SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2019; Congressional Record Vol. 165, No. 78
(House of Representatives - May 10, 2019)

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[Pages H3687-H3715]
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                 SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2019


                             general leave

  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
may have 5 legislative days in which to revise and extend their remarks 
and include extraneous material on H.R. 2157.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Ms. Dean). Is there objection to the request 
of the gentlewoman from New York?
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to House Resolution 357 and rule 
XVIII, the Chair declares the House in the Committee of the Whole House 
on the state of the Union for the consideration of the bill, H.R. 2157.
  The Chair appoints the gentlewoman from Iowa (Ms. Finkenauer) to 
preside over the Committee of the Whole.

                              {time}  0919


                     In the Committee of the Whole

  Accordingly, the House resolved itself into the Committee of the 
Whole House on the state of the Union for the consideration of the bill 
(H.R. 2157) making supplemental appropriations for the fiscal year 
ending September 30, 2019, and for other purposes, with Ms. Finkenauer 
in the chair.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to the rule, the bill is considered read the 
first time.
  General debate shall be confined to the bill and shall not exceed 1 
hour equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority 
member of the Committee on Appropriations.
  The gentlewoman from New York (Mrs. Lowey) and the gentlewoman from 
Texas (Ms. Granger) each will control 30 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from New York.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Last year, we watched hurricanes pummel Florida, Georgia, and the 
Carolinas; wildfires burn large swaths of the West; and typhoons strike 
territories in the Pacific.
  In addition to the tragic loss of life, families lost everything, 
businesses were upended, and communities were ripped apart.
  That is why, in January, the House passed an emergency disaster 
relief bill, H.R. 268, to help our fellow Americans recover and 
rebuild. Unfortunately, the bill languished for months

[[Page H3688]]

in the Senate over assistance for Puerto Rico. As it sat there, floods 
battered the Midwest and tornadoes swept the South, resulting in even 
more destruction. And it sat there in the Senate.
  This legislation attempts to meet the needs of all of America's 
disaster-stricken communities, whether in Puerto Rico or the Midwest, 
California or the Carolinas, with $17.2 billion in emergency spending.
  In addition to the funding provided in H.R. 268, the bill makes three 
critical additions.
  It includes $1.5 billion for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers for 
repairs to Corps projects damaged by flooding and natural disasters.
  It provides $1 billion for Community Development Block Grant Disaster 
Recovery, with language ensuring it is spent quickly to help 
communities rebuild housing, businesses, and public infrastructure in 
the most impacted and distressed areas affected by major natural 
disasters.
  And it includes $500 million for the Department of Agriculture's 
Emergency Conservation Program, providing emergency funding and 
technical assistance to farmers and ranchers to rehabilitate farmland 
damaged by natural disasters.
  That is an additional $3 billion to address the urgent needs 
following the Midwest floods and Southern tornadoes, and an additional 
$3 billion to rebuild damaged infrastructure, to help communities 
recover, and to bring local economies back to life.
  American citizens are relying on our Federal Government to deliver a 
robust disaster relief package. They have waited long enough. Frankly, 
they can't afford to wait any longer.
  Further delays will only leave communities more vulnerable and 
exposed to future natural disasters. With the Atlantic hurricane season 
beginning in just 4 weeks and looming summer heat increasing wildfire 
risk, we must act now.
  Madam Chair, this legislation is a critical and long-overdue step to 
meeting our fellow citizens' urgent needs. I urge my colleagues to 
support it, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  I rise today in opposition to H.R. 2157, the Supplemental 
Appropriations Act of 2019.
  This bill is similar to the disaster supplemental that passed the 
House in January. We have been waiting for the Senate to act on their 
version of the supplemental for several months.
  Unfortunately, taking up a disaster bill for the second time without 
addressing the administration's concerns will not increase its chance 
of becoming law.
  While this bill assists many communities struggling to recover from 
hurricanes, wildfires, flooding, and tornadoes, I have to oppose this 
measure today.
  I am particularly concerned about repairs that are needed for 
severely damaged military installations. We must return these 
facilities to a condition that can support our men and women in 
uniform. Unfortunately, the needs are actually greater than what is 
funded in this bill.
  I am also concerned that the bill fails to address the humanitarian 
and security crisis at the border. The rule for this bill does not 
allow us to consider an amendment to provide humanitarian relief and 
enhanced security at the border.
  On my recent visits to the border, I have seen firsthand that the 
crisis is getting worse every day. The numbers are staggering. In April 
alone, Customs and Border Protection made 109,000 apprehensions on the 
southwest border. More than half of these were family units.
  There have been more apprehensions in the first 7 months of this 
fiscal year than in all of the last fiscal year. Resources are urgently 
needed to address the health and safety of our law enforcement 
personnel, as well as families with children who are seeking refuge. 
This bill does nothing to address this crisis.
  We have no choice but to work together on this issue. We do not have 
the luxury of waiting for months to get resources to law enforcement, 
social service providers, and public health officers. The time to act 
is now.
  I want to thank Chairwoman Lowey for her tireless work to address the 
needs of our Nation. Just as we worked together to end the shutdown in 
February, we can come together again to rebuild our communities, 
protect our border, and provide humanitarian assistance where it is 
urgently needed.
  Unfortunately, I have to oppose this bill as it currently stands. I 
hope we can continue to work with the Senate and the White House to 
come up with a compromise and get disaster assistance to the 
communities that need it most.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I yield 3 minutes to the distinguished 
gentlewoman from Ohio (Ms. Kaptur) the chairwoman of the Energy and 
Water Development, and Related Agencies Subcommittee.

