VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN REAUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2019; Congressional Record Vol. 165, No. 58
(House of Representatives - April 03, 2019)

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           VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN REAUTHORIZATION ACT OF 2019


                             General Leave

  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members may 
have 5 legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks and 
insert extraneous material on H.R. 1585.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from New York?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 281 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the state of the Union for the consideration of the bill, H.R. 1585.
  The Chair appoints the gentleman from California (Mr. Aguilar) to 
preside over the Committee of the Whole.

                              {time}  1425


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the consideration of the bill 
(H.R. 1585) to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act of 1994, and 
for other purposes, with Mr. Aguilar in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to the rule, the bill is considered read the 
first time.
  The gentleman from New York (Mr. Nadler) and the gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Collins) each will control 30 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself 2 minutes.
  Mr. Chairman, H.R. 1585, the Violence Against Women Reauthorization 
Act of 2019, will not only reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act, 
also known as VAWA, but will also strengthen and expand the act's 
critical programs.
  VAWA's grant programs provide communities across America the crucial 
assistance they need to combat crimes of domestic violence, dating 
violence, sexual assault, and stalking. H.R. 1585 builds on this 
foundation by enhancing the services available under these programs and 
by expanding their reach to include vulnerable populations who are 
victims of these crimes.
  VAWA, which is not gender exclusive, addresses the needs of men and 
women, children, persons with disabilities, homeless persons, and LGBTQ 
people, among others. Importantly, H.R. 1585 includes new protections 
for transgender individuals.
  The range of individuals VAWA helps is broad and should be as diverse 
as our communities around the country. I am pleased that this 
reauthorization continues our commitment to this important principle.
  This bill reauthorizes a wide variety of grant programs, including 
programs to help prosecute violent crimes against women and to provide 
services to sexual assault victims. It also strengthens various 
nondiscrimination provisions, provides greater protections for 
survivors during the prosecution of perpetrators, expands services for 
older survivors of abuse, authorizes programs specifically targeted 
toward rural areas, strengthens protections against gun violence in 
domestic abuse situations, and expands the jurisdiction of some Tribal 
authorities over non-Indians who commit certain crimes on Tribal lands.
  I want to thank Ms. Bass, the chair of the Subcommittee on Crime, 
Terrorism, and Homeland Security and the sponsor of this legislation, 
for her outstanding leadership in the effort to reauthorize VAWA.
  I also want to thank Ms. Jackson Lee for her longstanding and 
tireless efforts over the years to protect and strengthen the act.
  Thanks to their efforts and the efforts of many others, this bill 
will not only continue the progress enabled by VAWA as originally 
enacted, but it will also make the act an even more effective tool in 
addressing the horrible scourge of domestic violence.
  Mr. Chair, accordingly, I urge my colleagues to support this 
legislation, and I reserve the balance of my time.


[[Page H3004]]


                                         House of Representatives,


                                   Committee on the Judiciary,

                                   Washington, DC, March 14, 2019.
     Hon. Frank Pallone, Jr.,
     Chairman, Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of 
         Representatives, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairman Pallone: I am writing to you concerning H.R. 
     1585, the ``Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 
     2019.''
       I appreciate your willingness to work cooperatively on this 
     legislation. I recognize that the bill contains provisions 
     that fall within the jurisdiction of the Committee on Energy 
     and Commerce. I acknowledge that your Committee will not 
     formally consider H.R. 1585 and agree that the inaction of 
     your Committee with respect to the bill does not waive any 
     future jurisdictional claim over the matters contained in 
     H.R. 1585 which fall within your Committee's Rule X 
     jurisdiction.
       I will ensure that our exchange of letters is included in 
     the Congressional Record during floor consideration of the 
     bill. I appreciate your cooperation regarding this 
     legislation and look forward to continuing to work with you 
     as this measure moves through the legislative process.
           Sincerely,
                                                   Jerrold Nadler,
     Chairman.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                             Committee on Energy and Commerce,

                                   Washington, DC, March 21, 2019.
     Hon. Jerrold Nadler,
     Chair, Committee on the Judiciary, Washington, DC.
       Dear Mr. Chair: I write concerning H.R. 1585, the 
     ``Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019,'' as 
     amended, which was additionally referred to the Committee on 
     Energy and Commerce.
       In recognition of the desire to expedite consideration of 
     H.R. 1585, the Committee on Energy and Commerce agrees to 
     waive formal consideration of the bill as to provisions that 
     fall within the rule X jurisdiction of the Committee on 
     Energy and Commerce. The Committee takes this action with the 
     mutual understanding that we do not waive any jurisdiction 
     over the subject matter contained in this or similar 
     legislation, and that the Committee will be appropriately 
     consulted and involved as this bill or similar legislation 
     moves forward so that we may address any remaining issues 
     within our jurisdiction. I also request that you support my 
     request to name members of the Committee on Energy and 
     Commerce to any conference committee to consider such 
     provisions.
       Finally, I would appreciate the inclusion of this letter in 
     the report on the bill and into the Congressional Record 
     during floor consideration of H.R. 1585.
           Sincerely,
                                               Frank Pallone, Jr.,
     Chairman.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                                   Committee on the Judiciary,

                                   Washington, DC, March 14, 2019.
     Hon. Maxine Waters,
     Chairwoman, Committee on Financial Services, House of 
         Representatives, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairwoman Waters: I am writing to you concerning H.R. 
     1585, the ``Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 
     2019.''
       I appreciate your willingness to work cooperatively on this 
     legislation. I recognize that the bill contains provisions 
     that fall within the jurisdiction of the Committee on 
     Financial Services. I acknowledge that your Committee will 
     not formally consider H.R. 1585 and agree that the inaction 
     of your Committee with respect to the bill does not waive any 
     future jurisdictional claim over the matters contained in 
     H.R. 1585 which fall within your Committee's Rule X 
     jurisdiction.
       I will ensure that our exchange of letters is included in 
     the Congressional Record during floor consideration of the 
     bill. I appreciate your cooperation regarding this 
     legislation and look forward to continuing to work with you 
     as this measure moves through the legislative process.
           Sincerely,
                                                   Jerrold Nadler,
     Chairman.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                              Committee on Financial Services,

                                   Washington, DC, March 21, 2019.
     Hon. Jerrold Nadler,
     Chairman, House Committee on the Judiciary, Washington, DC.
       Dear Mr. Chairman: I am writing concerning H.R. 1585, the 
     ``Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019.'' 
     Because you have been working with the Committee on Financial 
     Services concerning provisions in the bill that fall within 
     our Rule X jurisdiction, I agree to forgo formal 
     consideration of the bill so that it may proceed 
     expeditiously to the House floor. I do so based on my 
     understanding that the Committee on the Judiciary will work 
     to ensure that the text of H.R. 1585 that will be considered 
     by House of Representatives will include changes that are 
     being discussed between the two Committees with respect to 
     certain provisions that are within the jurisdiction of the 
     Committee on Financial Services, provided that the relevant 
     texts are submitted to the Committee on the Judiciary in a 
     timely manner.
       The Committee on Financial Services takes this action to 
     forego formal consideration of H.R. 1585 with our mutual 
     understanding that, by foregoing formal consideration of H.R. 
     1585 at this time, we do not waive any jurisdiction over the 
     subject matter contained in this or similar legislation, and 
     that our Committee will be appropriately consulted and 
     involved as this or similar legislation moves forward. Our 
     Committee also reserves the right to seek appointment of an 
     appropriate number of conferees to any House-Senate 
     conference involving this or similar legislation and request 
     your support for any such request.
       Finally, I would appreciate your response to this letter 
     confirming this understanding, and, while I understand that 
     your letter to the Committee and my response will be included 
     in the Committee report on H.R. 1585, I would ask that a copy 
     of our exchange of letters on this matter be included in the 
     Congressional Record during floor consideration of H.R. 1585.
           Sincerely,
                                                    Maxine Waters,
     Chairwoman.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                                   Committee on the Judiciary,

                                   Washington, DC, March 21, 2019.
     Hon. Maxine Waters,
     Chairwoman, Committee on Financial Services, House of 
         Representatives, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairwoman Waters: I am writing to acknowledge your 
     letter dated March 21, 2019 responding to our request to your 
     Committee that it waive any jurisdictional claims over the 
     matters contained in H.R. 1585, the ``Violence Against Women 
     Reauthorization Act of 2019,'' that fall within your 
     Committee's Rule X jurisdiction. The Committee on the 
     Judiciary confirms our mutual understanding that your 
     Committee does not waive any jurisdiction over the subject 
     matter contained in this or similar legislation, and your 
     Committee will be appropriately consulted and involved as the 
     bill or similar legislation moves forward so that we may 
     address any remaining issues within your Committee's 
     jurisdiction.
       I will ensure that this exchange of letters is included in 
     the Congressional Record during floor consideration of the 
     bill. I appreciate your cooperation regarding this 
     legislation and look forward to continuing to work with you 
     as this measure moves through the legislative process.
           Sincerely,
                                                   Jerrold Nadler,
     Chairman.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                                   Committee on the Judiciary,

                                   Washington, DC, March 14, 2019.
     Hon. Richard Neal,
     Chairman, Committee on Ways and Means, House of 
         Representatives, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairman Neal: I am writing to you concerning H.R. 
     1585, the ``Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 
     2019.''
       I appreciate your willingness to work cooperatively on this 
     legislation. I recognize that the bill contains provisions 
     that fall within the jurisdiction of the Committee on Ways 
     and Means. I acknowledge that your Committee will not 
     formally consider H.R. 1585 and agree that the inaction of 
     your Committee with respect to the bill does not waive any 
     future jurisdictional claim over the matters contained in 
     H.R. 1585 which fall within your Committee's Rule X 
     jurisdiction.
       I will ensure that our exchange of letters is included in 
     the Congressional Record during floor consideration of the 
     bill. I appreciate your cooperation regarding this 
     legislation and look forward to continuing to work with you 
     as this measure moves through the legislative process.
           Sincerely,
                                                   Jerrold Nadler,
     Chairman.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                                  Committee on Ways and Means,

                                   Washington, DC, March 18, 2019.
     Hon. Jerrold Nadler,
     Chairman, Committee on the Judiciary, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairman Nadler: In recognition of the desire to 
     expedite consideration of H.R. 1585, Violence Against Women 
     Reauthorization Act of 2019, the Committee on Ways and Means 
     agrees to waive formal consideration of the bill as to 
     provisions that fall within the rule X jurisdiction of the 
     Committee on Ways and Means.
       The Committee on Ways and Means takes this action with the 
     mutual understanding that we do not waive any jurisdiction 
     over the subject matter contained in this or similar 
     legislation, and the Committee will be appropriately 
     consulted and involved as the bill or similar legislation 
     moves forward so that we may address any remaining issues 
     within our jurisdiction. The Committee also reserves the 
     right to seek appointment of an appropriate number of 
     conferees to any House-Senate conference involving this or 
     similar legislation.
       Finally, I would appreciate your response to this letter 
     confirming this understanding, and would ask that a copy of 
     our exchange of letter on this matter be included in the 
     Congressional Record during floor consideration of H.R. 1585.
           Sincerely,
                                                  Richard E. Neal,
                                                         Chairman.

[[Page H3005]]

     
                                  ____
                                         House of Representatives,


                                   Committee on the Judiciary,

                                   Washington, DC, March 21, 2019.
     Hon. Richard Neal,
     Chairman, Committee on Ways and Means, House of 
         Representatives, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairman Neal: I am writing to acknowledge your letter 
     dated March 18, 2019 responding to our request to your 
     Committee that it waive any jurisdictional claims over the 
     matters contained in H.R. 1585, the ``Violence Against Women 
     Reauthorization Act of 2019,'' that fall within your 
     Committee's Rule X jurisdiction. The Committee on the 
     Judiciary confirms our mutual understanding that your 
     Committee does not waive any jurisdiction over the subject 
     matter contained in this or similar legislation, and your 
     Committee will be appropriately consulted and involved as the 
     bill or similar legislation moves forward so that we may 
     address any remaining issues within your Committee's 
     jurisdiction.
       I will ensure that this exchange of letters is included in 
     the Congressional Record during floor consideration of the 
     bill. I appreciate your cooperation regarding this 
     legislation and look forward to continuing to work with you 
     as this measure moves through the legislative process.
           Sincerely,
                                                   Jerrold Nadler,
     Chairman.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                                   Committee on the Judiciary,

                                   Washington, DC, March 14, 2019.
     Hon. Bobby Scott,
     Chairman, Committee on Education and Labor, House of 
         Representatives, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairman Scott: I am writing to you concerning H.R. 
     1585, the ``Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 
     2019.''
       I appreciate your willingness to work cooperatively on this 
     legislation. I recognize that the bill contains provisions 
     that fall within the jurisdiction of the Committee on 
     Education and Labor. I acknowledge that your Committee will 
     not formally consider H.R. 1585 and agree that the inaction 
     of your Committee with respect to the bill does not waive any 
     future jurisdictional claim over the matters contained in 
     H.R. 1585 which fall within your Committee's Rule X 
     jurisdiction.
       I will ensure that our exchange of letters is included in 
     the Congressional Record during floor consideration of the 
     bill. I appreciate your cooperation regarding this 
     legislation and look forward to continuing to work with you 
     as this measure moves through the legislative process.
           Sincerely,
                                                   Jerrold Nadler,
     Chairman.
                                  ____

         Committee on Education and Labor, House of 
           Representatives,
                                   Washington, DC, March 20, 2019.
     Hon. Jerrold Nadler,
     Chairman, House Committee on the Judiciary, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairman Nadler: I write concerning H.R. 1585, the 
     ``Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019.'' This 
     bill was primarily referred to the Committee on the Judiciary 
     and secondarily to the Committee on Education and Labor. As a 
     result of your having consulted with me concerning this bill 
     generally, I agree to forgo consideration of the bill in 
     Committee so the bill may proceed expeditiously to the House 
     floor.
       The Committee takes this action with our mutual 
     understanding that by foregoing consideration of H.R. 1585, 
     we do not waive any jurisdiction over the subject matter 
     contained in this or similar legislation, and we will be, 
     appropriately consulted and involved as the bill or similar 
     legislation moves forward so we may address any remaining 
     issue within our Rule X jurisdiction. Additionally, I 
     respectfully request your support for the appointment of 
     conferees from the Committee on Education and Labor should 
     this bill or similar language be considered in a conference 
     with the Senate.
       Finally, I would appreciate a response confirming this 
     understanding and ask that a copy of our exchange of letters 
     on this matter be included in the Congressional Record during 
     floor consideration of H.R. 1585.
           Respectfully,
                                        Robert C. ``Bobby'' Scott,
     Chairman.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                                   Committee on the Judiciary,

                                   Washington, DC, March 21, 2019.
     Hon. Bobby Scott,
     Chairman, Committee on Education and Labor, House of 
         Representatives, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairman Scott: I am writing to acknowledge your 
     letter dated March 20, 2019 responding to our request to your 
     Committee that it waive any jurisdictional claims over the 
     matters contained in H.R. 1585, the ``Violence Against Women 
     Reauthorization Act of 2019,'' that fall within your 
     Committee's Rule X jurisdiction. The Committee on the 
     Judiciary confirms our mutual understanding that your 
     Committee does not waive any jurisdiction over the subject 
     matter contained in this or similar legislation, and your 
     Committee will be appropriately consulted and involved as the 
     bill or similar legislation moves forward so that we may 
     address any remaining issues within your Committee's 
     jurisdiction.
       I will ensure that this exchange of letters is included in 
     the Congressional Record during floor consideration of the 
     bill. I appreciate your cooperation regarding this 
     legislation and look forward to continuing to work with you 
     as this measure moves through the legislative process.
           Sincerely,
                                                   Jerrold Nadler,
     Chairman.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                                   Committee on the Judiciary,

                                   Washington, DC, March 14, 2019.
     Hon. Raul Grijalva,
     Chairman, Committee on Natural Resources,
     House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairman Grijalva: I am writing to you concerning H.R. 
     1585, the ``Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 
     2019.''
       I appreciate your willingness to work cooperatively on this 
     legislation. I recognize that the bill contains provisions 
     that fall within the jurisdiction of the Committee on Natural 
     Resources. I acknowledge that your Committee will not 
     formally consider H.R. 1585 and agree that the inaction of 
     your Committee with respect to the bill does not waive any 
     future jurisdictional claim over the matters contained in 
     H.R. 1585 which fall within your Committee's Rule X 
     jurisdiction.
       I will ensure that our exchange of letters is included in 
     the Congressional Record during floor consideration of the 
     bill. I appreciate your cooperation regarding this 
     legislation and look forward to continuing to work with you 
     as this measure moves through the legislative process.
           Sincerely,
                                                   Jerrold Nadler,
     Chairman.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                               Committee on Natural Resources,

                                   Washington, DC, March 18, 2019.
     Hon. Jerrold Nadler,
     Chair, Committee on the Judiciary,
     Washington, DC.
       Dear Mr. Chair: I write concerning H.R. 1585, the 
     ``Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019,'' as 
     amended, which was additionally referred to the Committee on 
     Natural Resources.
       I will allow the Committee on Natural Resources to be 
     discharged from further consideration of the bill. I do so 
     with the understanding that the Committee does not waive any 
     jurisdictional claim over the subject matters contained in 
     the bill that fall within its Rule X jurisdiction. I also 
     request that you support my request to name members of the 
     Committee on Natural Resources to any conference committee to 
     consider such provisions. Finally, please include this letter 
     in the report on the bill and into the Congressional Record 
     during consideration of the measure on the House floor.
       I appreciate your cooperation regarding this legislation 
     and look forward to continuing to work with you as this 
     measure moves through the legislative process.
           Sincerely,
                                                    Raul Grijalva,
     Chair, Committee on Natural Resources.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                                   Committee on the Judiciary,

                                   Washington, DC, March 14, 2019.
     Hon. Mark Takano,
     Chairman, Committee on Veterans' Affairs, House of 
         Representatives, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairman Takano: I am writing to you concerning H.R. 
     1585, the ``Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 
     2019.''
       I appreciate your willingness to work cooperatively on this 
     legislation. I recognize that the bill contains provisions 
     that fall within the jurisdiction of the Committee on 
     Veterans' Affairs. I acknowledge that your Committee will not 
     formally consider H.R. 1585 and agree that the inaction of 
     your Committee with respect to the bill does not waive any 
     future jurisdictional claim over the matters contained in 
     H.R. 1585 which fall within your Committee's Rule X 
     jurisdiction.
       I will ensure that our exchange of letters is included in 
     the Congressional Record during floor consideration of the 
     bill. I appreciate your cooperation regarding this 
     legislation and look forward to continuing to work with you 
     as this measure moves through the legislative process.
           Sincerely,
                                                   Jerrold Nadler,
     Chairman.
                                  ____

                                         House of Representatives,


                               Committee on Veterans' Affairs,

                                   Washington, DC, March 18, 2019.
     Hon. Jerrold Nadler,
     Chairman, Committee on the Judiciary, House of 
         Representatives, Washington, DC.
       Dear Chairman Nadler: I write concerning H.R. 1585, the 
     Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019. As a 
     result of your having consulted with us on provisions within 
     H.R. 1585 that fall within the Rule X jurisdiction of the 
     Committee on Veterans' Affairs, I forego any further 
     consideration of this bill so that it may proceed 
     expeditiously to the House floor for consideration.
       The Committee on Veterans' Affairs takes this action with 
     our mutual understanding that by foregoing consideration of 
     H.R. 1585 at this time, we do not waive any jurisdiction over 
     subject matter contained in this or similar legislation and 
     that our committee

[[Page H3006]]

     will be appropriately consulted and involved as this bill or 
     similar legislation moves forward so that we may address any 
     remaining issues in our jurisdiction. Further I request your 
     support for the appointment of conferees from the Committee 
     on Veterans' Affairs during any House-Senate conference 
     convened on this or related legislation.
       Finally, I ask that a copy of our exchange of letters on 
     this matter be included in the bill report filed by the 
     Judiciary Committee, as well as in the Congressional Record 
     during floor consideration, to memorialize our understanding.
           Sincerely,
                                                      Mark Takano,
                                                         Chairman.

  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Chair, I rise today in opposition to H.R. 1585, the Violence 
Against Women Reauthorization Act.
  Mr. Chair, I support reauthorization of the Violence Against Women 
Act. I believe the intent of this legislation is commendable, and many 
of the programs it authorizes are critical.
  This is a bill that should be and should have broad bipartisan 
support. It is a bill that should transcend the political games which 
we see too often in Washington, and we should approach it methodically 
and wholistically.
  Unfortunately, instead of good faith collaboration, my colleagues 
across the aisle have doubled down on partisan politics at the expense 
of good policy. They have sought, at every turn, to make this bill into 
a political weapon rather than a critical resource for victims and 
tools to support law enforcement.
  I tried to meet with my Democratic colleagues to negotiate a 
meaningful reauthorization of VAWA. We tried to engage with other 
Members in bipartisan, bicameral negotiations, although our efforts 
were rebuffed, and we were handed the flawed bill that is before us 
today. My colleagues across the aisle informed us H.R. 1585 would be 
the bill. This is particularly unfortunate because this bill is dead on 
arrival in the Senate.
  There are areas where both sides can agree, areas where we can 
strengthen existing law. Instead of seeking out those areas and 
negotiating in good faith, they have decided a highly partisan bill 
with zero chance of moving forward in the Senate was the best way to 
approach reauthorizing crucial VAWA programs.

                              {time}  1430

  Remember, Republicans tried to add a short-term extension of VAWA to 
the funding bill in February when Congresswoman Lesko offered it as a 
previous question. Democrats blocked this attempt and refused to 
include a short-term extension to allow time for meaningful 
negotiations to take place.
  Mr. Chairman, my colleagues and I want to find a solution that helps 
victims, prevents domestic violence, and strengthens programs that 
serve vulnerable populations. We stand willing and ready to discuss 
ways to do that.
  But I cannot and will not support a bill that undermines and 
jeopardizes due process; that curtails prosecutorial discretion; that 
makes it more difficult for victims in rural areas to find housing; 
that could weaken programs for female victims; that could re-victimize 
abused women; and that undercuts the Second Amendment rights.
  This bill contains a large expansion of unemployment insurance 
benefits, which amounts to a new tax on employers. This bill continues 
to expand the focus of programs past women and children; and this bill 
fails to provide a faith-based exemption for grant recipients, which 
could jeopardize these organizations' ability to provide services for 
victims.
  Mr. Chairman, this legislation was referred to seven committees. The 
bill was rushed to markup at the Judiciary Committee, but at least 
Judiciary actually had a markup. Even though the rushed markup ended in 
a party-line vote, that markup is far more than the Democrats gave the 
other committees of jurisdiction.
  The Ways and Means Committee is the committee with expertise in 
unemployment insurance benefits, but if you are on that committee, 
Democrats denied you the chance to weigh in on that issue at committee, 
and Americans didn't get to benefit from your expertise there.
  The Financial Services Committee is the committee with expertise on 
housing issues. But if you are on that committee, you were shut down as 
well; this bill moving ahead without the benefit of your consideration.
  Democrats also denied the Natural Resources, Education and Labor, 
Veterans' Affairs, and Energy and Commerce Committees the chance to 
weigh in on a bill with provisions that sit squarely within their 
jurisdiction.
  I want to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act. I want to do it 
in a way that meets the fundamental goals and intent of the original 
law, and I want to recognize changes that need to be addressed.
  Simply put, I want to find a bipartisan, bicameral agreement that 
Democrats shunned when they rushed this bill to the floor. This bill 
could actually put women at greater risk in some of the programs it 
authorizes, and it is not a solution that I can support.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
Florida (Mrs. Demings), the vice-chair of the Crime, Terrorism, and 
Homeland Security Subcommittee.
  Mrs. DEMINGS. Mr. Chairman, some of the hardest calls law enforcement 
officers take are intimate partner violence calls. These situations are 
heartbreaking, volatile, dangerous, and far too commonplace. Domestic 
violence affects every community and crosses all racial and 
socioeconomic lines. It is heartbreaking and even more tragic because 
domestic violence is often preventable. That is the purpose of the 
Violence Against Women Act.
  One in five homicides in Florida is a result of domestic violence. In 
2016, over 100,000 domestic violence incidents were reported to police 
in Florida. Since I began my remarks, three women have been beaten, 
battered, or murdered.
  Mr. Chairman, these calls are extremely dangerous for everyone 
involved. When law enforcement responds to these calls, they too are 
put at great risk. In 2017, more officers were shot responding to 
domestic violence calls than any other type of call.
  All too often, it is a first responder, family member, neighbor, or 
other loved one who is killed in a domestic violence incident. In fact, 
these deaths make up 1 of 5 domestic violence homicide victims.
  We have to train, equip, and empower law enforcement, healthcare 
providers, and other responders to address intimate partner violence. 
These programs have already proven effective.
  Grantees funded by VAWA have trained nearly 90,000 law enforcement 
officers in best practices and techniques to handle these sensitive 
situations. But the VAWA reauthorization is not just about continuing 
these successful programs. It also makes additional improvements which 
will save lives of victims and responders.
  Nationwide, the presence of a gun in a domestic violence situation 
makes it five times more likely that someone will be killed.
  The VAWA reauthorization will help law enforcement disarm dangerous 
people and convicted felons, create new notification systems for law 
enforcement, address the so-called ``boyfriend loophole'' that lets 
non-married but dangerous partners get weapons.
  The Violence Against Women Act reauthorization is a critical step to 
our efforts to protect these Americans; and I urge my colleagues to 
support this critical and necessary legislation.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to the 
gentlewoman from Arizona (Mrs. Lesko).
  Mrs. LESKO. Mr. Chairman, I am a survivor of domestic violence from a 
previous marriage. I serve on the advisory council of a domestic 
violence shelter in my district. I am the co-chairwoman of the Working 
Group Against Domestic Violence in Congress.
  So if you haven't figured it out, this issue is very important to me 
and I want to protect women.
  Another role I have is, I am co-chairwoman of the Congressional 
Women's Caucus. And in that, I spoke with my Democratic colleague, and 
she knew it was an important issue to me, it was an important issue to 
her, and we really had talked about having a bipartisan approach that 
all women and all of us could vote on that we would agree on.

  So once I found out that Representative Bass was going to be the 
sponsor of the bill, I reached out to her office.

[[Page H3007]]

We were trying to--we just never were able to get together before the 
Judiciary Committee markup on the bill, in the attempt to talk with 
her, to see if she would listen to my concerns.
  Then, in the Judiciary Committee, I offered an amendment that 
basically would make sure that domestic violence shelters could protect 
the victims and keep their privacy private. And that amendment was 
rejected, and I was told that it was too broad, and those types of 
things.
  So in that Judiciary Committee hearing I asked Representative Bass if 
she would be agreeable to meeting with me, so I could work with her to 
do an amendment in a bipartisan fashion to protect women and children, 
and she said absolutely, yes. And, again, I reached out to her office 
on at least two occasions and never got a response.
  So I have really tried to work on this in a bipartisan fashion, 
because there are some concerns I have. And let me tell you the reason 
why I am going to vote ``no'' on this bill, even though I am a survivor 
of domestic violence.
  First of all, the bill forces domestic violence shelters, under 
penalty of Federal law, this law, to house biological males in with 
women. And often these women have been abused themselves, and they may 
not--this may violate their privacy, and it may have risks.
  The second reason is this bill forces prisons to take in biological 
males, under penalty of Federal law, and put them in women's prisons. 
In the United Kingdom this happened, and a male identifying as a woman 
was placed in a woman's prison and ended up raping women.
  The third reason is this bill takes away gun rights.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. I yield the gentlewoman from Arizona as much 
time as she may consume.
  Mrs. LESKO. This bill, thirdly, also takes away gun rights in 2 
cases: One with ex parte orders of protection; that is when a woman, 
like myself, would go in to see a Justice of the Peace; we would get an 
order of protection. Under this bill, the perpetrator's gun rights 
would be taken away, even though they weren't there in court.
  Also, it would take away someone's gun rights if they were convicted 
of a misdemeanor, which is very rare.
  So, again, I don't think this bill is going to get heard in the U.S. 
Senate, which, I hope that my friends on the other side of the aisle--
this is an important issue to all of us, and I hope that we can work 
together so it is something that I can support, something that we all 
can support, because it is a really important issue.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman 
from Michigan (Mrs. Dingell).
  Mrs. DINGELL. Mr. Chair, I rise to discuss the urgent need for 
Congress to update the Violence Against Women Act and the lifesaving 
programs it supports.
  I have a great deal of respect for my co-chair of the Domestic 
Violence Task Force, but we disagree very strongly on what this bill 
does.
  No woman, no child, and no family should fear for their life because 
of domestic violence. Without updates and support for the critical 
programs in VAWA, we are moving backwards. Good programs that are there 
to help victims are now threatened, and it is one more stress being 
added on to the pile of these victims, and one more fear that we just 
add to them.
  In one 24-hour period in Michigan, domestic violence programs 
answered 408 hotline calls of people in immediate danger, and served 
2,359 victims with emergency shelter, transitional housing, counseling, 
and legal advice.
  The bill before us today is landmark legislation that will respond to 
our Nation's crisis of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
assault, and stalking. It will equip our State and local partners to 
provide compassionate care and support to women, families, and, yes, 
men, too. We need to admit that sometimes they are victims who need to 
rebuild their lives and heal.
  VAWA also includes my Zero Tolerance for Domestic Abusers to close 
the loopholes that make it easy for domestic abusers and stalkers to 
purchase weapons without passing a background check.
  This isn't a poison pill. This will save a life. Shouldn't we be 
doing that?
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I yield as much time as she may 
consume to the gentlewoman from West Virginia (Mrs. Miller).
  Mrs. MILLER. Mr. Chairman, I rise today to speak against H.R. 1585. I 
stand before you as a woman, a wife, a mother, and a grandmother. I 
represent a State where one in three women experience domestic 
violence. This is a scourge on our society and must stop.
  The Violence Against Women Act should have one clear goal, to protect 
women from domestic abuse. Any solution put forward must provide law 
enforcement and the justice system with the tools to do this to the 
best of their ability, and to keep this objective free from partisan 
manipulation, dilution of resources, or political games. Unfortunately, 
this bill does not do that.
  My Republican colleagues, under the leadership of Ranking Member 
Collins and Mrs. Lesko, who has been a recipient of domestic violence, 
have sought to come together with our friends across the aisle to find 
a bipartisan solution to help women, to no avail.
  Now is not the time to play politics. This is an issue where we can 
and should find common ground. It is not the time to hold the safety of 
women as a bargaining chip against infringements on religious liberty 
or weakening of the Second Amendment. We can and must do better.
  I urge my colleagues to vote against this legislation and come 
together to pass a bill that protects women, instead of trying to use 
it as a political pawn.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Rhode Island (Mr. Cicilline), a distinguished member of the Judiciary 
Committee.

  Mr. CICILLINE. Mr. Chairman, I am a proud sponsor of the Violence 
Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019.
  Violence against women is one of our country's greatest shames. For 
over 20 years, VAWA has provided critical protections for survivors of 
violence, while also helping them rebuild their lives.
  VAWA grants help survivors to access vital resources such as legal 
assistance, safe housing, and counseling. VAWA also facilitates 
important partnerships between advocates, law enforcement, and the 
courts, which further helps survivors in times of crisis and reduces 
future violence.
  In 2018 alone, because of VAWA grants, the Rhode Island Coalition 
Against Domestic Violence served over 8,500 individual victims of 
domestic violence, assisted over 2,900 victims in obtaining a 
restraining order, and answered over 13,000 crisis line calls.
  H.R. 1585 improves upon VAWA by prohibiting persons convicted of 
dating violence or misdemeanor stalking from possessing firearms. And 
let's be honest. This is the principal objection of my colleagues on 
the other side of the aisle, because the powerful gun lobby is scoring 
this bill because of that provision.
  This bill protects employees from being fired because they are 
survivors of sexual assault or domestic violence and ensures survivors' 
eligibility to receive unemployment insurance.

                              {time}  1445

  Survivors of violence and their families cannot wait any longer as 
VAWA continues to stay lapsed.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to support this bill in a bipartisan 
way so that the American people can see action by Congress, Republicans 
and Democrats who are standing up, loudly condemning violence against 
women, and reauthorizing VAWA in a new and improved way so that we can 
really take on the issue of domestic violence and all the pernicious 
consequences of violence against women in this country.
  Stand up to the gun lobby. Do what is right for women in America.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I yield as much time as he may 
consume to the gentleman from Texas (Mr. Gohmert).
  Mr. GOHMERT. Mr. Chair, I rise out of concern for violence that has 
been done against women.
  As someone who has prosecuted such things and has sentenced many men 
to prison for such things, I want to be part of the solution toward 
mitigating and stopping the violence against women, but I can't vote 
for this bill in its current form when politics, as my friends have 
said, have been played with it here, because I have heard the

[[Page H3008]]

testimony repeatedly, as a judge, from experts.
  I have read the studies. The literature, psychiatric literature, 
indicates that the studies show that women who have been through sexual 
assault are more likely to experience post-traumatic stress disorder 
than even soldiers, on a percentage basis.
  One of the things that can trigger the trauma coming back is a man 
coming into a confined space like a restroom, like a dressing room, 
like a battered women's shelter, and they are living it again.
  Why would we do that? Why would we have a bill that forces that kind 
of trauma back on women who have been through enough?
  This bill, in the name of equality, says women are not going to be 
able to have a safe place from biological men. No. We are going to 
force them, and under this bill, there will be lawsuits. A homeless 
shelter, a shelter for battered women, and it is shocking how much of 
this still goes on, but they will be subject to lawsuits if this bill 
becomes law.
  You will have people, the government with all its power, forcing 
shelters for battered women to accept biological men, no matter how 
traumatic it is for the women who have suffered domestic abuse from 
men, sexual assault from men.
  For heaven's sake, can't we compromise in the name of really helping 
women?
  I understand the concern from my colleagues across the aisle is that 
we don't want to hurt the feelings of someone who is biologically a man 
who thinks they are a woman. We don't want to hurt their feelings; 
therefore, it is worth the risk of all the trauma that will be relived 
by women by forcing men into those confined situations. There are other 
alternatives instead of making women suffer more than they already 
have.
  This Violence Against Women Act, the way it is currently written in 
its current form, will do additional violence to women. It is something 
that I just can't support.
  Mr. Chair, I wish my friends would worry about the concerns for men 
who think they are women and suffering from gender dysphoria in some 
other bill. Let's use this one to protect women.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Georgia (Mrs. McBath), a distinguished member of the Judiciary 
Committee.
  Mrs. McBATH. Mr. Chairman, I will be short and to the point.
  The number one way that women in America are being killed by their 
intimate partners is with a gun. We cannot address the epidemic of 
gender-based violence without addressing gun violence.
  The NRA sees it differently. They don't want us to close the 
boyfriend loophole. They don't want to keep firearms out of the hands 
of those whose actions show that they are a threat. Their solution to 
gun violence is by arming women, selling more guns, even though we know 
that this would make women less safe.
  Nearly 1 million American women alive today have been shot or shot at 
by an intimate partner. They deserve better.
  Mr. Chair, I ask my colleagues to vote ``yes'' to reauthorize the 
Violence Against Women Act for those we have lost, for those who have 
survived, and for the safety of all Americans.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Virginia (Ms. Wexton).
  Ms. WEXTON. Mr. Chair, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Chair, as a former domestic violence prosecutor and advocate for 
abused women, I have seen firsthand the impact of the Violence Against 
Women Act's legal protections and survivor support services. Because of 
this law, survivors can access a national hotline, a network of 
shelters, and get protection orders that carry across State lines.
  The bill before us today will close the boyfriend loophole by 
stopping abusers and stalkers from obtaining firearms.
  The NRA thinks this language is too broad. They are wrong. When women 
are five times more likely to be murdered if there is a gun present in 
the household, it is clear that gun violence is a women's issue.
  We have made important progress, but we can't let up, not when a 
woman is murdered by a male intimate partner with a gun every 16 hours.
  This bill tells survivors: You are not alone. You will always have a 
place to go. You will always have people on your side.
  Most importantly, it will save lives.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to support it.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman 
from New Mexico (Mr. Lujan), the assistant Democratic leader.

  Mr. LUJAN. Mr. Chair, I want to share a story of one of my 
constituents, Rayen. Her story is hard to hear, but we cannot tune it 
out.
  When Rayen first reached out for protection, her partner, Daniel, had 
struck her with a wrench, raped her, and strangled her to the point of 
unconsciousness. But Tribal police had little jurisdiction over Daniel, 
who is not Native American. They were forced to turn the case over to 
Federal prosecutors.
  Next, Rayen went missing. Her body was found several weeks later, 
beaten and strangled.
  Rayen's story is representative of the violence women, especially 
Native women, face every day. This violence is an epidemic in our 
country. Native women are 10 times more likely to be murdered than any 
other ethnicity.
  We need to act. The Violence Against Women Act is a pillar of our 
Federal response to domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, 
and stalking.
  Passage of H.R. 1585 will ensure that every survivor of domestic 
violence is given the protection they need to rebuild their lives after 
experiencing violence.
  Mr. Chair, please join me in voting for this legislation in memory of 
Rayen and in memory of all the women who have faced domestic violence 
and assault.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman 
from Maryland (Mr. Brown).
  Mr. BROWN of Maryland. Mr. Chairman, I am a cosponsor of the Violence 
Against Women Act, and I believe that this is the most important bill 
that this Congress will pass to protect thousands of women against 
violence and demonstrate that we value the dignity of every human 
being.
  I was proud to work with the committee to close three potentially 
fatal loopholes that allow abusers to possess firearms.
  We closed the stalking loophole by treating stalking similarly to 
other domestic violence crimes. Currently, 76 percent of women who are 
murdered by their partner were first stalked.
  We closed the dating partner loophole by expanding restrictions on 
dating partners convicted of domestic violence from buying a gun.
  We closed the temporary restraining order loophole by prohibiting an 
abuser from getting their hands on a gun when a court issues a 
temporary order, because this is when an abuser is most likely to lash 
out and retaliate.
  When domestic violence kills three women a day, we have a moral 
responsibility to act.
  Mr. Chairman, we cannot let the gun lobby scare us into putting their 
interests above the lives of thousands of Americans. We must 
reauthorize VAWA now with these increased protections.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
California (Ms. Bass), the chair of the Crime, Terrorism and Homeland 
Security Subcommittee and the sponsor of this legislation.
  Ms. BASS. Mr. Chair, I rise in support of H.R. 1585, the Violence 
Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019.
  This bipartisan measure was introduced by myself and my colleague, 
Mr. Fitzpatrick, the gentleman from Pennsylvania. Several other Members 
have supported this effort and were inadvertently left off the sponsor 
list due to a clerical error. To remedy that, I will furnish a separate 
statement for the Record that includes those names, respectively.
  H.R. 1585 will reauthorize the VAWA of 1994, a landmark piece of 
legislation

[[Page H3009]]

first enacted and signed into law by President Clinton in 1994. This 
was a direct response to the epidemic of violence against women that 
plagued our country at that time.
  While we have made significant progress, we still have much to do.
  It is estimated that more than 2 million adults and more than 15 
million children are exposed to domestic violence annually. These 
alarming figures make it imperative that we reauthorize VAWA now.
  We concluded our celebration of Women's History Month in March, but 
our job to protect women is not complete.
  Movements like #MeToo across this country demand Congress' attention 
to better deal with the gaping holes left unfilled in current law 
around the issues of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
assault, harassment, and stalking.
  The VAWA efforts will have the same profound effect on a victim 
survivor and their families no matter one's party affiliation. Hence, 
these are human problems, period.

  This is our opportunity to respond to the basic needs of victims and 
survivors everywhere, absent discrimination based on their race, sex, 
religion, or nationality.
  That is why this law has been reauthorized three times since 
enactment, in 2000, 2005, and 2013, with strong bipartisan approval and 
overwhelming support from Congress, States, and local communities.
  H.R. 1585 continues that tradition, which reflects a reasonable and 
compromised approach to reauthorize grant programs under VAWA. For 
example, this bill includes various pieces of bipartisan legislation, 
Republican amendments from our committee markup, and Republican 
amendments through the rules process.
  H.R. 1585 is intended to make modifications, as Congress has done in 
the past to all previous reauthorizations of VAWA.
  For example, in South Los Angeles, part of my district, the Jenesse 
Center helps hundreds of people every year. VAWA funding has supported 
the growth of Jenesse's legal department, which provides direct legal 
services that not only assist survivors in securing immediate safety, 
but also helps them achieve long-term goals of stability and self-
sufficiency.
  VAWA funding is integral to Jenesse's transitional, or bridge, 
housing program for survivors. After overcoming the initial crisis 
phase, people need space and time to rebuild family bonds, secure 
education and vocational training, and receive the mental health 
counseling needed to heal from trauma.
  H.R. 1585 is inclusive, sensible, and responsive.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chair, I yield an additional 30 seconds to the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Bass).
  Ms. BASS. Mr. Chair, this bill is about preventing and responding to 
domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and stalking. That 
is why I urge my colleagues to exert courage and stand with victims by 
supporting this bill.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1500

  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Michigan (Mr. Kildee).
  Mr. KILDEE. Mr. Chairman, I thank my friend for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise in support of the Violence Against Women 
Reauthorization Act. This is a persistent crisis in our country that 
requires Congress to act.
  While a lot of progress has been made since VAWA was first passed in 
1994, too many women still face violence. According to the National 
Coalition Against Domestic Violence, one in three women will experience 
some form of physical violence in their lifetime.
  Protecting women from violence has been, and should always be, a 
bipartisan issue. In 1994, Republicans and Democrats came together to 
pass VAWA. Since then, this act has been reauthorized three times, 
including in 2013, just after I became a Member of this body.
  Because of this law, victims of domestic violence, dating violence, 
sexual assault, and stalking have been able to access support, as well, 
while offenders have been held more accountable by our criminal justice 
system.
  Since VAWA first passed, the rate of intimate partner violence 
declined by 67 percent. This law works, and we can strengthen it with 
this action.
  Mr. Chairman, I am proud to be a cosponsor of the Grijalva amendment 
No. 13, which deals with some of the issues we see in Tribal 
communities. This is an important bill, and I urge all of my colleagues 
to support it.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I continue to reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentlewoman 
from California (Ms. Speier).
  Ms. SPEIER. Mr. Chairman, I thank the chairman of the Judiciary 
Committee for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, today, I stand here in proud support of the bipartisan 
Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019, which includes my 
bill, the Closing the Law Enforcement Consent Loophole Act.
  I introduced this bill when I read a shocking article last year about 
a teenager in New York who was raped by two police officers while in 
their custody in the back of an unmarked police vehicle. When she 
reported the rape, a loophole in New York State law allowed the 
officers to claim she consented to having sex with them, despite the 
fact that she was handcuffed and under their control.
  I was appalled to learn about this and was concerned that that was a 
legitimate defense, at that time, in New York, and it remains an 
acceptable defense in 30 other States and for Federal law enforcement 
officers.
  My bill has now been included in VAWA and will no longer allow for 
Federal law enforcement officers to use that consent defense as well.
  There are also financial incentives for the 30 States that need to 
close their loopholes by providing additional VAWA grant funds to 
States that pass similar legislation.
  Mr. Chairman, I urge my colleagues to protect the safety of our 
women. Closing this loophole puts us one step closer to achieving that 
safety.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I continue to reserve the 
balance of my time
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Michigan (Mrs. Lawrence), a co-chair of the Bipartisan Women's Caucus.
  Mrs. LAWRENCE. Mr. Chairman, today, I rise in support of H.R. 1585, 
the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019.
  I would like to first thank Representative Karen Bass, the sponsor of 
this legislation, for her support of this issue.
  As important as the successes of this bill have been, they are at 
times insufficient. Every day, an average of three women are killed by 
a current or former intimate partner. Every year, 7.9 million women are 
victims of stalking, rape, or physical violence by an intimate partner.
  The bill before us today provides important updates to the Violence 
Against Women Act that improves services for victims of domestic 
violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.
  Mr. Chairman, as co-chair of the Bipartisan Women's Caucus and as co-
chair of the Democratic Women's Caucus, I strongly urge my colleagues, 
on both sides of the aisle, to support this passage of legislation.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I continue to reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 2 minutes to the distinguished 
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Collins and I have been working on any number of issues dealing 
with criminal justice reform, and certainly we have spent the last 
couple of years on the Judiciary Committee. He may not recall, but 
working with our chairman in the last session of Congress, who 
acknowledged that the Judiciary Committee had many opportunities to 
work together--and I totally agree--one of those issues was, of course, 
the Violence Against Women Act. We engaged with the staff quite 
extensively because we wanted this to be a bipartisan bill.
  So, for a 3-year period, we engaged, I engaged, many women of this 
Congress

[[Page H3010]]

engaged, and we think we have come up with a product that recognizes 
that, as we speak here today, there are women who are dying from 
domestic violence. As we stand here today, law enforcement will tell 
you that the most difficult, or one of the most difficult, calls they 
have to make is a domestic violence call.
  Maybe it is like my constituent, Candice, whose bill I introduced, 
who was laying in the bed with a little baby and her other children 
were moving around the house, and a significant other--a husband, a 
boyfriend--took his gun and killed Candice while that baby was lying 
next to her. The little children had to hear that, and they were 
scurrying. They had to run to another house to try to get help for 
mommy.
  You see, ladies and gentlemen, this is not about a score of the 
National Rifle Association, because this is not a gun bill, this is a 
lifesaving bill. This is a bill that a Republican from Pennsylvania, 
Mr. Fitzpatrick, put a health provision in, he expanded the Public 
Health Service Act.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Carson of Indiana). The time of the gentlewoman 
has expired.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield an additional 1 minute to the 
gentlewoman from Texas.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. His bill will allow more services to come for those 
children and those survivors of domestic violence, it will expand the 
capacity of early childhood programs to address domestic violence, 
dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. It will put in $291 
million, so that date rape kits, DNA kits, will not be backlogged, so 
that law enforcement will have resources, and so that prosecutors will 
have resources.
  Candice cannot be brought back. And we introduced that bill at a time 
when no one wanted to see anything having to do with protecting us from 
guns. Now we have a statement that respects Candice's life by 
indicating that if you have been convicted, you need not have a gun 
around your family, it should be in a lockbox.
  What more can we do to be fair and balanced and draw bipartisan 
support, even to the extent of joining with my friend from Texas to 
have a bill amendment that deals with female genital mutilation.
  We have worked hard. This bill deserves 100 percent support of this 
Congress, because while we talk lives are being lost.
  Mr. Chairman, I ask my friends to support the legislation that we are 
debating, H.R. 1585.
  Mr. Chair, I rise in support of the Violence Against Women 
Reauthorization Act of 2019.
  The Violence Against Women Act (``VAWA'') is landmark legislation 
which--through policy reforms, interstate cooperation and grant 
allocation--has been pivotal in providing a national response to 
protecting half of the population.
  Equally important, it has ushered in a seismic transformation on how 
society perceives violence against women.
  The law has enhanced and improved the lives of girls and women, boys 
and men.
  There are many similarities between the year that VAWA initially 
passed in 1994, and the moment in which we all find ourselves today.
  When it was first passed, the country was experiencing reverberations 
to yet another polarizing battle to fill a seat on the Supreme Court.
  Then the courageous victim sharing her truth was Anita Hill.
  Today, as VAWA is yet again scheduled to expire, the country is 
assessing the ripples created by the #MeToo movement.
  But despite the passage of over a quarter-century since its first 
enactment, the malignant treatment received by a courageous person 
willing to share her story unfortunately endures.
  The need to create a safe space for victims of violence, especially 
women, supported with substantial resources to address this scourge has 
taken on a new urgency in this era of the #MeToo movement.
  When discussing VAWA, we cannot forget the victims of domestic 
violence like Brittany Smith, who was 23 years old and was gunned down 
last year in Houston, by her boyfriend and San Diego-based Marine; nor 
can we forget Charlene Caldwell, a mother and grandmother beaten to 
death last year by a baseball bat at the hands of her boyfriend in 
Houston.
  Domestic violence was alleged in both of these horrific events.
  Unfortunately, there are too many stories like Charlene's or 
Brittany's.
  The stories of these two women remind us of the urgency to protect 
survivors NOW, before it is too late, because many of these deaths are 
preventable.
  Despite the experiences of #MeToo survivors or victims like Ms. Smith 
or Ms. Caldwell, all is not for naught.
  Since VAWA's codification in 1994, more victims report episodes of 
domestic violence to the police and the rate of non-fatal intimate 
partner violence against women has decreased by almost two-thirds.
  VAWA has also led to a significant increase in the reporting of 
sexual assault.
  For example, the percentage of victims of rape and sexual assault who 
report the assault to the police increased from 28.8 percent in 1993--
the year prior to VAWA's initial passage--to 50 percent in 2010.
  In the first 15 years of VAWA's validity, rates of serious intimate 
partner violence declined by 72 percent for women and 64 percent for 
men.
  Research suggests that referring a victim to a domestic violence or 
sexual assault advocate has been linked to an increased willingness to 
file a police report--survivors with an advocate filed a report with 
law enforcement 59 percent of the time, versus 41 percent for 
individuals not referred to a victim advocate.
  This progress cannot be allowed to stop.
  Congress must continue sending the clear message that violence 
against women is unacceptable.
  Prior to VAWA, law enforcement lacked the resources and tools to 
respond effectively to domestic violence and sexual assault.
  Each reauthorization of VAWA has improved protections for women and 
men, while helping to change the culture and reduce the tolerance for 
these crimes.
  The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019 improves 
current law in several important respects, and takes a holistic 
approach to the goal of eliminating the harm faced by victims of 
violence, and making vital services accessible to victims of this 
scourge.
  For example, this iteration of VAWA contains guidance on the use of 
grants to activate judicial and law enforcement tools to develop and 
enforce firearm surrender policies; expands permissible use of grant 
funding for programs focused on increasing survivor/law enforcement/
community safety; and provides legal assistance for dependent children 
in appropriate circumstances.

