RECOGNIZING HONG KONG'S BILATERAL RELATIONSHIP WITH THE UNITED STATES; Congressional Record Vol. 165, No. 162
(House of Representatives - October 15, 2019)

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 RECOGNIZING HONG KONG'S BILATERAL RELATIONSHIP WITH THE UNITED STATES

  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and agree to 
the resolution (H. Res. 543) recognizing Hong Kong's bilateral 
relationship with the United States, condemning the interference of the 
People's Republic of China in Hong Kong's affairs, and supporting the 
people of Hong Kong's right to protest, as amended.
  The Clerk read the title of the resolution.
  The text of the resolution is as follows:

                              H. Res. 543

       Whereas the United States-Hong Kong Policy Act of 1992 
     (Public Law 102-383) states--
       (1) ``[s]upport for democratization is a fundamental 
     principle of United States foreign policy'';
       (2) ``the human rights of the people of Hong Kong are of 
     great importance to the United States and are directly 
     relevant to United States interests in Hong Kong [and] serve 
     as a basis for Hong Kong's continued economic prosperity''; 
     and
       (3) ``Hong Kong must remain sufficiently autonomous from 
     the People's Republic of China to justify a different 
     treatment than accorded to the People's Republic of China 
     under United States law'';
       Whereas the United States maintains substantial economic 
     and political interests in Hong Kong, with more than 1,200 
     United States firms operating in the Special Administrative 
     Region, due largely to Hong Kong's strong business 
     environment, predicated on respect for the rule of law and an 
     independent judiciary;
       Whereas the United States supports Hong Kong's ``high 
     degree of autonomy'' promised by the Joint Declaration 
     between the Government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain 
     and the Government of the People's Republic of China on the 
     Question of the Hong Kong (``Joint Declaration'' ) in 
     accordance with the ``One Country, Two Systems'' framework 
     through bilateral agreements, the promotion of trade and 
     investment, and the bolstering of educational, academic, and 
     cultural links;
       Whereas the Department of State reported in its 2019 Hong 
     Kong Policy Act Report, dated March 21, 2019, that the 
     People's Republic of China has carried out a number of 
     actions inconsistent with China's commitments in the Basic 
     Law of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (``Basic 
     Law'') and the Joint Declaration, which have diminished Hong 
     Kong's high degree of autonomy;
       Whereas China has increasingly constrained Hong Kong's 
     freedoms in violation of the ``One Country, Two Systems'' 
     framework by, among other actions, supporting the restriction 
     of entry into Hong Kong for individuals critical of the 
     Communist Party of China, instructing to the Hong Kong 
     Government to refuse a United States extradition request in 
     May 2018, and abusing the national security rationale to 
     justify interference with matters related to Hong Kong 
     politics and governance;
       Whereas on April 3, 2019, the Government of Hong Kong 
     introduced the Fugitive Offenders and Mutual Legal Assistance 
     in Criminal Matters Legislation (Amendment) Bill 2019 
     (commonly known as the ``extradition bill'') that would amend 
     the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance by expanding the existing 
     extradition arrangement to include mainland China, allowing 
     for the handover of any persons in the territory of Hong 
     Kong, residents and non-residents, as well as any materials 
     in their possession;
       Whereas the Department of State issued a statement on June 
     9, 2019, warning that the lack of procedural protections in 
     the bill could negatively impact Hong Kong's longstanding 
     protections of human rights, fundamental freedoms, and 
     democratic values;
       Whereas on June 9, 2019, as many as 1,000,000 people 
     protested against the bill, and on June 12, 2019, tens of 
     thousands staged a protest near the Legislative Council 
     building to express opposition to the bill;
       Whereas on June 12, 2019, the Government of Hong Kong took 
     advantage of the acts of a small group of protesters to 
     classify the largely peaceful protest as an unlawful assembly 
     and a ``riot'', a charge that can result in a prison sentence 
     of up to 10 years for those who were arrested;
       Whereas the police's excessive use of force on June 12, 
     2019, as seen in video footage, to disperse the protestors, 
     including the use of tear gas, bean bag rounds, rubber 
     bullets, batons, and pepper spray, caused severe injuries to 
     protesters;
       Whereas the excessive use of force fueled tensions and 
     contributed to the worsening of violence;
       Whereas on June 16, 2019, as many as 2,000,000 people 
     peacefully gathered in the Admiralty district, which is 
     likely the largest protest in Hong Kong's history;
       Whereas on July 21, 2019, a group alleged to be linked to 
     organized crime violently attacked protestors, innocent 
     bystanders, and journalists with sticks and metal bars in 
     Yuen Long, which resulted in the hospitalization of forty-
     five people, with one person in critical condition;
       Whereas the Hong Kong Police Force have been slow to take 
     meaningful action against those who attacked the protestors 
     on July 21, 2019, suggesting the police may be complicit in 
     their actions;
       Whereas the protestors' demands included--
       (1) the complete withdrawal of the extradition bill;
       (2) the implementation of universal suffrage in the 
     election of the Chief Executive and all members the 
     Legislative Council;
       (3) the establishment of an independent commission to 
     investigate police conduct during the protests;
       (4) the declassification of the protests as a riots; and
       (5) the dropping of all charges against persons who 
     participated in any protests;
       Whereas on July 27, 2019, nine people were injured when 
     police fired rubber bullets at demonstrators in Yuen Long who 
     were protesting the July 21 violent attacks against 
     protestors and the lack of a police response to them;
       Whereas on July 29, 2019, China's spokesman for the State 
     Council's Hong Kong and Macao Affairs Office issued a 
     statement referring to the protesters as ``radical elements 
     committing evil and criminal acts'';
       Whereas on July 30, 2019, China's Foreign Ministry falsely 
     claimed that the pro-democracy protests are the ``work of the 
     United States'', alleging that American officials have 
     interfered in Hong Kong's internal affairs;
       Whereas the Chinese Communist Party has called the protests 
     ``absolutely intolerable'', ``terrorism'', and ``terror 
     atrocities'', raising fears that China may use the People's 
     Liberation Army or the People's Armed Police to violently 
     suppress the protestors;
       Whereas on August 5, 2019, teachers, aviation workers, 
     finance employees, and civil servants went on strike across 
     seven districts, the largest citywide strike in decades, 
     which evolved into a wave of demonstrations

