ADOPTING THE RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FOR THE 116TH CONGRESS; Congressional Record Vol. 165, No. 1
(House of Representatives - January 03, 2019)

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[Pages H17-H32]
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   ADOPTING THE RULES OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FOR THE 116TH 
                                CONGRESS

  Mr. HOYER. Mr. Speaker, pursuant to House Resolution 5, I call up the 
resolution (H. Res. 6) adopting the rules of the House of 
Representatives for the One Hundred Sixteenth Congress, and for other 
purposes, and ask for immediate consideration of the resolution.
  The Clerk read the title of the resolution.
  The text of the resolution is as follows:

                               H. Res. 6

       Resolved,

          TITLE I--RULES OF THE ONE HUNDRED SIXTEENTH CONGRESS

     SEC. 101. ADOPTION OF THE RULES OF THE ONE HUNDRED FIFTEENTH 
                   CONGRESS.

       The Rules of the House of Representatives of the One 
     Hundred Fifteenth Congress, including applicable provisions 
     of law or concurrent resolution that constituted rules of the 
     House at the end of the One Hundred Fifteenth Congress, are 
     adopted as the Rules of the House of Representatives of the 
     One Hundred Sixteenth Congress, with amendments to the 
     standing rules as provided in section 102, and with other 
     orders as provided in this resolution.

     SEC. 102. CHANGES TO THE STANDING RULES.

       (a) Notification of Convening of the House.--In clause 12 
     of rule I, insert ``, Delegates, and the Resident 
     Commissioner'' after ``Members'' each place it appears.

[[Page H18]]

       (b) Voting by Delegates and the Resident Commissioner in 
     the Committee of the Whole.--
       (1) In clause 3(a) of rule III, insert ``In a Committee of 
     the Whole House on the State of the Union, each Delegate and 
     the Resident Commissioner shall possess the same powers and 
     privileges as Members of the House.'' before ``Each 
     Delegate''.
       (2) In clause 6 of rule XVIII, add at the end the following 
     new paragraph:
       ``(h) Whenever a recorded vote on any question has been 
     decided by a margin within which the votes cast by the 
     Delegates and the Resident Commissioner have been decisive, 
     the Committee of the Whole shall rise and the Speaker shall 
     put such question de novo without intervening motion. Upon 
     the announcement of the vote on that question, the Committee 
     of the Whole shall resume its sitting without intervening 
     motion.''.
       (c) Allowing Delegates and the Resident Commissioner to 
     Serve on Joint Committees.--In clause 3(b) of rule III, 
     strike ``and to any'' and insert ``, joint committee, or''.
       (d) Admittance to the Hall of the House.--In clause 2(a) of 
     rule IV--
       (1) strike subparagraphs (1) and (2) and insert the 
     following:
       ``(1) Members of Congress, Members-elect, Delegates, 
     Delegates-elect, the Resident Commissioner, and the Resident 
     Commissioner-elect.
       ``(2) Contestants in election cases during the pendency of 
     their cases on the floor.''; and
       (2) in subparagraph (14), insert ``and of the Territories'' 
     after ``States''.
       (e) Office of Speaker.--In clause 2(a) of rule IX, add the 
     following new subparagraph:
       ``(3) A resolution causing a vacancy in the Office of 
     Speaker shall not be privileged except if offered by 
     direction of a party caucus or conference.''.
       (f) Designating Committee on Oversight and Reform.--In the 
     standing rules, strike ``Committee on Oversight and 
     Government Reform'' each place it appears and insert (in each 
     instance) ``Committee on Oversight and Reform''.
       (g) Designating Committee on Education and Labor.--
       (1) In clause 1(e) of rule X, strike ``the Workforce'' and 
     insert ``Labor''.
       (2) In clause 3(d) of rule X, strike ``the Workforce'' and 
     insert ``Labor''.
       (h) Education and Labor Jurisdiction Clarification.--In 
     clause 1(e) of rule X, add the following new subparagraphs:
       ``(14) Organization, administration, and general management 
     of the Department of Education.
       ``(15) Organization, administration, and general management 
     of the Department of Labor.''.
       (i) Committee Oversight Plans.--Amend clause 2(d) of rule X 
     to read as follows:
       ``(d)(1) Not later than March 1 of the first session of a 
     Congress, the chair of each standing committee (other than 
     the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on Ethics, and 
     the Committee on Rules) shall--
       ``(A) prepare, in consultation with the ranking minority 
     member, an oversight plan for that Congress;
       ``(B) provide a copy of that plan to each member of the 
     committee for at least seven calendar days before its 
     submission; and
       ``(C) submit that plan (including any supplemental, 
     minority, additional, or dissenting views submitted by a 
     member of the committee) simultaneously to the Committee on 
     Oversight and Reform and the Committee on House 
     Administration.
       ``(2) In developing the plan, the chair of each committee 
     shall, to the maximum extent feasible--
       ``(A) consult with other committees that have jurisdiction 
     over the same or related laws, programs, or agencies with the 
     objective of ensuring maximum coordination and cooperation 
     among committees when conducting reviews of such laws, 
     programs, or agencies and include in the plan an explanation 
     of steps that have been or will be taken to ensure such 
     coordination and cooperation;
       ``(B) review specific problems with Federal rules, 
     regulations, statutes, and court decisions that are 
     ambiguous, arbitrary, or nonsensical, or that impose severe 
     financial burdens on individuals;
       ``(C) give priority consideration to including in the plan 
     the review of those laws, programs, or agencies operating 
     under permanent budget authority or permanent statutory 
     authority;
       ``(D) have a view toward ensuring that all significant 
     laws, programs, or agencies within the committee's 
     jurisdiction are subject to review every 10 years; and
       ``(E) have a view toward insuring against duplication of 
     Federal programs.
       ``(3) Not later than April 15 in the first session of a 
     Congress, after consultation with the Speaker, the Majority 
     Leader, and the Minority Leader, the Committee on Oversight 
     and Reform shall report to the House the oversight plans 
     submitted under subparagraph (1) together with any 
     recommendations that it, or the House leadership group 
     described above, may make to ensure the most effective 
     coordination of oversight plans and otherwise to achieve the 
     objectives of this clause.''.
       (j) Activity Reports.--
       (1) In clause 1(d)(2)(B) of rule XI, strike ``authorization 
     and''.
       (2) In clause 1(d)(2)(C) of rule XI, strike ``authorization 
     and''.
       (k) Oversight Over the Executive Office of the President.--
     In clause 3(i) of rule X, strike ``with a view to determining 
     their economy and efficiency'' and insert ``, including the 
     Executive Office of the President''.
       (l) Oversight and Reform Committee Depositions.--In clause 
     4(c)(3)(B) of rule X--
       (1) in item (i), insert ``and'' after the semicolon;
       (2) in item (ii), strike ``; and'' and insert ``.''; and
       (3) strike item (iii).
       (m) Removing Certain Committee Term Limits.--
       (1) In clause 5(a)(2) of rule X--
       (A) strike subdivisions (B) and (C); and
       (B) in subdivision (A), strike ``(A)'' and redesignate 
     items (i), (ii), and (iii) as subdivisions (A), (B), and (C).
       (2) In clause 5(c) of rule X--
       (A) strike the designation of subparagraph (1); and
       (B) strike subparagraph (2).
       (n) Rules of Committees.--In clause 2(a)(2) of rule XI, 
     strike ``30'' and insert ``60''.
       (o) Committee Markup Notice.--In clause 2(g)(3)(A)(ii) of 
     rule XI, strike ``third day'' and insert ``third calendar day 
     (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, or legal holidays except when 
     the House is in session on such a day)''.
       (p) Annual Ethics Training.--In clause 3(a)(6)(B)(ii) of 
     rule XI--
       (1) strike ``officer and employee'' and insert ``Member, 
     Delegate, Resident Commissioner, officer, and employee''; and
       (2) strike ``officer or employee'' and insert ``Member, 
     Delegate, Resident Commissioner, officer, or employee''.
       (q) Considering Criminal Trial Evidence in Ethics 
     Investigation.--In clause 3(p) of rule XI--
       (1) in subparagraph (5)(C), strike ``first; or'' and insert 
     ``first;'';
       (2) in subparagraph (5)(D), strike ``investigation;'' and 
     insert ``investigation; or'';
       (3) in subparagraph (5), add at the end the following new 
     subdivision:
       ``(E) the committee or an investigative subcommittee 
     determines to take into evidence the trial transcript or 
     exhibits admitted into evidence at a criminal trial pursuant 
     to subparagraph (9);'';
       (4) in subparagraph (7), strike ``; and'' and insert a 
     semicolon;
       (5) in subparagraph (8), strike the period and insert ``; 
     and''; and
       (6) add at the end the following new subparagraph:
       ``(9) in any investigation permitted by House or committee 
     rules, in addition to any other evidence which the committee 
     or an investigative subcommittee may consider, if the 
     respondent has been convicted by a court of record for a 
     crime which is related to the subject of the investigation, 
     the committee or investigative subcommittee may take into 
     evidence the trial transcript and all exhibits admitted into 
     evidence at the trial.''.
       (r) Consensus Calendar.--
       (1) In clause 1 of rule XIII, add at the end the following 
     new paragraph:
       ``(c) There is established a Consensus Calendar as provided 
     in clause 7 of rule XV.''.
       (2) In rule XV, add at the end the following new clause:

     ``Consensus Calendar

       ``7.(a)(1) At least once during any week in which the House 
     convenes, the House shall consider a measure on the Consensus 
     Calendar as designated by the Speaker.
       ``(2) This paragraph does not apply before March 1 of an 
     odd-numbered year or after September 30 of an even-numbered 
     year.
       ``(b)(1) The sponsor of a measure that has accumulated 290 
     cosponsors and has not been reported by the committee of 
     primary jurisdiction may present to the Clerk a motion in 
     writing to place that measure on the Consensus Calendar.
       ``(2) A proper motion presented under subparagraph (1) 
     shall be placed in the custody of the Clerk, and shall appear 
     in a portion of the Congressional Record designated for that 
     purpose. The Clerk shall maintain a cumulative list of such 
     motions, and shall make such list publicly available in 
     electronic form.
       ``(3) A motion presented under subparagraph (1) shall be 
     considered as withdrawn if the measure is reported by the 
     committee of primary jurisdiction prior to its placement on 
     the Consensus Calendar.
       ``(c) After a measure has maintained at least 290 
     cosponsors for a cumulative period of 25 legislative days 
     after the presentation of a motion under paragraph (b)(1), 
     the measure shall be placed on the Consensus Calendar. Such 
     measure shall remain on the Consensus Calendar until it is--
       ``(1) considered in the House; or
       ``(2) reported by the committee of primary jurisdiction.''.
       (s) Recorded Votes in Rules Committee Reports.--In clause 
     3(b) of rule XIII, insert ``, and applies only to the maximum 
     extent practicable to a report by the Committee on Rules on a 
     rule, joint rule, or the order of business'' after 
     ``Ethics''.
       (t) 72-Hour Text Availability.--
       (1) In clause 4(a)(1) of rule XIII--
       (A) strike ``the third calendar day (excluding Saturdays, 
     Sundays, or legal holidays except when the House is in 
     session on such a day) on which each report'' and insert 
     ``the proposed text of each report (except views referred to 
     in clause 2(l) of rule XI)''; and
       (B) insert ``for 72 hours'' after ``Resident 
     Commissioner''.
       (2) In clause 11 of rule XXI--
       (A) strike ``the third calendar day (excluding Saturdays, 
     Sundays, or legal holidays except when the House is in 
     session on such a day) on which''; and
       (B) insert ``for 72 hours'' after ``Resident 
     Commissioner''.

[[Page H19]]