  Ms. KAPTUR. Madam Chair, I thank Chairwoman Lowey for yielding, and I 
thank her and Ranking Member Granger for bringing this bill to the 
floor.
  Madam Chair, I rise in strong support of H.R. 2157, the Supplemental 
Appropriations Act for 2019.
  Natural disasters across our Nation have been devastating the lives 
of millions of Americans. This map shows just some of the areas and 
families that have been stricken and have waited and waited and waited 
months for Federal support.
  The Missouri and Mississippi River systems are absolutely clogged 
from the Canadian border all the way down to the mouth at New Orleans. 
The devastation is understood by Americans who watch the news.
  We have waited months and months and months for Federal support. The 
failure of this body to act faster is shameful, so I welcome this 
moment this morning on behalf of all those who have been harmed.
  It is the top responsibility of Congress to provide these hard-hit 
communities with strength, hope, and support to recover.
  Imagine looking out your window and seeing this in your backyard. 
That has happened to thousands and thousands of families.
  This supplemental will finally provide aid to these ailing people and 
communities damaged by hurricanes, typhoons, volcanic activities, 
tornadoes, floods, snowstorms, and wildfires.
  From our energy and water accounts, $2 billion is provided to fix 
damaged Army Corps projects, with an additional $1.5 billion in Army 
Corps funding for the devastation wreaked by the flooding in the 
Midwest.
  We are at a 125-year high in the amount of rainfall coming down 
between the Rockies and the Appalachians--a 125-year high in this 
country.
  Many communities have been flooded like this one, but, also, we have 
very high water levels even in the Great Lakes region, where land is 
just soaked and farmers, business owners, and homeowners are so 
concerned about what is going to happen.
  Many of these communities are still underwater, but here we provide 
an initial downpayment.
  The bill also contains $775 million to accelerate projects to 
mitigate future disaster damages.

                              {time}  0930

  The bill comprehensively aids devastated communities with nutrition 
and Medicaid assistance, crop and livestock aid to farmers, and aid to 
upended rural populations.
  It rebuilds devastated military and Coast Guard installations so our 
servicemembers can focus on protecting our national security. Imagine 
Camp Lejeune asking us for more help.
  It funds resiliency of our Nation's drinking water, wastewater, and 
electrical grid systems, and provides communities help to rebuild 
businesses and local public infrastructure.
  Importantly, it includes significant help to rebuild Puerto Rico, 
which suffered complete devastation from Hurricanes Irma and Maria. 
This is deeply personal to my constituents, and to me. The President's 
refusal to recognize Puerto Ricans as the American citizens they are is 
unconscionable. The Senate Republicans back this position and find it 
reprehensible.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I yield the gentlewoman from Ohio an 
additional 15 seconds.
  Ms. KAPTUR. This is the second time this House has voted on 
supplemental funding this year. It is time the Senate take up this 
legislation and

[[Page H3689]]

