FURTHER CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2019; Congressional Record Vol. 165, No. 1
(House of Representatives - January 03, 2019)

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[Pages H190-H196]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




              FURTHER CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2019

  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Madam Speaker, pursuant to House Resolution 5, I 
call up the joint resolution (H.J. Res. 1) making further continuing 
appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security for fiscal year 
2019, and for other purposes, and ask for its immediate consideration.
  The Clerk read the title of the joint resolution.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 5, the joint 
resolution is considered read.
  The text of the joint resolution is as follows:

                              H.J. Res. 1

       Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the 
     United States of America in Congress assembled,
       Section 1. The Continuing Appropriations Act, 2019 
     (division C of Public Law 115-245) is further amended--
       (1) in section 105--
       (A) in paragraph (2), by striking ``or'' at the end;
       (B) in paragraph (3)--
       (i) by inserting ``except as provided in paragraph (4),'' 
     before ``December''; and
       (ii) by striking the period at the end and inserting ``; 
     or''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(4) with respect to appropriations and funds made 
     available, and other authorities granted, pursuant to section 
     101(5) of this joint resolution for the Department of 
     Homeland Security, February 8, 2019.''; and
       (2) in section 110, by adding at the end the following:
       ``(c) With respect to mandatory payments whose budget 
     authority was provided in the Department of Homeland Security 
     Appropriations Act, 2018 (division F of Public Law 115-141), 
     subsections (a) and (b) shall be applied by substituting 
     `section 105(4)' for `section 105(3)' each place it 
     appears.''.
       Sec. 2. (a) Employees furloughed as a result of a lapse in 
     appropriations beginning on or about December 22, 2018, and 
     ending on the date of the enactment of this joint resolution 
     shall be compensated at their standard rate of compensation, 
     for the period of such lapse in appropriations, as soon as 
     practicable after such lapse in appropriations ends.
       (b) For purposes of this section, ``employee'' means any 
     Federal employee whose salary and expenses are provided by 
     the amendment made by section 1(1)(C).
       (c) All obligations incurred in anticipation of the 
     appropriations made and authority granted by this joint 
     resolution for the purposes of maintaining the essential 
     level of activity to protect life and property and bringing 
     about orderly termination of Government functions, and for 
     purposes as otherwise authorized by law, are hereby ratified 
     and approved if otherwise in accord with the provisions of 
     this joint resolution.
       Sec. 3. (a) If a State (or another Federal grantee) used 
     State funds (or the grantee's non-Federal funds) to continue 
     carrying out a Federal program or furloughed State employees 
     (or the grantee's employees) whose compensation is advanced 
     or reimbursed in whole or in part by the Federal Government--
       (1) such furloughed employees shall be compensated at their 
     standard rate of compensation for such period;
       (2) the State (or such other grantee) shall be reimbursed 
     for expenses that would have been paid by the Federal 
     Government during such period had appropriations been 
     available, including the cost of compensating such furloughed 
     employees, together with interest thereon calculated under 
     section 6503(d) of title 31, United States Code; and
       (3) the State (or such other grantee) may use funds 
     available to the State (or the grantee) under such Federal 
     program to reimburse such State (or the grantee), together 
     with interest thereon calculated under section 6503(d) of 
     title 31, United States Code.
       (b) For purposes of this section, the term ``State'' and 
     the term ``grantee'', including United States territories and 
     possessions, shall have the meaning given such terms under 
     the applicable Federal program under subsection (a). In 
     addition, ``to continue carrying out a Federal program'' 
     means the continued performance by a State or other Federal 
     grantee, during the period of a lapse in appropriations, of a 
     Federal program that the State or such other grantee had been 
     carrying out prior to the period of the lapse in 
     appropriations.
       (c) The authority under this section applies with respect 
     to the period of a lapse in appropriations beginning on or 
     about December 22, 2018, and ending on the date of enactment 
     of this joint resolution with respect to the Department of 
     Homeland Security which, but for such lapse in 
     appropriations, would have paid, or made reimbursement 
     relating to, any of the expenses referred to in this section 
     with respect to the program involved. Payments and 
     reimbursements under this authority shall be made only to the 
     extent and in amounts provided in advance in appropriations 
     Acts.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 5, the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Roybal-Allard) and the gentlewoman 
from Texas (Ms. Granger) each will control 15 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from California.


