines associated with 
     modernizing the current Air Force aggressor squadrons to 
     include upgrading aircraft's radar, infrared search-and-track 
     systems, radar warning receiver, tactical datalink, threat-
     representative jamming pods, and other upgrades necessary to 
     provide a realistic advanced adversary threat.
       (D) Any costs associated with moving the aircraft.
       (E) Any jobs on the relevant military installation that may 
     be affected by said changes.


           amendment no. 252 offered by mr. levin of michigan

       At the end of subtitle G of title VIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 898. COMPTROLLER GENERAL REPORT ON CONTRACTOR VIOLATIONS 
                   OF CERTAIN LABOR LAWS.

       Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Comptroller of the United States shall submit a 
     report to Congress on the number of contractors--
       (1) that performed a contract with the Department of 
     Defense during the five-year period preceding the date of the 
     enactment of this Act; and
       (2) that have been found by the Department of Labor to have 
     committed willful or repeat violations of the Occupational 
     Safety and Health Act of 1970 (29 U.S.C. 651 et seq.) or the 
     Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. 201 et seq.), and 
     the nature of the violations committed.


          amendment no. 253 offered by mr. levin of california

       At the end of subtitle C of title II add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 2__. INCREASE IN FUNDING FOR NAVAL UNIVERSITY RESEARCH 
                   INITIATIVES.

       (a) Increase.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 201 for research, development, test, 
     and evaluation, as specified in the corresponding funding 
     table in section 4201 for Navy basic research, University 
     Research Initiatives, line 001 (PE 0601103N) is hereby 
     increased by $5,000,000.
       (b) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 301 for operation and maintenance, as 
     specified in the corresponding funding table in section 4301, 
     for operation and maintenance, Defense-wide, operating 
     forces, Special Operations Command Theater Forces, line 100 
     is hereby reduced by $5,000,000.


          amendment no. 254 offered by mr. levin of california

       At the end of subtitle G of title V, add the following:

     SEC. 567. ASSESSMENT AND STUDY OF TRANSITION ASSISTANCE 
                   PROGRAM.

       (a) One-year Independent Assessment of the Effectiveness of 
     TAP.--
       (1) Independent assessment.--Not later than 90 days after 
     the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of 
     Veterans Affairs, in consultation with the covered officials, 
     shall enter into an agreement with an appropriate entity with 
     experience in adult education to carry out a 1-year 
     independent assessment of TAP, including--
       (A) the effectiveness of TAP for members of each military 
     department during the entire military life cycle;
       (B) the appropriateness of the TAP career readiness 
     standards;
        ) a review of information that is provided to the 
     Department of Veterans Affairs under TAP, including mental 
     health data;
       (D) whether TAP effectively addresses the challenges 
     veterans face entering the civilian workforce and in 
     translating experience and skills from military service to 
     the job market;
       (E) whether TAP effectively addresses the challenges faced 
     by the families of veterans making the transition to civilian 
     life;
       (F) appropriate metrics regarding TAP outcomes for members 
     of the Armed Forces one year after separation, retirement, or 
     discharge from the Armed Forces;
       (G) what the Secretary, in consultation with the covered 
     officials and veterans service organizations determine to be 
     successful outcomes for TAP;
       (H) whether members of the Armed Forces achieve successful 
     outcomes for TAP, as determined under subparagraph (G);
       (I) how the Secretary and the covered officials provide 
     feedback to each other regarding such outcomes;
       (J) recommendations for the Secretaries of the military 
     departments regarding how to improve outcomes for members of 
     the Armed Forces after separation, retirement, and discharge; 
     and

[[Page H5668]]

       (K) other topics the Secretary and the covered officials 
     determine would aid members of the Armed Forces as they 
     transition to civilian life.
       (2) Report.--Not later than 90 days after the completion of 
     the independent assessment under paragraph (1), the Secretary 
     and the covered officials, shall submit to the Committees on 
     Veterans' Affairs of the Senate and House of Representatives 
     and the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and House 
     of Representatives--
       (A) the findings and recommendations (including recommended 
     legislation) of the independent assessment prepared by the 
     entity described in paragraph (1); and
       (B) responses of the Secretary and the covered officials to 
     the findings and recommendations described in subparagraph 
     (G).
       (3) Definitions.--In this section:
       (A) The term ``covered officials'' is comprised of--
       (I) the Secretary of Defense;
       (ii) the Secretary of Labor;
       (iii) the Administrator of the Small Business 
     Administration; and
       (iv) the Secretaries of the military departments.
       (B) The term ``military department'' has the meaning given 
     that term in section 101 of title 10, United States Code.
       (b) Longitudinal Study on Changes to TAP.--
       (1) Study.--Not later than 90 days after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, in 
     consultation with the Secretaries of Defense and Labor and 
     the Administrator of the Small Business Administration, shall 
     conduct a five-year longitudinal study regarding TAP on three 
     separate cohorts of members of the Armed Forces who have 
     separated from the Armed Forces, including--
       (A) a cohort that has attended TAP counseling as 
     implemented on the date of the enactment of this Act;
       (B) a cohort that attends TAP counseling after the 
     Secretaries of Defense and Labor implement changes 
     recommended in the report under subsection a(2); and
        ) a cohort that has not attended TAP counseling.
       (2) Progress reports.--Not later than 90 days after the day 
     that is one year after the date of the initiation of the 
     study under paragraph (1) and annually thereafter for the 
     three subsequent years, the Secretaries of Veterans Affairs, 
     Defense, and Labor, and the Administrator of the Small 
     Business Administration, shall submit to the Committees on 
     Veterans' Affairs of the Senate and House of Representatives 
     and the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and House 
     of Representatives a progress report of activities under the 
     study during the immediately preceding year.
       (3) Final report.--Not later than 180 days after the 
     completion of the study under paragraph (1), the Secretaries 
     of Veterans Affairs, Defense, and Labor, and the 
     Administrator of the Small Business Administration, shall 
     submit to the Committees on Veterans' Affairs of the Senate 
     and House of Representatives and the Committees on Armed 
     Services of the Senate and House of Representatives a report 
     of final findings and recommendations based on the study.
       (4) Elements.--The final report under paragraph (3) shall 
     include information regarding the following:
       (A) The percentage of each cohort that received 
     unemployment benefits during the study.
       (B) The numbers of months members of each cohort were 
     employed during the study.
        ) Annual starting and ending salaries of members of each 
     cohort who were employed during the study.
       (D) How many members of each cohort enrolled in an 
     institution of higher learning, as that term is defined in 
     section 3452(f) of title 38, United States Code.
       (E) The academic credit hours, degrees, and certificates 
     obtained by members of each cohort during the study.
       (F) The annual income of members of each cohort.
       (G) The total household income of members of each cohort.
       (H) How many members of each cohort own their principal 
     residences.
       (I) How many dependents that members of each cohort have.
       (J) The percentage of each cohort that achieves a 
     successful outcome for TAP, as determined under subsection 
     (1)(G).
       (K) Other criteria the Secretaries and the Administrator of 
     the Small Business Administration determine appropriate.


          amendment no. 255 offered by mr. levin of california

       At the end of subtitle G of title X, insert the following:

     SEC. 10__. REPORT ON COMBATING TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS 
                   INITIATIVE.

       Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of 
     this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to the 
     congressional defense committees a report containing an 
     analysis of the progress of the Department of Defense in 
     implementing the Combating Trafficking in Persons Initiative, 
     published in 2007 and as revised on June 21, 2019.


        amendment no. 256 offered by mr. ted lieu of california

       At the end of subtitle G of title XII, add the following:

     SEC. _. PROHIBITION ON IN-FLIGHT REFUELING TO NON-UNITED 
                   STATES AIRCRAFT THAT ENGAGE IN HOSTILITIES IN 
                   THE ONGOING CIVIL WAR IN YEMEN.

        For the two-year period beginning on the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Department of Defense may not 
     provide in-flight refueling pursuant to section 2342 of title 
     10, United States Code, or any other applicable statutory 
     authority to non-United States aircraft that engage in 
     hostilities in the ongoing civil war in Yemen unless and 
     until a declaration of war or a specific statutory 
     authorization for such use of United States Armed Forces has 
     been enacted.


        amendment no. 257 offered by mr. ted lieu of california

       Add at the end of subtitle G of title XII the following:

     SEC. __. UNITED STATES STRATEGY FOR LIBYA.

       (a) Report Required.--Not later than 120 days after the 
     date of enactment of this Act, the President shall submit to 
     the appropriate congressional committees a report that 
     contains a strategy for Libya.
       (b) Elements.--The report required by subsection (a) shall 
     include the following elements:
       (1) An explanation of the strategy for Libya, including a 
     description of the ends, ways, and means inherent to the 
     strategy.
       (2) An explanation of the legal authorities supporting the 
     strategy.
       (3) A detailed description of U.S. counterterrorism and 
     security partnerships with Libyan actors.
       (4) A detailed description of Libyan security actors and an 
     assessment of how those actors advance or undermine stability 
     in Libya and or U.S. strategic interests in Libya.
       (5) A detailed description of how Libyan security actors 
     support or obstruct civilian authorities and U.N. led efforts 
     towards a political settlement of the conflict.
       (6) A detailed description of the military activities of 
     external actors in Libya, including Russia, Egypt, France, 
     Qatar, the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Turkey, and the United 
     Arab Emirates, including assessments of whether those 
     activities:
       (A) have undermined progress towards stabilization, 
     including the United Nations-led negotiations;
       (B) involve United States-origin equipment and violate 
     contractual conditions of acceptable use of such equipment; 
     or
       (C) violate or seek to violate the United Nations arms 
     embargo on Libya imposed pursuant to United Nations Security 
     Council Resolution 1970 (2011).
       (7) A plan to integrate the United States diplomatic, 
     development, military, and intelligence resources necessary 
     to implement the strategy.
       (8) A detailed description of the roles of the United 
     States Armed Forces in supporting the strategy.
       (9) Any other matters as the President considers 
     appropriate.
       (c) Form.--The report required by subsection (a) shall be 
     submitted in unclassified form, but may include a classified 
     annex.
       (d) Appropriate Congressional Committees Defined.--In this 
     section, the term ``appropriate congressional committees'' 
     means--
       (1) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on 
     Foreign Relations, the Committee on Appropriations, and the 
     Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate; and
       (2) the Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on 
     Foreign Affairs, the Committee on Appropriations, and the 
     Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of 
     Representatives.


           amendment no. 258 offered by mr. loebsack of iowa

       At the end of subtitle C of title III, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 3__. EXTENSION OF TEMPORARY INSTALLATION REUTILIZATION 
                   AUTHORITY FOR ARSENALS, DEPOTS AND PLANTS.

       (a) Ensuring Viability of Arsenals, Depots and Plants.--
     Section 345(d) of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
     Fiscal Year 2018 (Public Law 115-91; 10 U.S.C. 2667 note) is 
     amended by striking ``September 30, 2020'' and inserting 
     ``September 30, 2025''.
       (b) Report Required .-- Not later than March 1, 2020, the 
     Secretary of the Army shall submit to the congressional 
     defense committees a report that includes--
       (1) the results of a needs assessment conducted by the 
     Secretary to determine the logistical, information 
     technology, and security requirements to create an internal 
     listing service of Army assets available for lease at 
     Arsenal's, depots and plants; and
       (2) information from any previous Army assessments or 
     inventory of real property.


           amendment no. 259 offered by mr. loebsack of iowa

       At the end of subtitle B of title II, add the following:

     SEC. ___. STEM JOBS ACTION PLAN.

       (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
       (1) Jobs in science, technology, engineering, and math in 
     addition to maintenance and manufacturing (collectively 
     referred to in this section as ``STEM'') make up a 
     significant portion of the workforce of the Department of 
     Defense.
       (2) These jobs exist within the organic industrial base, 
     research, development, and engineering centers, life-cycle 
     management commands, and logistics centers of the Department.
       (3) Vital to the continued support of the mission of all of 
     the military services, the

[[Page H5669]]

     Department needs to maintain its STEM workforce.
       (4) It is known that the demographics of personnel of the 
     Department indicate that many of the STEM personnel of the 
     Department will be eligible to retire in the next few years.
       (5) Decisive action is needed to replace STEM personnel as 
     they retire to ensure that the military does not further 
     suffer a skill and knowledge gap and thus a serious readiness 
     gap.
       (b) Assessments and Plan of Action.--The Secretary of 
     Defense, in conjunction with the Secretary of each military 
     department, shall --
       (1) perform an assessment of the STEM workforce for 
     organizations within the Department of Defense, including the 
     numbers and types of positions and the expectations for 
     losses due to retirements and voluntary departures;
       (2) identify the types and quantities of STEM jobs needed 
     to support future mission work;
       (3) determine the shortfall between lost STEM personnel and 
     future requirements;
       (4) analyze and explain the appropriateness and impact of 
     using reimbursable and working capital fund dollars for new 
     STEM hires;
       (5) identify a plan of action to address the STEM jobs gap, 
     including hiring strategies and timelines for replacement of 
     STEM employees; and
       (6) deliver to Congress, not later than December 31, 2020, 
     a report specifying such plan of action.


        amendment no. 260 offered by mr. lowenthal of california

       At the end of subtitle C of title XXVIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 28__. CONTINUED DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE USE OF HEATING, 
                   VENTILATION, AND AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS 
                   UTILIZING VARIABLE REFRIGERANT FLOW.

       Notwithstanding any provision of law to the contrary, the 
     Department of Defense may continue to consider and select 
     heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems that 
     utilize variable refrigerant flow as an option for use in 
     Department of Defense facilities.


           amendment no. 261 offered by mr. lucas of oklahoma

       Page 948, line 4, strike ``(b)''.
       Page 948, line 9, strike ``; and'' and insert ``;''.
       Page 948, line 10, strike ``paragraph (2)(C)'' and insert 
     ``subsection (a)(2)(C)''.
       Page 948, line 12, strike the period at the end and insert 
     ``; and''.
       Page 948, after line 12 insert the following:
       (3) in subsection (b)(1)--
       (A) by inserting after ``the Secretary of Defense,'' the 
     following: ``in coordination with the Administrator of the 
     National Aeronautics and Space Administration,'';
       (B) by inserting after ``defense'' the following: ``and 
     science'' ;
       (C) by inserting after ``the Department of Defense'' the 
     following: ``and the National Aeronautics and Space 
     Administration'';
       (4) in subsection (b)(2)(D), by inserting after ``the 
     Secretary'' the following: ``or the Administrator of the 
     National Aeronautics and Space Administration''.


          amendment no. 262 offered by mr. lujan of new mexico

       At the end of subtitle B of title XXXI, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 31__. ACCOUNTING PRACTICES OF NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY 
                   ADMINISTRATION FACILITIES.