       (3) In clause 8(a)(1)(A) of rule XXII--
       (A) strike ``the third calendar day (excluding Saturdays, 
     Sundays, or legal holidays except when the House is in 
     session on such a day) on which''; and
       (B) insert ``for 72 hours'' after ``Resident 
     Commissioner''.
       (4) In clause 8(b)(1)(A) of rule XXII--
       (A) strike ``the third calendar day (excluding Saturdays, 
     Sundays, or legal holidays except when the House is in 
     session on such a day) on which''; and
       (B) insert ``for 72 hours'' after ``Resident 
     Commissioner''.
       (u) Macroeconomic Analysis.--In rule XIII, strike clause 8.
       (v) Discharge Petitions.--
       (1) In clause 2 of rule XV--
       (A) strike ``Discharge motions, second and fourth Mondays'' 
     and insert ``Discharge motions'';
       (B) strike paragraph (a) and redesignate the subsequent 
     paragraphs accordingly;
       (C) in paragraph (b) (as so redesignated), strike 
     ``paragraph (b)'' and insert ``paragraph (a)''; and
       (D) in paragraph (c)(1) (as so redesignated), strike the 
     first sentence and insert the following: ``A motion to 
     discharge that has been on the calendar for at least seven 
     legislative days (except during the last six days of a 
     session of Congress) shall be privileged only at a time or 
     place, designated by the Speaker, in the legislative schedule 
     within two legislative days after the day on which a Member 
     whose signature appears thereon announces to the House an 
     intention to offer the motion.''.
       (2) In clause 6(e) of rule XIII, strike ``on a day when it 
     is in order to consider a motion to discharge committees 
     under clause 2 of rule XV'' and insert ``on the second and 
     fourth Mondays of a month''.
       (3) In clause 3 of rule XV, strike ``on a day when it is in 
     order to consider a motion to discharge committees under 
     clause 2'' and insert ``on the second and fourth Mondays of a 
     month''.
       (4) In clause 4 of rule XV, strike ``after the disposition 
     of motions to discharge committees and''.
       (w) Private Calendar.--In clause 5 of rule XV--
       (1) in the caption, strike ``, first and third Tuesdays''; 
     and
       (2) in paragraph (b)(1), amend the first sentence to read 
     as follows: ``On any day, after the disposal of such business 
     on the Speaker's table as requires reference only, the 
     Speaker may direct the Clerk to call any bill or resolution 
     that has been on the Private Calendar for at least seven 
     days, but only on the second legislative day after the 
     legislative day on which the Speaker or a designee announces 
     to the House an intention to do so.''.
       (x) Religious Headdress.--In clause 5 of rule XVII, insert 
     ``non-religious headdress or'' before ``a hat''.
       (y) Quorum in the Committee of the Whole.--In clause 6 of 
     rule XVIII--
       (1) in paragraph (a), insert ``, Delegates, and the 
     Resident Commissioner'' after ``Members'';
       (2) in paragraph (e), insert ``, Delegates, and the 
     Resident Commissioner'' after ``Members''; and
       (3) in paragraph (g)(2), insert ``, Delegates, and the 
     Resident Commissioner'' after ``Members''.
       (z) Two-minute Voting in the Committee of the Whole.--In 
     clause 6 of rule XVIII--
       (1) in paragraph (f)--
       (A) strike ``without any intervening business or debate''; 
     and
       (B) after ``first pending amendment'' insert the following: 
     ``, if in the discretion of the Chair Members, Delegates, and 
     the Resident Commissioner would be afforded an adequate 
     opportunity to vote''; and
       (2) in paragraph (g)--
       (A) in subparagraph (1), strike ``without intervening 
     business''; and
       (B) in subparagraph (2), strike ``without intervening 
     debate or motion''.
       (aa) Postponability of Certain Votes.--In clause 8(a)(2) of 
     rule XX--
       (1) redesignate subdivisions (G) through (J) as 
     subdivisions (H) through (K), respectively;
       (2) insert after subdivision (F) the following new 
     subdivision:
       ``(G) The question of agreeing to an amendment.'';
       (3) in subdivision (H) (as redesignated), strike ``(F)'' 
     and insert ``(G)''; and
       (4) strike subdivision (K) (as redesignated).
       (bb) Discretion for Five-minute Votes.--
       (1) Strike clause 8(c) of rule XX (and redesignate the 
     succeeding paragraph accordingly).
       (2) Amend clause 9 of rule XX to read as follows:
       ``9.(a) The Speaker may reduce to five minutes the minimum 
     time for electronic voting on any question that follows 
     another electronic vote or a report from the Committee of the 
     Whole, if in the discretion of the Speaker Members would be 
     afforded an adequate opportunity to vote.
       ``(b) To the maximum extent practicable, notice of possible 
     five-minute voting for a given series of votes shall be 
     issued prior to the first electronic vote in the series.''.
       (cc) Net Increase in Budget Authority.--In clause 2 of rule 
     XXI, strike paragraph (g).
       (dd) Removing Supermajority Vote.--
       (1) In clause 5 of rule XXI, strike paragraph (b) and 
     redesignate the subsequent paragraph accordingly.
       (2) In clause 10 of rule XX, strike ``, or increasing 
     Federal income tax rates (within the meaning of clause 5 of 
     rule XXI)''.
       (3) In clause 5(a) of rule XXI, strike ``paragraph (1)'' 
     and insert ``subparagraph (1)''.
       (ee) Pay-As-You-Go Point Of Order.--In rule XXI, amend 
     clause 10 to read as follows:
       ``10.(a)(1) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c), 
     it shall not be in order to consider any bill, joint 
     resolution, amendment, or conference report if the provisions 
     of such measure affecting direct spending and revenues have 
     the net effect of increasing the deficit or reducing the 
     surplus for either the period comprising--
       ``(A) the current fiscal year, the budget year, and the 
     four fiscal years following that budget year; or
       ``(B) the current fiscal year, the budget year, and the 
     nine fiscal years following that budget year.
       ``(2) The effect of such measure on the deficit or surplus 
     shall be determined on the basis of estimates made by the 
     Committee on the Budget relative to baseline estimates 
     supplied by the Congressional Budget Office consistent with 
     section 257 of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.
       ``(b) If a bill, joint resolution, or amendment is 
     considered pursuant to a special order of the House directing 
     the Clerk to add as new matter at the end of such measure the 
     provisions of a separate measure as passed by the House, the 
     provisions of such separate measure as passed by the House 
     shall be included in the evaluation under paragraph (a) of 
     the bill, joint resolution, or amendment.
       ``(c)(1) Except as provided in subparagraph (2), the 
     evaluation under paragraph (a) shall exclude a provision 
     expressly designated as an emergency for purposes of pay-as-
     you-go principles in the case of a point of order under this 
     clause against consideration of--
       ``(A) a bill or joint resolution;
       ``(B) an amendment made in order as original text by a 
     special order of business;
       ``(C) a conference report; or
       ``(D) an amendment between the Houses.
       ``(2) In the case of an amendment (other than one specified 
     in subparagraph (1)) to a bill or joint resolution, the 
     evaluation under paragraph (a) shall give no cognizance to 
     any designation of emergency.
       ``(3) If a bill, a joint resolution, an amendment made in 
     order as original text by a special order of business, a 
     conference report, or an amendment between the Houses 
     includes a provision expressly designated as an emergency for 
     purposes of pay-as-you-go principles, the Chair shall put the 
     question of consideration with respect thereto.
       ``(d) For the purpose of this clause, the terms `budget 
     year' and `current year' have the meanings specified in 
     section 250 of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985, and the term `direct spending' has the 
     meaning specified in such section 250 except that such term 
     shall also include provisions in appropriations Acts that 
     make outyear modifications to substantive law as described in 
     section 3(4)(C) of the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 
     2010.''.
       (ff) Banning Discrimination on the Basis of Sexual 
     Orientation or Gender Identity.--In clause 9 of rule XXIII, 
     insert ``sexual orientation, gender identity,'' before 
     ``disability''.
       (gg) Banning Sexual Relationships Between Members and 
     Committee Staff.--In clause 18(a) of rule XXIII, strike 
     ``Resident Commissioner.'' and insert ``Resident 
     Commissioner, or who is an employee of a committee on which 
     the Member, Delegate, or Resident Commissioner serves.''.
       (hh) Service of Indicted Members in Leadership and on 
     Committees.--In clause 10 of rule XXIII--
       (1) designate the existing sentence as paragraph (a); and
       (2) insert at the end the following new paragraph:
       ``(b) A Member, Delegate, or Resident Commissioner who has 
     been indicted for or otherwise formally charged with criminal 
     conduct in any Federal, State, or local court punishable as a 
     felony for which a sentence of two or more years' 
     imprisonment may be imposed should submit his or her 
     resignation from any standing, select, joint or ad hoc 
     committee, and any subcommittee thereof, on which he or she 
     serves, and should step aside from any party caucus or 
     conference leadership position he or she holds, unless or 
     until judicial or executive proceedings result in acquittal 
     or the charges are dismissed or reduced to less than a felony 
     as described in this paragraph.''.
       (ii) Banning Members, Officers, and Employees From Sitting 
     on Corporate Boards.--Effective January 1, 2020, in rule 
     XXIII--
       (1) redesignate clause 19 as clause 20; and
       (2) insert after clause 18 the following new clause:
       ``19.(a) A Member, Delegate, Resident Commissioner, 
     officer, or employee of the House may not serve as an officer 
     or director of any public company.
       ``(b) In paragraph (a), the term `public company' means an 
     issuer as defined in section 3 of the Securities Exchange Act 
     of 1934 (15 U.S.C. 78c)--
       ``(1) the securities of which are required to be registered 
     under section 12 of such Act (15 U.S.C. 78l); or
       ``(2) that is required to file reports under section 15(d) 
     of such Act (15 U.S.C. 78o(d)).
       ``(c) Not later than December 31, 2019, the Committee on 
     Ethics shall develop regulations addressing other types of 
     prohibited service or positions that could lead to conflicts 
     of interest.''.
       (jj) Suspension of the Debt Limit.--Rule XXVIII is amended 
     to read as follows:

[[Page H20]]

  


                             ``RULE XXVIII

                  ``Statutory Limit on the Public Debt

       ``1. Upon adoption by the House of a concurrent resolution 
     on the budget under section 301 or 304 of the Congressional 
     Budget Act of 1974, the Clerk shall prepare an engrossment of 
     a joint resolution suspending the statutory limit on the 
     public debt in the form prescribed in clause 2. Upon 
     engrossment of the joint resolution, the vote by which the 
     concurrent resolution on the budget was adopted by the House 
     shall also be considered as a vote on passage of the joint 
     resolution in the House, and the joint resolution shall be 
     considered as passed by the House and duly certified and 
     examined. The engrossed copy shall be signed by the Clerk and 
     transmitted to the Senate for further legislative action.
       ``2. The matter after the resolving clause in a joint 
     resolution described in clause 1 shall be as follows: 
     `Section 3101(b) of title 31, United States Code, shall not 
     apply for the period beginning on the date of enactment and 
     ending on September 30, ____.' with the blank being filled 
     with the budget year for the concurrent resolution.
       ``3. Nothing in this rule shall be construed as limiting or 
     otherwise affecting--
       ``(a) the power of the House or the Senate to consider and 
     pass bills or joint resolutions, without regard to the 
     procedures under clause 1, that would change the statutory 
     limit on the public debt; or
       ``(b) the rights of Members, Delegates, the Resident 
     Commissioner, or committees with respect to the introduction, 
     consideration, and reporting of such bills or joint 
     resolutions.
       ``4. In this rule the term 'statutory limit on the public 
     debt' means the maximum face amount of obligations issued 
     under authority of chapter 31 of title 31, United States 
     Code, and obligations guaranteed as to principal and interest 
     by the United States (except such guaranteed obligations as 
     may be held by the Secretary of the Treasury), as determined 
     under section 3101(b) of such title after the application of 
     section 3101(a) of such title, that may be outstanding at any 
     one time.''.

     SEC. 103. SEPARATE ORDERS.

       (a) Deposition Authority.--
       (1) During the One Hundred Sixteenth Congress, the chair of 
     a standing committee (other than the Committee on Rules), and 
     the chair of the Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence, 
     upon consultation with the ranking minority member of such 
     committee, may order the taking of depositions, including 
     pursuant to subpoena, by a member or counsel of such 
     committee.
       (2) Depositions taken under the authority prescribed in 
     this subsection shall be subject to regulations issued by the 
     chair of the Committee on Rules and printed in the 
     Congressional Record.
       (b) Providing for Transparency With Respect to Memorials 
     Submitted Pursuant to Article V of the Constitution of the 
     United States.--With respect to any memorial presented under 
     clause 3 of rule XII purporting to be an application of the 
     legislature of a State calling for a convention for proposing 
     amendments to the Constitution of the United States pursuant 
     to Article V, or a rescission of any such prior application--
       (1) the chair of the Committee on the Judiciary shall, in 
     the case of a memorial presented in the One Hundred 
     Fourteenth Congress or succeeding Congresses, and may, in the 
     case of such a memorial presented prior to the One Hundred 
     Fourteenth Congress, designate any such memorial for public 
     availability by the Clerk; and
       (2) the Clerk shall make such memorials as are designated 
     pursuant to paragraph (1) publicly available in electronic 
     form, organized by State of origin and year of receipt, and 
     shall indicate whether the memorial was designated as an 
     application or a rescission.
       (c) Limitation on Advance Appropriations.--
       (1) Except as provided in paragraph (2), any general 
     appropriation bill or bill or joint resolution continuing 
     appropriations, or amendment thereto or conference report 
     thereon, may not provide an advance appropriation.
       (2) An advance appropriation may be provided for programs, 
     activities or accounts identified in lists submitted for 
     printing in the Congressional Record by the chair of the 
     Committee on the Budget (when elected)--
       (A) for fiscal year 2020, under the heading ``Accounts 
     Identified for Advance Appropriations'' in an aggregate 
     amount not to exceed $28,852,000,000 in new budget authority, 
     and for 2021, accounts separately identified under the same 
     heading; and
       (B) for fiscal year 2020, under the heading ``Veterans 
     Accounts Identified for Advance Appropriations'' in an 
     aggregate amount not to exceed $75,550,600,000 in new budget 
     authority.
       (3) Definition.--The term ``advance appropriation'' means 
     any new discretionary budget authority provided in a general 
     appropriation bill or bill or joint resolution continuing 
     appropriations for fiscal year 2019, or any amendment thereto 
     or conference report thereon, that first becomes available 
     following fiscal year 2019.
       (d) Exercise Facilities for Former Members.--During the One 
     Hundred Sixteenth Congress--
       (1) The House of Representatives may not provide access to 
     any exercise facility which is made available exclusively to 
     Members and former Members, officers and former officers of 
     the House of Representatives, and their spouses to any former 
     Member, former officer, or spouse who is a lobbyist 
     registered under the Lobbying Disclosure Act of 1995 or any 
     successor statute or who is an agent of a foreign principal 
     as defined in clause 5 of rule XXV. For purposes of this 
     subsection, the term ``Member'' includes a Delegate or 
     Resident Commissioner to the Congress.
       (2) The Committee on House Administration shall promulgate 
     regulations to carry out this subsection.
       (e) Numbering of Bills.--In the One Hundred Sixteenth 
     Congress, the first 10 numbers for bills (H.R. 1 through H.R. 
     10) shall be reserved for assignment by the Speaker and the 
     second 10 numbers for bills (H.R. 11 through H.R. 20) shall 
     be reserved for assignment by the Minority Leader.
       (f) Inclusion of Citations for Proposed Repeals and 
     Amendments.--To the maximum extent practicable and consistent 
     with established drafting conventions, an instruction in a 
     bill or joint resolution proposing to repeal or amend any law 
     or part thereof not contained in a codified title of the 
     United States Code shall include, in parentheses immediately 
     following the designation of the matter proposed to be 
     repealed or amended, the applicable United States Code 
     citation (which may be a note in the United States Code), or, 
     if no such citation is available, an appropriate alternative 
     citation to the applicable law or part.
       (g) Broadening Availability of Legislative Documents in 
     Machine-readable Formats.--The Committee on House 
     Administration, the Clerk, and other officers and officials 
     of the House shall continue efforts to broaden the 
     availability of legislative documents in machine readable 
     formats in the One Hundred Sixteenth Congress in furtherance 
     of the institutional priority of improving public 
     availability and use of legislative information produced by 
     the House and its committees.
       (h) Subcommittees.--Notwithstanding clause 5(d) of rule X, 
     during the One Hundred Sixteenth Congress--
       (1) the Committee on Agriculture may have not more than six 
     subcommittees; and
       (2) the Committee on Financial Services may have not more 
     than seven subcommittees.
       (i) Requiring Committee Hearing and Markup on Bills and 
     Joint Resolutions.--
       (1) Effective March 1, 2019, during the One Hundred 
     Sixteenth Congress, it shall not be in order to consider a 
     bill or joint resolution pursuant to a special order of 
     business reported by the Committee on Rules that--
       (A) has not been reported by a committee; or
       (B) has been reported by a committee unless the report 
     includes a list of related committee and subcommittee 
     hearings and a designation of at least one committee or 
     subcommittee hearing that was used to develop or consider 
     such bill or joint resolution.
       (2) This subsection shall not apply to a bill or joint 
     resolution--
       (A) continuing appropriations for a fiscal year;
       (B) containing an emergency designation under section 
     251(b)(2) or section 252(e) of the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act; or
       (C) designated pursuant to clause 7(a) of rule XV.
       (j) Member Day Hearing Requirement.--During the first 
     session of the One Hundred Sixteenth Congress, each standing 
     committee (other than the Committee on Ethics) shall hold a 
     hearing at which it receives testimony from Members, 
     Delegates, and the Resident Commissioner on proposed 
     legislation within its jurisdiction, except that the 
     Committee on Rules may hold such hearing during the second 
     session of the One Hundred Sixteenth Congress.
       (k) Empaneling Investigative Subcommittee of the Committee 
     on Ethics.--The text of House Resolution 451, One Hundred 
     Tenth Congress, shall apply in the One Hundred Sixteenth 
     Congress in the same manner as such provision applied in the 
     One Hundred Tenth Congress, except that references to the 
     Committee on Standards of Official Conduct shall be construed 
     as references to the Committee on Ethics.
       (l) War Powers Resolution.--During the One Hundred 
     Sixteenth Congress, a motion to discharge a measure 
     introduced pursuant to section 6 or section 7 of the War 
     Powers Resolution (50 U.S.C. 1545-46) shall not be subject to 
     a motion to table.
       (m) Budget Matters.--During the first session of the One 
     Hundred Sixteenth Congress, pending the adoption of a 
     concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2019--
       (1) the allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate 
     levels as contained in the statement of the chair of the 
     Committee on the Budget of the House of Representatives in 
     the Congressional Record of May 10, 2018, as adjusted in the 
     One Hundred Fifteenth Congress, shall be considered for all 
     purposes in the House to be the allocations, aggregates, and 
     other appropriate levels under titles III and IV of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974; and
       (2) the provisions of House Concurrent Resolution 71, One 
     Hundred Fifteenth Congress, specified in section 30104(f)(1) 
     of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 shall have no force or 
     effect except for sections 5201, 5202, 5203, and 5401 of such 
     concurrent resolution.
       (n) Legal Issues Related to the Patient Protection and 
     Affordable Care Act.--To protect the institutional interests 
     of the House of Representatives, the Speaker, on behalf of 
     the House, is authorized to intervene, otherwise appear, or 
     take any other