  It also updates programs designed to reduce dating violence, help 
children exposed to violence and engage men in preventing violence 
against women.
  Additionally, the bill improves services for victims of domestic 
violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.
  It provides policies, protection, and justice for young victims of 
violence, including extending the Rape Prevention and Education grant 
program, addressing bullying of young people, improving grants focused 
on prevention education for students, and expanding relevant training 
for school-based and campus health centers; and reauthorizes and 
updates programs designed to reduce dating violence, help children 
exposed to violence, and engage men in preventing violence.
  This bill also recognizes the cascading ills associated with 
identifying, eliminating, and preventing the reemergence of domestic 
violence.
  This bill expands grants under the Public Health Service Act to 
support implementation of training programs to improve the capacity of 
early childhood programs to address domestic violence, dating violence, 
sexual assault, and stalking among the families they serve; preserves 
and expands housing protections for survivors; provides economic 
security assistance for survivors, by reauthorizing the National 
Resource Center on Workplace Responses; protects employees from being 
fired because they are survivors of sexual assault or domestic 
violence; and protects survivors' eligibility to receive Unemployment 
Insurance.
  Recognizing that many women are victimized at the hands of intimate 
partners, this iteration of VAWA helps prevent ``intimate partner'' 
homicides, by including provisions expanding firearms laws to prohibit 
persons convicted of dating violence from possessing firearms, 
prohibiting persons convicted of misdemeanor stalking from possessing 
firearms, and prohibiting individuals subject to ex parte protective 
orders from possessing firearms.
  Accordingly, the bill helps protect Native American women, by 
including provisions to improve the response to missing and murdered 
Native American women, improving tribal access to federal crime 
information databases, and reaffirming tribal criminal jurisdiction 
over non-Indian perpetrators of domestic violence, sexual assault, 
dating violence, stalking, and trafficking for all federally recognized 
Indian tribes and Alaskan Natives.
  Additionally, this bill protects the Office on Violence Against Women 
in the Department of Justice from being de-emphasized, merged, or 
consolidated into any other DOJ office.
  VAWA is central to our nation's effort to fight the epidemic of 
domestic, sexual, and dating violence and stalking.

[[Page H3011]]

  This work did not happen on its own.
  It was the product of a collaborative effort of stakeholders, 
including victim advocates.
  It was the product of those willing to share their stories of the 
abuse suffered at the hands of those who were entrusted to love, but 
instead harmed.
  The courage, strength, and resilience displayed by survivors has 
reminded all that we must continue to foster an environment for victims 
of violence to come forward and expose episodes of violence against 
women.
  This bill represents the good that can come when courageous people 
with a story to tell come forward with the belief that through their 
pain, the lives of others can be helped.
  Having listened to concerned stakeholders from all pockets of the 
country, we have put pen to paper and produced a bill that is endorsed 
by the bipartisan National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic 
Violence (NTF), which is a national collaboration comprising a large 
and diverse group of 35 national, tribal, state, territorial, and local 
organizations, advocates, and individuals that focus on the 
development, passage and implementation of effective public policy to 
address domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and 
stalking.
  Indeed, there is no reason our work on this cannot be bipartisan, as 
has been the custom of prior Congresses in authorizing this critical 
piece of legislation.
  The love for a spouse, the comfort of a mother and the best wishes 
for a sister know no political allegiance.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I continue to reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Maryland (Mr. Hoyer), the distinguished majority leader.
  Mr. HOYER. Mr. Chairman, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Mr. Chairman, I want to thank all of those who have been involved in 
getting this to the floor. This bill is a critically important bill 
and, unfortunately, its authorization expired last year. It is timely 
that we bring it to the floor. I am hopeful that it passes.
  Mr. Chairman, I was proud to be a cosponsor of the original Violence 
Against Women Act in 1994. It passed on a bipartisan vote in the House. 
It was reauthorized in 2000 with a vote--and everybody ought to note 
this--that passed 371-1. And in 2005, it was reauthorized and passed 
415-4 and signed, of course, by President Bush.
  Democrats fought hard to expand the law's protections to immigrant 
women, Native Americans, and LGBT people, and we did so in 2013 with 
bipartisan support once more. We want to protect all of our women, 
whatever their particular difference.
  I was disappointed that the law's authorization expired at the end of 
fiscal year 2018. It is critical that we enact a long-term 
reauthorization of the law without further delay in order to provide 
that certainty that another short-term extension cannot.
  This legislation was introduced by Representative Karen Bass. It is a 
5-year reauthorization. The gentlewoman from Texas, who just spoke, Ms. 
Jackson Lee, did a lot of work on this bill in the Judiciary Committee 
as well. I thank her for her leadership in this effort.
  Her bill--and I speak of Congresswoman Bass--would improve on current 
law by expanding existing grants that make communities safer and 
protect vulnerable populations, including Native American women.
  Why wouldn't we do that? I can't think of a reason.
  It would also improve economic assistance and security for survivors 
struggling with unemployment or financial hardship due to an abusive 
relationship to which they had been exposed.
  It would also ensure that the Department of Justice's Office on 
Violence Against Women remains open and is not merged into another 
office or de-emphasized.
  And, very importantly, the bill closes loopholes in gun laws to help 
prevent intimate partner homicides, an all too frequent happening.
  According to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence, on 
average, nearly 20 people every minute are physically abused by an 
intimate partner in the United States. That is a tragedy and a crisis.
  One in four women experience severe intimate partner physical 
violence. And one in seven have been stalked by an intimate partner to 
the point at which she felt very fearful or believed that she, or 
someone close to her, would be harmed or killed.
  The presence of a gun in a domestic violence situation increases the 
risk of homicide by 500 percent. That is why we aim to close gun 
loopholes by expanding the definition of intimate partners to include 
dating or former dating partners.
  It is also why this bill has language preventing anybody convicted of 
a misdemeanor crime of stalking from obtaining a gun.
  I am deeply disappointed that some Republican Members of this House 
are using the NRA as cover to vote against this reauthorization which 
has been overwhelmingly, in a bipartisan fashion, reauthorized over and 
over again.
  These are commonsense protections that prevent domestic abusers from 
obtaining the guns that have, sadly, been used so frequently to harm or 
kill their partners.
  Mr Chairman, I urge every Member to vote for this reauthorization. 
Let's make this renewal of the Violence Against Women Act as strongly 
bipartisan as the House's support for the law used to be. Let's send a 
resounding message that the House stands with the victims and survivors 
and law enforcement and will do its job to help them and to prevent 
domestic violence and abuse, which have no place in our society, but 
are, tragically, too often, perpetrated in our country.
  Mr. Chairman, let's make it safer for women, for families, and for 
the children they care for. Let's pass this bill. Let's reauthorize the 
Violence Against Women Act.

                              {time}  1515

  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I have no other speakers, and I 
yield myself the balance of my time.
  Mr. Chairman, really, in closing, I would just reiterate the points 
that I have made.
  We are looking forward to a bipartisan, bicameral bill that we do 
believe will come back eventually. The Senate has said this.
  There are many things, and I think the distinguished majority leader 
made it very clear. I think it was interesting that he said, why did 
this become a bill that was not--it should be as bipartisan as it 
should be. I think it is because of stuff that we did not talk about 
that had been added into this, which makes it much larger than what the 
bill actually should be about, and focused on those areas.
  We can disagree about a lot of things, but I think, in this one, all 
of us want to make sure that the Violence Against Women Act is 
reauthorized in a way that does promote the very ideals of the original 
law, and we would continue to do that.
  We look forward to a day in which this body can debate that bill. At 
this time, we cannot, because this bill does not feel like many of our 
Members may vote for it. They may vote against. But I think, at the end 
of the day, there will be a better product coming. I am looking forward 
to that.
  I appreciate the hard work by both sides, but I do believe there is a 
better outcome and alternative, a bipartisan, bicameral bill in the 
future.
  Mr. Chair, I urge a ``no'' vote on this bill, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chairman, every year approximately 7.9 million women 
are victims of rape, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate 
partner. An average of three women are killed every day by a current or 
former intimate partner.
  These grim statistics underscore the crucial need for us to act 
without delay to reauthorize VAWA and to enhance and expand the act so 
that it is even more effective than it has proven to be in the past.
  The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019 is 
comprehensive and inclusive legislation that I hope will earn 
bipartisan support in the long tradition of this important law. 
Therefore, I urge my colleagues to join with me in voting for this 
critical legislation today.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. BASS. Mr. Chair, a number of my colleagues who requested to be 
added as a cosponsor to H.R. 1585, the ``Violence Against Women 
Reauthorization Act of 2019'' were not listed as cosponsors due to a 
clerical error.
  I wish to thank all my colleagues for their enduring support of VAWA. 
The

[[Page H3012]]

reauthorization of VAWA is vital for domestic violence survivors. VAWA 
is a landmark piece of legislation first enacted in 1994 and signed 
into law by President Bill Clinton as part of the Violent Crime Control 
and Law Enforcement Act of 1994.
  This legislation was enacted in response to the prevalence of 
domestic and sexual violence, and the significant impact of such 
violence on the lives of women. It is estimated that more than two 
million adults and more than 15 million children are exposed to 
domestic violence annually. VAWA provides essential resources to those 
who need it most, which is why this piece of legislation is so 
essential.
  For the record, the following Members have expressed their support 
for H.R. 1585, the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019'' 
and would have been added as a cosponsor to H.R. 1585 but for a 
clerical error.
  Colin Allred
  Ami Bera
  Sanford D. Bishop, Jr.
  G.K. Butterfield
  Andre Carson
  Matt Cartwright
  Joaquin Castro
  Emanuel Cleaver
  Gerald Connolly
  Jim Costa
  TJ Cox
  Charlie Crist
  Sharice Davids
  Danny K. Davis
  Rosa DeLauro
  Mark DeSaulnier
  Theodore E. Deutch
  Michael F. Doyle
  Eliot Engel
  Dwight Evans
  Abby Finkenauer
  Jimmy Gomez
  Alcee L. Hastings
  Jahana Hayes
  Kendra S. Horn
  Hakeem Jeffries
  Henry C. ``Hank'' Johnson, Jr.
  Marcy Kaptur
  Daniel T. Kildee
  John Larson
  Al Lawson
  Barbara Lee
  Mike Levin
  John Lewis
  Ted Lieu
  Nita M. Lowey
  Ben Ray Lujan
  Elaine G. Luria
  Tom Malinowski
  Stephanie N. Murphy
  Richard E. Neal
  Joe Neguse
  Michael San Nicolas
  Donald Norcross
  Bill Pascrell, Jr.
  Ed Perlmutter
  Scott Peters
  Dean Phillips
  Mark Pocan
  David E. Price
  Harley Rouda
  Raul Ruiz
  Bobby Rush
  Mary Gay Scanlon
  Robert C. ``Bobby'' Scott
  Brad Sherman
  Mikie Sherrill
  Darren Soto
  Abigail Davis Spanberger
  Mark Takano
  Bennie G. Thompson
  Rashida Tlaib
  Norma J. Torres
  Xochitl Torres Small
  Marc A. Veasey
  The Acting CHAIR. All time for general debate has expired.
  In lieu of the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by 
the Committee on the Judiciary, printed in the bill, it shall be 
considered as an original bill for the purpose of amendment under the 
5-minute rule an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of 
the text of Rules Committee Print 116-9 modified by the amendment 
printed in part A of House Report 116-32. That amendment in the nature 
of a substitute shall be considered as read.
  The text of the amendment in the nature of a substitute is as 
follows:

                               H.R. 1585

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

       (a) Short Title.--This Act may be cited as the ``Violence 
     Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019''.
       (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act 
     is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title; table of contents.
Sec. 2. Universal definitions and grant conditions.
Sec. 3. Reporting on female genital mutilation, female genital cutting, 
              or female circumcision.

  TITLE I--ENHANCING LEGAL TOOLS TO COMBAT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING 
                 VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND STALKING

Sec. 101. Stop grants.
Sec. 102. Grants to improve the criminal justice response.
Sec. 103. Legal assistance for victims.
Sec. 104. Grants to support families in the justice system.
Sec. 105. Outreach and services to underserved populations grants.
Sec. 106. Criminal provisions.
Sec. 107. Rape survivor child custody.

                TITLE II--IMPROVING SERVICES FOR VICTIMS

Sec. 201. Sexual assault services program.
Sec. 202. Rural domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, 
              stalking, and child abuse enforcement assistance program.
Sec. 203. Training and services to end violence against people with 
              disabilities.
Sec. 204. Training and services to end abuse in later life.

     TITLE III--SERVICES, PROTECTION, AND JUSTICE FOR YOUNG VICTIMS

Sec. 301. Rape prevention and education grant.
Sec. 302. Creating hope through outreach, options, services, and 
              education (CHOOSE) for children and youth.
Sec. 303. Grants to combat violent crimes on campuses.
Sec. 304. Combat online predators.

                 TITLE IV--VIOLENCE REDUCTION PRACTICES

Sec. 401. Study conducted by the Centers for Disease Control and 
              Prevention.
Sec. 402. Saving Money and Reducing Tragedies (SMART) through 
              Prevention grants.

         TITLE V--STRENGTHENING THE HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS RESPONSE

Sec. 501. Grants to strengthen the healthcare systems response to 
              domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and 
              stalking.

                    TITLE VI--SAFE HOMES FOR VICTIMS

Sec. 601. Housing protections for victims of domestic violence, dating 
              violence, sexual assault, and stalking.
Sec. 602. Ensuring compliance and implementation; prohibiting 
              retaliation against victims.
Sec. 603. Protecting the right to report crime from one's home.
Sec. 604. Transitional housing assistance grants for victims of 
              domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or 
              stalking.
Sec. 605. Addressing the housing needs of victims of domestic violence, 
              dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.
Sec. 606. United States Housing Act of 1937 amendments.

                TITLE VII--ECONOMIC SECURITY FOR VICTIMS

Sec. 701. Findings.
Sec. 702. National Resource Center on workplace responses to assist 
              victims of domestic and sexual violence.
Sec. 703. Entitlement to unemployment compensation for victims of 
              sexual and other harassment and survivors of domestic 
              violence, sexual assault, or stalking.
Sec. 704. Study and reports on barriers to survivors' economic security 
              access.
Sec. 705. GAO Study.
Sec. 706. Education and information programs for survivors.
Sec. 707. Severability.

               TITLE VIII--HOMICIDE REDUCTION INITIATIVES

Sec. 801. Prohibiting persons convicted of misdemeanor crimes against 
              dating partners and persons subject to protection orders.
Sec. 802. Prohibiting stalkers and individuals subject to court order 
              from possessing a firearm.

                   TITLE IX--SAFETY FOR INDIAN WOMEN

Sec. 901. Findings and purposes.
Sec. 902. Authorizing funding for the tribal access program.
Sec. 903. Tribal jurisdiction over crimes of domestic violence, dating 
              violence, obstruction of justice, sexual violence, sex 
              trafficking, stalking, and assault of a law enforcement 
              officer or corrections officer.
Sec. 904. Annual reporting requirements.

               TITLE X--OFFICE ON VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

Sec. 1001. Establishment of Office on Violence Against Women.

      TITLE XI--IMPROVING CONDITIONS FOR WOMEN IN FEDERAL CUSTODY

Sec. 1101. Improving the treatment of primary caretaker parents and 
              other individuals in federal prisons.
Sec. 1102. Public health and safety of women.

       TITLE XII--LAW ENFORCEMENT TOOLS TO ENHANCE PUBLIC SAFETY

Sec. 1201. Notification to law enforcement agencies of prohibited 
              purchase or attempted purchase of a firearm.
Sec. 1202. Reporting of background check denials to state, local, and 
              tribal authorities.
Sec. 1203. Special assistant U.S. attorneys and cross-deputized 
              attorneys.

[[Page H3013]]

        TITLE XIII--CLOSING THE LAW ENFORCEMENT CONSENT LOOPHOLE

Sec. 1301. Short title.
Sec. 1302. Prohibition on engaging in sexual acts while acting under 
              color of law.
Sec. 1303. Incentives for States.
Sec. 1304. Reports to Congress.
Sec. 1305. Definition.

                        TITLE XIV--OTHER MATTERS

Sec. 1401. National stalker and domestic violence reduction.
Sec. 1402. Federal victim assistants reauthorization.
Sec. 1403. Child abuse training programs for judicial personnel and 
              practitioners reauthorization.
Sec. 1404. Sex offender management.
Sec. 1405. Court-appointed special advocate program.
Sec. 1406. Rape kit backlog.
Sec. 1407. Sexual assault forensic exam program grants.

     SEC. 2. UNIVERSAL DEFINITIONS AND GRANT CONDITIONS.

       Section 40002 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 
     U.S.C. 12291) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) by striking ``In this title'' and inserting ``In this 
     title, including for the purpose of grants authorized under 
     this Act'';
       (B) by redesignating paragraphs (34) through (45) as 
     paragraphs (42) through (53);
       (C) by inserting after paragraph (33) the following:
       ``(39) Internet enabled device.--The term `internet enabled 
     device' means devices that have a connection the Internet, 
     send and receive information and data, and maybe accessed via 
     mobile device technology, video technology, or computer 
     technology, away from the location where the device is 
     installed, and may include home automation systems, door 
     locks, and thermostats.
       ``(40) Technological abuse.--The term `technological abuse' 
     means behavior intended to harm, threaten, intimidate, 
     control, stalk, harass, impersonate, or monitor, except as 
     otherwise permitted by law, another person, that occurs using 
     the Internet, internet enabled devices, social networking 
     sites, computers, mobile devices, cellular telephones, apps, 
     location tracking devices, instant messages, text messages, 
     or other forms of technology. Technological abuse may 
     include--
       ``(A) unwanted, repeated telephone calls, text messages, 
     instant messages, or social media posts;
       ``(B) non-consensual accessing e-mail accounts, texts or 
     instant messaging accounts, social networking accounts, or 
     cellular telephone logs;
       ``(C) controlling or restricting a person's ability to 
     access technology with the intent to isolate them from 
     support and social connection;
       ``(D) using tracking devices or location tracking software 
     for the purpose of monitoring or stalking another person's 
     location;
       ``(E) impersonating a person (including through the use of 
     spoofing technology in photo or video or the creation of 
     accounts under a false name) with the intent to deceive or 
     cause harm; or
       ``(F) sharing or urging or compelling the sharing of 
     another person's private information, photographs, or videos 
     without their consent.
       ``(41) Female genital mutilation.--The terms `female 
     genital mutilation', `female genital cutting', `FGM/C', or 
     `female circumcision' mean the intentional removal or 
     infibulation (or both) of either the whole or part of the 
     external female genitalia for non-medical reasons. External 
     female genitalia includes the pubis, labia minora, labia 
     majora, clitoris, and urethral and vaginal openings.'';
       (D) in paragraph (19)(B), by striking ``and probation'' and 
     inserting ``probation, and vacatur or expungement'';
       (E) by redesignating paragraphs (13) through (33) as 
     paragraphs (18) through (38);
       (F) by striking paragraphs (11) and (12) and inserting the 
     following:
       ``(13) Digital services.--The term `digital services' means 
     services, resources, information, support or referrals 
     provided through electronic communications platforms and 
     media, whether via mobile device technology, video 
     technology, or computer technology, including utilizing the 
     internet, as well as any other emerging communications 
     technologies that are appropriate for the purposes of 
     providing services, resources, information, support, or 
     referrals for the benefit of victims of domestic violence, 
     dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.
       ``(14) Economic abuse.--The term `economic abuse', in the 
     context of domestic violence, dating violence, and abuse in 
     later life, means behavior that is coercive, deceptive, or 
     unreasonably controls or restrains a person's ability to 
     acquire, use, or maintain economic resources to which they 
     are entitled, including using coercion, fraud, or 
     manipulation to--
       ``(A) restrict a person's access to money, assets, credit, 
     or financial information;
       ``(B) unfairly use a person's personal economic resources, 
     including money, assets, and credit, for one's own advantage; 
     or
       ``(C) exert undue influence over a person's financial and 
     economic behavior or decisions, including forcing default on 
     joint or other financial obligations, exploiting powers of 
     attorney, guardianship, or conservatorship, or failing or 
     neglecting to act in the best interests of a person to whom 
     one has a fiduciary duty.
       ``(15) Elder abuse.--The term `elder abuse' has the meaning 
     given that term in section 2 of the Elder Abuse Prevention 
     and Prosecution Act. The terms `abuse,' `elder,' and 
     `exploitation' have the meanings given those terms in section 
     2011 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1397j).
       ``(16) Forced marriage.--The term `forced marriage' means a 
     marriage to which one or both parties do not or cannot 
     consent, and in which one or more elements of force, fraud, 
     or coercion is present. Forced marriage can be both a cause 
     and a consequence of domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault or stalking.
       ``(17) Homeless.--The term `homeless' has the meaning given 
     such term in section 41403(6).'';
       (G) by redesignating paragraphs (9) and (10) as paragraphs 
     (11) and (12), respectively;
       (H) by amending paragraph (8) to read as follows:
       ``(10) Domestic violence.--The term `domestic violence' 
     means a pattern of behavior involving the use or attempted 
     use of physical, sexual, verbal, emotional, economic, or 
     technological abuse or any other coercive behavior committed, 
     enabled, or solicited to gain or maintain power and control 
     over a victim, by a person who--
       ``(A) is a current or former spouse or dating partner of 
     the victim, or other person similarly situated to a spouse of 
     the victim under the family or domestic violence laws of the 
     jurisdiction;
       ``(B) is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the 
     victim as a spouse or dating partner, or other person 
     similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the family 
     or domestic violence laws of the jurisdiction;
       ``(C) shares a child in common with the victim;
       ``(D) is an adult family member of, or paid or nonpaid 
     caregiver for, a victim aged 50 or older or an adult victim 
     with disabilities; or
       ``(E) commits acts against a youth or adult victim who is 
     protected from those acts under the family or domestic 
     violence laws of the jurisdiction.''.
       (I) by redesignating paragraphs (6) and (7) as paragraphs 
     (8) and (9), respectively;
       (J) by amending paragraph (5) to read as follows:
       ``(7) Court-based and court-related personnel.--The terms 
     `court-based personnel' and `court-related personnel' mean 
     persons working in the court, whether paid or volunteer, 
     including--
       ``(A) clerks, special masters, domestic relations officers, 
     administrators, mediators, custody evaluators, guardians ad 
     litem, lawyers, negotiators, probation, parole, interpreters, 
     victim assistants, victim advocates, and judicial, 
     administrative, or any other professionals or personnel 
     similarly involved in the legal process;
       ``(B) court security personnel;
       ``(C) personnel working in related, supplementary offices 
     or programs (such as child support enforcement); and
       ``(D) any other court-based or community-based personnel 
     having responsibilities or authority to address domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking in the 
     court system.''.
       (K) by redesignating paragraphs (2) through (4) as 
     paragraphs (4) through (6) respectively;
       (L) by inserting after paragraph (1) the following:
       ``(3) Alternative justice response.--The term `alternative 
     justice response' means a process, whether court-ordered or 
     community-based, that--
       ``(A) involves, on a voluntary basis, and to the extent 
     possible, those who have committed a specific offense and 
     those who have been harmed as a result of the offense;
       ``(B) has the goal of collectively seeking accountability 
     from the accused, and developing a process whereby the 
     accused will take responsibility for his or her actions, and 
     a plan for providing relief to those harmed, through 
     allocution, restitution, community service, or other 
     processes upon which the victim, the accused, the community, 
     and the court (if court-ordered) can agree;
       ``(C) is conducted in a framework that protects victim 
     safety and supports victim autonomy; and
       ``(D) provides that information disclosed during such 
     process may not be used for any other law enforcement 
     purpose, including impeachment or prosecution, without the 
     express permission of all participants.''.
       (M) by redesignating paragraph (1) as paragraph (2); and
       (N) by inserting before paragraph (2) (as redesignated in 
     subparagraph (M) of this paragraph) the following:
       ``(1) Abuse in later life.--The term `abuse in later life' 
     means neglect, abandonment, domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, or stalking of an adult over the 
     age of 50 by any person, or economic abuse of that adult by a 
     person in an ongoing, relationship of trust with the victim. 
     Self-neglect is not included in this definition.''; and
       (2) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in paragraph (2)--
       (i) by redesignating subparagraphs (F) and (G) as 
     subparagraphs (H) and (I);
       (ii) by inserting after subparagraph (E) the following:
       ``(G) Death of the party whose privacy had been 
     protected.--In the event of the death of any victim whose 
     confidentiality and privacy is required to be protected under 
     this subsection, such requirement shall continue to apply, 
     and the right to authorize release of any confidential or 
     protected information be vested in the next of kin, except 
     that consent for release of the deceased victim's information 
     may not be given by a person who had perpetrated abuse 
     against the deceased victim.'';
       (iii) by redesignating subparagraphs (D) through (E) as 
     subparagraphs (E) through (F); and
       (iv) by inserting after subparagraph (C) the following:
       ``(D) Use of technology.--Grantees and subgrantees may use 
     telephone, internet, and other technologies to protect the 
     privacy, location and help-seeking activities of victims 
     using services. Such technologies may include--
       ``(i) software, apps or hardware that block caller ID or 
     conceal IP addresses, including instances in which victims 
     use digital services; or

[[Page H3014]]

       ``(ii) technologies or protocols that inhibit or prevent a 
     perpetrator's attempts to use technology or social media to 
     threaten, harass or harm the victim, the victim's family, 
     friends, neighbors or co-workers, or the program providing 
     services to them.'';
       (B) in paragraph (3), by inserting after ``designed to 
     reduce or eliminate domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, and stalking'' the following: ``provided that 
     the confidentiality and privacy requirements of this title 
     are maintained, and that personally identifying information 
     about adult, youth, and child victims of domestic violence, 
     dating violence, sexual assault and stalking is not requested 
     or included in any such collaboration or information-
     sharing'';
       (C) in paragraph (6), by adding at the end the following: 
     ``However, such disbursing agencies must ensure that the 
     confidentiality and privacy requirements of this title are 
     maintained in making such reports, and that personally 
     identifying information about adult, youth and child victims 
     of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault and 
     stalking is not requested or included in any such reports.'';
       (D) in paragraph (11), by adding at the end the following: 
     ``The Office on Violence Against Women shall make all 
     technical assistance available as broadly as possible to any 
     appropriate grantees, subgrantees, potential grantees, or 
     other entities without regard to whether the entity has 
     received funding from the Office on Violence Against Women 
     for a particular program or project.'';
       (E) in paragraph (13)--
       (i) in subparagraph (A), by inserting after ``the Violence 
     Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013'' the following: 
     ``(Public Law 113-4; 127 Stat. 54)''; and
       (ii) in subparagraph (C), by striking ``section 3789d of 
     title 42, United States Code'' and inserting ``section 809 of 
     title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 
     1968 (34 U.S.C. 10228)'';
       (F) in paragraph (14), by inserting after ``are also 
     victims of'' the following: ``forced marriage, or''; and
       (G) in paragraph (16)(C)(i), by striking ``$20,000 in 
     Department funds, unless the Deputy Attorney General'' and 
     inserting ``$100,000 in Department funds, unless the Director 
     or Principal Deputy Director of the Office on Violence 
     Against Women, the Deputy Attorney General,''.

     SEC. 3. REPORTING ON FEMALE GENITAL MUTILATION, FEMALE 
                   GENITAL CUTTING, OR FEMALE CIRCUMCISION.

       (a) In General.--The Director of the Federal Bureau of 
     Investigation shall, pursuant to section 534 of title 28, 
     United States Code, classify the offense of female genital 
     mutilation, female genital cutting, or female circumcision as 
     a part II crime in the Uniform Crime Reports.
       (b) Definition.--In this section, the terms ``female 
     genital mutilation'', ``female genital cutting'', ``FGM/C'', 
     or ``female circumcision'' mean the intentional removal or 
     infibulation (or both) of either the whole or part of the 
     external female genitalia for non-medical reasons. External 
     female genitalia includes the pubis, labia minora, labia 
     majora, clitoris, and urethral and vaginal openings.

  TITLE I--ENHANCING LEGAL TOOLS TO COMBAT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING 
                 VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND STALKING

     SEC. 101. STOP GRANTS.

       (a) In General.--Part T of title I of the Omnibus Crime 
     Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10441 et 
     seq.) is amended--
       (1) in section 2001(b)--
       (A) in paragraph (3), by inserting before the semicolon at 
     the end the following: ``including implementation of the non-
     discrimination requirements in section 40002(b)(13) of the 
     Violence Against Women Act of 1994'';
       (B) in paragraph (9)--
       (i) by striking ``older and disabled women'' and inserting 
     ``people 50 years of age or over and people with 
     disabilities''; and
       (ii) by striking ``older and disabled individuals'' and 
     inserting ``people'';
       (C) in paragraph (19), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (D) in paragraph (20), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting a semicolon; and
       (E) by inserting after paragraph (20), the following:
       ``(21) developing and implementing laws, policies, 
     procedures, or training to ensure the lawful recovery and 
     storage of any dangerous weapon by the appropriate law 
     enforcement agency from an adjudicated perpetrator of any 
     offense of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
     assault, or stalking, and the return of such weapon when 
     appropriate, where any Federal, State, tribal, or local court 
     has--
       ``(A)(i) issued protective or other restraining orders 
     against such a perpetrator; or
       ``(ii) found such a perpetrator to be guilty of misdemeanor 
     or felony crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, or stalking; and
       ``(B) ordered the perpetrator to relinquish dangerous 
     weapons that the perpetrator possesses or has used in the 
     commission of at least one of the aforementioned crimes.
     Policies, procedures, protocols, laws, regulations, or 
     training under this section shall include the safest means of 
     recovery of, and best practices for storage of, relinquished 
     and recovered dangerous weapons and their return, when 
     applicable, at such time as the individual is no longer 
     prohibited from possessing such weapons under Federal, State, 
     or Tribal law, or posted local ordinances; and
       ``(22) developing, enlarging, or strengthening culturally 
     specific victim services programs to provide culturally 
     specific victim services regarding, responses to, and 
     prevention of female genital mutilation, female genital 
     cutting, or female circumcision.'';
       (2) in section 2007--
       (A) in subsection (d)--
       (i) by redesignating paragraphs (5) and (6) as paragraphs 
     (7) and (8), respectively; and
       (ii) by inserting after paragraph (4) the following:
       ``(5) proof of compliance with the requirements regarding 
     protocols to strongly discourage compelling victim testimony, 
     described in section 2017;
       ``(6) proof of compliance with the requirements regarding 
     civil rights under section 40002(b)(13) of the Violent Crime 
     Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994;'';
       (B) in subsection (i)--
       (i) in paragraph (1), by inserting before the semicolon at 
     the end the following: ``and the requirements under section 
     40002(b) of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act 
     of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12291(b))''; and
       (ii) in paragraph (2)(C)(iv), by inserting after 
     ``ethnicity,'' the following: ``sexual orientation, gender 
     identity,''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(k) Reviews for Compliance With Nondiscrimination 
     Requirements.--
       ``(1) In general.--If allegations of discrimination in 
     violation of section 40002(b)(13)(A) of the Violence Against 
     Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12291(b)(13)(A)) by a potential 
     grantee under this part have been made to the Attorney 
     General, the Attorney General shall, prior to awarding a 
     grant under this part to such potential grantee, conduct a 
     review of the compliance of the potential grantee with such 
     section.
       ``(2) Establishment of rule.--Not later than 1 year after 
     the date of enactment of the Violence Against Women 
     Reauthorization Act of 2019, the Attorney General shall by 
     rule establish procedures for such a review.
       ``(3) Annual report.--Beginning on the date that is 1 year 
     after the date of enactment of the Violence Against Women 
     Reauthorization Act of 2019, the Attorney General shall 
     report to the Committees on the Judiciary of the Senate and 
     of the House of Representatives regarding compliance with 
     section 40002(b)(13)(A) of the Violence Against Women Act of 
     1994 (34 U.S.C. 12291(b)(13)(A)) by recipients of grants 
     under this part.''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:

     ``SEC. 2017. GRANT ELIGIBILITY REGARDING COMPELLING VICTIM 
                   TESTIMONY.

       ``In order to be eligible for a grant under this part, a 
     State, Indian tribal government, territorial government, or 
     unit of local government shall certify that, not later than 3 
     years after the date of enactment of this section, their 
     laws, policies, or practices will include a detailed protocol 
     to discourage the use of bench warrants, material witness 
     warrants, perjury charges, or other means of compelling 
     victim-witness testimony in the investigation, prosecution, 
     trial, or sentencing of a crime related to the domestic 
     violence, sexual assault, dating violence or stalking of the 
     victim.''.
       (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--Section 1001(a)(18) 
     of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 
     U.S.C. 10261(a)(18)) is amended by striking ``2014 through 
     2018'' and inserting ``2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 102. GRANTS TO IMPROVE THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE RESPONSE.

       (a) Heading.--Part U of title I of the Omnibus Crime 
     Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10461 et 
     seq.) is amended in the heading, by striking ``grants to 
     encourage arrest policies'' and inserting ``grants to improve 
     the criminal justice response''.
       (b) Grants.--Section 2101 of the Omnibus Crime Control and 
     Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10461) is amended--
       (1) by striking subsection (a) and inserting the following:
       ``(a) General Program Purpose.--The purpose of this part is 
     to assist States, State and local courts (including juvenile 
     courts), Indian tribal governments, tribal courts, and units 
     of local government to develop and strengthen effective law 
     enforcement and prosecution strategies to combat violent 
     crimes against women, and to develop and strengthen victim 
     services in cases involving violent crimes against women.'';
       (2) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by striking ``proarrest'' and 
     inserting ``offender accountability and homicide reduction'';
       (B) in paragraph (8)--
       (i) by striking ``older individuals (as defined in section 
     102 of the Older Americans Act of 1965 (42 U.S.C. 3002))'' 
     and inserting ``people 50 years of age or over''; and
       (ii) by striking ``individuals with disabilities (as 
     defined in section 3(2) of the Americans with Disabilities 
     Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12102(2)))'' and inserting ``people 
     with disabilities (as defined in the Americans with 
     Disabilities Act of 1990 (42 U.S.C. 12102))'';
       (C) in paragraph (19), by inserting before the period at 
     the end the following ``, including victims among underserved 
     populations (as defined in section 40002(a)(46) of the 
     Violence Against Women Act of 1994)''; and
       (D) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(23) To develop and implement an alternative justice 
     response (as such term is defined in section 40002(a) of the 
     Violence Against Women Act of 1994).
       ``(24) To develop and implement policies, procedures, 
     protocols, laws, regulations, or training to ensure the 
     lawful recovery and storage of any dangerous weapon by the 
     appropriate law enforcement agency from an adjudicated 
     perpetrator of any offense of domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, or stalking, and the return of such 
     weapon when appropriate, where any Federal, State, tribal, or 
     local court has--
       ``(A)(i) issued protective or other restraining orders 
     against such a perpetrator; or

[[Page H3015]]

       ``(ii) found such a perpetrator to be guilty of misdemeanor 
     or felony crimes of domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, or stalking; and
       ``(B) ordered the perpetrator to relinquish dangerous 
     weapons that the perpetrator possesses or has used in the 
     commission of at least one of the aforementioned crimes.
     Policies, procedures, protocols, laws, regulations, or 
     training under this section shall include the safest means of 
     recovery of and best practices for storage of relinquished 
     and recovered dangerous weapons and their return, when 
     applicable, at such time as the persons are no longer 
     prohibited from possessing such weapons under Federal, State, 
     Tribal or municipal law.''; and
       (3) in subsection (c)(1)--
       (A) in subparagraph (A)--
       (i) in clause (i), by striking ``encourage or mandate 
     arrests of domestic violence offenders'' and inserting 
     ``encourage arrests of offenders''; and
       (ii) in clause (ii), by striking ``encourage or mandate 
     arrest of domestic violence offenders'' and inserting 
     ``encourage arrest of offenders''; and
       (B) by inserting after subparagraph (E) the following:
       ``(F) certify that, not later than 3 years after the date 
     of the enactment of this subparagraph, their laws, policies, 
     or practices will include a detailed protocol to strongly 
     discourage the use of bench warrants, material witness 
     warrants, perjury charges, or other means of compelling 
     victim-witness testimony in the investigation, prosecution, 
     trial, or sentencing of a crime related to the domestic 
     violence, sexual assault, dating violence or stalking of the 
     victim; and''.
       (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--Section 1001(a)(19) 
     of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 
     U.S.C. 10261(a)(19)) is amended by striking ``2014 through 
     2018'' and inserting ``2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 103. LEGAL ASSISTANCE FOR VICTIMS.

       Section 1201 of division B of the Victims of Trafficking 
     and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (34 U.S.C. 20121) is 
     amended--
       (1) in subsection (a), by inserting after ``no cost to the 
     victims.'' the following: ``When legal assistance to a 
     dependent is necessary for the safety of a victim, such 
     assistance may be provided.'';
       (2) in subsection (c)--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by inserting after ``stalking, and 
     sexual assault'' the following: ``, or for dependents when 
     necessary for the safety of a victim'';
       (B) in paragraph (2), by inserting after ``stalking, and 
     sexual assault'' the following: ``, or for dependents when 
     necessary for the safety of a victim,'' and
       (C) in paragraph (3), by inserting after ``sexual assault, 
     or stalking'' the following: ``, or for dependents when 
     necessary for the safety of a victim,''; and
       (3) in subsection (f)(1), by striking ``2014 through 2018'' 
     and inserting ``2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 104. GRANTS TO SUPPORT FAMILIES IN THE JUSTICE SYSTEM.

       Section 1301 of division B of the Victims of Trafficking 
     and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (34 U.S.C. 12464) is 
     amended--
       (1) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in paragraph (7), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (B) in paragraph (8)--
       (i) by striking ``to improve'' and inserting ``improve''; 
     and
       (ii) by striking the period at the end and inserting ``; 
     and'' ; and
       (C) by inserting after paragraph (8) the following:
       ``(9) develop and implement an alternative justice response 
     (as such term is defined in section 40002(a) of the Violence 
     Against Women Act of 1994).''; and
       (2) in subsection (e), by striking ``2014 through 2018'' 
     and inserting ``2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 105. OUTREACH AND SERVICES TO UNDERSERVED POPULATIONS 
                   GRANTS.

       Section 120 of the Violence Against Women and Department of 
     Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (34 U.S.C. 20123) is 
     amended--
       (1) in subsection (d)--
       (A) in paragraph (4), by striking ``or'' at the end;
       (B) in paragraph (5), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``; or''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(6) developing, enlarging, or strengthening culturally 
     specific programs and projects to provide culturally specific 
     services regarding, responses to, and prevention of female 
     genital mutilation, female genital cutting, or female 
     circumcision.''; and
       (2) in subsection (g), by striking ``2014 through 2018'' 
     and inserting ``2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 106. CRIMINAL PROVISIONS.

       Section 2265 of title 18, United States Code, is amended--
       (1) in subsection (d)(3)--
       (A) by striking ``restraining order or injunction,''; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following: ``The prohibition 
     under this paragraph applies to all protection orders for the 
     protection of a person residing within a State, territorial, 
     or tribal jurisdiction, whether or not the protection order 
     was issued by that State, territory, or Tribe.''; and
       (2) in subsection (e), by adding at the end the following: 
     ``This applies to all Alaska tribes without respect to 
     `Indian country' or the population of the Native village 
     associated with the Tribe.''.

     SEC. 107. RAPE SURVIVOR CHILD CUSTODY.

       Section 409 of the Justice for Victims of Trafficking Act 
     of 2015 (34 U.S.C. 21308) is amended by striking ``2015 
     through 2019'' and inserting ``2020 through 2024''.

                TITLE II--IMPROVING SERVICES FOR VICTIMS

     SEC. 201. SEXUAL ASSAULT SERVICES PROGRAM.

       Section 41601(f)(1) of the Violent Crime Control and Law 
     Enforcement Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12511(f)(1)) is amended by 
     striking ``2014 through 2018'' and inserting ``2020 through 
     2024''.

     SEC. 202. RURAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL 
                   ASSAULT, STALKING, AND CHILD ABUSE ENFORCEMENT 
                   ASSISTANCE PROGRAM.

       Section 40295 of the Violent Crime Control and Law 
     Enforcement Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12341) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)(3), by striking ``women'' and 
     inserting ``adults, youth,''; and
       (2) in subsection (e)(1), by striking ``2014 through 2018'' 
     and inserting ``2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 203. TRAINING AND SERVICES TO END VIOLENCE AGAINST 
                   PEOPLE WITH DISABILITIES.

       Section 1402 of division B of the Victims of Trafficking 
     and Violence Protection Act of 2000 (34 U.S.C. 20122) is 
     amended--
       (1) in the heading, by striking ``women'' and inserting 
     ``people'';
       (2) in subsection (a), by striking ``individuals'' each 
     place it appears and inserting ``people'';
       (3) in subsection (b)--
       (A) by striking ``disabled individuals'' each place it 
     appears and inserting ``people with disabilities'';
       (B) in paragraph (3), by inserting after ``law 
     enforcement'' the following: ``and other first responders''; 
     and
       (C) in paragraph (8), by striking ``providing advocacy and 
     intervention services within'' and inserting ``to enhance the 
     capacity of'';
       (4) in subsection (c), by striking ``disabled individuals'' 
     and inserting ``people with disabilities''; and
       (5) in subsection (e), by striking ``2014 through 2018'' 
     and inserting ``2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 204. TRAINING AND SERVICES TO END ABUSE IN LATER LIFE.

       Section 40801 of the Violent Crime Control and Law 
     Enforcement Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12421)--
       (1) in the heading, by striking ``enhanced training'' and 
     inserting ``training'';
       (2) by striking subsection ``(a) Definitions.--In this 
     section--'' and all that follows through paragraph (1) of 
     subsection (b) and inserting the following: ``The Attorney 
     General shall make grants to eligible entities in accordance 
     with the following:'';
       (3) by redesignating paragraphs (2) through (5) of 
     subsection (b) as paragraphs (1) through (4);
       (4) in paragraph (1) (as redesignated by paragraph (3) of 
     this subsection)--
       (A) by striking ``, including domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, stalking, exploitation, and 
     neglect'' each place it appears;
       (B) in subparagraph (A)--
       (i) in clause (i), by inserting after ``elder abuse'' the 
     following: ``and abuse in later life'';
       (ii) in clauses (ii) and (iii), by inserting after 
     ``victims of'' the following: ``elder abuse and''; and
       (iii) in clause (iv), by striking ``advocates, victim 
     service providers, and courts to better serve victims of 
     abuse in later life'' and inserting ``leaders, victim 
     advocates, victim service providers, courts, and first 
     responders to better serve older victims'';
       (C) in subparagraph (B)--
       (i) in clause (i), by striking ``or other community-based 
     organizations in recognizing and addressing instances of 
     abuse in later life'' and inserting ``community-based 
     organizations, or other professionals who may identify or 
     respond to abuse in later life''; and
       (ii) in clause (ii), by inserting after ``victims of'' the 
     following: ``elder abuse and''; and
       (D) in subparagraph (D), by striking ``subparagraph 
     (B)(ii)'' and inserting ``paragraph (2)(B)'';
       (5) in paragraph (2) (as redesignated by paragraph (3))--
       (A) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``over 50 years of 
     age'' and inserting ``50 years of age or over''; and
       (B) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``in later life'' and 
     inserting ``50 years of age or over''; and
       (6) in paragraph (4) (as redesignated by paragraph (3)), by 
     striking ``2014 through 2018'' and inserting ``2020 through 
     2024''.

     TITLE III--SERVICES, PROTECTION, AND JUSTICE FOR YOUNG VICTIMS

     SEC. 301. RAPE PREVENTION AND EDUCATION GRANT.

       Section 393A of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 
     280b-1b) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) in paragraph (2), by inserting before the semicolon at 
     the end the following ``or digital services (as such term is 
     defined in section 40002(a) of the Violence Against Women Act 
     of 1994)''; and
       (B) in paragraph (7), by striking ``sexual assault'' and 
     inserting ``sexual violence, sexual assault, and sexual 
     harassment'';
       (2) in subsection (b), by striking ``Indian tribal'' and 
     inserting ``Indian Tribal''; and
       (3) in subsection (c)--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by striking ``$50,000,000 for each of 
     fiscal years 2014 through 2018'' and inserting ``$150,000,000 
     for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2024''; and
       (B) in paragraph (3), by adding at the end the following: 
     ``Not less than 80 percent of the total amount made available 
     under this subsection in each fiscal year shall be awarded in 
     accordance with this paragraph.''.

[[Page H3016]]

  


     SEC. 302. CREATING HOPE THROUGH OUTREACH, OPTIONS, SERVICES, 
                   AND EDUCATION (CHOOSE) FOR CHILDREN AND YOUTH.

       Section 41201 of the Violent Crime Control and Law 
     Enforcement Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12451) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) by striking ``stalking, or sex trafficking'' and 
     inserting ``or stalking''; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following: ``Grants awarded 
     under this section may be used to address sex trafficking or 
     bullying as part of a comprehensive program focused primarily 
     on domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or 
     stalking.'';
       (2) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in paragraph (1)--
       (i) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A), by striking 
     ``target youth who are victims of domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, stalking, and sex trafficking'' and 
     inserting ``target youth, including youth in underserved 
     populations who are victims of domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, and stalking'';
       (ii) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``stalking, and sex 
     trafficking'' and inserting ``and stalking'';
       (iii) in subparagraph (B)--

       (I) by striking ``stalking, or sex trafficking'' and 
     inserting ``or stalking''; and
       (II) by striking ``or'' at the end;

       (iv) in subparagraph (C)--

       (I) by striking ``stalking, and sex trafficking'' and 
     inserting ``or stalking''; and
       (II) by striking the period at the end and inserting a 
     semicolon; and

       (v) by inserting after subparagraph (C) the following:
       ``(D) clarify State or local mandatory reporting policies 
     and practices regarding peer-to-peer dating violence, sexual 
     assault, and stalking; or
       ``(E) develop, enlarge, or strengthen culturally specific 
     programs and projects to provide culturally specific services 
     regarding, responses to, and prevention of female genital 
     mutilation, female genital cutting, or female 
     circumcision.''; and
       (B) in paragraph (2)--
       (i) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``stalking, or sex 
     trafficking'' and inserting ``stalking, or female genital 
     mutilation, female genital cutting, or female circumcision'';
       (ii) by striking ``stalking, or sex trafficking'' each 
     place it appears and inserting ``or stalking'';
       (iii) in subparagraph (C), by inserting ``confidential'' 
     before ``support services'';
       (iv) in subparagraph (D), by striking ``stalking, and sex 
     trafficking'' and inserting ``and stalking''; and
       (v) in subparagraph (E), by inserting after ``programming 
     for youth'' the following: ``, including youth in underserved 
     populations,'';
       (3) in subsection (c)--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by striking ``stalking, or sex 
     trafficking'' and inserting ``or stalking''; and
       (B) in paragraph (2)(A), by striking ``paragraph (1)'' and 
     inserting ``subparagraph (A) or (B) of paragraph (1)'';
       (4) in subsection (d)(3), by striking ``stalking, and sex 
     trafficking'' and inserting ``and stalking, including 
     training on working with youth in underserved populations 
     (and, where intervention or programming will include a focus 
     on female genital mutilation, female genital cutting, or 
     female circumcision, or on sex trafficking, sufficient 
     training on those topics)''; and
       (5) in subsection (f), by striking ``$15,000,000 for each 
     of fiscal years 2014 through 2018'' and inserting 
     ``$25,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 303. GRANTS TO COMBAT VIOLENT CRIMES ON CAMPUSES.

       Section 304 of the Violence Against Women and Department of 
     Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (34 U.S.C. 20125) is 
     amended--
       (1) in subsection (b)--
       (A) in paragraph (2), by striking the second sentence;
       (B) by amending paragraph (3) to read as follows:
       ``(3) To provide prevention and education programming about 
     domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and 
     stalking, including technological abuse and reproductive and 
     sexual coercion, that is age-appropriate, culturally 
     relevant, ongoing, delivered in multiple venues on campus, 
     accessible, promotes respectful nonviolent behavior as a 
     social norm, and engages men and boys. Such programming 
     should be developed in partnership or collaboratively with 
     experts in intimate partner and sexual violence prevention 
     and intervention.'';
       (C) in paragraph (9), by striking ``and provide'' and 
     inserting ``, provide, and disseminate'';
       (D) in paragraph (10), by inserting after ``or adapt'' the 
     following ``and disseminate''; and
       (E) by inserting after paragraph (10) the following:
       ``(11) To train campus health centers on how to recognize 
     and respond to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
     assault, and stalking, including training health providers on 
     how to provide universal education to all members of the 
     campus community on the impacts of violence on health and 
     unhealthy relationships and how providers can support ongoing 
     outreach efforts.'';
       (2) in subsection (c)(3), by striking ``2014 through 2018'' 
     and inserting ``2020 through 2024'';
       (3) in subsection (d)--
       (A) in paragraph (3)(B), by striking ``for all incoming 
     students'' and inserting ``for all students''; and
       (B) in paragraph (4)(C), by inserting after ``sex,'' the 
     following: ``sexual orientation, gender identity,''; and
       (4) in subsection (e), by striking ``$12,000,000 for each 
     of fiscal years 2014 through 2018'' and inserting 
     ``$16,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 304. COMBAT ONLINE PREDATORS.

       (a) In General.--Chapter 110A of title 18, United States 
     Code, is amended by inserting after section 2261A the 
     following:

     ``Sec. 2261B. Enhanced penalty for stalkers of children

       ``(a) In General.--Except as provided in subsection (b), if 
     the victim of an offense under section 2261A is under the age 
     of 18 years, the maximum term of imprisonment for the offense 
     is 5 years greater than the maximum term of imprisonment 
     otherwise provided for that offense in section 2261.
       ``(b) Limitation.--Subsection (a) shall not apply to a 
     person who violates section 2261A if--
       ``(1) the person is subject to a sentence under section 
     2261(b)(5); and
       ``(2)(A) the person is under the age of 18 at the time the 
     offense occurred; or
       ``(B) the victim of the offense is not less than 15 nor 
     more than 17 years of age and not more than 3 years younger 
     than the person who committed the offense at the time the 
     offense occurred.''.
       (b) Clerical Amendment.--The table of sections at the 
     beginning of chapter 110A of title 18, United States Code, is 
     amended by inserting after the item relating to section 2261A 
     the following new item:

``2261B. Enhanced penalty for stalkers of children.''.
       (c) Conforming Amendment.--Section 2261A of title 18, 
     United States Code, is amended in the matter following 
     paragraph (2)(B), by striking ``section 2261(b) of this 
     title'' and inserting ``section 2261(b) or section 2261B, as 
     the case may be''.
       (d) Report on Best Practices Regarding Enforcement of Anti-
     stalking Laws.--Not later than 1 year after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Attorney General shall submit a 
     report to Congress, which shall--
       (1) include an evaluation of Federal, tribal, State, and 
     local efforts to enforce laws relating to stalking; and
       (2) identify and describe those elements of such efforts 
     that constitute the best practices for the enforcement of 
     such laws.

                 TITLE IV--VIOLENCE REDUCTION PRACTICES

     SEC. 401. STUDY CONDUCTED BY THE CENTERS FOR DISEASE CONTROL 
                   AND PREVENTION.

       Section 402 of the Violence Against Women and Department of 
     Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (42 U.S.C. 280b-4) is 
     amended--
       (1) in subsection (b), by striking ``violence against 
     women'' and inserting ``violence against adults, youth,''; 
     and
       (2) in subsection (c), by striking ``2014 through 2018'' 
     and inserting ``2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 402. SAVING MONEY AND REDUCING TRAGEDIES (SMART) THROUGH 
                   PREVENTION GRANTS.

