PROVIDING FOR CONSIDERATION OF H.R. 823, COLORADO OUTDOOR RECREATION AND ECONOMY ACT; PROVIDING FOR CONSIDERATION OF H.R. 1373, GRAND CANYON CENTENNIAL PROTECTION ACT; PROVIDING FOR CONSIDERATION...; Congressional Record Vol. 165, No. 171
(House of Representatives - October 29, 2019)

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                              {time}  1215
 PROVIDING FOR CONSIDERATION OF H.R. 823, COLORADO OUTDOOR RECREATION 
AND ECONOMY ACT; PROVIDING FOR CONSIDERATION OF H.R. 1373, GRAND CANYON 
 CENTENNIAL PROTECTION ACT; PROVIDING FOR CONSIDERATION OF H.R. 2181, 
CHACO CULTURAL HERITAGE AREA PROTECTION ACT OF 2019; AND PROVIDING FOR 
 PROCEEDINGS DURING THE PERIOD FROM NOVEMBER 1, 2019, THROUGH NOVEMBER 
                                11, 2019

  Ms. SHALALA. Mr. Speaker, by direction of the Committee on Rules, I 
call up House Resolution 656 and ask for its immediate consideration.
  The Clerk read the resolution, as follows:

                              H. Res. 656

       Resolved, That at any time after adoption of this 
     resolution the Speaker may, pursuant to clause 2(b) of rule 
     XVIII, declare the House resolved into the Committee of the 
     Whole House on the state of the Union for consideration of 
     the bill (H.R. 823) to provide for the designation of certain 
     wilderness areas, recreation management areas, and 
     conservation areas in the State of Colorado, and for other 
     purposes. The first reading of the bill shall be dispensed 
     with. All points of order against consideration of the bill 
     are waived. General debate shall be confined to the bill and 
     amendments specified in this section and shall not exceed one 
     hour equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking 
     minority member of the Committee on Natural Resources. After 
     general debate the bill shall be considered for amendment 
     under the five-minute rule. The amendment in the nature of a 
     substitute recommended by the Committee on Natural Resources 
     now printed in the bill, modified by the amendment printed in 
     part A of the report of the Committee on Rules accompanying 
     this resolution, shall be considered as adopted in the House 
     and in the Committee of the Whole. The bill, as amended, 
     shall be considered as the original bill for the purpose of 
     further amendment under the five-minute rule and shall be 
     considered as read. All points of order against provisions in 
     the bill, as amended, are waived. No further amendment to the 
     bill, as amended, shall be in order except those printed in 
     part B of the report of the Committee on Rules. Each such 
     further amendment may be offered only in the order printed in 
     the report, may be offered only by a Member designated in the 
     report, shall be considered as read, shall be debatable for 
     the time specified in the report equally divided and 
     controlled by the proponent and an opponent, shall not be 
     subject to amendment, and shall not be subject to a demand 
     for division of the question in the House or in the Committee 
     of the Whole. All points of order against such further 
     amendments are waived. At the conclusion of consideration of 
     the bill for amendment the Committee shall rise and report 
     the bill, as amended, to the House with such further 
     amendments as may have been adopted. The previous question 
     shall be considered as ordered on the bill, as amended, and 
     on any further amendment thereto to final passage without 
     intervening motion except one motion to recommit with or 
     without instructions.
       Sec. 2.  At any time after adoption of this resolution the 
     Speaker may, pursuant to clause 2(b) of rule XVIII, declare 
     the House resolved into the Committee of the Whole House on 
     the state of the Union for consideration of the bill (H.R. 
     1373) to protect, for current and future generations, the 
     watershed, ecosystem, and cultural heritage of the Grand 
     Canyon region in the State of Arizona, and for other 
     purposes. The first reading of the bill shall be dispensed 
     with. All points of order against consideration of the bill 
     are waived. General debate shall be confined to the bill and 
     shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by 
     the chair and ranking minority member of the Committee on 
     Natural Resources. After general debate the bill shall be 
     considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. It shall 
     be in order to consider as an original bill for the purpose 
     of amendment under the five-minute rule the amendment in the 
     nature of a substitute recommended by the Committee on 
     Natural Resources now printed in the bill. The committee 
     amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be considered 
     as read. All points of order against the committee amendment 
     in the nature of a substitute are waived. No amendment to the 