[[Page H21]]

     steps, in the case of Texas v. United States, No. 4:18-cv-
     00167-O (N.D. Tex.) and in any appellate proceedings arising 
     from such case. The Speaker, in consultation with the 
     Bipartisan Legal Advisory Group, is also authorized to 
     intervene, otherwise appear, or take any other steps in any 
     other cases involving the Patient Protection and Affordable 
     Care Act to protect the institutional interests of the House 
     and to defend such Act, the amendments made by such Act to 
     other provisions of law, and any amendments to such 
     provisions, including the provisions ensuring affordable 
     health coverage for those with preexisting conditions. The 
     House authorizes the Office of General Counsel of the House 
     of Representatives, at the direction of the Speaker, to 
     represent the House in any such litigation, and to take such 
     steps as may be appropriate, including the supervision and 
     employment of services of outside counsel, including pro bono 
     counsel, or other experts.
       (o) Legal Issues Related to the Supplemental Nutrition 
     Assistance Program.--The Office of General Counsel is 
     directed to immediately explore all possible legal options 
     for responding to any rulemaking by the United States 
     Department of Agriculture, announced on or after December 20, 
     2018, to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program 
     involving requirements for able-bodied adults without 
     dependents.
       (p) Congressional Member Organization Transparency 
     Reform.--
       (1) Payment of salaries and expenses through account of 
     organization.--A Member of the House of Representatives and 
     an eligible Congressional Member Organization may enter into 
     an agreement under which--
       (A) an employee of the Member's office may carry out 
     official and representational duties of the Member by 
     assignment to the Organization; and
       (B) to the extent that the employee carries out such duties 
     under the agreement, the Member shall transfer the portion of 
     the Members' Representational Allowance (MRA) of the Member 
     which would otherwise be used for the salary and related 
     expenses of the employee to a dedicated account in the House 
     of Representatives which is administered by the Organization, 
     in accordance with the regulations promulgated by the 
     Committee on House Administration under paragraph (2).
       (2) Regulations.--The Committee on House Administration 
     (hereafter referred to in this subsection as the 
     ``Committee'') shall promulgate regulations as follows:
       (A) Use of mra.--Pursuant to the authority of section 
     101(d) of the House of Representatives Administrative Reform 
     Technical Corrections Act (2 U.S.C. 5341(d)), the Committee 
     shall prescribe regulations to provide that an eligible 
     Congressional Member Organization may use the amounts 
     transferred to the Organization's dedicated account under 
     paragraph (1)(B) for the same purposes for which a Member of 
     the House of Representatives may use the Members' 
     Representational Allowance, except that the Organization may 
     not use such amounts for franked mail, official travel, or 
     leases of space or vehicles.
       (B) Maintenance of limitations on number of shared 
     employees.--Pursuant to the authority of section 104(d) of 
     the House of Representatives Administrative Reform Technical 
     Corrections Act (2 U.S.C. 5321(d)), the Committee shall 
     prescribe regulations to provide that an employee of the 
     office of a Member of the House of Representatives who is 
     covered by an agreement entered into under paragraph (1) 
     between the Member and an eligible Congressional Member 
     Organization shall be considered a shared employee of the 
     Member's office and the Organization for purposes of such 
     section, and shall include in such regulations appropriate 
     accounting standards to ensure that a Member of the House of 
     Representatives who enters into an agreement with such an 
     Organization under paragraph (1) does not employ more 
     employees than the Member is authorized to employ under such 
     section.
       (C) Participation in student loan repayment program.--
     Pursuant to the authority of section 105(b) of the 
     Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 2003 (2 U.S.C. 
     4536(b)), relating to the student loan repayment program for 
     employees of the House, the Committee shall promulgate 
     regulations to provide that, in the case of an employee who 
     is covered by an agreement entered into under paragraph (1) 
     between a Member of the House of Representatives and an 
     eligible Congressional Member Organization and who 
     participates in such program while carrying out duties under 
     the agreement--
       (i) any funds made available for making payments under the 
     program with respect to the employee shall be transferred to 
     the Organization's dedicated account under paragraph (1)(B); 
     and
       (ii) the Organization shall use the funds to repay a 
     student loan taken out by the employee, under the same terms 
     and conditions which would apply under the program if the 
     Organization were the employing office of the employee.
       (D) Access to house services.--The Committee shall 
     prescribe regulations to ensure that an eligible 
     Congressional Member Organization has appropriate access to 
     services of the House.
       (E) Other regulations.--The Committee shall promulgate such 
     other regulations as may be appropriate to carry out this 
     subsection.
       (3) Eligible congressional member organization defined.--In 
     this subsection, the term ``eligible Congressional Member 
     Organization'' means, with respect to the One Hundred 
     Sixteenth Congress, an organization meeting each of the 
     following requirements:
       (A) The organization is registered as a Congressional 
     Member Organization with the Committee on House 
     Administration.
       (B) The organization designates a single Member of the 
     House of Representatives to be responsible for the 
     administration of the organization, including the 
     administration of the account administered under paragraph 
     (1)(B), and includes the identification of such Member with 
     the statement of organization that the organization files and 
     maintains with the Committee on House Administration.
       (C) At least 3 employees of the House are assigned to 
     perform some work for the organization.
       (D) During the One Hundred Fifteenth Congress, at least 15 
     Members of the House of Representatives used a portion of the 
     Members' Representational Allowance of the Member for the 
     salary and related expenses of an employee who was a shared 
     employee of the Member's office and the organization.
       (E) The organization files a statement with the Committee 
     on House Administration and the Chief Administrative Officer 
     of the House of Representatives certifying that it will 
     administer an account in accordance with paragraph (1)(B).
       (q) Non-disclosure Agreements.--Any non-disclosure 
     agreement imposed by any employing or contracting authority 
     in the House of Representatives to which a paid or unpaid 
     employee or contractor is or was required to agree as a term 
     of employment shall--
       (1) provide clear guidance that the employee or contractor 
     may communicate concerning any matter with the Committee on 
     Ethics, the Office of Congressional Workplace Rights, or any 
     other office or entity designated by the Committee on House 
     Administration without prior, concurrent, or subsequent 
     notice or approval; and
       (2) not be binding and shall have no legal effect to the 
     extent to which it requires prior, concurrent, or subsequent 
     notice or approval from anyone on any matter with respect to 
     communications from an employee or contractor to any of the 
     committees, offices, or entities described in paragraph (1).
       (r) Requiring Members to Pay for Discrimination 
     Settlements.--
       (1) In general.--In the case of a settlement of a complaint 
     under the Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 in 
     connection with a claim alleging a violation described in 
     paragraph (2) which is committed personally by a Member, 
     Delegate, or Resident Commissioner, if the Member, Delegate, 
     or Resident Commissioner is not required under law to 
     reimburse the Treasury for the amount of the settlement, the 
     chair and ranking minority member of the Committee on House 
     Administration may not approve the settlement pursuant to 
     clause 4(d)(2) of rule X unless, under the terms and 
     conditions of the settlement, the Member, Delegate, or 
     Resident Commissioner is required to reimburse the Treasury 
     for the amount of the settlement.
       (2) Violations described.--A violation described in this 
     paragraph is--
       (A) a violation of section 201(a) or section 206(a) of the 
     Congressional Accountability Act of 1995; or
       (B) a violation of section 207 of such Act which consists 
     of intimidating, taking reprisal against, or otherwise 
     discriminating against any covered employee under such Act 
     because of a claim alleging a violation described in 
     subparagraph (A).
       (s) Mandatory Anti-harassment and Anti-discrimination 
     Policies for House Offices.--
       (1) Requiring offices to adopt policy.--Each employing 
     office of the House of Representatives under the 
     Congressional Accountability Act of 1995 shall adopt an anti-
     harassment and anti-discrimination policy for the office's 
     workplace.
       (2) Regulations.--Not later than April 1, 2019, the 
     Committee on House Administration shall promulgate 
     regulations to carry out this section, and shall ensure that 
     such regulations are consistent with the requirements of the 
     Congressional Accountability Act of 1995, rule XXIII, and 
     other relevant laws, rules, and regulations.
       (t) Displaying Statement of Rights and Protections Provided 
     to House Employees.--The Committee on House Administration 
     shall issue regulations to provide that each employing office 
     of the House of Representatives shall post in a prominent 
     location in the office (including, in the case of the office 
     of a Member, Delegate, or the Resident Commissioner, a 
     prominent location in each district office) a statement of 
     the rights and protections provided to employees of the House 
     of Representatives under the Congressional Accountability Act 
     of 1995, including the procedures available to employees of 
     the House under such Act for responding to and adjudicating 
     allegations of violations of such rights and protections.

     SEC. 104. COMMITTEES, COMMISSIONS, AND HOUSE OFFICES.

       (a) House Democracy Partnership.--House Resolution 24, One 
     Hundred Tenth Congress, shall apply in the One Hundred 
     Sixteenth Congress in the same manner as such resolution 
     applied in the One Hundred Tenth Congress except that the 
     commission concerned shall be known as the House Democracy 
     Partnership.
       (b) Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission.--
       (1) In general.--Sections 1 through 7 of House Resolution 
     1451, One Hundred Tenth

[[Page H22]]

     Congress, shall apply in the One Hundred Sixteenth Congress 
     in the same manner as such provisions applied in the One 
     Hundred Tenth Congress, except that--
       (A) the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission may, in addition 
     to collaborating closely with other professional staff 
     members of the Committee on Foreign Affairs, collaborate 
     closely with professional staff members of other relevant 
     committees;
       (B) the resources of the Committee on Foreign Affairs which 
     the Commission may use shall include all resources which the 
     Committee is authorized to obtain from other offices of the 
     House of Representatives; and
       (C) any amounts authorized to provide full-time 
     professional staff and resources to the Tom Lantos Human 
     Rights Commission shall be in addition to and separate from 
     the overall budget authorization for the Committee on Foreign 
     Affairs as provided by resolution of the House, shall be 
     administered by the Committee on Foreign Affairs, and shall 
     be distributed equally between the co-chairs of the 
     Commission.
       (2) Funding.--For the expenses of the Commission, including 
     the expenses of full-time professional staff and other 
     resources, there shall be paid, out of the applicable 
     accounts of the House of Representatives, not more than 
     $52,000, to be available during the period beginning at noon 
     on January 3, 2019, and ending on March 31, 2019. The amounts 
     provided under this paragraph shall be administered by the 
     Committee on Foreign Affairs in the same manner as amounts 
     provided for the expenses of such Committee by resolution of 
     the House, and shall be distributed equally between the co-
     chairs of the Commission.
       (c) Office of Congressional Ethics.--Section 1 of House 
     Resolution 895, One Hundred Tenth Congress, shall apply in 
     the One Hundred Sixteenth Congress in the same manner as such 
     provision applied in the One Hundred Tenth Congress, except 
     that--
       (1) the Office of Congressional Ethics shall be treated as 
     a standing committee of the House for purposes of section 
     202(i) of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 (2 
     U.S.C. 4301(i));
       (2) references to the Committee on Standards of Official 
     Conduct shall be construed as references to the Committee on 
     Ethics;
       (3) any requirement for concurrence in section 1(b)(1) 
     shall be construed as a requirement for consultation;
       (4) the second sentence of section 1(b)(6)(A) shall not 
     apply;
       (5) members subject to section 1(b)(6)(B) may be 
     reappointed for a third additional term;
       (6) any individual who is the subject of a preliminary 
     review or second-phase review by the board shall be informed 
     of the right to be represented by counsel and invoking that 
     right should not be held negatively against such individual; 
     and
       (7) the Office may not take any action that would deny any 
     person any right or protection provided under the 
     Constitution of the United States.
       (d) Office of Diversity and Inclusion.--
       (1) Establishment.--There is established an Office of 
     Diversity and Inclusion of the House of Representatives 
     (hereafter in this clause referred to as the ``Office'').
       (2) Director.--The Speaker, in consultation with the 
     Minority Leader, shall appoint a Director of the Office from 
     recommendations provided by the chair of the Committee on 
     House Administration in consultation with the ranking 
     minority member of such committee.
       (3) Operational plan.--Not later than 60 days after the 
     appointment of the Director of the Office, the Office shall 
     submit to the Committee on House Administration an 
     operational plan for the Office that shall include, 
     consistent with applicable House rules, regulations, and law, 
     a plan for appointing and establishing duties for staff of 
     the Office which shall set forth a proposed maximum number of 
     staff.
       (4) Diversity plan.--Not later than 90 days after 
     submitting the operational plan under paragraph (3), the 
     Office shall submit a diversity plan to the Committee on 
     House Administration for the committee's review and approval, 
     and shall include in the plan the following:
       (A) Policies to direct and guide House employing offices to 
     recruit, hire, train, develop, advance, promote, and retain a 
     diverse workforce, consistent with applicable House rules, 
     regulations, and law.
       (B) The development of a survey, in consultation with the 
     Committee on House Administration, to evaluate diversity in 
     House employing offices.
       (C) A framework for the House of Representatives diversity 
     report required by paragraph (5).
       (D) A proposal for the composition of an Advisory Council 
     that shall, as necessary, inform the work of the Office.
       (E) Any additional components as determined by the 
     Committee on House Administration.
       (5) Diversity report.--At the end of each session of 
     Congress, the Office shall submit a House of Representatives 
     diversity report to the Speaker, the Majority Leader and 
     Minority Leader, the chair and ranking minority member of the 
     Committee on House Administration, and the chair and ranking 
     minority member of the Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch 
     of the Committee on Appropriations.
       (6) Regulations.--The Office shall carry out its duties 
     pursuant to regulations issued by the Committee on House 
     Administration.
       (7) Definition.--In this subsection, the term ``House 
     employing office'' means--
       (A) the official office of a Member, Delegate, or the 
     Resident Commissioner;
       (B) each committee of the House and each joint committee; 
     and
       (C) any other office of the House.
       (e) Office of the Whistleblower Ombudsman.--
       (1) Establishment.--There is established an Office of the 
     Whistleblower Ombudsman, to be headed by the Whistleblower 
     Ombudsman.
       (2) Appointment.--The Whistleblower Ombudsman shall be 
     appointed by the Speaker in consultation with the chairs and 
     ranking minority members of the Committee on House 
     Administration and the Committee on Oversight and Reform.
       (3) Duties.-- The Whistleblower Ombudsman, under the 
     direction of the Committee on House Administration, and in 
     consultation with any other standing committee and the 
     Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence (at the request of 
     the chair or ranking minority member of such other 
     committee), shall--
       (A) promulgate best practices for whistleblower intake for 
     offices of the House; and
       (B) provide training for offices of the House on 
     whistleblower intake, including establishing an effective 
     reporting system for whistleblowers, maintaining 
     whistleblower confidentiality, advising staff of relevant 
     laws and policies, and protecting information provided by 
     whistleblowers.
       (f) Select Committee on the Climate Crisis.--
       (1) Establishment; composition.--
       (A) Establishment.--There is hereby established a Select 
     Committee on the Climate Crisis (hereinafter in this 
     subsection referred to as the ``Select Committee'').
       (B) Composition.--The Select Committee shall be composed of 
     15 Members, Delegates, or the Resident Commissioner appointed 
     by the Speaker, of whom 6 shall be appointed on the 
     recommendation of the Minority Leader. The Speaker shall 
     designate one member of the Select Committee as its chair. A 
     vacancy in the membership of the Select Committee shall be 
     filled in the same manner as the original appointment.
       (2) Jurisdiction; functions.--
       (A) Legislative jurisdiction.--The Select Committee shall 
     not have legislative jurisdiction and shall have no authority 
     to take legislative action on any bill or resolution.
       (B) Investigative jurisdiction.--The sole authority of the 
     Select Committee shall be to investigate, study, make 
     findings, and develop recommendations on policies, 
     strategies, and innovations to achieve substantial and 
     permanent reductions in pollution and other activities that 
     contribute to the climate crisis which will honor our 
     responsibility to be good stewards of the planet for future 
     generations. The Select Committee may, at its discretion, 
     hold public hearings in connection with any aspect of its 
     investigative functions.
       (3) Procedure.--(A) Except as specified in subparagraph 
     (B), the Select Committee shall have the authorities and 
     responsibilities of, and shall be subject to the same 
     limitations and restrictions as, a standing committee of the 
     House, and shall be deemed a committee of the House for all 
     purposes of law or rule.
       (B)(i) Rules X and XI shall apply to the Select Committee 
     where not inconsistent with this subsection.
       (ii) Service on the Select Committee shall not count 
     against the limitations in clause 5(b)(2) of rule X.
       (iii) Clause 2(m)(1)(B) of rule XI, clause 2(m)(3) of rule 
     XI, and section 103(a) of this resolution shall not apply to 
     the Select Committee, but the Select Committee may recommend 
     subpoenas and depositions and submit such recommendations to 
     the relevant standing committee.
       (iv) Clause 2(d) of rule X shall not apply to the Select 
     Committee.
       (4) Funding.--To enable the Select Committee to carry out 
     the purposes of this section--
       (A) the Select Committee may use the services of staff of 
     the House; and
       (B) the Select Committee shall be eligible for interim 
     funding pursuant to clause 7 of rule X.
       (5) Reporting.--The Select Committee may report to the 
     House or any committee of the House from time to time the 
     results of its investigations and studies, together with such 
     detailed findings and policy recommendations as it may deem 
     advisable. All such reports shall be submitted to the House 
     by December 31, 2020. All policy recommendations shall be 
     submitted to the relevant standing committees not later than 
     March 31, 2020.
       (6) Publication.--The Select Committee shall ensure that 
     reports and proposals prepared in accordance with this 
     subsection shall, upon completion, be made available to the 
     general public in widely accessible formats not later than 30 
     calendar days following the respective dates for completion 
     set forth in paragraph (5).