                             General Leave

  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all 
Members have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and 
include extraneous material on the measure under consideration.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from California?
  There was no objection.
  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.

[[Page H191]]

  Madam Speaker, today is the beginning of the 116th Congress. The 
first and most basic responsibility this House has is to reopen our 
government to serve the needs of the American people. The greatest 
obstacle in keeping the government open has been disagreements on how 
to spend Homeland Security dollars. That is why, in the best interests 
of the country, it makes sense to reopen the government by passing the 
remaining six bipartisan funding bills for fiscal year 2019 and to 
reopen the Department of Homeland Security through a short-term 
continuing resolution.
  The resolution before us would do just that. It would reopen the 
Department of Homeland Security through February 8 of this year. This 
would give us time to negotiate a DHS funding bill for the rest of the 
fiscal year based on the most current needs assessment, such as meeting 
the housing needs of children in border custody.
  The ability to reach a full-year funding bill for the Department of 
Homeland Security will not be possible, however, if the President is 
unwilling to change his focus from a campaign promise to one that 
realistically addresses the most urgent and immediate national security 
vulnerabilities our homeland faces today.
  This means any serious discussion of Homeland Security investments 
must include funding for hiring more law enforcement agents to focus on 
opioid, gang, trade, and child exploitation investigations; funding for 
the hiring of additional customs officers to intercept illicit drugs 
and other contraband, almost all of which comes into our country 
through the ports of entry.
  It must also include investing more in first responder grants to 
better prepare States and localities to prevent and respond to 
terrorism and disasters of every kind.
  It must contain funding for the recapitalization of the Coast Guard's 
air and sea fleets, including funding for the procurement of our first 
heavy icebreaker since the 1970s, because, as the Arctic ice recedes, 
Russia, China, and other countries are winning the race to lay claim to 
the vast resources of that region.
  While border security is important, it is only one of many pieces of 
the Homeland Security mission, which includes criminal investigations, 
first responder preparedness, disaster response, the protection of our 
cyber networks, and the protection of our critical infrastructure, 
coastal waters, and our air and surface transportation systems. These 
must also be funding priorities if we are to protect our homeland. Yet 
every dollar set aside for a border wall is a dollar lost to our 
ability to meet these and our other most pressing and critical Homeland 
Security needs.
  I urge my House colleagues to support this resolution, and I urge the 
Senate to do the same, so we can quickly get to work on negotiating a 
full-year funding bill in support of the critical work of the 
Department of Homeland Security.
  Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Madam Speaker, today I rise in opposition to H.J. Res. 1. Again, this 
bill put forward by the new Democratic leadership fails to secure our 
border. The President has said that he will not sign it. The Senate has 
said they will not consider it.
  This plan ignores one of the main responsibilities of the Congress, 
which is to protect the American people.
  Every day, there are an average of 2,100 illegal crossings at our 
southern border. According to the Department of Homeland Security, over 
17,000 criminals were apprehended at the border last year.
  From human traffickers to drug smugglers to suspected terrorists, 
these criminal illegal immigrants represent a clear threat to the 
safety and security of our homeland.

                              {time}  2030

  The situation at the border is a crisis, not only for border States 
like my home State of Texas, but for our entire country. We owe it to 
the American people to work together to address this problem and secure 
our border.
  As the leader of the Speaker's Working Group on the Border Crisis in 
2014, I had the opportunity to travel multiple times to our southern 
border and to the countries from where the majority of unaccompanied 
minors were coming. Not only did I talk to the leadership of each 
country, but I talked with many of the people who are sending their 
children to the United States.
  In addition to the crime and violence created by the cartels, I was 
told time and time again that the reason people and children were 
risking their lives to come to the United States was because of the 
lack of enforcement of our immigration laws and our unsecured borders.
  In order to discourage people from taking the treacherous and often 
deadly trip to the United States, it is vital that they know that we 
will enforce our immigration laws and that the border is secure.
  It is time to end the political gamesmanship and get to work on a 
bill that will reopen the government and fund border security. I urge 
my colleagues to vote ``no'' on this bill, and I reserve the balance of 
my time.
  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Madam Speaker, how much time do I have remaining?
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from California has 11 
minutes remaining.
  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Madam Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the 
distinguished gentleman from Mississippi (Mr. Thompson), the chairman 
of the Committee on Homeland Security.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi. Madam Speaker, I rise today in support 
of the new Democratic majority's efforts to reopen the Department of 
Homeland Security.
  Since the government shutdown on December 21, roughly 2.5 million 
holiday travelers each day have passed through airport security 
checkpoints staffed by Transportation Security Administration officers 
who aren't getting paid.
  As we speak, 87 percent of the DHS workforce is reporting to work 
without pay and without knowing when the next paycheck will come. These 
are fellow Americans with bills to pay and families to support. The 
President should not be treating them like pawns in his pathetic 
pursuit to fulfill an absurd campaign promise.
  Madam Speaker, I include in the Record a New York Times article dated 
January 3, 2019.

