THE VOTING RIGHTS ADVANCEMENT ACT OF 2019; Congressional Record Vol. 165, No. 195
(House of Representatives - December 06, 2019)

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[Pages H9331-H9334]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




               THE VOTING RIGHTS ADVANCEMENT ACT OF 2019

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 1(c) of rule XIX, further 
consideration of the bill (H.R. 4) to amend the Voting Rights Act of 
1965 to revise the criteria for determining which States and political 
subdivisions are subject to section 4 of the Act, and for other 
purposes, will now resume.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I have a motion to 
recommit at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentleman opposed to the bill?
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. I am in its current form.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Mr. Davis moves to recommit the bill H.R. 4 to the 
     Committee on the Judiciary with instructions to report the 
     same back to the House forthwith with the following 
     amendment:
       Page 39, after line 9, insert the following:

     SEC. 11. RULE OF CONSTRUCTION.

       Nothing in this Act or the amendments made by this Act may 
     be construed to allow fines or other amounts paid to the 
     United States in connection with a violation of title I of 
     the Voting Rights Act of 1965 (52 U.S.C. 10301 et seq.), 
     including any amount paid pursuant to a settlement agreement 
     (including a plea agreement, deferred prosecution agreement, 
     or non-prosecution agreement), to be used to make a payment 
     in support of a campaign for election for the office of 
     Senator or Representative in, or Delegate or Resident 
     Commissioner to, the Congress.

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois (during the reading). Mr. Speaker, I ask 
unanimous consent to waive the reading of the motion to recommit.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Illinois?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Illinois is recognized for 5 minutes in support of his motion.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, H.R. 4 is the fourth 
partisan attempt by this majority to federalize our elections. One 
thing all four of these partisan bills have in common is they all have 
good titles.
  In October, the majority jammed through H.R. 4617, the SHIELD Act, an 
attempt to federally hijack campaign finance law in this country. In 
June, the majority jammed through H.R. 2722, the SAFE Act, an attempt 
to federally hijack election infrastructure in this country. And in 
February, the majority jammed through H.R. 1, the For the People Act, a 
piece of legislation that, as introduced, would fund all of our 
campaigns with tax dollars from hardworking Americans.
  Catchy titles can't hide the facts, and the facts are that these four 
bills are bad partisan policy that would negatively affect the American 
people.
  When the Democrats proposed public financing of campaigns in H.R. 1, 
I could hardly believe it. The 6-to-1 small-dollar campaign match 
program would create a mandatory donation from the American taxpayer to 
a political candidate.
  For every $200 donated by hardworking Americans to any political 
campaign of all of us in this institution, the Federal Government, on 
the backs of the taxpayers, would give $1,200 to that same politician's 
campaign.
  This program would do nothing but fill the swamp, and any Member who 
voted for it was voting to fill their own pockets and the pockets of 
political operatives nationwide.
  At Rules Committee, though, this was changed. The shell game now 
includes a fund which is supposedly financed through fines and 
settlements. But we have now seen the CBO score, and this fund does not 
support itself.
  So what happens when it fails? I will tell you. It will ultimately 
fall to the taxpayers in this country to support this Democratic 
policy.
  But fines and settlements take us back to the legislation we hope to 
recommit to the committee today. There are Members who would have you 
believe that there are currently no existing laws protecting the right 
for every American to vote or that the Voting Rights Act is no longer 
in place. However, the Voting Rights Act is in effect today and 
protecting every American's right to vote, and it includes many 
important provisions:
  Title I of the Voting Rights Act, 52 United States Code 10501(a) 
says: No citizen shall be denied, because of his failure to comply with 
any test or device, the right to vote in any election.
  That is still in effect today, without H.R. 4, and it comes with a 
$5,000 fine if you don't follow that.
  Section 307(a): No person shall prevent another who is entitled to 
vote, from voting. Still in effect, $5,000 fine.
  Section 308(b): No person shall destroy, deface, or alter official 
voting ballots. Still in effect, $5,000 fine.

[[Page H9332]]

  307(c): No person shall provide false information in registering to 
vote, or in voting. Still in effect, $10,000 fine.
  307(e): No person shall vote more than once. Still in effect, $10,000 
fine.
  307(d): No person shall falsify or conceal material facts. Still in 
effect, $10,000 fine.
  307(b): No person shall intimidate, threaten, or coerce any person 
for voting or attempting to vote. Still in effect.
  Do not let anyone tell you the Voting Rights Act is not alive and 
well in this country. What we have debated today is not a 
reauthorization of this important, historically bipartisan legislation 
that has prevented discrimination at the ballot box, because it does 
not need reauthorization.
  Sections 2 and 3 of the VRA that are currently in effect are 
continuing to help safeguard the public from discrimination at the 
ballot box. Every eligible American who wants to vote in our country's 
elections should be able to cast their vote.
  This bill is only about preclearance and the Democrat majority giving 
the Department of Justice and the Federal Government control over all 
election activity.
  Jurisdictions under preclearance cannot move a polling location, 
expand vote-by-mail efforts, nor properly maintain their voting rolls 
without a partisan Department of Justice clearing everything they do. 
This is about control and taking power away from State and local 
election officials who they don't like and putting it in the hands of 
the Federal Government.
  This bill does not reauthorize the Voting Rights Act. What does it 
do? It opens the doors for fines and settlements in this country, 
including under this act, to be hijacked once again by my colleagues 
for their own political campaigns if they get their way.
  My motion to recommit is simple: Make it clear to your constituents 
that fines and settlements under the VRA will not be going to your own 
campaign coffers.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. SEWELL of Alabama. Mr. Speaker, I oppose the amendment.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from Alabama is recognized 
for 5 minutes.
  Ms. SEWELL of Alabama. Mr. Speaker, I oppose this amendment because 
it is a mere distraction. It is an attempt to politicize the Voting 
Rights Act of 1965 by interjecting campaign finance and settlement 
terms into civil rights legislation.
  If Republicans were really serious about voting rights--about voting 
rights--they would actually be willing to come to the table and talk 
about how we can fully restore section 4 of the Voting Rights Act of 
1965.
  Leave it up to our colleagues across the aisle to interject money and 
finance into civil rights law. What has been lost today in this debate 
is the very heart of this bill; it is the central meaning of the bill.
  Let's not forget the brave patriots of the civil rights and voting 
rights movement who marched, prayed, and died for the right to vote. 
These foot soldiers for equality, like our very own   John Lewis, were 
ordinary citizens who dared to achieve extraordinary social change by 
forcing this Nation to live up to its ideals of equality and justice 
for all.
  We know, Mr. Speaker, that the price of freedom is not free. It has 
been bought and paid for by those brave foot soldiers so that, one day, 
a little Black girl from Selma, Alabama, could sit in this august body.
  I know I am not the only Black and Brown colleague of ours who owes 
our very presence in this Chamber to the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
  Mr. Speaker, old battles have become new again. We fight for the same 
equity that these foot soldiers fought for in Selma.
  Progress is elusive. Every generation must fight to maintain the 
progress that we have had and to seek to advance it.
  Since the Supreme Court's decision in 2013 in Shelby v. Holder, 
States across this country have enacted harsh measures that make it 
more difficult to vote.
  Mr. Speaker, I dare say that Selma is now. Since the Shelby decision, 
25 States have put in place new voting restrictions.