       (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that 
     the Secretary of Energy should ensure that each laboratory 
     operating contractor or plant or site manager of National 
     Nuclear Security Administration sites applies generally 
     accepted and consistent accounting best practices for 
     laboratory, plant, or site directed research and development.
       (b) Report Required.--Not later than 210 days after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, the Administrator for 
     Nuclear Security shall submit to the congressional defense 
     committees a report that assesses the costs, benefits, risks, 
     and other effects of the pilot program under section 3119 of 
     the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2017 
     (Public Law 114-328; 50 U.S.C. 2791 note).


          amendment no. 263 offered by mr. lujan of new mexico

       At the end of subtitle C of title II, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 2__. STUDY AND REPORT ON LAB-EMBEDDED ENTREPRENEURIAL 
                   FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM.

       (a) Study.--The Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
     Engineering, in consultation with the Director of the 
     Advanced Manufacturing Office of the Department of Energy, 
     shall conduct a study on the feasibility and potential 
     benefits of establishing a lab-embedded entrepreneurial 
     fellowship program.
       (b) Elements.--The study under subsection (a) shall 
     include, with respect to a lab-embedded entrepreneurial 
     fellowship program, the following:
       (1) An estimate of administrative and programmatic costs 
     and materials, including appropriate levels of living 
     stipends and health insurance to attract a competitive pool 
     of applicants.
       (2) An assessment of capacity for entrepreneurial fellows 
     to use laboratory facilities and equipment.
       (3) An assessment of the benefits for participants in the 
     program through access to mentorship, education, and 
     networking and exposure to leaders from academia, industry, 
     government, and finance.
       (4) Assessment of the benefits for the Department of 
     Defense science and technology activities through 
     partnerships and exchanges with program fellows.
       (5) An estimate of the economic benefits created by the 
     implementation of this program, based in part on similar 
     entrepreneurial programs.
       (c) Consultation.--In conducting the study under subsection 
     (a), the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and 
     Engineering shall consult with the following, as necessary:
       (1) The Director of the Defense Advanced Research Projects 
     Agency.
       (2) The Director of Research for each military service.
       (3) Relevant research facilities, including the Department 
     of Energy National Laboratories (as defined in section 2 of 
     the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 15801)).
       (d) Report.--
       (1) In general.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Under Secretary of Defense for 
     Research and Engineering shall submit to the designated 
     recipients a report on the results of the study conducted 
     under subsection (a). At minimum, the report shall include an 
     explanation of the results of the study with respect to each 
     element set forth in subsection (b).
       (2) Nonduplication of efforts.--The Under Secretary of 
     Defense for Research and Engineering may use or add to any 
     existing reports completed by the Department in order to meet 
     the reporting requirement under paragraph (1).
       (3) Form of report.--The report under paragraph (1) shall 
     be submitted in unclassified form, but may include a 
     classified annex.
       (e) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) The term ``designated recipients'' means the following:
       (A) The Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on 
     Science, Space, and Technology, and the Committee on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives.
       (B) The Committee on Armed Services, the Committee on 
     Energy and Natural Resources, and the Committee on 
     Appropriations of the Senate.
       (C) The Secretary of Defense.
       (D) The Secretary of Energy.
       (2) The term ``lab-embedded entrepreneurial fellowship 
     program'' means a competitive, two-year program in which 
     participants (to be known as ``fellows'') are selected from a 
     pool of applicants to work in a Federal research facility 
     where the fellows will conduct research, development, and 
     demonstration activities, commercialize technology, and train 
     to be entrepreneurs.


          amendment no. 264 offered by mr. lujan of new mexico

       At the end of subtitle B of title III, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. __. FINDINGS, PURPOSE, AND APOLOGY.

       Section 2(a)(1) of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act 
     (Public Law 101-426; 42 U.S.C. 2210 note) is amended by 
     inserting ``, including individuals in New Mexico, Idaho, 
     Colorado, Arizona, Utah, Texas, Wyoming, Oregon, Washington, 
     South Dakota, North Dakota, Nevada, Guam, and the Northern 
     Mariana Islands,'' after ``tests exposed individuals''.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentlewoman 
from Oklahoma (Ms. Kendra S. Horn) and the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Thornberry) each will control 10 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Oklahoma.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Mr. Chair, I yield 8 minutes to the 
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Chair, I thank the gentlewoman from Oklahoma for 
yielding, and I thank the chairman of the full committee, Chairman 
Smith, for his important leadership, collaboration, and cooperation 
with me on these amendments.
  I also thank my colleague from Texas, Ranking Member Thornberry, for 
his support and work on these amendments and on the work of the NDAA.
  I thank them both for their important work on behalf of the men and 
women of the United States military.

                              {time}  2000

  The Jackson Lee amendment No. 203 directs the Secretary of Defense to 
promulgate regulations to ensure that candidates granted admission to 
attend a military academy undergo screening for speech disorders and be 
provided the results of the screening test and a list of warfare 
unrestricted line officer positions and occupation specialists that 
require successful performance on the speech test. Academy students 
shall have the option of undergoing speech therapy to reduce speech 
disorders or impediments.

[[Page H5670]]

  Specifically, this amendment is intended to help military academy 
candidates who have stuttering-related speech disorders.
  Madam Chair, 5 to 10 percent of all children stutter. Boys are two to 
three times more likely to stutter than girls. Approximately 75 percent 
of children recover from stuttering, but the remaining 25 percent will 
experience lifelong effects.
  I learned about the issue of stuttering and its implications for a 
successful military career through the experiences of a legislative 
fellow currently serving in my Washington, D.C., office. He is a 2016 
graduate from the United States Naval Academy with a degree in 
operations research and a veteran naval officer who was separated from 
the Navy in April 2019. His separation was not due to any fault of his 
own but because of the current processes of the United States Navy and 
the United States Naval Academy relating to speech fluency issues 
relating to stuttering.
  Let me also say that there was an ad that we have seen on television 
about a young man who was confronting a doctor during World War I and 
World War II. It had to do with ancestry. He was insisting that he was 
in good health, and the doctor said no. The end of the story is they 
showed that he prevailed, and he went to World War I or II and even won 
a Purple Heart.
  This Navy lieutenant's stuttering was not severe and undetectable to 
most individuals who engage him in conversation. He went on to secure a 
screening by the flight doctor. The flight doctor then administered a 
speech fluency test. During the test, his speech fluency did not meet 
naval standards, but he was an important contributor to the United 
States Navy.
  At the time, he advised the doctor that he might not be able to do 
the surface war command officer that he had selected even though he 
wanted to be an aviator. He then went on to another discipline, surface 
warfare officer. Then after graduating from the United States Naval 
Academy with an operations research degree, he served aboard the USS 
Scout.
  His captain said that he was able in every way. It was clear that he 
might not be able to be a surface warfare officer, but he was able.
  What happened was a tragedy. He went on to seek extra care. His 
overall speech fluency improved. The captain decided that transferring 
to a different community would be the best option. That was the 
captain's decision.
  Unfortunately, because of the speech impediment that could not be 
heard, he was sent to a Probationary Officer Continuation and Retention 
Board, the wrong board to be sent to, and a speech impediment was not 
considered a medical issue. Therefore, he could not go before the 
medical board.
  This very fine African American graduate of the academy could not 
serve because we did not do him service. We did not do him the kind of 
service that he needed to have. Unfortunately, this board was not 
really meant for someone who was capable, qualified, and ready. This is 
one where you do not have a right to appeal, if you can imagine that, 
and no one ever notifies you why.
  I am here today to say that my amendment will, hopefully, have an 
impact on the many different young soldiers who want to serve.
  Madam Chair, can you believe a half million dollars was spent on his 
education?
  Let me indicate that this amendment is supported by the National 
Stuttering Association. The National Stuttering Association says that 
we support the Jackson Lee amendment No. 203 that allows for military 
academy candidates to have access to, and options for, undergoing 
speech therapy to successfully manage speech disorders or impediments 
so that entry into officer or occupational specialist positions in the 
military is possible. Military personnel who stutter can be and are 
effective communicators, and stuttering does not limit military career 
aspirations.
  Jimmy Stewart became an aviator in World War II and reached the rank 
of brigadier general on July 23, 1959, a little later than World War 
II. He retired from military service on May 31, 1968.
  Madam Chair, I include in the Record a letter from National 
Stuttering Association and the famous people who stutter.


                              National Stuttering Association,

                                      New York, NY, July 11, 2019.
     Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee,
     Washington, DC.
       Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee: The National Stuttering 
     Association (NSA) is the largest non-profit organization in 
     the world dedicated to bringing hope and empowerment to 
     children and adults who stutter, families and professionals, 
     through support, education, advocacy, and research. We have 
     long worked with individuals and communities to increase 
     understanding of stuttering and to improve outcomes for 
     people who stutter in all aspects of their lives.
       Over the last several years, we have enhanced outreach 
     efforts to raise stuttering awareness to colleges and 
     universities, employers and the military. A recurrent theme 
     we hear from young people and adults who stutter are barriers 
     to employment and career success based on false assumptions 
     about stuttering. To that end, we have developed and enhanced 
     educational outreach programs for employers, which of course 
     includes the military. Just last year, a stuttering support 
     chapter was launched at Wright Patterson AFB, at the request 
     of personnel who stutter.
       We support Jackson Lee Amendment #203 that allows for 
     military academy candidates to have access to, and options 
     for, undergoing speech therapy to successfully manage speech 
     disorders or impediments so that entry into Officer or 
     Occupational Specialists positions in the military is 
     possible. Military personnel who stutter can be, and are, 
     effective communicators and stuttering does not have to limit 
     military career aspiration.
       Thank you for alerting us to this important act. Feel free 
     to contact us anytime for additional support or resources.
           Respectfully,
     Pamela Mertz,
       National Stuttering Association, Board of Directors, 
     Employment Advocacy/Military Support.

       Famous people who stutter:

       Jimmy Stewart, Charlie Sheen, Tiger Woods, Marilyn Monroe, 
     James Earl Jones, Samuel L. Jackson, Jack Paar, Elvis 
     Presley.

       Actors, singers & entertainers:

       Marc Anthony, Emily Blunt, Leon Botstein, Wayne Brady, 
     Garret Dillahunt, Robert Donat, Sheila Fraser, Noel 
     Gallagher, Gerald ``Gerry'' Goffin, Francois Goudreault, 
     Jason Gray, Ray Griff, Tim Gunn, Steve Harvey, John Lee 
     Hooker.
       Scatman John, Harvey Keitel, Nicole Kidman, B.B. King, 
     Kendrick Lamar, Peggy Lipton, Doug MacLeod, Raymond Massey, 
     John Melendez, Robert Merrill, Sam Neill, Jack Paar, Elvis 
     Presley, Anthony Quinn, Eric Roberts.
       Hrithik Roshan, Mike Rowe, Budd Schulberg, Ed 
     Sheeran, Carly Simon, Tom Sizemore, Mel Tillis, Megan 
     Washington, Michelle Williams, Ann Wilson, Bill Withers, 
     Shane Yellowbird.

       Sports stars:

       Michael Attardi, Alex Carter, Rubin ``Hurricane'' Carter, 
     Johnny Damon, Antonio Dixon, Perico Fernandez, Sophie 
     Gustafson, Lester Hayes, Ron Harper, Bo Jackson, Tommy John, 
     Juanfran (Juan Francisco Garcia Garcia), Ivo Karlovic, 
     Michael Kidd-Gilchrist, Gordie Lane.
       Greg Louganis, Bob Love, Kenyon Martin, Trumaine McBride, 
     Shaquille O'Neal, Adrian Peterson, Ellis Lankster, Boyd 
     Rankin, James Rodriguez, Mark Rubin, Bryan Rust, Bob Sanders, 
     Sigi Schmid, Matt Slauson, George Springer, Darren Sproles.
       Dave Taylor, Jermain Taylor, Ken Venturi, Herschel Walker, 
     Bill Walton, Jeff Walz, Pat Williams, Damien Woody, Chris 
     Zorich.

       Writers, authors, producers, composers, and artists:

       Jeffrey Blitz, Jorge Luis Borges, Lewis Carroll, Calvert 
     Casey, Scott Damian, Jim Davis, Charles Darwin, Francine du 
     Plessix Gray, Margaret Drabble, Dominick Dunne, John Gregory 
     Dunne, Jack Eberts, Indiana Gregg, Robert A. Heinlein, Edward 
     Hoagland.
       Philip Larkin, Ann McGovern, Somerset Maugham, David 
     Mitchell, Mike Peters, Budd Schulberg, Jane Seymour, Marc 
     Shell, Neville Shute, Alan Rabinowitz, John Updike, Andrew 
     Lloyd Webber.

       Journalists and photographers:

       P.F. Bentley, Henry Luce, Byron Pitts, John Stossel, Jeff 
     Zeleny.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Chair, I include in the Record the actual 
resume of Michael Pender, a graduate of Annapolis and an excellent 
young man.