                [From the New York Times, Jan. 3, 2019]

  Government Shutdown Leaves Workers Reeling: ``We Seem To Be Pawns''

         (By Campbell Robertson, Mitch Smith and Alan Blinder)

       No sooner had the news of an impasse come out of a meeting 
     room in Washington than thousands of miles away, on an island 
     in the Pacific, Tomas Kaselionis had to start making 
     decisions.
       ``For me, it's do I consider a car payment or do I pay the 
     gas bill or the phone bill?'' said Mr. Kaselionis, who is 
     working on typhoon recovery for the Federal Emergency 
     Management Agency, unpaid and far from home in the United 
     States commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. ``Those 
     are conversations within the next week that I have to have 
     with my wife.''
       By Saturday, the federal government will have been shut 
     down for two weeks, a full pay cycle for federal workers. If 
     the shutdown lasts through Monday, it will surpass the one of 
     2013, and if it lasts beyond the following Saturday, it will 
     be the longest shutdown in United States history. Politicians 
     have said they were hopeful that the standoff could be over 
     in a matter of ``days and weeks,'' a reassurance that rang 
     hollow to hundreds of thousands of federal workers who were 
     not getting paid.
       ``They have to realize that this affects everyday people,'' 
     said Ray Coleman Jr., a corrections officer who teaches 
     G.E.D. classes at a federal prison in Florida and is 
     president of his local union. ``It affects the boots on the 
     ground. To me, it's like a political chess game that they're 
     playing, and we seem to be pawns.''
       By Thursday, fallout from the shutdown was spreading fast. 
     The chairman of the Federal Communications Commission 
     announced on Twitter that the agency would ``suspend most 
     operations.''
       Federal court proceedings, to the irritation of judges, 
     slowed as government lawyers asked for stays. The Justice 
     Department asked to delay a hearing on a suit brought by the 
     N.A.A.C.P. over the Trump administration's census 
     preparations. And a much-anticipated E.P.A. hearing on lead 
     contamination in East Chicago, Ind., was canceled.
       All the while, claims for unemployment benefits were piling 
     up; the District of Columbia said it had received about 900 
     claims connected to the shutdown, and the state of Maryland 
     counted 637 at midweek. More than 350 federal workers in 
     Colorado had filed unemployment claims.
       ``People are, to be frank, a little pissed,'' said Daniel 
     A. Sobien, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service 
     in Tampa,

[[Page H192]]