       Section 41303 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 
     U.S.C. 12463) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (b)(1)--
       (A) in subparagraph (C), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (B) in subparagraph (D), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(E) strategies within each of these areas addressing the 
     unmet needs of underserved populations.'';
       (2) in subsection (d)(3)--
       (A) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (B) in subparagraph (B), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(C) include a focus on the unmet needs of underserved 
     populations.'';
       (3) in subsection (f), by striking ``$15,000,000 for each 
     of fiscal years 2014 through 2018'' and inserting 
     ``$45,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2024''; 
     and
       (4) in subsection (g), by adding at the end the following:
       ``(3) Remaining amounts.--Any amounts not made available 
     under paragraphs (1) and (2) may be used for any set of 
     purposes described in paragraphs (1), (2), or (3) of 
     subsection (b), or for a project that fulfills two or more of 
     such sets of purposes.''.

         TITLE V--STRENGTHENING THE HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS RESPONSE

     SEC. 501. GRANTS TO STRENGTHEN THE HEALTHCARE SYSTEMS 
                   RESPONSE TO DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, 
                   SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND STALKING.

       Section 399P of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 
     280g-4) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) in paragraph (2), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (B) in paragraph (3), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``; and''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(4) the development or enhancement and implementation of 
     training programs to improve the capacity of early childhood 
     programs to address domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, and stalking among families they serve.'';
       (2) in subsection (b)(1)--
       (A) in subparagraph (A)(ii), by inserting ``, including 
     labor and sex trafficking'' after ``other forms of violence 
     and abuse'';
       (B) in subparagraph (B)(ii)--
       (i) by striking ``on-site access to''; and
       (ii) by striking ``patients by increasing'' and all that 
     follows through the semicolon and inserting the following: 
     ``patients by--

       ``(I) increasing the capacity of existing health care 
     professionals and public health staff to address domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking;

[[Page H3017]]

       ``(II) contracting with or hiring advocates for victims of 
     domestic violence or sexual assault to provide such services; 
     or
       ``(III) providing funding to State domestic and sexual 
     violence coalitions to improve the capacity of such 
     coalitions to coordinate and support health advocates and 
     other health system partnerships;'';

       (C) in subparagraph (B)(iii), by striking ``and'' at the 
     end;
       (D) in subparagraph (B)(iv) by striking the period at the 
     end and inserting the following: ``, with priority given to 
     programs administered through the Health Resources and 
     Services Administration, Office of Women's Health; and''; and
       (E) in subparagraph (B), by adding at the end the 
     following:
       ``(v) the development, implementation, dissemination, and 
     evaluation of best practices, tools, and training materials 
     for behavioral health professionals to identify and respond 
     to domestic violence, sexual violence, stalking, and dating 
     violence.''.
       (3) in subsection (b)(2)(A)--
       (A) in the heading, by striking ``Child and elder abuse'' 
     and inserting the following: ``Child abuse and abuse in later 
     life''; and
       (B) by striking ``child or elder abuse'' and inserting the 
     following: ``child abuse or abuse in later life'';
       (4) in subsection (b)(2)(C)(i), by striking ``elder abuse'' 
     and inserting ``abuse in later life'';
       (5) in subsection (b)(2)(C)(iii), by striking ``or'' at the 
     end;
       (6) in subsection (b)(2)(C)(iv)--
       (A) by inserting ``mental health,'' after ``dental,''; and
       (B) by striking ``exams.'' and inserting ``exams and 
     certifications;'';
       (7) in subsection (b)(2)(C), by inserting after clause (iv) 
     the following:
       ``(v) development of a State-level pilot program to--

       ``(I) improve the response of substance use disorder 
     treatment programs and systems to domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, and stalking; and
       ``(II) improve the capacity of substance use disorder 
     treatment programs and systems to serve survivors of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking 
     dealing with substance use disorder; or

       ``(vi) development and utilization of existing technical 
     assistance and training resources to improve the capacity of 
     substance use disorder treatment programs to address domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking among 
     patients the programs serve.''
       (8) in subsection (d)(2)(A)--
       (A) by inserting ``or behavioral health'' after ``of 
     health'';
       (B) by inserting ``behavioral'' after ``physical or''; and
       (C) by striking ``mental'' before ``health care'';
       (9) in subsection (d)(2)(B)--
       (A) by striking ``or health system'' and inserting 
     ``behavioral health treatment system''; and
       (B) by striking ``mental'' and inserting ``behavioral'';
       (10) in subsection (f) in the heading, by striking 
     ``Research and Evaluation'' and inserting ``Research, 
     Evaluation, and Data Collection'';
       (11) in subsection (f)(1), by striking ``research and 
     evaluation'' and inserting ``research, evaluation, or data 
     collection'';
       (12) in subsection (f)(1)(B), by inserting after ``health 
     care'' the following: ``or behavioral health'';
       (13) in subsection (f)(2)--
       (A) in the heading, by inserting after ``Research'' the 
     following: ``and data collection'';
       (B) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A), by inserting 
     ``or data collection'' before ``authorized in paragraph 
     (1)'';
       (C) in subparagraph (C), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (D) in subparagraph (D), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting a semicolon; and
       (E) by inserting after subparagraph (D) the following:
       ``(E) research on the intersection of substance use 
     disorder and domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
     assault, and stalking, including the effect of coerced use 
     and efforts by an abusive partner or other to interfere with 
     substance use disorder treatment and recovery; and
       ``(F) improvement of data collection using existing Federal 
     surveys by including questions about domestic violence, 
     dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking and substance 
     use disorder, coerced use, and mental or behavioral 
     health.'';
       (14) in subsection (g), by striking ``2014 through 2018'' 
     and inserting ``2020 through 2024''; and
       (15) in subsection (h), by striking ``herein'' and 
     ``provided for''.

                    TITLE VI--SAFE HOMES FOR VICTIMS

     SEC. 601. HOUSING PROTECTIONS FOR VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC 
                   VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND 
                   STALKING.

       Section 41411 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 
     U.S.C. 12491) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) in paragraph (1)(A), by striking ``brother, sister,'' 
     and inserting ``sibling,''; and
       (B) in paragraph (3)--
       (i) in subparagraph (A), by inserting before the semicolon 
     at the end the following: ``including the direct loan program 
     under such section'';
       (ii) in subparagraph (D), by striking ``the program under 
     subtitle A'' and inserting ``the programs under subtitles A 
     through D'';
       (iii) in subparagraph (I)--

       (I) by striking ``sections 514, 515, 516, 533, and 538 of 
     the Housing Act of 1949 (42 U.S.C. 1484, 1485, 1486, 1490m, 
     and 1490p-2)'' and inserting ``sections 514, 515, 516, 533, 
     538, and 542 of the Housing Act of 1949 (42 U.S.C. 1484, 
     1485, 1486, 1490m, 1490p-2, and 1490r)''; and
       (II) by striking ``and'' at the end;

       (iv) in subparagraph (J), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting a semicolon; and
       (v) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(K) the provision of assistance from the Housing Trust 
     Fund as established under section 1338 of the Federal Housing 
     Enterprises Financial Safety and Soundness Act of 1992 (12 
     U.S.C. 4501);
       ``(L) the provision of assistance for housing under the 
     Comprehensive Service Programs for Homeless Veterans program 
     under subchapter II of chapter 20 of title 38, United States 
     Code (38 U.S.C. 2011 et seq.);
       ``(M) the provision of assistance for housing and 
     facilities under the grant program for homeless veterans with 
     special needs under section 2061 of title 38, United States 
     Code;
       ``(N) the provision of assistance for permanent housing 
     under the program for financial assistance for supportive 
     services for very low-income veteran families in permanent 
     housing under section 2044 of title 38, United States Code; 
     and
       ``(O) any other Federal housing programs providing 
     affordable housing to low-income persons by means of 
     restricted rents or rental assistance as identified by the 
     appropriate agency.''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(4) Covered housing provider.--The term `covered housing 
     provider' refers to the individual or entity under a covered 
     housing program that has responsibility for the 
     administration or oversight of housing assisted under a 
     covered housing program and includes public housing agencies, 
     sponsors, owners, mortgagors, managers, grantee under the 
     continuum of Care, State and local governments or agencies 
     thereof, and nonprofit or for-profit organizations or 
     entities.
       ``(5) Continuum of care.--The term `Continuum of Care' 
     means the Federal program authorized under subtitle C of 
     title IV of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 
     U.S.C. 11381 et seq.).
       ``(6) Internal transfer.--The term `internal transfer' 
     means a transfer to a unit of the same covered housing 
     provider and under the same covered housing program except 
     for programs under the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance 
     Act.
       ``(7) External transfer.--The term `external transfer' 
     means a transfer to a unit of a different covered housing 
     provider under the same covered housing program.'';
       (2) in subsection (b)(3)--
       (A) in the heading, by inserting after ``criminal 
     activity'' the following: ``and family break-up'';
       (B) by amending subparagraph (A) to read as follows:
       ``(A) Denial of assistance, tenancy, and occupancy rights 
     prohibited.--
       ``(i) In general.--A tenant shall not be denied assistance, 
     tenancy, or occupancy rights to housing assisted under a 
     covered housing program solely on the basis of criminal 
     activity directly relating to domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, or stalking that is engaged in by a 
     member of the household of the tenant or any guest or other 
     person under the control of the tenant, if the tenant or an 
     affiliated individual of the tenant is the victim or 
     threatened victim of such domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, or stalking.
       ``(ii) Criminal activity engaged in by perpetrator of 
     abuse.--A tenant shall not be denied assistance, tenancy, or 
     occupancy rights to housing assisted under a covered housing 
     program solely on the basis of criminal activity, including 
     drug-related criminal activity (as such term is defined 
     section 3(b)(9) of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 
     U.S.C. 1437a(b)(9)), engaged in by the perpetrator of the 
     domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or 
     stalking.
       ``(iii) Review prior to denial of assistance.--Prior to 
     denying assistance, tenancy, or occupancy rights to housing 
     assisted under a covered housing program to a tenant on the 
     basis of criminal activity of the tenant, including drug-
     related criminal activity, the covered housing provider must 
     conduct an individualized review of the totality of the 
     circumstances regarding the criminal activity at issue if the 
     tenant is a victim of domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, or stalking. Such review shall include 
     consideration of--

       ``(I) the nature and severity of the criminal activity;
       ``(II) the amount of time that has elapsed since the 
     occurrence of the criminal activity;
       ``(III) if the tenant engaged in more than one instance of 
     criminal activity, the frequency and duration of the criminal 
     activity;
       ``(IV) whether the criminal activity was related to a 
     symptom of a disability, including a substance use disorder;
       ``(V) whether the victim was coerced by the perpetrator of 
     domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or 
     stalking;
       ``(VI) whether the victim has taken affirmative steps to 
     reduce the likelihood that the criminal activity will recur; 
     and
       ``(VII) any mitigating factors.

     The covered housing program must provide the tenant with a 
     written summary of its review and the tenant shall have the 
     opportunity to invoke the covered housing program's grievance 
     policy to dispute the findings.'';
       (C) in subparagraph (B)--
       (i) in the heading, by striking ``Bifurcation'' and 
     inserting ``Family break-up'';
       (ii) by redesignating clauses (i) and (ii) as clauses (ii) 
     and (iii) respectively;
       (iii) by inserting before clause (ii) (as redesignated by 
     clause (ii) of this subparagraph) the following:
       ``(i) In general.--If a family break-up results from an 
     occurrence of domestic violence, dating

[[Page H3018]]

     violence, sexual assault, or stalking, and the perpetrator no 
     longer resides in the unit and was the sole tenant eligible 
     to receive assistance under a covered housing program, the 
     covered housing provider shall--

       ``(I) provide any other tenant or resident the opportunity 
     to establish eligibility for the covered housing program; or
       ``(II) provide that tenant or resident with at least 180 
     days to remain in the unit under the same terms and 
     conditions as the perpetrator and find new housing or 
     establish eligibility for another covered housing program.''.

       (iv) in clause (ii) (as redesignated by clause (ii) of this 
     subparagraph)--

       (I) in the heading, by striking ``In general'' and 
     inserting ``Eviction''; and
       (II) by inserting after ``a public housing agency'' the 
     following: ``, participating jurisdictions, grantees under 
     the Continuum of Care, grantees,''; and

       (v) by striking clause (iii) (as redesignated by clause 
     (ii) of this subparagraph);
       (D) in subparagraph (C)--
       (i) in clause (iii), by striking ``or'' at the end;
       (ii) in clause (iv), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``; or''; and
       (iii) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(v) to limit any right, remedy, or procedure otherwise 
     available under the Violence Against Women Reauthorization 
     Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-162, 119 Stat. 2960) prior to the 
     date of enactment of the Violence Against Women 
     Reauthorization Act of 2019.''; and
       (E) by inserting after subparagraph (C) the following:
       ``(D) Early termination.--A covered housing provider shall 
     permit a tenant assisted under the covered housing program to 
     terminate the lease at any time prior to the end date of the 
     lease, without penalty, if the tenant has been a victim of 
     domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or 
     stalking and the tenant--
       ``(i) sends notice of the early lease termination to the 
     landlord in writing prior to or within 3 days of vacating the 
     premises unless a shorter notice period is provided for under 
     State law;
       ``(ii)(I) reasonably believes that the tenant is threatened 
     with imminent harm if the tenant remains within the same 
     dwelling unit subject to the lease; or
       ``(II) is a victim of sexual assault, the sexual assault 
     occurred on the premises during the 180-day period preceding 
     the request for lease termination; and
       ``(iii) provides a form of documentation consistent with 
     the requirements outlined in subsection (c)(3).
     Nothing in this subparagraph may be construed to preclude any 
     automatic termination of a lease by operation of law.'';
       (3) in subsection (c)(4), in the matter preceding 
     subparagraph (A)--
       (A) by striking ``Any information submitted to a public 
     housing agency or owner or manager'' and inserting ``Covered 
     housing providers shall ensure any information submitted''; 
     and
       (B) by inserting after ``owner or manager'' the following: 
     ``of housing assisted under a covered housing program'';
       (4) by amending subsection (e) to read as follows:
       ``(e) Emergency Transfers.--
       ``(1) In general.--Tenants who are victims of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking shall 
     be transferred to another available and safe dwelling unit 
     assisted under a covered housing program if--
       ``(A) the tenant expressly requests the transfer from the 
     covered housing provider; and
       ``(B)(i) the tenant reasonably believes that the tenant is 
     threatened with imminent harm from further violence if the 
     tenant remains within the same dwelling unit assisted under a 
     covered housing program; or
       ``(ii) in the case of a tenant who is a victim of sexual 
     assault, the sexual assault occurred on the premises during 
     the 180 day period preceding the request for transfer.
     A tenant who is not in good standing retains the right to an 
     emergency transfer if they meet the eligibility requirements 
     in this section and the eligibility requirements of the 
     program to which the tenant intends to transfer.
       ``(2) Policies.--Each appropriate agency shall adopt an 
     emergency transfer policy for use by covered housing 
     programs. Such emergency transfer policies shall reflect the 
     variations in program operation and administration by covered 
     housing program type. The policies must, at a minimum--
       ``(A) describe a process that--
       ``(i) permits tenants who are victims of domestic violence, 
     dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking to move to 
     another available and safe dwelling quickly through an 
     internal emergency transfer and by receiving a tenant 
     protection voucher, if eligible, pursuant to subsection (f);
       ``(ii) provides that the victim can choose between 
     completing an internal emergency transfer or receiving a 
     tenant protection voucher, whichever is the safest option for 
     the victim; and
       ``(iii) requires that an internal emergency transfer must 
     occur within 10 days after a covered housing provider's 
     approval of a request for an emergency transfer;
       ``(B) describe a process to permit tenants who are victims 
     of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or 
     stalking to complete an emergency external transfer;
       ``(C) describe a process that allows a victim of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking to 
     temporarily relocate, while maintaining eligibility for the 
     covered housing program without the loss of their housing 
     status, if there are no alternative comparable housing 
     program units available, until a safe housing unit under the 
     covered housing program or a tenant protection voucher is 
     available;
       ``(D) prioritize completing internal emergency transfers 
     and receiving tenant protection vouchers over external 
     emergency transfers, except for Continua of Care, which shall 
     prioritize completing an internal emergency transfer or 
     external emergency transfer prior to receiving a tenant 
     protection voucher;
       ``(E) mandate that emergency internal and external 
     transfers take priority over non-emergency transfers;
       ``(F) mandate that emergency internal and external 
     transfers are not considered new applicants and take priority 
     over existing waiting lists for a covered housing program;
       ``(G) incorporate confidentiality measures to ensure that 
     the appropriate agency and the covered housing provider do 
     not disclose any information regarding a tenant who is victim 
     of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or 
     stalking, including the location of a new dwelling unit to 
     any person or entity without the written authorization of the 
     tenant;
       ``(H) mandate that if a victim cannot receive an internal 
     transfer, external transfer, and a tenant protection voucher, 
     then the covered housing provider must assist the victim in 
     identifying other housing providers who may have safe and 
     available units to which the victim can move and that the 
     covered housing provider also assist tenants in contacting 
     local organizations offering assistance to victims; and
       ``(I) mandate a uniform policy for how a victim of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking 
     requests an emergency internal or external transfer.
       ``(3) Local Systems Funded by Continuum of Care.--In 
     addition to adopting the policies as defined in paragraph (2) 
     in an emergency transfer policy, each grantee under the 
     Continuum of Care shall designate the entity within its 
     geographic area that will coordinate and facilitate emergency 
     transfers, and that entity shall also--''.
       ``(A) coordinate emergency external transfers among all 
     covered housing providers participating in the Continuum of 
     Care;
       ``(B) identify an emergency external transfer, if 
     available, within 30 days of an approved request;
       ``(C) coordinate emergency transfers with Continua of Care 
     in other jurisdictions in cases where the victim requests an 
     out-of-jurisdiction transfer; and
       ``(D) ensure a victim is not required to be reassessed 
     through the local Continuum of Care intake process when 
     seeking an emergency transfer placement.
       ``(4) Regional offices.--Each regional office of the 
     Department of Housing and Urban Development (hereinafter in 
     this section referred to as a `HUD regional office') shall 
     develop and implement a regional emergency transfer plan in 
     collaboration with public housing agencies and the entities 
     designated under paragraph (3). Such a plan shall set forth 
     how public housing agencies will coordinate emergency 
     transfers with other public housing agencies regionally. The 
     plans must be submitted to the Violence Against Women 
     Director and be made publicly available. HUD regional offices 
     shall defer to any additional emergency transfer policies, 
     priorities and strategies set by entities designated under 
     paragraph (3).
       ``(5) Covered housing providers.--Each covered housing 
     provider shall develop and implement an emergency transfer 
     policy consistent with the requirements in paragraph (2) or 
     (3).'';
       (5) in subsection (f), by adding at the end the following: 
     ``The Secretary shall establish these policies and procedures 
     within 60 days after the date of enactment of the Violence 
     Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019.'';
       (6) by redesignating subsection (g) as subsection (k); and
       (7) by inserting after subsection (f) the following:
       ``(g) Emergency Transfer Policies and Procedures.--The head 
     of each appropriate agency shall establish the policy 
     required under subsection (e) with respect to emergency 
     transfers and emergency transfer vouchers within 180 days 
     after the date of enactment of the Violence Against Women 
     Reauthorization Act of 2019.
       ``(h) Emergency Transfer Vouchers.--Provision of emergency 
     transfer vouchers to victims of domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, or stalking under subsection (e), 
     shall be considered an eligible use of any funding for tenant 
     protection voucher assistance available under section 8(o) of 
     the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f(o)) 
     subject to the availability of appropriated funds.
       ``(i) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are 
     authorized to be appropriated to carry out emergency 
     transfers under this section, $20,000,000 under section 8(o) 
     of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f(o)) 
     for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2024.
       ``(j) Training and Referrals.--
       ``(1) Training for staff of covered housing programs.--The 
     Secretary of Housing and Urban Development, in partnership 
     with domestic violence experts, shall develop mandatory 
     training for staff of covered housing providers to provide a 
     basic understanding of domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, and stalking, and to facilitate 
     implementation of this section. All staff of covered housing 
     providers shall attend the basic understanding training once 
     annually; and all staff and managers engaged in tenant 
     services shall attend both the basic understanding training 
     and the implementation training once annually.
       ``(2) Referrals.--The appropriate agency with respect to 
     each covered housing program shall supply all appropriate 
     staff of the covered housing providers with a referral 
     listing of public contact information for all domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking 
     service providers offering services in its coverage area.''.

[[Page H3019]]

  


     SEC. 602. ENSURING COMPLIANCE AND IMPLEMENTATION; PROHIBITING 
                   RETALIATION AGAINST VICTIMS.

       Chapter 2 of subtitle N of title IV of the Violence Against 
     Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12491 et seq.) is amended by 
     inserting after section 41411 the following:

     ``SEC. 41412. COMPLIANCE REVIEWS.

       ``(a) Annual Compliance Reviews.--Each appropriate agency 
     administering a covered housing program shall establish a 
     process by which to review compliance with the requirements 
     of this subtitle, on an annual basis, of the covered housing 
     providers administered by that agency. Such a review shall 
     examine the following topics:
       ``(1) Covered housing provider compliance with requirements 
     prohibiting the denial of assistance, tenancy, or occupancy 
     rights on the basis of domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, or stalking.
       ``(2) Covered housing provider compliance with 
     confidentiality provisions set forth in section 41411(c)(4).
       ``(3) Covered housing provider compliance with the 
     notification requirements set forth in section 41411(d)(2).
       ``(4) Covered housing provider compliance with accepting 
     documentation set forth in section 41411(c).
       ``(5) Covered housing provider compliance with emergency 
     transfer requirements set forth in section 41411(e).
       ``(6) Covered housing provider compliance with the 
     prohibition on retaliation set forth in section 41414.
       ``(b) Regulations.--Each appropriate agency shall issue 
     regulations to implement subsection (a) not later than one 
     year after the effective date of the Violence Against Women 
     Reauthorization Act of 2019. These regulations shall--
       ``(1) define standards of compliance for covered housing 
     providers;
       ``(2) include detailed reporting requirements, including 
     the number of emergency transfers requested and granted, as 
     well as the length of time needed to process emergency 
     transfers, disaggregated by external and internal transfers; 
     and
       ``(3) include standards for corrective action plans where a 
     covered housing provider has failed to meet compliance 
     standards.
       ``(c) Public Disclosure.--Each appropriate agency shall 
     ensure that an agency-level assessment of the information 
     collected during the compliance review process completed 
     pursuant to this subsection is made publicly available. This 
     agency-level assessment shall include an evaluation of each 
     topic identified in subsection (a).
       ``(d) Rules of Construction.--Nothing in this section shall 
     be construed--
       ``(1) to limit any claim filed or other proceeding 
     commenced, by the date of enactment of the Violence Against 
     Women Reauthorization Act of 2019, with regard to any right, 
     remedy, or procedure otherwise available under the Violence 
     Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-
     162, 119 Stat. 2960), as in effect on the day prior to such 
     date of enactment; or
       ``(2) to supersede any provision of any Federal, State, or 
     local law that provides greater protection than this 
     subsection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, or stalking.

     ``SEC. 41413. DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT 
                   VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN DIRECTOR.

       ``(a) Establishment.--There shall be, within the Office of 
     the Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban 
     Development, a Violence Against Women Director (in this 
     section referred to as the `Director').
       ``(b) Duties.--The Director shall--
       ``(1) support implementation of the provisions of this 
     subtitle;
       ``(2) coordinate development of Federal regulations, 
     policy, protocols, and guidelines on matters relating to the 
     implementation of this subtitle, at each agency administering 
     a covered housing program;
       ``(3) advise and coordinate with designated officials 
     within the United States Interagency Council on Homelessness, 
     the Department of Housing and Urban Development, the 
     Department of the Treasury, the Department of Agriculture, 
     the Department of Health and Human Services, the Department 
     of Veterans Affairs, and the Department of Justice concerning 
     legislation, implementation, and other issues relating to or 
     affecting the housing provisions under this subtitle;
       ``(4) provide technical assistance, coordination, and 
     support to each appropriate agency regarding advancing 
     housing protections and access to housing for victims of 
     domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and 
     stalking, including compliance with this subtitle;
       ``(5) ensure that adequate technical assistance is made 
     available to covered housing providers regarding 
     implementation of this subtitle, as well as other issues 
     related to advancing housing protections for victims of 
     domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and 
     stalking, including compliance with this subtitle;
       ``(6) act as a liaison with the judicial branches of 
     Federal, State, and local governments on matters relating to 
     the housing needs of victims of domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, and stalking;
       ``(7) implement a quality control system and a corrective 
     action plan system for those covered housing providers that 
     fail to comply with this subtitle, wherein--
       ``(A) such corrective action plans shall be developed in 
     partnership with national, State, or local programs focused 
     on child or adult victims of domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, or stalking; and
       ``(B) such corrective action plans shall include provisions 
     requiring covered housing providers to review and develop 
     appropriate notices, procedures, and staff training to 
     improve compliance with this subtitle, in partnership with 
     national, state, or local programs focused on child or adult 
     victims;
       ``(8) establish a formal reporting process to receive 
     individual complaints concerning noncompliance with this 
     subtitle;
       ``(9) coordinate the development of interagency guidelines 
     to ensure that information concerning available dwelling 
     units is forwarded to the Director by all covered housing 
     providers for use by the Secretary in facilitating the 
     emergency transfer process;
       ``(10) coordinate with HUD regional offices and officials 
     at each appropriate agency the development of Federal 
     regulations, policy, protocols, and guidelines regarding 
     uniform timeframes for the completion of emergency transfers; 
     and
       ``(11) ensure that the guidance and notices to victims are 
     distributed in commonly encountered languages.
       ``(c) Rules of Construction.--Nothing in this section shall 
     be construed--
       ``(1) to limit any claim filed or other proceeding 
     commenced, by the date of enactment of the Violence Against 
     Women Reauthorization Act of 2019, with regard to any right, 
     remedy, or procedure otherwise available under the Violence 
     Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2005 (Public Law 109-
     162, 119 Stat. 2960), as in effect on the day prior to such 
     date of enactment; or
       ``(2) to supersede any provision of any Federal, State, or 
     local law that provides greater protection than this 
     subsection for victims of domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, or stalking.

     ``SEC. 41414. PROHIBITION ON RETALIATION.

       ``(a) Nondiscrimination Requirement.--No covered housing 
     provider shall discriminate against any person because that 
     person has opposed any act or practice made unlawful by this 
     subtitle, or because that individual testified, assisted, or 
     participated in any matter related to this subtitle.
       ``(b) Prohibition on Coercion.--No covered housing provider 
     shall coerce, intimidate, threaten, or interfere with, or 
     retaliate against, any person in the exercise or enjoyment 
     of, or on account of the person having exercised or enjoyed, 
     or on account of the person having aided or encouraged any 
     other individual in the exercise or enjoyment of, any rights 
     or protections under this subtitle, including--
       ``(1) intimidating or threatening any person because that 
     person is assisting or encouraging an individual entitled to 
     claim the rights or protections under this subtitle; and
       ``(2) retaliating against any person because that person 
     has participated in any investigation or action to enforce 
     this subtitle.
       ``(c) Enforcement Authority of the Secretary.--The 
     authority of the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development 
     and the Office for Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity to 
     enforce this section shall be the same as the Fair Housing 
     Act (42 U.S.C. 3610 et seq.).''.

     SEC. 603. PROTECTING THE RIGHT TO REPORT CRIME FROM ONE'S 
                   HOME.

       (a) In General.--Chapter 2 of subtitle N of title IV of the 
     Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12491 et seq.), 
     as amended by this Act, is further amended by inserting after 
     section 41414 the following:

     ``SEC. 41415. RIGHT TO REPORT CRIME AND EMERGENCIES FROM 
                   ONE'S HOME.

       ``(a) In General.--Landlords, homeowners, residents, 
     occupants, and guests of, and applicants for, housing 
     assisted under a covered housing program shall have the right 
     to seek law enforcement or emergency assistance on their own 
     behalf or on behalf of another person in need of assistance, 
     and shall not be penalized based on their requests for 
     assistance or based on criminal activity of which they are a 
     victim or otherwise not at fault under statutes, ordinances, 
     regulations, or policies adopted or enforced by covered 
     governmental entities as defined in subsection (d). Penalties 
     that are prohibited include--
       ``(1) actual or threatened assessment of penalties, fees, 
     or fines;
       ``(2) actual or threatened eviction;
       ``(3) actual or threatened refusal to rent or renew 
     tenancy;
       ``(4) actual or threatened refusal to issue an occupancy 
     permit or landlord permit; and
       ``(5) actual or threatened closure of the property, or 
     designation of the property as a nuisance or a similarly 
     negative designation.
       ``(b) Reporting.--Consistent with the process provided for 
     in section 104(b) of the Housing and Community Development 
     Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5304(b)), covered governmental 
     entities shall--
       ``(1) report any of their laws or policies, or, as 
     applicable, the laws or policies adopted by subgrantees, that 
     impose penalties on landlords, homeowners, residents, 
     occupants, guests, or housing applicants based on requests 
     for law enforcement or emergency assistance or based on 
     criminal activity that occurred at a property; and
       ``(2) certify that they are in compliance with the 
     protections under this subtitle or describe the steps they 
     will take within 180 days to come into compliance, or to 
     ensure compliance among subgrantees.
       ``(c) Oversight.--Oversight and accountability mechanisms 
     provided for under title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968 
     (42 U.S.C. 3601 et seq.) shall be available to address 
     violations of this section.
       ``(d) Definition.--For purposes of this section, `covered 
     governmental entity' shall mean any municipal, county, or 
     state government that receives funding pursuant to section 
     106 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (42 
     U.S.C. 5306).

[[Page H3020]]

       ``(e) Subgrantees.--For those covered governmental entities 
     that distribute funds to subgrantees, compliance with 
     subsection (b)(1) includes inquiring about the existence of 
     laws and policies adopted by subgrantees that impose 
     penalties on landlords, homeowners, residents, occupants, 
     guests, or housing applicants based on requests for law 
     enforcement or emergency assistance or based on criminal 
     activity that occurred at a property.''.
       (b) Supporting Effective, Alternative Crime Reduction 
     Methods.--
       (1) Additional authorized use of byrne-jag funds.--Section 
     501(a)(1) of subpart 1 of part E of title I of the Omnibus 
     Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 
     10152(a)(1)) is amended by adding after subparagraph (H) the 
     following:
       ``(I) Programs for the development and implementation of 
     alternative methods of reducing crime in communities, to 
     supplant punitive programs or policies. For purposes of this 
     subparagraph, a punitive program or policy is a program or 
     policy that (i) imposes a penalty on a victim of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking, on 
     the basis of a request by the victim for law enforcement or 
     emergency assistance; or (ii) imposes a penalty on such a 
     victim because of criminal activity at the property in which 
     the victim resides.''.
       (2) Additional authorized use of cops funds.--Section 
     1701(b) of part Q of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and 
     Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10381(b)) is amended--
       (A) in paragraph (22), by striking ``and'' after the 
     semicolon;
       (B) in paragraph (23), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; and''; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(24) to develop and implement alternative methods of 
     reducing crime in communities, to supplant punitive programs 
     or policies (as such term is defined in section 
     501(a)(1)(I)).''.
       (3) Additional authorized use of grants to encourage arrest 
     policies.--Section 2101(b) of part U of title I of the 
     Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 
     10461(b)), as amended by this Act, is further amended by 
     adding at the end the following:
       ``(25) To develop and implement alternative methods of 
     reducing crime in communities, to supplant punitive programs 
     or policies. For purposes of this paragraph, a punitive 
     program or policy is a program or policy that (A) imposes a 
     penalty on a victim of domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, or stalking, on the basis of a request by the 
     victim for law enforcement or emergency assistance; or (B) 
     imposes a penalty on such a victim because of criminal 
     activity at the property in which the victim resides.''.

     SEC. 604. TRANSITIONAL HOUSING ASSISTANCE GRANTS FOR VICTIMS 
                   OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL 
                   ASSAULT, OR STALKING.

       Section 40299 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (34 
     U.S.C. 12351) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a), in the matter preceding paragraph 
     (1)--
       (A) by striking ``the Director of the Violence Against 
     Women Office'' and inserting ``the Director of the Office on 
     Violence Against Women''; and
       (B) by inserting after ``, other nonprofit, nongovernmental 
     organizations'' the following: ``, population-specific 
     organizations''; and
       (2) in subsection (g)--
       (A) in paragraph (1), by striking ``2014 through 2018'' and 
     inserting ``2020 through 2024''; and
       (B) in paragraph (2), by striking ``5 percent'' and 
     inserting ``8 percent''.

     SEC. 605. ADDRESSING THE HOUSING NEEDS OF VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC 
                   VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, AND 
                   STALKING.

       (a) McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Grants.--Section 
     423(a) of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 
     U.S.C. 11383(a)) is amended by adding at the end the 
     following:
       ``(13) Facilitating and coordinating activities to ensure 
     compliance with section 41411(e) of the Violence Against 
     Women Act of 1994, including, in consultation with the 
     regional office (if applicable) of the appropriate agency (as 
     such term is defined in section 41411 of the Violence Against 
     Women Act of 1994), development of external emergency 
     transfer memoranda of understanding between covered housing 
     providers, participating in the local Continua of Care, 
     facilitation of external emergency transfers between those 
     covered housing providers participating in the local Continua 
     of Care, and monitoring compliance with the confidentiality 
     protections of section 41411(c)(4) of the Violence Against 
     Women Act of 1994 for reporting to that regional office.''.
       (b) Definition of Domestic Violence and Other Dangerous or 
     Life-Threatening Conditions Amended.--Section 103(b) of the 
     McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 11302(b)) 
     is amended to read as follows:
       (b) Domestic Violence and Other Dangerous or Life-
     Threatening Conditions.--Notwithstanding any other provision 
     of this section, the Secretary shall consider to be homeless 
     any individual or family who--
       ``(1) is fleeing, or attempting to flee, domestic violence, 
     dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and who have no 
     other residence and lack resoures to obtain other permanent 
     housing; or
       ``(2) is fleeing or attempting to flee a dangerous or life-
     threateniing condition in the individual's or family's 
     current housing situation, including where the health and 
     safety of children are jeopardized and who have no other 
     residence and lack the resources or support networks to 
     obtain other permanent housing.'.
       (c) Collaborative Grants To Increase the Long-Term 
     Stability of Victims.--Section 41404(i) of the Violence 
     Against Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12474(i)) is amended by 
     striking ``2014 through 2018'' and inserting ``2020 through 
     2024''.
       (d) Grants To Combat Violence Against Women in Public and 
     Assisted Housing.--Section 41405 of the Violence Against 
     Women Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12475) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (b), by striking ``the Director of the 
     Violence Against Women Office'' and inserting ``the Director 
     of the Office on Violence Against Women'';
       (2) in subsection (c)(2)(D), by inserting after 
     ``linguistically and culturally specific service providers,'' 
     the following: ``population-specific organizations,''; and
       (3) in subsection (g), by striking ``2014 through 2018'' 
     and inserting the following: ``2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 606. UNITED STATES HOUSING ACT OF 1937 AMENDMENTS.

       Section 5A(d) of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 
     U.S.C. 1437c-1(d)) is amended--
       (1) by amending paragraph (13) to read as follows:
       ``(13) Domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, 
     or stalking programs.--
       ``(A) Copies.--A copy of--
       ``(i) all standardized notices issued pursuant to the 
     housing protections under subtitle N of the Violence Against 
     Women Act of 1994, including the notice required under 
     section 41411(d) of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994;
       ``(ii) the emergency transfer plan issued pursuant to 
     section 41411 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994; and
       ``(iii) any and all memoranda of understanding with other 
     covered housing providers developed to facilitate emergency 
     transfers under section 41411(e) of the Violence Against 
     Women Act of 1994.
       ``(B) Descriptions.--A description of--
       ``(i) any activities, services, or programs provided or 
     offered by an agency, either directly or in partnership with 
     other service providers, to child or adult victims of 
     domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or 
     stalking;
       ``(ii) any activities, services, or programs provided or 
     offered by a public housing agency that helps child and adult 
     victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
     assault, or stalking, to obtain or maintain housing;
       ``(iii) any activities, services, or programs provided or 
     offered by a public housing agency to prevent domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, or 
     to enhance victim safety in assisted families; and
       ``(iv) all training and support services offered to staff 
     of the public housing agency to provide a basic understanding 
     of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and 
     stalking, and to facilitate implementation of the housing 
     protections of section 41411 of the Violence Against Women 
     Act of 1994.''; and
       (2) in pararaph (16), by inserting ``the Violence Against 
     Women Act of 1994,'' before ``the Fair Housing Act''.

                TITLE VII--ECONOMIC SECURITY FOR VICTIMS

     SEC. 701. FINDINGS.

       Congress finds the following:
       (1) Over 1 in 3 women experience sexual violence, and 1 in 
     5 women have survived completed or attempted rape. Such 
     violence has a devastating impact on women's physical and 
     emotional health, financial security, and ability to maintain 
     their jobs, and thus impacts interstate commerce and economic 
     security.
       (2) The Office on Violence Against Women of the Department 
     of Justice defines domestic violence as a pattern of abusive 
     behavior in any relationship that is used by one intimate 
     partner to gain or maintain power and control over another 
     intimate partner. Domestic violence can include physical, 
     sexual, emotional, economic, or psychological actions or 
     threats of actions that influence another person. Domestic 
     violence includes any behaviors that intimidate, manipulate, 
     humiliate, isolate, frighten, terrorize, coerce, threaten, 
     blame, hurt, injure, or wound an individual.
       (3) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report 
     that domestic violence or intimate partner violence is a 
     serious public health issue for millions of individuals in 
     the United States. Nearly 1 in 4 women and 1 in 9 men in the 
     United States have suffered sexual violence, physical 
     violence, or stalking by an intimate partner.
       (4) Homicide is one of the leading causes of death for 
     women on the job. Domestic partners or relatives commit 43 
     percent of workplace homicides against women. One study found 
     that intimate partner violence resulted in 142 homicides 
     among women at work in the United States from 2003 to 2008, a 
     figure which represents 22 percent of the 648 workplace 
     homicides among women during the period. In fact, in 2010, 
     homicides against women at work increased by 13 percent 
     despite continuous declines in overall workplace homicides in 
     recent years.
       (5) Women in the United States are 11 times more likely to 
     be murdered with guns than women in other high-income 
     countries. Female intimate partners are more likely to be 
     murdered with a firearm than all other means combined. The 
     presence of a gun in domestic violence situations increases 
     the risk of homicide for women by 500 percent.
       (6) Violence can have a dramatic impact on the survivor of 
     such violence. Studies indicate that 44 percent of surveyed 
     employed adults experienced the effect of domestic violence 
     in the workplace, and 64 percent indicated their workplace 
     performance was affected by such violence. Another recent 
     survey found that 78 percent of offenders used workplace 
     resources to express anger, check up on, pressure, or 
     threaten a survivor. Sexual assault, whether occurring in or 
     out of the workplace, can impair an employee's work 
     performance, require time away from work, and undermine the 
     employee's ability to maintain a job. Nearly 50 percent of 
     sexual assault survivors lose their jobs or are forced to 
     quit in the aftermath of the assaults.

[[Page H3021]]

       (7) Studies find that 60 percent of single women lack 
     economic security and 81 percent of households with single 
     mothers live in economic insecurity. Significant barriers 
     that survivors confront include access to housing, 
     transportation, and child care. Ninety-two percent of 
     homeless women have experienced domestic violence, and more 
     than 50 percent of such women cite domestic violence as the 
     direct cause for homelessness. Survivors are deprived of 
     their autonomy, liberty, and security, and face tremendous 
     threats to their health and safety.
       (8) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report 
     that survivors of severe intimate partner violence lose 
     nearly 8,000,000 days of paid work, which is the equivalent 
     of more than 32,000 full-time jobs and almost 5,600,000 days 
     of household productivity each year. Therefore, women 
     disproportionately need time off to care for their health or 
     to find safety solutions, such as obtaining a restraining 
     order or finding housing, to avoid or prevent further 
     violence.
       (9) Annual costs of intimate partner violence are estimated 
     to be more than $8,300,000,000. According to the Centers for 
     Disease Control and Prevention, the costs of intimate partner 
     violence against women in 1995 exceeded an estimated 
     $5,800,000,000. These costs included nearly $4,100,000,000 in 
     the direct costs of medical and mental health care and nearly 
     $1,800,000,000 in the indirect costs of lost productivity. 
     These statistics are generally considered to be 
     underestimated because the costs associated with the criminal 
     justice system are not included.
       (10) Fifty-five percent of senior executives recently 
     surveyed said domestic violence has a harmful effect on their 
     company's productivity, and more than 70 percent said 
     domestic violence negatively affects attendance. Seventy-
     eight percent of human resources professionals consider 
     partner violence a workplace issue. However, more than 70 
     percent of United States workplaces have no formal program or 
     policy that addresses workplace violence, let alone domestic 
     violence. In fact, only four percent of employers provided 
     training on domestic violence.
       (11) Studies indicate that one of the best predictors of 
     whether a survivor will be able to stay away from his or her 
     abuser is the degree of his or her economic independence. 
     However, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, 
     and stalking often negatively impact a survivor's ability to 
     maintain employment.
       (12) Abusers frequently seek to exert financial control 
     over their partners by actively interfering with their 
     ability to work, including preventing their partners from 
     going to work, harassing their partners at work, limiting 
     their partners' access to cash or transportation, and 
     sabotaging their partners' child care arrangements.
       (13) Economic abuse refers to behaviors that control an 
     intimate partner's ability to acquire, use, and maintain 
     access to, money, credit, ownership of assets, or access to 
     governmental or private financial benefits, including 
     defaulting on joint obligations (such as school loans, credit 
     card debt, mortgages, or rent). Other forms of such abuse may 
     include preventing someone from attending school, threatening 
     to or actually terminating employment, controlling or 
     withholding access to cash, checking, or credit accounts, and 
     attempting to damage or sabotage the creditworthiness of an 
     intimate partner, including forcing an intimate partner to 
     write bad checks, forcing an intimate partner to default on 
     payments related to household needs, such as housing, or 
     forcing an intimate partner into bankruptcy.
       (14) The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Public 
     Law 111-148), and the amendments made by such Act, ensures 
     that most health plans must cover preventive services, 
     including screening and counseling for domestic violence, at 
     no additional cost. In addition, it prohibits insurance 
     companies from discriminating against patients for 
     preexisting conditions, like domestic violence.
       (15) Yet, more can be done to help survivors. Federal law 
     in effect on the day before the date of enactment of this Act 
     does not explicitly--
       (A) authorize survivors of domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, or stalking to take leave from work 
     to seek legal assistance and redress, counseling, or 
     assistance with safety planning activities;
       (B) address the eligibility of survivors of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking for 
     unemployment compensation;
       (C) provide job protection to survivors of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking;
       (D) prohibit insurers and employers who self-insure 
     employee benefits from discriminating against survivors of 
     domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or 
     stalking and those who help them in determining eligibility, 
     rates charged, and standards for payment of claims; or
       (E) prohibit insurers from disclosing information about 
     abuse and the location of the survivors through insurance 
     databases and other means.
       (16) This Act aims to empower survivors of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking to be 
     free from violence, hardship, and control, which restrains 
     basic human rights to freedom and safety in the United 
     States.

     SEC. 702. NATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER ON WORKPLACE RESPONSES TO 
                   ASSIST VICTIMS OF DOMESTIC AND SEXUAL VIOLENCE.

       Section 41501 of the Violent Crime Control and Law 
     Enforcement Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12501) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a)--
       (A) by inserting ``and sexual harassment'' after ``domestic 
     and sexual violence''; and
       (B) by striking ``employers and labor organizations'' and 
     inserting ``employers, labor organizations, and victim 
     service providers'';
       (2) in subsection (b)(3), by striking ``and stalking'' and 
     inserting ``stalking, and sexual harassment'';
       (3) in subsection (c)(1), by inserting before the period at 
     the end ``or sexual harassment'';
       (4) in subsection (c)(2)(A), by inserting ``or sexual 
     harassment'' after ``sexual violence''; and
       (5) in subsection (e), by striking ``$1,000,000 for each of 
     fiscal years 2014 through 2018'' and inserting ``$2,000,000 
     for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 703. ENTITLEMENT TO UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION FOR 
                   VICTIMS OF SEXUAL AND OTHER HARASSMENT AND 
                   SURVIVORS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, SEXUAL ASSAULT, 
                   OR STALKING.

       (a) Unemployment Compensation.--
       (1) Section 3304(a) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is 
     amended by striking ``and'' at the end of paragraph (18), by 
     redesignating paragraph (19) as paragraph (20), and by 
     inserting after paragraph (18) the following new paragraph:
       ``(19) no person may be denied compensation under such 
     State law solely on the basis of the individual having a 
     voluntary separation from work if such separation is 
     attributable to such individual being a victim of sexual or 
     other harassment or a survivor of domestic violence, sexual 
     assault, or stalking; and''.
       (2) Section 3304 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is 
     amended by adding at the end the following new subsection:
       ``(g) Sexual or Other Harassment; etc.--
       ``(1) Documentation.--For purposes of subsection (a)(19), a 
     voluntary separation of an individual shall be considered to 
     be attributable to such individual being a survivor or victim 
     of sexual or other harassment or a survivor of domestic 
     violence, sexual assault, or stalking if such individual 
     submits such evidence as the State deems sufficient.
       ``(2) Sufficient documentation.--For purposes of paragraph 
     (1), a State shall deem sufficient, at a minimum--
       ``(A) evidence of such harassment, violence, assault, or 
     stalking in the form of--
       ``(i) a sworn statement and a form of identification,
       ``(ii) a police or court record, or
       ``(iii) documentation from a victim service provider, an 
     attorney, a police officer, a medical professional, a social 
     worker, an antiviolence counselor, a member of the clergy, or 
     another professional, and
       ``(B) an attestation that such voluntary separation is 
     attributable to such harassment, violence, assault, or 
     stalking.
       ``(3) Definitions.--For purposes of this section--
       ``(A) The terms `domestic violence', `sexual assault', and 
     `stalking' victim of sexual or other harassment', and 
     `survivor of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking' 
     have the meanings given such terms under State law, 
     regulation, or policy.
       ``(B) The term `victim service provider' has the meaning 
     given such term in section 40002 of the Violence Against 
     Women Act of 1994.''.
       (b) Unemployment Compensation Personnel Training.--Section 
     303(a) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 503(a)) is 
     amended--
       (1) by redesignating paragraphs (4) through (12) as 
     paragraphs (5) through (13), respectively; and
       (2) by inserting after paragraph (3) the following new 
     paragraph:
       ``(4)(A) Such methods of administration as will ensure 
     that--
       ``(i) applicants for unemployment compensation and 
     individuals inquiring about such compensation are notified of 
     the provisions of section 3304(a)(19) of the Internal Revenue 
     Code of 1986; and
       ``(ii) claims reviewers and hearing personnel are trained 
     in--
       ``(I) the nature and dynamics of sexual and other 
     harassment, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking; 
     and
       ``(II) methods of ascertaining and keeping confidential 
     information about possible experiences of sexual and other 
     harassment, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking to 
     ensure that--

       ``(aa) requests for unemployment compensation based on 
     separations stemming from sexual and other harassment, 
     domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking are identified 
     and adjudicated; and
       ``(bb) confidentiality is provided for the individual's 
     claim and submitted evidence.

       ``(B) For purposes of this paragraph--
       ``(i) the terms `domestic violence', `sexual assault', and 
     `stalking' have the meanings given such terms in section 
     40002 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 ;
       ``(ii) the term `sexual and other harassment' has the 
     meaning given such term under State law, regulation, or 
     policy; and
       ``(iii) the term `survivor of domestic violence, sexual 
     assault, or stalking' means--
       ``(I) a person who has experienced or is experiencing 
     domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking; and
       ``(II) a person whose family or household member has 
     experienced or is experiencing domestic violence, sexual 
     assault, or stalking.''.
       (c) TANF Personnel Training.--Section 402(a) of the Social 
     Security Act (42 U.S.C. 602(a)) is amended by adding at the 
     end the following new paragraph:
       ``(8) Certification that the state will provide information 
     to survivors of sexual and other harassment, domestic 
     violence, sexual assault, or stalking.--
       ``(A) In general.--A certification by the chief executive 
     officer of the State that the State has established and is 
     enforcing standards and procedures to--
       ``(i) ensure that applicants for assistance under the State 
     program funded under this part

[[Page H3022]]

     and individuals inquiring about such assistance are 
     adequately notified of--

       ``(I) the provisions of section 3304(a)(19) of the Internal 
     Revenue Code of 1986; and
       ``(II) assistance made available by the State to survivors 
     of sexual and other harassment, domestic violence, sexual 
     assault, or stalking;

       ``(ii) ensure that case workers and other agency personnel 
     responsible for administering the State program funded under 
     this part are adequately trained in--

       ``(I) the nature and dynamics of sexual and other 
     harassment, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking;
       ``(II) State standards and procedures relating to the 
     prevention of, and assistance for individuals who are 
     survivors of sexual and other harassment, domestic violence, 
     sexual assault, or stalking; and
       ``(III) methods of ascertaining and keeping confidential 
     information about possible experiences of sexual and other 
     harassment, domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking;

       ``(iii) ensure that, if a State has elected to establish 
     and enforce standards and procedures regarding the screening 
     for, and identification of, domestic violence pursuant to 
     paragraph (7)--

       ``(I) applicants for assistance under the State program 
     funded under this part and individuals inquiring about such 
     assistance are adequately notified of options available under 
     such standards and procedures; and
       ``(II) case workers and other agency personnel responsible 
     for administering the State program funded under this part 
     are provided with adequate training regarding such standards 
     and procedures and options available under such standards and 
     procedures; and

       ``(iv) ensure that the training required under 
     subparagraphs (B) and, if applicable, (C)(ii) is provided 
     through a training program operated by an eligible entity.
       ``(B) Definitions.--For purposes of this paragraph--
       ``(i) the terms `domestic violence', `sexual assault', and 
     `stalking' have the meanings given such terms in section 
     40002 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 ;
       ``(ii) the term `sexual and other harassment' has the 
     meaning given such term under State law, regulation, or 
     policy; and
       ``(iii) the term `survivor of domestic violence, sexual 
     assault, or stalking' means--

       ``(I) a person who has experienced or is experiencing 
     domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking; and
       ``(II) a person whose family or household member has 
     experienced or is experiencing domestic violence, sexual 
     assault, or stalking.''.