                             Michael Pender

       Michael Pender is a 2016 United States Naval Academy 
     graduate and a veteran naval officer who was separated from 
     the Navy in April 2019. His separation was not due to any 
     fault of his own, but because of the current processes of the 
     United States Navy and the United States Naval Academy 
     relating to speech fluency issues related to stuttering.
       Lieutenant Pender's stuttering was not severe, and 
     undetectable to most individuals who engage him in 
     conversation. However,

[[Page H5671]]

     for certain career opportunities in the military it matters a 
     great deal if someone has even a slight almost imperceptible 
     stutter.
       Michael Pender's story began with his enrollment at the 
     Naval Academy in 2012. Mr. Pender dreamed of becoming a naval 
     aviator from an early age. During the naval aviation 
     screening during his junior year at Annapolis, the USNA 
     flight doctor reviewing his medical records and USNA 
     application and noticed that Mr. Pender had a history of 
     speech disfluency. The flight doctor then administered a 
     speech fluency test to Mr. Pender. During the test, Mr. 
     Pender's speech fluency did not meet the Naval Aviation 
     community's standards, and he was told that he was 
     disqualified from serving as an aviator.
       Mr. Pender was disappointed with the determination. At that 
     critical juncture Mr. Pender was not informed about what 
     careers he could qualify to fill that would not be impacted 
     by the determination regarding his speech. He was given an 
     opportunity to take speech therapy, which he did until his 
     graduation.
       Mr. Pender selected the only unrestricted line option 
     left--the Surface Warfare community. At the time, Mr. Pender 
     advised the flight doctor that the demands for speech fluency 
     would be more of an issue as a Surface Warfare Officer. His 
     concerns were not satisfactorily addressed nor was he 
     provided with counseling to assist him in selecting an 
     appropriate career following his graduation.
       After graduating from the United States Naval Academy, Mr. 
     Pender served onboard the USS Scout (MCM 8) in San Diego, 
     where he began his training as a Surface Warfare Officer. 
     After serving diligently for 18 months and qualifying in all 
     required Surface Warfare watch-stations except for the 
     position of Officer of the Deck, it was clear that his speech 
     impediment would keep him from earning his Surface Warfare 
     Officer qualification.
       An Officer of the Deck is the captain's representative when 
     the captain is not on the bridge of the ship. Officer of the 
     Deck gives verbal orders to sailors who drive the ship. It 
     was difficult for Mr. Pender to give orders in a timely 
     manner without delay due to his speech impediment. Mr. Pender 
     wanted to address the issue and sought out a speech therapist 
     who would accept TRICare insurance to improve his speech as 
     he pursued his Officer of the Deck qualification. His overall 
     speech fluency improved, but not enough to give the Captain 
     confidence to qualify Mr. Pender as Officer of the Deck. Mr. 
     Pender and his Captain decided that transferring to a 
     different community would be the best option.
       Since stuttering is not classified as a medical issue, a 
     Medical Board was not an option to review his case. Once he 
     completed his education at Annapolis the options for career 
     change within the branch was extremely limited. In 2018, 
     after consulting with other officers, Mr. Pender's Captain 
     and Executive Officer decided that the best course of action 
     was to submit a redesignation package to the Probationary 
     Officer Continuation and Retention Board (POCR), with the 
     intention that he would re-designate into a different 
     community. In order to start this process, Mr. Pender's 
     Captain submitted a Surface Warfare Officer non-attainment 
     letter to the POCR Board. In that letter, Mr. Pender's 
     captain stated that Mr. Pender would not be able to qualify 
     as Surface Warfare Officer, not because of a lack of aptitude 
     or work ethic, but because of his speech impediment.
       The POCR Board has the authority to reassign a Naval 
     Officer to another Naval Community, which the Navy's method 
     of reassigning personnel to a new job. The POCR Board got 
     back to Mr. Pender in September 2018 stating that he would be 
     removed from the Active Duty List and he would be retained on 
     the Reserve Active Status list, effectively separating him 
     from the Navy without any due process or a right to appeal 
     the decision.
       It is disappointing that he had to separate from the Navy 
     for two reasons. First, he was not put into a position to 
     succeed coming out of the Naval Academy. His speech 
     impediment was a known condition at the Naval Academy, and 
     their service selection process should have evaluated Mr. 
     Pender's speech impediment to see if he would be successful 
     as a Naval Aviator or a Surface Warfare Officer. Second, he 
     should have been given a chance to serve in a restricted line 
     community. Even if his speech impediment was not caught until 
     he ultimately started his service as a Naval Officer, there 
     should be a process in place where officers who cannot 
     qualify in their respective unrestricted line communities due 
     to conditions that are not covered for Medical Boards are 
     given a fair chance to serve in one of the many restricted 
     line communities. The POCR Board process should only be 
     reserved for officers that were not able to qualify due to a 
     lack of desire or aptitude. In conclusion, there were plenty 
     of other communities in the Navy where Mr. Pender would have 
     been able to serve, and it is a shame that he is separated 
     from the Navy.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Chair, let me also indicate that I am very 
glad and grateful for amendment No. 201 that adds $10 million to 
research dealing with triple negative breast cancer.
  Between 10 and 17 percent of female breast cancer patients have this 
condition, and I believe this is crucial to helping military women and 
others.
  Amendment No. 202 deals with PTSD. We have added $2.5 million. I am 
grateful for this amendment. We are recognizing that more and more 
young people coming out have a continuation of PTSD. Currently, there 
are 31.3 million people in the United States being treated for PTSD.
  Let me also say that I am grateful for the seven other amendments 
that have been added.
  Jackson Lee amendment No. 195 creates housing for disaster survivors.
  No. 145 has the DOD engage in efforts to stop Boko Haram.
  No. 147 has to do with recruiting students who go to the Defense 
National Security Education Program. It prevents them from being 
recruited by foreign governments.
  Also, No. 148 deals with stopping a report on maternity mortality 
rates.
  Amendment No. 149 deals with the risk posed by debris in low Earth 
orbit.
  No. 160 deals with the idea of training in cybersecurity, cyber 
defense, and cyber operations for elementary, secondary, and 
postsecondary students.
  Then, No. 620 deals with artificial intelligence education strategic 
opportunities and risks.
  Madam Chair, may I ask how much time I have remaining.
  The Acting CHAIR (Ms. Bonamici). The gentlewoman has 40 seconds 
remaining.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Chair, my remaining comments are to simply say 
the amendment that is close to my heart is the one dealing with this 
academy graduate, this Naval Academy graduate. We asked everyone to 
give him another chance because the only thing that he was deficient in 
is not in heart, soul, and willingness to serve, but it was because he 
had a speech impediment.
  How shameful for us to deal with our young men and women like that.
  I thank my colleagues for supporting this amendment. I ask for a 
``yes'' vote on the Jackson Lee amendments and the Jackson Lee 
amendment that deals with the idea of making sure young people have the 
medical care, the service, and the ability to serve after graduating 
from an academy with $500,000 invested in this young man, and all my 
other underlying amendments.
  Madam Chair, I ask my colleagues to support them.
  Madam Chair, I thank Chairman Smith and Ranking Member Thornberry for 
their work on this bill and their devotion to the men and women of the 
Armed Forces.
  I also thank them for including in this En Bloc ten Jackson Lee 
Amendments.
  My remarks will focus on three of the Jackson Lee Amendments and the 
others are addressed in my statement for the record.
  Jackson Lee Amendments No. 201, No. 202, and No. 203, make important 
contributions to the bill.
  Jackson Lee Amendment No. 201 authorizes and encourages increased 
collaboration between the DOD and the National Institutes of Health 
(NIH) to combat Triple Negative Breast Cancer;
  Jackson Lee Amendment No. 202 authorizes $2.5 million in increased 
funding to combat and treat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder; and
  Jackson Lee Amendment No. 203 directs the Secretary of Defense to 
promulgate regulations to ensure that candidates granted admission to 
attend a military academy undergo screening for speech disorders and be 
provided the results of the screening test and a list of warfare 
unrestricted line (URL) Officer positions and occupation specialists 
that require successful performance on the speech test. Academy 
students shall have the option of undergoing speech therapy to reduce 
speech disorders or impediments.
  Specifically, Jackson Lee Amendment No. 203 is intended to help 
military academy candidates that have stuttering related speech 
disorders.
  Five to ten percent of all children stutter as they develop language 
skills.
  Boys are 2 to 3 times more likely to stutter than girls.
  Approximately 75 percent of children recover from stuttering, but the 
remaining 25 percent will experience life-long effects of stuttering.
  There are many famous and accomplished persons who stutter.
  One well known person who stuttered was Jimmy Stewart a much beloved 
actor who also served in the Air Force during World War II.
  Jimmy Stewart was a pilot during WWII and rose to the rank of Chief 
of Staff of the 2nd Combat Wing, 2nd Air Division of the 8th Air Force.
  As a member of the Air Force Reserves Jimmy Stewart continued his 
military service.

[[Page H5672]]

  On July 23, 1959, Jimmy Stewart achieved the rank of Brigadier 
General.
  He retired from military service on May 31, 1968.
  Stuttering can make it difficult to communicate with other people, 
which often affects a person's quality of life and interpersonal 
relationships.
  Stuttering can also negatively influence job performance and 
opportunities, and treatment can come at a high financial cost.
  I offer this amendment to help entrants into military academies, who 
may have a related stuttering speech disorder, find the right career 
fit for their military service after graduation.
  I learned about the impact of stuttering may have on promising 
military careers through the experience of a remarkable young man who 
is currently serving as a Legislative Fellow in my Washington, D.C., 
office.
  He is a 2016 graduate of the United States Naval Academy with a 
degree in Operations Research and a veteran naval officer who was 
separated from the Navy in April 2019.
  His separation was not due to any fault of his own, but because of 
the current processes of the United States Navy and the United States 
Naval Academy relating to speech fluency issues related to stuttering.
  This Navy Lieutenant's stuttering was not severe, and undetectable to 
most individuals who engage him in conversation.
  However, for certain career opportunities in the military it matters 
a great deal if someone has even a slight, almost-imperceptible 
stutter.
  His story began with his enrollment at the Naval Academy in 2012.
  He dreamed of becoming a naval aviator from an early age.
  During the naval aviation screening during his junior year at 
Annapolis, the Naval Academy flight doctor reviewing his medical 
records and USNA application, noticed that he had a history of speech 
disfluency.
  The flight doctor then administered a speech fluency test to him.
  During the test, his speech fluency did not meet the Naval Aviation 
community's standards, and he was told that he was disqualified from 
serving as an aviator.
  He was disappointed with the determination.
  At that critical juncture he was not informed regarding the career 
paths he was qualified to fill, notwithstanding his speech.
  He was given an opportunity to take speech therapy, which he did 
until his graduation.
  He selected another unrestricted line option left open to him-the 
Surface Warfare community.
  At the time, he advised the flight doctor that the demands for speech 
fluency would be more of an issue as a Surface Warfare Officer.
  After graduating from the United States Naval Academy with an 
Operations Research degree, he served onboard the USS Scout (MCM 8) in 
San Diego, where he began his training as a Surface Warfare Officer.
  After serving diligently for 18 months and qualifying in all required 
Surface Warfare watch-stations except for the position of Officer of 
the Deck, it was clear that his speech impediment would keep him from 
earning his Surface Warfare Officer qualification.
  An Officer of the Deck is the captain's representative when the 
captain is not on the bridge of the ship.
  Officer of the Deck gives verbal orders to sailors who drive the 
ship.
  It was difficult for him to give orders in a timely manner without 
delay due to his speech impediment.
  He wanted to address the issue and sought out a speech therapist who 
would accept TRI-Care insurance to improve his speech as he pursued his 
Officer of the Deck qualification.
  His overall speech fluency improved, but not enough to give the 
Captain confidence to qualify him as Officer of the Deck.
  He and his Captain decided that transferring to a different community 
would be the best option.
  Since stuttering is not classified as a medical issue, a Medical 
Board was not an option to review his case.
  Once he completed his education at Annapolis, the options for career 
change within the branch were extremely limited.
  In 2018, after consulting with other officers, his Captain and 
Executive Officer decided that the best course of action was to submit 
a re-designation package to the Probationary Officer Continuation and 
Retention Board (POCR), with the intention that he would re-designate 
into a different community.
  To start this process, his Captain submitted a Surface Warfare 
Officer non-attainment letter to the POCR Board.
  In that letter, his captain stated that the Lieutenant would not be 
able to qualify as Surface Warfare Officer, not because of a lack of 
aptitude or work-ethic, but because of his speech impediment.
  The POCR Board has the authority to reassign a Naval Officer to 
another Naval Community, which is the Navy's method of reassigning 
personnel to a new job.
  The POCR Board got back to him in September 2018, stating that he 
would be removed from the Active Duty List and he would be retained on 
the Reserve Active Status list, effectively separating him from the 
Navy without any due process or a right to appeal the decision.
  The Medical Board findings returned in March 2019 and stated that it 
was the stuttering that caused the anxiety order, and stuttering is not 
an issue that is covered for Medical Boards.
  It is disappointing that he had to separate from the Navy for two 
reasons.
  First, he was not put into a position to succeed coming out of the 
Naval Academy.
  His speech impediment was a known condition at the Naval Academy, and 
its service selection process should have evaluated his speech 
impediment to see if he would be successful as a Naval Aviator or a 
Surface Warfare Officer.
  Second, he should have been given a chance to serve in a restricted 
line community.
  Even if his speech impediment was not caught until he ultimately 
started his service as a Naval Officer, there should be a process in 
place where officers who cannot qualify in their respective 
unrestricted line communities due to conditions that are not covered 
for Medical Boards are given a fair chance to serve in one of the many 
restricted line communities.
  The POCR Board process should only be reserved for officers that were 
not able to qualify due to a lack of desire or aptitude.
  In conclusion, there were plenty of other communities in the Navy 
where he would have been able to serve, and it is a shame that he is 
separated from the Navy.
  I, and my Staff have benefited greatly from his insights on improving 
the experience of military cadets as well as his commitment to public 
service as a Legislative Fellow in my office.
  I am sure he will find success in his next endeavor and I thank him 
for his service to our nation.
  Jackson Lee Amendment No. 202 authorizes $2.5 million in increased 
funding to combat and treat Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.
  Today, 223.4 million people, which represents seventy percent of 
adults living in the United States, have experienced some type of 
traumatic event at least once in their lives.
  As many as 20 percent of those who experience a traumatic event 
develop PTSD.
  Currently, there are 31.3 million people in the United States being 
treated for PTSD.
  An estimated 8 percent of Americans or 24.4 million people at any 
given time will be experiencing PTSD.
  Nearly 50 percent of women and 60 percent of men will experience at 
least one trauma in their lifetime.
  For Veterans, this may mean surviving an IED explosion or an accident 
during a training exercise or witnessing the death or injury of a 
buddy.
  Among people who are victims of a severe traumatic experience like 
what may occur during military conflict, an estimated 60 to 80 percent 
will develop PTSD.
  Ten to thirty percent of combat veteran's lifetime will experience 
PTSD at some point during their lives.
  Studies estimate that 1 in every 5 military personnel returning from 
Iraq and Afghanistan has PTSD.
  20 percent of the soldiers who've been deployed in the past 6 years 
have PTSD. That's over 300,000 soldiers.
  17 percent of combat troops are women; 71 percent of female military 
personnel develop PTSD due to sexual assault within the ranks.
  I thank the Chair and Ranking Member for including this Jackson Lee 
Amendment to combat PTSD for consideration of H.R. 2500.
  This Jackson Lee Amendment provides authorization for a $10 million 
increase in funding for increased collaboration with NIH to combat 
Triple Negative Breast Cancer.
  This Jackson Lee Amendment authorizes and encourages increased 
collaboration between the DOD and the National Institutes of Health 
(NIH) to combat Triple Negative Breast Cancer.
  ``Triple Negative Breast Cancer'' is a term used to describe breast 
cancers whose cells do not have estrogen receptors and progesterone 
receptors, and do not have an excess of the ``HER2'' protein on their 
cell membrane of tumor cells.
  The lack of receptors in this form of breast cancer makes commonly 
used test and methods to detect the disease not as effective.
  This is a serious illness that effects between 10-17 percent of 
female breast cancer patients and this condition is more likely to 
cause death than the most common form of breast cancer.
  Seventy percent of women with metastatic triple negative breast 
cancer do not live more than five years after being diagnosed.
  The Jackson Lee Amendment will help to save lives.
  TNBC disproportionately impacts younger women, African American 
women, Hispanic/