[[Page H8117]]

     and resulted in the police firing approximately 800 tear gas 
     rounds to clear the protestors, almost as many as were used 
     in the previous 8 weeks combined;
       Whereas on August 5, 2019, a mob violently attacked 
     demonstrators with sticks and metal bars in North Point after 
     the demonstrators were dispersed by police from the Admiralty 
     district, and again the police did not respond to the ambush;
       Whereas on August 6, 2019, a Chinese Communist Party 
     official threatened the demonstrators by stating, ``those who 
     play with fire will perish by it'', and ``as for their [the 
     demonstrators'] punishment, it's only a matter of time'';
       Whereas on August 7, 2019, Chinese state media began 
     publishing articles accusing the Political Counselor to the 
     United States Consulate General in Hong Kong of being ``a 
     black hand creating chaos in Hong Kong'', as well as publicly 
     identifying family members of the Consulate General staff;
       Whereas on August 11, 2019, Hong Kong police beat fleeing 
     protesters with batons and fired pepper ball rounds at them 
     at close range;
       Whereas on August 11, 2019, it was reported that a young 
     woman, allegedly a medic, who has since become a symbol for 
     the protest movement, sustained a serious eye injury from a 
     bean-bag round after the police fired a projectile into the 
     crowd;
       Whereas on August 18, 2019, as many as 1,700,000 Hong Kong 
     people attended a peaceful rally against police brutality;
       Whereas on August 31, 2019, Hong Kong Police Force Special 
     Tactical Squad officers beat with batons protesters and train 
     passengers at Prince Edward station; and
       Whereas on September 4, 2019, Hong Kong Chief Executive 
     Carrie Lam announced the Government would withdraw the 
     extradition bill from the Legislative Council's agenda when 
     it reconvenes in October 2019: Now, therefore, be it
       Resolved, That the House of Representatives--
       (1) calls on the Government of Hong Kong to begin 
     negotiations to address the demonstrators' remaining demands, 
     which include--
       (A) the formal withdrawal of the bill from the Hong Kong 
     Legislative Council;
       (B) the implementation of universal suffrage;
       (C) the establishment of an independent investigation into 
     police conduct during the protests;
       (D) the declassification of the protest as a riot; and
       (E) the dropping of all charges against persons arrested 
     during the protests;
       (2) condemns--
       (A) the Hong Kong police's use of force against the 
     demonstrators in ways that are inconsistent with 
     international standards for the use of such equipment and in 
     violation of citizens' rights to freedom of expression and 
     peaceful assembly; and
       (B) the Hong Kong Government for tolerating the use of 
     violent force against protesters by police;
       (3) calls on the Administration to review the 
     appropriateness of sales by United States firms of munitions 
     and crowd-control equipment to Hong Kong, to ensure that they 
     are not used to repress peaceful protests;
       (4) condemns efforts by the Hong Kong and Chinese 
     Governments to characterize the protests as ``riots'' and to 
     falsely accuse the United States of orchestrating political 
     instability that they alone created;
       (5) shares the concerns of the people of Hong Kong that the 
     Hong Kong Government's proposed amendments to the Fugitive 
     Offenders Ordinance, if adopted, would negatively impact the 
     territory's long-standing protections of human rights, 
     fundamental freedoms, and democratic values as enshrined in 
     the Basic Law and the Sino-British Joint Declaration;
       (6) recognizes that the ``One Country, Two Systems'' 
     framework and the Basic Law require that Hong Kong is 
     afforded a high degree of autonomy with respect to economic 
     and trade matters and the rule of law;
       (7) condemns Chinese state media for targeting staff and 
     family members of the United States Consulate General in Hong 
     Kong;
       (8) calls on the Government of Hong Kong and all 
     governments--
       (A) to protect the rights of freedom of expression and 
     peaceful assembly;
       (B) to condemn all acts of violence against those seeking 
     to further their democratic rights; and
       (C) to refrain from the use of violence; and
       (9) calls on the Government of Hong Kong and the Government 
     of China to abide by the provisions of the Joint Declaration 
     and the Basic Law.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Sherman) and the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Smith) 
each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.