give some peace to American communities and our citizens living in 
devastation. I urge swift passage of this act.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Chair, I yield 3 minutes to the gentleman from 
Nebraska (Mr. Smith).
  Mr. SMITH of Nebraska. Madam Chair, I rise to reflect on the 
importance of the disaster supplemental bill we are considering today.
  In Nebraska, we continue our work to recover from the storm which hit 
our State at the end of February. The storm brought with it blizzard 
conditions and large amounts of rain, followed rapidly by destructive 
flooding.
  The impact of this storm continues to be felt across our State, 
particularly by our ag producers. In the west, the extreme blizzard 
conditions compounded an already hard winter, leading to severe cattle 
losses. In the east, stored grain was actually washed away or damaged 
by the floods, and extensive silting of fields has impeded planting as 
the season is now underway.
  I particularly appreciate both this bill and the most recent Senate 
package including language to ensure our disaster programs can address 
losses of stored grain. While crop insurance covers producers from 
planting, including coverage for prevented planting, up through 
harvest, it does not provide coverage for harvest grain which is stored 
and has not yet been sold. Our producers need this relief.
  I realize this bill is not perfect, and there are a number of issues 
I hope we can address moving forward. I would prefer to be considering 
legislation which addresses the concerns of some Senators and the 
President and would be signed into law. This bill does not, and I hope 
negotiations will get us there soon.
  I have long advocated for disaster packages to be paid for; this 
package is not, and my amendment to cover the cost was, unfortunately, 
not made in order.
  We have traditionally extended a number of tax relief provisions to 
families and businesses in disaster areas. I have introduced 
legislation to do this, and I hope we can act on this relief soon as 
well.
  Madam Chair, Nebraskans need relief. Considering this bill moves us 
closer to providing them relief and, for that reason, I do support it.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Mr. Chairman, I yield 3\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman 
from North Carolina (Mr. Price), the chairman of the Transportation 
Subcommittee.
  Mr. PRICE of North Carolina. Mr. Chairman, I thank our Appropriations 
chair for yielding this time, and I rise in support of this disaster 
supplemental, which will provide $17.2 billion in long overdue 
assistance for North Carolina and for other States and territories that 
have suffered from devastating natural disasters.
  North Carolina has been hit by two hurricanes in as many years, with 
thousands of people displaced, homes destroyed, and livelihoods lost.
  Meanwhile, typhoons, tornadoes and wildfires, have wreaked havoc on 
millions of Americans in the South, the Midwest, California, and 
several territories, including Puerto Rico.
  The bill before us ensures the Federal Government will remain an 
active partner in the recovery effort. It provides comprehensive 
resources for: flexible community development block grants, highway and 
bridge repairs, Army Corps construction along our coasts and rivers, 
Department of Agriculture crop and livestock relief, repairs to our 
military installations, and many other critical recovery activities.
  We all know that these resources are desperately needed. We all know 
that they should have been provided months ago. The House passed a 
similar package back in January that stalled in the Republican-
controlled Senate.
  The President has complicated our efforts, to put it mildly, and he 
has complicated them in a particularly unfortunate way. He is obsessed 
with Puerto Rico. He is determined to punish the island for offenses, 
real or imagined. This has stymied bipartisan and bicameral efforts to 
help all Americans recover, Puerto Ricans included.
  And now the President's latest move is to insist that this disaster 
recovery bill should become a vehicle for his border priorities.
  The administration is even holding back money that has already been 
appropriated, including nearly $16 billion in HUD Community Development 
Block Grants, held up by the White House and OMB for political 
purposes.
  This has slowed the recovery, not just in Puerto Rico, but in my home 
State, North Carolina, in Florida, in Georgia, Texas, South Carolina, 
and the Virgin Islands.
  It is time for the President to stop playing politics with disaster 
funding, and it is time for Republicans in the House and Senate to show 
some backbone, to say to the White House, ``enough already;'' to join 
with Democrats to help communities in need.
  I urge all of my colleagues to support this legislation.
  Ms. GRANGER. Mr. Chairman, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Mr. Chair, I yield 3 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
Minnesota (Ms. McCollum), the chair of the Interior Subcommittee.
  Ms. McCOLLUM. Mr. Chair, I rise in support of this funding package 
today. I am pleased that, within the Interior Subcommittee's 
jurisdiction, the bill provides more than $2 billion for recovery from 
devastating natural disasters.
  This includes $849 million to rebuild drinking water and waste 
treatment systems to a state of resiliency against future storms, and 
$50 million for coastal resiliency projects to reduce flooding and 
erosion caused by sea level rise and climate change.
  This bill provides funds to repair Federal facilities that were 
destroyed or damaged, like the Hawaii Volcanoes Observatory, funds for 
Historic Preservation grants to repair culturally significant sites and 
properties, and funds to clean up hazardous and solid waste.
  A critical provision in this bill provides $720 million to fully 
repay the U.S. Forest Service for funds it was forced to borrow in the 
last fiscal year to cover the cost of wildland fire suppression.
  An additional $134 million will help the Forest Service to address 
damage to national forests and to treat hazardous fuel loads.
  This emergency funding in this bill will help Americans who are 
struggling to restore their lives to return to their homes after 
devastating fires and hurricanes of last year.
  Communities in all of our States and our territories deserve Federal 
support as they recover from natural disasters. Democrats are proud, 
under the leadership of Chair Lowey, to be bringing this bill to the 
floor to help those who have suffered from these natural disasters to 
begin to rebuild and heal their lives.
  I urge my colleagues to support this bill.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I yield 3 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
Florida (Ms. Wasserman Schultz), the chairwoman of the Military 
Construction, Veterans Affairs, and Related Agencies Subcommittee.
  Ms. WASSERMAN SCHULTZ. Madam Chair, I thank the gentlewoman for 
yielding.
  I rise in support the underlying legislation.
  Madam Chair, H.R. 2157 totals $17.3 billion in emergency disaster 
appropriations to provide relief and recovery assistance for Americans 
affected by recent hurricanes.
  The MilCon/VA portion of the bill provides $860.4 million for 
Department of Defense military construction needs and the Department of 
Veterans Affairs.
  Specifically, the bill includes $115 million for the Marine Corps to 
begin planning for construction projects related to the devastation 
from Hurricanes Florence and Michael on Marine Corps facilities in 
North Carolina (New River, Cherry Point, and Lejeune).
  The Marine Corps is planning facility consolidation efforts resulting 
from the hurricanes' damage, and this funding represents the first step 
in that rebuilding process.
  Madam Chair, the bill also includes $700 million to begin rebuilding 
Tyndall Air Force Base in my home State of Florida. This funding will 
support the relocation of the F-22 mission, the beddown of F-35s, and 
the planning for construction of new facilities. This funding is a 
vital first step to begin the rebuild of Tyndall.
  Madam Chair, I also want to point out that this funding for Tyndall 
in North Carolina is a downpayment because Congress is going to need to 
provide much more than this to get these locations back up on their 
feet.