       (d) Sexual and Other Harassment, Domestic Violence, Sexual 
     Assault, or Stalking Training Grant Program.--
       (1) Grants authorized.--The Secretary of Labor (in this 
     subsection referred to as the ``Secretary'') is authorized to 
     award--
       (A) a grant to a national victim service provider in order 
     for such organization to--
       (i) develop and disseminate a model training program (and 
     related materials) for the training required under section 
     303(a)(4)(B) of the Social Security Act, as added by 
     subsection (b), and under subparagraph (B) and, if 
     applicable, subparagraph (C)(ii) of section 402(a)(8) of such 
     Act, as added by subsection (c); and
       (ii) provide technical assistance with respect to such 
     model training program, including technical assistance to the 
     temporary assistance for needy families program and 
     unemployment compensation personnel; and
       (B) grants to State, tribal, or local agencies in order for 
     such agencies to contract with eligible entities to provide 
     State, tribal, or local caseworkers and other State, tribal, 
     or local agency personnel responsible for administering the 
     temporary assistance for needy families program established 
     under part A of title IV of the Social Security Act in a 
     State or Indian reservation with the training required under 
     subparagraph (B) and, if applicable, subparagraph (C)(ii) of 
     such section 402(a)(8).
       (2) Eligible entity defined.--For purposes of paragraph 
     (1)(B), the term ``eligible entity'' means an entity--
       (A) that is--
       (i) a State or tribal domestic violence coalition or sexual 
     assault coalition;
       (ii) a State or local victim service provider with 
     recognized expertise in the dynamics of domestic violence, 
     sexual assault, or stalking whose primary mission is to 
     provide services to survivors of domestic violence, sexual 
     assault, or stalking, including a rape crisis center or 
     domestic violence program; or
       (iii) an organization with demonstrated expertise in State 
     or county welfare laws and implementation of such laws and 
     experience with disseminating information on such laws and 
     implementation, but only if such organization will provide 
     the required training in partnership with an entity described 
     in clause (i) or (ii); and
       (B) that--
       (i) has demonstrated expertise in the dynamics of both 
     domestic violence and sexual assault, such as a joint 
     domestic violence and sexual assault coalition; or
       (ii) will provide the required training in partnership with 
     an entity described in clause (i) or (ii) of subparagraph (A) 
     in order to comply with the dual domestic violence and sexual 
     assault expertise requirement under clause (i).
       (3) Application.--An entity seeking a grant under this 
     subsection shall submit an application to the Secretary at 
     such time, in such form and manner, and containing such 
     information as the Secretary specifies.
       (4) Reports.--
       (A) Reports to congress.--Not later than a year after the 
     date of the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, 
     the Secretary shall submit to Congress a report on the grant 
     program established under this subsection.
       (B) Reports available to public.--The Secretary shall 
     establish procedures for the dissemination to the public of 
     each report submitted under subparagraph (A). Such procedures 
     shall include the use of the internet to disseminate such 
     reports.
       (5) Authorization of appropriations.--
       (A) In general.--There are authorized to be appropriated--
       (i) $1,000,000 for fiscal year 2020 to carry out the 
     provisions of paragraph (1)(A); and
       (ii) $12,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2024 
     to carry out the provisions of paragraph (1)(B).
       (B) Three-year availability of grant funds.--Each recipient 
     of a grant under this subsection shall return to the 
     Secretary any unused portion of such grant not later than 3 
     years after the date the grant was awarded, together with any 
     earnings on such unused portion.
       (C) Amounts returned.--Any amounts returned pursuant to 
     subparagraph (B) shall be available without further 
     appropriation to the Secretary for the purpose of carrying 
     out the provisions of paragraph (1)(B).
       (e) Effect on Existing Laws, etc.--
       (1) More protective laws, agreements, programs, and 
     plans.--Nothing in this title shall be construed to supersede 
     any provision of any Federal, State, or local law, collective 
     bargaining agreement, or employment benefits program or plan 
     that provides greater unemployment insurance benefits for 
     survivors of sexual and other harassment, domestic violence, 
     sexual assault, or stalking than the rights established under 
     this title.
       (2) Less protective laws, agreements, programs, and 
     plans.--Any law, collective bargaining agreement, or 
     employment benefits program or plan of a State or unit of 
     local government is preempted to the extent that such law, 
     agreement, or program or plan would impair the exercise of 
     any right established under this title or the amendments made 
     by this title.
       (f) Effective Date.--
       (1) Unemployment amendments.--
       (A) In general.--Except as provided in subparagraph (B) and 
     paragraph (2), the amendments made by this section shall 
     apply in the case of compensation paid for weeks beginning on 
     or after the expiration of the 180-day period beginning on 
     the date of enactment of this Act.
       (B) Extension of effective date for state law amendment.--
       (i) In general.--Except as provided in paragraph (2), in a 
     case in which the Secretary of Labor identifies a State as 
     requiring a change to its statutes, regulations, or policies 
     in order to comply with the amendments made by this section, 
     such amendments shall apply in the case of compensation paid 
     for weeks beginning after the earlier of--

       (I) the date the State changes its statutes, regulations, 
     or policies in order to comply with such amendments; or
       (II) the end of the first session of the State legislature 
     which begins after the date of enactment of this Act or which 
     began prior to such date and remained in session for at least 
     25 calendar days after such date, except that in no case 
     shall such amendments apply before the date that is 180 days 
     after the date of enactment of this Act.

       (ii) Session defined.--In this subparagraph, the term 
     ``session'' means a regular, special, budget, or other 
     session of a State legislature.
       (2) TANF amendment.--
       (A) In general.--Except as provided in subparagraph (B), 
     the amendment made by subsection (c) shall take effect on the 
     date of enactment of this Act.
       (B) Extension of effective date for state law amendment.--
     In the case of a State plan under part A of title IV of the 
     Social Security Act which the Secretary of Health and Human 
     Services determines requires State action (including 
     legislation, regulation, or other administrative action) in 
     order for the plan to meet the additional requirements 
     imposed by the amendment made by subsection (c), the State 
     plan shall not be regarded as failing to comply with the 
     requirements of such amendment on the basis of its failure to 
     meet these additional requirements before the first day of 
     the first calendar quarter beginning after the close of the 
     first regular session of the State legislature that begins 
     after the date of enactment of this Act. For purposes of the 
     previous sentence, in the case of a State that has a two-year 
     legislative session, each year of the session is considered 
     to be a separate regular session of the State legislature.
       (g) Definitions.--In this section, the terms ``domestic 
     violence'', ``sexual assault'', ``stalking'', ``survivor of 
     domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking'', and 
     ``victim service provider'' have the meanings given such 
     terms in section 3304(g) of the Internal Revenue Code of 
     1986.

     SEC. 704. STUDY AND REPORTS ON BARRIERS TO SURVIVORS' 
                   ECONOMIC SECURITY ACCESS.

       (a) Study.--The Secretary of Health and Human Services, in 
     consultation with the Secretary of Labor, shall conduct a 
     study on the barriers that survivors of domestic violence, 
     dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking throughout the 
     United States experience in maintaining economic security as 
     a result of issues related to domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, or stalking.
       (b) Reports.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     enactment of this title, and every 5 years thereafter, the 
     Secretary of Health and Human Services, in consultation with 
     the Secretary of Labor, shall submit a report to Congress on 
     the study conducted under subsection (a).
       (c) Contents.--The study and reports under this section 
     shall include--
       (1) identification of geographic areas in which State laws, 
     regulations, and practices have a

[[Page H3023]]

     strong impact on the ability of survivors of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking to 
     exercise--
       (A) any rights under this Act without compromising personal 
     safety or the safety of others, including family members and 
     excluding the abuser; and
       (B) other components of economic security;
       (2) identification of geographic areas with shortages in 
     resources for such survivors, with an accompanying analysis 
     of the extent and impact of such shortage;
       (3) analysis of factors related to industries, workplace 
     settings, employer practices, trends, and other elements that 
     impact the ability of such survivors to exercise any rights 
     under this Act without compromising personal safety or the 
     safety of others, including family members;
       (4) the recommendations of the Secretary of Health and 
     Human Services and the Secretary of Labor with respect to 
     resources, oversight, and enforcement tools to ensure 
     successful implementation of the provisions of this Act in 
     order to support the economic security and safety of 
     survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
     assault, or stalking; and
       (5) best practices for States, employers, health carriers, 
     insurers, and other private entities in addressing issues 
     related to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
     assault, or stalking.

     SEC. 705. GAO STUDY.

       Not later than 18 months after the date of enactment of 
     this Act, the Comptroller General of the United States shall 
     submit to the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and 
     Pensions of the Senate a report that examines, with respect 
     to survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
     assault, or stalking who are, or were, enrolled at 
     institutions of higher education and borrowed a loan made, 
     insured, or guaranteed under title IV of the Higher Education 
     Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1070 et seq.) for which the survivors 
     have not repaid the total interest and principal due, each of 
     the following:
       (1) The implications of domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, or stalking on a borrower's ability to repay 
     their Federal student loans.
       (2) The adequacy of policies and procedures regarding 
     Federal student loan deferment, forbearance, and grace 
     periods when a survivor has to suspend or terminate the 
     survivor's enrollment at an institution of higher education 
     due to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or 
     stalking.
       (3) The adequacy of institutional policies and practices 
     regarding retention or transfer of credits when a survivor 
     has to suspend or terminate the survivor's enrollment at an 
     institution of higher education due to domestic violence, 
     dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking.
       (4) The availability or any options for a survivor of 
     domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or 
     stalking who attended an institution of higher education that 
     committed unfair, deceptive, or abusive acts or practices, or 
     otherwise substantially misrepresented information to 
     students, to be able to seek a defense to repayment of the 
     survivor's Federal student loan.
       (5) The limitations faced by a survivor of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking to 
     obtain any relief or restitution on the survivor's Federal 
     student loan debt due to the use of forced arbitration, gag 
     orders, or bans on class actions.

     SEC. 706. EDUCATION AND INFORMATION PROGRAMS FOR SURVIVORS.

       (a) Public Education Campaign.--
       (1) In general.--The Secretary of Labor, in conjunction 
     with the Secretary of Health and Human Services (through the 
     Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 
     and the grant recipient under section 41501 of the Violence 
     Against Women Act of 1994 that establishes the national 
     resource center on workplace responses to assist victims of 
     domestic and sexual violence) and the Attorney General 
     (through the Principal Deputy Director of the Office on 
     Violence Against Women), shall coordinate and provide for a 
     national public outreach and education campaign to raise 
     public awareness of the workplace impact of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, 
     including outreach and education for employers, service 
     providers, teachers, and other key partners. This campaign 
     shall pay special attention to ensure that survivors are made 
     aware of the existence of the following types of workplace 
     laws (federal and/or State): anti-discrimination laws that 
     bar treating survivors differently; leave laws, both paid and 
     unpaid that are available for use by survivors; unemployment 
     insurance laws and policies that address survivor 
     eligibility.
       (2) Dissemination.--The Secretary of Labor, in conjunction 
     with the Secretary of Health and Human Services and the 
     Attorney General, as described in paragraph (1), may 
     disseminate information through the public outreach and 
     education campaign on the resources and rights referred to in 
     this subsection directly or through arrangements with health 
     agencies, professional and nonprofit organizations, consumer 
     groups, labor organizations, institutions of higher 
     education, clinics, the media, and Federal, State, and local 
     agencies.
       (3) Information.--The information disseminated under 
     paragraph (2) shall include, at a minimum, a description of--
       (A) the resources and rights that are--
       (i) available to survivors of domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, or stalking; and
       (ii) established in this Act and the Violence Against Women 
     Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C.12291 et seq.);
       (B) guidelines and best practices on prevention of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, stalking, and sexual assault;
       (C) resources that promote healthy relationships and 
     communication skills;
       (D) resources that encourage bystander intervention in a 
     situation involving domestic violence, dating violence, 
     stalking, or sexual assault;
       (E) resources that promote workplace policies that support 
     and help maintain the economic security of survivors of 
     domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or 
     stalking; and
       (F) resources and rights that the heads of Federal agencies 
     described in paragraph (2) determine are appropriate to 
     include.
       (b) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Employee.--
       (A) In general.--The term ``employee'' means any individual 
     employed by an employer. In the case of an individual 
     employed by a public agency, such term means an individual 
     employed as described in section 3(e)(2) of the Fair Labor 
     Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. 203(e)(2)).
       (B) Basis.--The term includes a person employed as 
     described in subparagraph (A) on a full- or part-time basis, 
     for a fixed time period, on a temporary basis, pursuant to a 
     detail, or as a participant in a work assignment as a 
     condition of receipt of Federal or State income-based public 
     assistance.
       (2) Employer.--The term ``employer''--
       (A) means any person engaged in commerce or in any industry 
     or activity affecting commerce who employs 15 or more 
     individuals; and
       (B) includes any person acting directly or indirectly in 
     the interest of an employer in relation to an employee, and 
     includes a public agency that employs individuals as 
     described in section 3(e)(2) of the Fair Labor Standards Act 
     of 1938, but does not include any labor organization (other 
     than when acting as an employer) or anyone acting in the 
     capacity of officer or agent of such labor organization.
       (3) FLSA terms.--The terms ``employ'' and ``State'' have 
     the meanings given the terms in section 3 of the Fair Labor 
     Standards Act of 1938 (29 U.S.C. 203).
       (c) Study on Workplace Responses.--The Secretary of Labor, 
     in conjunction with the Secretary of Health and Human 
     Services, shall conduct a study on the status of workplace 
     responses to employees who experience domestic violence, 
     dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking while employed, 
     in each State and nationally, to improve the access of 
     survivors of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
     assault, or stalking to supportive resources and economic 
     security.
       (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized 
     to be appropriated to carry out this section, such sums as 
     may be necessary for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2024.

     SEC. 707. SEVERABILITY.

       If any provision of this Act, any amendment made by this 
     Act, or the application of such provision or amendment to any 
     person or circumstance is held to be unconstitutional, the 
     remainder of the provisions of this Act, the amendments made 
     by this Act, and the application of such provisions or 
     amendments to any person or circumstance shall not be 
     affected.

               TITLE VIII--HOMICIDE REDUCTION INITIATIVES

     SEC. 801. PROHIBITING PERSONS CONVICTED OF MISDEMEANOR CRIMES 
                   AGAINST DATING PARTNERS AND PERSONS SUBJECT TO 
                   PROTECTION ORDERS.

       Section 921(a) of title 18, United States Code, is 
     amended--
       (1) in paragraph (32), by striking all that follows after 
     ``The term `intimate partner' '' and inserting the following: 
     ``--
       ``(A) means, with respect to a person, the spouse of the 
     person, a former spouse of the person, an individual who is a 
     parent of a child of the person, and an individual who 
     cohabitates or has cohabited with the person; and
       ``(B) includes--
       ``(i) a dating partner or former dating partner (as defined 
     in section 2266); and
       ``(ii) any other person similarly situated to a spouse who 
     is protected by the domestic or family violence laws of the 
     State or tribal jurisdiction in which the injury occurred or 
     where the victim resides.'';
       (2) in paragraph (33)(A)--
       (A) in clause (i), by inserting after ``Federal, State,'' 
     the following: ``municipal,''; and
       (B) in clause (ii), by inserting ``intimate partner,'' 
     after ``spouse,'' each place it appears;
       (3) by redesignating paragraphs (34) and (35) as paragraphs 
     (35) and (36) respectively; and
       (4) by inserting after paragraph (33) the following:
       ``(34)(A) The term `misdemeanor crime of stalking' means an 
     offense that--
       ``(i) is a misdemeanor crime of stalking under Federal, 
     State, Tribal, or municipal law; and
       ``(ii) is a course of harassment, intimidation, or 
     surveillance of another person that--
       ``(I) places that person in reasonable fear of material 
     harm to the health or safety of--
       ``(aa) that person;
       ``(bb) an immediate family member (as defined in section 
     115) of that person;
       ``(cc) a household member of that person; or
       ``(dd) a spouse or intimate partner of that person; or
       ``(II) causes, attempts to cause, or would reasonably be 
     expected to cause emotional distress to a person described in 
     item (aa), (bb), (cc), or (dd) of subclause (I).
       ``(B) A person shall not be considered to have been 
     convicted of such an offense for purposes of this chapter, 
     unless--
       ``(i) the person was represented by counsel in the case, or 
     knowingly and intelligently waived the right to counsel in 
     the case; and
       ``(ii) in the case of a prosecution for an offense 
     described in this paragraph for which a person was entitled 
     to a jury trial in the jurisdiction in which the case was 
     tried, either--
       ``(I) the case was tried by a jury; or
       ``(II) the person knowingly and intelligently waived the 
     right to have the case tried by a jury, by guilty plea or 
     otherwise.

[[Page H3024]]

       ``(C) A person shall not be considered to have been 
     convicted of such an offense for purposes of this chapter if 
     the conviction has been expunged or set aside, or is an 
     offense for which the person has been pardoned or has had 
     civil rights restored (if the law of the applicable 
     jurisdiction provides for the loss of civil rights under such 
     an offense) unless the pardon, expungement, or restoration of 
     civil rights expressly provides that the person may not ship, 
     transport, possess, or receive firearms.''.

     SEC. 802. PROHIBITING STALKERS AND INDIVIDUALS SUBJECT TO 
                   COURT ORDER FROM POSSESSING A FIREARM.

       Section 922 of title 18, United States Code, is amended--
       (1) in subsection (d)--
       (A) in paragraph (8), by striking ``that restrains such 
     person'' and all that follows, and inserting ``described in 
     subsection (g)(8);'';
       (B) in paragraph (9), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``; or'';
       (C) by inserting after paragraph (9) the following:
       ``(10) who has been convicted in any court of a misdemeanor 
     crime of stalking.''; and
       (2) in subsection (g)--
       (A) by amending paragraph (8) to read as follows:
       ``(8) who is subject to a court order--
       ``(A) that was issued--
       ``(i) after a hearing of which such person received actual 
     notice, and at which such person had an opportunity to 
     participate; or
       ``(ii) in the case of an ex parte order, relative to which 
     notice and opportunity to be heard are provided--

       ``(I) within the time required by State, tribal, or 
     territorial law; and
       ``(II) in any event within a reasonable time after the 
     order is issued, sufficient to protect the due process rights 
     of the person;

       ``(B) that restrains such person from--
       ``(i) harassing, stalking, or threatening an intimate 
     partner of such person or child of such intimate partner or 
     person, or engaging in other conduct that would place an 
     intimate partner in reasonable fear of bodily injury to the 
     partner or child; or
       ``(ii) intimidating or dissuading a witness from testifying 
     in court; and
       ``(C) that--
       ``(i) includes a finding that such person represents a 
     credible threat to the physical safety of such individual 
     described in subparagraph (B); or
       ``(ii) by its terms explicitly prohibits the use, attempted 
     use, or threatened use of physical force against such 
     individual described in subparagraph (B) that would 
     reasonably be expected to cause bodily injury;'';
       (B) in paragraph (9), by striking the comma at the end and 
     inserting ``; or''; and
       (C) by inserting after paragraph (9) the following:
       ``(10) who has been convicted in any court of a misdemeanor 
     crime of stalking,''.

                   TITLE IX--SAFETY FOR INDIAN WOMEN

     SEC. 901. FINDINGS AND PURPOSES.

       (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
       (1) American Indians and Alaska Natives are 2.5 times as 
     likely to experience violent crimes--and at least 2 times 
     more likely to experience rape or sexual assault crimes--
     compared to all other races.
       (2) More than 4 in 5 American Indian and Alaska Native 
     women, or 84.3 percent, have experienced violence in their 
     lifetime.
       (3) The vast majority of Native victims--96% of women and 
     89% of male victims--report being victimized by a non-Indian.
       (4) Native victims of sexual violence are three times as 
     likely to have experienced sexual violence by an interracial 
     perpetrator as non-Hispanic White victims and Native stalking 
     victims are nearly 4 times as likely to be stalked by someone 
     of a different race.
       (5) While tribes exercising jurisdiction over non-Indians 
     have reported significant successes, the inability to 
     prosecute crimes related to the Special Domestic Violence 
     Criminal Jurisdiction crimes continues to leave Tribes unable 
     to fully hold domestic violence offenders accountable.
       (6) Tribal prosecutors report that the majority of domestic 
     violence cases involve children either as witnesses or 
     victims, and Department of Justice reports that American 
     Indian and Alaska Native children suffer exposure to violence 
     at rates higher than any other race in the United States.
       (7) Childhood exposure to violence has immediate and long-
     term effects, including: increased rates of altered 
     neurological development, poor physical and mental health, 
     poor school performance, substance abuse, and 
     overrepresentation in the juvenile justice system.
       (8) According to the Centers for Disease Control and 
     Prevention, homicide is the third leading cause of death 
     among American Indian and Alaska Native women between 10 and 
     24 years of age and the fifth leading cause of death for 
     American Indian and Alaska Native women between 25 and 34 
     years of age.
       (9) On some reservations, Indian women are murdered at more 
     than 10 times the national average.
       (10) According to a 2010 Government Accountability Office 
     report, United States Attorneys declined to prosecute nearly 
     52 percent of violent crimes that occur in Indian country.
       (11) Investigation into cases of missing and murdered 
     Indian women is made difficult for tribal law enforcement 
     agencies due to a lack of resources, such as--
       (A) necessary training, equipment, or funding;
       (B) a lack of interagency cooperation; and
       (C) a lack of appropriate laws in place.
       (12) Domestic violence calls are among the most dangerous 
     calls that law enforcement receives.
       (13) The complicated jurisdictional scheme that exists in 
     Indian country--
       (A) has a significant negative impact on the ability to 
     provide public safety to Indian communities;
       (B) has been increasingly exploited by criminals; and
       (C) requires a high degree of commitment and cooperation 
     among tribal, Federal, and State law enforcement officials.
       (14) Restoring and enhancing local, tribal capacity to 
     address violence against women provides for greater local 
     control, safety, accountability, and transparency.
       (15) In States with restrictive land settlement acts such 
     as Alaska, ``Indian country'' is limited, resources for local 
     tribal responses either nonexistent or insufficient to meet 
     the needs, jurisdiction unnecessarily complicated and 
     increases the already high levels of victimization of 
     American Indian and Alaska Native women. According to the 
     Tribal Law and Order Act Commission Report, Alaska Native 
     women are over-represented in the domestic violence victim 
     population by 250 percent; they comprise 19 percent of the 
     State population, but are 47 percent of reported rape 
     victims. And among other Indian Tribes, Alaska Native women 
     suffer the highest rates of domestic and sexual violence in 
     the country.
       (b) Purposes.--The purposes of this title are--
       (1) to clarify the responsibilities of Federal, State, 
     tribal, and local governments with respect to responding to 
     cases of domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, 
     trafficking, sexual violence, crimes against children, and 
     assault against tribal law enforcement officers and murdered 
     Indians;
       (2) to increase coordination and communication among 
     Federal, State, tribal, and local law enforcement agencies; 
     and
       (3) to empower tribal governments with the resources and 
     information necessary to effectively respond to cases of 
     domestic violence, dating violence, stalking, sex 
     trafficking, sexual violence, and missing and murdered 
     Indians; and
       (4) to increase the collection of data related to missing 
     and murdered Indians and the sharing of information among 
     Federal, State, and tribal officials responsible for 
     responding to and investigating cases of missing and murdered 
     Indians.

     SEC. 902. AUTHORIZING FUNDING FOR THE TRIBAL ACCESS PROGRAM.

       Section 534 of title 28, United States Code, is amended by 
     adding at the end the following:
       ``(g) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized 
     to be appropriated $3,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 
     through 2024, to remain available until expended, for the 
     purposes of enhancing the ability of tribal government 
     entities to access, enter information into, and obtain 
     information from, Federal criminal information databases, as 
     authorized by this section.''.

     SEC. 903. TRIBAL JURISDICTION OVER CRIMES OF DOMESTIC 
                   VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, OBSTRUCTION OF 
                   JUSTICE, SEXUAL VIOLENCE, SEX TRAFFICKING, 
                   STALKING, AND ASSAULT OF A LAW ENFORCEMENT 
                   OFFICER OR CORRECTIONS OFFICER.

       Section 204 of Public Law 90-284 (25 U.S.C. 1304) (commonly 
     known as the ``Indian Civil Rights Act of 1968'') is 
     amended--
       (1) in the heading, by striking ``crimes of domestic 
     violence'' and inserting ``crimes of domestic violence, 
     dating violence, obstruction of justice, sexual violence, sex 
     trafficking, stalking, and assault of a law enforcement or 
     corrections officer'';
       (2) in subsection (a)(6), in the heading, by striking 
     ``Special domestic violence criminal jurisdiction'' and 
     inserting ``Special tribal criminal jurisdiction'';
       (3) by striking ``special domestic violence criminal 
     jurisdiction'' each place such term appears and inserting 
     ``special tribal criminal jurisdiction'';
       (4) in subsection (a)--
       (A) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(12) Stalking.--The term `stalking' means engaging in a 
     course of conduct directed at a specific person proscribed by 
     the criminal law of the Indian tribe that has jurisdiction 
     over the Indian country where the violation occurs that would 
     cause a reasonable person to--
       ``(A) fear for the person's safety or the safety of others; 
     or
       ``(B) suffer substantial emotional distress.'';
       (B) by redesignating paragraphs (6) and (7) as paragraphs 
     (10) and (11);
       (C) by inserting before paragraph (10) (as redesignated) 
     the following:
       ``(8) Sex trafficking.--
       ``(A) In general.--The term `sex trafficking' means 
     conduct--
       ``(i) consisting of--

       ``(I) recruiting, enticing, harboring, transporting, 
     providing, obtaining, advertising, maintaining, patronizing, 
     or soliciting by any means a person; or
       ``(II) benefitting, financially or by receiving anything of 
     value, from participation in a venture that has engaged in an 
     act described in subclause (I); and

       ``(ii) carried out with the knowledge, or, except where the 
     act constituting the violation of clause (i) is advertising, 
     in reckless disregard of the fact, that--

       ``(I) means of force, threats of force, fraud, coercion, or 
     any combination of such means will be used to cause the 
     person to engage in a commercial sex act; or
       ``(II) the person has not attained the age of 18 years and 
     will be caused to engage in a commercial sex act.

       ``(B) Definitions.--In this paragraph, the terms `coercion' 
     and `commercial sex act' have the meanings given the terms in 
     section 1591(e) of title 18, United States Code.
       ``(9) Sexual violence.--The term `sexual violence' means 
     any nonconsensual sexual act or

[[Page H3025]]

     contact proscribed by the criminal law of the Indian tribe 
     that has jurisdiction over the Indian country where the 
     violation occurs, including in any case in which the victim 
     lacks the capacity to consent to the act.'';
       (D) by redesignating paragraphs (4) and (5) as paragraphs 
     (6) and (7);
       (E) by redesignating paragraphs (1) through (3) as 
     paragraphs (2) through (4);
       (F) in paragraph (3) (as redesignated), to read as follows:
       ``(3) Domestic violence.--The term `domestic violence' 
     means violence--
       ``(A) committed by a current or former spouse or intimate 
     partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim 
     shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating 
     with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or 
     intimate partner, or by a person similarly situated to a 
     spouse of the victim under the domestic- or family- violence 
     laws of an Indian tribe that has jurisdiction over the Indian 
     country where the violence occurs; or
       ``(B) committed against a victim who is a child under the 
     age of 18, or an elder (as such term is defined by tribal 
     law) who resides or has resided in the same household as the 
     defendant.'';
       (G) by inserting before paragraph (2) (as redesignated), 
     the following:
       ``(1) Assault of a law enforcement or correctional 
     officer.--The term `assault of a law enforcement or 
     correctional officer' means any criminal violation of the law 
     of the Indian tribe that has jurisdiction over the Indian 
     country where the violation occurs that involves the 
     threatened, attempted, or actual harmful or offensive 
     touching of a law enforcement or correctional officer.'';
       (H) by inserting after paragraph (4) (as redesignated), the 
     following:
       ``(5) Obstruction of justice.--The term `obstruction of 
     justice' means any violation of the criminal law of the 
     Indian tribe that has jurisdiction over the Indian country 
     where the violation occurs, and the violation involves 
     interfering with the administration or due process of the 
     tribe's laws including any tribal criminal proceeding or 
     investigation of a crime.'';
       (5) in subsection (b)(1), by inserting after ``the powers 
     of self-government of a participating tribe'' the following: 
     ``, including any participating tribes in the State of 
     Maine,''
       (6) in subsection (b)(4)--
       (A) in subparagraph (A)(i), by inserting after ``over an 
     alleged offense'' the following: ``, other than obstruction 
     of justice or an act of assault of a law enforcement or 
     corrections officer,''; and
       (B) in subparagraph (B)--
       (i) in clause (ii), by striking ``or'' at the end;
       (ii) in clause (iii)(II), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting the following: ``; or''; and
       (iii) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(iv) is being prosecuted for a crime of sexual violence, 
     stalking, sex trafficking, obstructing justice, or assaulting 
     a police or corrections officer under the laws of the 
     prosecuting tribe.'';
       (7) in subsection (c)--
       (A) in the matter preceding paragraph (1), by striking 
     ``domestic violence'' and inserting ``tribal''; and
       (B) in paragraph (1)--
       (i) in the paragraph heading, by striking ``and dating 
     violence'' and inserting ``, dating violence, obstruction of 
     justice, sexual violence, stalking, sex trafficking, or 
     assault of a law enforcement or corrections officer''; and
       (ii) by striking ``or dating violence'' and inserting ``, 
     dating violence, obstruction of justice, sexual violence, 
     stalking, sex trafficking, or assault of a law enforcement or 
     corrections officer'';
       (8) in subsection (d), by striking ``domestic violence'' 
     each place it appears and inserting ``tribal'';
       (9) in subsection (f)--
       (A) by striking ``special domestic violence'' each place it 
     appears and inserting ``special tribal'';
       (B) in paragraph (2), by striking ``prosecutes'' and all 
     that follows through the semicolon at the end and inserting 
     the following: ``prosecutes--
       ``(A) a crime of domestic violence;
       ``(B) a crime of dating violence;
       ``(C) a criminal violation of a protection order;
       ``(D) a crime of sexual violence;
       ``(E) a crime of stalking;
       ``(F) a crime of sex trafficking;
       ``(G) a crime of obstruction of justice; or
       ``(H) a crime of assault of a law enforcement or 
     correctional officer;'';
       (C) in paragraph (4), by inserting ``sexual violence, 
     stalking, sex trafficking, obstruction of justice, assault of 
     a law enforcement or correctional officer,'' after ``dating 
     violence,''; and
       (D) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(5) to create a pilot project to allow up to five Indian 
     tribes in Alaska to implement special tribal criminal 
     jurisdiction.'';
       (10) by redesignating subsections (g) and (h) as 
     subsections (h) and (i), respectively;
       (11) by inserting after subsection (f) the following:
       ``(g) Indian Country Defined.--For purposes of the pilot 
     project described in subsection (f)(5), the definition of 
     `Indian country' shall include Alaska Native-owned Townsites, 
     Allotments, and former reservation lands acquired in fee by 
     Alaska Native Village Corporations pursuant to the Alaska 
     Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 33) and other lands 
     transferred in fee to Native villages.''.
       (12) in subsection (i) (as redesignated) by striking 
     ``fiscal years 2014 through 2018'' and inserting ``fiscal 
     years 2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 904. ANNUAL REPORTING REQUIREMENTS.

       Beginning in the first fiscal year after the date of 
     enactment of this title, and annually thereafter, the 
     Attorney General and the Secretary of the Interior shall 
     jointly prepare and submit a report, to the Committee on 
     Indian Affairs and the Committee on the Judiciary of the 
     Senate and the Committee on Natural Resources and the 
     Committee on the Judiciary of the House of Representatives, 
     that--
       (1) includes known statistics on missing and murdered 
     Indian women in the United States, including statistics 
     relating to incidents of sexual abuse or sexual assault 
     suffered by the victims; and
       (2) provides recommendations regarding how to improve data 
     collection on missing and murdered Indian women.

               TITLE X--OFFICE ON VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

     SEC. 1001. ESTABLISHMENT OF OFFICE ON VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN.

       (a) Establishment of Office on Violence Against Women.--
     Section 2002 of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe 
     Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10442) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (a), by striking ``a Violence Against 
     Women Office'' and inserting ``an Office on Violence Against 
     Women'';
       (2) in subsection (b), by inserting after ``within the 
     Department of Justice'' the following: ``, not subsumed by 
     any other office'';
       (3) in subsection (c)(2), by striking ``Violence Against 
     Women Act of 1994 (title VI of Public 103-322) and the 
     Violence Against Women Act of 2000 (Division B of Public Law 
     106-386)'' and inserting ``Violence Against Women Act of 1994 
     (title VI1 of Public 103-322), the Violence Against Women Act 
     of 2000 (Division B of Public Law 106-386), the Violence 
     Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act 
     of 2005 (title IX of Public Law 109-162; 119 Stat. 3080), the 
     Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public 
     Law 113-4; 127 Stat. 54), and the Violence Against Women 
     Reauthorization Act of 2019''.
       (b) Director of the Office on Violence Against Women.--
     Section 2003 of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets 
     Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10443) is amended to read as follows:

     ``SEC. 2003. DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE ON VIOLENCE AGAINST 
                   WOMEN.

       ``(a) Appointment.--The President, by and with the advice 
     and consent of the Senate, shall appoint a Director for the 
     Office on Violence Against Women (in this title referred to 
     as the `Director') to be responsible, under the general 
     authority of the Attorney General, for the administration, 
     coordination, and implementation of the programs and 
     activities of the Office.
       ``(b) Other Employment.--The Director shall not--
       ``(1) engage in any employment other than that of serving 
     as Director; or
       ``(2) hold any office in, or act in any capacity for, any 
     organization, agency, or institution with which the Office 
     makes any contract or other agreement under the Violence 
     Against Women Act of 1994 (title IV of Public Law 103-322), 
     the Violence Against Women Act of 2000 (division B of Public 
     Law 106-386), the Violence Against Women and Department of 
     Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (title IX of Public Law 
     109-162; 119 Stat. 3080), the Violence Against Women 
     Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public Law 113-4; 127 Stat. 54), 
     or the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019.
       ``(c) Vacancy.--In the case of a vacancy, the President may 
     designate an officer or employee who shall act as Director 
     during the vacancy.
       ``(d) Compensation.--The Director shall be compensated at a 
     rate of pay not to exceed the rate payable for level V of the 
     Executive Schedule under section 5316 of title 5, United 
     States Code.''.
       (c) Duties and Functions of Director of the Office on 
     Violence Against Women.--Section 2004 of the Omnibus Crime 
     Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10444) is 
     amended to read as follows:

     ``SEC. 2004. DUTIES AND FUNCTIONS OF DIRECTOR OF THE OFFICE 
                   ON VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN.

       ``The Director shall have the following duties:
       ``(1) Maintaining liaison with the judicial branches of the 
     Federal and State Governments on matters relating to violence 
     against women.
       ``(2) Providing information to the President, the Congress, 
     the judiciary, State, local, and tribal governments, and the 
     general public on matters relating to violence against women.
       ``(3) Serving, at the request of the Attorney General, as 
     the representative of the Department of Justice on domestic 
     task forces, committees, or commissions addressing policy or 
     issues relating to violence against women.
       ``(4) Serving, at the request of the President, acting 
     through the Attorney General, as the representative of the 
     United States Government on human rights and economic justice 
     matters related to violence against women in international 
     fora, including, but not limited to, the United Nations.
       ``(5) Carrying out the functions of the Department of 
     Justice under the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 (title 
     IV of Public Law 103-322), the Violence Against Women Act of 
     2000 (division B of Public Law 106-386), the Violence Against 
     Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 
     (title IX of Public Law 109-162; 119 Stat. 3080), the 
     Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2013 (Public 
     Law 113-4; 127 Stat. 54), and the Violence Against Women 
     Reauthorization Act of 2019, including with respect to those 
     functions--
       ``(A) the development of policy, protocols, and guidelines;
       ``(B) the development and management of grant programs and 
     other programs, and the provision of technical assistance 
     under such programs; and
       ``(C) the awarding and termination of grants, cooperative 
     agreements, and contracts.
       ``(6) Providing technical assistance, coordination, and 
     support to--
       ``(A) other components of the Department of Justice, in 
     efforts to develop policy and to enforce Federal laws 
     relating to violence against

[[Page H3026]]

     women, including the litigation of civil and criminal actions 
     relating to enforcing such laws;
       ``(B) other Federal, State, local, and tribal agencies, in 
     efforts to develop policy, provide technical assistance, 
     synchronize federal definitions and protocols, and improve 
     coordination among agencies carrying out efforts to eliminate 
     violence against women, including Indian or indigenous women; 
     and
       ``(C) grantees, in efforts to combat violence against women 
     and to provide support and assistance to victims of such 
     violence.
       ``(7) Exercising such other powers and functions as may be 
     vested in the Director pursuant to this subchapter or by 
     delegation of the Attorney General.
       ``(8) Establishing such rules, regulations, guidelines, and 
     procedures as are necessary to carry out any function of the 
     Office.''.
       (d) Staff of Office on Violence Against Women.--Section 
     2005 of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 
     1968 (34 U.S.C. 10445) is amended in the heading, by striking 
     ``violence against women office'' and inserting ``office on 
     violence against women''.
       (e) Clerical Amendment.--Section 121(a)(1) of the Violence 
     Against Women and Department of Justice Reauthorization Act 
     of 2005 (34 U.S.C. 20124(a)(1)) is amended by striking ``the 
     Violence Against Women Office'' and inserting ``the Office on 
     Violence Against Women''.

      TITLE XI--IMPROVING CONDITIONS FOR WOMEN IN FEDERAL CUSTODY

     SEC. 1101. IMPROVING THE TREATMENT OF PRIMARY CARETAKER 
                   PARENTS AND OTHER INDIVIDUALS IN FEDERAL 
                   PRISONS.

       (a) Short Title.--This section may be cited as the ``Ramona 
     Brant Improvement of Conditions for Women in Federal Custody 
     Act''.
       (b) In General.--Chapter 303 of title 18, United States 
     Code, is amended by adding at the end the following:

     ``Sec. 4051. Treatment of primary caretaker parents and other 
       individuals

       ``(a) Definitions.--In this section--
       ``(1) the term `correctional officer' means a correctional 
     officer of the Bureau of Prisons;
       ``(2) the term `covered institution' means a Federal penal 
     or correctional institution;
       ``(3) the term `Director' means the Director of the Bureau 
     of Prisons;
       ``(4) the term `post-partum recovery' means the first 8-
     week period of post-partum recovery after giving birth;
       ``(5) the term `primary caretaker parent' has the meaning 
     given the term in section 31903 of the Family Unity 
     Demonstration Project Act (34 U.S.C. 12242);
       ``(6) the term `prisoner' means an individual who is 
     incarcerated in a Federal penal or correctional institution, 
     including a vulnerable person; and
       ``(7) the term `vulnerable person' means an individual 
     who--
       ``(A) is under 21 years of age or over 60 years of age;
       ``(B) is pregnant;
       ``(C) identifies as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or 
     intersex;
       ``(D) is victim or witness of a crime;
       ``(E) has filed a nonfrivolous civil rights claim in 
     Federal or State court;
       ``(F) has a serious mental or physical illness or 
     disability; or
       ``(G) during the period of incarceration, has been 
     determined to have experienced or to be experiencing severe 
     trauma or to be the victim of gender-based violence--
       ``(i) by any court or administrative judicial proceeding;
       ``(ii) by any corrections official;
       ``(iii) by the individual's attorney or legal service 
     provider; or
       ``(iv) by the individual.
       ``(b) Geographic Placement.--
       ``(1) Establishment of office.--The Director shall 
     establish within the Bureau of Prisons an office that 
     determines the placement of prisoners.
       ``(2) Placement of prisoners.--In determining the placement 
     of a prisoner, the office established under paragraph (1) 
     shall--
       ``(A) if the prisoner has children, place the prisoner as 
     close to the children as possible;
       ``(B) in deciding whether to assign a transgender or 
     intersex prisoner to a facility for male or female prisoners, 
     and in making other housing and programming assignments, 
     consider on a case-by-case basis whether a placement would 
     ensure the prisoner's health and safety, including serious 
     consideration of the prisoner's own views with respect to 
     their safety, and whether the placement would present 
     management or security problems; and
       ``(C) consider any other factor that the office determines 
     to be appropriate.
       ``(c) Prohibition on Placement of Pregnant Prisoners or 
     Prisoners in Post-partum Recovery in Segregated Housing 
     Units.--
       ``(1) Placement in segregated housing units.--A covered 
     institution may not place a prisoner who is pregnant or in 
     post-partum recovery in a segregated housing unit unless the 
     prisoner presents an immediate risk of harm to the prisoner 
     or others.
       ``(2) Restrictions.--Any placement of a prisoner described 
     in subparagraph (A) in a segregated housing unit shall be 
     limited and temporary.
       ``(d) Parenting Classes.--The Director shall provide 
     parenting classes to each prisoner who is a primary caretaker 
     parent.
       ``(e) Trauma Screening.--The Director shall provide 
     training to each correctional officer and each employee of 
     the Bureau of Prisons who regularly interacts with prisoners, 
     including each instructor and health care professional, to 
     enable those correctional officers and employees to--
       ``(1) identify a prisoner who has a mental or physical 
     health need relating to trauma the prisoner has experienced; 
     and
       ``(2) refer a prisoner described in paragraph (1) to the 
     proper healthcare professional for treatment.
       ``(f) Inmate Health.--
       ``(1) Health care access.--The Director shall ensure that 
     all prisoners receive adequate health care.
       ``(2) Hygienic products.--The Director shall make essential 
     hygienic products, including shampoo, toothpaste, 
     toothbrushes, and any other hygienic product that the 
     Director determines appropriate, available without charge to 
     prisoners.
       ``(3) Gynecologist access.--The Director shall ensure that 
     all prisoners have access to a gynecologist as appropriate.
       ``(g) Use of Sex-appropriate Correctional Officers.--
       ``(1) Regulations.--The Director shall make rules under 
     which--
       ``(A) a correctional officer may not conduct a strip search 
     of a prisoner of the opposite sex unless--
       ``(i) the prisoner presents a risk of immediate harm to the 
     prisoner or others, and no other correctional officer of the 
     same sex as the prisoner, or medical staff is available to 
     assist; or
       ``(ii) the prisoner has previously requested that an 
     officer of a different sex conduct searches;
       ``(B) a correctional officer may not enter a restroom 
     reserved for prisoners of the opposite sex unless--
       ``(i) a prisoner in the restroom presents a risk of 
     immediate harm to themselves or others; or
       ``(ii) there is a medical emergency in the restroom and no 
     other correctional officer of the appropriate sex is 
     available to assist;
       ``(C) a transgender prisoner's sex is determined according 
     to the sex with which they identify; and
       ``(D) a correctional officer may not search or physically 
     examine a prisoner for the sole purpose of determining the 
     prisoner's genital status or sex.
       ``(2) Relation to other laws.--Nothing in paragraph (1) 
     shall be construed to affect the requirements under the 
     Prison Rape Elimination Act of 2003 (42 U.S.C. 15601 et 
     seq.).''.
       (c) Substance Abuse Treatment.--Section 3621(e) of title 
     18, United States Code, is amended by adding at the end the 
     following:
       ``(7) Eligibility of primary caretaker parents and pregnant 
     women.--The Director of the Bureau of Prisons may not 
     prohibit an eligible prisoner who is a primary caretaker 
     parent (as defined in section 4051) or pregnant from 
     participating in a program of residential substance abuse 
     treatment provided under paragraph (1) on the basis of a 
     failure by the eligible prisoner, before being committed to 
     the custody of the Bureau of Prisons, to disclose to any 
     official of the Bureau of Prisons that the prisoner had a 
     substance abuse problem on or before the date on which the 
     eligible prisoner was committed to the custody of the Bureau 
     of Prisons.''.
       (d) Implementation Date.--
       (1) In general.--Not later than 2 years after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Director of the Bureau of Prisons 
     shall implement this section and the amendments made by this 
     section.
       (2) Report.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Director of the Bureau of Prisons 
     shall submit to the Committee on the Judiciary of the Senate 
     and the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
     Representatives a report on the implementation of this 
     section and the amendments made by this section.
       (e) Technical and Conforming Amendment.--The table of 
     sections for chapter 303 of title 18, United States Code, is 
     amended by adding at the end the following:

``4051. Treatment of primary caretaker parents and other 
              individuals.''.

     SEC. 1102. PUBLIC HEALTH AND SAFETY OF WOMEN.

       (a) Short Title.--This section may be cited as the ``Stop 
     Infant Mortality And Recidivism Reduction Act'' or the 
     ``SIMARRA Act''.
       (b) Establishment.--Not later than 270 days after the date 
     of the enactment of this section, the Director of the Federal 
     Bureau of Prisons (in this section referred to as the 
     ``Director'') shall establish a pilot program (in this 
     section referred to as the ``Program'') in accordance with 
     this section to permit women incarcerated in Federal prisons 
     and the children born to such women during incarceration to 
     reside together while the inmate serves a term of 
     imprisonment in a separate housing wing of the prison.
       (c) Purposes.--The purposes of this section are to--
       (1) prevent infant mortality among infants born to 
     incarcerated mothers and greatly reduce the trauma and stress 
     experienced by the unborn fetuses of pregnant inmates;
       (2) reduce the recidivism rates of federally incarcerated 
     women and mothers, and enhance public safety by improving the 
     effectiveness of the Federal prison system for women as a 
     population with special needs;
       (3) establish female offender risk and needs assessment as 
     the cornerstones of a more effective and efficient Federal 
     prison system;
       (4) implement a validated post-sentencing risk and needs 
     assessment system that relies on dynamic risk factors to 
     provide Federal prison officials with a roadmap to address 
     the pre- and post-natal needs of Federal pregnant offenders, 
     manage limited resources, and enhance public safety;
       (5) perform regular outcome evaluations of the 
     effectiveness of programs and interventions for federally 
     incarcerated pregnant women and mothers to assure that such 
     programs and interventions are evidence-based and to suggest 
     changes, deletions, and expansions based on the results of 
     such evaluations; and

[[Page H3027]]

       (6) assist the Department of Justice to address the 
     underlying cost structure of the Federal prison system and 
     ensure that the Department can continue to run prison 
     nurseries safely and securely without compromising the scope 
     or quality of the Department's critical health, safety and 
     law enforcement missions.
       (d) Duties of the Director of Bureau of Prisons.--
       (1) In general.--The Director shall carry out this section 
     in consultation with--
       (A) a licensed and board-certified gynecologist or 
     obstetrician;
       (B) the Director of the Administrative Office of the United 
     States Courts;
       (C) the Director of the Office of Probation and Pretrial 
     Services;
       (D) the Director of the National Institute of Justice; and
       (E) the Secretary of Health and Human Services.
       (2) Duties.--The Director shall, in accordance with 
     paragraph (3)--
       (A) develop an offender risk and needs assessment system 
     particular to the health and sensitivities of Federally 
     incarcerated pregnant women and mothers in accordance with 
     this subsection;
       (B) develop recommendations regarding recidivism reduction 
     programs and productive activities in accordance with 
     subsection (c);
       (C) conduct ongoing research and data analysis on--
       (i) the best practices relating to the use of offender risk 
     and needs assessment tools particular to the health and 
     sensitivities of federally incarcerated pregnant women and 
     mothers;
       (ii) the best available risk and needs assessment tools 
     particular to the health and sensitivities of Federally 
     incarcerated pregnant women and mothers and the level to 
     which they rely on dynamic risk factors that could be 
     addressed and changed over time, and on measures of risk of 
     recidivism, individual needs, and responsiveness to 
     recidivism reduction programs;
       (iii) the most effective and efficient uses of such tools 
     in conjunction with recidivism reduction programs, productive 
     activities, incentives, and rewards; and
       (iv) which recidivism reduction programs are the most 
     effective--

       (I) for Federally incarcerated pregnant women and mothers 
     classified at different recidivism risk levels; and
       (II) for addressing the specific needs of Federally 
     incarcerated pregnant women and mothers;

       (D) on a biennial basis, review the system developed under 
     subparagraph (A) and the recommendations developed under 
     subparagraph (B), using the research conducted under 
     subparagraph (C), to determine whether any revisions or 
     updates should be made, and if so, make such revisions or 
     updates;
       (E) hold periodic meetings with the individuals listed in 
     paragraph (1) at intervals to be determined by the Director; 
     and
       (F) report to Congress in accordance with subsection (i).
       (3) Methods.--In carrying out the duties under paragraph 
     (2), the Director shall--
       (A) consult relevant stakeholders; and
       (B) make decisions using data that is based on the best 
     available statistical and empirical evidence.
       (e) Eligibility.--An inmate may apply to participate in the 
     Program if the inmate--
       (1) is pregnant at the beginning of or during the term of 
     imprisonment; and
       (2) is in the custody or control of the Federal Bureau of 
     Prisons.
       (f) Program Terms.--
       (1) Term of participation.--To correspond with the purposes 
     and goals of the Program to promote bonding during the 
     critical stages of child development, an eligible inmate 
     selected for the Program may participate in the Program, 
     subject to subsection (g), until the earliest of--
       (A) the date that the inmate's term of imprisonment 
     terminates;
       (B) the date the infant fails to meet any medical criteria 
     established by the Director or the Director's designee along 
     with a collective determination of the persons listed in 
     subsection (d)(1); or
       (C) 30 months.
       (2) Inmate requirements.--For the duration of an inmate's 
     participation in the Program, the inmate shall agree to--
       (A) take substantive steps towards acting in the role of a 
     parent or guardian to any child of that inmate;
       (B) participate in any educational or counseling 
     opportunities established by the Director, including topics 
     such as child development, parenting skills, domestic 
     violence, vocational training, or substance abuse, as 
     appropriate;
       (C) abide by any court decision regarding the legal or 
     physical custody of the child;
       (D) transfer to the Federal Bureau of Prisons any child 
     support payments for the infant of the participating inmate 
     from any person or governmental entity; and
       (E) specify a person who has agreed to take at least 
     temporary custody of the child if the inmate's participation 
     in the Program terminates before the inmate's release.
       (g) Continuity of Care.--The Director shall take 
     appropriate actions to prevent detachment or disruption of 
     either an inmate's or infant's health and bonding-based well-
     being due to termination of the Program.
       (h) Reporting.--
       (1) In general.--Not later than 6 months after the date of 
     the enactment of this section and once each year thereafter 
     for 5 years, the Director shall submit a report to the 
     Congress with regards to progress in implementing the 
     Program.
       (2) Final report.--Not later than 6 months after the 
     termination of the Program, the Director shall issue a final 
     report to the Congress that contains a detailed statement of 
     the Director's findings and conclusions, including 
     recommendations for legislation, administrative actions, and 
     regulations the Director considers appropriate.
       (i) Authorization of Appropriations.--To carry out this 
     section, there is authorized to be appropriated $10,000,000 
     for each of fiscal years 2020 through 2024.