     SEC. 105. ORDERS OF BUSINESS.

       (a) The Speaker may recognize a Member, Delegate, and the 
     Resident Commissioner for the reading of the Constitution on 
     any legislative day during the first session of the One 
     Hundred Sixteenth Congress.
       (b) It shall be in order at any time through the 
     legislative day of January 17, 2019, for the Speaker to 
     entertain motions that the

[[Page H23]]

     House suspend the rules as though under clause 1 of rule XV. 
     The Speaker or her designee shall consult with the Minority 
     Leader or his designee on the designation of any matter for 
     consideration pursuant to this section.
       (c) The requirement of clause 6(a) of rule XIII for a two-
     thirds vote to consider a report from the Committee on Rules 
     on the same day it is presented to the House is waived with 
     respect to any resolution reported through the legislative 
     day of January 8, 2019, relating to a measure making or 
     continuing appropriations for the fiscal year ending 
     September 30, 2019.

      TITLE II--SELECT COMMITTEE ON THE MODERNIZATION OF CONGRESS

     SEC. 201. SELECT COMMITTEE ON THE MODERNIZATION OF CONGRESS.

       (a) Establishment.--There is hereby established a Select 
     Committee on the Modernization of Congress (hereinafter in 
     this section referred to as the ``Select Committee'').
       (b) Composition.--
       (1) The Select Committee shall be composed of 12 Members, 
     Delegates, or the Resident Commissioner appointed by the 
     Speaker.
       (2) The Speaker shall appoint members of the Select 
     Committee as follows:
       (A) At least 2 members from among Members, Delegates, or 
     the Resident Commissioner serving in their first term.
       (B) At least 2 members from the Committee on Rules.
       (C) At least 2 members from the Committee on House 
     Administration.
       (3) Of the members of the Select Committee appointed 
     pursuant to paragraph (1), 6 shall be appointed on the 
     recommendation of the Minority Leader, including 1 member 
     each as described in subparagraphs (A) through (C) of 
     paragraph (2).
       (4) The Speaker shall designate one member of the Select 
     Committee as chair, and, upon recommendation of the Minority 
     Leader, shall designate one member of the Select Committee as 
     vice chair.
       (5) A vacancy in the membership of the Select Committee 
     shall be filled in the same manner as the original 
     appointment.
       (c) Jurisdiction; Functions.--
       (1) Legislative jurisdiction.--The Select Committee shall 
     not have legislative jurisdiction and shall have no authority 
     to take legislative action on any bill or resolution.
       (2) Investigative jurisdiction.--The sole authority of the 
     Select Committee shall be to investigate, study, make 
     findings, hold public hearings, and develop recommendations 
     on modernizing Congress, including recommendations on--
       (A) rules to promote a more modern and efficient Congress;
       (B) procedures, including the schedule and calendar;
       (C) policies to develop the next generation of leaders;
       (D) staff recruitment, diversity, retention, and 
     compensation and benefits;
       (E) administrative efficiencies, including purchasing, 
     travel, outside services, and shared administrative staff;
       (F) technology and innovation; and
       (G) the work of the House Commission on Congressional 
     Mailing Standards.
       (d) Procedures.--
       (1)(A) Except as specified in subparagraph (B), the Select 
     Committee shall have the authorities and responsibilities of, 
     and shall be subject to the same limitations and restrictions 
     as, a standing committee of the House, and shall be deemed a 
     committee of the House for all purposes of law or rule.
       (B)(i) Rules X and XI shall apply to the Select Committee 
     where not inconsistent with this section.
       (ii) Service on the Select Committee shall not count 
     against the limitations in clause 5(b)(2) of rule X.
       (iii) Clause 2(m)(1)(B) of rule XI, clause 2(m)(3) of rule 
     XI, and section 103(a) of this resolution shall not apply to 
     the Select Committee, but the Select Committee may recommend 
     subpoenas and depositions and submit such recommendations to 
     the relevant standing committee.
       (iv) Clause 2(d) of rule X shall not apply to the Select 
     Committee.
       (2) During the first session of the One Hundred Sixteenth 
     Congress, the Select Committee shall hold a hearing at which 
     it receives testimony from Members, Delegates, and the 
     Resident Commissioner on matters described in subsection (c).
       (e) Funding.--To enable the Select Committee to carry out 
     the purposes of this section--
       (1) the Select Committee may use the services of staff of 
     the House; and
       (2) the Select Committee shall be eligible for interim 
     funding pursuant to clause 7 of rule X.
       (f) Reports.--
       (1) Interim status report.--Every 90 days, the Select 
     Committee shall provide an interim status report on its 
     activities to the Committee on House Administration and the 
     Committee on Rules. Each interim status report must include 
     transcripts of the Select Committee's proceedings, itemized 
     reporting of its expenditures, and a proposed plan for the 
     next 90 days.
       (2) Findings and recommendations.--The Select Committee may 
     report to the House or any committee from time to time the 
     results of its investigations and studies, together with such 
     detailed findings and policy recommendations as it may deem 
     advisable. The Select Committee may only submit any such 
     report if the report receives the votes of not fewer than 2/3 
     of its members.
       (3) Final report.--At the conclusion of the first session 
     of the One Hundred Sixteenth Congress, the Select Committee 
     shall submit a final report to the House. The final report 
     shall include the results of the Select Committee's studies, 
     detailed findings, and any policy recommendations as the 
     select committee may deem advisable. The Select Committee may 
     only submit the report if the report receives the votes of 
     not fewer than 2/3 of its members. The Select Committee shall 
     submit all policy recommendations included in the report to 
     relevant standing committees.
       (4) Publication.--The Select Committee shall ensure that 
     reports prepared in accordance with paragraphs (2) and (3) 
     shall, upon completion, be made available to the general 
     public in widely accessible formats not later than 30 
     calendar days following the date any such report is made 
     available to the House or a committee, as applicable.
       (g) Termination; Disposition of Records.--
       (1) Termination.--The Select Committee shall terminate on 
     February 1, 2020.
       (2) Disposition of records.--Upon its termination, the 
     records of the Select Committee shall be transferred to, and 
     shall become part of, the records of such standing committees 
     as the Speaker may designate.

TITLE III--INTERVENTION IN LITIGATION INVOLVING PATIENT PROTECTION AND 
                          AFFORDABLE CARE ACT

     SEC. 301. FINDINGS.

       The House of Representatives finds the following:
       (1) Texas, Wisconsin, Alabama, Arkansas, Arizona, Florida, 
     Georgia, Indiana, Kansas, Louisiana, Governor Paul LePage of 
     Maine, Mississippi (by and through Governor Phil Bryant), 
     Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Carolina, South 
     Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, and West Virginia have filed suit in 
     the United States District Court for the Northern District of 
     Texas, arguing that the Patient Protection and Affordable 
     Care Act (Public Law 111-148; 124 Stat. 119) is 
     unconstitutional and should be enjoined by asserting that the 
     Act's requirement to maintain minimum essential coverage 
     (commonly known as the ``individual responsibility 
     provision'') in section 5000A(a) of the Internal Revenue Code 
     of 1986, is unconstitutional following the amendment of that 
     provision by the Act to provide for reconciliation pursuant 
     to titles II and V of the concurrent resolution on the budget 
     for fiscal year 2018 (Public Law 115-97) (commonly known as 
     the ``Tax Cuts and Jobs Act'').
       (2) These State and individual plaintiffs also seek to 
     strike down the entire Patient Protection and Affordable Care 
     Act as not severable from the individual responsibility 
     provision.
       (3) On June 7, 2018, the Department of Justice refused to 
     defend the constitutionality of the amended individual 
     responsibility provision, despite the well-established duty 
     of the Department to defend Federal statutes where reasonable 
     arguments can be made in their defense.
       (4) The Department of Justice not only refused to defend 
     the amended individual responsibility provision, but 
     affirmatively argued that this provision is unconstitutional 
     and that the provisions of the Patient Protection and 
     Affordable Care Act guaranteeing issuance of health insurance 
     coverage regardless of health status or preexisting 
     conditions (commonly known as the ``guaranteed issue 
     provision'') found in sections 2702, 2704, and 2705(a) of the 
     Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 300gg-1, 300gg-3, 300gg-
     4(a)) and prohibitions on discriminatory premium rates 
     (commonly known as the ``community rating provision'') found 
     in sections 2701 and 2705(b) of the Public Health Service Act 
     (42 U.S.C. 300gg(a)(1), 300gg-4(b)) must now be struck down 
     as not severable from the individual responsibility 
     provision.
       (5) The district court recently held that the individual 
     responsibility provision is unconstitutional and that all of 
     the remaining provisions of the Patient Protection and 
     Affordable Care act are inseverable and therefore invalid.
       (6) Up to 133 million nonelderly Americans have some type 
     of preexisting health condition, such as, but not limited to, 
     diabetes, high cholesterol, cancer, arthritis, and asthma, 
     that could affect their insurance.
       (7) Prior to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act 
     and the enactment of protections such as guaranteed issue and 
     community rating, millions of Americans were denied health 
     insurance coverage, were unable to obtain coverage of 
     necessary medical services, or were priced out of the 
     individual market due to preexisting conditions.
       (8) Without such protections for preexisting conditions, 
     millions of Americans could once again lose access to 
     affordable, comprehensive health insurance.
       (9) More than 13 million Americans who gained coverage in 
     States that expanded Medicaid eligibility under the Patient 
     Protection and Affordable Care Act could lose coverage if the 
     Act were struck down in its entirety.
       (10) More than 2 million young adults who gained coverage 
     under a provision of the Patient Protection and Affordable 
     Care Act allowing individuals under the age of 26 to stay on 
     their parents' insurance could lose coverage if the Act were 
     struck down in its entirety.
       (11) More than 8.9 million low and middle-income Americans 
     who received tax credits averaging $520 per month to help pay 
     for

[[Page H24]]

     health insurance in the individual market under the Patient 
     Protection and Affordable Care Act could lose coverage if the 
     Act were struck down in its entirety.
       (12) An estimated 105 million Americans who now enjoy 
     coverage without lifetime limits due to the Patient 
     Protection and Affordable Care Act could once again face 
     lifetime limits on their benefits if the Act were struck down 
     in its entirety.
       (13) Nearly 12 million Medicare beneficiaries who received 
     an average of $2,200 in savings on prescription drugs due to 
     the closing of the Medicare prescription drug donut hole 
     under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act would 
     face rising drug costs if the Act were struck down in its 
     entirety.

     SEC. 302. AUTHORIZING LEGAL ACTION BY HOUSE.