[[Page H3690]]

  Madam Chair, these events happened 6 months ago, and yet the first 
supplemental request to be submitted by the administration is not to 
address natural disasters; it was for border needs.
  I am astounded that the administration continues to ignore these real 
emergencies which clearly should have been addressed months ago, and I 
am proud that the Democratic majority is doing just that today.
  I urge all Members of this body to cast a ``yes'' vote.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
New York (Ms. Velazquez), the chairwoman of the Small Business 
Committee.
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. Madam Chair, I rise in support of this legislation.
  It has now been 2 years since Maria barreled into Puerto Rico 
inflicting historic damage, enormous suffering, and the loss of 3,000 
American lives. Yet 20 months later, the people of the island continue 
struggling to recover and rebuild.
  Compounding this problem, Puerto Rico has exhausted funding for its 
nutritional assistance program, and the Governor has informed us they 
require $600 million to meet the food needs of the Commonwealth's most 
vulnerable. These are seniors, working single mothers, and those with 
disabilities.
  Let me remind my friends, in the U.S. Territory Puerto Rico, 65 
percent of our children live in poverty. It is un-American to deny 
nutrition assistance to American citizens living in Puerto Rico, 
particularly children. That is immoral, and we should be ashamed that, 
in the richest country, most powerful country in the world, we have 
allowed for children to suffer this way. That is simply wrong.
  In January, we passed a package to address this, but the Senate has 
failed to act, even though a number of my Republican Senate colleagues 
have promised to deliver Puerto Rico the aid they so desperately need.
  Making matters worse, our President has repeatedly distorted and 
misled the American people about the amount of money Puerto Rico 
receives.
  We must remember, Madam Chair, those suffering in Puerto Rico are our 
fellow citizens. It is unacceptable that this President and Senate 
Republicans would abandon them.
  Importantly, the bill also instructs FEMA to rebuild in a manner that 
is more resilient and capable of withstanding future extreme weather. 
Maria taught us painful lessons, and it only makes sense that as the 
island recovers we provide it with the tools to rebuild and resist 
future hurricanes.
  The CHAIR. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, I yield the gentlewoman from New York an 
additional 2 minutes.