     Fla., who has been furloughed and is living on savings. 
     ``They're tired of being political pawns. I realize that 
     unfair things happen to people all the time, but it really is 
     unfair that because of politics, government employees have to 
     shoulder the burden.''
       The impasse may be centered within a few blocks in 
     Washington, D.C., but the federal work force shouldering the 
     burden is spread across the country--fewer than one in five 
     federal workers are in the Washington statistical area. Among 
     the 800,000 federal workers affected are people with 
     doctorates earning $100,000 a year and those making a quarter 
     of that; workers in labs and workers in prisons; people who 
     clean up majestic national parks and people who clean up 
     cramped offices in the early morning hours.
       Among these workers, there was a widely shared sentiment of 
     frustration, even disgust, that the people in charge seemed 
     to lack concern for the people who actually keep the 
     government working.
       ``It's indefensible to not appreciate the role and 
     responsibility that there is to make sure the government runs 
     smoothly,'' said A. Ashley Tabaddor, a federal immigration 
     judge in Los Angeles and president of the National 
     Association of Immigration Judges, who is currently on 
     furlough.
       Brian Turner, an officer with the Transportation Security 
     Administration at the Philadelphia airport, said he has for 
     six years enjoyed being ``the last line of defense'' for 
     people getting on airplanes. He endured a 16-day shutdown in 
     2013, but at the time did not have a house or a family, and 
     the politics back then, as fierce as they were, just seemed 
     more predictable, he said.
       ``I love working for the country,'' he said. But, he added, 
     ``I can't go two months without a paycheck.''
       About 420,000 of the workers affected are classified as 
     essential and have been working without knowing when they 
     will next be paid. About 380,000 federal workers have been 
     furloughed. Unions and federal agencies have not provided 
     demographic information about the workers affected, but have 
     said that the group is generally similar to the broader 
     federal work force, some 2.1 million nonmilitary workers.
       The work force is spread out nationally, with thousands of 
     federal employees in every state, tens of thousands in states 
     like Georgia, Pennsylvania and Oklahoma, and the highest 
     percentage in California. According to officials at unions 
     which represent federal employees, the shutdown seemed to be 
     affecting workers outside of the Washington, D.C. area most 
     severely.
       Less-populated areas may be hit disproportionately hard, 
     including small towns such as Pollock, La., where the biggest 
     employer is a federal penitentiary.
       ``Our members get an average take-home pay of $500 a week, 
     and next week they aren't going to get that,'' said J. David 
     Cox Sr., president of the American Federation of Government 
     Employees, which represents about 40,000 Bureau of Prisons 
     employees who have been furloughed in the shutdown. ``The 
     places that are getting slammed are the ones, like Pollock, 
     that you can't find with a GPS.''
       In addition to the federal workers, thousands of people who 
     work for contractors--cleaning offices or serving food--are 
     missing wages, but are not considered in proposed legislation 
     that promises back pay once a deal is worked out.
       ``Just to think about it, it's so frightening,'' said Donna 
     Kelly, a contracted security guard who works--or did work, 
     before the museums closed on Wednesday--at the Smithsonian 
     Institution. She had applied for unemployment benefits, but 
     was still waiting for her application to be processed. ``I 
     really don't know what I'll do until I'm actually feeling the 
     pressure.''
       Nearly all of those affected, the contractors, furloughed 
     employees and employees who were working without pay, were 
     experiencing a growing, gnawing anxiety. They were keeping 
     track of the news: Mr. Trump's demands for a border wall, the 
     daily shifts over terms of an imaginable deal, the vows by 
     Democrats and Republicans not to budge. But many said they 
     were doing so simply to find out if they could pay mortgages, 
     plan vacations or take care of car payments.
       ``I don't think anybody who works for the government is 
     worried about if this wall gets built or not,'' said La-
     Shanda Palmer, a T.S.A. employee in Philadelphia. ``They want 
     to go back to work.'' She was concerned about paying her 
     bills and racking up late fees, and providing for her family. 
     She said she called her utility company hoping for an 
     accommodation; she did not get a break.
       ``Right now, the stress level is at 1,000,'' said Kutonya 
     King, a correctional counselor at the federal prison in 
     Jesup, Ga. Like other corrections officers, Ms. King said she 
     was concerned about the safety of the inmates and of her 
     fellow workers, who will have more and more to occupy their 
     minds if the shutdown drags on. An officer at another prison 
     wondered how many of her colleagues would end up staying home 
     because they could not afford gas.
       Still, Ms. King said some inmates had offered sympathy. 
     That seemed to be more than workers were hearing from 
     Washington.
       ``I don't particularly blame a particular party; I think 
     it's across the board,'' Ms. King said. ``They need to think 
     about the people.''
       Ms. King has been making plans in case the shutdown lasts 
     the promised days and weeks, having already canceled a long-
     planned family trip for the holidays. She may need that money 
     to pay bills, she said.
       Later on Thursday afternoon, back in Washington, a key 
     Republican senator suggested to reporters a new possible 
     timeline for the shutdown: ``months and months.''

  Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi. Madam Speaker, I have served on this 
committee since its inception and have spent more than a decade working 
with my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to identify and invest in 
effective ways to secure the border. That is why I find the President's 
bizarre obsession with wasting billions of dollars on building a wall 
so confounding. There is absolutely no evidence that a wall spanning 
the U.S.-Mexico border will make America safer.
  While I am at it, there is similarly no evidence that separating 
children from their families or implementing harsh asylum restrictions 
makes America safer either, but the Trump administration has forced DHS 
to pursue such cruel, costly, and inhumane policies.
  The kinds of threats America faces today transcend physical borders. 
The President needs to learn that and adjust his priorities 
accordingly.
  Last fall, Secretary Nielsen declared that cyberattacks and 
sophisticated hacking are the biggest threats to the United States. 
Yet, today, almost half the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security 
Agency workforce is furloughed, and the rest are working without pay 
because the President is fixated on his wall.
  According to one official: ``CISA has ceased a variety of critical 
cybersecurity and infrastructure protection capabilities.''
  I am disturbed that the President does not appear to understand that 
his actions have stalled progress on securing vulnerable networks.
  Moreover, the uncertainty as to when workers will be paid is also 
counterproductive.
  Madam Speaker, I am disappointed that we are forced to spend the 
first days of the 116th Congress on the unfinished business of the 
115th Congress instead of addressing priorities that Americans elected 
us to tackle in November, but this is where we find ourselves.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. I yield the gentleman an additional 15 seconds.
  Mr. THOMPSON of Mississippi. The American public needs Congress to be 
the grownups in the room. I urge my colleagues to support this short-
term spending bill so we can pay the DHS employees charged with 
protecting the homeland.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I yield 4 minutes to the gentleman from 
Tennessee (Mr. Fleischmann).
  Mr. FLEISCHMANN. Madam Speaker, I respectfully and strongly rise 
today in strong opposition to the proposal from my colleagues on the 
other side of the aisle to reopen the government without increased 
funding for border security.
  Let me be clear: This attempt to reopen our government without 
increased border security funding is dangerous, flawed, and truly puts 
party before country.
  We can all agree that our country is in crisis, as our porous 
borders, our porous southern border, allow dangerous criminals, deadly 
drugs, and human trafficking to pour into our country almost unchecked.
  So why do my colleagues on the other side of the aisle continue to 
refuse to take real action and do something about it?
  Just the other day, there was another tragedy where the police 
reported an individual who had come here illegally took the life of a 
police officer. That police officer left his family as a patriotic 
American dedicated to enforcing the rule of law and, as a result, lost 
his life.
  How many more times does this have to happen before my colleagues on 
the other side of this aisle support increased border security?
  In short, we need the wall.
  Madam Speaker, my colleagues on the other side of the aisle say that 
walls don't work. Let me assure you, they do. According to the 
Department of Homeland Security, there have been significant decreases 
along our southern border where walls and fencing have been built. Look 
at Yuma, Arizona, where illegal traffic has dropped 95 percent, 95 
percent over 9 years, or

[[Page H193]]

El Paso, Texas, where illegal traffic has dropped 72 percent in 1 year 
alone and over 95 percent in 22 years.
  Madam Speaker, House Republicans took a stand on December 5 to secure 
our Nation by passing a bill that included $5.7 billion in border 
security. That was the President's full request for the wall. This bill 
is central to fulfilling our promise as elected officials to protect 
the American people, ensure the safety of our Nation, and put American 
interests first. To reopen the government without necessary border 
security funding and wall funding is a sorely missed opportunity.
  Madam Speaker, let's get back to work negotiating and take up 
legislation that secures our southern border, funds the wall, and 
strengthens our Nation.
  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Madam Speaker, I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman 
from Texas (Mr. Cuellar), a longtime member of the Appropriations 
Subcommittee on Homeland Security.
  Mr. CUELLAR. Madam Speaker, look, everybody talks about the border 
and how violent it is. But if you look at the latest FBI statistics, 
whether it is rape, murder, or assault, the border crime rate is lower 
than the national crime rate. I can pick any city that you want, and 
you will see that none of the most dangerous cities in the country are 
on the border, none of them. None of them are.
  In fact, if you look at my hometown of Laredo, the murder rate on the 
border, and you compare it to Washington, D.C., where we are, it is 
about three or four times higher here in Washington, D.C. If people are 
worried about the crime, start off with Washington, D.C., if that is 
what y'all want to do.
  The wall is a 14th century solution to a 21st century issue that we 
have. We want to see strong border security. I live on the border. I 
don't just go visit for a second or 2 hours and say that I know the 
border better. I know what works down there, and the wall is a 14th 
century solution.
  If you want to spend billions of dollars on a wall, I will spend $100 
on a ladder that will take care of that wall. This is why we have to 
make sure that we spend money on Border Patrol. We are 2,000 Border 
Patrol agents short. In fact, if we spend money on retention so we can 
keep them, we don't have to lose them. We are losing Border Patrol 
agents right now.