[[Page H5673]]

Latina women, and women with a ``BRCA1'' genetic mutation, which is 
also prevalent in Jewish women.
  TNBC usually affects women under 50 years of age and makes up more 
than 30 percent of all breast cancer diagnoses in African American.
  African American women are far more susceptible to this dangerous 
subtype than white or Hispanic women.
  The collaboration between the Department of Defense and NIH to combat 
Triple Negative Breast Cancer can support the development of multiple 
targeted therapies for this devastating disease.
  Triple negative breast cancer is a specific strain of breast cancer 
for which no targeted treatment is available.
  The American Cancer Society calls this strain of breast cancer ``an 
aggressive subtype associated with lower survival rates.''
  In 2011, the Centers for Disease Control predicted that that year 
26,840 black women would be diagnosed with TNBC.
  The overall incidence rate of breast cancer is 10 percent lower in 
African American women than white women.
  African American women have a five-year survival rate of 78 percent 
after diagnosis as compared to 90 percent for white women.
  The incidence rate of breast cancer among women under 45 is higher 
for African American women compared to white women.
  Triple Negative Breast Cancer cells account for between 13 percent 
and 25 percent of all breast cancer in the United States and are 
usually of a higher grade and size, are more aggressive and more likely 
to metastasize, and onset at a much younger age.
  Currently, 70 percent of women with metastatic triple negative breast 
cancer do not live more than five years after being diagnosed.
  African American women are 3 times more likely to develop triple-
negative breast cancer than white women.
  African-American women have prevalence for TNBC of 26 percent versus 
16 percent in non-African-Americans women.
  African-American women are more likely to be diagnosed with larger 
tumors and more advanced stages of breast cancer.
  Currently there is no targeted treatment for TNBC exists.
  For this reason, I appreciate the support that the Armed Services 
Committee has shown for this amendment by including it in En Bloc No. 
8, and I ask my colleagues to support this Jackson Lee Amendment.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. I continue to reserve the balance of my time, Madam 
Chair.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Madam Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Rose).
  Mr. ROSE of New York. Madam Chair, I rise today in support of my 
bipartisan amendment in both the House and Senate to the National 
Defense Authorization Act, a necessary leap forward in combating the 
opioid crisis by cracking down on illegal fentanyl from China, Mexico, 
and other countries.
  I would like to acknowledge and thank the cosponsors of this 
amendment, my colleagues French Hill, Anthony Brindisi, Brian 
Fitzpatrick,   David Trone, and Conor Lamb.
  This amendment will place sanctions on drug manufacturers that 
knowingly provide fentanyl to traffickers, on transnational criminal 
organizations that mix fentanyl with other drugs and traffic them into 
the U.S., as well as financial institutions that assist these 
traffickers.
  Critically, my amendment also authorizes new funding to U.S. law 
enforcement and intelligence agencies to go after fentanyl traffickers 
while establishing a commission on fentanyl and opioid trafficking to 
ensure that we make progress here.
  Kids are dying in my district, in Staten Island, south Brooklyn, and 
New York City, and they are dying around the country because of deadly 
fentanyl.
  We know where it is coming from. It is about time that Congress does 
something about it. The days when a person or a company could find safe 
harbor in another country, flood our streets with drugs, and face no 
consequences have to be over.
  Madam Chair, I strongly urge all of my colleagues to vote in favor of 
this amendment. We have to get this done.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance 
of my time.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendments en bloc offered 
by the gentlewoman from Oklahoma (Ms. Kendra S. Horn).
  The en bloc amendments were agreed to.


  Amendments En Bloc No. 11 Offered by Ms. Kendra S. Horn of Oklahoma

  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Madam Chair, pursuant to House 
Resolution 476, I offer amendments en bloc as the designee of the 
gentleman from Washington (Mr. Smith).
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendments en bloc.
  Amendments en bloc No. 11 consisting of amendment Nos. 265, 266, 267, 
268, 269, 270, 271, 272, 273, 274, 275, 276, 277, 278, 279, 280, 281, 
282, 283, 284, 285, 286, 287, 288, 289, and 290, printed in part B of 
House Report 116-143, offered by Ms. Kendra S. Horn of Oklahoma:


          Amendment No. 265 Offered by Mrs. Luria of Virginia

       At the end of subtitle C of title VII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 7__. FINDINGS ON MUSCULOSKELETAL INJURIES.

       Congress finds the following:
       (1) Musculoskeletal injuries among active duty soldiers 
     result in over 10 million limited duty days each year and 
     account for over 70% of the medically non-deployable 
     population, extremity injury accounts for 79% of reported 
     trauma cases in theater, and service members experience 
     anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries at 10 times the 
     rate of the general population.
       (2) Congress recognizes the important work of the Naval 
     Advanced Medical Research Unit in Wound Care Research and 
     encourages continued development of innovations for the 
     Warfighter, especially regarding these tendon and ligament 
     injuries that prevent return to duty for extended periods of 
     time.


          Amendment No. 266 Offered by Mrs. Luria of Virginia

       At the end of subtitle B of title III, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 3__. STUDY ON ENERGY SAVINGS PERFORMANCE CONTRACTS.

       (a) Study.--The Secretary of Defense shall conduct a study 
     on how the Secretary could enter into more energy savings 
     performance contracts (referred to in this section as 
     ``ESPCs'' ). In conducting the study, the Secretary shall--
       (1) identify any legislative or regulatory barriers to 
     entering into more ESPCs; and
       (2) include policy proposals for how the Department of 
     Defense could evaluate the cost savings caused by increasing 
     energy resiliency when evaluating whether to enter into 
     ESPCs.
       (b) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the 
     congressional defense committees a report on the study 
     required under subsection (a).


        Amendment No. 267 Offered by Mr. Lynch of Massachusetts

       Add at the end of subtitle G of title VIII the following 
     new section:

     SEC. __. REESTABLISHMENT OF COMMISSION ON WARTIME 
                   CONTRACTING.

       (a) In General.--There is hereby reestablished in the 
     legislative branch under section 841 of the National Defense 
     Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 110-181; 
     122 Stat. 230) the Commission on Wartime Contracting.
       (b) Amendment to Duties.--Section 841(c)(1) of the National 
     Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 
     110-181; 122 Stat. 231) is amended to read as follows:
       ``(1) General duties.--The Commission shall study the 
     following matters:
       ``(A) Federal agency contracting funded by overseas 
     contingency operations funds.
       ``(B) Federal agency contracting for the logistical support 
     of coalition forces operating under the authority of the 2001 
     or 2002 Authorization for the Use of Military Force.
       ``(C) Federal agency contracting for the performance of 
     security functions in countries where coalition forces 
     operate under the authority of the 2001 or 2002 Authorization 
     for the Use of Military Force''.
       (c) Conforming Amendments.--Section 841 of the National 
     Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2008 (Public Law 
     110-181; 122 Stat. 230) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by striking ``the Committee on 
     Oversight and Government Reform'' each place it appears and 
     inserting ``the Committee on Oversight and Reform'';
       (B) in paragraph (2), by striking ``of this Act'' and 
     inserting ``of the Wartime Contracting Commission 
     Reauthorization Act of 2019''; and
       (C) in paragraph (4), by striking ``was first established'' 
     each place it appears and inserting ``was reestablished by 
     the Wartime Contracting Commission Reauthorization Act of 
     2019''; and
       (2) in subsection (d)(1), by striking ``On March 1, 2009'' 
     and inserting ``Not later than one year after the date of 
     enactment of the Wartime Contracting Commission 
     Reauthorization Act of 2019''.


   Amendment No. 268 Offered by Mr. Sean Patrick Maloney of New York

       Page 283, after line 10, insert the following:

     SEC. 567. INFORMATION REGARDING COUNTY VETERANS SERVICE 
                   OFFICERS.

       (a) Provision of Information.--The Secretary of Defense 
     shall ensure that a member of the Armed Forces who is 
     separating or retiring from the Armed Forces may elect to 
     have the Department of Defense form DD-214 of the member 
     transmitted to the appropriate county veterans service 
     officer based on the mailing address provided by the member.

[[Page H5674]]

       (b) Database.--The Secretary of Defense, in coordination 
     with the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, shall maintain a 
     database of all county veterans service officers.
       (c) County Veterans Service Officer Defined.--In this 
     section, the term ``county veterans service officer'' means 
     an employee of a county government, local government, or 
     Tribal government who is covered by section 14.629(a)(2) of 
     title 38, Code of Federal Regulations.


   Amendment No. 269 Offered by Mr. Sean Patrick Maloney of New York

       At the end of subtitle B of title VII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 719. MAINTENANCE OF CERTAIN MEDICAL SERVICES AT MILITARY 
                   MEDICAL TREATMENT FACILITIES AT SERVICE 
                   ACADEMIES.

       Section 1073d of title 10, United States Code, is amended 
     by adding at the end the following new subsection:
       ``(f) Maintenance of Certain Medical Services at Service 
     Academies.--(1) In carrying out subsection (a), the Secretary 
     of Defense shall ensure that each military medical treatment 
     facility located at a Service Academy (as defined in section 
     347 of this title) provides each covered medical service 
     unless the Secretary determines that a civilian health care 
     facility located not fewer than five miles from the Service 
     Academy provides the covered medical service.
       ``(2) In this subsection, the term `covered medical 
     service' means the following:
       ``(A) Emergency room services.
       ``(B) Orthopedic services.
       ``(C) General surgery services.
       ``(D) Ear, nose, and throat services.
       ``(E) Gynecological services.
       ``(F) Ophthalmology services.
       ``(G) In-patient services.
       ``(H) Any other medical services that the relevant 
     Superintendent of the Service Academy determines necessary to 
     maintain the readiness and health of the cadets or midshipmen 
     and members of the armed forces at the Service Academy.''.


            Amendment No. 270 Offered by Mr. Mast of Florida

       At the end of subtitle D of title VI, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 632. EXTENSION OF CERTAIN MORALE, WELFARE, AND 
                   RECREATION PRIVILEGES TO FOREIGN SERVICE 
                   OFFICERS ON MANDATORY HOME LEAVE.

       (a) In General.--Section 1065 of title 10, United States 
     Code, as added by section 621 of the John S. McCain National 
     Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 
     115-232), is amended--
       (1) in the heading, by striking ``veterans and caregivers 
     for veterans'' and inserting ``veterans, caregivers for 
     veterans, and Foreign Service officers'';
       (2) by redesignating subsections (f) and (g) as subsections 
     (g) and (h), respectively;
       (3) by inserting after subsection (e) the following new 
     subsection (f):
       ``(f) Eligibility of Foreign Service Officers on Mandatory 
     Home Leave.--A Foreign Service officer on mandatory home 
     leave may be permitted to use military lodging referred to in 
     subsection (h).''; and
       (4) in subsection (h), as redesignated by paragraph (2), by 
     adding at the end the following new paragraphs:
       ``(5) The term `Foreign Service officer' has the meaning 
     given that term in section 103 of the Foreign Service Act of 
     1980 (22 U.S.C. 3903).
       ``(6) The term `mandatory home leave' means leave under 
     section 903 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 
     4083).''.
       (b) Effective Date.--The amendments made by this section 
     shall take effect on January 1, 2020, as if originally 
     incorporated in section 621 of Public Law 115-232.


          Amendment No. 271 Offered by Mrs. McBath of Georgia

       At the end of subtitle H of title X, insert the following:

     SEC. 10__. DEFINITION OF CURRENT MONTHLY INCOME FOR PURPOSES 
                   OF BANKRUPTCY LAWS.

       Section 101(10A) of title 11, United States Code, is 
     amended by striking subparagraph (B) and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(B)(i) includes any amount paid by any entity other than 
     the debtor (or in a joint case the debtor and the debtor's 
     spouse), on a regular basis for the household expenses of the 
     debtor or the debtor's dependents (and in a joint case the 
     debtor's spouse if not otherwise a dependent); and
       ``(ii) excludes--

       ``(I) benefits received under the Social Security Act (42 
     U.S.C. 301 et seq.);
       ``(II) payments to victims of war crimes or crimes against 
     humanity on account of their status as victims of such 
     crimes;
       ``(III) payments to victims of international terrorism or 
     domestic terrorism, as those terms are defined in section 
     2331 of title 18, on account of their status as victims of 
     such terrorism; and
       ``(IV) any monthly compensation, pension, pay, annuity, or 
     allowance paid under title 10, 37, or 38 in connection with a 
     disability, combat-related injury or disability, or death of 
     a member of the uniformed services, except that any retired 
     pay excluded under this subclause shall include retired pay 
     paid under chapter 61 of title 10 only to the extent that 
     such retired pay exceeds the amount of retired pay to which 
     the debtor would otherwise be entitled if retired under any 
     provision of title 10 other than chapter 61 of that title.''.


       Amendment No. 272 Offered by Mr. McGovern of Massachusetts

       At the end of subtitle C of title VII, add the following:

     SEC. 7__. WOUNDED WARRIOR SERVICE DOG PROGRAM.