       TITLE XII--LAW ENFORCEMENT TOOLS TO ENHANCE PUBLIC SAFETY

     SEC. 1201. NOTIFICATION TO LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES OF 
                   PROHIBITED PURCHASE OR ATTEMPTED PURCHASE OF A 
                   FIREARM.

       (a) In General.--Title I of the NICS Improvement Amendments 
     Act of 2007 (18 U.S.C. 922 note) is amended by adding at the 
     end the following:

     ``SEC. 108. NOTIFICATION TO LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES OF 
                   PROHIBITED PURCHASE OF A FIREARM.

       ``(a) In General.--In the case of a background check 
     conducted by the National Instant Criminal Background Check 
     System pursuant to the request of a licensed importer, 
     licensed manufacturer, or licensed dealer of firearms (as 
     such terms are defined in section 921 of title 18, United 
     States Code), which background check determines that the 
     receipt of a firearm by a person would violate subsection 
     (g)(8), (g)(9), or (g)(10) of section 922 of title 18, United 
     States Code, and such determination is made after 3 business 
     days have elapsed since the licensee contacted the System and 
     a firearm has been transferred to that person, the System 
     shall notify the law enforcement agencies described in 
     subsection (b).
       ``(b) Law Enforcement Agencies Described.--The law 
     enforcement agencies described in this subsection are the law 
     enforcement agencies that have jurisdiction over the location 
     from which the licensee contacted the system and the law 
     enforcement agencies that have jurisdiction over the location 
     of the residence of the person for which the background check 
     was conducted, as follows:
       ``(1) The field office of the Federal Bureau of 
     Investigation.
       ``(2) The local law enforcement agency.
       ``(3) The State law enforcement agency.
       ``(4) The Tribal law enforcement agency.''.
       (b) Clerical Amendment.--The table of contents of the NICS 
     Improvement Amendments Act of 2007 (18 10 U.S.C. 922 note) is 
     amended by inserting after the item relating to section 107 
     the following:

``Sec. 108. Notification to law enforcement agencies of prohibited 
              purchase of a firearm.''.

     SEC. 1202. REPORTING OF BACKGROUND CHECK DENIALS TO STATE, 
                   LOCAL, AND TRIBAL AUTHORITIES.

       (a) In General.--Chapter 44 of title 18, United States 
     Code, is amended by inserting after section 925A the 
     following:

     ``Sec. 925B. Reporting of background check denials to State, 
       local, and tribal authorities

       ``(a) In General.--If the national instant criminal 
     background check system established under section 103 of the 
     Brady Handgun Violence Prevention Act (18 U.S.C. 922 note) 
     provides a notice pursuant to section 922(t) of this title 
     that the receipt of a firearm by a person would violate 
     subsection (g)(8), (g)(9), or (g)(10) of section 922 of this 
     title or State law, the Attorney General shall, in accordance 
     with subsection (b) of this section--
       ``(1) report to the law enforcement authorities of the 
     State where the person sought to acquire the firearm and, if 
     different, the law enforcement authorities of the State of 
     residence of the person--
       ``(A) that the notice was provided;
       ``(B) of the specific provision of law that would have been 
     violated;
       ``(C) of the date and time the notice was provided;
       ``(D) of the location where the firearm was sought to be 
     acquired; and
       ``(E) of the identity of the person; and
       ``(2) report the incident to local or tribal law 
     enforcement authorities and, where practicable, State, 
     tribal, or local prosecutors, in the jurisdiction where the 
     firearm was sought and in the jurisdiction where the person 
     resides.
       ``(b) Requirements for Report.--A report is made in 
     accordance with this subsection if the report is made within 
     24 hours after the provision of the notice described in 
     subsection (a), except that the making of the report may be 
     delayed for so long as is necessary to avoid compromising an 
     ongoing investigation.
       ``(c) Rule of Construction.--Nothing in subsection (a) 
     shall be construed to require a report with respect to a 
     person to be made to the same State authorities that 
     originally issued the notice with respect to the person.''.
       (b) Clerical Amendment.--The table of sections for such 
     chapter is amended by inserting after the item relating to 
     section 925A the following:

``925B. Reporting of background check denials to State, local, and 
              tribal authorities.''.

     SEC. 1203. SPECIAL ASSISTANT U.S. ATTORNEYS AND CROSS-
                   DEPUTIZED ATTORNEYS.

       (a) In General.--Chapter 44 of title 18, United States 
     Code, as amended by this Act, is further amended by inserting 
     after section 925B the following:

     ``Sec. 925C. Special assistant U.S. attorneys and cross-
       deputized attorneys

       ``(a) In General.--In order to improve the enforcement of 
     paragraphs (8), (9), and (10) of section 922(g), the Attorney 
     General may--
       ``(1) appoint, in accordance with section 543 of title 28, 
     qualified State, tribal, territorial and local prosecutors 
     and qualified attorneys working for the United States 
     government to serve as special assistant United States 
     attorneys for the

[[Page H3028]]

     purpose of prosecuting violations of such paragraphs;
       ``(2) deputize State, tribal, territorial and local law 
     enforcement officers for the purpose of enhancing the 
     capacity of the agents of the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, 
     Firearms, and Explosives in responding to and investigating 
     violations of such paragraphs; and
       ``(3) establish, in order to receive and expedite requests 
     for assistance from State, tribal, territorial and local law 
     enforcement agencies responding to intimate partner violence 
     cases where such agencies have probable cause to believe that 
     the offenders may be in violation of such paragraphs, points 
     of contact within--
       ``(A) each Field Division of the Bureau of Alcohol, 
     Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives; and
       ``(B) each District Office of the United States Attorneys.
       ``(b) Improve Intimate Partner and Public Safety.--The 
     Attorney General shall--
       ``(1) identify no less than 75 jurisdictions among States, 
     territories and tribes where there are high rates of firearms 
     violence and threats of firearms violence against intimate 
     partners and other persons protected under paragraphs (8), 
     (9), and (10) of section 922(g) and where local authorities 
     lack the resources to address such violence; and
       ``(2) make such appointments as described in subsection (a) 
     in jurisdictions where enhanced enforcement of such 
     paragraphs is necessary to reduce firearms homicide and 
     injury rates.
       ``(c) Qualified Defined.--For purposes of this section, the 
     term `qualified' means, with respect to an attorney, that the 
     attorney is a licensed attorney in good standing with any 
     relevant licensing authority.''.
       (b) Clerical Amendment.--The table of sections for such 
     chapter is amended by inserting after the item relating to 
     section 925B the following:

``925C. Special assistant U.S. attorneys and cross-deputized 
              attorneys.''.

        TITLE XIII--CLOSING THE LAW ENFORCEMENT CONSENT LOOPHOLE

     SEC. 1301. SHORT TITLE.

       This title may be cited as the ``Closing the Law 
     Enforcement Consent Loophole Act of 2019''.

     SEC. 1302. PROHIBITION ON ENGAGING IN SEXUAL ACTS WHILE 
                   ACTING UNDER COLOR OF LAW.

       (a) In General.--Section 2243 of title 18, United States 
     Code, is amended--
       (1) in the section heading, by adding at the end the 
     following: ``or by any person acting under color of law'';
       (2) by redesignating subsections (c) and (d) as subsections 
     (d) and (e), respectively;
       (3) by inserting after subsection (b) the following:
       ``(c) Of an Individual by Any Person Acting Under Color of 
     Law.--
       ``(1) In general.--Whoever, acting under color of law, 
     knowingly engages in a sexual act with an individual, 
     including an individual who is under arrest, in detention, or 
     otherwise in the actual custody of any Federal law 
     enforcement officer, shall be fined under this title, 
     imprisoned not more than 15 years, or both.
       ``(2) Definition.--In this subsection, the term `sexual 
     act' has the meaning given the term in section 2246.''; and
       (4) in subsection (d), as so redesignated, by adding at the 
     end the following:
       ``(3) In a prosecution under subsection (c), it is not a 
     defense that the other individual consented to the sexual 
     act.''.
       (b) Definition.--Section 2246 of title 18, United States 
     Code, is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (5), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (2) in paragraph (6), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting ``; and''; and
       (3) by inserting after paragraph (6) the following:
       ``(7) the term `Federal law enforcement officer' has the 
     meaning given the term in section 115.''.
       (c) Clerical Amendment.--The table of sections for chapter 
     109A of title 18, United States Code, is amended by amending 
     the item related to section 2243 to read as follows:

``2243. Sexual abuse of a minor or ward or by any person acting under 
              color of law.''.

     SEC. 1303. INCENTIVES FOR STATES.

       (a) Authority to Make Grants.--The Attorney General is 
     authorized to make grants to States that have in effect a law 
     that--
       (1) makes it a criminal offense for any person acting under 
     color of law of the State to engage in a sexual act with an 
     individual, including an individual who is under arrest, in 
     detention, or otherwise in the actual custody of any law 
     enforcement officer; and
       (2) prohibits a person charged with an offense described in 
     paragraph (1) from asserting the consent of the other 
     individual as a defense.
       (b) Reporting Requirement.--A State that receives a grant 
     under this section shall submit to the Attorney General, on 
     an annual basis, information on--
       (1) the number of reports made to law enforcement agencies 
     in that State regarding persons engaging in a sexual act 
     while acting under color of law during the previous year; and
       (2) the disposition of each case in which sexual misconduct 
     by a person acting under color of law was reported during the 
     previous year.
       (c) Application.--A State seeking a grant under this 
     section shall submit an application to the Attorney General 
     at such time, in such manner, and containing such information 
     as the Attorney General may reasonably require, including 
     information about the law described in subsection (a).
       (d) Grant Amount.--The amount of a grant to a State under 
     this section shall be in an amount that is not greater than 
     10 percent of the average of the total amount of funding of 
     the 3 most recent awards that the State received under the 
     following grant programs:
       (1) Part T of title I of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe 
     Streets Act of 1968 (34 U.S.C. 10441 et seq.) (commonly 
     referred to as the ``STOP Violence Against Women Formula 
     Grant Program'').
       (2) Section 41601 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 
     (34 U.S.C. 12511) (commonly referred to as the ``Sexual 
     Assault Services Program'').
       (e) Grant Term.--
       (1) In general.--The Attorney General shall provide an 
     increase in the amount provided to a State under the grant 
     programs described in subsection (d) for a 2-year period.
       (2) Renewal.--A State that receives a grant under this 
     section may submit an application for a renewal of such grant 
     at such time, in such manner, and containing such information 
     as the Attorney General may reasonably require.
       (3) Limit.--A State may not receive a grant under this 
     section for more than 4 years.
       (f) Uses of Funds.--A State that receives a grant under 
     this section shall use--
       (1) 25 percent of such funds for any of the permissible 
     uses of funds under the grant program described in paragraph 
     (1) of subsection (d); and
       (2) 75 percent of such funds for any of the permissible 
     uses of funds under the grant program described in paragraph 
     (2) of subsection (d).
       (g) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized 
     to be appropriated to carry out this chapter $5,000,000 for 
     each of fiscal years 2020 through 2024.
       (h) Definition.--For purposes of this section, the term 
     ``State'' means each of the several States and the District 
     of Columbia, Indian Tribes, and the Commonwealth of Puerto 
     Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the Virgin Islands, and the 
     Northern Mariana Islands.

     SEC. 1304. REPORTS TO CONGRESS.

       (a) Report by Attorney General.--Not later than 1 year 
     after the date of enactment of this Act, and each year 
     thereafter, the Attorney General shall submit to Congress a 
     report containing--
       (1) the information required to be reported to the Attorney 
     General under section 3(b); and
       (2) information on--
       (A) the number of reports made, during the previous year, 
     to Federal law enforcement agencies regarding persons 
     engaging in a sexual act while acting under color of law; and
       (B) the disposition of each case in which sexual misconduct 
     by a person acting under color of law was reported.
       (b) Report by GAO.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, and each year thereafter, the 
     Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to 
     Congress a report on any violations of section 2243(c) of 
     title 18, United States Code, as amended by section 2, 
     committed during the 1-year period covered by the report.

     SEC. 1305. DEFINITION.

       In this title, the term ``sexual act'' has the meaning 
     given the term in section 2246 of title 18, United States 
     Code.

                        TITLE XIV--OTHER MATTERS

     SEC. 1401. NATIONAL STALKER AND DOMESTIC VIOLENCE REDUCTION.

       Section 40603 of the Violent Crime Control and Law 
     Enforcement Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12402) is amended by 
     striking ``2014 through 2018'' and inserting ``2020 through 
     2024''.

     SEC. 1402. FEDERAL VICTIM ASSISTANTS REAUTHORIZATION.

       Section 40114 of the Violence Against Women Act of 1994 
     (Public Law 103-322) is amended to read as follows:

     ``SEC. 40114. AUTHORIZATION FOR FEDERAL VICTIM'S COUNSELORS.

       ``There are authorized to be appropriated for the United 
     States Attorneys for the purpose of appointing victim/witness 
     counselors for the prosecution of sex crimes and domestic 
     violence crimes where applicable (such as the District of 
     Columbia), $1,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 
     2024.''.

     SEC. 1403. CHILD ABUSE TRAINING PROGRAMS FOR JUDICIAL 
                   PERSONNEL AND PRACTITIONERS REAUTHORIZATION.

       Section 224(a) of the Crime Control Act of 1990 (34 U.S.C. 
     20334(a)) is amended by striking ``2014 through 2018'' and 
     inserting ``2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 1404. SEX OFFENDER MANAGEMENT.

       Section 40152(c) of the Violent Crime Control and Law 
     Enforcement Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12311(c)) is amended by 
     striking ``2014 through 2018'' and inserting ``2020 through 
     2024''.

     SEC. 1405. COURT-APPOINTED SPECIAL ADVOCATE PROGRAM.

       Section 219(a) of the Crime Control Act of 1990 (34 U.S.C. 
     20324(a)) is amended by striking ``2014 through 2018'' and 
     inserting ``2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 1406. RAPE KIT BACKLOG.

       Section 2(j) of the DNA Analysis Backlog Elimination Act of 
     2000 (34 U.S.C. 40701) is amended by striking ``2015 through 
     2019'' and inserting ``2020 through 2024''.

     SEC. 1407. SEXUAL ASSAULT FORENSIC EXAM PROGRAM GRANTS.

       Section 304(d) of the DNA Sexual Assault Justice Act of 
     2004 (34 U.S.C. 40723(d)) is amended by striking ``2015 
     through 2019'' and inserting ``2020 through 2024''.
  The Acting CHAIR. No amendment to that amendment in the nature of a 
substitute is in order except those printed in part B of House Report 
116-32. Each such amendment may be offered only in the order printed in 
the report, by a Member designated in the

[[Page H3029]]

report, shall be considered read, shall be debatable for the time 
specified in the report, equally divided and controlled by the 
proponent and an opponent, shall not be subject to amendment, and shall 
not be subject to a demand for division of the question.


                Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Jeffries

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 1 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. JEFFRIES. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 114, after line 13, insert the following:
       (4) Common languages.--The Secretary of Labor shall ensure 
     that the information disseminated to survivors under 
     paragraph (2) is made available in commonly encountered 
     languages.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Jeffries) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York.
  Mr. JEFFRIES. Mr. Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chair, I rise today to offer an amendment to H.R. 1585, the 
reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act.
  This amendment modestly modifies the bill to ensure that the 
materials distributed to victims and survivors are available in 
commonly encountered languages.
  There are approximately 26 million Americans whose primary language 
is not English. One in five American families speak another language at 
home. In my home State of New York, that number is one in three. 
Languages spoken throughout the country include Spanish, Chinese, 
Tagalog, Vietnamese, and French, just to name a few.
  H.R. 1585 provides that the Secretary of Labor may disseminate 
information on the resources and rights available to survivors of 
domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking. It is 
important that all survivors and all victims, regardless of the 
language they primarily speak or read, have access to such critical 
information.
  This amendment will not adversely impact Federal spending. In fact, 
several agencies, including the Department of Labor, have similar 
obligations to provide materials and notices in commonly encountered 
languages, and guidance and resources are available on how to do so 
consistent with existing provisions in other areas of law.
  Let me also briefly express my support for this important and 
significant legislation.
  Since the Violence Against Women Act was first enacted 30 years ago, 
it has helped to address the crisis of domestic and sexual violence 
through vital grant programs and improved law enforcement response to 
sexual crimes.
  It has also elevated an important national conversation about this 
issue, drawing attention to its prevalence, reducing stigma, and 
encouraging survivors to get support.
  I want to thank the distinguished chair of the House Judiciary 
Committee, Jerry Nadler, for his tremendous leadership, as well as my 
friend, Congresswoman Karen Bass, for her leadership in ushering 
forward H.R. 1585.
  I am proud today that we are doing our part in the United States 
House of Representatives to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act 
and urge my colleagues to support this amendment and the underlying 
bill.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I claim the time in opposition, 
although I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I appreciate my friend from New 
York. I have no problem with his amendment. It is already a current, 
existing order, introduced by President Clinton, and it is also under 
DOJ guidance. This is currently happening, and I think his wanting to 
continue this, to put it in this bill, I would have no problem with.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. JEFFRIES. Mr. Chair, I thank the distinguished gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Collins), my colleague, the ranking member on the House 
Judiciary Committee, for his support.
  This is a nation of immigrants. We are a gorgeous mosaic of people 
from all across the world. Out of many, we are one. That is what makes 
America such a phenomenal country.
  We just want to make sure that, with respect to this issue of sexual 
and domestic violence, every American who is a victim has an 
opportunity to get access to the resources that will be put into law.
  I thank my colleagues for their support, and I yield back the balance 
of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Jeffries).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentleman from New York 
will be postponed.


                 Amendment No. 2 Offered by Ms. Scanlon

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 2 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. SCANLON. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 25, line 15, insert ``(a) In General--'' before 
     ``Section 1201''.
       Page 26, after line 12, insert the following:
       (b) GAO Report.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Comptroller General of the United 
     States shall submit to Congress a report on the return on 
     investment for legal assistance grants awarded pursuant to 
     section 1201 of division B of the Victims of Trafficking and 
     Violence Protection Act of 2000 (34 U.S.C. 20121), including 
     an accounting of the amount saved, if any, on housing, 
     medical, or employment social welfare programs.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from Pennsylvania (Ms. Scanlon) and a Member opposed each will control 
5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Pennsylvania.
  Ms. SCANLON. Mr. Chair, I yield myself as much time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chair, I rise today to offer an amendment to study the return on 
investment of legal services for survivors of domestic violence.
  As a former legal services board member and director of a pro bono 
program, I know the importance of legal representation for the most 
vulnerable members of our community.
  Access to justice is especially critical when it comes to survivors 
of domestic violence and human trafficking. Too often, survivors are 
left to navigate the overwhelming fallout of abuse alone, whether that 
means seeking custody, housing, medical care, employment protections, 
or other legal assistance.
  In the aftermath of abuse, legal remedies are often complicated and 
hard to manage, and legal representation in these critical moments can 
make a life-changing difference. Sometimes that means a lawyer who can 
remove the abuser from the home so the survivor doesn't lose their 
housing; other times, it is an attorney helping a survivor access the 
medical resources to heal from physical and mental injuries.
  Access to justice remains a crucial issue in our legal system, and 
one of the key contributions of VAWA is that it recognizes the 
importance of legal services for the survivors of abuse. So not only 
does VAWA provide critical medical and housing services, but it 
provides legal representation that often saves public dollars.
  As with many social services, upfront investment in legal services 
can result in long-term benefits and savings. That is why my amendment 
would ask the GAO to conduct a study about the economic benefits of 
investments in legal services provided under the jurisdiction of VAWA.
  It is important that we have a full grasp of the importance of these 
investments so that my colleagues and I can continue pushing for robust 
investment in these critical legal resources. I urge my colleagues to 
support this amendment and the underlying bill.

[[Page H3030]]

  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I claim the time in opposition, 
although I am not opposed to it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance my time.
  Ms. SCANLON. Mr. Chair, I thank the distinguished gentleman from 
Georgia, and I thank my colleagues for their support.
  Mr. Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from New York (Mr. 
Nadler).
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chair, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  Mr. Chair, I support this amendment, which would require the 
preparation of a GAO report on the return on investment for legal 
assistance grants for victims.
  Studies show that the efficiency of the legal system improves 
whenever victims receive assistance by legal professionals. This 
amendment would provide a vehicle to help us assess the effectiveness 
and ramifications of providing legal assistance for victims, 
particularly in the areas of housing, medical needs, and employment 
social welfare programs.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Ms. SCANLON. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Pennsylvania (Ms. Scanlon).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
Pennsylvania will be postponed.

                              {time}  1530


                 Amendment No. 3 Offered by Ms. Escobar

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 3 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. ESCOBAR. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 156, insert after line 20 (and conform the table of 
     contents accordingly):

     SEC. 1103. RESEARCH AND REPORT ON WOMEN IN FEDERAL 
                   INCARCERATION.

       Not later than 18 months after the date of enactment of 
     this Act, and thereafter, every other year, the National 
     Institutes of Justice, in consultation with the Bureau of 
     Justice Statistics and the Bureau of Prisons (including the 
     Women and Special Population Branch) shall prepare a report 
     on the status of women in federal incarceration. Depending on 
     the topic to be addressed, and the facility, data shall be 
     collected from Bureau of Prisons personnel and a sample that 
     is representative of the population of incarcerated women. 
     The report shall include:
       (1) With regard to federal facilities wherein women are 
     incarcerated--
       (A) responses by such women to questions from the Adverse 
     Childhood Experience (ACES) questionnaire;
       (B) demographic data of such women, including sexual 
     orientation and gender identity;
       (C) responses by such women to questions about the extent 
     of exposure to sexual victimization, sexual violence and 
     domestic violence (both inside and outside of incarceration);
       (D) the number of such women were pregnant at the time that 
     they entered incarceration;
       (E) the number of such women who have children age 18 or 
     under, and if so, how many; and
       (F) the crimes for which such women are incarcerated and 
     the length of their sentence.
       (2) With regard to all federal facilities where persons are 
     incarcerated--
       (A) a list of best practices with respect to women's 
     incarceration and transition, including staff led programs, 
     services and management practices (including making sanitary 
     products readily available and easily accessible, and access 
     to and provision of healthcare);
       (B) the availability of trauma treatment at each facility 
     (including number of beds, and number of trained staff);
       (C) rates of serious mental illness broken down by gender 
     and security level and a list of residential programs 
     available by site; and
       (D) the availability of vocational education and a list of 
     vocational programs provided by each facility.

     SEC. 1104. REENTRY PLANNING AND SERVICES FOR INCARCERATED 
                   WOMEN.

       The Attorney General, in coordination with the Chief of 
     U.S. Probation and Pretrial Services and the Director of the 
     Bureau of Prisons (including Women and Special Population 
     Branch), shall collaborate on a model of gender responsive 
     transition for incarcerated women, including the development 
     of a national standard on prevention with respect to domestic 
     and sexual violence. In developing the model, the Chief and 
     the Director shall consult with such experts within the 
     federal government (including the Office on Violence Against 
     Women of the Department of Justice) and in the victim service 
     provider community (including sexual and domestic violence 
     and homelessness, job training and job placement service 
     providers) as are necessary to the completion of a 
     comprehensive plan. Issues addressed should include--
       (1) the development by the Bureau of Prisons of a contract 
     for gender collaborative services; and
       (2) identification by re-entry affairs coordinators and 
     responsive planning for the needs of re-entering women with 
     respect to--
       (A) housing, including risk of homelessness;
       (B) previous exposure to and risk for domestic and sexual 
     violence; and
       (C) the need for parenting classes, assistance securing 
     childcare, or assistance in seeking or securing jobs that 
     afford flexibility (as might be necessary in the re-entry, 
     parenting or other contexts).

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from Texas (Ms. Escobar) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Texas.
  Ms. ESCOBAR. Mr. Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chair, I thank Representatives Bass and Fitzpatrick and Chairman 
Nadler for their work on this bill, which will provide critical support 
to women.
  My amendment has two components to help ensure our work reaches women 
in every corner of society.
  The first requires an annual report on the status of women in Federal 
incarceration. According to the Federal Bureau of Prisons, women 
account for approximately 7 percent of the Federal inmate population. 
As of March 28, the U.S. had 180,181 Federal inmates. This means that 
the number of female prisoners in America is about 12,613.
  Women in prison face unique challenges. For example, they are more 
likely to have their children taken away from them while they are 
incarcerated, more likely to have trouble accessing basic hygiene 
products, and more likely to suffer from mental health problems.
  A report done by the Center for American Progress found that 75 
percent of incarcerated women suffer from substance abuse problems, 
while 68 percent experienced physical or sexual abuse at some point in 
their lives.
  This commonsense amendment would compile more comprehensive, badly 
needed data to help us better understand the needs of incarcerated 
women and help us deliver the services they need.
  The report on women would include data points such as sexual 
orientation and gender identity, exposure to sexual and domestic 
violence, whether the woman was pregnant at the time of her 
incarceration, and length of sentence. The report would also collect 
data on all Federal facilities where women are incarcerated to 
determine best practices and the availability of trauma treatment.
  This information can then be used by Congress to develop policies 
that would better serve women and their families.
  The second component of my amendment directs the Attorney General, in 
coordination with the Chief of U.S. Probation and Pretrial Services and 
the Director of the Bureau of Prisons, to collaborate on reentry 
planning and services for incarcerated women, including the development 
of a national standard on domestic and sexual violence prevention.
  Reentry and planning services are vital because reentering society is 
a difficult process for many and represents a critical point of 
transition that may help solidify rehabilitation or may, if poorly 
managed, pose new risk to success.
  This is especially the case for women because of the unique 
circumstances I mentioned previously. Many are caretakers for their 
children, victims of abuse, and have addiction issues.
  For example, finding a place to live is especially difficult. 
Formerly incarcerated individuals are nearly 10 times

[[Page H3031]]

more likely to become homeless. Data from the Prison Policy Initiative 
show that formerly incarcerated women face homelessness at much higher 
rates than men. For women of color, the rate of homelessness only 
increases. Further, many shelters are reluctant to accept women with 
children.
  When developing reentry plans and services, the Department of Justice 
officials are required to address gender-collaborative services; 
housing; previous exposure to and risk for domestic and sexual 
violence; and the need for parenting classes, securing childcare 
assistance, and assistance securing jobs that afford flexibility.
  Finally, the establishment of a national standard on domestic and 
sexual violence prevention will ensure that the government sets the bar 
for protecting vulnerable women from abuse. Affirmatively including 
incarcerated women in the reauthorization of VAWA will enable the 
government to treat these women with dignity and respect and ensure we 
are doing all we can to prevent future victims of violence.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. I claim the time in opposition to the 
amendment, although I am not opposed.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mrs. Lawrence). Without objection, the gentleman is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, again, I am not opposed to the 
amendment. I appreciate some of the comments by the gentlewoman from 
Texas.
  Several of these were actually in the FIRST STEP Act, which we passed 
last year, on criminal justice reform. I am glad to see that they are 
still being discussed.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. ESCOBAR. Madam Chair, I thank the distinguished gentleman from 
Georgia, and I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from New York (Mr. 
Nadler).
  Mr. NADLER. Madam Chair, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  I support this amendment, which would direct the preparation of a 
report on the status of women in Federal incarceration. The amendment 
would also direct the Attorney General to work on a model of gender-
responsive transition for incarcerated women, including the development 
of a national standard on prevention with respect to domestic and 
sexual violence.
  According to the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, very little current 
data exists on the status of incarcerated women in Federal custody. 
This amendment will allow us to better respond to the needs of 
incarcerated women, and it will provide us with vitally important data, 
for oversight purposes.
  Madam Chair, I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Ms. ESCOBAR. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Escobar).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                  Amendment No. 4 Offered by Ms. Dean

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 4 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. DEAN. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 16, after line 2, insert the following:

     SEC. 4. AGENCY AND DEPARTMENT COORDINATION.

       The heads of Executive Departments responsible for carrying 
     out this Act are authorized to coordinate and collaborate on 
     the prevention of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
     assault, and stalking, including sharing best practices and 
     efficient use of resources and technology for victims and 
     those seeking assistance from the Government.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from Pennsylvania (Ms. Dean) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Pennsylvania.
  Ms. DEAN. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  I rise to offer this amendment to H.R. 1585, the Violence Against 
Women Reauthorization Act of 2019.
  My amendment allows for cross-agency coordination to collaborate on 
the prevention of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, 
and stalking, and for the agencies to share best practices for victims.
  This will allow for greater efficiency and transparency, and most 
importantly, it will allow for the sharing of best practices and 
information that could help survivors of domestic violence.
  With every reauthorization of VAWA since 1994, we have enhanced its 
protections, preserved its accomplishments, and removed its 
shortcomings, including adding protections for the elderly and the 
disabled, expanding sexual assault and stalking provisions, and 
fighting housing discrimination.
  These reauthorizations of VAWA have allowed us to come together to 
work collaboratively to combat domestic violence. Similarly, my 
amendment asks the agencies to work cohesively together and coordinate 
to accomplish a common goal: to protect survivors and their families, 
and to end violence against women.
  As we know, domestic violence plagues all communities across this 
country and all the districts that we represent. In my home State of 
Pennsylvania, the problem is no different. In the last 10 years, more 
than 1,600 people have died as a result of domestic violence, including 
people of all demographics. Domestic violence has affected the lives of 
thousands of Pennsylvanians. Sadly, just in 2017, two of my 
constituents in Montgomery County lost their lives to domestic 
violence.
  That is why it is so imperative that we reauthorize the Violence 
Against Women Act, because we know, since its inception, the rate of 
violence has decreased by a remarkable 63 percent.
  We have the opportunity to come together once again and pass this 
bipartisan VAWA reauthorization with new and better provisions, 
including expanding protections for young victims, survivors without 
shelters, and LGBTQ people; preventing intimate partner homicides by 
prohibiting those convicted of dating violence from possessing 
firearms; and protecting the Office on Violence Against Women to ensure 
survivors of domestic violence have access to the much-needed resources 
they deserve.
  I am pleased to be an original cosponsor of the Violence Against 
Women Act, and I urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to stand 
up against domestic violence, support this amendment, and vote to 
reauthorize this vital piece of legislation.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I claim the time in opposition, 
although I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Ms. DEAN. Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Pennsylvania (Ms. Wild).
  Ms. WILD. Madam Chair, I thank the gentlewoman from Pennsylvania for 
yielding.
  I rise in support of this amendment, which is being sponsored by my 
colleague and friend from Pennsylvania.
  The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act, VAWA, responds to our 
Nation's crisis of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, 
and stalking. VAWA expired in September of last year, and it is long 
past time for Congress to reauthorize this legislation.
  Representative Dean's amendment will increase interagency cooperation 
efforts to prevent violence and provide critical services to survivors. 
No one solution can stop every act of violence, but this amendment 
recognizes that more coordination among agencies over best practices, 
resources, and technology will lead to better results for those in need 
of urgent assistance.
  As survivors transition out of crisis, they need access to housing, 
healthcare, and other vital resources to rebuild their lives. In my 
home district, organizations like Turning Point of Lehigh Valley assist 
survivors of abuse and their families. This amendment and VAWA overall 
will enable

[[Page H3032]]

shelters like Turning Point to better serve people in need.
  Madam Chair, I am proud to stand with survivors.
  Ms. DEAN. Madam Chair, I thank the author of this important bill, 
Representative Bass, and I thank the tireless advocates who have worked 
to bring us to this important day.
  Madam Chair, I urge my colleagues to support this amendment and to 
please support this bill.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Pennsylvania (Ms. Dean).
  The amendment was agreed to.


          Amendment No. 5 Offered by Mrs. Torres of California

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 5 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mrs. TORRES of California. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 33, line 17, strike ``and'' at the end.
       Page 34, line 3, strike the period at the end and insert 
     the following: ``; and''.
       Page 34, after line 3, insert the following:
       (4) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(e) Report.--Not later than 1 year after the date of the 
     enactment of the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act 
     of 2019, the Secretary, acting through the Director of the 
     Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, shall submit to 
     Congress, the Committee on Appropriations and the Committee 
     on Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives, and 
     the Committee on Appropriations and the Committee on Health, 
     Education, Labor, and Pensions of the Senate a report on the 
     activities funded by grants awarded under this section and 
     best practices relating to rape prevention and education.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from California (Mrs. Torres) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from California.
  Mrs. TORRES of California. Madam Chair, I rise today to offer an 
amendment to H.R. 1585, the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act 
of 2019.
  Madam Chair, rape is a crisis in this country. In the United States, 
one in five women will be raped in their lifetime--one in five. Men can 
be rape victims, too. As a matter of fact, 1 in 71 men will be raped.
  The LGBTQ community suffers from even higher rates of sexual violence 
and rape. Forty-six percent of bisexual women have been raped, and 47 
percent of transgender individuals have been assaulted at some point in 
their lives. These statistics are more severe for people of color in 
the LGBTQ community. What is worse is that many LGBTQ victims are 
denied services simply because of their sexual orientation or gender 
identity.
  Whether we know it or not, everyone in this room knows a rape 
survivor. Maybe she or he is the barista who makes your morning coffee.

                              {time}  1545

  Maybe she or he is a security officer who smiles at you on your way 
to work. Maybe he or she is your coworker, your sibling, your partner, 
or your child. Many people don't realize that they know a rape 
survivor.
  Too often, rape isn't reported because victims fear the consequences. 
Often survivors fear that no one will believe them or that they will be 
blamed or stigmatized. In the #MeToo era, the pervasiveness of sexual 
assault has come to the forefront. However, the public is still 
grappling with our understanding of rape, the myth versus reality.
  Many people still think that rape is only an act committed by a 
stranger in a dark alley. Instances like this do happen. In 2016, Brock 
Turner raped an unconscious young woman behind a dumpster. His 
punishment? Three months in jail. This sentencing alone reflects the 
failure to understand rape and a tendency to blame the victim.
  Our comprehension of rape has changed dramatically in the past 
decade. Instances of rape being perpetrated by strangers do happen, but 
eight out of ten rape survivors knew their rapist. The majority of 
female survivors were raped by an intimate partner.
  While there is plenty of data on VAWA grants administered by the 
Office of Violence Against Women, an analysis by the Congressional 
Research Service found that there is insufficient information on RPE 
formula grants run by the CDC.
  To prevent rape and create innovative trauma-informed policies and 
programs, we need to improve our understanding of which initiatives are 
effective. My amendment will bridge this information gap and help 
better inform our rape prevention efforts. My amendment requires the 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to provide a report to 
Congress on the activity of grant awardees funded through the Rape 
Prevention and Education Grant Program as well as on emerging and best 
practices relating to rape prevention and education.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition, although I 
am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mrs. TORRES of California. Madam Chair, I would like to thank the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Bass), the gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. 
Jackson Lee), and Chairman Nadler for introducing H.R. 1585, the 
Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019, and I urge its 
swift passage.
  Lastly, Madam Chair, I would ask that this amendment be made in 
order, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from California (Mrs. Torres).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 6 Offered by Mr. Burgess

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 6 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. BURGESS. Madam Chairman, I call up amendment No. 6 to H.R. 1585.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 170, line 18, strike ``Section 2(j)'' and insert 
     ``Section 2''.
       Page 170, line 19, strike ``by'' and insert ``--''.
       Page 170, strike lines 20 through 21, and insert the 
     following:
       (1) in subsection (f)--
       (A) in paragraph (1) by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (B) by redesignating paragraph (2) as paragraph (3); and
       (C) by inserting after paragraph (1) the following:
       ``(2) information on best practices for state and local 
     governments to reduce the backlog of DNA evidence''; and
       (2) in subsection (j), by striking ``2015 through 2019'' 
     and inserting ``2020 through 2024''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from Texas (Mr. Burgess) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Texas.
  Mr. BURGESS. Madam Chairman, the Violence Against Women Act 
reauthorizes the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program through 2024. 
This amendment simply requires State and local governments that are 
recipients of the grant program to include information in their reports 
to the Attorney General on best practices for reducing the backlog of 
DNA evidence.
  This grant program was originally authorized under the Justice for 
All Act of 2004 to provide grants to State and local governments for 
the collection and analysis of forensic samples and to ensure the 
timely processing of DNA evidence by law enforcement. Congress 
reauthorized the program several times, most recently providing $151 
million for fiscal year 2019.
  Despite these efforts, the backlog of untested DNA evidence is still 
high. According to reporting from The Texas Tribune, a paper back in 
the State of Texas, it costs between $500 and $2,000 to test a kit, and 
there are approximately 3,500 untested kits in Texas

[[Page H3033]]

alone. We must continue working to reduce this backlog so that we can 
bring justice to the victims of assault.
  State and local grant recipients are required to submit a report to 
the Attorney General which is then summarized for Congress. My 
amendment adds best practices for reducing the backlog to the report 
required by grant recipients in order to better understand the needs of 
entities directly involved in collecting and processing DNA evidence.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. NADLER. Madam Chair, I claim the time in opposition to the 
amendment, although I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from New York is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. NADLER. Madam Chair, I support this amendment to improve the 
reporting requirements for States and localities that receive funding 
under the Debbie Smith DNA Backlog Grant Program.
  As we all know, because of the increased awareness of the potential 
for DNA evidence to help solve criminal cases, the demand for DNA 
testing continues to grow nationwide. Crime laboratories now process 
more DNA than ever before. In recognition of this, H.R. 1585 
reauthorizes the Debbie Smith Act, which I helped to originate.
  This amendment directs States and localities to report information to 
the Attorney General on best practices for reducing the backlog of DNA 
evidence. The emphasis on best practices is a good one, as it will help 
ensure that the backlog is cleared in as expeditious and efficient a 
manner as possible.
  Madam Chair, I encourage my colleagues to support the amendment, and 
I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BURGESS. Madam Chairman, I thank the gentleman for his support, 
and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Burgess).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 7 Offered by Ms. Waters

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 7 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. WATERS. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 39, after line 6, insert the following:
       ``(12) To train campus personnel in how to use a victim-
     centered, trauma-informed interview technique, which means 
     asking questions of a student or a campus employee who is 
     reported to be a victim of sexual harassment, sexual assault, 
     domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking, in a manner 
     that is focused on the experience of the reported victim, 
     that does not judge or blame the reported victim for the 
     alleged crime, and that is informed by evidence-based 
     research on the neurobiology of trauma. To the extent 
     practicable, campus personnel shall allow the reported victim 
     to participate in a recorded interview and to receive a copy 
     of the recorded interview.'';

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from California (Ms. Waters) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from California.
  Ms. WATERS. Madam Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Madam Chair, I rise in support of H.R. 1585, the Violence Against 
Women Reauthorization Act of 2019. This legislation is the result of 
the tireless work of advocates, Chairman Nadler, of the bill's original 
sponsor, my colleague from California, Congresswoman Karen Bass, and 
most especially, the women who survived domestic violence and sexual 
assault and bravely shared their stories. Without their courage, this 
legislation would not be on the floor today.
  I also appreciate the title in this bill which helps victims of 
domestic violence access safe housing. Women who are in dangerous 
situations at home need to be able to quickly transfer to alternative 
housing, and that is precisely what Title 6 of this bill aims to do. I 
understand that there are some stakeholders who have raised some 
questions about how the implementation of this title would work, and I 
will continue to work with them as this bill moves through the Senate.
  Though the Violence Against Women Act has led to widespread change in 
how our Nation understands and responds to domestic violence, sexual 
assault, and sexual harassment, much work remains to be done.
  Twenty-five years after the original Violence Against Women Act 
passed in 1994, women who came forward are still too often disregarded, 
disgraced, and humiliated, all because those in power know that if the 
stories of the trauma and abuse suffered by women are true, then 
everything--including their power--would need to change. My amendment 
is another step toward ensuring that women who speak out and refuse to 
be silenced are supported and heard.
  Section 303 of H.R. 1585 includes the grant program that provides 
funds to higher education institutions to combat violent crimes on 
campuses, including especially, domestic and sexual violence. My 
amendment would create a new purpose area for section 303 grants, which 
allows funding to be used by higher education institutions to train 
employees on how to conduct victim-centered, trauma-informed interviews 
with the students who report being a victim of sexual assault, domestic 
violence, stalking, or harassment. The employee would be trained to 
communicate in a manner which does not blame or judge the survivor for 
the crimes he or she reports.
  My amendment stipulates that if a student requests to have a record 
of their conversations with college employees and administrators, then 
schools which accept funding for this purpose area must offer a 
recorded interview. Given the lengthy record of colleges suppressing 
reports of sexual or domestic violence on campus, recorded interviews 
can be incredibly important to survivors.
  Only one in five female college students report their sexual assault, 
and many cite a fear of retaliation and not being believed as the 
primary reasons they stayed silent. Students who come forward and 
report an assault or other crime should never be made to feel that they 
are at fault, that they will be punished, or that they should feel 
shame. College administrators should never use their ignorance as to 
how trauma affects young women--which can often make it difficult for a 
victim to recall exactly what happened and when--as a reason to 
discredit those who report.
  My amendment will help ensure that never happens by facilitating the 
training necessary for colleges to better support students as they 
navigate what is likely to be one of the most traumatic moments in 
their lives.
  So, Madam Chair, I urge all of my colleagues to support training to 
promote more effective conversations between students and college 
employees and vote in the affirmative for my amendment.
  Madam Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chairman, I do claim the time in 
opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I understand the gentlewoman's 
concern here, and I appreciate that concern.
  A bigger concern I have here is concerning the trend of handling 
responsibilities on campus and giving those--in a criminal matter and 
putting them into campus personnel rather than law enforcement. My 
concern is that these are crimes and they need to be treated as crimes.
  We need to do everything we possibly can to treat those victims and 
give them as much support and help as we possibly can, but I don't want 
to give in to the implication that this should be treated as anything 
other than a crime, and law enforcement personnel should be involved in 
all stages.

  I have seen a concerning trend across the country in trying to treat 
these differently or even adding in a layer of investigation. This 
needs to be treated as a crime.
  I understand the gentlewoman's concern here, and expanding this grant 
program could result from others in reducing resources that are 
available for prosecution. So I understand the gentlewoman's concern. I 
just would oppose this for those reasons and no more that.

[[Page H3034]]

  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. WATERS. Madam Chairman, I rise to continue to try and educate my 
colleagues on the opposite side of the aisle about the trauma that is 
faced by victims of sexual assault, and I am hopeful that they will 
agree with me, join in this amendment, and support this amendment so 
that we can create the opportunity to get these conversations going so 
that, indeed, these women can be supported and understood perhaps in 
ways this has never happened before.
  Madam Chair, I yield to the gentleman from New York (Mr. Nadler) who 
is the chair of the Judiciary Committee.
  Mr. NADLER. Madam Chair, I support this amendment which expands the 
types of grants that can be funded to combat violent crimes on college 
campuses.
  Evidence-based research on the neurobiology of trauma has shown the 
effectiveness of using victim-centered, trauma-informed interview 
techniques when investigating allegations of sexual harassment, sexual 
assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking.
  This amendment seeks to ensure that campus personnel who investigate 
these types of cases are trained in up-to-date, research-based methods 
for interviewing victims and handling cases in a sensitive manner.
  Madam Chair, I encourage my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Ms. WATERS. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1600

  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I appreciate the gentlewoman's 
concern; but, also, I do understand this issue, as someone who has been 
in the legal community, been a counselor, also a chaplain in the Air 
Force who has had to deal with sexual assault issues, and also served 
on the local board of Rape Response.
  I do get these issues. I don't disagree with the gentlewoman that 
there are concerns here, that we do need to be sensitive and we do need 
to do this.
  My concern lies simply in the fact that we need to put this funding 
and these resources not to a bifurcated process, but we also need to 
continue to make sure that this goes to law enforcement, because 
someone who mistreats and someone who is a victim of sexual harassment, 
sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, or stalking--it is 
a crime, and it needs to be treated as that.
  We need to make sure our law enforcement personnel can have better 
resources and better access so that the victims can be taken care of 
and the perpetrators can be locked up. That is my concern here, not 
that I don't understand what the victims may be going through.
  Although I have never personally been a victim, I have counseled on 
many occasions people who have been victims. So, I would just caution, 
so we understand the differences in our opinions, why someone may hold 
an opinion. And mine was simply from a law enforcement perspective, not 
that I was ignoring or ambivalent toward the feelings of those who have 
been victimized.
  Madam Chair, I would just oppose this for those reasons and nothing 
more, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Waters).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. NADLER. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from California 
will be postponed.


                  Amendment No. 8 Offered by Mr. Young

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 8 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. YOUNG. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 135, strike lines 8 through 15, and insert the 
     following:
       ``(g) Indian Country Defined.--For purposes of the pilot 
     project described in subsection (f)(5), the definition of 
     `Indian country' shall include--
       ``(1) Alaska Native-owned Townsites, Allotments, and former 
     reservation lands acquired in fee by Alaska Native Village 
     Corporations pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement 
     Act (43 U.S.C. 33) and other lands transferred in fee to 
     Native villages, and
       ``(2) all lands within any Alaska Native village with a 
     population that is at least 75 percent Alaska Native.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from Alaska (Mr. Young) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Alaska.
  Mr. YOUNG. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Madam Chair, my amendment would improve this bill's application to 
remote Alaska Native villages.
  Women in Alaska Native villages suffer the very highest sexual abuse 
rates in the Nation.
  Alaska Native women are overrepresented in the domestic violence 
survivor population by 250 percent.
  Alaska Natives comprise about 19 percent of the State's population, 
yet are 47 percent of the reported rape survivors.
  Yet, Native villages currently lack any efficient tools to criminally 
prosecute the offenders. The remoteness and isolation of the Native 
villages, most of which are not connected to the road system and only 
accessible by air, makes it difficult to prevent violence and care for 
the survivors.
  Almost all of these villages lack any form of law enforcement, and it 
can take days for authorities to fly to the village and respond to an 
incident, particularly when weather conditions are bad.
  My amendment will open the door to a meaningful pilot project to help 
overcome these limitations by crafting an Alaska solution for a unique 
Alaska problem.
  Currently, the bill would create an Alaska Native jurisdiction pilot 
program for five villages, but only covers Native lands that are 
largely outside the villages. These lands are not where people live 
and, therefore, not where crimes are committed.
  My amendment would add jurisdiction for all lands inside Alaska 
Native villages to cover where the majority of violence actually 
occurs.
  Villages need to be empowered to develop local solutions to these 
problems.
  My amendment is supported by the National Congress of American 
Indians, Alaska Federation of Natives, the Tanana Chiefs Conference, 
and Bristol Bay Native Corporation.
  Madam Chair, I urge my colleagues to support this amendment for 
Alaska, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. NADLER. Madam Chair, I claim the time in opposition to the 
amendment, although I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from New York is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. NADLER. Madam Chair, I support this amendment because it improves 
and enhances the special Tribal criminal jurisdiction pilot project 
created by VAWA in 2013 specifically to benefit Alaska Natives.
  For over 5 years, the special Tribal criminal jurisdiction has given 
qualifying Tribes across the United States the authority to prosecute 
non-Tribal members for certain offenses.
  This year's reauthorization of VAWA would extend that jurisdiction to 
more crimes, including dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.
  Tribes across the country have been effectively exercising their 
authority under VAWA and keeping their communities safe. This amendment 
would ensure that Alaska Native villages that qualify are also able to 
exercise this type of jurisdiction. It is only fair that they be 
allowed to do so.
  Madam Chair, I urge my colleagues to support this amendment, and I 
yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. YOUNG. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Alaska (Mr. Young).
  The amendment was agreed to.

[[Page H3035]]

  



            Amendment No. 9 Offered by Ms. Johnson of Texas

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 9 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. JOHNSON of Texas. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 52, line 13, strike ``means a transfer'' and insert 
     ``means an emergency transfer under subsection (e) from a 
     unit of a covered housing provider''.
       Page 52, line 16, insert ``that can transfer to any unit of 
     the same covered housing provider'' before the period at the 
     end.
       Page 52, line 18, strike ``means a transfer'' and insert 
     ``means an emergency transfer under subsection (e) from a 
     unit of a covered housing provider''.
       Page 59, strike lines 17 through 21 and insert the 
     following:
       ``(1) In general.--A tenant who is a victim of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking may 
     apply for an emergency transfer to another available and safe 
     dwelling unit assisted under a covered housing program, and 
     the covered housing provider shall grant such application 
     if--''.
       Page 60, line 24, strike ``internal emergency transfer'' 
     and insert ``internal transfer''.
       Page 61, beginning on line 4, strike ``internal emergency 
     transfer'' and insert ``internal transfer''.
       Page 61, beginning on line 8, strike ``internal emergency 
     transfer'' and insert ``internal transfer''.
       Page 61, line 15, strike ``external emergency transfer'' 
     and insert ``external transfer''.
       Page 62, beginning on line 1, strike ``internal emergency 
     transfer'' and insert ``internal transfer''.
       Page 62, line 3, strike ``external emergency transfer'' and 
     insert ``external transfer''.
       Page 62, line 5, strike ``internal emergency transfer'' and 
     insert ``internal transfer''.
       Page 62, line 6, strike ``external emergency transfer'' and 
     insert ``external transfer''.
       Page 62, line 8, strike ``emergency''.
       Page 62, line 11, strike ``emergency''.
       Page 63, line 9, strike ``emergency''.
       Page 63, line 15, strike ``emergency''.
       Page 63, line 18, strike ``emergency''.
       Page 69, line 19, strike ``subsection'' and insert 
     ``section''.
       Page 73, line 7, strike ``subsection'' and insert 
     ``section''.
       Page 80, line 9, strike ``external emergency transfer'' and 
     insert ``external transfer''.
       Page 80, line 21, strike ``external emergency transfer'' 
     and insert ``external transfer''.
       Page 80, line 24, strike ``external emergency transfer'' 
     and insert ``external transfer''.
       Page 84, line 6, strike ``pararaph'' and insert 
     ``paragraph''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from Texas (Ms. Johnson) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Texas.
  Ms. JOHNSON of Texas. Madam Chair, I rise today in support of my 
amendment offered to H.R. 1585, the Violence Against Women 
Reauthorization Act of 2019.
  My amendment will ensure that a tenant who is a victim of domestic 
violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking is able to apply 
for an emergency transfer to another available and safe dwelling unit 
assisted under a covered housing program. The covered housing provider 
shall grant such application.
  This amendment has also been scored by the Congressional Budget 
Office to have no effect on direct spending or revenues.
  In my home State of Texas and my city of Dallas, we are, 
unfortunately, deeply familiar with the tragedies involved in domestic 
violence. Families have been broken apart and people have lost their 
lives to the scourge of domestic violence.
  We have the duty to do more to protect these people. Therefore, it is 
necessary for us to make clear the distinction in law, the difference 
between internal and external transfers. Though it may sound trivial, 
this amendment is crucial to providing victims of domestic violence a 
sense of safety, security, and dignity.
  As representatives of Americans from all corners of our country, we 
know that this problem is not unique to any one part of our Nation. It 
is widespread and engrossing, and our response to it must also measure 
up to the significance of the challenge.
  Americans today are in need of protections and assistance to recover 
from domestic violence. They need these protections to return to full 
and prosperous lives.
  By voting in favor of this amendment, Congress is upholding our 
sacred obligation to protect the millions of victims and survivors who 
need and deserve our wholehearted, full support.
  As co-chair of the Congressional Homeless Caucus, I have worked on 
housing issues for a long time. I am appreciative of my colleagues on 
the Judiciary and Financial Services Committees for their partnership 
in strengthening the housing protections in this Violence Against Women 
Reauthorization Act of 2019.
  Madam Chair, I urge my colleagues to support the amendment, and I 
reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I claim the time in opposition, 
although I am not opposed.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I appreciate the gentlewoman's 
amendment, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. JOHNSON of Texas. Madam Chair, I simply urge adoption of this 
amendment, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Johnson).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 10 Offered by Mrs. Wagner

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 10 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mrs. WAGNER. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 35, line 3, strike ``and stalking'' and insert 
     ``stalking, and sex trafficking''.
       Page 35, strike lines 4 through 17, and insert the 
     following (and redesignate other provisions accordingly):
       (ii) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``or'' at the end;
       (iii) in subparagraph (C), by striking the period at the 
     end and inserting a semicolon; and
       Page 35, lines 22 through 23, strike ``and stalking'' and 
     insert ``stalking, and sex trafficking''.
       Page 36, line 8, insert ``sex trafficking,'' after 
     ``stalking,''.
       Page 36, strike lines 11 through 13 (and redesignate other 
     provisions accordingly).
       Page 36, line 15, insert ``and'' after the semicolon.
       Page 36, strike lines 16 through 18 (and redesignate other 
     provisions accordingly).