       (a) Authorization.--The Speaker, on behalf of the House of 
     Representatives, is authorized to intervene, otherwise 
     appear, or take any other steps in the case of Texas v. 
     United States, No. 4:18-cv-00167-O (N.D. Tex.) and in any 
     appellate proceedings arising from such case. The Speaker, in 
     consultation with the Bipartisan Legal Advisory Group, is 
     also authorized to intervene, otherwise appear, or take any 
     other steps in any other cases involving the Patient 
     Protection and Affordable Care Act to protect the 
     institutional interests of the House and to defend such Act, 
     the amendments made by such Act to other provisions of law, 
     and any amendments to such provisions, including the 
     provisions ensuring affordable health coverage for those with 
     preexisting conditions.
       (b) Role of General Counsel.--The Office of General Counsel 
     of the House of Representatives, at the direction of the 
     Speaker, shall represent the House in any litigation pursuant 
     to this title. The Office of General Counsel may employ the 
     services of outside counsel, including pro bono counsel, or 
     other experts for this purpose.
       (c) Reports on Amounts Expended.--The chair of the 
     Committee on House Administration shall cause to be printed 
     in the Congressional Record a statement setting forth the 
     aggregate amounts expended by the Office of General Counsel 
     on outside counsel and other experts pursuant to this title 
     on a quarterly basis, and such statement shall be submitted 
     for printing not more than 30 days after the expiration of 
     each such quarter.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 5, the question 
shall be divided among each of the three titles of House Resolution 6. 
The previous question is ordered on each portion of the divided 
question, except as specified in sections 2 and 3 of House Resolution 
5.
  The portion of the divided question comprising title I is now 
debatable for 30 minutes.
  The gentleman from Maryland (Mr. Hoyer) and the gentleman from 
California (Mr. McCarthy) each will control 15 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Maryland.
  Mr. HOYER. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, this rules package was developed under the leadership of 
Chairman McGovern and Democrats on the Rules Committee, but shaped by 
the voices of millions of Americans who want to see change in 
Washington.
  Elections, of course, have consequences, and today Americans will see 
the first changes that are the result of entrusting Democrats with a 
majority in the House.
  This rules package will restore power to the American people in five 
critical ways:
  A, restoring the people's voices;
  B, fixing the legislative process;
  C, improving oversight and ethics;
  D, imposing commonsense budget rules; and
  E, promoting inclusion and diversity.
  We will seek to restore the people's voices, Mr. Speaker, in a number 
of ways. The first is by bringing H.R. 1 to the floor early in this new 
Congress, legislation that will begin to undo the corrupting influence 
of undisclosed money in our politics.
  I want to thank my colleague from Maryland, Congressman  John 
Sarbanes, for his tireless efforts on that bill and look forward to 
bringing it to the floor.
  Next, Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton from the District of Columbia, 
the Resident Commissioner from Puerto Rico, and Delegates in the 
territories will once again be permitted to vote on amendments and help 
shape legislation as they seek to add the voices of millions of people 
they represent.
  We will also end the practice of allowing appropriations bills to 
target hardworking Federal employees by cutting individual salaries, 
programs, or office sizes.
  In fixing the broken legislative process, Mr. Speaker, Democrats will 
restore regular order to the House.
  Our new rules package will make it harder to throw the House into 
partisan chaos, and it includes new measures that facilitate 
bipartisanship, including by making it easier to force a vote on 
legislation supported by a majority of Members.
  Our rules improve oversight and ethics in several ways, including, 
for example, by making it easier for staff to report harassment, and 
close remaining loopholes allowing conflicts of interest.

                              {time}  1815

  Also, Mr. Speaker, no longer will Members or staff be allowed to 
serve on corporate boards, giving rise to conflicts of interest.
  Democrats will return to commonsense budget practices, such as 
eliminating Republicans' use of dynamic scoring and reinstating the 
Gephardt rule to prevent the default on our debt. The rules package, 
Mr. Speaker, also takes a step toward restoring paygo, which ensures 
that Congress has to pay for what it buys.
  Additionally, our rules package promotes diversity and inclusion by 
specifically banning discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and 
transgender Members and staff, as well as ensuring that Members and 
staff who wear religious head coverings can do so on the House floor 
without impediment. We also are creating an independent diversity 
office to help Members hire qualified staff who reflect the broad and 
diverse range of the constituents that we represent.
  Mr. Speaker, this rules package signals a new start for the House. We 
will go from the most closed Congress in history to a period when 
Americans finally have a House that is on their side. With these rules, 
Mr. Speaker, we will make government work again for those it serves. 
Hopefully, Mr. Speaker, they will also facilitate a process that will 
not close down the people's government.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise as the designee of the Republican leader, and I 
thank my good friend, the majority leader, for yielding me 15 minutes.
  Mr. Speaker, a couple of hours ago, we had a spirited debate that 
also reflected the way I hope both sides proceed and intend to approach 
the next 2 years: disagreeing without being disagreeable. In that 
respect, today represents a good start for the new Congress.
  Mr. Speaker, earlier today, I had an opportunity to speak on the 
rules package my Democratic friends are proposing for the 116th 
Congress. I laid out most of what I had to say then, but I want to 
reiterate a few key points.
  First, while, on the whole, I will be opposing this package, I do 
want to commend my friends for including some good bipartisan pieces 
that Republicans certainly can support. We support, for example, 
continuing the practice of Member Day hearings. We support the idea of 
a Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress, which we will 
discuss in more detail tomorrow. We are hopeful about other measures, 
such as the 72-hour rule for posting bill text and the proposed 
Consensus Calendar. We look forward to seeing how these proposals work 
in practice.
  Of course, my Democratic friends are also proposing a number of 
measures that we oppose. They are removing key fiscal responsibility 
measures like CutGo, the supermajority for raising income taxes; 
bringing back the so-called Gephardt rule; and deeming the debt limit 
to be suspended upon passage of a new budget by only the House. These 
changes will undoubtedly lead to more spending, more taxes, and more 
debt being piled on the American people.
  We also oppose the granting of the Speaker the authority to intervene 
in the Texas v. United States lawsuit over the legality of the 
Affordable Care Act and the unspecified grant of authority to do 
something, anything, about regulations that the Department of 
Agriculture has not yet issued on SNAP benefits for able-bodied adults. 
Most notably, we oppose the new partisan Select Committee on the 
Climate Crisis with a supermajority of Democrats, in contrast to the 
agreed upon ratio on

[[Page H25]]

other committees, and unclear funding and costs.
  While I continue to hope that, on our side, we proceed appropriately, 
I do not believe this rules package represents the best way to govern 
this institution. The Democrats have chosen today to increase spending, 
add a partisan select committee to the institution, and pave the way to 
pass tax and spend legislation. I do not believe these rules meet the 
lofty goals we aspire to meet of transparency, bipartisanship, and 
ensuring minority views are heard.
  For these reasons, and for others that I stated earlier today, I urge 
opposition to the measure.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. HOYER. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, while I regret that the gentleman opposes the rule, I 
appreciate his bipartisanship and his hope, which I share, that we will 
proceed in a fashion that will make the American people proud. Very 
frankly, we can be proud of ourselves for accomplishing that which the 
American people want accomplished.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield to my friend from Massachusetts, Mr. Jim 
McGovern, the chairman of the Rules Committee, to complete our side of 
the argument. He has done such an extraordinary job in putting these 
rules together.
  Mr. McGOVERN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume, 
and I thank the majority leader for yielding me the time.
  Mr. Speaker, a rules package may seem like some arcane technicality, 
a simple legislative move on the opening day of a Congress, but it is 
really much more than that. This is our first opportunity to declare 
what kind of institution this House will be. I am proud that, through 
collaboration and conversation, we have drafted a rules package that 
boldly declares that it is a new day for Congress.
  This package reflects the diversity of our new majority. Ideas are 
included here from Members that represent urban and rural parts of the 
country, longtime leaders and those who have taken the oath of office 
for the very first time today. We come from different backgrounds and 
have been elected here on different platforms. But each of us shares 
the same goal: making this place work again, not just function better 
legislatively, though that is important, but also respond more urgently 
to the needs of the people that we represent.
  That is why this rules package sets up consideration of H.R. 1, 
historic reforms to clean up money in politics. It creates the Select 
Committee on the Climate Crisis. It strengthens representation by 
giving voting rights to Delegates and the Resident Commissioner in the 
Committee of the Whole and ensures that they can be appointed to joint 
committees. It prohibits Members and staff from serving on boards of 
publicly traded companies. It eliminates CutGo and creates the first 
ever diversity office. I can go on and on and on.
  This rules package isn't some totally partisan document. It includes 
ideas from my friends on the other side of the aisle, too, because when 
I said at the start of this process that I wanted to hear from all 
Members, I meant it. Good ideas were included here regardless of what 
side of the aisle they come from. Changes like creating a Consensus 
Calendar to move ideas with broad support more quickly to the floor, 
reforming the motion to vacate the Chair, and striking the 3-day rule 
for committee markups are here because we took such a collaborative 
approach, and this package is stronger for it.
  Make no mistake, no one abandoned their principles. I am a 
progressive, and I know the Republican minority would never agree with 
me on priorities like healthcare or the environment. There are things 
here I know they wouldn't put in their own package. But in talking to 
each other to see where we agreed, there was actually agreement on many 
legislative reforms.
  I know that there are many Members here who will think of more ideas 
for how to improve this place, and I want to hear them, and our 
leadership does, too. That is why we are creating a truly bipartisan 
Select Committee on Modernizing Congress, so our efforts don't stop 
here today. These conversations can continue, and good ideas can keep 
moving forward.
  There has never been a process like this to develop a rules package. 
This has been unprecedented, and we have a historic set of reforms here 
as a result. They send a signal to the American people and Members here 
that the 116th Congress will be different, that it is a new era, that 
we are abandoning procedures that didn't work, and we are adopting new 
ideas.
  This Democratic majority is giving all Members a voice. We are 
listening to the American people, and we are holding this 
administration accountable. This will be a more accommodating 
institution as a result, a more responsive House and a place that looks 
more like the real world.
  That is what is at the heart of what we are debating. Right here, on 
day one, we have a chance to vote to be a different kind of Congress, 
one that turns the page on the past and charts a new course.
  The American people demanded a new direction by a 10 million vote 
margin. I know my colleagues in the majority want to see one, too, and 
even some of my Republican friends acknowledge that something has to 
change, so this is our chance. I strongly urge my colleagues to take 
this opportunity. Let's vote for this rules package and give Members 
and the American people the Congress that they deserve.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLE. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the distinguished 
gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. Womack), my good friend.
  Mr. WOMACK. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in opposition to H. Res. 6. I appreciate 
the gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. McGovern) and the new majority 
leadership including items of budget process reform in this package, to 
include eliminating term limits for the House Budget Committee members. 
There are other things that we did, as a joint bipartisan committee, 
and tried to get across the finish line but were unable to do so. 
Perhaps we can work on some of those.
  Mr. Speaker, for the few bright spots that H. Res. 6 has, they in no 
way make up for the shortcomings. This package does not rise to fiscal 
responsibility.
  First, it includes a new iteration of the Gephardt rule, which has 
been spoken about, that makes increasing the debt limit even easier by 
automatically passing debt limit increases without separate debate and 
vote.
  The package also replaces the existing budget enforcement rule known 
as CutGo with a paygo rule that was in place when Democrats passed many 
programs in the past, like ObamaCare, that added to our country's debt 
burden. To be clear, paygo does not encourage fiscal discipline under a 
Democratic majority.
  Finally, Mr. Speaker, H. Res. 6 reduces the threshold for passage of 
income tax increases on hardworking Americans from three-fifths to a 
simple majority vote. I am not surprised that the first step that the 
Democrats take in this process is surrendering the obligation to 
approve increases to the debt and enacting rules that make it easier to 
borrow and raise taxes.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues to vote against this rules package.
  Mr. McGOVERN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, in response to the gentleman, we had a CBS News report 
posted today that the U.S. Treasury shows that the national debt ended 
in 2018 more than $2 trillion larger than on the day President Trump 
took office.
  With all due respect to my friends on the other side of the aisle, 
your CutGo didn't work. It is a sham. What the majority presided over 
are record-breaking deficits, increases in the deficit and in the debt, 
so I think we need to take a very different approach.
  Mr. Speaker, I include in the Record a section-by-section analysis of 
the changes H. Res. 6 will make to the standing rules of the 115th 
Congress and the separate orders taking effect for the 116th Congress.

[[Page H26]]

  