  But we can't spend it the wrong way. The administration just spent 
$14.8 million to hire two Border Patrol agents. Now, maybe one of them 
is Captain America, I don't know. But are we going to spend $15 million 
to hire two Border Patrol agents?
  Spend that money on bonuses. Give them the equipment that we have. 
Protect private property rights on the border. We can go ahead and do 
that.
  If you want to stop drugs, look at the latest DEA report. You will 
see that the latest DEA report tells you that drugs come in through 
ports of entry. You can build the most beautiful wall, and they are 
going to come in through a port of entry. Put money on the ports of 
entry. Put money on CBP facilities and the facilities that we need.
  Finally, the last thing I want to say is this: There is technology 
that works for the military, and if it works for the military, we can 
surely use it on the border. Personnel, technology, we have to look at 
the right way of securing the border.
  I want to work with you. We want to work with you, but the wall is a 
14th century solution. We can do better than that.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I yield 4 minutes to the gentleman from 
South Carolina (Mr. Rice).
  Mr. RICE of South Carolina. Madam Speaker, it is true that about 30 
percent of the government is shut down. We are in a standoff here. Why 
is that? What is the purpose of this?
  It is because of two scourges on our country that have been brought 
on by our poor southern border, and that is illegal immigration and 
opioid deaths. My constituents have had enough.
  House Republicans passed a spending bill just a few weeks ago that 
included $5.7 billion that would go a long way toward securing our 
southern border and easing these disasters.
  Now the Democrats take charge, and the first thing they do is 
introduce a bill that eliminates that spending for border security.
  With respect to illegal immigration, hundreds of thousands of illegal 
aliens cross our southern border every year. This limitless supply of 
cheap labor unfairly competes for jobs and holds down wages for 
hardworking, law-abiding Americans. The most affected are the most 
vulnerable at the bottom of the income ladder.
  The American middle class is smaller and today makes the same money 
as it did in 1990. That is right. Until Donald Trump came along, the 
American middle class hadn't had a raise in 25 years. Cheap labor from 
illegal aliens breaking our laws every year to cheat American workers 
is one of the primary causes.
  Madam Speaker, my friends on the other side of the aisle love to 
complain about income inequality. Well, here is a chance to stop 
complaining and actually do something about income inequality.
  If you truly want to give the middle class a raise, let's stop the 
endless flow of illegal labor that cheats our middle class. Let's 
restore the $5.7 billion to secure our southern border and stop the 
flow of cheap illegal labor and watch wages rise.
  With respect to opioids, the scourge of opioid death is not new, but 
it is exploding in America as gangs and drug cartels become more adept 
at exploiting our porous southern border for fantastic profits. But 
these criminal profits come at great cost for honest, hardworking 
people, both in Central and South America and here in the United 
States.
  In 2017, 70,000 people died from opioid overdoses. That is up 45 
percent in 1 year. One hundred thirty-two of these Americans killed by 
drugs were in my district, and they are in your districts, too.
  You want to argue about who caused the shutdown? I don't care about 
who caused the shutdown. What I care about are 70,000 Americans killed 
by opioids, most of which come across our southern border. Law 
enforcement tells me 85 percent of those drugs killing my constituents 
and yours come across our southern border.