       (a) Grants Authorized.--Subject to the availability of 
     appropriations provided for such purpose, the Secretary of 
     Defense shall establish a program, to be known as the 
     ``Wounded Warrior Service Dog Program'', to award competitive 
     grants to nonprofit organizations to assist such 
     organizations in the planning, designing, establishing, or 
     operating (or any combination thereof) of programs to provide 
     assistance dogs to covered members.
       (b) Use of Funds.--
       (1) In general.--The recipient of a grant under this 
     section shall use the grant to carry out programs that 
     provide assistance dogs to covered members who have a 
     disability described in paragraph (2).
       (2) Disability.--A disability described in this paragraph 
     is any of the following:
       (A) Blindness or visual impairment.
       (B) Loss of use of a limb, paralysis, or other significant 
     mobility issues.
       (C) Loss of hearing.
       (D) Traumatic brain injury.
       (E) Post-traumatic stress disorder.
       (F) Any other disability that the Secretary of Defense 
     considers appropriate.
       (3) Timing of award.--The Secretary of Defense may not 
     award a grant under this section to reimburse a recipient for 
     costs previously incurred by the recipient in carrying out a 
     program to provide assistance dogs to covered members unless 
     the recipient elects for the award to be such a 
     reimbursement.
       (c) Eligibility.--To be eligible to receive a grant under 
     this section, a nonprofit organization shall submit an 
     application to the Secretary of Defense at such time, in such 
     manner, and containing such information as the Secretary may 
     require. Such application shall include--
       (1) a proposal for the evaluation required by subsection 
     (d); and
       (2) a description of--
       (A) the training that will be provided by the organization 
     to covered members;
       (B) the training of dogs that will serve as assistance 
     dogs;
       (C) the aftercare services that the organization will 
     provide for such dogs and covered members;
       (D) the plan for publicizing the availability of such dogs 
     through a targeted marketing campaign to covered members;
       (E) the recognized expertise of the organization in 
     breeding and training such dogs;
       (F) the commitment of the organization to humane standards 
     for animals; and
       (G) the experience of the organization with working with 
     military medical treatment facilities; and
       (3) a statement certifying that the organization--
       (A) is accredited by Assistance Dogs International, the 
     International Guide Dog Federation, or another similar widely 
     recognized accreditation organization that the Secretaries 
     determine has accreditation standards that meet or exceed the 
     standards of Assistance Dogs International and the 
     International Guide Dog Federation; or
       (B) is a candidate for such accreditation or otherwise 
     meets or exceeds such standards, as determined by the 
     Secretary of Defense.
       (d) Evaluation.--The Secretary of Defense shall require 
     each recipient of a grant to use a portion of the funds made 
     available through the grant to conduct an evaluation of the 
     effectiveness of the activities carried out through the grant 
     by such recipient.
       (e) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Assistance dog.--The term ``assistance dog'' means a 
     dog specifically trained to perform physical tasks to 
     mitigate the effects of a disability described in subsection 
     (b)(2), except that the term does not include a dog 
     specifically trained for comfort or personal defense.
       (2) Covered member.--The term ``covered member'' means a 
     member of the Armed Forces who is--
       (B) receiving medical treatment, recuperation, or therapy 
     under chapter 55 of title 10, United States Code;
       (C) in medical hold or medical holdover status; or
       (D) covered under section 1202 or 1205 of title 10, United 
     States Code.
       (f) Increase.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 1405 for Other Authorizations, 
     Defense Health Program, as specified in the corresponding 
     funding table in section 4501, for Consolidated Health 
     Support is hereby increased by $11,000,000.
       (g) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 301 for Operations and Maintenance, 
     as specified in the corresponding funding table in section 
     4301, for Operations and Maintenance, Defense-Wide, Line 460, 
     Office of the Secretary of Defense is hereby reduced by 
     $11,000,000.


       Amendment No. 273 Offered by Mr. McKinley of West Virginia

       Page 408, line 3, insert ``the Secretary of Energy'' after 
     ``Joint Chiefs of Staff,''.


      Amendment No. 274 Offered by Mr. McKinley1 of West Virginia

       Page 408, line 7, insert ``, with a focus on items that 
     contain high concentrations of rare earth materials'' after 
     ``rare earth materials''.


       Amendment No. 275 Offered by Mr. McKinley of West Virginia

       Page 408, line 16, insert ``, including use of a sole 
     source contract with a institution of

[[Page H5675]]

     higher education (as defined in section 101 of the Higher 
     Education Act of 1965 Act (20 U.S.C. 1001)) or other 
     entity,'' after ``methods''.


       Amendment No. 276 Offered by Mr. McKinley of West Virginia

       At the end subtitle B of title V, add the following:

     SEC. 520. REPORT REGARDING NATIONAL GUARD YOUTH CHALLENGE 
                   PROGRAM.

       Not later than December 31, 2020, the Secretary of Defense 
     shall submit a report to the congressional defense committees 
     regarding the resources and authorities the Secretary 
     determines necessary to identify the effects of the National 
     Guard Youth Challenge Program on graduates of that program 
     during the five years immediately preceding the date of the 
     report. Such resources shall include the costs of identifying 
     such effects beyond the 12-month, post-residential mentoring 
     period of that program.


        Amendment No. 277 Offered by Mr. McNerney of California

       At the end of subtitle B of title III, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 3__. REDUCTION OF DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE FACILITY WATER 
                   USE.

       (a) In General.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
     the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall 
     submit to the congressional defense committees a report 
     containing plan to reduce facility water use intensity, 
     relative to the baseline of the water consumption of the 
     facility for fiscal year 2018. The report shall include each 
     of the following:
       (1) Life-cycle cost-effective measures that will reduce 
     water consumption by 2 percent annually through the end of 
     fiscal year 2025.
       (2) Baseline development methodology for calculating a 
     baseline of water use intensity for fiscal year 2018, defined 
     as gallons per gross square foot per year, that will permit 
     all future reduction goals to be measured relative to such 
     baseline.
       (3) An identification of life-cycle cost effective water 
     savings measures that can be implemented to achieve in 
     Department of Defense facilities a minimum of 2 percent 
     annual reduction in water use through 2025.
       (4) A description of any barriers to implementation of a 
     water use reduction program.
       (b) Water Use.--In this section, the term ``water use'' 
     with respect to a facility includes--
       (1) all water used at the facility that is obtained from 
     public water systems or from natural freshwater sources such 
     as lakes, streams, and aquifers, where the water is 
     classified or permitted for human consumption; and
       (2) potable water used for drinking, bathing, toilet 
     flushing, laundry, cleaning and food services, watering of 
     landscaping, irrigation, and process applications such as 
     cooling towers, boilers, and fire suppression systems.


       Amendment No. 278 Offered by Mr. Meadows of North Carolina

       At the end of subtitle B of title VIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 8__. REPORT ON REQUIREMENTS RELATING TO CONSUMPTION-
                   BASED SOLUTIONS.

       (a) Report.--The Undersecretary of Defense for Acquisition 
     and Sustainment shall submit to the congressional defense 
     committees a report on the feasibility of revising the 
     Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement to include 
     requirements relating to consumption-based solutions.
       (b) Consumption-based Solutions Defined.--The term 
     ``consumption-based solutions'' means any combination of 
     hardware or equipment, software, and labor or services that 
     together provide a capability that is metered and billed 
     based on actual usage and predetermined pricing per resource 
     unit, and includes the ability to rapidly scale capacity up 
     or down.


       amendment no. 279 offered by mr. meadows of north carolina

       At the end of subtitle G of title VIII, add the following

     SEC. 898. FEDERAL CONTRACTOR DISCLOSURE OF UNPAID FEDERAL TAX 
                   LIABILITY.

       Section 2313(c) of title 41, United States Code, is amended 
     by adding at the end the following:
       ``(9) Any unpaid Federal tax liability of the person, but 
     only to the extent all judicial and administrative remedies 
     have been exhausted or have lapsed with respect to the 
     Federal tax liability.''.


       amendment no. 280 offered by mr. meadows of north carolina

       Page 394, after line 16, insert the following:
       (6) Delegation of authority.--The service acquisition 
     executive may delegate any of the responsibilities under this 
     subsection to a program executive officer (or equivalent).


       amendment no. 281 offered by mr. meadows of north carolina

       At the end of subtitle F of title VIII, add the following

     SEC. 882. BRIEFING ON THE TRUSTED CAPITAL MARKETPLACE PILOT 
                   PROGRAM.

       Not later than December 15, 2019, the Secretary of Defense 
     shall provide to the congressional defense committees a 
     briefing on the progress of the Trusted Capital Marketplace 
     pilot program (Solicitation number: CS-19-1701), to include 
     plans for how the program will--
       (1) align with critical defense requirements; and
       (2) become self-sustaining.


       amendment no. 282 offered by mr. meadows of north carolina

       At the end of title XII, add the following:

              Subtitle I--Stop Financing of Al-Shabaab Act

     SEC. 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This subtitle may be cited as the ``Stop Financing of al-
     Shabaab Act''.

     SEC. 2. SENSE OF CONGRESS AND STATEMENT OF POLICY.

       (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) the Horn of Africa region remains integral to United 
     States interests in Africa and the Indian Ocean region; and
       (2) United States assistance and diplomatic support for the 
     Government of Somalia and its Federal Member States must be 
     predicated upon measurable progress toward defined benchmarks 
     with respect to efforts to counter al-Shabaab, including the 
     enforcement of measures to combat illicit trafficking that 
     finances al-Shabaab.
       (b) Statement of Policy.--It is the policy of the United 
     States to--
       (1) combat any means by which al-Shabaab obtains funding 
     through illicit trafficking;
       (2) take into consideration compliance with and enforcement 
     of the international bans on illicit trafficking which 
     finances al-Shabaab when providing United States assistance 
     to any country;
       (3) notify countries receiving United States security 
     assistance which are identified by the Secretary of State or 
     Secretary of Defense as major components of illicit 
     trafficking routes that finance al-Shabaab, that continued 
     assistance may depend on the full implementation of the 
     obligations of such country to enforce as fully as possibly 
     all restrictions against such trafficking; and
       (4) ensure that continued United States security assistance 
     to Kenya, including assistance coordinated through the Kenya-
     United States Liaison Office, and assistance to multilateral 
     institutions such as the African Union Mission in Somalia 
     (AMISOM) to combat al-Shabaab recruitment, attacks, and other 
     operations inside Kenya also includes assistance to enable 
     the Kenya Defense Forces to end facilitation of trafficking 
     that funds al-Shabaab encountered by the Kenya Defense 
     Forces.

     SEC. 3. REPORT.

       (a) Report.--Subject to subsection (b), not later than 90 
     days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
     Secretary of State, in coordination with the Secretary of 
     Defense, shall submit to the relevant Congressional 
     committees a report including the contents described in 
     subsection (b).
       (b) Contents.--Each report described in subsection (a) 
     shall include the following:
       (1) Information on efforts made by troop contributors to 
     AMISOM to enforce any international bans on trafficked goods.
       (2) A recommendation, including a justification for such 
     recommendation, with respect to making certain future United 
     States security or other assistance to any country 
     conditional on enforcement of such international bans on 
     illicit trafficking that finances al-Shabaab.
       (3) The steps the Secretary of State and the Secretary of 
     Defense have taken to encourage ending the facilitation of 
     trafficking that finances al-Shabaab by recipients of United 
     States security assistance.
       (4) A description of the engagement of employees and 
     contractors of the Department of State with national and 
     regional Somali authorities, including authorities in 
     Jubaland, to encourage such Somali authorities to implement 
     their counter-trafficking obligations.
       (5) A description of efforts taken by the governments of 
     countries with nationals who purchase significant amounts of 
     trafficked goods that finance al-Shabaab and a description of 
     the steps the Secretary of State has taken to encourage such 
     compliance.
       (6) An assessment of prospective efforts to reduce the 
     production and illicit trade of trafficked goods in Somalia, 
     including the identification of alternative livelihoods, and 
     means of securing income. The assessment may include 
     recommendations from the Administrator of the United States 
     Agency for International Development.
       (c) Classified Information.--Each report required under 
     subsection (a) shall be submitted in unclassified form but 
     may contain a classified annex.
       (d) Definition.--In this section, the term ``relevant 
     Congressional committees'' means--
       (1) the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on 
     Armed Services of the House of Representatives; and
       (2) the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on 
     Armed Services of the Senate.


       amendment no. 283 offered by mr. meadows of north carolina

       At the appropriate place in title XII, add the following:

     SEC. __. SENSE OF CONGRESS RELATING TO MONGOLIA.

       It is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) the United States and Mongolia have a shared interest 
     in supporting and preserving Mongolia's democracy, including 
     Mongolia's ability to pursue an independent foreign policy, 
     defend against threats to its sovereignty, and maintain 
     territorial integrity;
       (2) Mongolia has consistently contributed forces to support 
     United States combat operations in Iraq and Afghanistan and 
     has a strong record of troop contributions to international 
     peacekeeping missions;
       (3) as one of NATO's nine ``partners across the globe'', 
     Mongolia shares the United

[[Page H5676]]

     States' vision of a rules-based order in the strategically 
     important Indo-Pacific region;
       (4) the United States should continue to take steps to 
     remain Mongolia's preferred security partner;
       (5) defense cooperation, a strong military-to-military 
     relationship, and increased interoperability between the 
     United States and the armed forces of Mongolia are in the 
     interest of the United States; and
       (6) annual multilateral military exercises in Mongolia 
     support peacekeeping and humanitarian assistance and disaster 
     response capacity of United States partners and allies, and 
     further United States regional objectives.


           amendment no. 284 offered by ms. meng of new york

       Page 1048, insert after line 20 the following:

     SEC. 2875. REPORT ON LEAD SERVICE LINES AT MILITARY 
                   INSTALLATIONS.

       Not later than January 1, 2021, the Secretary of Defense 
     shall submit to the congressional defense committees a report 
     that contains the following:
       (1) The number of military installations at which lead 
     service lines are connected to schools, childcare centers and 
     facilities, buildings, and other facilities of the 
     installation as the Secretary determines appropriate.
       (2) The total number of members of the Armed Forces 
     affected by the presence of lead service lines at military 
     installations.
       (3) Of the total number of members under paragraph (2), the 
     number of such members with dependents.
       (4) Actions, if any, undertaken by the Secretary to inform 
     individuals affected by the presence of lead service lines at 
     military installations of such presence.
       (5) Recommendations for legislative action relating to the 
     replacement of lead service lines at military installations.


           Amendment No. 285 Offered by Ms. Meng of New York

       Page 283, line 24, strike ``while on active duty''.