                               H. Res. 6

               Adopting the Rules for the 116th Congress

                      Section-by-Section Analysis


          Title I. Rules of the One Hundred Sixteenth Congress

     Section 101. Adoption of the Rules of the One Hundred 
         Fifteenth Congress.
       This section provides that the Rules of the 115th Congress 
     are the Rules of the 116th Congress, except for the 
     amendments contained in section 102 of the resolution and 
     orders contained in the resolution.
     Section 102. Changes to the Standing Rules.
       Notification of Convening of the House. Subsection (a) 
     clarifies that Delegates and the Resident Commissioner must 
     be notified of action regarding the convening of the House 
     pursuant to clause 12 of rule I.
       Voting by Delegates and the Resident Commissioner in the 
     Committee of the Whole. Subsection (b) extends the same 
     powers and privileges of Members to Delegates and the 
     Resident Commissioner when in the Committee of the Whole. The 
     subsection also provides that any recorded vote in the 
     Committee of the Whole, decided within a margin where the 
     Delegates and the Resident Commissioner may have had a 
     decisive impact on the final outcome of the vote, will be re-
     conducted in the House.
       Allowing Delegates and the Resident Commissioner to Serve 
     on Joint Committees. Subsection (c) provides that Delegates 
     and the Resident Commissioner may serve on joint committees.
       Admittance to the Hall of the House. Subsection (d) adds 
     Delegates-elect, the Resident Commissioner-elect, contestants 
     in elections for Delegate or the Resident Commissioner, and 
     Governors of the Territories to the list of people who are 
     permitted in the Hall of the House.
       Office of Speaker. Subsection (e) amends rule IX to provide 
     that a resolution causing a vacancy in the Office of Speaker 
     shall be privileged if offered at the direction of a party 
     caucus or conference. This change does not otherwise alter 
     the application of rule IX to privileged resolutions. A 
     resolution causing a vacancy in the Office of Speaker offered 
     at the direction of a party caucus or conference remains 
     subject to the notice and debate procedures in clause 2(a) of 
     rule IX. This change does not apply to a resolution reported 
     as privileged by the Committee on Ethics pursuant to clause 
     5(a)(5) of rule XIII.
       Designating Committee on Oversight and Reform. Subsection 
     (f) changes the name of the Committee on Oversight and 
     Government Reform to the Committee on Oversight and Reform.
       Designating Committee on Education and Labor. Subsection 
     (g) changes the name of the Committee on Education and the 
     Workforce back to the Committee on Education and Labor.
       Education and Labor Jurisdiction Clarification. Subsection 
     (h) clarifies that the Committee on Education and Labor's 
     jurisdiction includes the general management of the 
     Department of Education and the general management of the 
     Department of Labor. This change is intended to clarify the 
     Committee's existing jurisdiction over the organization and 
     administration of the departments, and it not intended to 
     alter jurisdiction over programs within the departments.
       Committee Oversight Plans. Subsection (i) amends the 
     requirements for committee oversight plans. The subsection 
     requires the chair of each standing committee (with the 
     exception of the Committees on Appropriations, Ethics, and 
     Rules), in consultation with the ranking minority member, to 
     prepare and submit an oversight plan to the Committees on 
     House Administration and Oversight and Reform by March 1 of 
     the first session of a Congress. Finally, the Committee on 
     Oversight and Reform, in consultation with House leadership 
     of both parties, is required to submit the oversight plans to 
     the House by April 15th of the first session of a Congress 
     with any recommendation it has for the effective coordination 
     of oversight plans.
       The subsection favors the standard of previous Congresses 
     over the 115th Congress, requiring an oversight plan as 
     opposed to the 115th Congress's new authorization and 
     oversight plan. The March 1st submission deadline is an 
     extension from the prior February 15th deadline. The 
     subsection also replaces the requirement for a committee 
     meeting on the plan with a requirement that the chair consult 
     with the ranking minority member, make the plan available to 
     each member of the committee for at least seven calendar 
     days, and include any committee member's views received 
     before the submission deadline. This subsection also modifies 
     which committees will initially receive these plans, removing 
     the Committee on Appropriations. Finally, the Committee on 
     Oversight and Reform's April 15th submission deadline to the 
     House is in line with the subsection's new timeline.
       Activity Reports. Subsection (j) amends language in clauses 
     1(d)(2)(B) and 1(d)(2)(C) of Rule XI referencing 
     authorization and oversight plans to conform with the changes 
     described in subsection (i).
       Oversight Over the Executive Office of the President. 
     Subsection (k) clarifies the Committee on Oversight and 
     Reform's existing special oversight authority over all 
     operations of government.
       Oversight and Reform Committee Depositions. Subsection (I) 
     removes the requirement that Members be present during 
     counsel-led depositions, returning to the standard of the 
     111th Congress.
       Removing Certain Committee Term Limits. Subsection (m) 
     removes term limits for committee chairs as well as members 
     of the Committee on the Budget.
       Rules of Committees. Subsection (n) extends the deadline 
     for committees to make their rules available to the public 
     from 30 days to 60 days after the chair's election at the 
     beginning of a Congress. This change is intended to grant 
     committees adequate time to organize, as some committees do 
     not have a full complement of members at the start of a 
     Congress.
       Committee Markup Notice. Subsection (o) modifies the three-
     day notification requirement for committee markups by 
     specifying that Saturdays, Sundays, or legal holidays, except 
     when the House is in session, do not count toward fulfillment 
     of the notification requirement.
       Annual Ethics Training. Subsection (p) extends the annual 
     ethics training requirement to all Members, Delegates, and 
     the Resident Commissioner. The previous rule required new 
     Members, Delegates, and Resident Commissioner to attend 
     ethics training, and staff to attend ethics training 
     annually.
       Considering Criminal Trial Evidence in Ethics 
     Investigation. Subsection (q) authorizes the Committee on 
     Ethics to consider as evidence the transcripts and exhibits 
     from trial where a Member, Delegate, or the Resident 
     Commissioner was convicted by a court of record for a crime 
     related to the subject of the investigation by the Committee 
     on Ethics.
       Consensus Calendar. Subsection (r) creates a Consensus 
     Calendar, and mandates that the Speaker must designate, and 
     the House must consider, at least one measure on the 
     Consensus Calendar during any week in which the House 
     convenes (except at the beginning and the end of a Congress). 
     The designation is accomplished via an announcement from the 
     chair immediately prior to a measure's consideration. 
     Measures may be considered in any manner otherwise available 
     under the rules to satisfy this requirement.
       This subsection also provides that, to be eligible for 
     placement on the Consensus Calendar, a measure must 
     accumulate 290 cosponsors, and must not have been reported by 
     its primary committee of jurisdiction. Once this 
     cosponsorship threshold is reached the sponsor of the measure 
     may, while the House is in session, submit to the Clerk a 
     written motion to place the measure on the Consensus 
     Calendar. If the above-mentioned conditions have been met, 
     the Clerk will note the motion's submission in the 
     Congressional Record of that day, and enter the motion on a 
     comprehensive list of Consensus Calendar Motions (which will 
     be viewable on the Clerk's website). Once a measure that was 
     the subject of a properly filed motion has maintained 290 
     cosponsors for a cumulative total of 25 legislative days, it 
     is placed on the Consensus Calendar, where it remains until 
     it is considered in the House or reported by its primary 
     committee. The 25-legislative day count begins on the 
     legislative day after a proper motion is filed, and the 
     required 25 legislative days need not run contiguously to be 
     counted. Any day on which the measure has less than 290 
     cosponsors shall not count towards the 25-day cumulative 
     total. A Consensus Calendar motion is considered withdrawn if 
     the measure that is the subject of such motion is reported by 
     its primary committee before the measure has been placed on 
     the Consensus Calendar. However, once the measure has been 
     placed on the Consensus' Calendar it remains there even if it 
     falls below 290 cosponsors after such placement.
       Recorded Votes in Rules Committee Reports. Subsection (s) 
     provides that the requirement for recorded votes to be 
     depicted in committee reports applies to reports from the 
     Committee on Rules on a rule, joint rule, or the order of 
     business only to the maximum extent practicable, due to the 
     constricted timeframe under which such reports are prepared 
     and filed. This change is intended to ensure special rules--
     and thus the floor schedule--cannot be delayed due to a 
     typographical error in the recorded votes depiction.
       72-Hour Text Availability. Subsection (t) requires that 
     legislative text be made publicly available for a full 72 
     hours before it is considered in the House. Previously, 
     legislative text could not be considered before ``the third 
     day'' on which it had been available to Members, Delegates, 
     and the Resident Commissioner. The new 72-hour availability 
     requirement would apply to the same types of text to which 
     the former three-day availability rules applied: reports 
     accompanying measures or matters (clause 4(a)(1) of rule 
     XIII); unreported bills and joint resolutions (clause 11 of 
     rule XXI); conference reports (clause 8(a)(1)(A) of rule 
     XXII); and amendments reported from conference in 
     disagreement (clause 8(b)(1)(A) of rule XXII). In all cases, 
     the 72-hour clock would begin to run at the time that the 
     relevant text is made available electronically. The 
     additional language inserted in clause 4(a)(1) of rule XIII 
     regarding the proposed text of a report is intended to ensure 
     that, in the case of reports, the 72-hour clock will begin to 
     run at the time the proposed content of a report (other than 
     any supplemental, minority, additional, or dissenting views 
     described in clause 2(1) of rule XI) is made available 
     electronically. It is important to note that the 72-hour 
     availability period for a committee report is calculated 
     differently than the two-day period

[[Page H27]]

     for filing supplemental, minority, additional, or dissenting 
     views. As a result, there is the potential that the two 
     periods could conflict if proposed report text is made 
     available prior to the filing of the report. Therefore, any 
     committee making the report available electronically must 
     also make any such views available electronically promptly 
     after they are submitted to the committee to avoid the 
     possibility that the House would consider a measure prior to 
     the availability of the complete accompanying report.
       Macroeconomic Analysis. Subsection (u) removes the 
     requirement that the Congressional Budget Office and Joint 
     Committee on Taxation make assumptions, to the extent 
     practicable, regarding changes in macroeconomic variables 
     (often called ``dynamic scoring'') when preparing estimates 
     on the budgetary effects of major legislation.
       Discharge Petitions. Subsection (v) amends the discharge 
     petition process. The subsection expands the number of days 
     on which motions to discharge, following a perfected 
     discharge petition, may be considered by removing the 
     provision that currently restricts motions to discharge to 
     the second and fourth Mondays of a month. Instead, the 
     subsection requires the Speaker to schedule the consideration 
     of a privileged motion to discharge within two legislative 
     days after the day on which a Member who signed the discharge 
     petition announces to the House an intention to offer a 
     motion to discharge. A motion to discharge may only be called 
     up by the Member who gave notice under this rule.
       Private Calendar. Subsection (w) expands the availability 
     of the discretionary call of the Private Calendar beyond the 
     third Tuesday of a month, permitting the Speaker or a 
     designee to call up eligible private measures on any day with 
     sufficient notice. The subsection requires the measure to 
     have been on the Private Calendar for at least seven days, 
     after which the Speaker or a designee may announce to the 
     House an intention to call up the measure. That measure then 
     may be called up two legislative days after the legislative 
     day on which the announcement is made, after the disposal of 
     such business on the Speaker's table as requires reference 
     only. The level of specificity in timing is intended to 
     ensure that the Official Objectors are able to be on the 
     Floor at the appropriate day and time.
       Religious Headdress. Subsection (x) clarifies and maintains 
     the existing prohibition on wearing hats in the Hall of the 
     House, while making express that this prohibition does not 
     include religious headwear. The language for this 
     clarification is modeled on the statutory provision providing 
     for proper decorum during the Pledge of Allegiance, 4 U.S.C. 
     4.
       Quorum in the Committee of the Whole. Subsection (y) 
     clarifies that Delegates and the Resident Commissioner count 
     when establishing a quorum in the Committee of the Whole and 
     when determining if the requisite number are present to 
     request a recorded vote therein. The subsection also 
     instructs the Chair to include Delegates and the Resident 
     Commissioner when determining if Members are provided 
     adequate opportunity to vote. This change conforms clause 6 
     of rule XVIII to the changes made to the House rules in 
     subsection (b).
       Two-Minute Voting in the Committee of the Whole. Subsection 
     (z) provides the Chair of the Committee of the Whole with 
     additional discretion to reduce votes to two minutes, if in 
     the discretion of the Chair Members, Delegates, and the 
     Resident Commissioner would be afforded an adequate 
     opportunity to vote.
       Postponability of Certain Votes. Subsection (aa) provides 
     that any vote on an amendment in the House is postponable, as 
     is a vote on ordering the previous question thereon.
       Discretion for Five-Minute Votes. Subsection (bb) provides 
     the Speaker with additional discretion to reduce votes to 5 
     minutes, if in the discretion of the Speaker Members would be 
     afforded an adequate opportunity to vote.
       Net Increase in Budget Authority. Subsection (cc) removes 
     the point of order prohibiting amendments to general 
     appropriation bills that propose a net increase in the level 
     of budget authority in a bill. This will allow amendments 
     that increase spending without offsetting that increase, so 
     long as the amendment does not cause the bill to exceed 
     302(a) or 302(b) budget allocations.
       Removing Supermajority Vote. Subsection (dd) removes the 
     requirement that the House agree by at least a 3/5 
     supermajority in order to raise revenue through additional 
     Federal income taxes. The subsection also removes the 
     requirement that any such measure receives an automatic 
     record vote, and provides a technical fix to a cross-
     reference in clause 5(a)(2) of rule XXI.
       Pay-As-You-Go Point of Order. Subsection (ee) reinstates 
     the PAYGO rule from the 111th Congress, with changes to 
     conform with the recent practice of tying the measurement 
     timeline to the calendar year, rather than the last completed 
     budget resolution. As in the 111th Congress, this provision 
     establishes a point of order against any measure that has a 
     net effect of increasing the deficit or reducing the 
     surplus for the current fiscal year, the budget year, and 
     up to nine fiscal years following that budget year. The 
     subsection stipulates that the net budgetary effects of a 
     measure will be determined by the non-partisan 
     Congressional Budget Office (CBO) but provides that if a 
     measure is considered pursuant to a special order that 
     instructs the Clerk of the House to add the measure to 
     another measure passed by the House, then the net 
     budgetary effects of the entire package will be 
     considered. Finally, the subsection provides for 
     exemptions, given an emergency designation.
       Banning Discrimination on the Basis of Sexual Orientation 
     or Gender Identity. Subsection (ff) adds to the Code of 
     Official Conduct a prohibition on discrimination by any 
     Member, Delegate, Resident Commissioner, officer, or employee 
     of the House on the basis of sexual orientation or gender 
     identity.
       Banning Sexual Relationships Between Members and Committee 
     Staff. Subsection (gg) extends the prohibition on sexual 
     relationships between members (including Delegates and the 
     Resident Commissioner) and their employees to include members 
     who serve on a committee on which a staffer works, even if 
     that staffer is not his or her direct employee.
       Service of Indicted Members in Leadership and on 
     Committees. Subsection (hh) adds to the Code of Official 
     Conduct the standard that a Member, Delegate, or Resident 
     Commissioner who has been indicted or formally charged with 
     criminal conduct for a felony offense punishable by at least 
     two years in prison should resign from any committee on which 
     he or she serves, and step aside from any party caucus or 
     conference leadership position the Member, Delegate, or 
     Resident Commissioner holds, until he or she is acquitted or 
     the charges are dismissed or reduced below the previously 
     described threshold.
       Banning Members, Officers, and Employees from Sitting on 
     Corporate Boards. Subsection (ii) prohibits Members, 
     Delegates and the Resident Commissioner, officers, and 
     employees of the House from serving as an officer or director 
     of any public company, effective January 1, 2020. The 
     subsection also requires the Committee on Ethics to develop 
     regulations by December 31, 2019, addressing other types of 
     prohibited service or positions that could lead to conflicts 
     of interest.
       Suspension of the Debt Limit. Subsection (jj) provides that 
     when the House adopts a budget resolution, a separate joint 
     resolution suspending the Federal debt limit through 
     September 30 of the budget year is deemed to have passed the 
     House by the same vote and is engrossed separately and sent 
     to the Senate.
     Section 103. Separate Orders.
       Deposition Authority. Subsection (a) provides the Permanent 
     Select Committee on Intelligence and each standing committee 
     of the 116th Congress (except for the Committee on Rules) the 
     authority to order the taking of a deposition by a member or 
     counsel of such committee. Members, Delegates, and the 
     Resident Commissioner may participate in all such 
     depositions, but their presence is not required. Depositions 
     taken under this authority are subject to regulations issued 
     by the chair of the Committee on Rules and printed in the 
     Congressional Record.
       Providing for Transparency with Respect to Memorials 
     Submitted Pursuant to Article V of the Constitution of the 
     United States. Subsection (b) carries forward provisions from 
     the 115th Congress that clarify the procedures of the House 
     regarding the receipt of Article V memorials from the States 
     by directing the Clerk to make each memorial, designated by 
     the chair of the Committee on the Judiciary, electronically 
     available, organized by State of origin and year of receipt, 
     and indicate whether the memorial was designated as an 
     application or rescission.
       In carrying out this subsection, it is expected that the 
     chair of the Committee on the Judiciary will be solely 
     charged with determining whether a memorial purports to be an 
     application of the legislature of a state calling for a 
     constitutional convention or rescission of prior 
     applications. The Clerk's role will be entirely 
     administrative. The chair of the Committee on the Judiciary 
     will only designate memorials from state legislatures (and 
     not petitions from individuals or other parties), as it is 
     only state legislatures that are contemplated under Article V 
     of the Constitution.
       In submitting each memorial to the Clerk, the chair of the 
     Committee on the Judiciary will include a transmission letter 
     that indicates it has been designated under this subsection 
     of House Resolution 6. The Clerk will make publicly available 
     the memorial and the transmission letter from the chair. 
     Ancillary documentation from the state or other parties is 
     not expected to be publicized.
       The chair of the Committee on the Judiciary is also 
     permitted to designate memorials from Congresses prior to the 
     116th Congress to be made publicly available under the same 
     procedure.
       Limitation on Advance Appropriations. Subsection (c) 
     prohibits fiscal year 2019 general appropriation bills or 
     measures continuing appropriations for fiscal year 2019 from 
     making advance appropriations, apart from exceptions 
     designated by the chair of the Committee on the Budget.
       Exercise Facilities for Former Members. Subsection (d) 
     continues the prohibition on access to any exercise facility 
     that is made available exclusively to Members, Delegates, the 
     Resident Commissioner, former Members, former Delegates, 
     former Resident Commissioners, officers, and former officers 
     of the House and their spouses to any former Member, former 
     Delegate, former Resident Commissioner, former officer, or 
     spouse who is a lobbyist registered under the Lobbying 
     Disclosure Act of 1995.