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from Missouri (Mrs. Wagner) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Missouri.
  Mrs. WAGNER. Madam Chair, I rise today to urge my colleagues to 
support my amendment to the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act 
of 2019.
  VAWA grant programs serve women and girls, especially those in 
underserved communities who are experiencing violence.
  Sex trafficking is one such form of violence. Victims endure horrific 
trauma, violence, and abuse. Unfortunately, there is a real gap in 
services for child sex trafficking victims.
  In Missouri, we struggle to find safe and secure options for girls 
who are looking to restart their lives. Amazing nonprofits like The 
Covering House in my district serve youth, along with other 
organizations across the country, but there is still a substantial 
unfilled need for services.
  In addition to counseling and housing, victim service providers are 
trying to prevent violence by educating children and ensuring that they 
never become victims of sex trafficking in the first place.
  That is why programs like the Creating Hope through Outreach, 
Options, Service, and Education for Children and Youth program, CHOOSE, 
are so essential.
  This VAWA program ensures that the Department of Justice can develop, 
expand, and strengthen victim-centered interventions that target youth 
who are victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, 
stalking, and sex trafficking.
  It enables schools to provide training to personnel on the needs of 
students

[[Page H3036]]

who are victims of trafficking, and it develops prevention programming 
in middle and high schools.
  These are critical services, and this amendment will ensure that the 
CHOOSE program can continue to provide funding for programs that 
counter sex trafficking, not only other forms of violence.
  We cannot unintentionally strip sex trafficking references out of 
VAWA text. Sex trafficking is a paramount example of violence against 
girls and women, and we must be careful not to disenfranchise these 
victims as we legislate.
  I thank my colleague from Texas, Representative Sheila Jackson Lee, 
and others for cosponsoring my amendment and working to ensure that we 
have bipartisan support.
  I will also work with my colleagues in the Senate to ensure these 
references are restored in the final VAWA legislation.
  Madam Chair, I urge my House colleagues to support my amendment and 
ensure that child sex trafficking victims maintain access to critical 
services, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Chair, I claim time in opposition to the 
amendment, although I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentlewoman from Texas is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Chair, I thank Congresswoman Wagner for her 
continuing leadership. It has been a pleasure to work with her over the 
years in the House Committee on the Judiciary on the question of human 
trafficking and sex trafficking.
  I am delighted to join this amendment, along with Congresswoman 
Maloney from New York. We have a long history of working on the issues 
of human trafficking and sex trafficking.
  Madam Chair, the International Labor Organization estimates that 
there are 40.3 million victims of human trafficking. Twenty-five 
percent of them are children; 75 percent of them are women and girls.
  It is a tragedy, but one out of seven endangered runaways reported to 
the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children were likely 
child sex trafficking victims. Of those, 88 percent were in the care of 
social services or foster care when they ran.
  From 2007 to 2017, the National Human Trafficking Hotline has 
received 34,700 sex trafficking cases inside the United States; and, in 
2017, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children indicated 
that children continue in 2017, again, to be sex trafficked. The 
International Labor Organization, again, estimates that there are 4.8 
million people trapped in forced sexual exploitation.

                              {time}  1615

  What is necessary to know is that sex trafficking can be a revolving 
door. It is income that sex traffickers and human traffickers use.
  I am very delighted to join with Congresswoman Wagner's amendment to 
this bill dealing with violence against women because it is an expanded 
bill that answers the concerns of so many.
  I am glad that this amendment will ensure that the Creating Hope 
through Outreach, Options, Service, and Education for Children and 
Youth program, the CHOOSE Children and Youth program, can continue to 
be programs that address sex trafficking.
  It is important to note, in particular, that it is answering the 
question of the gap in services in our States for young women who are 
at risk and who are struggling to restart their lives. We must ensure 
that, once these individuals have been victimized, sex trafficked, we 
do all we can to help them heal and recover.
  I ask all Members to join in supporting this amendment, which 
emphasizes that sex trafficking is a part of our trying to stop and 
stomp out for good violence against women. I ask all Members to support 
the Wagner-Jackson Lee-Maloney amendment.
  Madam Chair, I rise in strong support of the Wagner/Jackson Lee/
Maloney Amendment to H.R. 1585, the Violence Against Women 
Reauthorization Act of 2019.
  The Wagner/Jackson Lee/Maloney makes an improvement to the bill by 
drawing attention to the lack of services for child sex trafficking 
services and which draws attention to groups like CHOOSE Children and 
Youth (Creating Hope through Outreach, Options, Service and Education 
for Children and Youth) for educating and preventing sex trafficking.
  Madam Chair, while we live in the richest, most powerful country in 
the history of the world, in our nation we still see the prevalence of 
sex trafficking.
  It is important that as we do this work before us today, we emphasize 
that sex trafficking is also a form of violence against women and 
children.
  The Congress--this body--must work to ensure that services for sex 
trafficking victims are available.
  The Wagner/Jackson Lee/Maloney Amendment addresses the gap in 
services in our state for young women who are risk and who are 
struggling to restart their lives.
  Crime, and especially crimes falling within the umbrella of offenses 
addressed in VAWA are unconscionable and intolerable in a civilized 
society.
  We must ensure that once these individuals have been victimized, we 
do all we can to help them heal and recover.
  This Jackson Lee/Wagner/Maloney Amendment works towards that end.
  I ask all members to support the Wagner/Jackson Lee/Maloney Amendment 
and I thank the gentlelady from Missouri for her work.

                        Notes on Sex Trafficking


          Sex Trafficking is an extension of human trafficking

       The International Labor Organization estimates that there 
     are 40.3 million victims of human trafficking globally.
       81 percent of them are trapped in forced labor.
       25 percent of them are children.
       75 percent are women and girls.
       The International Labor Organization estimates that forced 
     labor and human trafficking is a $150 billion industry 
     worldwide.
       The U.S. Department of Labor has identified 148 goods from 
     75 countries made by forced and child labor.
       In 2017, an estimated 1 out of 7 endangered runaways 
     reported to the National Center for Missing and Exploited 
     Children were likely child sex trafficking victims.
       Of those, 88 percent were in the care of social services or 
     foster care when they ran.
       There is no official estimate of the total number of human 
     trafficking victims in the U.S. Estimates indicate that the 
     total number of victims nationally reaches into the hundreds 
     of thousands when estimates of both adults and minors and sex 
     trafficking and labor trafficking are aggregated.
       From 2007 to 2017, the National Human Trafficking Hotline 
     has received reports of 34,700 sex trafficking cases inside 
     the United States.
       In 2017, the National Center for Missing & Exploited 
     Children estimated that 1 in 7 endangered runaways reported 
     to them were likely sex trafficking victims.
       The International Labor Organization estimates that there 
     are 4.8 million people trapped in forced sexual exploitation 
     globally.

  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. WAGNER. Madam Chair, I thank my friends across the aisle, 
certainly the Representative from Texas, Ms. Sheila Jackson Lee, and my 
good friend from New York, Carolyn Maloney, who I know wanted to speak 
today on the amendment but is held up in a hearing that she is chairing 
presently. I thank them for their bipartisan support, and I urge all my 
colleagues to support this amendment.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Chair, I yield such time as he may consume to 
the gentleman from New York (Mr. Nadler), the chairman of the Judiciary 
Committee.
  Mr. NADLER. Madam Chair, I thank the gentlewoman for yielding.
  I support this bipartisan amendment, which would ensure that entities 
focused on addressing sex trafficking maintain eligibility for CHOOSE 
grants.
  We know that sex trafficking is a serious problem in the United 
States. At this time, CHOOSE grants are available for the purpose of 
enhancing the safety of youth and children who are victims of or 
exposed to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, 
stalking, or sex trafficking, and for preventing future violence.
  This amendment ensures that we continue to provide critical funding 
to address sex trafficking in our communities. I urge my colleagues to 
support this amendment.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Chair, I am holding up this bill, H.R. 1585. 
We are very grateful for the many victims who, once this bill is 
passed, will be able to both be honored but also be protected.
  At the same time, with the gentlewoman's help, we want to make sure

[[Page H3037]]

that sex trafficked victims are not left out of important historic 
legislation like H.R. 1585. With her amendment--and I am pleased to 
join it with Congresswoman Maloney--we are ensuring that sex 
trafficking and the victims of sex trafficking will be heard, their 
voices will be heard. More importantly, there will be resources and 
programs that will address their pain but also address their ability to 
restore their lives.
  I ask my colleagues to support the Wagner-Jackson Lee-Maloney 
amendment to H.R. 1585, the Violence Against Women Act.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mrs. CAROLYN B. MALONEY of New York. Madam Chair, I rise today in 
support of this amendment.
  Power and control. The tools of human traffickers are the same as 
those of domestic abusers.
  Human trafficking and domestic violence are not distinct crimes. They 
often overlap. In both cases, it is often intimate partners who traffic 
or abuse their victims. In both cases, abusers and traffickers use 
emotional manipulation, economic abuse, physical violence--all tactics 
to exert power and control over their victims.
  Support services for survivors need to recognize the intersections 
between sex trafficking and domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
assault and stalking.
  That is why this amendment from Congresswoman Wagner is so important.
  This amendment would ensure that the Justice Department's Creating 
Hope through Outreach, Options, Service and Education for Children and 
Youth Program can continue to include programs that address sex 
trafficking. We must address both of these crimes individually and we 
do.
  But we must also acknowledge that these crimes can often overlap and 
where they overlap we need to address the patterns that perpetuate this 
violence, in order to best serve survivors and connect them with the 
resources they need to get the help they deserve.
  So I urge my colleagues to support this important amendment and thank 
the gentlewoman from Missouri for all of her efforts to combat human 
trafficking and domestic abuse.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Missouri (Mrs. Wagner).
  The question was taken; and the Acting Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Mr. NADLER. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further 
proceedings on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Missouri 
will be postponed.


                Amendment No. 11 Offered by Mrs. Wagner

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 11 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mrs. WAGNER. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 15, strike lines 6 through 12, and insert the 
     following:
       (G) in paragraph (16)--
       (i) in subparagraph (C)(i), by striking ``$20,000 in 
     Department funds, unless the Deputy Attorney General'' and 
     inserting ``$100,000 in Department funds, unless the Director 
     or Principal Deputy Director of the Office on Violence 
     Against Women, the Deputy Attorney General,''; and
       (ii) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(E) Ineligibility.--If the Attorney General finds that a 
     recipient of grant funds under this Act has fraudulently 
     misused such grant funds, after reasonable notice and 
     opportunity for a hearing, such recipient shall not be 
     eligible to receive grant funds under this Act for up to 5 
     years. A misuse of grant funds or an error that does not rise 
     to the level of fraud is not grounds for ineligibility.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from Missouri (Mrs. Wagner) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Missouri.
  Mrs. WAGNER. Madam Chair, I rise today to ask my colleagues to vote 
for my amendment that will ensure greater transparency and 
accountability when it comes to taxpayer dollars.
  The Department of Justice inspector general has found frequent 
misconduct, fraud, and abuse in VAWA grant-making. More than $7 billion 
in grants has been awarded over the years, and audits have revealed 
that too many recipients are out of compliance with the terms of these 
grants.
  This amendment will ensure that the Office on Violence Against Women 
cannot continue to grant VAWA dollars to organizations that are 
fraudulently misusing funds. Organizations that misuse funds will lose 
their eligibility to receive VAWA grants for up to 5 years.
  Errors that do not rise to the level of fraud will not impact an 
organization's eligibility, but we must encourage grant recipients to 
act with caution and integrity. In this way, we can best serve the 
women and girls that VAWA programs are meant to empower.
  I thank you for supporting justice and services for America's women 
and children and girls, and I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on my 
amendment and broaden access for organizations acting in compliance 
with honesty and good faith.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. NADLER. Madam Chair, I claim the time in opposition to the 
amendment, although I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman from New York is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. NADLER. Madam Chair, I support this amendment, which would make 
entities found by the Attorney General to have fraudulently misused 
VAWA grant funds ineligible to apply for future grants for up to 5 
years.
  This amendment tries to guard against the potential misuse of grant 
funds, but it does so in a way that safeguards due process, after 
reasonable notice and opportunity for a hearing.
  Any misuse of funds that does not rise to the level of fraud, or that 
is merely an error, is insufficient to make a grantee ineligible for 
funds and only places a temporary, but sufficiently lengthy, ban on 
receipt of funding.
  Because this is a commonsense measure, I urge my colleagues to 
support this amendment.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mrs. WAGNER. Madam Chair, I thank the chairman for his leadership and 
for his support of this amendment, and I encourage all my colleagues to 
support this amendment.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Missouri (Mrs. Wagner).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 12 Offered by Mr. Grijalva

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 12 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 131, strike line 8 and all that follows through line 
     12, and insert the following:
       ``(B)(i) committed against a victim who is a child under 
     the age of 18, or an elder (as such term is defined by tribal 
     law), including when an offender recklessly engages in 
     conduct that creates a substantial risk of death or serious 
     bodily injury to the victim, or committed as described in 
     subparagraph (A) while the child or elder is present; and
       ``(ii) the child or elder--
       ``(I) resides or has resided in the same household as the 
     offender;
       ``(II) is related to the offender by blood or marriage;
       ``(III) is related to another victim of the offender by 
     blood or marriage;
       ``(IV) is under the care of a victim of the offender who is 
     an intimate partner or former spouse; or
       ``(V) is under the care of a victim of the offender who is 
     similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the 
     domestic- or family- violence laws of an Indian tribe that 
     has jurisdiction over the Indian country where the violence 
     occurs.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from Arizona (Mr. Grijalva) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Arizona.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Madam Chair, as we have heard over and over today, and 
justifiably so, the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act 
is critical for women across this country. This bill will ensure the 
safety of women, especially Native American women.
  My amendment will expand the definition of domestic violence to 
include violence against or witnessed by a

[[Page H3038]]

child or elder, as defined by Tribal law. This important amendment will 
allow Tribes to ensure that perpetrators acting violently toward or 
near children or elders receive consequences for their actions.
  The Tulalip Tribe is one of the first Tribes to implement the Special 
Domestic Violence Criminal Jurisdiction from the 2013 Violence Against 
Women Act reauthorization. They immediately experienced the 
implications of not having this protection for children and elders in 
their jurisdiction.
  Of the 30 cases they received in Tribal court, 20 involved children 
and/or elders. Although the violence impacted the child or the elder, 
the Tribal court was not able to prosecute. When the jurisdiction moved 
to the State, it did not prosecute the remaining 20 cases in State 
court. Justice was not served for the children and/or the elders 
experiencing violence.
  In 2010, the Attorney General's report on American Indian and Alaska 
Native children exposed to violence included the recommendation that 
Congress should restore the inherent authority of American Indian and 
Alaska Native Tribes to assert jurisdiction over persons who commit 
crimes against American Indian and Alaska Native children.
  This amendment is a step toward guaranteeing that Congress keeps 
American Indian and Alaska Native children and elders safe. By passing 
this amendment, Congress will restore the inherent authority for the 
Tulalip Tribe and others to fully secure the safety of Tribal children 
and elders throughout Indian Country.
  I urge my colleagues to protect Native children and elders by 
supporting this amendment.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I claim the time in opposition, 
although I am not opposed.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Madam Chair, I have no other speakers, and I yield back 
the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Grijalva).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 13 Offered by Mr. Grijalva

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 13 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 134, strike line 3 and all that follows through page 
     135, line 18, and insert the following:
       (9) by striking subsections (f), (g), and (h) and inserting 
     the following:
       ``(f) Grants and Reimbursement to Tribal Governments.--
       ``(1) Reimbursement.--
       ``(A) In general.--The Attorney General is authorized to 
     reimburse tribal government authorities for expenses incurred 
     in exercising special tribal criminal jurisdiction.
       ``(B) Eligible expenses.--Eligible expenses for 
     reimbursement shall include--
       ``(i) expenses incurred to arrest or prosecute offenders 
     and to detain inmates (including costs associated with 
     providing health care);
       ``(ii) expenses related to indigent defense services; and
       ``(iii) costs associated with probation and rehabilitation 
     services.
       ``(C) Procedure.--Reimbursements authorized pursuant to 
     this section shall be in accordance with rules promulgated by 
     the Attorney General after consultation with Indian tribes 
     and within one year after the date of enactment of this Act. 
     The rules promulgated by the Department shall set a maximum 
     allowable reimbursement to any tribal government in a one 
     year period.
       ``(2) Grants.--The Attorney General may award grants to the 
     governments of Indian tribes (or to authorized designees of 
     those governments)--
       ``(A) to strengthen tribal criminal justice systems to 
     assist Indian tribes in exercising special tribal criminal 
     jurisdiction, including--
       ``(i) law enforcement (including the capacity of law 
     enforcement, court personnel, or other non-law enforcement 
     entities that have no Federal or State arrest authority 
     agencies but have been designated by a tribe as responsible 
     for maintaining public safety within its territorial 
     jurisdiction, to enter information into and obtain 
     information from national crime information databases);
       ``(ii) prosecution;
       ``(iii) trial and appellate courts (including facilities 
     construction);
       ``(iv) probation systems;
       ``(v) detention and correctional facilities (including 
     facilities construction);
       ``(vi) alternative rehabilitation centers;
       ``(vii) culturally appropriate services and assistance for 
     victims and their families; and
       ``(viii) criminal codes and rules of criminal procedure, 
     appellate procedure, and evidence;
       ``(B) to provide indigent criminal defendants with the 
     effective assistance of licensed defense counsel, at no cost 
     to the defendant, in criminal proceedings in which a 
     participating tribe prosecutes--
       ``(i) a crime of domestic violence;
       ``(ii) a crime of dating violence;
       ``(iii) a criminal violation of a protection order;
       ``(iv) a crime of sexual violence;
       ``(v) a crime of stalking;
       ``(vi) a crime of sex trafficking;
       ``(vii) a crime of obstruction of justice; or
       ``(viii) a crime of assault of a law enforcement or 
     correctional officer;
       ``(C) to ensure that, in criminal proceedings in which a 
     participating tribe exercises special tribal criminal 
     jurisdiction, jurors are summoned, selected, and instructed 
     in a manner consistent with all applicable requirements;
       ``(D) to accord victims of domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual violence, stalking, sex trafficking, 
     obstruction of justice, assault of a law enforcement or 
     correctional officer, and violations of protection orders 
     rights that are similar to the rights of a crime victim 
     described in section 3771(a) of title 18, consistent with 
     tribal law and custom; and
       ``(E) to create a pilot project to allow up to five Indian 
     tribes in Alaska to implement special tribal criminal 
     jurisdiction.
       ``(g) Indian Country Defined.--For purposes of the pilot 
     project described in subsection (f)(2)(E), the definition of 
     `Indian country' shall include Alaska Native-owned Townsites, 
     Allotments, and former reservation lands acquired in fee by 
     Alaska Native Village Corporations pursuant to the Alaska 
     Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 33) and other lands 
     transferred in fee to Native villages.
       ``(h) Supplement, Not Supplant.--Amounts made available 
     under this section shall supplement and not supplant any 
     other Federal, State, tribal, or local government amounts 
     made available to carry out activities described in this 
     section.
       ``(i) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are 
     authorized to be appropriated $7,000,000 for each of fiscal 
     years 2020 through 2024 to carry out subsection (f) and to 
     provide training, technical assistance, data collection, and 
     evaluation of the criminal justice systems of participating 
     tribes.
       ``(j) Use of Funds.--Not less than 25 percent of the total 
     amount of funds appropriated under this section in a given 
     year shall be used for each of the purposes described in 
     paragraphs (1) and (2) of subsection (f), with remaining 
     funds available to be distributed for either of the purposes 
     described in paragraph (1) or (2) of subsection (f), or any 
     combination of such purposes, depending on need and in 
     consultation with Indian tribes.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from Arizona (Mr. Grijalva) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Arizona.


        Modification to Amendment No. 13 Offered by Mr. Grijalva

  Mr. GRIJALVA. Madam Chair, I ask unanimous consent that my amendment 
be modified in the form that I have placed at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will report the modification.
  The Clerk read as follows:
  Modification to Amendment No. 13 Offered by Mr. Grijalva:

       The amendment is modified to read as follows:
       Page 134, strike line 3 and all that follows through page 
     135, line 18, and insert the following:
       (9) by striking subsections (f), (g), and (h) and inserting 
     the following:
       ``(f) Grants and Reimbursement to Tribal Governments.--
       ``(1) Reimbursement.--
       ``(A) In general.--The Attorney General is authorized to 
     reimburse tribal government authorities for expenses incurred 
     in exercising special tribal criminal jurisdiction.
       ``(B) Eligible expenses.--Eligible expenses for 
     reimbursement shall include--
       ``(i) expenses incurred to arrest or prosecute offenders 
     and to detain inmates (including costs associated with 
     providing health care);
       ``(ii) expenses related to indigent defense services; and
       ``(iii) costs associated with probation and rehabilitation 
     services.
       ``(C) Procedure.--Reimbursements authorized pursuant to 
     this section shall be in accordance with rules promulgated by 
     the Attorney General after consultation with Indian tribes 
     and within one year after the date of enactment of this Act. 
     The rules promulgated by the Department shall set a

[[Page H3039]]

     maximum allowable reimbursement to any tribal government in a 
     one year period.
       ``(2) Grants.--The Attorney General may award grants to the 
     governments of Indian tribes (or to authorized designees of 
     those governments)--
       ``(A) to strengthen tribal criminal justice systems to 
     assist Indian tribes in exercising special tribal criminal 
     jurisdiction, including--
       ``(i) law enforcement (including the capacity of law 
     enforcement, court personnel, or other non-law enforcement 
     entities that have no Federal or State arrest authority 
     agencies but have been designated by a tribe as responsible 
     for maintaining public safety within its territorial 
     jurisdiction, to enter information into and obtain 
     information from national crime information databases);
       ``(ii) prosecution;
       ``(iii) trial and appellate courts (including facilities 
     construction);
       ``(iv) probation systems;
       ``(v) detention and correctional facilities (including 
     facilities construction);
       ``(vi) alternative rehabilitation centers;
       ``(vii) culturally appropriate services and assistance for 
     victims and their families; and
       ``(viii) criminal codes and rules of criminal procedure, 
     appellate procedure, and evidence;
       ``(B) to provide indigent criminal defendants with the 
     effective assistance of licensed defense counsel, at no cost 
     to the defendant, in criminal proceedings in which a 
     participating tribe prosecutes--
       ``(i) a crime of domestic violence;
       ``(ii) a crime of dating violence;
       ``(iii) a criminal violation of a protection order;
       ``(iv) a crime of sexual violence;
       ``(v) a crime of stalking;
       ``(vi) a crime of sex trafficking;
       ``(vii) a crime of obstruction of justice; or
       ``(viii) a crime of assault of a law enforcement or 
     correctional officer;
       ``(C) to ensure that, in criminal proceedings in which a 
     participating tribe exercises special tribal criminal 
     jurisdiction, jurors are summoned, selected, and instructed 
     in a manner consistent with all applicable requirements;
       ``(D) to accord victims of domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual violence, stalking, sex trafficking, 
     obstruction of justice, assault of a law enforcement or 
     correctional officer, and violations of protection orders 
     rights that are similar to the rights of a crime victim 
     described in section 3771(a) of title 18, consistent with 
     tribal law and custom; and
       ``(E) to create a pilot project to allow up to five Indian 
     tribes in Alaska to implement special tribal criminal 
     jurisdiction.
       ``(g) Supplement, Not Supplant.--Amounts made available 
     under this section shall supplement and not supplant any 
     other Federal, State, tribal, or local government amounts 
     made available to carry out activities described in this 
     section.
       ``(h) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are 
     authorized to be appropriated $7,000,000 for each of fiscal 
     years 2020 through 2024 to carry out subsection (f) and to 
     provide training, technical assistance, data collection, and 
     evaluation of the criminal justice systems of participating 
     tribes.
       ``(i) Use of Funds.--Not less than 25 percent of the total 
     amount of funds appropriated under this section in a given 
     year shall be used for each of the purposes described in 
     paragraphs (1) and (2) of subsection (f), with remaining 
     funds available to be distributed for either of the purposes 
     described in paragraph (1) or (2) of subsection (f), or any 
     combination of such purposes, depending on need and in 
     consultation with Indian tribes.''.

  Mr. GRIJALVA (during the reading). Madam Chair, I ask unanimous 
consent that the reading of the modification be dispensed with.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman 
from Arizona?
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. Is there objection to the original request of the 
gentleman from Arizona?
  There was no objection.
  The Acting CHAIR. The amendment is modified.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Arizona.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Madam Chair, the underlying bill will provide a 
historic extension of Tribal jurisdiction and ensure that more Native 
people receive the proper legal protections against people who commit 
violence toward them.
  Unfortunately, during the historic passage of the 2013 Violence 
Against Women reauthorization, the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe quickly 
realized the cost of implementing this important provision was pricey. 
Cost concerns about implementing Tribal jurisdiction are generally 
related to incarceration, healthcare, and jury selection.
  Further, a National Congress of American Indians report found that 
there are multiple implementation costs related to incarceration, 
healthcare, code development, law enforcement, and prosecutors. This 
hinders some Tribes from implementing the most important provisions 
related to the Violence Against Women Act.
  Unlike States, Tribes do not have the ability to tax for the costs 
related to implementing these important provisions that protect its 
people.
  With the support of Representative Kildee, who represents the area of 
the Saginaw Chippewa Tribe, the amendment I am offering will help 
alleviate the costs Tribes will incur due to the expanded criminal 
jurisdiction provision.
  This amendment would authorize the Department of Justice to reimburse 
Tribes that incur costs related to arrest, indigent defense services, 
and rehabilitation services.
  Further, this amendment provides language allowing DOJ to award 
grants to improve their law enforcement, detention and correctional 
facilities, culturally appropriate services, and criminal code 
development.
  I urge my colleagues to protect Indian Country from violence and 
support this amendment that will ease the costs incurred by Tribes for 
implementing this historic bill.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I claim the time in opposition, 
although at this point I am not necessarily opposed.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. GRIJALVA. Madam Chair, I have no other speakers. I yield back the 
balance of my time.

                              {time}  1630

  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I do think it is interesting, 
for a sovereign government, the expansion should come out of the funds 
here is the only concern I would have on this, but other than that, I 
yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment, as modified, 
offered by the gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Grijalva).
  The amendment, as modified, was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 14 Offered by Mr. Emmer

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 14 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. EMMER. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 32, after line 24, insert the following (and conform 
     the table of contents accordingly):

     SECTION 205. DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM ON TRAUMA-INFORMED 
                   TRAINING FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT.

       Title IV of the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement 
     Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 10101 note) is amended by adding at 
     the end the following:

       ``Subtitle Q--Trauma-informed Training for Law Enforcement

     ``SEC. 41701. DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM ON TRAUMA-INFORMED 
                   TRAINING FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT.

       ``(a) Definitions.--In this section--
       ``(1) the term `Attorney General' means the Attorney 
     General, acting through the Director of the Office on 
     Violence Against Women;
       ``(2) the term `covered individual' means an individual who 
     interfaces with victims of domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, and stalking, including--
       ``(A) an individual working for or on behalf of an eligible 
     entity;
       ``(B) a school or university administrator; and
       ``(C) an emergency services or medical employee;
       ``(3) the term `demonstration site', with respect to an 
     eligible entity that receives a grant under this section, 
     means--
       ``(A) if the eligible entity is a law enforcement agency 
     described in paragraph (4)(A), the area over which the 
     eligible entity has jurisdiction; and
       ``(B) if the eligible entity is an organization or agency 
     described in paragraph (4)(B), the area over which a law 
     enforcement agency described in paragraph (4)(A) that is 
     working in collaboration with the eligible entity has 
     jurisdiction; and
       ``(4) the term `eligible entity' means--
       ``(A) a State, local, territorial, or Tribal law 
     enforcement agency; or
       ``(B) a national, regional, or local victim services 
     organization or agency working in collaboration with a law 
     enforcement agency described in subparagraph (A).
       ``(b) Grants Authorized.--
       ``(1) In general.--The Attorney General shall award grants 
     on a competitive basis to

[[Page H3040]]

     eligible entities to carry out the demonstration program 
     under this section by implementing evidence-based or 
     promising policies and practices to incorporate trauma-
     informed techniques designed to--
       ``(A) prevent re-traumatization of the victim;
       ``(B) ensure that covered individuals use evidence-based 
     practices to respond to and investigate cases of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking;
       ``(C) improve communication between victims and law 
     enforcement officers in an effort to increase the likelihood 
     of the successful investigation and prosecution of the 
     reported crime in a manner that protects the victim to the 
     greatest extent possible;
       ``(D) increase collaboration among stakeholders who are 
     part of the coordinated community response to domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; and
       ``(E) evaluate the effectiveness of the training process 
     and content by measuring--
       ``(i) investigative and prosecutorial practices and 
     outcomes; and
       ``(ii) the well-being of victims and their satisfaction 
     with the criminal justice process.
       ``(2) Term.--The Attorney General shall make grants under 
     this section for each of the first 2 fiscal years beginning 
     after the date of enactment of this Act.
       ``(3) Award basis.--The Attorney General shall award grants 
     under this section to multiple eligible entities for use in a 
     variety of settings and communities, including--
       ``(A) urban, suburban, Tribal, remote, and rural areas;
       ``(B) college campuses; or
       ``(C) traditionally underserved communities.
       ``(c) Use of Funds.--An eligible entity that receives a 
     grant under this section shall use the grant to--
       ``(1) train covered individuals within the demonstration 
     site of the eligible entity to use evidence-based, trauma-
     informed techniques and knowledge of crime victims' rights 
     throughout an investigation into domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, or stalking, including by--
       ``(A) conducting victim interviews in a manner that--
       ``(i) elicits valuable information about the domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking; and
       ``(ii) avoids re-traumatization of the victim;
       ``(B) conducting field investigations that mirror best and 
     promising practices available at the time of the 
     investigation;
       ``(C) customizing investigative approaches to ensure a 
     culturally and linguistically appropriate approach to the 
     community being served;
       ``(D) becoming proficient in understanding and responding 
     to complex cases, including cases of domestic violence, 
     dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking--
       ``(i) facilitated by alcohol or drugs;
       ``(ii) involving strangulation;
       ``(iii) committed by a non-stranger;
       ``(iv) committed by an individual of the same sex as the 
     victim;
       ``(v) involving a victim with a disability;
       ``(vi) involving a male victim; or
       ``(vii) involving a lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender 
     (commonly referred to as `LGBT') victim;
       ``(E) developing collaborative relationships between--
       ``(i) law enforcement officers and other members of the 
     response team; and
       ``(ii) the community being served; and
       ``(F) developing an understanding of how to define, 
     identify, and correctly classify a report of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking; and
       ``(2) promote the efforts of the eligible entity to improve 
     the response of covered individuals to domestic violence, 
     dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking through various 
     communication channels, such as the website of the eligible 
     entity, social media, print materials, and community 
     meetings, in order to ensure that all covered individuals 
     within the demonstration site of the eligible entity are 
     aware of those efforts and included in trainings, to the 
     extent practicable.
       ``(d) Demonstration Program Trainings on Trauma-informed 
     Approaches.--
       ``(1) Identification of existing trainings.--
       ``(A) In general.--The Attorney General shall identify 
     trainings for law enforcement officers, in existence as of 
     the date on which the Attorney General begins to solicit 
     applications for grants under this section, that--
       ``(i) employ a trauma-informed approach to domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking; and
       ``(ii) focus on the fundamentals of--

       ``(I) trauma responses; and
       ``(II) the impact of trauma on victims of domestic 
     violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.

       ``(B) Selection.--An eligible entity that receives a grant 
     under this section shall select one or more of the approaches 
     employed by a training identified under subparagraph (A) to 
     test within the demonstration site of the eligible entity.
       ``(2) Consultation.--In carrying out paragraph (1), the 
     Attorney General shall consult with the Director of the 
     Office for Victims of Crime in order to seek input from and 
     cultivate consensus among outside practitioners and other 
     stakeholders through facilitated discussions and focus groups 
     on best practices in the field of trauma-informed care for 
     victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
     assault, and stalking.
       ``(e) Evaluation.--The Attorney General, in consultation 
     with the Director of the National Institute of Justice, shall 
     require each eligible entity that receives a grant under this 
     section to identify a research partner, preferably a local 
     research partner, to--
       ``(1) design a system for generating and collecting the 
     appropriate data to facilitate an independent process or 
     impact evaluation of the use of the grant funds;
       ``(2) periodically conduct an evaluation described in 
     paragraph (1); and
       ``(3) periodically make publicly available, during the 
     grant period--
       ``(A) preliminary results of the evaluations conducted 
     under paragraph (2); and
       ``(B) recommendations for improving the use of the grant 
     funds.
       ``(f) Authorization of Appropriations.--The Attorney 
     General shall carry out this section using amounts otherwise 
     available to the Attorney General.
       ``(g) Rule of Construction.--Nothing in this section shall 
     be construed to interfere with the due process rights of any 
     individual.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from Minnesota (Mr. Emmer) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Minnesota.
  Mr. EMMER. Madam Chair, as we consider the Violence Against Women 
Act, or VAWA, reauthorization, I offer an amendment to allow for a 
demonstration program that will issue grants to promote trauma-informed 
training for law enforcement and other personnel.
  The amendment is substantially similar to the Abby Honold Act, which 
has been led by bipartisan Minnesota Members of Congress. The amendment 
does not authorize new appropriations, but merely enables existing 
funds to be used for training that ultimately could save lives and help 
find the perpetrators of an assault.
  The amendment aims to help victims of sexual crimes, in addition to 
those who have experienced other forms of trauma, by improving the care 
and treatment they receive after the event.
  Specifically, the amendment will create a voluntary grant program to 
train law enforcement agencies in evidence-based, trauma-informed 
interview techniques to prevent retraumatization of victims, improve 
communication between victims and law enforcement, and ensure accurate 
and complete information is submitted to law enforcement.
  The amendment and bill is in honor of Abby Honold, who attended the 
University of Minnesota. Abby was the victim of rape, but I know her as 
one of the bravest people I have ever met for being able to publicly 
share her story and fight for changes to the law that will help 
countless Americans.
  During traumatic events, parts of the brain shut down and block 
shocking experiences, shielding the victim, but affecting recollection. 
When searching for evidence of criminal behavior, many interview 
techniques are not developed to comfort the victim and effectively 
access these memories. Information collected in the normal manner may 
inhibit memory recall and accuracy of events and details. This often 
leads to suspicion of the victim.
  Thankfully, Abby was treated by a nurse who had been trained to 
provide trauma-informed techniques that allowed the nurse to ask 
sensitive questions in a respectful way that enabled an accurate 
recount of events. Nurse Walther, who interviewed Abby, made her feel 
comfortable, and by using the trauma-informed techniques, avoided 
retraumatization.
  The difference that we can make for victims by providing training for 
these techniques will ensure that recovery and healing can occur for 
victims of these traumatic instances.
  Abby also encountered Officer Kevin Randolph, who went above and 
beyond to help her win her case against her perpetrator because he 
understood how these techniques lead to more accurate information and 
ensured prosecution.
  In Minnesota alone, 2,000 women report being raped or sexually 
assaulted every year. Abby's Act will help law enforcement investigate 
sexual assault cases and improve care and treatment for victims.
  The amendment establishes a pilot program to train law enforcement, 
first responders, university officials, or any

[[Page H3041]]

other personnel who interface with victims of sexual violence in 
trauma-informed techniques focused on preventing retraumatization of 
the victim, improving communication and rapport between victims and law 
enforcement, as well as collaboration between the different entities 
that assist a victim of sexual violence.
  Sexual assault is a crime, and it is vital for law enforcement to 
have accurate and complete information to prosecute it. For Abby and 
for the thousands of victims who experience trauma, this is a key part 
of their recovery process, as is a compassionate response in the 
immediate aftermath of an event.
  This pilot program would be an important step forward to provide 
better treatment to sexual assault victims in crisis and to make 
certain it is treated like the serious crime that it is.
  I am disappointed that the bill before us today will be a partisan 
vote and Republicans on the Judiciary Committee were excluded from the 
process, but I offer this bipartisan amendment as a demonstration that 
we can still work together.
  I also hope the Senate considers this body's overwhelming support for 
the Abby Honold Act as it contemplates VAWA reauthorization.
  Abby has been a strong advocate for the use of trauma-informed care 
by law enforcement, and I have been fortunate to work with her and our 
law enforcement community on this important legislation.
  A good first step to holding those accountable is ensuring law 
enforcement has the tools and resources needed to investigate these 
crimes.
  This bill is just one step towards solving a clear problem across our 
country.
  Victims of sexual assault deserve the best possible care and the most 
compassionate response following their trauma, and we can provide it 
now. We must all work together to ensure these crimes are treated as 
the heinous acts they are, with the hope that one day they cease 
altogether.
  The Acting CHAIR. The time of the gentleman from Minnesota has 
expired.
  Ms. JAYAPAL. Madam Chair, I claim the time in opposition to the 
amendment, even though I am not opposed to it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentlewoman from Washington 
is recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Ms. JAYAPAL. Madam Chair, I am very proud to cosponsor this 
bipartisan amendment with my colleague from Minnesota to provide access 
to training on trauma-informed techniques for law enforcement and other 
agencies that respond to survivors of domestic violence and sexual 
assault.
  Unfortunately, as you well know, despite our best efforts, rape and 
sexual assault continue to be underreported, and the statistic tells us 
that, out of every 1,000 rapes, 995 perpetrators will walk free.

  One thing we can do to address this is to make sure that 
investigators have training on trauma-informed techniques to work with 
the survivors of sexual violence so that investigators don't further 
harm survivors. This is not just in the best interest of the survivor, 
but it is also to make sure that law enforcement can hold perpetrators 
accountable.
  I am particularly moved by the courage and the determination of Abby 
Honold, the namesake of this amendment, and many, many women across my 
State and across the country who have suffered the same situation as 
she has.
  Ms. Honold endured a brutal attack, and then she did something truly 
courageous. And let me just say, Madam Chair, that it is courageous to 
continue to submit yourself to investigation after a brutal assault. 
She took action to call attention to the importance of the trauma-
informed services she received that helped her to pursue justice, and 
today, her work has resulted in this amendment to ensure that others 
will be able to provide the same kind of assistance that she received.
  So as we recognize Sexual Assault Awareness Month, I hope that my 
colleagues will support this amendment to the reauthorization of the 
Violence Against Women Act, traditionally a bipartisan act in this 
Chamber.
  When Congress passed VAWA 25 years ago, it was a landmark achievement 
that sent a very clear message to people living in abusive or violent 
situations that we saw them, that we would stand with them. With each 
reauthorization, we continue to expand critical protections and make 
improvements like this amendment to better serve survivors.
  Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from Minnesota (Ms. 
Omar), my colleague on this side of the aisle.
  Ms. OMAR. Madam Chair, I rise today in support of this amendment.
  This amendment to the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act 
includes language of a bill that I am proud to be an original cosponsor 
of called the Abby Honold Act.
  Abby is a constituent of mine, a former student at the University of 
Minnesota. A survivor of sexual assault, she has been a fierce champion 
of this initiative and was the driving force behind this legislation 
that bears her name.
  I want to make sure that my colleagues support this amendment on 
behalf of the thousands of victims who experience trauma. This is a key 
part of their recovery process and a crucial response to the immediate 
aftermath.
  Ms. JAYAPAL. Madam Chair, we look forward to everyone supporting this 
amendment. We hope that we continue to operate in a bipartisan fashion 
in this Chamber to pass not only this amendment, but the full 
reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Minnesota (Mr. Emmer).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 15 Offered by Mr. Quigley

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 15 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. QUIGLEY. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 171, insert after line 2, the following (and conform 
     the table of contents accordingly):

     SEC. 1408. REVIEW ON LINK BETWEEN SUBSTANCE USE AND VICTIMS 
                   OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL 
                   ASSAULT, OR STALKING.

       Not later than 24 months after the date of enactment of 
     this Act, the Secretary of the Department of Health and Human 
     Services shall complete a review and submit a report to 
     Congress on whether being a victim of domestic violence, 
     dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking increases the 
     likelihood of having a substance use disorder.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from Illinois (Mr. Quigley) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Illinois.
  Mr. QUIGLEY. Madam Chair, I yield myself as much time as I may 
consume.
  Madam Chair, I rise today to offer this straightforward, commonsense 
amendment that does not affect direct spending or revenues.
  My amendment requires the Secretary of HHS to complete a review of 
the relationship between survival of domestic violence, dating 
violence, sexual assault, or stalking and the likelihood of developing 
a substance use disorder.
  This information is vital because we know traumatic experiences such 
as domestic violence are associated with behavioral health conditions; 
we know that behavioral health conditions are associated with substance 
use disorders; and we know that substance use is linked to traumatic 
experiences. What we don't know is if survivors of domestic violence 
have an increased likelihood of developing a substance use disorder. 
Although the evidence exists, we have yet to conduct a comprehensive 
review of the data to make the connection.
  It is important to understand the nature and impact of trauma to 
effectively serve those who have suffered. If the review indicates a 
connection, it would help providers prevent domestic violence survivors 
from developing a substance use disorder and enable survivors to access 
preventative and more comprehensive services.
  This review will also give a better understanding of the broader 
impacts

[[Page H3042]]

and effects of trauma on survivors. Social stigma silences both 
domestic violence survivors and those suffering from substance use 
disorders. We cannot allow survivors to be silenced any longer.
  To reduce stigma, we must talk about these issues, better educate 
ourselves on the struggles of those living with them, and let survivors 
know they are not alone. By acknowledging that there might be a 
connection between domestic violence survival and substance use 
disorders, we can begin the conversation and let victims know that we 
are willing and able to support them through their recovery.
  Congress has a responsibility to victims and survivors. This 
amendment and, more broadly, this bill is one step toward fulfilling 
that responsibility.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I claim the time in opposition 
to the amendment, even though I am not opposed to it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I yield 3 minutes to the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Fitzpatrick).
  Mr. FITZPATRICK. Madam Chair, I rise today in strong support of 
legislation introduced by myself and Representative Karen Bass to 
reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act.
  VAWA programs have provided educational tools and helped survivors 
and their families get the resources they need to protect themselves 
and to begin the healing process. This should not be a partisan issue.

                              {time}  1645

  I would like to thank Congresswoman Bass for her leadership. She is a 
valued partner in this fight, and I am grateful that we can make this 
bill bipartisan.
  Across our country, Madam Chair, millions of women and children have 
been saved by the programs funded through VAWA. Shelters, counseling, 
training, and law enforcement are all key parts of a national strategy 
to end domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence, and 
stalking.
  In the district I represent, in Bucks and Montgomery Counties, in 
Pennsylvania, and in all of our districts, VAWA programs are saving 
lives.
  A Woman's Place in Bucks County, Pennsylvania, relies on VAWA funding 
to save lives. Unlike some larger women's organizations, their 
emergency housing only has room for seven families. Nonetheless, their 
shelter saved 150 women and children who were in imminent danger, often 
fleeing for their lives.
  Another Bucks County organization, Network of Victim Assistance, or 
NOVA, has helped more than 3,600 victims of sexual assault, human 
trafficking, stalking, and other serious crimes. NOVA's work to expand 
prevention programs, which is essential to preventing violence, is 
supported by VAWA.
  This bill also includes my Combat Online Predators Act, which will 
increase penalties for cyberstalking against children. My constituent, 
Madison Zezzo, was cyberstalked by a then 51-year-old predator, who was 
only sentenced to probation and counseling. Three years later, he made 
contact with Madison again and created a web of social media accounts 
to cyberstalk her. He was later sentenced to between 18 months and 7 
years in prison.
  From domestic violence and sexual assault to cyberstalking, we must 
do more to prevent violence and, when it does happen, to support 
victims and bring perpetrators to justice.
  Madam Chair, the Violence Against Women Act will help us do all these 
things. I urge my colleagues, both Democrat and Republican alike, to 
support this legislation, which will save lives in all of our 
communities.
  Mr. QUIGLEY. Madam Chair, I yield the balance of my time to the 
gentlewoman from Oklahoma (Ms. Kendra S. Horn), an extraordinary 
advocate on this issue.
  Ms. KENDRA S. HORN of Oklahoma. Madam Chair, I thank the gentleman 
from Illinois for yielding time to me to speak on this important topic.
  Madam Chair, I rise in support of this amendment today which directs 
the Secretary of Health and Human Services to study the relationship 
between domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking 
experience and the likelihood of developing a substance use disorder.
  This information is critical. If we are going to make smart policy, 
we must take an evidence-based approach. We must understand the nature 
and impact of trauma to best serve those who have suffered.
  We know traumatic experiences, such as domestic violence, are 
associated with behavioral conditions, including substance abuse; and 
we know that these behavioral health conditions are also associated 
with collective trauma. The full impact of trauma is only now beginning 
to be understood as tools such as the Adverse Childhood Experiences 
Score, or ACES, begin to inform this.
  As the gentleman from Illinois mentioned, broadening our 
understanding will weaken stigma. Far too often, social stigma silences 
both domestic violence survivors and those suffering from substance use 
disorders. We must empower them, not further traumatize them.
  To reduce this stigma, we have to continue to talk about these 
issues, educate ourselves about these issues, and support those who are 
struggling with them. This amendment and, more broadly, this bill is an 
important step towards fulfilling that responsibility.
  Reauthorizing the Violence Against Women Act reaffirms and expands 
protections for women everywhere. It improves services available to 
survivors, empowers local law enforcement to protect their communities, 
prevents stalkers and abusers from obtaining firearms, and strengthens 
protections against discrimination in housing and the workplace--
because everyone, everywhere deserves a life free from abuse.
  Madam Chair, I urge my colleagues to support this amendment, so we 
can better protect and treat those who have experienced unspeakable 
suffering, and to support the reauthorization of the Violence Against 
Women Act.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. QUIGLEY. Madam Chair, I ask support for the amendment, and I 
yield back the balance of my time.

  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Quigley).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                  Amendment No. 16 Offered by Ms. Meng

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 16 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. MENG. Madam Chair, as the designee of the gentlewoman from New 
Hampshire (Ms. Kuster), I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 171, insert after line 2 the following (and conform 
     the table of contents accordingly):

     SEC. 1408. INTERAGENCY WORKING GROUP TO STUDY FEDERAL EFFORTS 
                   TO COLLECT DATA ON SEXUAL VIOLENCE.

       (a) Establishment.--Not later than 180 days after the date 
     of the enactment of this Act, the Attorney General shall 
     establish an interagency working group (in this section 
     referred to as the ``Working Group'') to study Federal 
     efforts to collect data on sexual violence and to make 
     recommendations on the harmonization of such efforts.
       (b) Composition.--The Working Group shall be comprised of 
     at least one representative from the following agencies, who 
     shall be selected by the head of that agency:
       (1) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.
       (2) The Department of Education.
       (3) The Department of Health and Human Services.
       (4) The Department of Justice.
       (c) Duties.--The Working Group shall consider the 
     following:
       (1) What activity constitutes different acts of sexual 
     violence.
       (2) Whether reports that use the same terms for acts of 
     sexual violence are collecting the same data on these acts.
       (3) Whether the context which led to an act of sexual 
     violence should impact how that act is accounted for in 
     reports.
       (4) Whether the data collected is presented in a way that 
     allows the general public to understand what acts of sexual 
     violence are included in each measurement.
       (5) Steps that agencies that compile reports relating to 
     sexual violence can take to avoid double counting incidents 
     of sexual violence.