                              {time}  2045

  That 70,000 Americans killed by drug overdoses is more than traffic 
deaths, 37,000, and homicides, 17,000, combined; more than traffic 
deaths and homicides combined. And most of these drugs killing your 
constituents are coming across our southern border.
  Mr. Speaker, the Democrats say they are for border security, but they 
take no action. Empty words.
  They stripped the funding from the spending bill. They want to argue 
about who is to blame for the shutdown. Go home and tell that to a 
family that lost a loved one from opioids because you refused to take 
action to secure our southern border. Empty words.
  Funny, Mr. Schumer voted in favor of a border wall in 2006. Why is he 
against it now? Because Mr. Trump wants it? Empty words.
  It is time to stop the finger pointing and do something to truly help 
our constituents. Let's help the middle class by ending unfair 
competition from illegal aliens.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I yield an additional 30 seconds to the 
gentleman.
  Mr. RICE of South Carolina. Madam Speaker, let's reduce opioid deaths 
by ending the flow of deadly drugs from Mexico. Let's restore the $5.7 
billion that Homeland Security says they need to finally secure our 
southern border.
  Madam Speaker, the Democrats are terribly worried about who gets 
blamed for the shutdown. Frankly, I don't care who gets blamed.
  This is a fight to keep drugs off our streets and out of the hands of 
our children. It is a fight to keep our communities safe. It is a fight 
for higher wages for hardworking Americans. It is a fight worth having.
  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Madam Speaker, I yield 2\1/2\ minutes to the 
gentleman from Maryland (Mr. Ruppersberger), another longtime member of 
the Appropriations Subcommittee on Homeland Security.
  Mr. RUPPERSBERGER. Madam Speaker, I rise in support of H.J. Res. 1, 
which makes continuing appropriations for the Department of Homeland 
Security.

[[Page H194]]

  As a matter of principle, I don't like continuing resolutions. Stop-
gap bills provide funding at current levels only; they prevent new 
spending where needed and prolong programs that have been discontinued; 
and last, Band-Aid budgets are bad for everyone, the American taxpayers 
and especially those on the front lines tasked with protecting the 
homeland.
  But today, the 13th day of this senseless government shutdown, the 
administration has tied our hands in demanding more than $5 billion for 
the President's campaign pledge, a border wall that really does not 
work.
  I am a member of the Appropriations Homeland Security Subcommittee. 
When we met with the previous head of the border patrol, Ronald 
Vitiello, we asked: How much time does a physical wall buy you?
  His answer was: `` . . . a few minutes to a few seconds.''
  What we need is more manpower. Last year there were more than 800 
vacancies for border patrol officers at checkpoints in Laredo, Tucson, 
and San Diego alone. They are working triple overtime there.
  So our tax dollars can be better spent investing in more Customs and 
Border Patrol officers, more immigration judges, and by leveraging the 
fruits of modern technology, such as new communication towers, state-
of-the-art cameras, drones, all-terrain vehicles, and fencing where 
appropriate.
  Brick and mortar walls are a 4th century solution to a 21st century 
problem.
  We also need President Trump to stop leading by fear and falsehoods.
  As it relates to his border wall issue, the real problem is 
undocumented immigrants overstaying their visas, which constitutes well 
over half of those here illegally. And those are facts.
  Most of the drugs entering our country are coming through official 
land, air, and seaports of entry. I represent one of those ports: the 
Port of Baltimore.
  In electing 60 new Democrats to Congress, the American people have 
rejected this willy-nilly style of governance and are demanding a 
return to commonsense governing.
  No, we don't want open borders. Yes, we can do better when it comes 
to border security, but we must do it strategically.
  This continuing resolution gives us 30 days to debate funding levels 
for border security, including physical enhancements. It is identical 
to legislation already passed by our colleagues in the Senate just a 
few weeks ago.
  Madam Speaker, I urge my colleagues to support H.J. Res. 1.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Speaker, Democrats made a pledge to the 
American people, and we are here at 8:50 in the evening making good on 
our pledge to the American people to open the government, to open the 
government by funding certain appropriations up until September 30, and 
by opening the government by extending Homeland Security funding until 
February 8 to make sure that the TSOs, the border patrol, the CBPs are 
all being paid.
  How many of you go through the airports and go through security? Do 
you realize that those TSOs are not being paid?
  My commitment to them as I traveled here to Washington is: You need 
to be paid; not because you are not great public servants, but because 
it is a shame.
  So I come today to say, do what is right, not for the party, but for 
the American people.
  The President indicated: I will build a great, great wall on our 
southern border and Mexico will pay for it.
  Where is the Mexico funding? Today I introduced a bill: no funding 
for the wall; Mexico will pay for it.
  So it is extremely important to recognize our duty, and our duty is 
to fund this government, but I also want to give a constitutional 
lesson, if I might.
  Article I is the Congress. Article II is the executive. We work 
together. We don't have dictates from the executive to tell Congress 
what is best to do for the American people.
  Pay our Federal workers so that jobs can get done, so that there is 
not rubbish and trash and disaster on the Mall that is so beautiful.
  And what is this breaking news? Again, the misuse of the military. 
The Trump administration wants to send more troops to the border, not 
for protecting the border with Mexico, but to add 160 miles of wire.
  I just came from the border on Saturday. I wanted to say what I know. 
I go to the border all the time through the years that I have been on 
Homeland Security and I talk to the border patrol agents, and they 
don't want a concrete wall, but I will tell you what they need----
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Madam Speaker, I yield an additional 30 seconds to 
the gentlewoman from Texas.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Speaker, they don't want a four-legged table 
with Pepto Bismol on the table and one doctor. They don't want a room 
of individuals who have a sign that says, ``Flu room.'' They don't want 
the innocent children and families coming across, who are now condemned 
that they are coming across misrepresenting, and they are fleeing 
bloodshed and persecution. And the dominant numbers who are coming 
across the border are women and children and families.
  We are a big enough Nation to have a resolution through real border 
security, through technology, through personnel, through individuals at 
the ports of entry, CBP.
  We know how to do this, and all we need to do is sit down and do it. 
That is why we need the bills that are on the floor, Madam Speaker. 
Open the government now and vote for these bills.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I urge my colleagues to vote ``no'' on 
this bill. I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Madam Speaker, I urge my House colleagues to 
support this resolution and the critical work of the Department of 
Homeland Security. I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. All time for debate has expired.
  Pursuant to House Resolution 5, the previous question is ordered on 
the joint resolution.
  The question is on the engrossment and third reading of the joint 
resolution.
  The joint resolution was ordered to be engrossed and read a third 
time, and was read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentlewoman opposed to the joint 
resolution?
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I am, in its current form.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:
       Ms. Granger moves to recommit the joint resolution H.J. 
     Res. 1 to the Committee on Appropriations.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from Texas is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, the bills that House Democrats have 
chosen to consider today are not in keeping with the months of good-
faith negotiations to resolve the differences between the House, the 
Senate, and the White House.
  More importantly, they fail to truly address the crisis on our 
southern border and the very real threat it poses to the safety and 
security of our homeland.
  We owe it to the American people to work together to address this 
problem and secure our border. It is time to reopen the government and 
fund border security.
  Madam Speaker, I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on the motion to 
recommit, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Madam Speaker, I rise in opposition to the motion 
to recommit.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from California is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Madam Speaker, this shutdown has gone on long 
enough. This motion to recommit would only further prolong the 
shutdown.
  We need to pass H.J. Res. 1 immediately to ensure that all components