  Selma is still now, because, since the Shelby decision, 12 States 
have laws making it harder for citizens to register and stay 
registered.
  Selma is now. Since the Shelby decision, 10 more States have made 
early and absentee voting more difficult.
  While today there are no poll taxes or literacy tests, these modern-
day barriers to voting are no less discriminatory or suppressive than 
those old practices.
  Voting rights should be a nonpartisan issue, and the fact that, in 
this amendment, they would try to politicize voting rights, we should 
all--all--be appalled by that.
  Voting rights have been, always, very nonpartisan, and it used to be 
that the Voting Rights Acts passed overwhelmingly with Republicans and 
Democrats. In fact, the VRA was reauthorized five times--yes--under 
Republican and Democratic Presidents. So what has changed?
  I ask my colleagues across the aisle: What are you afraid of? Why are 
you afraid to let more Americans vote?
  Is it because your own political interests are only realized when you 
limit access to the ballot box?
  I say: Shame on you. Shame on you.
  Could it be that what we need more than anything else is to look at 
our North Star; that is,   John Lewis. Mr. Lewis, we are all honored, 
every day, to be able to call you ``colleague,'' and the reality is 
that what happened on that bridge in Selma, Alabama, in 1965 is still 
occurring today.
  If one person who is an American and who is a voter is not allowed to 
vote, it goes to the very heart of the integrity of all of our 
elections. We should all want to make sure that every American can 
vote.
  So, let us make sure that we remember what Elijah Cummings would say. 
He would say: We are better than this.
  We are better than this. Having an amendment that deals with 
politicizing the Voting Rights Act is appalling.
  I ask my colleagues to vote ``no'' on the amendment and to remember 
the words of another civil rights activist, Amelia Boynton Robinson, 
who also was bludgeoned on that bridge with   John Lewis in 1965, who 
came to this Chamber in 2015, as my special guest, for the State of the 
Union. Many of you on both sides of the aisle were willing to host her.
  I say to you what she said. When people said: ``I stand on your 
shoulders,'' she said, ``Get off my shoulders. Do your own work.''
  I say now: Miss Amelia, we are doing our own work because we are 
voting to restore the Voting Rights Act of 1965.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members are reminded to address their 
remarks to the Chair.
  Without objection, the previous question is ordered on the motion to 
recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Ms. SEWELL. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 9 of rule XX, the Chair 
will reduce to 5 minutes the minimum time for any electronic vote on 
the question of passage.
  This is a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 200, 
noes 215, not voting 15, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 653]

                               AYES--200

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Axne
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (NC)
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brindisi
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gooden
     Gottheimer
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)

[[Page H9333]]


     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McAdams
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Murphy (NC)
     Newhouse
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Simpson
     Slotkin
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spanberger
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Torres Small (NM)
     Turner
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                               NOES--215

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Barragan
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Himes
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--15

     Barr
     Bass
     Byrne
     Cartwright
     Emmer
     Gabbard
     Gosar
     Hunter
     Kinzinger
     Larson (CT)
     Marchant
     Norman
     Porter
     Serrano
     Shimkus

                              {time}  1231

  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the ayes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Mr. Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. This is a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 228, 
noes 187, answered not voting 16, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 654]

                               AYES--228

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Barragan
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green, Al (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy (FL)
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pelosi
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Ryan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--187

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (NC)
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gooden
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Keller
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Murphy (NC)
     Newhouse
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rooney (FL)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

[[Page H9334]]


  


                             NOT VOTING--16

     Barr
     Bass
     Byrne
     Cartwright
     Emmer
     Gabbard
     Gosar
     Hunter
     Kinzinger
     Larson (CT)
     Marchant
     McHenry
     Norman
     Porter
     Serrano
     Shimkus

                              {time}  1239

  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.


                          personal explanation

  Mr. LARSON of Connecticut. Mr. Speaker, on Friday, December 6, 2019, 
I was unfortunately not present for roll call votes 653 through 654, in 
order to attend a funeral. If I had been present for these votes, I 
would have voted:
  Nay on roll call vote 653 on the motion to recommit with 
instructions.
  Yea on roll call vote 654 on the passage of H.R. 4.

                          ____________________