     committee amendment in the nature of a substitute shall be in 
     order except those printed in part C of the report of the 
     Committee on Rules accompanying this resolution. Each such 
     amendment may be offered only in the order printed in the 
     report, may be offered only by a Member designated in the 
     report, shall be considered as read, shall be debatable for 
     the time specified in the report equally divided and 
     controlled by the proponent and an opponent, shall not be 
     subject to amendment, and shall not be subject to a demand 
     for division of the question in the House or in the Committee 
     of the Whole. All points of order against such amendments are 
     waived. At the conclusion of consideration of the bill for 
     amendment the Committee shall rise and report the bill to the 
     House with such amendments as may have been adopted. Any 
     Member may demand a separate vote in the House on any 
     amendment adopted in the Committee of the Whole to the bill 
     or to the committee amendment in the nature of a substitute. 
     The previous question shall be considered as ordered on the 
     bill and amendments thereto to final passage without 
     intervening motion except one motion to recommit with or 
     without instructions.
       Sec. 3.  At any time after adoption of this resolution the 
     Speaker may, pursuant to clause 2(b) of rule XVIII, declare 
     the House resolved into the Committee of the Whole House on 
     the state of the Union for consideration of the bill (H.R. 
     2181) to provide for the withdrawal and protection of certain 
     Federal land in the State of New Mexico. The first reading of 
     the bill shall be dispensed with. All points of order against 
     consideration of the bill are waived. General debate shall be 
     confined to the bill and amendments specified in this section 
     and shall not exceed one hour equally divided and controlled 
     by the chair and ranking minority member of the Committee on 
     Natural Resources. After general debate the bill shall be 
     considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. The 
     amendment printed in part D of the report of the Committee on 
     Rules accompanying this resolution shall be considered as 
     adopted in the House and in the Committee of the Whole. The 
     bill, as amended, shall be considered as read. All points of 
     order against provisions in the bill, as amended, are waived. 
     No further amendment to the bill, as amended, shall be in 
     order except those printed in part E of the report of the 
     Committee on Rules. Each such further amendment may be 
     offered only in the order printed in the report, may be 
     offered only by a Member designated in the report, shall be 
     considered as read, shall be debatable for the time specified 
     in the report equally divided and controlled by the proponent 
     and an opponent, shall not be subject to amendment, and shall 
     not be subject to a demand for division of the question in 
     the House or in the Committee of the Whole. All points of 
     order against such further amendments are waived. At the 
     conclusion of consideration of the bill for amendment the 
     Committee shall rise and report the bill, as amended, to the 
     House with such further amendments as may have been adopted. 
     The previous question shall be considered as ordered on the 
     bill, as amended, and on any further amendment thereto to 
     final passage without intervening motion except one motion to 
     recommit with or without instructions.
       Sec. 4.  On any legislative day during the period from 
     November 1, 2019, through November 11, 2019--
        (a) the Journal of the proceedings of the previous day 
     shall be considered as approved; and
       (b) the Chair may at any time declare the House adjourned 
     to meet at a date and time, within the limits of clause 4, 
     section 5, article I of the Constitution, to be announced by 
     the Chair in declaring the adjournment.
       Sec. 5.  The Speaker may appoint Members to perform the 
     duties of the Chair for the duration of the period addressed 
     by section 4 of this resolution as though under clause 8(a) 
     of rule I.
       Sec. 6.  Each day during the period addressed by section 4 
     of this resolution shall not constitute a calendar or 
     legislative day for purposes of clause 7(c)(1) of rule XXII.
       Sec. 7.  Each day during the period addressed by section 4 
     of this resolution shall not constitute a legislative day for 
     purposes of clause 7 of rule XV.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from Florida is recognized 
for 1 hour.
  Ms. SHALALA. Mr. Speaker, for the purpose of debate only, I yield the 
customary 30 minutes to the gentlewoman from Arizona (Mrs. Lesko), 
pending which I yield myself such time as I

[[Page H8551]]

may consume. During consideration of this resolution, all time yielded 
is for the purpose of debate only.