                             General Leave

  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include 
extraneous material on H. Res. 543.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from California?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  The world is watching Hong Kong, and Hong Kong is watching the floor 
of the House of Representatives. People by the tens of thousands in 
Hong Kong have demonstrated in favor of bills we are considering here 
today. In doing so, they have taken great risk to themselves and showed 
tremendous courage. The least we could do is pass these bills.
  I rise today to speak in favor of these bills on Hong Kong. I am 
proud to cosponsor all of the legislation under consideration dealing 
with Hong Kong.
  I want to first focus on a resolution I introduced with our 
colleagues, Mrs. Wagner; Mr. Connolly; and Mr. Yoho, the ranking member 
of the Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, and Nonproliferation, my 
partner on the Asia, the Pacific, and Nonproliferation Subcommittee.
  This resolution demonstrates that the so-called extradition bill is 
an infringement on the rights of the people of Hong Kong, including 
their right to a high degree of autonomy, autonomy that was granted to 
Hong Kong when that city was returned to the control of Beijing.
  This resolution also establishes that the House of Representatives 
stands with Hong Kong protestors and supports their five major demands. 
These demands are:
  Complete withdrawal of the extradition bill;
  Universal suffrage in the election of the chief executive and all 
members of the Legislative Council;
  The establishment of an independent commission to investigate the 
police's excessive use of force against the protestors;
  The changing of the classification so these protests are not 
classified as riots and the participants are not classified as rioters; 
and, finally,
  Having all charges against the people who participate in these 
protests dropped.
  Many of us in Congress and around the United States have been 
inspired by the people of Hong Kong standing up for their fundamental 
rights over the last few months. One of the protests brought nearly 25 
percent of the entire population of Hong Kong into the streets. That is 
simply unprecedented.
  It would behoove Beijing to heed the protestors' demands. Sadly, 
instead of recognizing their own role in causing these protests, the 
Chinese Communist Party has tried to characterize the demonstrations as 
the handiwork of the United States. We categorically reject this 
assertion.
  These protests were motivated, first and foremost, in reaction to the 
effort by the People's Republic of China and the Chinese Communist 
Party to interfere in the autonomy that was promised to the people of 
Hong Kong. These protests were motivated by the policies of Beijing and 
the Hong Kong government that have increasingly reduced the city's high 
degree of autonomy.
  The state-run media has even gone so far as to accuse a particular 
State Department official by name of orchestrating the protests. That 
is an insult to the people of Hong Kong, who speak for themselves and 
act for themselves. Moreover, it has put that diplomat and her family 
in danger. This is simply unacceptable behavior, and the Stand with 
Hong Kong Resolution criticizes this egregious action by the Chinese 
Government.
  Finally, let me reiterate my support for the other complementary 
bills that we are considering today on Hong Kong.
  The first is the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act of 2019, 
which was introduced by our colleague Mr. Smith, who will be managing 
time on the other side. This legislation will amend the Hong Kong 
Policy Act of 1992 to account for the changes that have taken place 
over the last 25 years.
  The Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act also conveys to Beijing 
that it cannot undermine the city's freedom while expecting America to 
still give that city preferential trade arrangements.
  I am also a strong supporter of Congressman Jim McGovern's PROTECT 
Hong Kong Act, which would restrict U.S. firms' ability to sell the 
Hong Kong police weapons to use against protestors.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.