                              {time}  0945

  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. Madam Chair, I pray passage of this bill which 
rightfully assists so many other parts of the Union, of our Nation, 
will motivate the Senate at last to act and the President to sign this 
badly needed aid into law. This is a matter of life and death for so 
many in Puerto Rico. I urge a ``yes'' vote.
  The CHAIR. Members are reminded to refrain from engaging in 
personalities toward the President.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Chair, to close, I would like to thank Chairwoman 
Lowey for her leadership. I look forward to working with her on 
legislation that addresses both natural disasters and the humanitarian 
crisis on the border.
  We should provide much-needed relief to communities recovering from 
hurricanes, floods, wildfires, and tornadoes, but we cannot turn our 
back on a border crisis that is growing worse by the day. Law 
enforcement agencies providing humanitarian assistance are being rushed 
and pushed to the limit, and we must act now.
  The chairwoman and I have worked together for many years to find 
solutions in the national interest. I know we will be able to do so 
again.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mrs. LOWEY. Madam Chair, it is time to stop playing games and provide 
assistance to all Americans, no matter whether you lost your home to a 
wildfire in the West, farmland to flooding in the Midwest, or your 
entire community to a hurricane in Puerto Rico. Vote ``yes.''
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Chair, I rise in strong support of H.R. 2157, 
the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2019.
  This bill is a comprehensive emergency disaster supplemental bill to 
help meet the urgent needs of American communities still struggling to 
recover from recent hurricanes, typhoons, wildfires, floods and other 
natural disasters.
  This robust disaster package includes $17.2 billion in long overdue 
emergency spending for disaster-stricken communities across our nation 
and territories.
  It builds on the legislation that passed the House in January--
including an additional $3 billion to address the urgent needs of those 
living in the Midwest (Nebraska, Missouri, South Dakota, Iowa and 
Kansas) and South (Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia and the 
Carolinas) who have been devastated by flooding and tornadoes in recent 
months.
  This bill also provides some additional disaster assistance to 
communities continuing to recover from Hurricane Harvey.
  House Democrats are standing up and taking action to help communities 
across the United States and in Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana 
Islands, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands and American Samoa recover and 
heal from devastating disasters--these communities should not be held 
hostage because of President Trump's personal contempt for Puerto Rico.
  Senate Republicans should come to their senses and join Democrats in 
advancing this bill and speeding relief to millions of Americans.
  Included in this legislation is critical funding for:
  Infrastructure and community development to rebuild our 
transportation systems and repair housing, businesses and public 
infrastructure;
  Farmers and rural communities to bolster the farmer safety net and 
restore disaster-damaged lands;
  Social services, mental health, education and dislocated worker 
initiatives to invest in the well-being of children, workers and 
families in disaster-struck areas--including providing critical 
nutrition and Medicaid assistance for Puerto Rico and U.S. territories;
  DOD and Veterans Affairs to repair and rebuild hurricane-damaged 
bases and facilities; and
  Disaster resiliency to mitigating damage and costs from future 
disasters which are becoming more frequent as a result of climate 
change.
  American families hit by natural disasters deserve to know that their 
government will stand with them throughout the road to recovery.
  Democrats are committed to delivering this assistance to our fellow 
Americans as they work to rebuild their lives and their communities.
  Another reason I strongly support this bill is that H.R. 2157, the 
``Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2019,'' provides much needed and 
long overdue relief to Americans in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin 
Islands still suffering from the ravages of Hurricanes Maria and Irma, 
as well as relief to victims of Hurricane Michael which struck Alabama, 
Florida, and Georgia in October 2018. It also provides relief to the 
victims of the Midwestern floods that have caused so much damage in 
Nebraska, Missouri, South Dakota, Iowa, and Kansas.
  I support this legislation and offered an amendment that would have 
provided additional funding for electricity delivery and necessary 
expenses related to the consequences of Hurricanes Harvey, Maria, Irma, 
and Maria, and Super Typhoon Yutu including technical assistance 
related to electric grids.
  As the representative of the Eighteenth Congressional District of 
Texas, which was ground zero for Hurricane Harvey, I regularly hear 
from constituents expressing their concern with ineffective and 
inadequate FEMA mechanisms put in place to help rectify the damage 
caused by natural disasters.
  That is why I also offered an amendment to H.R. 2157 that would 
prohibits funds in the bill from being used to prevent the FEMA 
Administrator from monitoring the response given to disaster victims in 
order to ensure quality control or becoming aware of complaints 
regarding the response given to disaster victims and having in place a 
mechanism to address such complaints.
  A third Jackson Lee amendment to H.R. 2157 would have provided a 
minimum of $1 million for wastewater and drinking water treatment works 
and facilities impacted by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria.
  Hurricane Sandy inflicted more than $70 billion in damages in 2012, 
and Matthew cost the U.S. about $10.3 billion in 2016. With Harvey, an 
estimated 13 million people were affected, nearly 135,000 homes damaged 
or destroyed in the historic flooding, and up to a million cars were 
wrecked.
  Hurricane Harvey ranks as the second-most costly hurricane to hit the 
U.S. mainland since

[[Page H3691]]