           Amendment No. 286 Offered by Ms. Meng of New York

       At the end of subtitle B of title V, insert the following:

     SEC. 520. PERMANENT EXTENSION OF SUICIDE PREVENTION AND 
                   RESILIENCE PROGRAM FOR THE RESERVE COMPONENTS.

       Strike subsection (g) of section 10219 of title 10, United 
     States Code.


       Amendment No. 287 Offered by Mrs. Miller of West Virginia

       At the end of subtitle H of title X of the bill, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 10___. HONORING LAST SURVIVING MEDAL OF HONOR RECIPIENT 
                   OF SECOND WORLD WAR.

       (a) Use of Rotunda.--At the election of the individual (or 
     next of kin of the individual), the last individual to die 
     who was awarded the Medal of Honor for acts performed during 
     World War II shall be permitted to lie in honor in the 
     rotunda of the Capitol upon death.
       (b) Implementation.--The Architect of the Capitol, under 
     the direction and supervision of the President pro tempore of 
     the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives, 
     shall take the necessary steps to implement subsection (a) 
     upon the death of the individual described in such 
     subsection.


         Amendment No. 288 Offered by Mr. Mitchell of Michigan

       At the end of subtitle G of title VIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 898. UNIFORMITY IN APPLICATION OF MICRO-PURCHASE 
                   THRESHOLD TO CERTAIN TASK OR DELIVERY ORDERS.

       Section 4106(c) of title 41, United States Code, is amended 
     by striking ``$2,500'' and inserting ``the micro-purchase 
     threshold under section 1902 of this title''.


          Amendment No. 289 Offered by Ms. Moore of Wisconsin

       Page 387, after line 15, insert the following new section:

     SEC. 729. NATIONAL CAPITAL CONSORTIUM PSYCHIATRY RESIDENCY 
                   PROGRAM.

       (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that--
       (1) racial, gender, or other forms of discrimination or 
     harassment should not be tolerated within the PRP; and
       (2) that PRP leadership should--
       (A) set the tone that such conduct is not acceptable;
       (B) ensure that all such complains are thoroughly 
     investigated;
       (C) ensure that violators are held accountable;
       (D) ensure that victims are protected, and not retaliated 
     against;
       (E) maintain a workplace free from unlawful harassment and 
     discrimination;
       (F) conduct regular workplace climate assessments to assess 
     the extent of discrimination or harassment in the PRP; and
       (G) provide refresher training, at least annually, on 
     acceptable standards of behavior for all involved in the PRP 
     programs, including residents and ways to report or address 
     discrimination, harassment, or other inappropriate behavior.
       (b) PRP Defined.--In this section, the term ``PRP'' means 
     the National Capital Consortium Psychiatry Residency Program.


          Amendment No. 290 Offered by Ms. Moore of Wisconsin

       At the end of title XXVI, add the following new section:

     SEC. 26__. REVIEW AND REPORT ON CONSTRUCTION OF NEW, OR 
                   MAINTENANCE OF EXISTING, DIRECT FUEL PIPELINE 
                   CONNECTIONS AT AIR NATIONAL GUARD AND AIR FORCE 
                   RESERVE INSTALLATIONS.

       (a) Review Required.--Not later than 180 days after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of the Air 
     Force, in conjunction with the Defense Logistics Agency, 
     shall complete a review considering--
       (1) the need for, and benefits of, the construction of new, 
     or maintenance of existing, direct fuel pipeline connections 
     at Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve installations; 
     and
       (2) the barriers, including funding needs and any 
     inconsistent guidance and consideration of such projects by 
     the Air Force, that may impede such projects.
       (b) Elements of Review.--The review required by subsection 
     (a) shall include the following:
       (1) An analysis of the extent that the Air Force and 
     Defense Logistics Agency have identified direct fuel pipeline 
     projects as an effective and efficient way to enhance the 
     ability of regular component, Air National Guard, and Air 
     Force Reserve installations, to improve the readiness of 
     affected units and help them to meet their mission 
     requirements, including an assessment of how the Air National 
     Guard and Air Force Reserve facilities, across all States and 
     territories, can leverage such connections to better support 
     current and emerging air refueling requirements.
       (2) An assessment of how direct fuel pipeline connections 
     enhance the resiliency and efficiency of the installations 
     and help meet existing Defense Logistics Agency requirements 
     for secondary storage and other fuel requirements.
       (3) A list of Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve 
     installations that currently do not have a direct connection 
     pipeline but have access to such a pipeline within reasonable 
     proximity (less than five miles) to the facility.
       (4) An overview and summary of the current process for 
     considering such proposals, including the factors used to 
     consider requests, including the weight provided to each 
     factor  and including a list of Air National Guard and Air 
     Force Reserve installations that have sought funding for 
     projects to create direct access to a national fuel pipeline 
     or to maintain access to such pipelines over the last five 
     years.
       (5) A list of the total instances in the past five years in 
     which projects for direct fuel pipeline connections have been 
     approved for regular component, Air National Guard, or Air 
     Force Reserve installations, including the costs of each 
     project and the justification for such approval.
       (6) A list of Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve 
     installations with current pipeline connections that the Air 
     Force or Defense Logistics Agency has determined should no 
     longer be used, including--
       (A) an analysis of the justifications for each such 
     determination, such as decisions to switch from pipelines to 
     using trucks as the primary fuel delivery method;
       (B) an assessment of whether these determinations fairly 
     weigh the costs and benefits of building or maintaining a 
     pipeline tap as a practical primary or secondary fuel 
     delivery method for the installation compared to railroad, 
     barge terminal, or truck delivery; and
       (C) an assessment of whether these determinations fairly 
     consider or weigh how direct fuel pipeline connections 
     increase security for the fuel supply by reducing the threat 
     of interruption, enhance mission reliability by providing 
     access to greater fuel storage capability, and the ability of 
     such projects once completed to better support the domestic 
     and global operations of the Air National Guard or Air Force 
     Reserve installation.
       (7) An assessment of how costs associated with each direct 
     fuel pipeline connection project is considered by the Air 
     Force or Defense Logistics Agency and the weight given to 
     such costs in the final analysis.
       (8) An assessment of the effectiveness or usefulness of 
     guidance or technical assistance provided to installations 
     requesting or proposing direct fuel pipeline connection 
     projects and recommend ways to provide additional assistance 
     to ensure the Air Force and Defense Logistics Agency receive 
     the most up to date information about the costs and benefits 
     of proposed projects from installations.
       (9) An assessment of the available funding sources though 
     the Air Force, Defense Logistics Agency, other Department of 
     Defense entities, or other mechanisms, such as a public-
     private partnership or enhanced use lease, that can support 
     direct fuel pipeline connection projects either in whole or 
     in part.
       (10) An assessment of the extent to which direct fuel 
     pipeline connection projects have been incorporated in any 
     comprehensive plan the Air Force has developed or will 
     develop regarding investments needed to improve Air National 
     Guard, Air Force Reserve, and regular component installations 
     to meet the Department's needs.
       (c) Final Report.--Not later than one year after the date 
     of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of the Air Force 
     shall provide a final report to the Committees on Armed

[[Page H5677]]

     Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives 
     containing the results of the review required by subsection 
     (a) and recommendations from the review on how the Air Force 
     can better expedite and support the use of fuel pipelines at 
     Air National Guard and Air Force Reserve installations. Such 
     recommendations shall include options for accelerating the 
     development and consideration of such projects where most 
     feasible and appropriate, including whether costs savings 
     could be obtained by including such projects as part of other 
     related projects already authorized at an installation.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 476, the gentlewoman 
from Oklahoma (Ms. Kendra S. Horn) and the gentleman from Texas (Mr. 
Thornberry) each will control 10 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Oklahoma.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Madam Chair, I currently have no 
speakers, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. THORNBERRY. Madam Chair, I have no speakers, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Madam Chair, I encourage my 
colleagues to support the en bloc package, as well as the NDAA upon 
final passage, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. McGOVERN. Madam Chair, this bipartisan amendment co-sponsored by 
Congresswoman Walorski will authorize $11 million for the Wounded 
Warrior Service Dog Program in FY 2020, and I want to thank Chairman 
Smith for including this amendment in En Bloc 11. This lifechanging 
program will aid our nation's veterans by awarding grants to nonprofit 
organizations that stand-up, operate, and provide free assistance dogs 
to veterans and service members with physical disabilities, PTSD, or 
traumatic brain injuries. Service dogs often become an integral part of 
a veteran or servicemember's treatment team because they provide both 
physical and emotional support--they can protect a veteran who is 
having a seizure, remind them to take medications, or even create a 
protective physical barrier in a crowded space.
  Madam Chair, this amendment will continue to effectively expand 
treatment options for our veterans and service members and I encourage 
my colleagues to support it.
  Ms. MOORE. Madam Chair, I rise in support of my amendments to H.R. 
2500 which are included in this En Bloc package.
  My first amendment is fairly simple and direct. It would remind those 
in charge of the DoD's National Capital Consortium Psychiatry Residency 
Program--or PRP--of their responsibility to maintain an environment 
that is free of harassment and discrimination.
  This critical program helps train professionals who are on the 
frontlines of addressing critical mental health needs. The Chairman and 
Ranking Member are both aware of the tremendous need for such 
providers, both in and outside, of the military. It's those concerns 
that are behind the inclusion of Section 717 in this bill which calls 
for the Defense Department to provide a strategy to recruit and retain 
mental health providers.
  It is important that this workforce be culturally competent and 
diverse which is why ensuring that this program's leadership actively 
work to ensure that residents are trained in an atmosphere where 
discrimination or harassment of any sort is not tolerated. Period.
  What I do know is that tolerating a work environment that is toxic or 
being turned toxic because of racial or sexually derogatory statements 
or actions makes it harder to recruit and retain these in-demand 
providers and also hurt efforts to ensure a diverse mental health 
workforce.
  Unfortunately, in 2016, a report by the program's ombudsman noted an 
``undercurrent'' of discrimination in the PRP program and a recent 
report to my office, while noting improvements, still reported that 
offensive statements continue to be made.
  Just one report of harmful statements or actions is one too many. 
That's the standard that we should have and that should be enforced.
  This amendment simply makes clear that racial and gender-based 
discrimination or harassment have no place in the PRP (or elsewhere in 
the military for that matter) and reaffirms the need for leaders to 
proactively work to provide an environment where such conduct is not 
tolerated.
  The military and the taxpayer will invest much to recruit and train 
these individuals. Therefore, it is important that those who 
participate in this demanding residency program should be able to do so 
in a safe and harassment free environment.
  Additionally, I am pleased about the inclusion in En Bloc 11 of 
another amendment I offered requesting certain information from the Air 
Force.
  Fuel is a lifeline for many of the missions that we ask our men and 
women in uniform to carry out. Therefore, it is critical that the Air 
Force and Defense Logistics Agency consider the best options for 
ensuring that Air Force facilities, including Air Guard and Air Reserve 
facilities, have a reliable and secure fuel supply.
  One effective but under-utilized option are projects that help Air 
Guard and Air Reserve facilities tap nearby national fuel pipelines 
that could provide uninterrupted access to millions of gallons for jet 
fuel. These projects can be an effective and efficient way to help 
these units carry out their missions, help them to easily meet 
Department and Defense Logistics Agency requirements for a reliable 
secondary fuel supply, and help them meet current and emerging air 
refueling requirements, among other benefits, while also reducing the 
threat to fuel supplies.
  Any delay or disruption to fuel supplies directly translates into a 
degradation of mission readiness.
  And in many cases, these projects make mission and economic sense, 
like in my district, where we are going to build a new fuel facility 
less than 1 mile away from an existing fuel pipeline that would provide 
millions of gallons of fuel storage and reduce the need for the 400 
plus trucks that currently supply the base.
  According to one estimate, such a pipeline would provide access to 
more fuel and cost less than what it will cost to pay to truck in 
significantly less fuel over the next three years.
  The amendment I have offered would request the Air Force provide 
information on how it prioritizes and considers requests to undertake 
such projects at Air Guard and Air Reserve facilities, especially for 
units where such projects would help improve mission readiness, among 
other benefits.
  This would include information about the Air Guard and Air Reserve 
facilities where such projects could be of benefit, with an emphasis on 
facilities located near fuel pipelines that they currently do not 
access, and information about the criteria used to consider these 
projects and barriers such as funding that may impede such projects.
  This amendment builds on an amendment I successfully offered to the 
FY 2020 Defense Appropriations bill when it came before the House last 
month to encourage the Air Force to pursue such projects.
  I thank the Chairman and Ranking Member for their support.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendments en bloc offered 
by the gentlewoman from Oklahoma (Ms. Kendra S. Horn).
  The en bloc amendments were agreed to.


  Amendments En Bloc No. 12 Offered by Ms. Kendra S. Horn of Oklahoma

  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Madam Chair, pursuant to House 
Resolution 476, I offer amendments en bloc as the designee of the 
gentleman from Washington (Mr. Smith).
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendments en bloc.
  Amendments en bloc No. 12 consisting of amendment Nos. 291, 292, 293, 
294, 295, 296, 297, 298, 299, 300, 301, 302, 303, 304, 305, 306, 307, 
308, 309, 311, 312, 313, 314, 315, and 316, printed in part B of House 
Report 116-143, offered by Ms. Kendra S. Horn of Oklahoma:


          Amendment No. 291 Offered by Mr. Morelle of New York

       At the end of subtitle B of title XXXI, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 3121. FUNDING FOR INERTIAL CONFINEMENT FUSION IGNITION 
                   AND HIGH YIELD PROGRAM.

       (a) Increase.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated by this title for Weapons Activities, as 
     specified in the corresponding funding table in section 4701, 
     for the Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield 
     program, facility operations and target production, is hereby 
     increased by $5,000,000.
       (b) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated by this title for Weapons Activities, as 
     specified in the corresponding funding table in section 4701, 
     for Stockpile Services, management, technology, and 
     production, is hereby reduced by $5,000,000.


          Amendment No. 292 Offered by Mr. Mullin of Oklahoma

       At the end of subtitle C of title VII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 729. REPORT ON MEDICAL PROVIDERS AND MEDICAL MALPRACTICE 
                   INSURANCE.

       The Secretary of Defense shall submit to the congressional 
     defense committees a report identifying the number of medical 
     providers employed by the Department of Defense who, before 
     being employed by the Department, lost medical malpractice 
     insurance coverage by reason of the insurer dropping the 
     coverage.