[[Page H195]]

of our Department of Homeland Security are open and functional to 
protect the American people.
  Madam Speaker, for those reasons, I urge my colleagues to oppose the 
motion to recommit, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 and clause 9 of rule 
XX, this 15-minute vote on the motion to recommit will be followed by 
5-minute votes on:
  Passage of the joint resolution, if ordered;
  The motion to recommit on H.R. 21; and
  Passage of H.R. 21.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 197, 
nays 233, not voting 2, as follows:

                              [Roll No. 8]

                               YEAS--197

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marino
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                               NAYS--233

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan, Ben Ray
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--2

     Garamendi
     Smucke

                              {time}  2124

  Messrs. GONZALEZ of Texas, MORELLE, SCHNEIDER, Ms. OMAR, and Mr. 
RUPPERSBERGER changed their vote from ``yea'' to ``nay.''
  Messrs. HOLDING, COMER, and HILL of Arkansas changed their vote from 
``nay'' to ``yea.''
  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the joint 
resolution.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. This will be a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 239, 
noes 192, not voting 1, as follows:

                              [Roll No. 9]

                               AYES--239

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hurd (TX)
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan, Ben Ray
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond

[[Page H196]]


     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stefanik
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--192

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marino
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McMorris Rodgers
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Spano
     Stauber
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--1

       
     Smucker
       


                Announcement by the Speaker Pro Tempore

  The SPEAKER pro tempore (during the vote). There are 2 minutes 
remaining.

                              {time}  2134

  So the joint resolution was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________