[[Page H8118]]

  

  Mr. SMITH of New Jersey. Mr. Speaker, I yield as much time as he may 
consume to the gentleman from Florida (Mr. Yoho).
  Mr. YOHO. Mr. Speaker, I thank my colleagues, Mr. Smith and Mr. 
Sherman, whom I have the pleasure of serving with on the Foreign 
Affairs Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, and Nonproliferation, for 
raising this important topic.
  I rise today to bring attention to three very important and timely 
measures that the House will consider this afternoon. These bipartisan 
measures passed out of the House Foreign Affairs Committee unanimously, 
and they include H. Res. 543, by Representative Sherman; H.R. 3289, by 
Representative Smith; and H.R. 4270, by Representative McGovern. I am 
proud to say that I am a cosponsor of all three.
  Over the past 5 months, mass civilian protests in Hong Kong have 
begun to shed light on the deterioration of the Chinese Communist 
Party's influence outside of mainland China. Rising resentment in Hong 
Kong is not simply a result of the ill-fated extradition law championed 
by Chief Executive Carrie Lam, but the continued encroachment on 
freedom and liberties by President Xi Jinping and the Chinese Communist 
Party.
  Despite the 1997 Sino-British agreement, leaders in Beijing continued 
their high-intensity political pressure campaign to subdue dissent 
within Hong Kong, which has emboldened the people of Hong Kong to stand 
up against Beijing, but more for freedom. This is illustrated by the 
people of Hong Kong raising and waving the American flag while burning 
the Chinese flag.
  The protestors now maintain five demands that Mr. Sherman already 
talked about: withdrawal of the extradition bill; drop charges against 
the protestors; launch an investigation into the police forces; and 
universal suffrage, which would allow voters to directly pick their 
leaders instead of hand-picked leaders of their chief executive by 
Beijing.
  As the ranking member of the Subcommittee on Asia, the Pacific, and 
Nonproliferation, I have been extremely outspoken against the continued 
deterioration of rights and freedoms in Hong Kong. The passage of these 
important pieces of legislation will send a strong message to President 
Xi Jinping and the Chinese Communist Party that these abuses will not 
be tolerated by the international community.
  Keep in mind that China and Great Britain signed this international 
agreement in 1997, where it stated that Hong Kong would be an 
autonomous region, self-ruled, and have an independent judiciary 
system. Only 22 years into it, Xi Jinping has said, as far as he is 
concerned, that agreement is null and void, and so you see the people 
of Hong Kong standing up in protest. Because they have experienced 
freedom and liberty, they are willing to risk their life.
  I just had a group of Hong Kong students come in. These are the 
people who are right in the forefront of the protests in Hong Kong, and 
they came to our office begging for help from the American people, from 
the American Government.
  Now, granted, Hong Kong, we all know, is a province of China. But we 
also know there was an agreement, for 50 years, it was to be 
autonomously ruled with an independent judiciary committee that Xi 
Jinping and the Communist Party of China have canceled, and I think 
this is a message for all people of the intent of what China is doing.
  We, as Members of Congress, have so much more that we represent. It 
is not a political body where we fight back and forth and discuss 
different things. What we represent here in America is what people 
around the world are willing to risk their life for and to stand up, in 
front of the face of adversity, to one of the emerging superpowers of 
the world and say: We do not accept your communist authority rule. We 
want you to honor liberty and freedom.
  See, the people of Hong Kong, they have experienced freedom and 
liberties. Xi Jinping and the Communist Party can't understand that 
because they have never experienced freedom or liberty. As supposedly 
the greatest deliberative body on the planet, this transcends way 
beyond what we do here.
  This is standing up for ideals that people around the world are 
willing to die for, and it is this body that can send a strong message 
to the Chinese Communist Party, to Xi Jinping that says we will not let 
liberties and freedom be taken away from people who have claimed that, 
who have known that all their life, and that that should be honored by 
those who are trying to take it apart.
  Before they want to take it apart, I suggest Xi Jinping and the 
Communist Party try freedom and liberty: Try democracy for a while; you 
might like it.
  I think these are three very important bills that should pass through 
this House unanimously and should pass through the Senate to show that 
we stand in solidarity with the folks, our friends in Hong Kong; and, 
if not, if we don't send a strong message, it will embolden China.
  I hope manufacturers and all businesses around the world that do 
business in Hong Kong are paying attention to this, because they are 
the ones that are creating a business environment that feeds China so 
that they can continue these terrible acts of suppression of liberties 
and freedoms. I hope the business community will say: You know what, we 
stand with the American people.
  It pains me when I see people like the NBA or other organizations, 
corporations that will bow down to China, and they do it for profit. It 
is time that we stand up not just as Americans, but people who are the 
bearers of liberty and freedom around the world that the rest of the 
world looks to.
  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SMITH of New Jersey. Mr. Speaker, I yield such time as he may 
consume to the gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. Hill).
  Mr. HILL of Arkansas. Mr. Speaker, I thank my friend from New Jersey 
very much for allowing me to speak on the subject of Hong Kong today.
  I rise in support of all these bills before us today, particularly 
the bill from my friend from New Jersey, the Hong Kong Human Rights and 
Democracy Act, and I stand in solidarity with all freedom-loving people 
in Hong Kong.
  For more than 4 months, we have witnessed Hong Kong citizens 
peacefully protest for the right to live in a free and fair political 
system.
  Over my years, I have traveled to Hong Kong and witnessed their 
innovative spirit and work ethic. In fact, Hong Kong was the model for 
the post-World War II growth of the Asian Tigers in their prosperity 
and innovation.