          Amendment No. 293 Offered by Mrs. Murphy of Florida

       At the end of subtitle C of title II, add the following:

[[Page H5678]]

  


     SEC. __. INDEPENDENT STUDY ON THREATS TO UNITED STATES 
                   NATIONAL SECURITY FROM DEVELOPMENT OF 
                   HYPERSONIC WEAPONS BY FOREIGN NATIONS.

       (a) Independent Study.--Not later than 30 days after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense 
     shall seek to enter into a contract with a federally funded 
     research and development center under which the center will 
     conduct a study on the development of hypersonic weapons 
     capabilities by foreign nations and the threat posed by such 
     capabilities to United States territory, forces and overseas 
     bases, and allies.
       (b) Elements of Study.--The study required under subsection 
     (a) shall--
       (1) describe the hypersonic weapons capabilities in 
     development in the People's Republic of China, the Russian 
     Federation, and other nations;
       (2) assess the proliferation risk that nations that develop 
     hypersonic weapons capabilities might transfer this 
     technology to other nations;
       (3) attempt to describe the rationale for why each nation 
     that is developing hypersonic weapons capabilities is 
     undertaking such development; and
       (4) examine the unique threats created to United States 
     national security by hypersonic weapons due to both their 
     maneuverability and speed, distinguishing between hypersonic 
     glide vehicles delivered by rocket boosters (known as boost-
     glide systems) and hypersonic cruise missiles, and further 
     distinguishing between longer-range systems that can reach 
     United States territory and shorter or medium range systems 
     that might be used in a regional conflict.
       (c) Submission to Department of Defense.--Not later than 
     270 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the 
     federally funded research and development center that 
     conducts the study under subsection (a) shall submit to the 
     Secretary of Defense a report on the results of the study in 
     both classified and unclassified form.
       (d) Submission to Congress.--Not later than 30 days after 
     the date on which the Secretary of Defense receives the 
     report under subsection (c), the Secretary shall submit to 
     the congressional defense committees an unaltered copy of the 
     report in both classified and unclassified form, and any 
     comments of the Secretary with respect to the report.


          Amendment No. 294 Offered by Mrs. Murphy of Florida

       At the end of title XI, add the following:

     SEC. 1113. CLARIFICATION OF LIMITATION ON EXPEDITED HIRING 
                   AUTHORITY FOR POST-SECONDARY STUDENTS.

       Section 3116(d)(1) of title 5, United States Code, is 
     amended to read as follows:
       ``(1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), the 
     total number of students that the head of an agency may 
     appoint under this section during a fiscal year may not 
     exceed the number equal to 15 percent of the number of 
     students that the agency head appointed during the previous 
     fiscal year to a position at the GS-11 level, or an 
     equivalent level, or below.''.


       Amendment No. 295 Offered by Mrs. Napolitano of California

       At the end of subtitle A of title III, insert the 
     following:

     SEC. __. INCREASE IN FUNDING FOR CIVIL MILITARY PROGRAMS.

       (a) Increase.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated for operation and maintenance, Defense-wide, as 
     specified in the corresponding funding table in section 4301, 
     for Civil Military Programs is hereby increased by 
     $50,000,000 (to be used in support of the National Guard 
     Youth Challenge Program).
       (b) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated for operation and maintenance, Defense-wide, as 
     specified in the corresponding funding table in section 4301, 
     for Operation and Maintenance, Defense-wide is hereby reduced 
     by $50,000,000.


       Amendment No. 296 Offered by Mr. Norman of South Carolina

       At the end of subtitle G of title VIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 898. PILOT PROGRAM ON PAYMENT OF COSTS FOR DENIED 
                   GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABILITY OFFICE BID PROTESTS.

       Section 827 of the National Defense Authorization Act for 
     Fiscal Year 2018 (10 U.S.C. 2304 note) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) by inserting ``direct'' before ``costs incurred''; and
       (B) by striking ``in processing'' and inserting ``by the 
     Department in support of hearings to adjudicate''; and
       (2) in subsection (b), by striking ``two years after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act'' and inserting ``60 days 
     after the Secretary of Defense certifies in writing to the 
     congressional defense committees that the Department of 
     Defense has business systems that have been independently 
     audited and that can accurately identify the direct costs 
     incurred by the Department of Defense in support of hearings 
     to adjudicate covered protests''.


       Amendment No. 297 Offered by Mr. Norman of South Carolina

       At the end of subtitle C of title XVI, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 16__. CYBERSECURITY DEFENSE ACADEMY PILOT PROGRAM.

       (a) Program Required.--The Secretary of Defense carry out a 
     pilot program under which the Secretary shall seek to enter 
     into a public-private partnership with eligible cybersecurity 
     organizations to train and place veterans as cybersecurity 
     personnel within the Department of Defense. The public-
     private partnership entered into under this subsection shall 
     be known as the ``Cybersecurity Defense Academy''.
       (b) Activities.--The Cybersecurity Defense Academy shall 
     provide educational courses in topics relating to 
     cybersecurity, including the following:
       (1) Cybersecurity analysis.
       (2) Cybersecurity penetration testing.
       (3) Cybersecurity threat hunting.
       (4) Cybersecurity advanced exploitation.
       (5) Linux systems administration.
       (6) Robotics process automation analysis.
       (c) Placement of Graduates.--
       (1) In general.--The Secretary of Defense shall establish a 
     process under which an individual who has completed a course 
     of study at the Cybersecurity Defense Academy may be placed 
     in a cybersecurity-related position within the Department of 
     Defense.
       (2) Waiver of certification.--The Secretary of Defense 
     shall waive the certification requirements set forth in 
     Department of Defense Directives 8570 and 8140 with respect 
     to the initial placement of an individual described in 
     paragraph (1) if the Secretary Determines that the training 
     provided to the individual by the Cybersecurity Defense 
     Academy meets or exceeds the level of training required by 
     such directives..
       (d) Eligible Cybersecurity Organization Defined.--In this 
     section, the term ``eligible cybersecurity organizton'' means 
     an nonprofit or for-profit organization that--
       (1) has a history of working with state and local 
     governments;
       (2) is accredited by the American National Standards 
     Institute;
       (3) has experience placing veterans in cybersecurity 
     positions;
       (4) does not charge fees to servicemembers or veterans for 
     taking a cybersecurity course; and
       (5) aligns aptitude and psychometric selection with 
     cybersecurity career choice.
       (e) Initial Report.--Not later than 90 days after the date 
     one which the 50th graduate of the Cybersecurity Defense 
     Academy is placed in the Department of Defense, the Secretary 
     of Defense shall submit to the congressional defense 
     committees a report that includes the following:
       (1) The number of individuals who graduated from the 
     Cybersecurity Defense Academy.
       (2) The number of such individuals who were directly placed 
     in cybersecurity positions with employers.
       (3) The efficiency and effectiveness (speed of entry and 
     candidate selection) based on aptitude and psychometric tools 
     utilized to allocate veterans to cybersecurity roles.
       (4) The benefits or burdens of permanently establishing the 
     Cybersecurity Defense Academy.
       (5) Recommendations identifying any specific actions that 
     should be carried out if the program under this section 
     should become permanent.
       (6) Recommendations for any changes to Department of 
     Defense Directives 8570 and 8140.
       (f) Termination.--
       (1) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), the 
     program under this section shall terminate on the date that 
     is five years after the date of the enactment of this Act.
       (2) Continuation.--The Secretary of Defense may continue 
     the program after the termination date applicable under 
     paragraph (1) if the Secretary determines that continuation 
     of the program after that date is advisable and appropriate. 
     If the Secretary determines to continue the program after 
     that date, the Secretary shall do the following:
       (A) Not later than 180 days after the date on which the 
     report is submitted under subsection (e), the Secretary shall 
     submit to the congressional defense committees a report 
     describing the reasons for the determination to continue the 
     program.
       (B) The Secretary shall--
       (i) establish the program throughout the Department of 
     Defense and individual service branches;
       (ii) make recommendations to the President and all 
     committees of Congress for making the program applicable to 
     all departments and agencies of the Federal Government;
       (iii) conduct contract negotiations with companies that 
     provide services under the program to ensure that such 
     services are provided at a cost-effective rate; and
       (iv) ensure that cybersecurity courses accredited by the 
     American National Standards Institute are integrated into 
     level III of the IAT, IAM, and IASE baseline certifications 
     described in Department of Defense Directive 8570.


         Amendment No. 298 Offered by Mr. O'Halleran of Arizona

       In section 232(e)(2), strike ``; and'' at the end and 
     insert ``;''.
       In section 232(e)(3), strike the period at the end and 
     insert ``; and''.
       At the end of section 232(e), add the following:
       (4) the United States Naval Observatory (as described in 
     section 8715 of title 10, United States Code).

[[Page H5679]]

  



         Amendment No. 299 Offered by Mr. O'Halleran of Arizona

       At the end of section 718, page 367, after line 20, insert 
     the following:
       (c) Report on Implementation of Guidance on Opioid 
     Prescriptions for Pain From Minor Outpatient Procedures.--Not 
     later than 6 months after the date of enactment of this Act, 
     the Secretary of Defense, acting in conjunction with the 
     Director of the Defense Health Agency, shall submit to the 
     Committees on Armed Services of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate a report on the implementation and results of 
     the Defense Health Agency's guidance on opioid prescriptions 
     for pain from minor outpatient procedures in Guidance Report 
     entitled ``Pain Management and Opioid Safety in the Military 
     Health System (MHS)'' (DHA-PI 6025.04, issued on June 8, 
     2018).


           amendment no. 300 offered by ms. omar of minnesota

       At the end of subtitle G of title VIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 898. REQUIREMENT FOR CONTRACTORS TO REPORT GROSS 
                   VIOLATIONS INTERNATIONALLY RECOGNIZED HUMAN 
                   RIGHTS.

       (a) In General.--A contractor performing a Department of 
     Defense contract in a foreign country shall report possible 
     cases of gross violations of internationally recognized human 
     rights to the Secretary of Defense.
       (b) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the enactment of 
     this Act, the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence of 
     the Secretary of State, shall submit to the appropriate 
     congressional committees a report that describes--
       (1) the policies and procedures in place to obtain 
     information about possible cases of gross violations of 
     internationally recognized human rights from contractors 
     described in subsection (a); and
       (2) the resources needed to investigate reports made 
     pursuant to subsection (a).
       (c) Form of Report.--The report required by subsection (b) 
     shall be submitted in unclassified form, but may include a 
     classified annex.
       (d) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Appropriate congressional committees.--the term 
     ``appropriate congressional committees'' means--
       (A) the congressional defense committees; and
       (B) the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and 
     the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of 
     Representatives.
       (2) Gross violations of internationally recognized human 
     rights.--The term ``gross violations of internationally 
     recognized human rights'' means torture or cruel, inhuman, or 
     degrading treatment or punishment, prolonged detention 
     without charges and trial, causing the disappearance of 
     persons by the abduction and clandestine detention of those 
     persons, child sexual assault, and other flagrant denial of 
     the right to life, liberty, or the security of person.


           amendment no. 301 offered by ms. omar of minnesota

       At the end of subtitle G of title XII, add the following:

     SEC. _. PROHIBITION ON USE OF FUNDS TO ESTABLISH ANY MILITARY 
                   INSTALLATION OR BASE FOR THE PURPOSE OF 
                   PROVIDING FOR THE PERMANENT STATIONING OF 
                   UNITED STATES ARMED FORCES IN SOMALIA.

       None of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act 
     or otherwise made available to the Department of Defense for 
     fiscal year 2020 may be obligated or expended to establish 
     any military installation or base for the purpose of 
     providing for the permanent stationing of United States Armed 
     Forces in Somalia.


         amendment no. 302 offered by mr. panetta of california

       At the end of subtitle B of title XXVIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 28__. PILOT PROGRAM TO BUILD AND MONITOR USE OF SINGLE 
                   FAMILY HOMES.

       (a) In General.--The Secretary of the Army shall carry out 
     a pilot program to build and monitor the use of not fewer 
     than 5 single family homes for members of the Army and their 
     families.
       (b) Location.--The Secretary of the Army shall carry out 
     the pilot program at no less than two installations of the 
     Army located in different climate regions of the United 
     States as determined by the Secretary.
       (c) Design.--In building homes under the pilot program, the 
     Secretary of the Army shall use the All-American Abode design 
     from the suburban single-family division design by the United 
     States Military Academy.
       (d) Funding Increase.--Notwithstanding the amounts set 
     forth in the funding tables in division D, the amount 
     authorized to be appropriated in section 2103 for Army 
     military construction, as specified in the corresponding 
     funding table in section 4601, for Military Construction, FH 
     Con Army Family Housing P&D, is hereby increased by 
     $5,000,000, with the amount of such increase to be made 
     available to carry out the pilot program.
       (e) Offset.--Notwithstanding the amounts set forth in the 
     funding tables in division D, the amount authorized to be 
     appropriated in section 201 for research, development, test, 
     and evaluation, as specified in the corresponding funding 
     table in section 4201, for Air Force, Line 088, Program 
     Element 0604933F, ICBM FUZE MODERNIZATION, is hereby reduced 
     by $5,000,000.


         amendment no. 303 offered by mr. panetta of california

       At the end of subtitle E of title V, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 5__. INFORMATION ON LEGAL SERVICES PROVIDED TO MEMBERS 
                   OF THE ARMED FORCES HARMED BY HEALTH OR 
                   ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARDS AT MILITARY HOUSING.

       (a) Report.--Not later than 90 days after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall submit 
     to the congressional defense committees a report on the legal 
     services that the Secretary may provide to members of the 
     Armed Forces who have been harmed by a health or 
     environmental hazard while living in military housing.
       (b) Availability of Information.--The Secretary of the 
     military department concerned shall make the information 
     contained in the report submitted under subsection (a) 
     available to members of the Armed Forces at all installations 
     of the Department of Defense in the United States.


         amendment no. 304 offered by mr. panetta of california

       At the end of subtitle C of title XXVIII, add the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 28__. REPORT ON DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE USE OF 
                   INTERGOVERNMENTAL SUPPORT AGREEMENTS.