[[Page H3043]]

       (d) Report Required.--Not later than 2 years after the date 
     of the enactment of this Act, the Working Group shall publish 
     and submit to Congress a report on the following:
       (1) The activities of the Working Group.
       (2) Recommendations to harmonize Federal efforts to collect 
     data on sexual violence.
       (3) Actions Federal agencies can take to implement the 
     recommendations described in paragraph (2).
       (4) Recommendations for congressional action to implement 
     the recommendations described in paragraph (2).
       (e) Termination.--The Working Group shall terminate 30 days 
     after the date on which the report is submitted pursuant to 
     subsection (d).
       (f) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Harmonize.--The term ``harmonize'' includes efforts to 
     coordinate sexual violence data collection to produce 
     complementary information, as appropriate, without 
     compromising programmatic needs.
       (2) Sexual violence.--The term ``sexual violence'' includes 
     an unwanted sexual act (including both contact and non-
     contact) about which the Federal Government collects 
     information.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from New York (Ms. Meng) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from New York.
  Ms. MENG. Madam Chair, I rise today in strong support of 
Congresswoman Kuster's bipartisan amendment that calls on key Federal 
agencies to harmonize their sexual violence surveys and reporting 
systems.
  This amendment was inspired by a Government Accountability Office 
study that found Federal agencies engaged in collecting data on sexual 
violence are using different terminology for the same types of sex 
crimes, and these crimes are being categorized in dissimilar ways.
  As one example, an act some Federal surveys identified as rape is 
considered ``nonconsensual sex acts'' or ``sexual coercion'' in others.
  For another survey, attempted nonconsensual sex acts are not 
specifically included in the definition of ``nonconsensual sex acts'' 
in the survey, even though they are counted in overarching measurement 
of this behavior.
  These surveys and reporting systems are important, but their 
ambiguities and inconsistencies are very problematic and need to be 
corrected.
  Ms. Kuster's amendment requires four Federal agencies that conduct 
eight critical sexual violence surveys to form a working group to help 
improve coordination and develop clearer sexual violence terminology 
and categorization. This working group will then complete a report 
identifying the internal steps and congressional action that can be 
taken to address this issue.
  I know Ms. Kuster is proud that this amendment is bipartisan, and she 
has asked me to extend her thanks to our colleagues, Representatives 
Turner, Speier, Morelle, and Raskin, for joining her to introduce it 
for consideration within this landmark legislation to reauthorize the 
Violence Against Women Act.
  Additionally, she is grateful to House Judiciary Committee leadership 
for their support, and to Senators McCaskill and Johnson for 
shepherding a similar bill through the Senate last year.
  Madam Chair, we know the #MeToo movement continues to shed a light on 
the disturbing prevalence of sexual violence in our country. For 
survivors, it has been a powerful and moving reminder that they are not 
alone. For all of us, it has been a wake-up call that the status quo is 
unacceptable and will not be tolerated anymore.
  In order to fully understand the scope of the challenge we face, we 
need reliable, transparent data. The Federal Government has a critical 
role to play to that end. We have tremendous confidence that better 
communication amongst these agencies, coupled with thoughtfully 
harmonized terminology and categorization, will yield more accurate 
data. Armed with that knowledge, we can better prevent and end the 
scourge of sexual violence.
  Madam Chair, I urge support of Ms. Kuster's amendment, and I reserve 
the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I claim the time in opposition, 
although I am not opposed to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Ms. MENG. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from New York (Ms. Meng).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings 
will now resume on those amendments printed in part B of House Report 
116-32 on which further proceedings were postponed, in the following 
order:
  Amendment No. 1 by Mr. Jeffries of New York.
  Amendment No. 2 by Ms. Scanlon of Pennsylvania.
  Amendment No. 7 by Ms. Waters of California.
  Amendment No. 10 by Mrs. Wagner of Missouri.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the minimum time for any 
electronic vote after the first vote in this series.


                Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Jeffries

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on amendment No. 1 offered by the gentleman from New York 
(Mr. Jeffries) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 363, 
noes 67, not voting 7, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 147]

                               AYES--363

     Adams
     Aderholt
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Axne
     Bacon
     Balderson
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Bergman
     Beyer
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Bost
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady
     Brindisi
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Carter (GA)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davids (KS)
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Davis, Rodney
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duffy
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fletcher
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx (NC)
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Fulcher
     Gabbard
     Gallagher
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gottheimer
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TX)
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Haaland
     Hagedorn
     Harder (CA)
     Hartzler
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins (LA)
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (AR)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Hollingsworth
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Huizenga
     Hurd (TX)
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (TX)
     Joyce (OH)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamb
     Lamborn
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latta
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Mast
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Mullin
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Newhouse
     Norcross
     Norton
     Nunes
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Olson
     Omar
     Pallone

[[Page H3044]]


     Palmer
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Plaskett
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (NY)
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Rouzer
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Smucker
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Spano
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Stevens
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Taylor
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Turner
     Underwood
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watkins
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Wexton
     Wild
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth
     Young

                                NOES--67

     Abraham
     Allen
     Amash
     Babin
     Baird
     Banks
     Barr
     Biggs
     Bishop (UT)
     Brooks (AL)
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     DesJarlais
     Duncan
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Gaetz
     Gohmert
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Green (TN)
     Grothman
     Harris
     Hern, Kevin
     Hice (GA)
     Hunter
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (PA)
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Lesko
     Loudermilk
     Massie
     McClintock
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mooney (WV)
     Norman
     Palazzo
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Rose, John W.
     Roy
     Scalise
     Scott, Austin
     Steube
     Walker
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wright
     Yoho
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--7

     Holding
     McEachin
     Payne
     Radewagen
     Rooney (FL)
     Rutherford
     Ryan

                              {time}  1723

  Mr. GOODEN, Mrs. MILLER, Messrs. GAETZ, JOHNSON of South Dakota, 
CLINE, BUDD, JOHN W. ROSE of Tennessee, GROTHMAN, ABRAHAM, and 
LOUDERMILK changed their vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  Messrs. PALMER, REED, TIPTON, HIGGINS of Louisiana, MAST, and McHENRY 
changed their vote from ``no'' to ``aye.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  Stated for:
  Mr. HOLDING. Madam Chair, I was inadvertently detained during roll 
call No. 147. Had I been present, I would have voted ``yea'' on 
rollcall No. 147.


                 Amendment No. 2 Offered by Ms. Scanlon

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
Pennsylvania (Ms. Scanlon) on which further proceedings were postponed 
and on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 394, 
noes 36, not voting 7, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 148]

                               AYES--394

     Abraham
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Aguilar
     Allen
     Allred
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Axne
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Barr
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Bergman
     Beyer
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Bost
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady
     Brindisi
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cloud
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davids (KS)
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Davis, Rodney
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duffy
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Estes
     Evans
     Ferguson
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fletcher
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx (NC)
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Fulcher
     Gabbard
     Gallagher
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Gianforte
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gottheimer
     Granger
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TX)
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Haaland
     Hagedorn
     Harder (CA)
     Hartzler
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (AR)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Huizenga
     Hurd (TX)
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Johnson (TX)
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamb
     Lamborn
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latta
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meeks
     Meng
     Meuser
     Miller
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Mullin
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Newhouse
     Norcross
     Norman
     Norton
     Nunes
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Olson
     Omar
     Pallone
     Palmer
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Plaskett
     Pocan
     Porter
     Posey
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (NY)
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose (NY)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouda
     Rouzer
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Smucker
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Spano
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Stevens
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Taylor
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Turner
     Underwood
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watkins
     Watson Coleman
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Wexton
     Wild
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Yarmuth

                                NOES--36

     Amash
     Babin
     Banks
     Biggs
     Brooks (AL)
     Buck
     Cline
     Duncan
     Gaetz
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Golden
     Gosar
     Graves (GA)
     Green (TN)
     Harris
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hunter
     Jordan
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Lesko
     Massie
     Mast
     McClintock
     Mitchell
     Palazzo
     Ratcliffe
     Roy
     Steube
     Weber (TX)
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--7

     Bishop (UT)
     McEachin
     Payne
     Radewagen
     Rooney (FL)
     Rutherford
     Ryan


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1729

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 7 Offered by Ms. Waters

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from 
California (Ms. Waters) on which further proceedings

[[Page H3045]]

were postponed and on which the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 258, 
noes 173, not voting 6, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 149]

                               AYES--258

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Bacon
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Collins (NY)
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Davis, Rodney
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Gabbard
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Gianforte
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Green (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hurd (TX)
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Joyce (OH)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Mullin
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     Norton
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Plaskett
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Reed
     Rice (NY)
     Richmond
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Stevens
     Stivers
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Turner
     Underwood
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walden
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--173

     Abraham
     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bergman
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (UT)
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (PA)
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Olson
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Steube
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Walberg
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--6

     McEachin
     Payne
     Radewagen
     Rooney (FL)
     Rutherford
     Ryan


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1735

  Mr. CARTER of Georgia changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 10 Offered by Mrs. Wagner

  The Acting CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a 
recorded vote on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Missouri 
(Mrs. Wagner) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The Acting CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The Acting CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 429, 
noes 0, not voting 8, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 150]

                               AYES--429

     Abraham
     Adams
     Aderholt
     Aguilar
     Allen
     Allred
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Axne
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Barragan
     Bass
     Beatty
     Bera
     Bergman
     Beyer
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Bishop (UT)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Bost
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady
     Brindisi
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carbajal
     Cardenas
     Carson (IN)
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cline
     Cloud
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cummings
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davids (KS)
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Davis, Rodney
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Emmer
     Engel
     Escobar
     Eshoo
     Espaillat
     Estes
     Evans
     Ferguson
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fletcher
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx (NC)
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Fulcher
     Gabbard
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Gottheimer
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Green (TX)
     Griffith
     Grijalva
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Haaland
     Hagedorn
     Harder (CA)
     Harris
     Hartzler
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (AR)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Johnson (TX)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Keating
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Kustoff (TN)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamb
     Lamborn
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Latta
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Lesko
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted

[[Page H3046]]


     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Marshall
     Massie
     Mast
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McCollum
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meeks
     Meng
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Mullin
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Newhouse
     Norcross
     Norman
     Norton
     Nunes
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Olson
     Omar
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Palmer
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Plaskett
     Pocan
     Porter
     Posey
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (NY)
     Rice (SC)
     Richmond
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose (NY)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouda
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sablan
     San Nicolas
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Schweikert
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Smucker
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Spano
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stevens
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Suozzi
     Swalwell (CA)
     Takano
     Taylor
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Turner
     Underwood
     Upton
     Van Drew
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walker
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watkins
     Watson Coleman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Wenstrup
     Westerman
     Wexton
     Wild
     Williams
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yarmuth
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--8

     Courtney
     Larson (CT)
     McEachin
     Payne
     Radewagen
     Rooney (FL)
     Rutherford
     Ryan


                    Announcement by the Acting Chair

  The Acting CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1743

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                  Amendment No. 17 Offered by Ms. Meng

  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Malinowski). It is now in order to consider 
amendment No. 17 printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. MENG. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 145, line 19, insert after ``parent'' the following: 
     ``, and such classes shall be made available to prisoners 
     with limited English proficiency in compliance with Title VI 
     of the Civil Rights Act of 1964''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from New York (Ms. Meng) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from New York.
  Ms. MENG. Mr. Chair, my amendment would ensure that incarcerated, 
pregnant prisoners who are primary caretaker parents and who have 
limited English proficiency will have access to parenting classes.
  Mr. Chair, we know that at the end of 2016 there were over 111,000 
women in prisons across our country. That is a nearly 750 percent 
increase from 1980. Women are the fastest growing population of 
incarcerated individuals in our country.
  Our Nation has 4 percent of the world's female population, but 30 
percent of its female incarcerated population.
  We also know that women of color are significantly overrepresented in 
our criminal justice system. In fact, two-thirds of women in jail are 
women of color.
  Additionally, a recent study published just 2 weeks ago in the 
American Journal of Public Health found that, during their 1-year study 
of rates of pregnancy and outcomes among women in prison in 22 States 
and the Federal system, almost 1,400 pregnant women were admitted to 
prison.
  Given the intersection of these data points, my amendment ensures 
that parenting classes be accessible to those incarcerated women with 
limited English proficiency.
  The Bureau of Prisons already provides certain parenting classes for 
pregnant incarcerated individuals. They include the Mother and Infants 
Nursing Together, MINT, program; and the Residential Parenting Program.
  The MINT program teaches parenting skills to facilitate mother-child 
bonding and provides the tools to help build a stable home environment 
upon release.
  The Residential Parenting Program at the Washington State Department 
of Corrections allows Bureau of Prison incarcerated women and their 
infants to participate in the program.
  Studies show that these programs are significant for incarcerated 
females and their families, as they can play important roles in 
successful reentry into society.
  Under my amendment, all pregnant incarcerated women or incarcerated 
moms will be able to better provide for their children no matter what 
language they speak.
  The BOP's incarcerated female population is incredibly diverse, with 
many ethnicities and many foreign countries represented, but no one 
should be denied the chance to be the best parent they can be simply 
because they are non-English speaking.
  Mr. Chair, I thank my good friend Congresswoman Karen Bass as well as 
Congressman Fitzpatrick for their leadership in shepherding this 
landmark legislation.
  The 2019 reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act responds 
to our Nation's crisis of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual 
assault, and stalking.
  Mr. Chair, I urge support for my amendment, and I reserve the balance 
of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I rise in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I am not necessarily opposed to 
the goal of the amendment. In fact, I understand the amendment. I 
appreciate the gentlewoman bringing it.
  I have supported similar programs in the FIRST STEP Act. The thing 
here is that this amendment is not necessary because, in the underlying 
bill, it already provides for parenting classes and resources.
  I appreciate the gentlewoman bringing it. I don't necessarily have a 
problem with it, except it is already there. So, offering this 
amendment is fine, but I just, at this point, would just say it is 
already there.
  I have supported similar programs before. I appreciate the 
gentlewoman's concern in this, and we would agree on that.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. MENG. Mr. Chairman, we just want to make sure that no one is 
denied the chance to bond with their newborn or child simply because 
they don't speak the language.
  This amendment ensures compliance with title VI of the Civil Rights 
Act of 1964, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, 
color, and national origin in programs and activities receiving Federal 
financial assistance.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, again, understanding the 
concerns, all this is already, frankly, covered. It is covered in the 
underlying bill, but it is also covered in other programs.
  In going through some of these--and I know we have got a couple 
more--in some of these amendments, anything that takes funding away 
that would go from regular programs would be of concern, but I am happy 
to work with my colleagues to address these issues in other areas. I 
just don't think VAWA, probably, is the best way, but I appreciate the 
gentlewoman's concern.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from New York (Ms. Meng).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                  Amendment No. 18 Offered by Ms. Meng

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 18 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.

[[Page H3047]]

  

  Ms. MENG. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 153, line 25, strike ``and'' at the end.
       Page 153, after line 25, insert the following (and 
     redesignate other provisions accordingly):
       (F) develop tools to communicate parenting program 
     availability and eligibility criteria to each employee of the 
     Bureau of Prisons and each pregnant inmate to ensure that 
     each pregnant inmate in the custody of a Bureau of Prisons 
     facility understands the resources available to such inmate; 
     and

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from New York (Ms. Meng) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from New York.
  Ms. MENG. Mr. Chair, this amendment would ensure that our Federal 
prison develops tools to communicate parenting program availability and 
eligibility criteria to each employee of the Bureau of Prisons and each 
pregnant incarcerated woman so that each of these women in the custody 
of a Bureau of Prisons facility understands the resources available to 
them.
  Mr. Chair, we know that women are the fastest growing population in 
the criminal justice system. Only 5 percent of the world's female 
population lives in the U.S., but they account for nearly 30 percent of 
the world's incarcerated women. That is an injustice to not only those 
incarcerated but to their families, our economy, and our society as a 
whole.
  According to Prison Policy Initiative, 80 percent of the women who 
will go to jail this year are moms, including nearly 150,000 women who 
are pregnant when they are admitted, and many of these women are the 
primary caretaker of their family.
  This means that the impact of their incarceration reaches far beyond 
the prison system. As we incarcerate women, we are also incarcerating 
their families.
  Currently, the BOP does offer some programs to women who are moms or 
soon-to-be mothers. Mothers and Infants Nursing Together, otherwise 
known as MINT, is offered to moms who are pregnant at the time of 
commitment. Participating mothers can enroll in pre- and postnatal 
classes on childbirth, parenting, and coping skills. This program 
offers the chance for mothers to acquire parenting skills and bond with 
their infant after birth.
  The Residential Parenting Program offered by the Washington State 
Department of Corrections' Residential Parenting Program gives its 
participants and their infants the opportunity to reside in the minimum 
security unit for up to 30 months after birth.
  Mr. Chair, these programs are important resources to pregnant mothers 
and parents who are incarcerated. In fact, participants of the MINT 
program have reported that the program has helped them learn important 
parenting skills and develop a bond with their infants.
  However, the September 2018 Department of Justice's OIG review of the 
Federal Bureau of Prisons' management of its female inmate population 
found that BOP's pregnancy programs were underutilized.
  Between fiscal years 2012 and 2016, there were 951 pregnant 
incarcerated women in BOP's custody, 558 of whom were in institutions 
designed to house sentenced inmates. Of these 558 sentenced pregnant 
inmates, they estimate that only 204 participated in MINT or the 
Residential Parenting Program. That is, only 37 percent were in these 
parenting and pregnancy programs.
  The reasons were varied. Incarcerated mothers who may be eligible for 
the programs are often not identified as being eligible. While social 
workers are responsible for informing inmates of these opportunities, 
social worker positions often remain vacant.
  Many staff did not fully understand the eligibility criteria for the 
Mothers and Infants Nursing Together program, and, even more 
surprising, some staff were entirely unaware of these programs' 
existence.
  These are valuable programs that need to be reaching more people. 
This amendment directs the Bureau of Prisons to develop tools to better 
communicate the availability of these programs and their eligibility 
criteria to inmates. With these improvements, incarcerated individuals 
will be empowered to better utilize the resources made available to 
them.
  Mr. Chair, I urge support for the amendment, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.

                              {time}  1800

  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I claim the time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, again, I have been on this side, 
and I would love to see more cooperation, especially since this is one 
of the areas I do believe, Mr. Chair, we can actually have agreement 
on. The chairman and I have talked about this a great deal, and others, 
members of our Judiciary Committee.
  The FIRST STEP Act, criminal justice reform is something that I have 
been working on for many years. I think the issue of women 
incarceration is definitely something that needs to be looked at.
  Again, my concern with this program is the diversion of dollars that 
go through these programs to programs that already exist, and I am not 
sure how we are prioritizing these anymore. Even the numbers given were 
based over a number-of-years period, not a single-year period.
  When we were doing the FIRST STEP Act and doing some of the 
incarceration numbers, these numbers were a lot lower in the Federal 
prison of those actually pregnant at the time.
  So again, I don't, by any means, demean or try to talk badly about an 
amendment in the sense that it is not intended well. I think the 
problem is the underlying issues are already there. The underlying 
stuff is there. I appreciate her bringing that out. We just disagree 
that this would be the place to do this.
  There are other places we could work on this, and I think criminal 
justice reform is a great place to put this. I do commend the 
gentlewoman for bringing it.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. MENG. Mr. Chair, I appreciate the gentleman's comments.
  Again, only 37 percent of pregnant inmates utilize these programs. I 
think that it is very common sense to make sure that more people are 
aware of these programs, both staff employees and those who are 
incarcerated.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from New York.
  The amendment was agreed to.


                  Amendment No. 19 Offered by Ms. Meng

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 19 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. MENG. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 145, line 21, insert after ``training'' the following: 
     ``, including cultural competency training,''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from New York (Ms. Meng) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from New York.
  Ms. MENG. Mr. Chair, my amendment would ensure that cultural 
competency training is included in trauma screening trainings provided 
to correctional officers and each Bureau of Prisons employee, including 
instructors and healthcare professionals.
  Estimates suggest that as many as 90 percent of incarcerated women 
have experienced some sort of trauma such as interpersonal or sexual 
violence in their lives. Female inmates are more likely to have been 
the victims of direct violence, repeated sexual violence, and intimate 
partner violence. We also know that trauma is experienced in different 
ways, depending on the individual's gender identity, culture, and past 
experiences.
  The BOP's incarcerated female population is incredibly diverse, with 
many ethnicities, approximately 30 religions, and women from all 50 
States and many foreign countries represented.

[[Page H3048]]

  Studies show that trauma treatment programs should be administered 
and facilitated during the first 12 months of the incarcerated 
individual's sentence so as to maximize the benefits of these programs.
  Research also shows that the effects of trauma manifest themselves 
differently for incarcerated women and men. This manifestation is 
further compounded by the individual's cultural background.
  Incarcerated individuals with limited English proficiency have unique 
challenges in interaction with correctional officers. This is also true 
for LGBT incarcerated individuals who have experienced injustice and 
violence in very specific ways.
  In order to address the past trauma of inmates, the BOP has tried to 
adopt a ``trauma-informed correctional care approach.'' Under this 
method, the actions of staff are centered on the understanding that 
trauma is real and prevalent, and opportunities to avoid retraumatizing 
inmates are an opportunity for healing.
  This approach also includes several principles which seek to ensure 
the psychological and emotional safety of those incarcerated 
individuals and staff, and use communication methods that avoid 
triggering memories of past trauma.
  And yet testimony from formerly incarcerated women illustrates that 
correction staff in women's facilities still often fail to receive 
trauma-informed and gender-responsive training, let alone culturally 
competent training.
  Correctional officers, healthcare professionals, and other staff 
members must be adequately trained on methods of trauma-informed care 
that address the needs of incarcerated individuals.
  The trauma screenings must equip each BOP employee to be mindful of 
the unique culturally rooted trauma of incarcerated individuals. A 
better understand of these needs allows correctional officers and 
instructors to provide the most effective care possible. Such training 
would ensure that correctional staff respond to incarcerated 
individuals in productive and impactful ways.
  In other words, these officials will be able to provide trauma-
informed care to those who have limited English proficiency, come from 
diverse backgrounds, or live with disabilities, regardless of gender, 
sexual orientation, or gender identity.
  The dignity of an incarcerated individual must be honored and upheld, 
and ensuring the proper training of employees to interact with them 
would be a significant first step.
  I urge support for the amendment, and I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I claim the time in opposition, 
but I am not necessarily opposed.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. MENG. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from New York (Ms. Meng).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 20 Offered by Ms. Plaskett

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 20 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. PLASKETT. Mr. Chair, I rise in support of my amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 29, strike lines 3 through 7, and insert the 
     following:

     SEC. 201. SEXUAL ASSAULT SERVICES PROGRAM.

       Section 41601 of the Violent Crime Control and Law 
     Enforcement Act of 1994 (34 U.S.C. 12511) is amended--
       (1) in subsection (b)(4), by striking ``0.25 percent'' and 
     inserting ``0.5 percent''; and
       (2) in subsection (f)(1), by striking ``2014 through 2018'' 
     and inserting ``2020 through 2024''.
       Page 79, line 19, strike ``and''.
       Page 79, line 21, strike the period at the end and insert 
     ``; and''.
        Page 79, insert after line 21 the following:
       (C) in paragraph (3)(B), by striking ``0.25 percent'' and 
     inserting ``0.5 percent''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from the Virgin Islands (Ms. Plaskett) and a Member opposed each will 
control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from the Virgin Islands.
  Ms. PLASKETT. Mr. Chair, the Violence Against Women Act is the 
cornerstone of our Nation's response to domestic violence, sexual 
assault, dating violence, and stalking. VAWA's community response model 
helps abuse victims find safety and receive services, while holding 
thousands of perpetrators accountable for their actions.
  I would like to commend Congresswoman Karen Bass, Congresswoman 
Sheila Jackson Lee, and leadership for their commitment to making this 
legislation a priority of this Congress.
  Mr. Chair, the U.S. territories, including my district of the U.S. 
Virgin Islands, along with Puerto Rico, Guam, the Northern Mariana 
Islands, and American Samoa, are eligible for the Violence Against 
Women Act programs under the Departments of Justice and Health and 
Human Services.
  For example, the Sexual Assault Services Formula Grant authorized 
under VAWA provides funding to support rape crisis centers and assist 
individuals who have been sexually assaulted. The Office on Violence 
Against Women awards no less than 1.5 percent of the total amount 
appropriated for the program to each State, the District of Columbia, 
and Puerto Rico. The Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam, and the 
Northern Mariana Islands are awarded a base amount of 1 quarter of 1 
percent of the total appropriation.
  In fiscal years 2017-2018, the smaller territories each received just 
$60,000 in funding under the Sexual Assault Services Formula Program. 
My amendment would double the minimum amount made available to these 
U.S. territories under the program. This funding is sorely needed at 
this time.
  According to mental health professionals in the Virgin Islands, a 
recent increase in domestic violence cases can partially be attributed 
to the residual stress of the disastrous hurricanes of 2017. Even 
before this uptick, however, the territories were massively 
underequipped to shelter and protect the victims of violence, and the 
situation has only worsened since.
  Mr. Chair, my amendment would similarly double the minimum amount 
made available to the small territories for transitional housing 
services, including housing for victims for whom emergency shelter 
services are unavailable or insufficient and to move individuals into 
permanent housing.
  In the Virgin Islands, assistance for emergency and transitional 
housing is crucially important, as the territory has seen housing costs 
skyrocket since the aforementioned disasters. Without this assistance, 
many women have no hope of escaping life-threatening situations.
  There is currently one domestic violence and abuse program on St. 
Thomas offering a hotline and emergency shelter. On the island of St. 
Croix, there is one program which offers a hotline and emergency 
shelter to victims.
  Undeniably, there is a need for more funding to provide additional 
services. This amendment takes a positive step towards addressing the 
additional funding needs to adequately assist and protect women and 
children of the Virgin Islands and other territories who lived through 
the horror of violence this bill seeks to protect them from.
  I would like to acknowledge and thank the Women's Coalition and the 
Virgin Islands Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Council on St. 
Croix and the Family Resource Center on St. Thomas for their passionate 
and continued work to provide services and training on prevention to 
the victims of abuse and their families.
  I would also like to acknowledge and thank my colleague across the 
aisle, Congresswoman Aumua Amata Coleman Radewagen of American Samoa, 
for cosponsoring this amendment to improve services for women and 
children in the U.S. island territories.
  I urge my colleagues to support my amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I claim the time in opposition, 
although I am not opposed.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I yield 3 minutes to the 
gentlewoman

[[Page H3049]]

from Puerto Rico (Miss Gonzalez-Colon).
  Miss GONZALEZ-COLON of Puerto Rico. Mr. Chair, I rise in support of 
the bipartisan amendment presented by my friends Stacey Plaskett and 
Amata Radewagen.
  As my friend just mentioned, the smaller territories are facing a 
challenge in the limited funds they receive to address such a large and 
horrific issue. Federal funds to fight violence against women and 
support survivors cannot be based on the ZIP Code or where you live. I 
do believe that any kind of violence must be addressed, regardless of 
the State or the territory the people are living in, giving the 
survivors the same access to services, intervention, and assistance.
  In the fiscal years 2017 and 2018, these four territories--we are 
talking about the Northern Marianas, Virgin Islands, American Samoa, 
and Guam--received less than $60,000 to aid victims of domestic 
violence; and, simply put, this was not enough.
  I am speaking also on behalf of my friend, Amata Radewagen, for 
American Samoa. And I do say that, as more women step out of the 
shadows to seek the assistance they need, it is our job in the Federal 
Government to be able to provide the tools and resources to the 
organizations and, more importantly, to the victims themselves.
  Congress must rework the formula grant to allow these four 
territories access to additional funds. I encourage all my colleagues 
to support this amendment, and I am supporting the amendment as well.
  Ms. PLASKETT. Mr. Chair, I just want to thank my colleague and my 
good friend--indeed, my sister--from the neighboring island of Puerto 
Rico for her support of this legislation and, as a member of the larger 
island, speaking on behalf of the smaller islands and territories.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from the Virgin Islands (Ms. Plaskett).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                  Amendment No. 21 Offered by Mr. Bera

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 21 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. BERA. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 28, insert after line 24 the following:

     SEC. 108. ENHANCING CULTURALLY SPECIFIC SERVICES FOR VICTIMS 
                   OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, DATING VIOLENCE, SEXUAL 
                   ASSAULT, AND STALKING.

       Section 121(a) of the Violence Against Women and Department 
     of Justice Reauthorization Act of 2005 (34 U.S.C. 20124(a)) 
     is amended by adding at the end the following:
       ``(3) Additional authorization of appropriations.--In 
     addition to the amounts made available under paragraph (1), 
     there are authorized to be appropriated to carry out this 
     section $2,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2020 through 
     2024.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Bera) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. BERA. Mr. Chair, I rise today to offer an amendment to H.R. 1585, 
the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act.
  My amendment is simple. It would increase the authorized funding 
level for grants that support the development of culturally specific 
services for victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and abuse.
  Domestic violence is a devastating reality for many women, and this 
is particularly the case in our AAPI communities. A survey done in 2015 
estimated that 40 to 60 percent of AAPI women experience physical or 
sexual violence by an intimate partner in their lifetime.
  However, the unfortunate stigma of these events within the AAPI 
community means that a lot of these survivors do not seek help 
afterwards or even report these incidents in the first place.

                              {time}  1815

  Yet when I think about my own community, the South Asian community 
and Native American community, we have had some devastating cases.
  You have generational divides here where there is an older generation 
that doesn't allow folks to talk about this. You have arranged 
marriages where a bride may travel thousands of miles and have no 
family resources, have no ability to talk about it.
  We have got to address this issue. We have got to make it okay for 
folks to come out of the shadows.
  That is why, while it is important to expand access to these 
services, it is just as critical that the person can feel comfortable 
seeking out these services. Often, that means they are able to get help 
from someone who looks like them and understands their cultural 
background.
  Providing these resources in a culturally appropriate context can 
help survivors feel supported and heard.
  My amendment would increase the funding for grants that support 
organizations that provide critical services and resources to 
communities of color.
  Lastly, I want to thank my colleague, Congresswoman Karen Bass, for 
her work on this reauthorization. I am pleased that we have the 
opportunity to strengthen these programs.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to support my amendment and support 
the underlying bill, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I rise in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Georgia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, again, I appreciate the 
gentleman's concern.
  My concern is that the underlying bill already addresses this with 
sufficient funding. This amendment or anything like it was not offered 
in committee and not brought up in the discussions of this.
  I don't doubt the sincerity of the need in this, but we do believe 
that the underlying bill would cover it, so for that reason, I would 
oppose it.
  I appreciate the gentleman's concern, and I am sure there are other 
ways that we could work it out, but we do believe the bill itself would 
cover that.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BERA. Mr. Chairman, I am prepared to close.
  My amendment would increase support for communities of color who face 
domestic and sexual violence in our country and allow them to access 
critical support services in a culturally appropriate context.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to support my amendment and the 
underlying bill, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Bera).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 22 Offered by Mr. Gallego

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 22 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. GALLEGO. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 136, insert after line 9 the following (and amend the 
     table of contents accordingly):

     SEC. 905. REPORT ON THE RESPONSE OF LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES 
                   TO REPORTS OF MISSING OR MURDERED INDIANS.

       (a) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Covered database.--The term ``covered database'' 
     means--
       (A) the database of the National Crime Information Center;
       (B) the Combined DNA Index System;
       (C) the Next Generation Identification System; and
       (D) any other database or system of a law enforcement 
     agency under which a report of a missing or murdered Indian 
     may be submitted, including--
       (i) the Violent Criminal Apprehension Program; or
       (ii) the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System.
       (2) Indian.--The term ``Indian'' has the meaning given the 
     term in section 4 of the Indian Self-Determination and 
     Education Assistance Act (25 U.S.C. 5304).
       (3) Indian country.--The term ``Indian country'' has the 
     meaning given the term in section 1151 of title 18, United 
     States Code.
       (4) Law enforcement agency.--The term ``law enforcement 
     agency'' means a Federal, State, local, or Tribal law 
     enforcement agency.

[[Page H3050]]

       (5) Missing or murdered indian.--The term ``missing or 
     murdered Indian'' means any Indian who is--
       (A) reported missing in Indian country or any other 
     location; or
       (B) murdered in Indian country or any other location.
       (6) Notification system.--The term ``notification system'' 
     means--
       (A) the Criminal Justice Information Network;
       (B) the AMBER Alert communications network established 
     under subtitle A of title III of the PROTECT Act (34 U.S.C. 
     20501 et seq.); and
       (C) any other system or public notification system that 
     relates to a report of a missing or murdered Indian, 
     including any State, local, or Tribal notification system.
       (b) Report.--Not later than 1 year after the date of 
     enactment of this section, the Comptroller General of the 
     United States shall submit to the Committee on Indian Affairs 
     of the Senate and the Committee on Natural Resources of the 
     House of Representatives a comprehensive report that 
     includes--
       (1) a review of--
       (A) each law enforcement agency that has jurisdiction over 
     missing or murdered Indians and the basis for that 
     jurisdiction;
       (B) the response procedures, with respect to a report of a 
     missing or murdered Indian, of--
       (i) the Federal Bureau of Investigation;
       (ii) the Bureau of Indian Affairs; and
       (iii) any other Federal law enforcement agency responsible 
     for responding to or investigating a report of a missing or 
     murdered Indian;
       (C) each covered database and notification system;
       (D) Federal interagency cooperation and notification 
     policies and procedures related to missing or murdered 
     Indians;
       (E) the requirements of each Federal law enforcement agency 
     relating to notifying State, local, or Tribal law enforcement 
     agencies after the Federal law enforcement agency receives a 
     report of a missing or murdered Indian; and
       (F) the public notification requirements of law enforcement 
     agencies relating to missing or murdered Indians;
       (2) recommendations and best practices relating to 
     improving cooperation between and response policies of law 
     enforcement agencies relating to missing and murdered 
     Indians; and
       (3) recommendations relating to--
       (A) improving how--
       (i) covered databases address instances of missing or 
     murdered Indians, including by improving access to, 
     integrating, and improving the sharing of information between 
     covered databases; and
       (ii) notification systems address instances of missing or 
     murdered Indians, including by improving access to, 
     integrating, and improving the sharing of information between 
     notification systems;
       (B) social, educational, economic, and any other factor 
     that may contribute to an Indian becoming a missing or 
     murdered Indian; and
       (C) legislation to reduce the likelihood that an Indian may 
     become a missing or murdered Indian.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from Arizona (Mr. Gallego) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Arizona.
  Mr. GALLEGO. Mr. Chair, my amendment to the Violence Against Women 
Act shines a light on a crisis that has been ignored for too long by 
this body: the crisis of missing and murdered indigenous women.
  In Indian Country, American Indians and Alaska Native women 
experience murder rates ten times the national average.
  One study found that there were 5,712 reported cases of missing 
indigenous women in 2016.
  In reality, the numbers are even worse than this, because indigenous 
women are often underrepresented in national and local data.
  Just one example of the thousands of heartbreaking cases of missing 
and murdered women and girls is Ashlynne Mike, an 11-year-old Navajo 
girl.
  In 2016, Ashlynne and her 9-year-old brother, Ian, were tricked into 
accepting a ride home from a stranger while playing after school on the 
Navajo Reservation.
  When Ashlynne and Ian did not return home, her family contacted the 
authorities.
  Ian was eventually found a few hours later wandering on the side of a 
road.
  Friends and family members then mobilized a search party for Ashlynne 
and spread the news of her abduction through texts and social media. 
However, because of the jurisdictional issues, an official AMBER Alert 
wasn't issued until 12 hours after her disappearance.
  According to a study on children abductions by the Washington State 
Attorney General's Office, 76 percent of kidnapped children are killed 
within the first 3 hours.
  Eventually, Ashlynne's body was found by family members near a dirt 
road.
  Indigenous communities are demanding action on this crisis and 
justice for Native women and girls like Ashlynne.
  That is why last month, I was proud to hold the first ever hearing on 
missing and murdered indigenous women in the Subcommittee for 
Indigenous Peoples of the United States.
  That is why today, I am proud to introduce this amendment as a first 
step towards solutions.
  We know the factors exacerbating this crisis are many. They include 
lack of resources, lack of coordination between law enforcement 
agencies, and jurisdictional challenges within our criminal justice 
system.
  My amendment would drill down on the nature and scope of these 
issues, so that we can take direct legislative action to fix them. It 
will give us the tools to give Tribes the resources and support they 
need to combat horrific violence directed at their communities.
  This amendment is identical to the bipartisan Studying the Missing 
and Murdered Indian Crisis Act that I introduced earlier this week and 
that Senator Tester has introduced in the Senate.
  After hearing Ashlynne's story and knowing that there are thousands 
of women and girls who have suffered and died as a result of this 
crisis, I am sure that my colleagues will agree: Silence is not an 
option. Inaction is not an option.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to support this amendment. I yield 
back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Arizona (Mr. Gallego).
  The amendment was agreed to.


         Amendment No. 23 Offered by Ms. Clark of Massachusetts

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 23 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Add, at the end of the bill, the following (and conform the 
     table of contents accordingly):

                    TITLE XV--CYBERCRIME ENFORCEMENT

     SEC. 1501. LOCAL LAW ENFORCEMENT GRANTS FOR ENFORCEMENT OF 
                   CYBERCRIMES.

       (a) In General.--Subject to the availability of 
     appropriations, the Attorney General shall award grants under 
     this section to States and units of local government for the 
     prevention, enforcement, and prosecution of cybercrimes 
     against individuals.
       (b) Application.--
       (1) In general.--To request a grant under this section, the 
     chief executive officer of a State or unit of local 
     government shall submit an application to the Attorney 
     General within 90 days after the date on which funds to carry 
     out this section are appropriated for a fiscal year, in such 
     form as the Attorney General may require. Such application 
     shall include the following:
       (A) A certification that Federal funds made available under 
     this section will not be used to supplant State or local 
     funds, but will be used to increase the amounts of such funds 
     that would, in the absence of Federal funds, be made 
     available for law enforcement activities.
       (B) An assurance that, not fewer than 30 days before the 
     application (or any amendment to the application) was 
     submitted to the Attorney General, the application (or 
     amendment) was submitted for review to the governing body of 
     the State or unit of local government (or to an organization 
     designated by that governing body).
       (C) An assurance that, before the application (or any 
     amendment to the application) was submitted to the Attorney 
     General--
       (i) the application (or amendment) was made public; and
       (ii) an opportunity to comment on the application (or 
     amendment) was provided to citizens and to neighborhood or 
     community-based organizations, to the extent applicable law 
     or established procedure makes such an opportunity available.
       (D) An assurance that, for each fiscal year covered by an 
     application, the applicant shall maintain and report such 
     data, records, and information (programmatic and financial) 
     as the Attorney General may reasonably require.
       (E) A certification, made in a form acceptable to the 
     Attorney General and executed by the chief executive officer 
     of the applicant (or by another officer of the applicant, if 
     qualified under regulations promulgated by the Attorney 
     General), that--

[[Page H3051]]

       (i) the programs to be funded by the grant meet all the 
     requirements of this section;
       (ii) all the information contained in the application is 
     correct;
       (iii) there has been appropriate coordination with affected 
     agencies; and
       (iv) the applicant will comply with all provisions of this 
     section and all other applicable Federal laws.
       (F) A certification that the State or in the case of a unit 
     of local government, the State in which the unit of local 
     government is located, has in effect criminal laws which 
     prohibit cybercrimes against individuals.
       (G) A certification that any equipment described in 
     subsection (c)(7) purchased using grant funds awarded under 
     this section will be used primarily for investigations and 
     forensic analysis of evidence in matters involving 
     cybercrimes against individuals.
       (c) Use of Funds.--Grants awarded under this section may 
     only be used for programs that provide--
       (1) training for State or local law enforcement personnel 
     relating to cybercrimes against individuals, including--
       (A) training such personnel to identify and protect victims 
     of cybercrimes against individuals;
       (B) training such personnel to utilize Federal, State, 
     local, and other resources to assist victims of cybercrimes 
     against individuals;
       (C) training such personnel to identify and investigate 
     cybercrimes against individuals;
       (D) training such personnel to enforce and utilize the laws 
     that prohibit cybercrimes against individuals;
       (E) training such personnel to utilize technology to assist 
     in the investigation of cybercrimes against individuals and 
     enforcement of laws that prohibit such crimes; and
       (F) the payment of overtime incurred as a result of such 
     training;
       (2) training for State or local prosecutors, judges, and 
     judicial personnel, relating to cybercrimes against 
     individuals, including--
       (A) training such personnel to identify, investigate, 
     prosecute, or adjudicate cybercrimes against individuals;
       (B) training such personnel to utilize laws that prohibit 
     cybercrimes against individuals;
       (C) training such personnel to utilize Federal, State, 
     local, and other resources to assist victims of cybercrimes 
     against individuals; and
       (D) training such personnel to utilize technology to assist 
     in the prosecution or adjudication of acts of cybercrimes 
     against individuals, including the use of technology to 
     protect victims of such crimes;
       (3) training for State or local emergency dispatch 
     personnel relating to cybercrimes against individuals, 
     including--
       (A) training such personnel to identify and protect victims 
     of cybercrimes against individuals;
       (B) training such personnel to utilize Federal, State, 
     local, and other resources to assist victims of cybercrimes 
     against individuals;
       (C) training such personnel to utilize technology to assist 
     in the identification of and response to cybercrimes against 
     individuals; and
       (D) the payment of overtime incurred as a result of such 
     training;
       (4) assistance to State or local law enforcement agencies 
     in enforcing laws that prohibit cybercrimes against 
     individuals, including expenses incurred in performing 
     enforcement operations, such as overtime payments;
       (5) assistance to State or local law enforcement agencies 
     in educating the public in order to prevent, deter, and 
     identify violations of laws that prohibit cybercrimes against 
     individuals;
       (6) assistance to State or local law enforcement agencies 
     to establish task forces that operate solely to conduct 
     investigations, forensic analyses of evidence, and 
     prosecutions in matters involving cybercrimes against 
     individuals;
       (7) assistance to State or local law enforcement and 
     prosecutors in acquiring computers, computer equipment, and 
     other equipment necessary to conduct investigations and 
     forensic analysis of evidence in matters involving 
     cybercrimes against individuals, including expenses incurred 
     in the training, maintenance, or acquisition of technical 
     updates necessary for the use of such equipment for the 
     duration of a reasonable period of use of such equipment;
       (8) assistance in the facilitation and promotion of 
     sharing, with State and local law enforcement officers and 
     prosecutors, of the expertise and information of Federal law 
     enforcement agencies about the investigation, analysis, and 
     prosecution of matters involving laws that prohibit 
     cybercrimes against individuals, including the use of 
     multijurisdictional task forces; or
       (9) assistance to State and local law enforcement and 
     prosecutors in processing interstate extradition requests for 
     violations of laws involving cybercrimes against individuals, 
     including expenses incurred in the extradition of an offender 
     from one State to another.
       (d) Report to the Secretary.--On the date that is one year 
     after the date on which a State or unit of local government 
     receives a grant under this section, and annually thereafter, 
     the chief executive of such State or unit of local government 
     shall submit to the Attorney General a report which 
     contains--
       (1) a summary of the activities carried out during the 
     previous year with any grant received by such State or unit 
     of local government;
       (2) an evaluation of the results of such activities; and
       (3) such other information as the Attorney General may 
     reasonably require.
       (e) Report to Congress.--Not later than November 1 of each 
     even-numbered fiscal year, the Attorney General shall submit 
     to the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
     Representatives and the Committee on the Judiciary of the 
     Senate a report that contains a compilation of the 
     information contained in the report submitted under 
     subsection (d).
       (f) Authorization of Appropriations.--
       (1) In general.--There are authorized to be appropriated to 
     carry out this section $20,000,000 for each of fiscal years 
     2020 through 2024.
       (2) Limitation.--Of the amount made available under 
     paragraph (1) in any fiscal year, not more than 5 percent may 
     be used for evaluation, monitoring, technical assistance, 
     salaries, and administrative expenses.
       (g) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) The term ``cybercrimes against individuals'' means the 
     criminal offenses applicable in the relevant State or unit of 
     local government that involve the use of a computer to cause 
     personal harm to an individual, such as the use of a computer 
     to harass, threaten, stalk, extort, coerce, cause fear, 
     intimidate, without consent distribute intimate images of, or 
     violate the privacy of, an individual, except that--
       (A) use of a computer need not be an element of such an 
     offense; and
       (B) such term does not include the use of a computer to 
     cause harm to a commercial entity, government agency, or any 
     non-natural persons.
       (2) The term ``computer'' includes a computer network and 
     an interactive electronic device.

     SEC. 1502. NATIONAL RESOURCE CENTER GRANT.

       (a) In General.--Subject to the availability of 
     appropriations, the Attorney General shall award a grant 
     under this section to an eligible entity for the purpose of 
     the establishment and maintenance of a National Resource 
     Center on Cybercrimes Against Individuals to provide resource 
     information, training, and technical assistance to improve 
     the capacity of individuals, organizations, governmental 
     entities, and communities to prevent, enforce, and prosecute 
     cybercrimes against individuals.
       (b) Application.--To request a grant under this section, an 
     eligible entity shall submit an application to the Attorney 
     General not later than 90 days after the date on which funds 
     to carry out this section are appropriated for fiscal year 
     2020 in such form as the Attorney General may require. Such 
     application shall include the following:
       (1) An assurance that, for each fiscal year covered by an 
     application, the applicant shall maintain and report such 
     data, records, and information (programmatic and financial) 
     as the Attorney General may reasonably require.
       (2) A certification, made in a form acceptable to the 
     Attorney General, that--
       (A) the programs funded by the grant meet all the 
     requirements of this section;
       (B) all the information contained in the application is 
     correct; and
       (C) the applicant will comply with all provisions of this 
     section and all other applicable Federal laws.
       (c) Use of Funds.--The eligible entity awarded a grant 
     under this section shall use such amounts for the 
     establishment and maintenance of a National Resource Center 
     on Cybercrimes Against Individuals, which shall--
       (1) offer a comprehensive array of technical assistance and 
     training resources to Federal, State, and local governmental 
     agencies, community-based organizations, and other 
     professionals and interested parties, related to cybercrimes 
     against individuals, including programs and research related 
     to victims;
       (2) maintain a resource library which shall collect, 
     prepare, analyze, and disseminate information and statistics 
     related to--
       (A) the incidence of cybercrimes against individuals;
       (B) the enforcement, and prosecution of laws relating to 
     cybercrimes against individuals; and
       (C) the provision of supportive services and resources for 
     victims of cybercrimes against individuals; and
       (3) conduct research related to--
       (A) the causes of cybercrimes against individuals;
       (B) the effect of cybercrimes against individuals on 
     victims of such crimes; and
       (C) model solutions to prevent or deter cybercrimes against 
     individuals or to enforce the laws relating to cybercrimes 
     against individuals.
       (d) Duration of Grant.--
       (1) In general.--The grant awarded under this section shall 
     be awarded for a period of 5 years.
       (2) Renewal.--A grant under this section may be renewed for 
     additional 5-year periods if the Attorney General determines 
     that the funds made available to the recipient were used in a 
     manner described in subsection (c), and if the recipient 
     resubmits an application described in subsection (b) in such 
     form, and at such time as the Attorney General may reasonably 
     require.

[[Page H3052]]

       (e) Subgrants.--The eligible entity awarded a grant under 
     this section may make subgrants to other nonprofit private 
     organizations with relevant subject matter expertise in order 
     to establish and maintain the National Resource Center on 
     Cybercrimes Against Individuals in accordance with subsection 
     (c).
       (f) Report to the Secretary.--On the date that is one year 
     after the date on which an eligible entity receives a grant 
     under this section, and annually thereafter for the duration 
     of the grant period, the entity shall submit to the Attorney 
     General a report which contains--
       (1) a summary of the activities carried out under the grant 
     program during the previous year;
       (2) an evaluation of the results of such activities; and
       (3) such other information as the Attorney General may 
     reasonably require.
       (g) Report to Congress.--Not later than November 1 of each 
     even-numbered fiscal year, the Attorney General shall submit 
     to the Committee on the Judiciary of the House of 
     Representatives and the Committee on the Judiciary of the 
     Senate a report that contains a compilation of the 
     information contained in the report submitted under 
     subsection (d).
       (h) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized 
     to be appropriated to carry out this section $4,000,000 for 
     each of fiscal years 2020 through 2024.
       (i) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Cybercrimes against individuals.--The term 
     ``cybercrimes against individuals'' has the meaning given 
     such term in section 1501(g).
       (2) Eligible entity.--The term ``eligible entity'' means a 
     nonprofit private organization that focuses on cybercrimes 
     against individuals and that--
       (A) provides documentation to the Attorney General 
     demonstrating experience working directly on issues of 
     cybercrimes against individuals; and
       (B) includes on the entity's advisory board representatives 
     who have a documented history of working directly on issues 
     of cybercrimes against individuals and who are geographically 
     and culturally diverse.

     SEC. 1503. NATIONAL STRATEGY, CLASSIFICATION, AND REPORTING 
                   ON CYBERCRIME.

       (a) Definitions.--In this section:
       (1) Computer.--The term ``computer'' includes a computer 
     network and any interactive electronic device.
       (2) Cybercrime against individuals.--The term ``cybercrime 
     against individuals'' means a Federal, State, or local 
     criminal offense that involves the use of a computer to cause 
     personal harm to an individual, such as the use of a computer 
     to harass, threaten, stalk, extort, coerce, cause fear, 
     intimidate, without consent distribute intimate images of, or 
     violate the privacy of, an individual, except that--
       (A) use of a computer need not be an element of the 
     offense; and
       (B) the term does not include the use of a computer to 
     cause harm to a commercial entity, government agency, or non-
     natural person.
       (b) National Strategy.--The Attorney General shall develop 
     a national strategy to--
       (1) reduce the incidence of cybercrimes against 
     individuals;
       (2) coordinate investigations of cybercrimes against 
     individuals by Federal law enforcement agencies; and
       (3) increase the number of Federal prosecutions of 
     cybercrimes against individuals.
       (c) Classification of Cybercrimes Against Individuals for 
     Purposes of Crime Reports.--In accordance with the authority 
     of the Attorney General under section 534 of title 28, United 
     States Code, the Director of the Federal Bureau of 
     Investigation shall--
       (1) design and create within the Uniform Crime Reports a 
     category for offenses that constitute cybercrimes against 
     individuals;
       (2) to the extent feasible, within the category established 
     under paragraph (1), establish subcategories for each type of 
     cybercrime against individuals that is an offense under 
     Federal or State law;
       (3) classify the category established under paragraph (1) 
     as a Part I crime in the Uniform Crime Reports; and
       (4) classify each type of cybercrime against individuals 
     that is an offense under Federal or State law as a Group A 
     offense for the purpose of the National Incident-Based 
     Reporting System.
       (d) Annual Summary.--The Attorney General shall publish an 
     annual summary of the information reported in the Uniform 
     Crime Reports and the National Incident-Based Reporting 
     System relating to cybercrimes against individuals.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from Massachusetts (Ms. Clark) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Massachusetts.
  Ms. CLARK of Massachusetts. Mr. Chairman, every day, millions of 
Americans use the internet to enrich their lives, engage with their 
communities, and do their jobs.
  While most online interactions are positive, the sad reality is that 
for far too many Americans having an online presence means being 
subjected to harassment, stalking, sextortion, and sexual abuse.
  In recent years, the internet has become an easy way for abusers to 
stalk victims of domestic violence and prey on vulnerable children.
  These crimes aren't just one-off occurrences, they are not just 
virtual. They can destroy lives.
  One of my constituents received an onslaught of rape and death 
threats so horrific and explicit that she and her husband fled their 
home and eventually moved because they feared for their lives.
  Unfortunately, when she reported these threats to law enforcement, 
the officers she worked with did not have the training or the resources 
necessary to fully investigate this crime and bring the perpetrators to 
justice.
  And this is just one story.
  In fact, 20 percent, one in five, of all adult internet users have 
been affected by cyberstalking, persistent harassing emails or other 
unwanted online contact.
  One increasingly common form of online abuse involves perpetrators 
threatening to expose private or sensitive material, including nude 
images, unless victims produce sexual materials or pay the abuser 
money.
  The Department of Justice recently declared that this type of abuse, 
known as sextortion, ``. . . is by far the most significantly growing 
threat to children,'' and that:

       Sextortion cases tend to have more victims who are minors 
     per offense than all other child sexual exploitation 
     offenses.