1900, causing more than $125 billion in damage.
  Our residents need more money than for single-family home repairs, 
whether it is disaster recovery or general housing dollars and I will 
continue to stride on behalf of the neighborhoods and on behalf of 
hard-working homeowners who deserve these funds, so they can continue 
on with their lives and return to their homes.
  Victims of natural disasters are entitled to know who to contact when 
issues related to FEMA arise and to be assured that their questions are 
answered, and complaints addressed.
  Allocating funding for measures such as Electricity Delivery for 
necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricanes Harvey, 
Maria, Irma, and Super Typhoon Yutu, is vital to negate the effects of 
these catastrophic events from significantly worsening.
  Hospitals, first-responders, and a number of other vital institutions 
that help our communities recover from the aftereffects of natural 
disasters need access to electricity.
  Moreover, with the severity of natural disasters and the ranging of 
their locations we must be proactive in our preparation for recovery.
  Alternatively, water is the most essential resource known to man.
  A human can go for more than three weeks without food--Mahatma Gandhi 
survived 21 days of complete starvation--but water is a different 
story.
  At least 60 percent of the adult body is made of it and every living 
cell in the body needs it to keep functioning.
  Under extreme conditions an adult can lose 1 to 1.5 liters of sweat 
per hour and if that lost water is not replaced, the total volume of 
body fluid can fall quickly and, most dangerously, blood volume may 
drop.
  We do not have the luxury of not preparing for hurricanes, floods. 
earthquakes, mudslides, tornados or other natural disasters.
  With these events it is not a question of if, but when.
  For these reasons, I urge my colleagues to support the rule and the 
underlying legislation.
  The CHAIR. All time for general debate has expired.
  Pursuant to the rule, an amendment in the nature of a substitute 
consisting of the text of Rules Committee Print 116-12, modified by the 
amendment printed in part B of House Report 116-51, shall be considered 
as adopted, and the bill, as amended, shall be considered as an 
original bill for the purpose of further amendment under the 5-minute 
rule and shall be considered as read.
  The text of the bill, as amended, is as follows:

                               H.R. 2157

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled.
       That the following sums are hereby appropriated, out of any 
     money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, and out of 
     applicable corporate or other revenues, receipts, and funds, 
     for the several departments, agencies, corporations, and 
     other organizational units of Government for fiscal year 
     2019, and for other purposes, namely:

                                TITLE I

                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

                         AGRICULTURAL PROGRAMS

                   Processing, Research and Marketing

                        Office of the Secretary

       For an additional amount for the ``Office of the 
     Secretary'', $3,005,442,000, which shall remain available 
     until December 31, 2020, for necessary expenses related to 
     losses of crops (including milk, on-farm stored commodities, 
     and harvested adulterated wine grapes), trees, bushes, and 
     vines, as a consequence of Hurricanes Michael and Florence, 
     other hurricanes, floods, tornadoes, typhoons, volcanic 
     activity, snowstorms, and wildfires occurring in calendar 
     years 2018 and 2019 under such terms and conditions as 
     determined by the Secretary:  Provided, That the Secretary 
     may provide assistance for such losses in the form of block 
     grants to eligible States and territories and such assistance 
     may include compensation to producers, as determined by the 
     Secretary, for past or future crop insurance premiums, forest 
     restoration, and poultry and livestock losses:  Provided 
     further, That of the amounts provided under this heading, 
     tree assistance payments may be made under section 1501(e) of 
     the Agricultural Act of 2014 (7 U.S.C. 9081(e)) to eligible 
     orchardists or nursery tree growers (as defined in such 
     section) of pecan trees with a tree mortality rate that 
     exceeds 7.5 percent (adjusted for normal mortality) and is 
     less than 15 percent (adjusted for normal mortality), to be 
     available until expended, for losses incurred during the 
     period beginning January 1, 2018, and ending December 31, 
     2018:  Provided further, That in the case of producers 
     impacted by volcanic activity that resulted in the loss of 
     crop land, or access to crop land, the Secretary shall 
     consider all measures available, as appropriate, to bring 
     replacement land into production:  Provided further, That the 
     total amount of payments received under this heading and 
     applicable policies of crop insurance under the Federal Crop 
     Insurance Act (7 U.S.C. 1501 et seq.) or the Noninsured Crop 
     Disaster Assistance Program (NAP) under section 196 of the 
     Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform Act of 1996 (7 
     U.S.C. 7333) shall not exceed 90 percent of the loss as 
     determined by the Secretary:  Provided further, That the 
     total amount of payments received under this heading for 
     producers who did not obtain a policy or plan of insurance 
     for an insurable commodity for the applicable crop year under 
     the Federal Crop Insurance Act (7 U.S.C. 1501 et seq.) for 
     the crop incurring the losses or did not file the required 
     paperwork and pay the service fee by the applicable State 
     filing deadline for a noninsurable commodity for the 
     applicable crop year under NAP for the crop incurring the 
     losses shall not exceed 70 percent of the loss as determined 
     by the Secretary:  Provided further, That producers receiving 
     payments under this heading, as determined by the Secretary, 
     shall be required to purchase crop insurance where crop 
     insurance is available for the next two available crop years, 
     excluding tree insurance policies, and producers receiving 
     payments under this heading shall be required to purchase 
     coverage under NAP where crop insurance is not available in 
     the next two available crop years, as determined by the 
     Secretary:  Provided further, That, not later than 120 days 
     after the end of fiscal year 2019, the Secretary shall submit 
     a report to the Congress specifying the type, amount, and 
     method of such assistance by State and territory:  Provided 
     further, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                          Farm Service Agency