                              {time}  1545

  In the 1980s, when a proponent of welfare statism queried pro-growth 
economist Melvyn B. Krauss:
  ``But how many Hong Kongs can the world have?''
  Dr. Krauss replied, ``As many as the world will allow itself.''
  Freedom lovers should rally to that wisdom.
  This summer, I had the opportunity to hear directly from leaders in 
Hong Kong dedicated to religious tolerance and democracy as promised in 
the one country, two systems agreement.
  The people of Hong Kong continue to wave American flags during their 
protests as a symbol for the freedoms that they desire.
  Rather than receiving support from all over our great land here in 
this country, they have had to witness the blatant hypocrisy that we 
have seen from U.S. companies, including the National Basketball 
Association, more worried about the bottom line and retribution from 
the PRC, rather than standing up for the basic human rights that we are 
so blessed with in this country and that we advocate for as a part of 
our foreign policy all over this globe.
  The free world is looking to us for leadership, and that is why I 
thank the gentleman from New Jersey (Mr. Smith), Mr. McGovern, and Mr. 
Sherman for supporting these legislative efforts on a bipartisan basis, 
but more importantly, supporting the people in Hong Kong that they have 
the right to freedom of expression and democratic governance guaranteed 
under that 50-year arrangement agreed to in 1997 by both--by both, Mr. 
Speaker--the United Kingdom and the People's Republic of China.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge all my colleagues to support these measures 
today, and I thank their sponsors.
  Mr. SMITH of New Jersey. Mr. Speaker, I have no further requests for