  According to a 2015 FBI analysis of 43 sextortion cases, at least two 
victims committed suicide and at least ten more attempted.
  From self-mutilation to suicide, the consequences of sextortion for 
traumatized victims can be devastating.
  If we are going to prevent these types of online crimes, we need to 
make sure our law enforcement understands how to best combat them.
  This amendment establishes a grant program to train local and State 
law enforcement to prevent, enforce, and prosecute crimes carried out 
online. It creates a national resource center to study these crimes and 
requires the FBI to update the Uniform Crime Reports and National 
Incident-Based Reporting System to include cybercrimes.
  In an economy that is increasingly online, these crimes can 
profoundly impact career choice and economic participation.
  My amendment would make sure our criminal justice system is equipped 
to respond to the crimes that happen online or offline.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to provide law enforcement with the 
tools they need to combat these crimes by supporting my amendment.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I rise in opposition to the 
amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Georgia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I understand what the 
gentlewoman is talking about and wants to do here.
  The concern here is this amendment establishes an entirely new grant 
program with a national resource center. It is unclear how it would be 
necessary, but it is also unclear on what resources would be used to 
establish that new center. And if it means taking money out of the 
current VAWA bill for victims, for women and others, then I would 
definitely be opposed to this.
  Provisions in existing law and the underlying bill already address 
these and similar issues, including digital and cyber abuse.
  So just from that perspective, from a concern of where the funds are 
actually coming from and how to do this, but also the fact that it 
seems redundant, that is why I would oppose it.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Massachusetts (Ms. Clark).
  The amendment was agreed to.


             Amendment No. 24 Offered by Mr. Krishnamoorthi

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 24 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. KRISHNAMOORTHI. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.

[[Page H3053]]

  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 109, line 8, insert after ``other components of 
     economic security'' the following ``, including financial 
     empowerment, affordable housing, transportation, healthcare 
     access, and quality education and training opportunities''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from Illinois (Mr. Krishnamoorthi) and a Member opposed each will 
control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Illinois.
  Mr. KRISHNAMOORTHI. Mr. Chair, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Chair, I rise today in support of amendment No. 24 to the 
Violence Against Women Act.
  The true cost of domestic violence is difficult to compute because of 
just how many aspects of someone's life it can affect and the economic 
sabotage it can induce.
  A woman could face job insecurity because she must spend excessive 
resources on legal assistance or childcare. She could lack the 
financial security to leave an abusive partner, because the partner may 
be tightening his grip on a shared bank account. She may be vulnerable 
to homelessness. She may even face unavoidable and skyrocketing 
healthcare costs due to the physical abuse she has experienced.
  There are numerous ways that domestic and sexual violence can create 
economic obstacles for women in America, and it is imperative that we 
study these issues, to strengthen the health and safety of our 
communities.
  My bipartisan amendment, which I introduced with Congresswoman Susan 
Brooks of Indiana, requires the Department of Health and Human Services 
and the Department of Labor to analyze and report all barriers that 
survivors face in achieving economic security outside of an abusive 
relationship.
  This amendment would ensure we are taking a comprehensive approach to 
strengthen the economic stability of survivors of domestic and sexual 
violence, including their ability to achieve financial empowerment, 
affordable housing, transportation, healthcare access, and quality 
education and training opportunities.
  Ultimately, this information will help put more women and survivors 
of domestic and sexual violence on a path of upward mobility.
  Mr. Chair, I strongly urge my colleagues to support this amendment, 
and I reserve the balance of my time.

                              {time}  1830

  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition 
to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. KRISHNAMOORTHI. Mr. Chairman, I urge my colleagues to support 
this amendment, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Krishnamoorthi).
  The amendment was agreed to.


             Amendment No. 25 Offered by Mr. Krishnamoorthi

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 25 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. KRISHNAMOORTHI. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 114, line 10, insert after ``or stalking'' the 
     following: ``, including guidelines and best practices to 
     promote the creation of effective employee assistance 
     programs''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from Illinois (Mr. Krishnamoorthi) and a Member opposed each will 
control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Illinois.
  Mr. KRISHNAMOORTHI. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of my amendment No. 25 to the 
Violence Against Women Act.
  For decades, Congress has taken action to ensure that victims of 
domestic violence are supported and protected from their abusers by 
providing resources and tools to promote health and safety.
  We know that one in three women experience domestic violence or 
sexual assault in their lifetime. We also know that the devastating 
effects of such violence are experienced at home, in relationships, and 
even when they go to work.
  In fact, the Department of Labor reports that, in total, survivors of 
domestic violence lose nearly 8 million days of paid work a year due to 
a violent situation at home, whether that be finding legal assistance, 
securing childcare, or receiving health services. Statistics show that 
abusers are more likely to follow or harass survivors at their 
workplace, which can add an overwhelming sense of fear. Survivors may 
also experience an extreme loss in productivity due to distraction, 
worry, or poor performance. Due to the abundance of difficult issues 
facing these individuals, their ability to remain employed often is at 
risk.
  These missed days result in $1.8 billion in lost productivity for 
American businesses per year. According to the Bureau of Labor 
Statistics, over 44 percent of workplaces do not have formal policies 
that address domestic violence in the workplace.
  Moving forward, we must find ways to help employers offer lifesaving 
resources to victims of such violence, an endeavor that will improve 
the health and safety of American employees both at home and at the 
workplace.
  Many companies nationwide have adopted effective ``employee 
assistance programs'' that include comprehensive domestic violence 
services for survivors. Employee assistance programs have been proven 
to help survivors when they come into work by offering free counseling, 
referrals, and assessments. In many cases, these programs offer 
lifesaving services to survivors dealing with dangerous and difficult 
situations at home.
  This bipartisan amendment, which I am offering with my colleague 
Congressman   Don Bacon, directs the Department of Health and Human 
Services and the Department of Labor to launch a public information 
campaign that includes guidelines and best practices for employers to 
create these effective employee assistance programs. By conducting 
extensive research and sharing these findings with employers across the 
country, we can strengthen support services at the workplace for the 
betterment of women's health and safety.
  Mr. Chairman, with the reauthorization of the Violence Against Women 
Act, we have a momentous opportunity to improve employee assistance 
programs throughout the country. I urge my colleagues to seize this 
moment by supporting this amendment, and I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Krishnamoorthi).
  The amendment was agreed to.


           Amendment No. 26 Offered by Mr. Brown of Maryland

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 26 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. BROWN of Maryland. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 28, insert after line 24 the following (and conform 
     the table of contents accordingly):

     SEC. 108. GRANTS FOR LETHALITY ASSESSMENT PROGRAMS.

       (a) In General.--The Attorney General may make grants to 
     States, units of local government, Indian tribes, domestic 
     violence victim service providers, and State or Tribal 
     Domestic Violence Coalitions for technical assistance and 
     training in the operation or establishment of a lethality 
     assessment program.
       (b) Definition.--In this section, the term ``lethality 
     assessment program'' means a program that--
       (1) rapidly connects a victim of domestic violence to local 
     community-based victim service providers;
       (2) helps first responders and others in the justice 
     system, including courts, law enforcement agencies, and 
     prosecutors of tribal government and units of local 
     government, identify and respond to possibly lethal 
     circumstances; and

[[Page H3054]]

       (3) identifies victims of domestic violence who are at high 
     risk of being seriously injured or killed by an intimate 
     partner.
       (c) Qualifications.--To be eligible for a grant under this 
     section, an applicant shall demonstrate experience in 
     developing, implementing, evaluating, and disseminating a 
     lethality assessment program.
       (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized 
     to be appropriated $5,000,000 to carry out this section for 
     each of fiscal years 2020 through 2024.
       (e) Definitions.--Terms used in this section have the 
     meanings given such terms in section 40002 of the Violence 
     Against Women Act of 1994.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from Maryland (Mr. Brown) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Maryland.
  Mr. BROWN of Maryland. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  Mr. Chairman, I want to first recognize the hard work of my 
colleagues--the chairman of the Judiciary Committee, Jerry Nadler; my 
colleague from California, Congresswoman Karen Bass; as well as all the 
members of the Judiciary Committee--on the underlying bill.
  My amendment would create a grant program for States, localities, and 
nonprofits to establish and operate a lethality assessment program.
  The lethality assessment program was developed in my home State of 
Maryland in 2005 by the Maryland Network Against Domestic Violence.
  Research shows that for one-third of victims of domestic violence, 
homicide or attempted homicide was the first act of violence in that 
relationship.
  Research also shows that in the year prior to the homicide, more than 
44 percent of abusers were arrested, and almost one-third of the 
victims contacted the police about the abuser.
  The lethality assessment program was developed to reduce the number 
of missed opportunities to identify victims of domestic violence who 
are at risk of being killed, and it enables them to take steps that 
might save their lives.
  The lethality assessment program is an evidence-based homicide 
prevention tool. Because intimate partner homicides are predictable in 
many cases, they are preventable in many cases.
  This program is used in 37 States by law enforcement, nurses, social 
workers, hospital personnel, caseworkers, and court personnel.
  By simply asking the lethality screening questions, the trained 
person conducting the screening educates the victim about the signs of 
increased risk of homicide. The trained person then further educates 
the victim as to how to remain safe, what options are available, and 
what resources are in the community. The victim feels empowered to make 
choices that increase their own safety.
  The lethality assessment program is one of only two models of 
evidence-based intimate partner homicide prevention to be recognized 
and honored as a promising practice by the Department of Justice.
  During my time as Lieutenant Governor, I supported expanding and 
fully funding the lethality assessment program in Maryland because I 
understood then, just as I understand today, that domestic violence and 
violence against women is not just a woman's issue. Domestic violence 
impacts all of us, families, neighbors, and entire communities.
  As we stand here debating my amendment and whether to reauthorize 
legal protections and resources for women, one in four women continue 
to experience abuse or stalking by their current or former intimate 
partner.
  One woman of the thousands who are killed by a current or former 
intimate partner every year was my cousin, Cathy. She was a 40-year-old 
woman and a teacher. She loved her work, and she loved her 
schoolchildren.
  On the weekend before she was going to begin her classes, in 2008, 
she was stalked; she was ambushed; she was tormented; and she was shot 
and killed by her former intimate partner in front of two police 
officers.
  While there is nothing that will bring Cathy back, we have the 
opportunity, right now, to pass commonsense legislation that safeguards 
women and families from the horrors that Cathy and my family 
experienced, and so many other families.
  Domestic violence does not discriminate, and it is up to us to ensure 
that our wives, husbands, partners, mothers, and children live their 
lives free from violence.
  Mr. Chairman, I strongly encourage my colleagues to support this 
amendment and the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019, 
and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Maryland (Mr. Brown).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 27 Offered by Ms. Haaland

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 27 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. HAALAND. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 18, line 8, strike ``and''.
       Page 18, line 14, strike the period at the end and insert a 
     semicolon.
       Page 18, after line 14, insert the following:
       ``(23) providing victim advocates in State or local law 
     enforcement agencies, prosecutors' offices, and courts and 
     providing supportive services and advocacy to urban American 
     Indian and Alaska Native victims of domestic violence, dating 
     violence, sexual assault, and stalking.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from New Mexico (Ms. Haaland) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from New Mexico.
  Ms. HAALAND. Mr. Chairman, this bipartisan amendment addresses the 
needs of Native Americans living in urban areas by making victim 
advocates available in State courts for urban Indians under the STOP 
Violence Against Women Formula Grant Program for States.
  In 2018, the State STOP grant program awarded 56 awards totaling over 
$154 million to State programs to provide funding for victim services 
to address sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and 
stalking through State initiatives to enhance existing programs and 
fill gaps in services.
  Currently, the State STOP grant program is used to strengthen 
partnerships between Tribal and non-Tribal stakeholders to improve 
responses to Native American victims, but there is no requirement for 
State grant activities to prioritize the hiring of in-court victim 
advocates for urban Indians.
  Frequently, the subgrantees of this program are community-based 
organizations, which are chronically underfunded, short-staffed, and 
not able to specifically address the needs of urban Indian victims.
  This leaves urban Native victims without any resources, which are 
severely needed within State courts and which could easily be remedied 
by hiring in-court State victim advocates. This is especially true in 
light of the crisis of missing and murdered indigenous women, to break 
the cycle of generational trauma and violence.
  Due to devastating Federal policies, like forced relocation and 
removal, 71 percent of the Native American population lives in urban 
areas. Urban cities with high populations of Native Americans include 
places like Phoenix; Seattle; Los Angeles; and in my district, 
Albuquerque.
  Recent reports by the Urban Indian Health Institute identified 506 
cases of missing and murdered indigenous women across 71 urban cities. 
My State of New Mexico ranked number one for the highest number of 
missing and murdered indigenous women cases, which was 78.
  Mr. Chairman, I thank the bipartisan cosponsors of this amendment, 
Representatives Grijalva, Cole, Gallego, Moore, Young, Case, Soto, 
Davids, and Torres, for their support. I ask my colleagues to help 
these Native American women who are the victims of violence.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from New Mexico (Ms. Haaland).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 28 Offered by Ms. Haaland

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 28 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. HAALAND. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.

[[Page H3055]]

  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 127, strike line 3, and insert the following:
       (a) In General.--Section 534 of title 28, United States 
     Code, is
       Page 127, insert after line 11 the following:
       (b) Indian Tribe and Indian Law Enforcement Information 
     Sharing.--Section 534 of title 28, United States Code, is 
     further amended by amending subsection (d) to read as 
     follows:
       ``(d) Indian Tribe and Indian Law Enforcement Information 
     Sharing.--The Attorney General shall permit tribal law 
     enforcement entities (including entities designated by a 
     tribe as maintaining public safety within a tribe's 
     territorial jurisdiction that has no federal or state arrest 
     authority) and Bureau of Indian Affairs law enforcement 
     agencies--
       ``(1) to access and enter information into Federal criminal 
     information databases; and
       ``(2) to obtain information from the databases.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from New Mexico (Ms. Haaland) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from New Mexico.
  Ms. HAALAND. Mr. Chairman, I offer this bipartisan amendment to 
improve public safety in Indian Country through the Tribal Access 
Program, or TAP, which is an existing information-sharing system for 
Tribes in Indian Country.
  The Tribal Access Program administered through the Department of 
Justice is an effective method of sharing criminal conviction 
information between Tribal, local, State, and Federal law enforcement 
agencies.

                              {time}  1845

  TAP allows law enforcement officers in neighboring jurisdictions to 
see each other's restraining orders, warrants, and exclusion orders 
across jurisdictional boundaries to improve public safety.
  Having this information is critical to keeping victims of domestic 
violence safe from harm, but, unfortunately, the Department of Justice 
has told many Tribes they don't qualify to participate. Although the 
statute says that any Tribal government can access this data, the DOJ 
rejects applications from Tribes that don't specifically have arrest 
authority.
  Under my amendment, a Tribal government with a designated public 
safety agency, regardless of their ability to detain and arrest 
perpetrators, will have access and the ability to enter information 
into the TAP program.
  I want to be clear that my amendment does not allow these designated 
public safety departments or agencies to determine criminal 
convictions. That is a determination made by courts through due 
process. This amendment only allows information sharing and access to 
TAP to better communicate between public safety departments on 
reservations that are frequently limited in resources.
  The stakes are too high to continue to deny Tribes that are already 
struggling from resources to keep people safe in Indian Country access 
to this important information.
  For example, I heard from a Tribe that one of their members had a 
preexisting restraining order against her abuser; however, when the 
perpetrator entered the reservation, the Reservation Patrol--a Tribal 
public safety agency without arrest authority--unknowingly allowed the 
abuser to enter the reservation because they did not have access to 
information about the existing restraining order.
  The violation of the restraining order against the unsuspecting 
victim could have been prevented if the Reservation Patrol had the 
ability to access the criminal history of the abuser through TAP.
  Denying Tribal public safety departments access to information that 
can prevent crimes, particularly violence against women, is 
unconscionable.
  The chronic lack of public safety resources in Indian Country, 
including inadequately staffed law enforcement agencies and lack of 
cell phone and internet service for communication, already puts Tribes 
behind in protecting their members.
  If this were about any other community located off the reservation, 
it is likely this amendment wouldn't be at issue today.
  I thank the bipartisan cosponsors of this amendment--Representatives 
Young, Cook, Grijalva, Cole, Gallego, Ruiz, Case, Soto, Davids, and 
Torres--for their support and ask my colleagues to help give Tribal 
public safety departments the information they need to protect Native 
American women from violence.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from New Mexico (Ms. Haaland).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 29 Offered by Mr. Rouda

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 29 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. ROUDA. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 85, after line 13, insert the following (and 
     redesignate other provisions accordingly):
       (4) Transgender and gender non-conforming people face 
     extraordinary levels of physical and sexual violence.
       (5) More than 1 in 4 transgender people have faced bias-
     driven assault, and this rate is higher for trans women and 
     trans people of color.
       (6) The American Foundation for Suicide Prevention has 
     found that transgender and gender non-conforming people had 
     an elevated prevalence of suicide attempts, especially when 
     they have suffered physical or sexual violence.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Rouda) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. ROUDA. Mr. Chair, transgender and gender nonconforming people 
face extraordinary levels of physical and sexual violence. According to 
the U.S. Transgender Survey, which surveyed nearly 28,000 transgender 
Americans across all 50 States, nearly half of transgender individuals 
have been sexually assaulted in their lifetime, and nearly 1 in 10 
respondents in the survey reported that they were physically attacked 
in the past year because of being transgender.
  Transgender people face disproportionate harassment and violence. 
More than one in four transgender people have faced bias-driven 
assault, and this rate is higher for trans women and trans people of 
color. The fear caused by these acts sends people underground and away 
from community services and support.
  This violence has deadly consequences. The American Foundation for 
Suicide Prevention has found that transgender and gender nonconforming 
people have an elevated prevalence of suicide attempts, especially when 
they have suffered physical or sexual assault.
  As always, listening to and believing survivors is critical, and I 
stand committed to rejecting the prejudice and hate facing transgender 
and gender nonconforming people in our Nation. Far too often, the 
experiences of transgender and gender nonconforming people are ignored 
and overlooked.
  My amendment, which is supported by the Human Rights Campaign and the 
National Center for Transgender Equality, adds language to the Violence 
Against Women Reauthorization Act that recognizes the ongoing epidemic 
of violence against these members of the LGBTQ community.
  Mr. Chair, I ask my colleagues to join me in supporting this 
amendment that seeks to include the experiences of transgender and 
gender nonconforming people in this important piece of legislation.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I appreciate the gentleman. I 
have no problem.
  As far as any violence against anyone, no matter what the cause is, 
is wrong. And no one should be treated differently because of choices 
and other things in their life, whether it be just the basic humanity 
that we deal with.
  I think the only concern that I have here, as someone who has dealt 
with

[[Page H3056]]

suicide, who has dealt with it on a counseling level for many years 
both in the military and outside, I would not want to assign a certain 
bias to the reasoning here, because there are other reasons, as well, 
for suicide, and to keep that holistically. That is why, from my 
personal standpoint, I would not want to assign that.
  I think any of these is tragic and do contribute to that issue, just 
as it would anything else. So I think limiting it, in my opinion, would 
not be good in the holistic approach to making sure that no one 
believes that their only choice in life is suicide, which is what the 
amendment seems to do.
  I think there are multiple things there, and we need to be very aware 
of that--and the friends and family around us. If I could take anything 
else from this moment, it is that I would include everybody listening 
in today, no matter what their background is, suicide is something that 
is tragic.
  And if it comes to a point where people do not feel any hope, it is 
imperative that people reach out to all people, no matter who they are, 
if they know them or not, and just ask simple questions: ``Are you 
okay?'' ``Can we talk?'' Do the things like that that help people 
understand that they are not alone in this situation.
  I appreciate the gentleman's concern. I do voice opposition to this 
amendment just in the sense that I believe it is too limiting in scope 
to say that this is the reason why or to input a bias into a 
congressional finding.
  Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROUDA. Mr. Chair, I appreciate the Member's comments and agree 
that suicide, nationally, is an issue, regardless of the situation, and 
I appreciate his comments that anybody in that situation should be 
encouraged to reach out.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Rouda).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 30 Offered by Mr. Rouda

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 30 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. ROUDA. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 38, after line 15, insert the following (and 
     redesignate other provisions accordingly):
       (C) in paragraph (4), by inserting after ``improve delivery 
     of'' the following: ``primary prevention training and''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Rouda) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. ROUDA. Mr. Chair, as we seek to reauthorize this landmark piece 
of bipartisan legislation, it is important that we recognize we have a 
long way to go to end rape, sexual violence, and sexual harassment on 
college campuses.
  Nearly one-quarter of American college women experience sexual 
violence.
  Let me repeat. Nearly one-quarter of college women experience sexual 
violence while attending school.
  We have failed the young people of our Nation who are tirelessly 
pursuing higher education and chasing the American Dream.
  The Violence Against Women Act supports hundreds of thousands of 
sexual assault survivors across the United States; however, we must do 
more to prevent these acts of sexual violence from occurring in the 
first place. My amendment would give colleges and universities the 
opportunity to use grant funding to offer or improve the delivery of 
primary prevention training.
  Primary prevention training is exactly what it sounds like. It seeks 
to educate and change the culture on college campuses. It promotes 
healthy relationships and addresses community and societal challenges. 
It teaches students consent and stops sexual assaults from occurring.
  Organizations like End Rape on Campus know that primary prevention 
training works, and they are in full support of this amendment.
  As I mentioned earlier, one-quarter of college women experience 
sexual violence while on campus. Today, we can begin to change that 
unacceptable statistic by adopting this amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition, 
although I am not necessarily opposed to it.
  The Acting CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, again, I do not necessarily oppose 
the amendment.
  I think the underlying actual law addresses what you are after here, 
so, in my mind, it is duplicative and can serve to muddy up, really, 
some existing law that is already here. So that would be my concern 
about your amendment. I think it is already covered.
  Mr. Chair, I appreciate the gentleman offering the amendment, and I 
reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROUDA. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Rouda).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 31 Offered by Mr. Rouda

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 31 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. ROUDA. Mr. Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 39, line 6, insert after ``efforts.'' the following:
       ``(12) To develop and implement an alternative justice 
     response (as such term is defined in section 40002(a) of the 
     Violence Against Women Act of 1994).''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Rouda) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. ROUDA. Mr. Chair, as I mentioned, 25 percent of female students 
on campus have experienced sexual assault, yet less than 10 percent of 
college students who experience sexual violence report their assaults.
  For many survivors, reporting a sexual assault is an incredibly 
traumatic process that forces them to repeatedly relive the worst days 
or nights of their lives.
  More than just traumatic, reporting can be dangerous or detrimental 
to one's social status, academic pursuits, or career prospects.
  Knowing that 90 percent of students feel uncomfortable with the 
current reporting process, my amendment would give colleges and 
universities the opportunity to use grant funding to offer alternative 
justice response programs.
  These programs allow for a nonpunitive response to objectionable 
conduct, seek accountability from the accused, provide alternative 
pathways for justice and healing for survivors, and give an opportunity 
for education and behavioral change.
  Research has shown that alternative justice programs, which return 
autonomy and control to survivors, can lessen PTSD symptoms.
  Working toward justice and healing are not always linear processes, 
and this amendment would allow for the complex experiences of survivors 
to be respected and supported.
  Mr. Chair, I ask that my colleagues join me in supporting this 
amendment, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, I claim the time in opposition 
to the amendment.
  The Acting CHAIR. The gentleman from Georgia is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, this one is one that, from many 
perspectives--and we talked about this a little bit earlier in this 
debate. Especially when it comes to the alternative justice issue here, 
we understand the concerns for the victims and need to be a part of 
that, but this is something prosecutors across the country have

[[Page H3057]]

opposed. And, in fact, the National District Attorneys Association 
points out in a letter today:

       While this approach may work successfully in other types of 
     situations, we lack sufficient information on potential 
     downsides of bringing a batterer into the same room with a 
     victim in order to conflict-resolve what is considered a 
     crime of violence.

                              {time}  1900

  They go on to say that:

       A philosophy of putting the ability to consent to this kind 
     of program on a victim's shoulders is misplaced and may 
     result in unintended consequences to the victim, such as 
     safety concerns. The prosecutors are among the people that 
     utilize the beneficial tools of VAWA the most, and they are 
     on the front lines of combating the violence against women.

  I don't think that we should ignore that. I think when we are looking 
at this, as I said earlier in this debate today, anyone who does this 
is a criminal. If they do this to people, stalking, domestic violence, 
all this, they are criminal actions, and I do not want to take that 
away from this. The victim should be cared for. The victim should be 
nurtured. The victim should be able to come forward in that process.
  But I do not want to take campuses and other places away where it 
becomes something which law enforcement does not have the primary say 
so, or you are allowing the campus, Mr. Chairman, to come in and have 
their own alternative kind of investigative process. And this is 
something that is of concern.
  I appreciate the gentleman's concern in how people move through this 
process, but this is just not the right way to go, especially in this 
bill. There may be other ways to address this.
  That is why I would oppose the amendment, because I just feel like we 
do not need to ever take away the fact that the victims in this are 
victims of a crime. We never can take that away and would not want to 
resurface that in any other way. I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROUDA. Mr. Chairman, I appreciate the gentleman's comments.
  As I mentioned early, when you look at 25 percent of the female 
student body experiencing sexual assault on campus, and only 10 percent 
feeling comfortable to come forward and report, that 90 percent of them 
that do not feel that they have an avenue that they are comfortable 
with to share their story and seek justice, this is an opportunity to 
do just that.
  There is no evidence that suggests those universities that have 
already provided restorative justice have seen a decline in actual 
reports.
  As such, I think this is a program that provides exactly what was 
laid out in the amendment and should have bipartisan support.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Again, not to prolong this, but I think the 
interesting issue here, Mr. Chairman, is from the understanding there 
are ways inside VAWA. There are other programs here. And I would just 
have to say that for those who do not come forward, there are also many 
other reasons besides the fact of the law enforcement process that we 
go through here.
  So what I don't want to have is just because the law enforcement 
process does require reporting and does require this, we don't want to 
let the abuser in this situation, or the perpetrator in this situation 
be allowed to continue because the system is too hard.
  I would like to see the system be made where the victims can come 
forward and not take it away to where it would be something that is 
alternative.
  So I think in many ways we are probably saying or at least wanting 
the same things. I want to make it easier for them to report the folks 
who do this to them, no matter what background they are from or gender 
they are or anything else and have that ability for law enforcement to 
do what should be done, and that is, to put these people in jail.
  I think that is the big difference I have here, and I don't think 
this is the proper place for it. There may be other ways we can find 
common ground in this, but not here, especially with what VAWA has the 
ability to do already inside it.
  So that is my opposition to this. We want the same thing. The people 
who perpetrate these crimes need to be prosecuted. I just don't want to 
see things diverted and an outlet given. It should be better for the 
victims to be able to come and report this. It is a sad state of 
occurrence when you don't have the ability or want to come report 
because they feel the system is too hard. But also, not taking this out 
of account, there are other reasons why this is not reported, or they 
don't feel like they can come forward. And I don't think we can deny 
that.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROUDA. Mr. Chairman, I will point out that lots of times victims 
do not come forward to the police department and the court system 
because they recognize that they often will not get justice. That could 
be because of a lack of evidence, or that could be for other reasons. 
This provides another recourse for them.
  As the father of a daughter and three sons, I would want to see this 
available for those kids in that type of a situation, that if the 
victim felt this was the right course of action for them to address 
that issue, then I believe this amendment helps them do just that.
  And while I respect my colleague's comment, again, I would hold the 
amendment up as is, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chairman, again, that is fine. I think 
the National District Attorneys Association also would agree that this 
is something that should be studied, but not mandated. And I think the 
amendment here goes farther than most of us are feeling comfortable 
with in that regard.
  I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. ROUDA. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. COLLINS of Georgia. Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Rouda).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 32 Offered by Mr. Rouda

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 32 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. ROUDA. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 38, strike lines 1 through 2 and insert the following:
       (A) by amending paragraph (2) to read as follows:
       ``(2) To develop, strengthen, and implement campus 
     policies, protocols, and services that more effectively 
     identify and respond to the crimes of domestic violence, 
     dating violence, sexual assault and stalking, including the 
     use of technology to commit these crimes, and to train campus 
     administrators, campus security personnel, and all 
     participants in the resolution process, including the Title 
     IX coordinator's office and student conduct office on campus 
     disciplinary or judicial boards on such policies, protocols, 
     and services.''.
       Page 39, line 12, strike ``and''.
       Page 39, insert after line 12, the following:
       (B) by amending paragraph (3)(D) to read as follows:
       ``(D) The grantee shall train all participants in the 
     resolution process, including the Title IX coordinator's 
     office and student conduct office, to respond effectively to 
     situations involving domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, or stalking.''; and
       Page 39, line 13, strike ``(B) in paragraph'' and insert 
     ``(C) in paragraph''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Rouda) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California
  Mr. ROUDA. Mr. Chairman, my final amendment addresses training for 
all participants involved in the complaint resolution process.
  Campus disciplinary processes, governed by Title IX, vary by school, 
and involve many participants before the complaint even reaches the 
hearing phase where a campus disciplinary or judicial board would be 
involved. Many survivors never even reach the hearing phase.
  At the same time, throughout the disclosure process, survivors are 
required to relive and discuss their sexual assaults with 
administrators, faculty, and staff. As previously mentioned, only 10 
percent of college student survivors officially report their assault.
  When and if they decide to report, survivors deserve to be met with 
trauma-informed care, and campus faculty and staff deserve training on 
the best practices to meet this critical need.
  My amendment would give colleges and universities the opportunity to 
use

[[Page H3058]]

grant funding for training of all participants involved with the 
resolution process in training which identifies or responds to crimes 
of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.
  Resolution process members include the Title IX coordinator's office, 
as well as the office of student conduct. This training will ensure 
that survivors are treated with more respect, professionalism, and 
compassion by every school official, campus security guard, 
administrator, and professor.
  I urge Members to adopt this amendment which promotes effective and 
positive responses to survivors on college campuses.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Rouda).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 33 Offered by Mrs. Craig

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 33 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mrs. CRAIG. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 37, line 21, insert ``(a) In General.--'' before 
     ``Section 304''.
       Page 39, after line 19, insert the following:
       (b) Report on Best Practices Regarding Domestic Violence, 
     Dating Violence, Sexual Assault, and Stalking on Campuses.--
     Not later than 1 year after the date of enactment of this 
     Act, the Secretary of Education shall submit to Congress a 
     report, which includes--
       (1) an evaluation of programs, events, and educational 
     materials related to domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, and stalking; and
       (2) an assessment of best practices and guidance from the 
     evaluation described in paragraph (1), which shall be made 
     publicly available online to universities and college 
     campuses to use as a resource.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from Minnesota (Mrs. Craig) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Minnesota.
  Mrs. CRAIG. Mr. Chairman, I rise today to offer an amendment to H.R. 
1585, the Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act.
  Every student deserves to learn in an environment that is safe and 
free from harassment and violence. Yet, we all know that domestic 
violence and sexual assault remain prevalent threats to women, and 
especially young women, on college campuses across our country.
  College-aged students are at greater risk than any other age groups 
for domestic and sexual violence. These instances of violence are 
vastly underreported. A study of college students by the U.S. 
Department of Justice found that around one in five women are targets 
of attempted or completed sexual assault.
  The Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019 increases 
funding for grants to combat violent crimes on campuses and allocates 
funding to train campus health centers to recognize and to respond to 
these crimes.
  My amendment directs the Secretary of Education to study and submit a 
report to Congress on best practices regarding the prevention of 
domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking on 
college campuses. This includes an evaluation of programs, events, and 
educational materials related to preventing acts of violence and 
harassment.
  Preventing violence against young people on college campuses starts 
with education. Sharing information for best practices and guidance for 
educators on college campuses opens the door for collaborative work 
among experts in intimate partner and sexual violence prevention.
  My amendment does not change the enforcement and implementation 
responsibilities of the Department of Education. Congress needs a 
report on best practices for prevention of these acts of violence, not 
on the agency's recent efforts to change regulations and requirements 
under Title IX.
  None of us can address sexual and domestic violence on our own. That 
is why this amendment provides a commonsense approach toward solving 
the problem by forcing the agency to continue to review best practices 
and prevention methods for combating acts of violence.
  Colleges and universities, sexual violence prevention experts, and 
the Federal Government should share resources and information, learn 
from their peers, and take steps toward eradicating sexual and domestic 
violence altogether.
  When it comes to the safety of our students, we cannot afford to work 
in silos. Every student deserves to feel safe in their community and we 
must be proactive and collaborative in our work to end sexual and 
domestic violence on our college campuses.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment and support the 
underlying bill.
  Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Minnesota (Mrs. Craig).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 34 Offered by Ms. Schrier

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 34 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. SCHRIER. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 44, line 14, insert after ``professionals'' the 
     following: ``, including specialists in trauma and in 
     behavioral health care,''.
       Page 44, line 17, strike ``and stalking'' and insert the 
     following: ``stalking, and children exposed to violence''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from Washington (Ms. Schrier) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Washington.
  Ms. SCHRIER. Mr. Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Chair, I am pleased to offer this amendment to the Violence 
Against Women Act along with my colleagues, Representatives Lauren 
Underwood and also Representative Donna Shalala.
  This amendment would help increase the number of healthcare 
professionals who are able to assist children exposed to violence and 
also ensures that trauma and behavioral healthcare specialists are 
included in efforts to address domestic and dating violence, sexual 
assault, stalking, and childhood exposure to violence.
  The long-term effects of childhood exposure to adverse experiences, 
which include domestic and sexual violence that go unaddressed, are 
chilling. Children exposed to violence, when they become adults, are 
more likely to have addictive behaviors, to drop out of school, and to 
be violent themselves.
  The effects of these adverse experiences can be mitigated through 
counseling and other intervention services, which is why my amendment 
would require funding authorized under this section to be used to 
increase the number of social workers, psychologists, psychiatrists, 
trauma specialists, and others who are trained in counseling children 
exposed to violence.
  As a pediatrician, I know firsthand that if we treat adverse 
childhood experiences early, we can mitigate the costly long-term 
effects that occur later in life.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  Mr. Chair, I yield to the gentlewoman from Illinois (Ms. Underwood).
  Ms. UNDERWOOD. Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of this 
amendment, which I coauthored with my colleague from Washington.
  A female pediatrician and female nurse working together to write 
legislation, this has literally never happened before in this body.

                              {time}  1915

  Our amendment ensures that trauma and behavioral health specialists 
are included as healthcare professionals in the section of this bill 
intended to strengthen our healthcare system's response to domestic 
violence.
  Behavioral healthcare, of course, includes mental health as well as 
treatment for substance abuse disorders. Both are particularly 
important to victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, dating 
violence, and stalking. Mental healthcare can be lifesaving for 
domestic violence survivors. Survivors

[[Page H3059]]

are three times more likely to meet criteria for post-traumatic stress 
disorder. They are also more likely to have suicidal thoughts and to 
attempt suicide. Mothers who experience domestic violence are nearly 
twice as likely to develop post-partum depression than those who don't.
  Access for treatment for substance abuse is also critical for 
domestic violence survivors. Survivors experience substance abuse 
disorders at rates two to six times higher than average.
  Violence against women isn't just a women's issue. It is a children's 
issue, it is a men's issue, it is a family issue, and it is an economic 
issue. That is why it is so important that our healthcare system take a 
comprehensive approach to its response.
  Mr. Chairman, I urge my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to 
support our amendment.
  Ms. SCHRIER. Mr. Chairman, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Washington (Ms. Schrier).
  The amendment was agreed to.


               Amendment No. 35 Offered by Ms. Underwood

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 35 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. UNDERWOOD. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 142, insert after line 4 the following:

     SEC. 1002. REPORT OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL ON THE EFFECTS OF 
                   THE SHUTDOWN.

       Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this 
     title, the Attorney General shall submit a report to Congress 
     on the effects of the Federal Government shutdown that lasted 
     from December 22, 2018 to January 25, 2019, evaluating and 
     detailing the extent of the effect of the shutdown on the 
     ability of the Department of Justice to disperse funding and 
     services under the Violence Against Women Act of 1994, the 
     Violence Against Women and Department of Justice 
     Reauthorization Act of 2005, and the Victims of Crime Act of 
     1984, to victims of domestic violence, dating violence, 
     sexual assault, and stalking.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from Illinois (Ms. Underwood) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Illinois.
  Ms. UNDERWOOD. Mr. Chairman, the recent Federal Government shutdown 
was the longest in our Nation's history. It was reckless, and it was 
dangerous. It hurt our Nation's security, it hurt Federal workers, and 
it hurt our most vulnerable populations, including survivors of 
domestic violence and abuse.
  My amendment would direct the Department of Justice to report to 
Congress the effects of the shutdown on DOJ's efforts to disburse VAWA 
and VOCA funding. This funding provides services to prevent and respond 
to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking.
  This amendment is in direct response to months of conversations with 
domestic violence shelters and agencies that serve my community in 
Illinois's 14th District and to the urgent need in all of our 
districts.
  I am thankful to my colleagues from Illinois and Pennsylvania for 
their support as cosponsors.
  Over the past month, we have worked to understand how the shutdown 
affected our ability to respond to domestic violence. Let's be clear. 
Everyone wants domestic violence victims to get the support they need. 
But that didn't happen during the shutdown, and we don't know why not. 
We have been told there was about a 2-week period at the beginning of 
the shutdown where DOJ employees who help process VAWA and VOCA grants 
weren't able to work. We know grantees were warned about a delay in 
processing their funding, and we have been told that those DOJ 
employees were expected and allowed to return to work at some point 
during the shutdown.
  But that is not enough. We need to know what happened so that we can 
make sure it doesn't happen again.
  I want to share the stories that I am hearing from shelters in my 
district about how the shutdown affected them, because their 
experiences are unacceptable. Family Shelter Service, a domestic 
violence agency, serves my constituents in DuPage County, Illinois. 
During the shutdown, they had to turn away 138 members of my community 
who were seeking safety at the shelter. Because of the shutdown, Family 
Shelter Service had to hold off on filling four open positions for 
employees that were funded by VAWA and VOCA. Three of these positions 
were for child counselors. The shelter reports that this directly led 
to a decrease in the number of children whom they were able to help.
  I also represent McHenry County in Illinois. It is a big county, but 
it only has one domestic violence agency called Turning Point. In 2018 
alone, Turning Point served more than 1,700 people, and 170 of those 
were children. Fifteen percent of Turning Point's funding comes from 
VOCA. They shared with me that because of the shutdown, they had to 
stop referring survivors for individual counseling because of the lack 
of resources.
  Now, Illinois has some supplemental sources of domestic violence 
funding, but many States rely almost completely on Federal funding. 
Failure to maintain and protect these Federal funding streams literally 
puts lives at risk.
  Resources for domestic violence survivors and the organizations that 
help them are already stretched too far and too thin. It is our fiscal 
and moral responsibility to ensure that their funding is not 
interrupted again.
  Mr. Chairman, I urge all of my colleagues to support my amendment, 
and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Illinois (Ms. Underwood).
  The amendment was agreed to.


           Amendment No. 36 offered by Mr. Casten of Illinois

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 36 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. CASTEN of Illinois. Mr. Chairman, I have an amendment at the 
desk.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 38, line 24, insert after ``centers'' the following: 
     ``and appropriate campus faculty, such as academic advisors 
     or professionals who deal with students on a daily basis,''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from Illinois (Mr. Casten) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Illinois.
  Mr. CASTEN of Illinois. Mr. Chairman, I yield myself such time as I 
may consume.
  Mr. Chairman, I rise to offer amendment No. 36 to H.R. 1585, the 
Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act.
  My amendment would ensure that campus faculty are trained to 
recognize victims of sexual and domestic violence. Specifically, this 
legislation amends the bill to include ``appropriate campus faculty, 
such as academic advisors or professionals who deal with students on a 
daily basis'' for grant training programs to recognize and respond to 
domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking. This 
would include training health providers on how to provide universal 
education to all members of the campus community on the impacts of 
violence on health and unhealthy relationships and how providers can 
support ongoing outreach efforts.
  Now, going off to school can be a wonderful opportunity for our 
children. But sexual and domestic violence on college campuses is 
horrific and must be addressed. We know that of undergraduate students, 
23.1 percent of females and 5.4 percent of males experience rape or 
sexual assault during their time on campus.
  But all too often, those students do not report to law enforcement. 
Only 20 percent of female student victims report their experience. Some 
don't report because they fear reprisal, others don't think it was 
important enough, and some don't even believe that police could or 
would do anything to help.
  We cannot eradicate sexual violence on campus if we can't even reach 
the students who are being impacted. We are failing them.
  That is why this amendment to include campus faculty in training 
programs to help them identify signs of

[[Page H3060]]

sexual and domestic violence is so necessary. If students feel that 
they cannot report these crimes, then we must have knowledgeable and 
trained faculty in place to provide help if it is needed.
  Recently I went to a panel at Benedictine University in Illinois, and 
I got to hear directly from campus faculty about this specific issue 
and from students on the unique needs on college campuses. There are 
really specific challenges, as Congresswoman Underwood was mentioning. 
We have limited but flawed procedures in place for people who need 
shelter when they are victims of domestic violence. That is really hard 
on a college campus.
  What do you do for someone when they are in a dorm room and everybody 
knows where the dorms are on campus?
  What do you do to change their schedule if there is only one section 
of the class they need to take?
  What can schools do when a survivor doesn't feel safe to go to class?
  I was honored at the time to speak with Bernadette Muloski, 
Benedictine's Violence Against Women Act Grant Coordinator. She pointed 
out that when schools provide more information and resources for 
reporting and speaking openly about these issues, then it often leads 
to higher numbers of reports--not because violence is happening more 
often, but because people finally feel safe to come forward.
  Now, it is so important for the first person that a student confides 
in to have an appropriate reaction, because that disclosure often has a 
huge impact on the survivor's healing. It is also impactful on how the 
student decides to move forward, either in reporting or seeking 
additional assistance such as counseling and support.
  So if the first person does not respond with empathy and gives an 
indication that they don't care or maybe doesn't know what to do and 
doesn't know where the resources are on campus, the student may never 
tell another person or may struggle with that, and the perpetrator may 
go on to commit more violence.
  On college campuses students often develop mentor relationships with 
faculty or staff beyond the health department that they are working 
with, and it is more likely that a survivor will disclose their 
experience to someone they know as opposed to a stranger. That is why 
we have to get this right.
  This amendment would provide the resources to train all of those 
faculty who interact with students, and by providing resources to 
schools so that they can individualize their response to sexual and 
domestic violence, we will enable them to better meet the unique 
challenges of those students. This is particularly true for underserved 
communities. Coordinated, comprehensive responses allow college 
communities to develop sustainable strategies to address these crimes.
  For colleges and universities to curb sexual violence on campus, we 
must create the safe, respectful, collegiate learning and teaching 
environment that every student and employee deserves.
  Mr. Chairman, I urge my colleagues to support my amendment which will 
not only provide resources for college and university faculty, but also 
the support that students need and deserve.
  Mr. Chairman, I thank Representative Bass for authoring this bill, 
and I thank all the tireless advocates who have worked to bring us to 
this day.
  Mr. Chairman, I urge my colleagues to support this amendment, please 
support this bill, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Casten).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 37 Offered by Ms. Porter

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 37 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Ms. PORTER. I have an amendment at the desk, Mr. Chairman.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 11, line 24, strike ``and''.
       Page 15, line 12, strike the period at the end and insert 
     ``; and''.
       Page 15, insert after line 12 the following:
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(c) Rule of Construction.--For purposes of this Act, 
     nothing may be construed to preclude the term `domestic 
     violence' from including economic abuse each place the term 
     `domestic violence' occurs unless doing so would trigger an 
     extension of effective date under section 703(f)(1)(B) of the 
     Violence Against Women Reauthorization Act of 2019.''.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentlewoman 
from California (Ms. Porter) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from California.
  Ms. PORTER. Mr. Chairman, I am honored to be here today to introduce 
my amendment to the Violence Against Women Act, which integrates the 
term ``economic abuse'' throughout the legislation. I wrote this 
amendment to ensure that this largely invisible abuse is recognized 
federally, and victims are afforded all of the protections offered 
under VAWA.
  Over one-quarter of women and 11 percent of men have experienced 
sexual violence, physical violence, or stalking by an intimate partner 
in their lifetimes. I am one of them.
  I suffered domestic violence, and every year, millions suffer in 
silence for many reasons, but one of the most prominent among those 
reasons is economic necessity. According to a study conducted in 2012, 
74 percent of survivors stayed with their abuser for financial reasons.
  Financial abuse through consumer credit still has not been 
appropriately recognized under the law. Using debt to exercise coercive 
control is one of the most prevalent and nefarious forms of domestic 
violence. In a Michigan State study, 99 percent of domestic violence 
victims reported some form of economic abuse.
  Economic abuse takes many forms, ranging from employment sabotage to 
malicious attempts to restrict survivor's access to funds.
  Threats of violence cause women to take time off from school or work 
and interfere with their abilities to maintain employment or complete 
their educations.
  Abusers obstruct childcare and transportation options to disrupt job 
and academic performance, stealing victim's keys, and leaving children 
intentionally unattended. They cut off access to financial information 
to keep their partner in a state of financial dependence and unable to 
leave. They commit identity theft to run up credit card debt and ruin 
their partner's credit scores, taking out loans in their partner's name 
that the victim knows nothing about and cannot pay off.
  In intimate partner relationships, on average, physical violence 
victims lose 7 days of paid employment, rape victims lose 8, and 
stalking victims lose 10 per year.

                              {time}  1930

  For the rest of their lives, these survivors are less financially 
secure because they endured an abusive relationship.
  Abusers often take advantage of their heightened degree of financial 
sophistication relative to their partner's. They don't tell their 
partners about the assets the couple owns, and they force their 
partners to sign quitclaim deeds and give up ownership in major assets 
like homes without knowing it.
  Coerced debt follows victims of domestic violence for the rest of 
their lives, long after they have left the relationship. It is 
particularly destructive in the weeks after these women leave, when 
they try to rent an apartment or otherwise provide for themselves 
financially.
  Burdening a woman with economic obligations that she did not take on 
as she is trying to escape an abusive relationship can be as crippling 
to her long-term well-being as violence.
  Credit repair is an almost impossible process. Expunging coerced debt 
from a victim's credit report, even with extensive evidence of fraud, 
is an intractable task, which is why I will be introducing legislation 
to provide a way forward for women whose credit scores are ruined as a 
result of domestic violence.
  I endured an abusive relationship, and my three children and I were 
able to move forward with our lives, staying in our community and in 
our home. I had a good job; I had a strong credit history; and I was 
extremely engaged with our family's financial decisions, which allowed 
me to leave when I needed to.
  However, without a substantial safety net, many women can't and don't

[[Page H3061]]

leave. When they do leave, almost 40 percent of survivors become 
homeless. This is wholly unacceptable.
  Until we address the full spectrum of abuse that survivors face, we 
won't significantly reduce rates of domestic violence. And for so long 
as domestic violence is a glaringly prevalent problem in our society, 
we will not see gender equality.
  Incorporating economic abuse into the definition of domestic violence 
in this landmark Federal legislation is a huge step.
  I am honored to have the opportunity to carry the voices of Orange 
County families and survivors to the Halls of Congress.
  I found help to let my family rebuild our lives. A police officer who 
had been trained in DV because of VAWA helped create the amazing, 
healthy children I have. I will count the passage of VAWA among my 
proudest achievements.
  Mr. Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Porter).
  The amendment was agreed to.


            Amendment No. 38 Offered by Mr. Rose of New York

  The Acting CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 38 
printed in part B of House Report 116-32.
  Mr. ROSE of New York. Mr. Chairman, I rise today in support of my 
amendment to expand national domestic violence hotlines.
  The Acting CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 171, insert after line 2 the following (and conform 
     the table of contents accordingly):

     SEC. 1408. NATIONAL DOMESTIC VIOLENCE HOTLINE.

       Not later than 3 months after the date of enactment of this 
     Act, a national domestic violence hotline for which a grant 
     is provided under section 313 of the Family Violence 
     Prevention and Services Act shall include the voluntary 
     feature of texting via telephone to ensure all methods of 
     communication are available for victims and those seeking 
     assistance.

  The Acting CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 281, the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Rose) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from New York.
  Mr. ROSE of New York. Mr. Chairman, when you consider hotlines today, 
we have to think about the fact that text messages are absolutely 
important, and they are also, all too often, ignored.
  We need to evolve. We need to fix the new problems of today as well 
as the problems of the future.
  As a subcommittee chairman of the Homeland Security Committee and as 
one of the younger Members of this body, I understand that the advent 
of social networks and technology has, in many ways, helped us track 
and identify bad actors. But as we have heard from survivors of 
domestic violence, it also allows abuse, coercion, stalking, and 
intimidation in more ways than ever before.
  Survivors need the necessary tools to keep themselves safe. When a 
woman is being constantly monitored by her abuser, is unable to hide, 
and finds herself trapped, a phone call could put her life in even more 
danger.
  This is why I implore my colleagues to support this amendment, 
because we are talking life and death here. This is not only a matter 
of believing survivors--though, to be clear, we absolutely must. This 
is about making sure that we empower survivors with the resources they 
need in the 21st century, no matter what age they are.
  It breaks my heart to know that those hiding from their abusers could 
be a young college student or even a teenager in high school. A recent 
study on intimate partner violence found that 1 in 10 high school 
students have experienced physical violence from dating a partner in a 
given year. Nearly one in three women in college have said they have 
been in an abusive dating relationship.
  If these statistics do not highlight the need for Congress to provide 
as much relief as we possibly can, I don't know what does.
  Making sure women in crisis can quickly and easily get help by 
texting the crisis hotline should be a no-brainer. The technology 
exists, and it has been proven to be effective by other organizations 
helping those in need. This isn't rocket science.
  If we apply modern-day technology to combat dating violence and 
sexual assault, we can keep survivors and their families safe while 
holding the perpetrators accountable.
  It is our job to make sure that our federally funded hotlines can 
serve in the most effective way. We need to get this done because, at 
the end of the day, this amendment will save lives.
  Mr. Chair, I urge my colleagues to support this amendment, and I 
yield back the balance of my time.
  The Acting CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Rose).
  The amendment was agreed to.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Chair, I move that the Committee do now rise.
  The motion was agreed to.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Mr. 
Malinowski) having assumed the chair, Mr. Rose of New York, Acting 
Chair of the Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, 
reported that that Committee, having had under consideration the bill 
(H.R. 1585) to reauthorize the Violence Against Women Act of 1994, and 
for other purposes, had come to no resolution thereon.

                          ____________________