                  emergency forest restoration program

       For an additional amount for the ``Emergency Forest 
     Restoration Program'', for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricanes Michael and Florence and wildfires 
     occurring in calendar year 2018, and other natural disasters, 
     $480,000,000, to remain available until expended:  Provided, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                 Natural Resources Conservation Service

               watershed and flood prevention operations

       For an additional amount for ``Watershed and Flood 
     Prevention Operations'', for necessary expenses for the 
     Emergency Watershed Protection Program related to the 
     consequences of Hurricanes Michael and Florence and wildfires 
     occurring in calendar year 2018, and other natural disasters, 
     $125,000,000, to remain available until expended:  Provided, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                           Rural Development

               rural community facilities program account

       For an additional amount for the cost of grants for rural 
     community facilities programs as authorized by section 306 
     and described in section 381E(d)(1) of the Consolidated Farm 
     and Rural Development Act, for necessary expenses related to 
     the consequences of Hurricanes Michael and Florence and 
     wildfires occurring in calendar year 2018, and other natural 
     disasters, $150,000,000, to remain available until expended:  
     Provided, That sections 381E-H and 381N of the Consolidated 
     Farm and Rural Development Act are not applicable to the 
     funds made available under this heading: Provided further, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                     GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS TITLE

       Sec. 101.  In addition to other amounts made available by 
     section 309 of division A of the Additional Supplemental 
     Appropriations for Disaster Relief Requirements Act, 2017 
     (Public Law 115-72; 131 Stat. 1229), there is hereby 
     appropriated $600,000,000 for the Secretary of Agriculture to 
     provide a grant to the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico for 
     disaster nutrition assistance in response to Presidentially 
     declared major disasters and emergencies:  Provided, That the 
     funds made available to the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico under 
     this section shall remain available for obligation by the 
     Commonwealth until September 30, 2020, and shall be in 
     addition to funds otherwise made available:  Provided 
     further, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.
       Sec. 102.  In addition to amounts otherwise made available, 
     out of the funds made available under section 18 of the Food 
     and Nutrition Act of 2008, $25,200,000 shall be available for 
     the Secretary to provide a grant to the Commonwealth of the 
     Northern Mariana Islands for disaster nutrition assistance in 
     response to the Presidentially declared major disasters and 
     emergencies: Provided, That funds made available to the 
     Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands under this 
     section shall remain available for obligation by the 
     Commonwealth until September 30, 2020: Provided further, That 
     such amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.
       Sec. 103.  For purposes of administering title I of 
     subdivision 1 of division B of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 
     2018 (Public Law 115-123), losses to agricultural producers 
     resulting from hurricanes shall also include losses of peach 
     and

[[Page H3692]]

     blueberry crops in calendar year 2017 due to extreme cold: 
     Provided, That the amounts provided by this section are 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985: 
     Provided further, That amounts repurposed under this heading 
     that were previously designated by the Congress as an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 are designated by the 
     Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.
       Sec. 104. (a)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (2), a 
     person or legal entity is not eligible to receive a payment 
     under the Market Facilitation Program established pursuant to 
     the Commodity Credit Corporation Charter Act (15 U.S.C. 714 
     et seq.) if the average adjusted gross income of such person 
     or legal entity is greater than $900,000.
       (2) Paragraph (1) shall not apply to a person or legal 
     entity if at least 75 percent of the adjusted gross income of 
     such person or legal entity is derived from farming, 
     ranching, or forestry related activities.
       (b) A person or legal entity may not receive a payment 
     under the Market Facilitation Program described in subsection 
     (a)(1), directly or indirectly, of more than $125,000.
       (c) In this section, the term ``average adjusted gross 
     income'' has the meaning given the term defined in section 
     760.1502 of title 7 Code of Federal Regulations (as in effect 
     July 18, 2018).
       (d) The amount provided by this section is designated by 
     the Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant 
     to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
       Sec. 105.  There is hereby appropriated $5,000,000, to 
     remain available until September 30, 2020, for the Secretary 
     of Agriculture to conduct an independent study, including a 
     survey of participants, to compare the impact of the 
     additional benefits provided by section 309 of Public Law 
     115-72 to the food insecurity, health status, and well-being 
     of low-income residents in Puerto Rico without such 
     additional benefits: Provided, That such amount is designated 
     by the Congress as being for an emergency requirement 
     pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget 
     and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
       Sec. 106.  In addition to amounts otherwise made available, 
     out of the funds made available under section 18 of the Food 
     and Nutrition Act of 2008, $5,000,000 shall be available for 
     the Secretary to provide a grant to American Samoa for 
     disaster nutrition assistance in response to the 
     Presidentially declared major disasters and emergencies: 
     Provided, That funds made available to the territory under 
     this section shall remain available for obligation by the 
     territory until September 30, 2020: Provided further, That 
     such amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.
       Sec. 107.  For an additional amount for the ``Emergency 
     Conservation Program'', for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricanes Michael and Florence and of 
     wildfires occurring in calendar year 2018, and other natural 
     disasters, $500,000,000, to remain available until expended: 
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                                TITLE II