                             General Leave

  Ms. SHALALA. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
may have 5 legislative days in which to revise and extend their 
remarks.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from Florida?
  There was no objection.
  Ms. SHALALA. Mr. Speaker, the Rules Committee met last night and 
reported House Resolution 656, providing for consideration of H.R. 823, 
the Colorado Outdoor Recreation and Economy Act; H.R. 1373, the Grand 
Canyon Centennial Protection Act; and H.R. 2181, the Chaco Cultural 
Heritage Protection Act, each under a structured rule.
  The rule provides each bill with 1 hour of general debate equally 
divided and controlled by the chair and the ranking member of the 
Committee on Natural Resources. The rule makes in order 13 amendments 
total: 10 Republican amendments and 3 Democratic amendments. The rule 
also provides each bill with a motion to recommit.
  Finally, the rule provides recess instructions from November 1 
through November 11.
  Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of the bills in this rule: H.R. 
823, H.R. 1373, and H.R. 2181. These important bills recognize the need 
to protect unique and irreplaceable American landscapes--public lands 
that belong to all of us, not to the highest bidder and not to any 
individual Representative or party.
  President Theodore Roosevelt once said: ``Of all the questions which 
can come before this Nation . . . there is none which compares in 
importance with the great central task of leaving this land even a 
better land for our descendants than it is for us.''
  And that is what these three bills attempt to do. They represent the 
culmination of years of locally driven efforts. These bills protect 
some of our most iconic lands and resources.
  H.R. 823 is the result of collaborative efforts among a diverse set 
of local stakeholders with a shared interest in providing long-term 
protections for public lands in Colorado. The bill builds on earlier 
proposals to protect roughly 400,000 acres of public lands for the 
benefit of the people of Colorado and all Americans.
  H.R. 2181 would withdraw lands within a longstanding, 10-mile buffer 
zone around the Chaco Culture National Historical Park. This withdrawal 
would protect an ancestral site for the Puebloan and Tribal 
communities. It would prevent damage to previously undiscovered 
cultural resources. Chaco Culture National Historical Park, a UNESCO 
World Heritage Site, was the hub of trade and culture for thousands of 
ancestral Puebloans from 1850 to 1250 A.D.
  Lastly, H.R. 1373 would permanently prohibit new mining claims on 
approximately 1 million acres of public land surrounding Grand Canyon 
National Park, the crown jewel of our National Park System--of course, 
not counting Everglades National Park or Biscayne National Park in 
south Florida.
  In south Florida, we are all too familiar with what can happen if we 
fail to protect our most vulnerable and most unique lands and waters. 
Whether the Everglades, Big Cypress, and the Miami River or the Grand 
Canyon, Chaco Culture National Historical Park, and public lands in 
Colorado, we have a deep obligation to conserve and restore these 
lands. And science tells us, as the climate crisis intensifies, these 
efforts have never been more urgent.
  Mr. Speaker, I proudly support these historic steps forward. Let us 
pass these bills.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LESKO. Mr. Speaker, I thank Representative Shalala for yielding 
me the customary 30 minutes, and I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Speaker, energy and mining are critical drivers of the American 
economy and quality of life. These industries create thousands of well-
paying jobs.
  The United States cannot reach or sustain our potential without 
developing our natural resources. But, today, we are debating three 
bills that put American energy, American quality of life, and American 
national security at risk.
  It seems just yesterday that I was here at this very same podium 
speaking much of these same words. In fact, it was just last month. At 
that time, I spoke out against bills banning offshore drilling.
  Now this majority wants to pass sweeping bans on even more domestic 
natural resources. This time they want to ban American energy from 
Colorado, New Mexico, and my home State of Arizona.
  As I said last month, they want to ban it all; and American families, 
including Arizona families, will pay the price.