       (a) Plan Required.--Not later than July 31, 2020, the 
     Secretary of Defense shall submit to the Committees on Armed 
     Service of the Senate and the House of Representatives a 
     report containing a plan to improve the collection and 
     monitoring of information regarding the consideration and use 
     of intergovernmental support agreements, as authorized by 
     section 2679 of title 10, United States Code, including 
     information regarding the financial and nonfinancial benefits 
     derived from the use of such agreements.
       (b) Additional Plan Elements.--The plan required by 
     subsection (a) also shall include the following:
       (1) A timeline for implementation of the plan.
       (2) A education and outreach component for installation 
     commanders to improve understanding of the benefits of 
     intergovernmental support agreements and to encourage greater 
     use of such agreements.
       (3) Proposals to standardize across all military 
     departments the approval process for intergovernmental 
     support agreements.
       (4) Proposals to achieve efficiencies in intergovernmental 
     support agreements based on inherent intergovernmental trust.
       (5) Proposals for the development of criteria to evaluate 
     the effectiveness of intergovernmental support agreements 
     separate from Federal Acquisition Regulations.


         amendment no. 305 offered by mr. panetta of california

       At the end of subtitle C of title II, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 2__. REPORT ON INNOVATION INVESTMENTS AND MANAGEMENT.

       (a) Report Required.--Not later than December 31, 2019, the 
     Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering shall 
     submit to the congressional defense committees a report on 
     the efforts of the Department of Defense to improve 
     innovation investments and management.
       (b) Elements.--The report required under subsection (a) 
     shall include an explanation of each of the following:
       (1) How incremental and disruptive innovation investments 
     for each military department are defined.
       (2) How such investments are assessed.
       (3) Whether the Under Secretary has defined a science and 
     technology management framework that--
       (A) emphasizes greater use of existing flexible approaches 
     to more quickly initiate and discontinue projects to respond 
     to the rapid pace of innovation;
       (B) incorporates acquisition stakeholders into technology 
     development programs to ensure that they are relevant to 
     customers; and
       (C) promotes advanced prototyping of disruptive 
     technologies within the labs so that the science and 
     technology community can prove that these technologies work 
     to generate demand from future acquisition programs.


         amendment no. 306 offered by mr. panetta of california

       At the end of subtitle B of title II, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 2__. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON FUTURE VERTICAL LIFT 
                   TECHNOLOGIES.

       (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
       (1) As the United States enters an era of great power 
     competition, the Army must appropriately modernize its 
     aircraft fleet.
       (2) Specifically, investments in maturation technologies to 
     accelerate the deployment of future vertical lift programs is 
     paramount.
       (3) Technology designs and prototypes must be converted 
     into production-ready articles for effective fielding.
       (4) Congress is concerned that the Army is not adequately 
     resourcing programs to improve pilot situational awareness, 
     increase flight operations safety, and diminish operation and 
     maintenance costs.
       (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that 
     the Army should to continue to invest in research, 
     development, test, and evaluation programs to mature future 
     vertical lift technologies.

[[Page H5680]]

  



         amendment no. 307 offered by mr. panetta of california

       At the end of subtitle H of title V, add the following:

     SEC. __. FULL MILITARY HONORS CEREMONY FOR CERTAIN VETERANS.

       Section 1491(b) of title 10, United States Code, is amended 
     by adding at the end the following:
       ``(3) The Secretary concerned shall provide full military 
     honors (as determined by the Secretary concerned) for the 
     funeral of a veteran who--
       ``(A) is first interred or first inurned in Arlington 
     National Cemetery on or after the date of the enactment of 
     this paragraph;
       ``(B) was awarded the medal of honor or the prisoner-of-war 
     medal; and
       ``(C) is not entitled to full military honors by the grade 
     of that veteran.''.


         amendment no. 308 offered by mr. panetta of california

       Add at the appropriate place in subtitle F of title XII of 
     division A the following:

     SEC. 1258. NATO SUPPORT ACT.

       (a) Findings.--Congress finds that:
       (1) The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), which 
     came into being through the North Atlantic Treaty, which 
     entered into force on April 4, 1949, between the United 
     States of America and the other founding members of the North 
     Atlantic Treaty Organization, has served as a pillar of 
     international peace and stability, a critical component of 
     United States security, and a deterrent against adversaries 
     and external threats.
       (2) The House of Representatives affirmed in H. Res. 397, 
     on June 27, 2017, that--
       (A) NATO is one of the most successful military alliances 
     in history, deterring the outbreak of another world war, 
     protecting the territorial integrity of its members, and 
     seeing the Cold War through to a peaceful conclusion;
       (B) NATO remains the foundation of United States foreign 
     policy to promote a Europe that is whole, free, and at peace;
       (C) the United States is solemnly committed to the North 
     Atlantic Treaty Organization's principle of collective 
     defense as enumerated in Article 5 of the North Atlantic 
     Treaty; and
       (D) the House of Representatives--
       (i) strongly supports the decision at the NATO Wales Summit 
     in 2014 that each alliance member would aim to spend at least 
     2 percent of its nation's gross domestic product on defense 
     by 2024;
       (ii) condemns any threat to the sovereignty, territorial 
     integrity, freedom and democracy of any NATO ally; and
       (iii) welcomes the Republic of Montenegro as the 29th 
     member of the NATO Alliance.
       (b) Statement of Policy.--It is the policy of the United 
     States--
       (1) to remain a member in good standing of NATO;
       (2) to reject any efforts to withdraw the United States 
     from NATO, or to indirectly withdraw from NATO by condemning 
     or reducing contributions to NATO structures, activities, or 
     operations, in a manner that creates a de facto withdrawal;
       (3) to continue to work with NATO members to meet their 
     2014 Wales Defense Investment Pledge commitments; and
       (4) to support robust United States funding for the 
     European Deterrence Initiative, which increases the ability 
     of the United States and its allies to deter and defend 
     against Russian aggression.
       (c) Prohibition on the Use of Funds to Withdraw From 
     NATO.--Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no funds 
     are authorized to be appropriated, obligated, or expended to 
     take any action to withdraw the United States from the North 
     Atlantic Treaty, done at Washington, DC on April 4, 1949, 
     between the United States of America and the other founding 
     members of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization.


         amendment no. 309 offered by mr. panetta of california

       At the end of subtitle B of title II, add the following new 
     section:

     SEC. 2__. MODIFICATION OF DEFENSE QUANTUM INFORMATION SCIENCE 
                   AND TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT 
                   PROGRAM.

       Section 234 of the John S. McCain National Defense 
     Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2019 (Public Law 115-232; 
     10 U.S.C. 2358 note) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (c)--
       (A) in paragraph (2), by striking the semicolon at the end 
     and inserting ``, including through coordination with--
       ``(A) the National Quantum Coordination Office;
       ``(B) the subcommittee on Quantum Information Science and 
     the subcommittee on Economic and Security Implications of 
     Quantum Science of the National Science and Technology 
     Council;
       ``(C) the Quantum Economic Development Consortium;
       ``(D) the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and 
     Sustainment
       ``(E) the Industrial Policy office of the Department of 
     Defense;
       ``(F) industry;
       ``(G) academic institutions; and
       ``(H) national laboratories;'';
       (B) by redesignating paragraphs (3) and (4) as paragraphs 
     (5) and (8), respectively;
       (C) by inserting after paragraph (2) the following new 
     paragraphs:
       ``(3) develop, in coordination with the entities listed in 
     paragraph (2), plans for workforce development, enhancing 
     awareness and reducing risk of cybersecurity threats, and the 
     development of ethical guidelines for the use of quantum 
     technology;
       ``(4) develop, in coordination with the National Institute 
     of Standards and Technology, a quantum science taxonomy and 
     requirements for technology and standards;'';
       (D) in paragraph (5) (as so redesignated), by striking 
     ``and'' at the end;
       (E) by inserting after paragraph (5) (as so redesignated) 
     the following new paragraphs:
       ``(6) support efforts to increase the technology readiness 
     level of quantum technologies under development in the United 
     States;
       ``(7) coordinate quantum technology initiatives with allies 
     of the United States, including by coordinating with allies 
     through The Technical Cooperation Program; and''; and
       (F) in paragraph (8) (as so redesignated), by striking 
     ``meeting the long-term challenges and achieving the specific 
     technical goals'' and inserting ``carrying out the program 
     required by subsection (a)''; and
       (2) in subsection (d)--
       (A) by redesignating subparagraphs (C) through (E) as 
     subparagraphs (E) through (G), respectively; and
       (B) by inserting after subparagraph (B) the following new 
     subparagraphs:
       ``(C) A quantum technology roadmap indicating the likely 
     timeframes for development and military deployment of quantum 
     technologies, and likely relative national security impact of 
     such technologies.
       ``(D) A description of efforts to update classification and 
     cybersecurity practices surrounding quantum technology, 
     including--
       ``(i) security processes and requirements for engagement 
     with allied countries; and
       ``(ii) a plan for security-cleared workforce 
     development.''.


        amendment no. 311 offered by mr. perlmutter of colorado

       Page 169, line 19, strike ``2023'' and insert ``2022''.
       Add at the end of subtitle B of title XXXI the following 
     new section:

     SEC. 31__. IMPROVEMENTS TO ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL 
                   ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM ACT OF 2000.

       (a) Office of Ombudsman.--Section 3686 of the Energy 
     Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 
     2000 (42 U.S.C. 7385s-15) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (c)--
       (A) by redesignating paragraphs (2) and (3) as paragraphs 
     (3) and (4), respectively; and
       (B) by inserting after paragraph (1) the following new 
     paragraph:
       ``(2) To provide guidance and assistance to claimants.''; 
     and
       (2) in subsection (h), by striking ``2019'' and inserting 
     ``2020''.
       (b) Advisory Board on Toxic Substances and Worker Health.--
     Section 3687 of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness 
     Compensation Program Act of 2000 (42 U.S.C. 7385s-16) is 
     amended--
       (1) in subsection (b)(1)--
       (A) in subparagraph (C), by striking ``; and'' and 
     inserting a semicolon;
       (B) in subparagraph (D), by striking ``; and'' and 
     inserting a semicolon; and
       (C) by adding after subparagraph (D) the following:
       ``(E) the claims adjudication process generally, including 
     review of procedure manual changes prior to incorporation 
     into the manual and claims for medical benefits; and
       ``(F) such other matters as the Secretary considers 
     appropriate; and'';
       (2) in subsection (g)--
       (A) by striking ``The Secretary of Energy shall'' and 
     inserting ``The Secretary of Energy and the Secretary of 
     Labor shall each''; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following new sentence: ``The 
     Secretary of Labor shall make available to the Board the 
     program's medical director, toxicologist, industrial 
     hygienist and program's support contractors as requested by 
     the Board.'';
       (3) by redesignating subsections (h) and (i) as subsections 
     (i) and (j), respectively; and
       (4) by inserting after subsection (g) the following:
       ``(h) Response to Recommendations.--Not later than 60 days 
     after submission to the Secretary of Labor of the Board's 
     recommendations, the Secretary shall respond to the Board in 
     writing, and post on the public Internet website of the 
     Department of Labor, a response to the recommendations that--
       ``(1) includes a statement of whether the Secretary accepts 
     or rejects the Board's recommendations;
       ``(2) if the Secretary accepts the board's recommendations, 
     describes the timeline for when those recommendations will be 
     implemented; and
       ``(3) if the Secretary does not accept the recommendations, 
     describes the reasons the Secretary does not agree and 
     provide all scientific research to the Board supporting that 
     decision.''.


         amendment no. 312 offered by mr. perry of pennsylvania

       On page 918, after line 16, insert the following new 
     paragraph (and redesignate the subsequent paragraphs 
     accordingly):
       (8) An evaluation of the level of threat information 
     sharing between the Department and the Defense Industrial 
     Base.


         amendment no. 313 offered by mr. peters of california

       Page 283, after line 10, insert the following:

[[Page H5681]]

  


     SEC. 567. PILOT PROGRAM TO IMPROVE INFORMATION SHARING 
                   BETWEEN DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE AND DESIGNATED 
                   RELATIVES AND FRIENDS OF MEMBERS OF THE ARMED 
                   FORCES REGARDING THE EXPERIENCES AND CHALLENGES 
                   OF MILITARY SERVICE.

       (a) Pilot Program Described.--
       (1) Purpose.--Not later than one year after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Defense shall seek to 
     enter into an agreement with the American Red Cross to carry 
     out a pilot program under which the American Red Cross--
       (A) encourages a member of the Armed Forces, upon the 
     enlistment or appointment of such member, to designate up to 
     10 persons to whom information regarding the military service 
     of such member shall be disseminated using contact 
     information obtained under paragraph (5); and
       (B) provides such persons, within 30 days after the date on 
     which such persons were designated under subparagraph (A), 
     the option to elect to receive such information regarding 
     military service; and
       (2) Types of information.--The types of information to be 
     disseminated under the pilot program to persons who elect to 
     receive information shall include information regarding--
       (A) aspects of daily life and routine experienced by 
     members of the Armed Forces;
       (B) the challenges and stresses of military service, 
     particularly during and after deployment as part of a 
     contingency operation;
       (C) the services available to members of the Armed Forces 
     and the dependents of such members to cope with the 
     experiences and challenges of military service;
       (D) benefits administered by the Department of Defense for 
     members of the Armed Forces and the dependents of such 
     members;
       (E) a toll-free telephone number through which such persons 
     who elect to receive information under the pilot program may 
     request information regarding the program; and
       (F) such other information as the Secretary of Defense 
     determines to be appropriate.
       (3) Privacy of information.--In carrying out the pilot 
     program under paragraph (1), the Secretary of Defense may not 
     disseminate information under paragraph (2) in violation of 
     laws and regulations pertaining to the privacy of members of 
     the Armed Forces, including requirements pursuant to--
       (A) section 552a of title 5, United States Code; and
       (B) the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act 
     of 1996 (Public Law 104-191).
       (4) Notice and modifications.--In carrying out the pilot 
     program under paragraph (1), the Secretary of Defense shall, 
     with respect to a member of the Armed Forces--
       (A) ensure that such member is notified of the ability to 
     modify designations made by the member under paragraph 
     (1)(A); and
       (B) upon the request of a member, authorize the member to 
     modify such designations at any time.
       (5) Contact information.--In making a designation under the 
     pilot program, a member of the Armed Forces shall provide 
     necessary contact information, specifically including an 
     email address, to facilitate the dissemination of information 
     regarding the military service of the member.
       (6) Opt-out of program.--In carrying out the pilot program 
     under p