[[Page H28]]

       Numbering of Bills. Subsection (e) reserves the first 10 
     numbers for bills (H.R. 1 through H.R. 10) for assignment by 
     the Speaker and the second 10 numbers (H.R. 11 through H.R. 
     20) for assignment by the Minority Leader.
       Inclusion of Citations for Proposed Repeals and Amendments. 
     Subsection (f) continues from the 115th Congress a 
     requirement, to the maximum extent practicable, for parallel 
     citations for amendatory instructions to Public Laws and 
     Statutes at Large that are not classified in the U.S. Code.
       Broadening Availability of Legislative Documents in 
     Machine-Readable Formats. Subsection (g) continues from the 
     115th Congress a requirement to instruct the appropriate 
     officers and committees to continue to advance government 
     transparency by taking further steps to publish documents of 
     the House in machine-readable formats.
       Subcommittees. Subsection (h) waives clause 5(d) of rule X 
     to allow the Committee on Agriculture up to six 
     subcommittees, which is consistent with authorities in the 
     114th and 115th Congresses, and the Committee on Financial 
     Services up to seven subcommittees.
       Requiring Committee Hearing and Markup on Bills and Joint 
     Resolutions. Subsection (i) provides, effective March 1, 
     2019, a point of order against the consideration of a bill or 
     joint resolution pursuant to a special order of business 
     reported by the Committee on Rules if such measure has not 
     been reported by at least one committee. The provision also 
     provides a point of order against any bill or joint 
     resolution reported by committee if the report does not 
     contain a list of relevant committee and subcommittee 
     hearings, which includes the designation of at least one such 
     hearing that was used to develop or consider the underlying 
     measure. Finally, the provision provides exceptions to the 
     points of order for continuing resolutions, measures that 
     contain specified emergency designations pursuant to the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act, and 
     measures on the Consensus Calendar designated for 
     consideration pursuant to clause 7(a) of rule XV.
       Member Day Hearing Requirement. Subsection (j) requires 
     each standing committee (except for the Committee on Ethics) 
     to hold a Member Day Hearing during the first session of the 
     116th Congress to hear testimony from Members, Delegates, and 
     the Resident Commissioner--whether or not they are a member 
     of the committee--on proposed legislation within its 
     jurisdiction. The subsection permits the Committee on Rules 
     to hold its Member Day Hearing during the second session, in 
     order to receive testimony on proposed changes to the 
     standing rules for the next Congress.
       Empaneling Investigative Subcommittee of the Committee on 
     Ethics. Subsection (k) reinstates House Resolution 451 from 
     the 110th Congress, directing the Committee on Ethics to 
     empanel an investigative subcommittee or issue a report 
     within 30 days of the date a Member, Delegate, or the 
     Resident Commissioner is indicted or criminal charges are 
     filed. The subsection updates any references in House 
     Resolution 451 to the Committee on Standards of Official 
     Conduct to be references to the Committee on Ethics.
       War Powers Resolution. Subsection (I) expressly provides 
     that any motion to discharge a measure introduced pursuant to 
     section 6 or section 7 of the War Powers Resolution would not 
     be subject to a motion to table. House action on similar 
     House procedures has made it unclear as to whether such a 
     motion to table would be available. The order serves to 
     provide certainty for all Members, Delegates, and the 
     Resident Commissioner on this procedure.
       Budget Matters. Subsection (m) reestablishes that the 
     allocations, aggregates, and other appropriate levels 
     contained in the statement of the chair of the Committee on 
     the Budget of May 10, 2018, as adjusted during the 115th 
     Congress, are effective pending the adoption of an FY19 
     budget resolution. The subsection also provides that the 
     provisions of House Concurrent Resolution 71 from the 115th 
     Congress, effective pursuant to section 30104(f)(1) of the 
     Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018, will no longer be in effect 
     except for sections 5201, 5202, 5203, and 5401.
       Legal Issues Related to the Patient Protection and 
     Affordable Care Act. Subsection (n) authorizes the Speaker, 
     on behalf of the House, to intervene, otherwise appear, or 
     take any other steps in Texas v. United States, No. 4:18-cv-
     00167-0 (N.D. Tex.), or any other case involving the 
     constitutionality or legality of any provision of the Patient 
     Protection and Affordable Care Act, including provisions 
     ensuring affordable health coverage for those with 
     preexisting conditions.
       Legal Issues Related to the Supplemental Nutrition 
     Assistance Program. Subsection (o) directs the Office of 
     General Counsel of the House of Representatives to explore 
     all possible legal options for responding to any rulemaking 
     by the United States Department of Agriculture, on or after 
     December 20, 2018, to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance 
     Program involving requirements for able-bodied adults without 
     dependents.
       Congressional Member Organization Transparency Reform. 
     Subsection (p) allows participating Members to enter into 
     agreements with eligible Congressional Member Organizations 
     for the purpose of payment of salaries and expenses and 
     expands the definition of Congressional Member Organizations 
     from the 114th and 115th Congresses. The subsection requires 
     that for the organization to be eligible during the 116th 
     Congress, the organization must register with the Committee 
     on House Administration, designate a single Member to be 
     responsible for the administration of the organization, have 
     at least 3 employees assigned to perform some work for the 
     organization, and had at least 15 Members during the 115th 
     Congress using a portion of their Members' Representational 
     Allowance (MRA) to pay for the salaries and expenses of the 
     organization.
       Non-Disclosure Agreements. Subsection (q) provides that 
     Non-Disclosure Agreements required by offices as a condition 
     of employment for paid or unpaid staff or contractors cannot 
     require notice or approval for employees to communicate with 
     the Committee on Ethics, the Office of Congressional 
     Workplace Rights, or any other office or entity designated by 
     the Committee on House Administration; and that Non-
     Disclosure Agreements must also provide clear guidance to 
     that effect.
       Requiring Members to Pay for Discrimination Settlements. 
     Subsection (r) requires a Member, Delegate, or the Resident 
     Commissioner to reimburse the Treasury for any settlement of 
     a complaint related to a claim alleging a violation by the 
     Member of sections 201(a), 206(a), or 207 of the 
     Congressional Accountability Act of 1995, which cover 
     discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex (which the 
     Equal Employment Opportunity Commission recognizes as 
     including sexual orientation and gender identity), national 
     origin, disability, or an employee's service in the uniformed 
     services, and retaliation for claims alleging such 
     discrimination.
       Mandatory Anti-Harassment and Anti-Discrimination Policies 
     for House Offices. Subsection (s) requires each House office 
     to adopt an anti-harassment and anti-discrimination policy. 
     Identical language was passed by the House in House 
     Resolution 724 in the 115th Congress. It requires the 
     Committee on House Administration to issue regulations to 
     carry out the subsection by April 1, 2019.
       Displaying Statement of Rights and Protections Provided to 
     House Employees. Subsection (t) directs the Committee on 
     House Administration to issue regulations requiring each 
     House office to prominently display a statement of the rights 
     and protections provided to House employees under the 
     Congressional Accountability Act of 1995, including 
     procedures available to employees for responding to and 
     adjudicating allegations of workplace rights violations. 
     Identical language was passed by the House in the 115th 
     Congress in House Resolution 630.
     Section 104. Committees, Commissions, and House Offices.
       House Democracy Partnership. Subsection (a) reauthorizes 
     the House Democracy Assistance Commission, now known as the 
     House Democracy Partnership.
       Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission. Subsection (b) 
     reauthorizes the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission. The 
     subsection carries forward and makes modest modifications to 
     provisions from the 115th Congress to reaffirm that the 
     commission's budget is in addition to and separate from the 
     House Committee on Foreign Affairs' budget, and to ensure 
     equal distribution of funding between the commission's co-
     chairs to reflect the bipartisan structure of the commission. 
     It authorizes $52,000 for staff and resources in the first 
     quarter of 2019.
       Office of Congressional Ethics. Subsection (c) reauthorizes 
     the Office of Congressional Ethics (OCE) and carries forward 
     provisions from the 115th Congress without substantive 
     revision.
       Office of Diversity and Inclusion. Subsection (d) 
     establishes the Office of Diversity and Inclusion in the 
     House of Representatives. The subsection instructs the 
     Speaker, in consultation with the Minority Leader, to appoint 
     a Director from recommendations provided by the chair of the 
     Committee on House Administration, in consultation with the 
     ranking minority member. The subsection establishes a 60-day 
     deadline after the appointment of the Director for the Office 
     to submit an operational plan to the Committee on House 
     Administration. Within 90 days of submitting the operational 
     plan, the Office is required to submit a diversity plan to 
     the Committee on House Administration for review and 
     approval.
       The diversity plan must include: (1) policies to direct and 
     guide House offices to recruit, hire, train, develop, 
     advance, promote and retain a diverse workforce; (2) the 
     development of a survey to evaluate diversity in House 
     offices; (3) a framework for the House of Representatives 
     diversity report; and (4) a proposal for the composition of 
     an Advisory Council to inform the work of the Office.
       The subsection also requires the Office to submit a House 
     of Representatives diversity report at the end of each 
     session of Congress to the Speaker, the Majority and Minority 
     Leaders, and the chairs and ranking minority members of the 
     Committee on House Administration and the Subcommittee on the 
     Legislative Branch of the Committee on Appropriations.
       Office of the Whistleblower Ombudsman. Subsection (e) 
     establishes an Office of the Whistleblower Ombudsman and 
     authorizes the Speaker, in consultation with the chairs and 
     ranking minority members of the Committees on House 
     Administration and Oversight and Reform, to appoint a 
     Whistleblower Ombudsman. The subsection also instructs the 
     Whistleblower Ombudsman, under the direction of the Committee 
     on House Administration and in consultation with other 
     committees at the request of their chairs, to develop best 
     practices for whistleblower intake for House offices and 
     provide trainings to House offices on how to

[[Page H29]]

     safely receive information from whistleblowers.
       Select Committee on the Climate Crisis. Subsection (f) 
     establishes a Select Committee on the Climate Crisis to 
     investigate, study, make findings, and develop 
     recommendations on policies, strategies, and innovations to 
     achieve substantial and permanent reductions in pollution and 
     other activities that contribute to the climate crisis. The 
     Select Committee is authorized to hold hearings and may 
     report to the House or any committee the results of its 
     investigations and studies, together with any detailed 
     findings and policy recommendations it deems advisable. The 
     subsection requires that it issue all policy recommendations 
     to the relevant standing committees by March 31, 2020 and 
     submit all reports to the House by December 31, 2020.
       The Speaker is directed to appoint 15 Members, Delegates, 
     or the Resident Commissioner to serve on the Select Committee 
     and to designate one of its members to serve as the chair. 
     Six of the 15 members must be appointed on the recommendation 
     of the Minority Leader.
       The Select Committee will be governed by Rules X and XI, 
     except as provided in the subsection. The subsection does not 
     extend subpoena and deposition authority to the Select 
     Committee, but authorizes the Select Committee to submit 
     subpoena and deposition recommendations to the relevant 
     standing committees.
     Section 105. Orders of Business.
       Subsection (a) allows the Speaker to recognize Members, 
     Delegates, or the Resident Commissioner for the reading of 
     the Constitution on any legislative day during the first 
     session of the 116th Congress.
       Subsection (b) grants the Speaker authority to consider 
     bills under suspension of the rules through the legislative 
     day of January 17, 2019.
       Subsection (c) grants the House authority, through the 
     legislative day of January 8, 2019, to adopt a report from 
     the Committee on Rules through a majority vote on the same 
     day it is filed, if the resolution reported is related to a 
     measure making or continuing appropriations for the fiscal 
     year ending September 30, 2019.


      Title II. Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress.

       Title II establishes a Select Committee on the 
     Modernization of Congress to investigate, study, make 
     findings, hold public hearings, and develop recommendations 
     on modernizing Congress. Topics for investigation include: 
     (1) rules to promote a more modern and efficient Congress; 
     (2) procedures including the schedule and calendar; (3) 
     policies to develop the next generation of leaders; (4) staff 
     recruitment, diversity, retention, and compensation and 
     benefits; (5) administrative efficiencies; (6) technology and 
     innovation; and (7) the Franking Commission.
       The title requires the Select Committee to provide interim 
     status reports to the Committee on House Administration and 
     the Committee on Rules. It authorizes the Select Committee to 
     report the results of investigations and studies to the House 
     on a rolling basis, along with detailed findings and policy 
     recommendations, and requires a final such report at the end 
     of the first session of the 116th Congress. All policy 
     recommendations must be agreed to by at least 2/3 of the 
     Select Committee's members.
       The Speaker is directed to appoint 12 Members, Delegates, 
     or the Resident Commissioner to serve on the Select 
     Committee, including two members serving in their first term, 
     two members of the Committee on Rules, and two members from 
     the Committee on House Administration. Six of the 12 members 
     must be appointed on the recommendation of the Minority 
     Leader, including one member from each of the three described 
     categories. The Speaker is directed to designate a chair, 
     and, on the recommendation of the Minority Leader, a vice 
     chair.
       The Select Committee will be governed by Rules X and XI, 
     except as provided in the subsection. The subsection does not 
     extend subpoena and deposition authority to the Select 
     Committee, but authorizes the Select Committee to submit 
     subpoena and deposition recommendations to the relevant 
     standing committees. The Select Committee is required to hold 
     a Member Day Hearing.


Title III. Intervention in Litigation Involving Patient Protection and 
                          Affordable Care Act.

       Title III authorizes the Speaker, on behalf of the House, 
     to intervene, otherwise appear, or take any other steps, in 
     the case Texas v. United States, No. 4:18-cv-00167-O (N.D. 
     Tex.), in any appellate proceedings arising from such case. 
     In addition, Title III authorizes the Speaker, in 
     consultation with the Bipartisan Legal Advisory Group, to 
     intervene, otherwise appear, or take any other steps in any 
     other cases involving the Patient Protection and Affordable 
     Care Act, to protect the institutional interests of the House 
     and to defend such act and the amendments made by such Act to 
     other provisions of law, and any amendments to such 
     provisions, including the provisions ensuring affordable 
     health coverage for those with preexisting conditions.
       The title directs the Office of General Counsel of the 
     House of Representatives to represent the House in any such 
     litigation and authorizes the Office of General Counsel to 
     employ the services of outside counsel, including pro bono 
     counsel, or other outside experts.
       The title also requires the chair of the Committee on House 
     Administration to print in the Congressional Record the 
     aggregate amounts expended on outside counsel and other 
     experts within 30 days of the end of each quarter.
       This title is included to protect the institutional 
     interests of the House of Representatives in litigation 
     involving the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, 
     given that the Department of Justice has not only refused to 
     defend provisions of the law, but has affirmatively argued 
     that certain provisions are unconstitutional.
  Mr. McGOVERN. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
New Jersey (Mr. Gottheimer), someone we worked with very closely on 
this rules package.
  Mr. GOTTHEIMER. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of our new rules package that 
will help get more broadly based bipartisan legislation to the floor 
for debate and a vote.
  Both in New Jersey and in Washington, D.C., people are frustrated 
that Congress can't get things done. Whether it is completing the 
critical Gateway project back home in between New York and New Jersey, 
getting healthcare premiums down, cutting red tape, or lowering our 
taxes, commonsense ideas with broad bipartisan support often never make 
it to the House floor because a handful of splinter obstructionists use 
old-school tricks to block commonsense ideas.
  After years of hearing these complaints in diners and town halls at 
home, a group I co-chair called the Problem Solvers Caucus, comprised 
of half Democratic and half Republican Members, 7 months ago called for 
a reform package to break the gridlock.
  Especially in this era of a divided Congress, where we have a 
Democratic House and a Republican Senate and White House, to get things 
done, Congress will have to work together to deliver legislation with 
broad support. Whether that is fixing our infrastructure or getting 
healthcare costs down, we are going to have to work together.
  Today, we will take the first step with both Republicans and 
Democrats voting on the rules package that includes many of the Problem 
Solvers' break the gridlock ideas, including the new Consensus Calendar 
and modernizing the motion to vacate and discharge petition.
  The changes that we are making will also allow a full 3 days for us 
to actually read legislation before we vote on it, letting us have a 
full understanding of what we are voting on--just commonsense. We are 
also requiring hearings and markups on major legislation, again, all 
things that just seem like common sense that we should be doing.
  I am deeply proud of this Chamber, and I thank Speaker Pelosi and 
Chairman McGovern and their excellent teams for their hard work in 
reforming the House. I thank my co-chair of the Problem Solvers Caucus, 
Congressman  Tom Reed from New York, and the whole Problem Solvers 
Caucus for this big step in their work for a more cooperative, 
productive, and bipartisan House of Representatives.