                              {time}  1230

  H.R. 823 withdraws areas in Colorado from mineral development. This 
bill particularly impacts its Third Congressional District, represented 
by Congressman Scott Tipton. Sixty-five percent of the lands affected 
by this bill are in his district, yet, this bill does not have his 
support, nor the support of any of the Republican members of the 
Colorado delegation.
  Similarly, H.R. 2181 withdraws Federal lands in New Mexico from 
resource development. It also terminates all non-producing oil and gas 
leases on those lands.
  Finally, H.R. 1373, I believe, is a misleadingly-titled land grab 
that deals with land far outside the Grand Canyon. I believe it is 
deeply misguided.
  Arizona currently produces $6.6 billion in nonfuel minerals, which 
makes it the second largest State in the production of minerals in the 
United States. Yet, this bill would permanently lock up about 1 million 
acres of public lands in Arizona, hampering the economic potential of 
my State.
  The area impacted by this bill also contains the largest tract of 
uranium deposits in the country. Restricting access to these deposits 
puts our national security at risk because we have to rely on foreign 
countries to provide us uranium.
  It is also important to note that much of the lands affected by this 
bill are in Arizona's Fourth Congressional District, represented by my 
good friend, Congressman Gosar. Yet, Mr. Gosar has expressed very clear 
opposition to this bill.
  These three bills ignore the economic benefits of domestic energy 
production. Energy development brings high-paying jobs, facilitates 
manufacturing and investment, and provides government revenues. Energy 
development in the United States also makes energy more affordable for 
everyone.
  The average salary paid in the natural gas and oil development fields 
is $113,000 a year; and the energy industry supports 300,000 jobs.
  Domestic oil production has allowed Americans to spend 28 percent 
less in fuel, resulting in nearly $1,000 in savings per family in 2017 
alone. To my constituents, that is a lot of money.
  I believe in an all-of-the-above energy approach. In my home State of 
Arizona, this is a reality and a necessity. We have to rely on multiple 
and diverse energy sources to ensure affordable and reliable energy.
  I support nuclear, hydroelectric, coal, sun, wind, and other 
alternative sources, and I also support domestic oil and natural gas 
production.
  An all-of-the-above approach, like that in Arizona, would benefit 
American families and their quality of life.
  In contrast, the bans that the Democrats propose would harm the U.S. 
economy, threaten our national security, and increase energy prices and 
rates on consumers.
  I urge opposition to the rule, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. SHALALA. Mr. Speaker, I have no further speakers. I am prepared 
to close.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LESKO. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  If we defeat the previous question, I will offer an amendment to the 
rule to make in order a resolution to prevent any moratorium on the use 
of hydraulic fracking on Federal lands unless authorized by Congress.
  Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent to insert into the Record the 
text of my amendment, along with extraneous material, immediately prior 
to the vote on the previous question.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentlewoman from Arizona?

[[Page H8552]]