[[Page H8119]]

time, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. SHERMAN. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself as much time as I may 
consume, and I will close.
  Mr. Speaker, several years ago, I joined the then chairman of the 
Foreign Affairs Committee, Mr. Royce, in visiting Hong Kong. We had a 
chance to spend a lot of time with both young and more experienced 
leaders fighting for democracy and autonomy for Hong Kong. And this 
has, in fact, been the policy of the United States since the 1992 Hong 
Kong Policy Act, which establishes our support for democratization as a 
fundamental principle of U.S. foreign policy.
  In recent days, we have seen demonstrators in Hong Kong asking the 
U.S. Congress to pass the three pieces of legislation that are before 
us. The protestors want to know if our support for democracy is merely 
rhetorical or if we are willing to take action to defend our 
principles.
  By passing these three bills today, we will affirm that the U.S. 
Congress supports democracy, human rights, and appropriate autonomy for 
Hong Kong.
  Mr. Speaker, as to all three bills, I want to thank Speaker Pelosi 
and Chairman Engel and many other colleagues for their leadership on 
this issue.
  Mr. Speaker, turning to the specifics of H. Res. 543, the specific 
matter before us at this moment, I want to thank my Foreign Affairs 
Committee colleagues for helping to introduce this measure, including 
Mrs. Wagner, Mr. Connolly, and Mr. Yoho, who spoke just a few minutes 
ago.
  H. Res. 543 recognizes our country's strong relationship with the 
people of Hong Kong. It is an important measure of solidarity at a time 
when protesters are facing police brutality and China is trying to take 
away the autonomy that it promised.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues to support this measure, and I 
yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Speaker, I rise in strong support of H. Res. 
543, a resolution ``Recognizing Hong Kong's bilateral relationship with 
the United States, condemning the interference of the People's Republic 
of China in Hong Kong's affairs, and supporting the people of Hong 
Kong's right to protest.''
  As a senior member of the House Committee on the Judiciary, I support 
H. Res. 543 because it calls on the Hong Kong government to address the 
protesters' five demands, condemns police brutality against peaceful 
protesters, and condemns efforts to falsely accuse U.S. diplomats of 
fueling unrest.
  On June 30, 1997, China resumed the exercise of sovereignty over Hong 
Kong, ending more than 150 years of British colonial rule.
  Hong Kong is a customs territory and economic entity separate from 
the rest of China and is able to enter into international agreements on 
its own behalf in commercial, economic, and certain legal matters.
  U.S. policy toward Hong Kong is stated in the U.S.-Hong Kong Policy 
Act of 1992 and grounded in the determination to promote Hong Kong's 
prosperity, autonomy, and way of life.
  The United States maintains substantial economic and political 
interests in Hong Kong.
  The U.S. supports Hong Kong's autonomy under the ``One Country, Two 
Systems'' framework by concluding and implementing bilateral 
agreements; promoting trade and investment; broadening law enforcement 
cooperation; bolstering educational, academic, and cultural links; 
supporting high-level visits of U.S. officials; and serving the large 
community of U.S. citizens and visitors.
  After 22 years, protests erupted over Carrie Lam's proposal to amend 
extradition laws to allow suspects to be transferred to mainland China 
for trial.
  A few days after proposing the amendment to the extradition laws, 
Carrie Lam suspended the proposal, but the protests in Hong Kong 
continue as the people of Hong Kong demand the high degree of autonomy 
promised by the Sino-British Joint Declaration of 1984.
  It is critical for the United States Congress to stand with the women 
and men advocating and speaking up for the autonomy and dignity of 
people of Hong Kong.
  I applaud the efforts and sacrifices pro-democracy activists have 
made and they should know that the United States fully supports their 
desire for freedom and peace, and strongly condemns the violent and 
oppressive tactics of the Hong Kong police.
  As a senior member of the House Committee on Homeland Security, I 
support the bilateral relationship between Hong Kong and the United 
States and the promotion of international peace.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge my colleagues to join me in supporting H. Res. 
543 to condemn the brutality faced by the people of Hong Kong and which 
poses a strong threat to the democratic values we work to protect.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Sherman) that the House suspend the 
rules and agree to the resolution, H. Res. 543, as amended.
  The question was taken; and (two-thirds being in the affirmative) the 
rules were suspended and the resolution, as amended, was agreed to.
  The title of the resolution was amended so as to read: ``A resolution 
recognizing Hong Kong's bilateral relationship with the United States, 
condemning the People's Republic of China for violating their 
obligations to the people of Hong Kong, and supporting the people of 
Hong Kong's right to freedom of assembly and peaceful protest.''.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________