                              {time}  1830

  Mr. COLE. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman from 
Puerto Rico (Miss Gonzalez-Colon).
  Miss GONZALEZ-COLON of Puerto Rico. Mr. Speaker, I thank Chairman 
McGovern for his leadership and this opportunity.
  As the only Member representing Puerto Rico in this Congress, I 
represent 3.2 million American citizens living on the island, and there 
are 5.4 million Puerto Ricans living on the mainland.
  Today, while we are discussing this resolution that will give 
Delegates and the Resident Commissioner the opportunity to vote in the 
Committee of the Whole, one issue that triggers me being here is that 
our vote would only count if the cast votes are not deciding votes. So 
we can vote in the Committee of the Whole, as the rule is providing, 
but if the casting votes are in contest, then you need to do a second 
round of votes without the territories.
  That is like a symbolic vote, and that is the reason the people of 
Puerto Rico want to become a State. That is the only way we can achieve 
four Members of Congress representing Puerto Rico in the House, two 
Members on the Senate side, not just using a symbolic vote in this 
House.
  As a matter of an example, a few minutes ago our names, the 
territories'

[[Page H30]]

Delegates names were on the board, but we can't vote on regular bills. 
We can't vote on anything else. So it will look like we are not present 
during the debates. It will look like we are not present on the floor 
of the House whenever there is a real discussion on the floor, but our 
names are still there. We can't vote ``yes''; we can't vote ``no.''
  Mr. Speaker, I think it is not a symbolic vote. This is a good step, 
but we should have the full right to vote.
  Mr. McGOVERN. Mr. Speaker, I include in the Record a statement on the 
interpretation of clause 8 of Rule II.

   Statement by Chairman McGovern on Civil Enforcement of Subpoenas 
                    Pursuant to House Rule II(8)(b)

       I want to speak regarding House Rule II(8)(b). Pursuant to 
     this provision, the Bipartisan Legal Advisory Group (BLAG) is 
     delegated the authority to speak for the full House of 
     Representatives with respect to all litigation matters. A 
     vote of the BLAG to authorize litigation and to articulate 
     the institutional position of the House in that litigation, 
     is the equivalent of a vote of the full House of 
     Representatives. For example, in the 115th Congress, the 
     BLAG, pursuant to Rule II(8)(b), authorized House Committees 
     to intervene in ongoing litigation. The BLAG has been 
     delegated this authority for all litigation matters, and I 
     want to be clear that this includes litigation related to the 
     civil enforcement of a Committee subpoena. If a Committee 
     determines that one or more of its duly issued subpoenas has 
     not been complied with and that civil enforcement is 
     necessary, the BLAG, pursuant to House Rule II(8)(b), may 
     authorize the House Office of General Counsel to initiate 
     civil litigation on behalf of this Committee to enforce the 
     Committee's subpoena(s) in federal district court.

  Mr. McGOVERN. Mr. Speaker, I include in the Record a list of all 
Members and caucuses who offered ideas and proposals for H. Res. 6, and 
I thank these Members for their contributions.

 List of Members and Caucuses Who Submitted Ideas and Proposals to H. 
                                 Res. 6

       Mr. Allred of Texas, Mr. Bera of California, Mr. Beyer of 
     Virginia, Ms. Bordallo from Guam, Mr. Brown of Maryland, Mr. 
     Carbajal of California, Ms. Castor of Florida, Mr. Cicilline 
     of Rhode Island, Mr. Coffman of Colorado, Mr. Connolly of 
     Virginia, Mr. Cooper of Tennessee, Mr. Costa of California, 
     Mr. Cummings of Maryland, Mr. Curbelo of Florida, Mr. Deutch 
     of Florida, Ms. Dingell of Michigan, Ms. Esty of Connecticut, 
     Mr. Faso of New York, Mr. Fitzpatrick of Pennsylvania, Mr. 
     Gallagher of Wisconsin.
       Mr. Gonzalez of Texas, Ms. Gonzalez-Colon from Puerto Rico, 
     Mr. Gottheimer of New Jersey, Mr. Grijalva of Arizona, Mr. 
     Hastings of Florida, Mr. Himes of Connecticut, Mr. Hoyer of 
     Maryland, Ms. Johnson of Texas, Mr. Joyce of Ohio, Mr. Katko 
     of New York, Mr. Khanna from California, Mr. Kilmer of 
     Washington, Mr. Lance of New Jersey, Mr. Langevin of Rhode 
     Island, Mr. Lipinski of Illinois, Ms. Lofgren of California, 
     Ms. Lowey of New York, Ms. Omar of Minnesota, Ms. Murphy of 
     Florida, Mr. Nadler of New York.
       Mr. Nolan of Minnesota, Ms. Norton from the District of 
     Columbia, Mr. O'Halleran of Arizona, Mr. Panetta of 
     California, Ms. Pelosi of California, Mr. Peters of 
     California, Ms. Plaskett from the U.S. Virgin Islands, Mr. 
     Polis of Colorado, Mr. Pocan of Wisconsin, Ms. Radewagen from 
     America Samoa, Mr. Raskin of Maryland, Mr. Reed of New York, 
     Ms. Rice of New York, Mr. Richmond of Louisiana, Ms. Rosen of 
     Nevada, Progressive Caucus, Congressional Black Caucus, 
     Congressional Hispanic Caucus, Democratic Women's Working 
     Group, New Democrat Coalition, Blue Dog Coalition, 
     Congressional Asian Pacific Coalition, Problem Solvers 
     Caucus.
  Mr. McGOVERN. Mr. Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I thank the chairman of the Rules 
Committee and I thank the team, all the opportunities that we had to 
engage in this rules package.
  It is a new day, Mr. Speaker, a new day because I am glad that we 
have opened some opportunity for our Delegates and Commissioners to be 
able to participate on behalf of their millions of constituents, which 
did not occur under Republican rule. That is a wonderful new step.
  But I do acknowledge the fact that we are $2 trillion in debt and 
that the deficit has increased under this administration, and here we 
are now asking for $5.2 billion for a border wall.
  I am glad that this rules package is transparent and fiscally 
responsible, but I am most excited about the responsibility for the 
Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act because, unfortunately, my 
State, the State of Texas, is leading an ill-fated legislation 
litigation that would undermine the right of Americans to have good 
healthcare. It will undermine the protection for those with a 
preexisting condition. It will undermine the fact that Texas was a 
poster child for uninsured Americans.
  Twenty-five percent of our State was uninsured, and this legislation 
indicates that our Speaker can intervene on any legislation and/or 
litigation that interferes with or undermines protecting the American 
people's healthcare. That is what they voted for. That is why they sent 
us to the United States Congress. That is why we are here.
  And for the many people that suffer that I see in my district, again, 
the poster child for uninsured Americans, now we have, in this rules 
package, the ability of our Speaker to stand up for the American people 
and to fight for the healthcare that they so desire.
  So if there is anything in here that I can support--and there are 
many, many things of transparency--the fact that we now can stand up to 
protect the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is one for this 
Nation. It is a new day, and our people will survive because of that.
  Mr. COLE. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the distinguished 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Burgess).
  Mr. BURGESS. Mr. Speaker, I thank the gentleman from Oklahoma, and I 
congratulate him on being the ranking member of the Rules Committee. I 
also congratulate the new chairman of the Rules Committee.
  Mr. Speaker, I do speak in opposition to the rule. This authorization 
for the Speaker of the House to intervene in any lawsuit, particularly 
the one in Texas, is not a good idea, not something that I think that 
we should be pursuing.
  The Affordable Care Act has multiple problems. We are forcing people 
to buy insurance they can't afford, don't understand, and can't use. 
They are functionally uninsured, and they are out a ton of money to do 
that.
  In addition, the work requirements that the Department of Agriculture 
is working on after the farm bill was passed, this is something that is 
important for the administration. We have more jobs than we have 
workers. People should be working, and it is time to get people back to 
work.
  Finally, the addition of the Gephardt rule but the removal of the 
requirement that the Senate concur with the House budget before the 
Gephardt rule goes into effect, this is a dangerous policy and one this 
House ought to reject.
  Mr. McGOVERN. Mr. Speaker, may I inquire how much time I have left.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Massachusetts has 1\3/4\ 
minutes remaining.
  Mr. McGOVERN. Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLE. Mr. Speaker, may I make the same inquiry as to my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Oklahoma has 8 minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. COLE. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the distinguished 
gentleman from Kansas (Mr. Estes).
  Mr. ESTES. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in strong opposition to H. Res. 
6.
  Among the many rule changes included, this bill opens the door for 
Democrats to raise taxes by removing the current requirement of a 
three-fifths majority of the House of Representatives to pass a tax 
increase.
  At a time when our Nation's debt is $22 trillion, increasing taxes 
and government spending will only succeed in further bankrupting our 
children and grandchildren. For generations, Americans have worked to 
leave the country better off for their kids and grandkids. Mortgaging 
our kids' future will not do that.
  Following implementation of the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, our economy 
has experienced historic growth. Instead of building upon that 
progress, this bill would allow the Democrats to raise taxes with a 
simple majority vote, stopping our economy in its tracks.
  It is a shame that my colleagues have spent their first day in the 
majority seeking to change the rules to allow for tax and debt 
increases. Once this bill is passed, it is all but certain that the 
Democrats will then use the mechanisms to raise taxes on families in 
Kansas and across our Nation to pay for increased government spending.
  This is a dangerous precedent that should be widely opposed, and I 
urge my colleagues to vote against this bill.
  Mr. McGOVERN. Mr. Speaker, I would just remind the gentleman, in

[[Page H31]]

the last 2 years, the Republicans have exploded the debt by $2 
trillion.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLE. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Mr. Speaker, in closing, I want to begin by urging all Members to 
oppose this measure. While the rule package includes some provisions 
Republicans can certainly support, it, unfortunately, includes too many 
provisions that we cannot.
  The rule package today removes important fiscal responsibility 
measures from House rules, establishes a partisan climate committee, 
and grants the Speaker the power to intervene in a lawsuit over the 
legality of the ACA. Those are all things that my conference, quite 
frankly, is unanimously opposed to.
  I do want to address, just in passing, my friend's discussion about 
the deficit. I will remind him, when President Obama was in office, 
that deficit was doubled, actually increased at a faster rate, 
particularly when my friends were empowered in the first opening 2 
years, than it ever has in any peacetime in American history.
  The deficit is all too high. I agree with my friends very much on 
that. I am glad they are born-again deficit hawks. That means they are 
going to be serious about entitlement reform, because we all know what 
drives the deficit here, and that is simply the demographic reality of 
an aging population and an overextended bunch of entitlements.
  I actually have a bipartisan bill, which I would encourage my friends 
to look at, which doesn't dictate an outcome but actually sets up the 
same sort of process that Democrats and Republicans worked on together 
in 1983, the last time Social Security was at risk, came to a 
bipartisan compromise, developed something that restored the fiscal 
sanity. That is legislation my friend in the former Congress, Mr. 
Delaney, and I had for three Congresses. We could never get anybody 
interested in it on either side of the aisle.
  So if my friends want to engage in a virtuous debate about dealing 
with the deficit, I am all for it. I actually have a bipartisan remedy 
that I would invite them to look at, and I think it would yield us a 
very good result and start us down that road. But that is for another 
day. I want to end on a positive note.
  I again want to congratulate my friend from Massachusetts (Mr. 
McGovern) on his elevation to chairman of the Rules Committee. I know 
very much, from having worked with him for many years, that he will 
keep his word because he always has, that he will operate in a manner 
that is aboveboard and that is fair and respectful to all, and that he 
will seriously do what he is committed to do, and that is entertain 
suggestions from all quarters. I actually have no doubt that he will do 
that, and I genuinely look forward to having the opportunity to work 
with him on the committee that he chairs during the next 2 years.
  He is going to do, certainly, not only a good job for the people of 
his conference, but I believe a good job for the people of this 
institution and for the American people as well.
  Mr. Speaker, despite my affections, I do urge a ``no'' vote on the 
previous question and ``no'' on the underlying measure.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. McGOVERN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Mr. Speaker, I want to thank the gentleman from Oklahoma for his kind 
words, and I hope he knows how much I respect him and how much I admire 
him.
  Mr. Speaker, there are so many people who played a role in crafting 
these rules, from our historymaking Speaker, who gave us the 
opportunity to solicit Member feedback, and the many colleagues who 
spoke with me about their suggestions, to the office of the 
Parliamentarian and the Office of Legislative Counsel, to our 
incredible Rules staff. All made important contributions to this 
package. I want to thank everyone for their involvement. Their work and 
dedication made these historic rules possible.
  We have a unique moment here to implement real reforms, to say no to 
business as usual and create a better legislative process and make 
progress on the majority's agenda, while making this House look like 
the real world. Let's seize this opportunity.
  I urge all my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on this package. Let's 
restore integrity to this place and get to work on behalf of the people 
we represent.
  And that is not just the view of the majority. I know that many in 
the minority share that view. We can do better. I look forward to 
working with the gentleman from Oklahoma and others on the Republican 
side of the aisle as we move forward in this new session.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge everybody to vote ``yes'' on this great rules 
package, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 5, the previous 
question is ordered on the portion of the divided question comprising 
title I.
  The question is on that portion of that divided question.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.
  Mr. COLE. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 234, 
nays 197, not voting 1, as follows:

                              [Roll No. 7]

                               YEAS--234

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan, Ben Ray
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Reed
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NAYS--197

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gabbard
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn

[[Page H32]]


     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Khanna
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marino
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--1

       
     Smucker
       

                              {time}  1913

  Messrs. JOYCE of Ohio and SCHWEIKERT changed their vote from ``yea'' 
to ``nay.''
  Mr. ROUDA and Ms. SEWELL of Alabama changed their vote from ``nay'' 
to ``yea.''
  So the portion of the divided question compromising title I was 
agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mrs. Beatty). Pursuant to section 3 of House 
Resolution 5, further proceedings will be postponed.

                          ____________________