  There was no objection.
  Mrs. LESKO. Mr. Speaker, this resolution would affirm that States 
should maintain primacy for the regulation of hydraulic fracturing and 
prevent any President from imposing a ban on hydraulic fracturing.
  In recent weeks, many of the Democratic candidates for President have 
pledged to ban hydraulic fracturing in the United States, a campaign 
promise straight out of the ``keep it in the ground'' playbook.
  While this widely-used practice is often vilified by extreme 
environmentalists and proponents of the Green New Deal, in fact, 
hydraulic fracturing is heavily regulated by the States and governed by 
stringent industry standards throughout the country.
  American households and businesses have benefited significantly from 
the shale gas revolution. After the introduction of hydraulic 
fracturing techniques, U.S. gas bills fell by $13 billion collectively 
every year from 2007-2013.
  All the while, natural gas production using fracking is driving 
emissions reductions, resulting in the lowest emission levels in a 
generation. In fact, methane emissions have decreased 15 percent since 
1990 as natural gas production increased over 50 percent.
  Thanks to hydraulic fracturing, the U.S. is leading the way in 
emissions reductions through innovation in the energy sector. In 2017, 
U.S. carbon emissions reached the lowest level since 1992, and per 
capita emissions reached the lowest level since 1950.
  Also, banning domestic oil and gas production will return the U.S. to 
a time when we relied on foreign countries for oil and gas. Remember 
the 1970s? We do not want to put our country in a national security 
risk.
  Mr. Speaker, in closing, the bills before us today are harmful to 
American jobs, American quality of life, and American security. The 
message underlying these bills is the false notion that domestic energy 
production is harmful.
  I cannot disagree more. Domestic energy production creates hundreds 
of thousands of well-paying jobs, lowers electricity bills, and 
prevents us from being dependent on foreign actors.
  Utilizing America's natural resources is a commonsense step for 
America's energy future. America must be able to utilize its natural 
resources for our economy and for our national security. We should 
encourage an expansion of domestic energy production, but, instead, my 
Democrat colleagues in the majority seek to limit them.

  Mr. Speaker, I urge ``no'' on the previous question, ``no'' on the 
underlying measure, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. SHALALA. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my time.
  Mr. Speaker, with all due respect to my distinguished colleague and 
friend from Arizona, these bills recognize that some places, lands that 
belong to Coloradans, to Arizonans, to the ancestral Pueblo peoples, 
belong to all Americans, and they are just too precious to exploit.
  I would like to close, once again, by quoting our conservation 
President, Teddy Roosevelt. ``We have fallen heirs to the most glorious 
heritage a people ever received, and each one must do his part if we 
wish to show that the Nation is worthy of this good fortune.''
  Mr. Speaker, today we are doing our part.
  Mr. Speaker, I urge a ``yes'' vote on the rule and the previous 
question.
  The material previously referred to by Mrs. Lesko is as follows:

                   Amendment to House Resolution 656

       At the end of the resolution, add the following:
       Sec. 8. That immediately upon adoption of this resolution, 
     the House shall resolve into the Committee of the Whole House 
     on the state of the Union for consideration of the resolution 
     (H. Res. 659) affirming that States should maintain primacy 
     for the regulation of hydraulic fracturing for oil and 
     natural gas production on State and private lands and that 
     the President should not declare a moratorium on the use of 
     hydraulic fracturing on Federal lands (including the Outer 
     Continental Shelf), State lands, private lands, or lands held 
     in trust for an Indian Tribe unless such moratorium is 
     authorized by an Act of Congress. The first reading of the 
     resolution shall be dispensed with. All points of order 
     against consideration of the resolution are waived. General 
     debate shall be confined to the resolution and shall not 
     exceed one hour equally divided and controlled by the chair 
     and ranking minority member of the Committee on Natural 
     Resources. After general debate the resolution shall be 
     considered for amendment under the five-minute rule. All 
     points of order against provisions in the resolution are 
     waived. When the committee rises and reports the resolution 
     back to the House with a recommendation that the resolution 
     be adopted, the previous question shall be considered as 
     ordered on the resolution and amendments thereto to adoption 
     without intervening motion. If the Committee of the Whole 
     rises and reports that it has come to no resolution on the 
     resolution, then on the next legislative day the House shall, 
     immediately after the third daily order of business under 
     clause 1 of rule XIV, resolve into the Committee of the Whole 
     for further consideration of the resolution.
       Sec. 9. Clause 1(c) of rule XIX shall not apply to the 
     consideration of H. Res. 659.

  Ms. SHALALA. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time, and I 
move the previous question on the resolution.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on ordering the previous 
question.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.
  Mrs. LESKO. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX, further 
proceedings on this question will be postponed.

                          ____________________