                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

                  Economic Development Administration

                economic development assistance programs

                     (including transfers of funds)

       Pursuant to section 703 of the Public Works and Economic 
     Development Act (42 U.S.C. 3233), for an additional amount 
     for ``Economic Development Assistance Programs'' for 
     necessary expenses related to flood mitigation, disaster 
     relief, long-term recovery, and restoration of infrastructure 
     in areas that received a major disaster designation as a 
     result of Hurricanes Florence, Michael, and Lane, Typhoons 
     Yutu and Mangkhut, and of wildfires, volcanic eruptions, 
     earthquakes, and other natural disasters occurring in 
     calendar year 2018, and tornadoes and floods occurring in 
     calendar year 2019 under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster 
     Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq.), 
     $600,000,000, to remain available until expended:  Provided, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985:  Provided further, That within the amount appropriated, 
     up to 2 percent of funds may be transferred to the ``Salaries 
     and Expenses'' account for administration and oversight 
     activities:  Provided further, That within the amount 
     appropriated, $1,000,000 shall be transferred to the ``Office 
     of Inspector General'' account for carrying out 
     investigations and audits related to the funding provided 
     under this heading.

            National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

                  operations, research, and facilities

       For an additional amount for ``Operations, Research, and 
     Facilities'' for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricanes Florence and Michael, Typhoon 
     Yutu, and of wildfires, $120,570,000, to remain available 
     until September 30, 2020, as follows:
       (1) $3,000,000 for repair and replacement of observing 
     assets, real property, and equipment;
       (2) $11,000,000 for marine debris assessment and removal;
       (3) $31,570,000 for mapping, charting, and geodesy 
     services;
       (4) $25,000,000 to improve: (a) hurricane intensity 
     forecasting, including through deployment of unmanned ocean 
     observing platforms and enhanced data assimilation; (b) flood 
     prediction, forecasting, and mitigation capabilities; and (c) 
     wildfire prediction, detection, and forecasting; and
       (5) $50,000,000 for Title IX Fund grants as authorized 
     under section 906(c) of division O of Public Law 114-113:

     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985:  Provided further, That the National 
     Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shall submit a 
     spending plan to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
     House of Representatives and the Senate for funding provided 
     under subsection (4) of this heading within 45 days after the 
     date of enactment of this Act.

               procurement, acquisition and construction

       For an additional amount for ``Procurement, Acquisition and 
     Construction'', $25,000,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2021, for improvements to operational and 
     research weather supercomputing infrastructure and satellite 
     ground services used for hurricane intensity and track 
     prediction; flood prediction, forecasting, and mitigation; 
     and wildfire prediction, detection, and forecasting:  
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985:  Provided further, That the National 
     Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shall submit a 
     spending plan to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
     House of Representatives and the Senate within 45 days after 
     the date of enactment of this Act.

                      fishery disaster assistance

       For an additional amount for ``Fishery Disaster 
     Assistance'' for necessary expenses associated with the 
     mitigation of fishery disasters, $150,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended:  Provided, That funds shall be used 
     for mitigating the effects of commercial fishery failures and 
     fishery resource disasters declared by the Secretary of 
     Commerce, including those declared by the Secretary to be a 
     direct result of Hurricanes Florence and Michael and Typhoons 
     Yutu and Mangkhut:  Provided further, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                         DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

                     United States Marshals Service

                         salaries and expenses

       For an additional amount for ``Salaries and Expenses'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricanes 
     Florence and Michael and Typhoon Yutu, $1,336,000:  Provided, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                         Federal Prison System

                        buildings and facilities

       For an additional amount for ``Buildings and Facilities'' 
     for necessary expenses related to the consequences of 
     Hurricanes Florence and Michael and Typhoon Yutu, 
     $28,400,000, to remain available until expended:  Provided, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                       Legal Services Corporation

               payment to the legal services corporation

       For an additional amount for ``Payment to the Legal 
     Services Corporation'' to carry out the purposes of the Legal 
     Services Corporation Act by providing for necessary expenses 
     related to the consequences of Hurricanes Florence, Michael, 
     and Lane, Typhoons Yutu and Mangkhut, calendar year 2018 
     wildfires, volcanic eruptions, and earthquakes, and calendar 
     year 2019 tornadoes and floods, $15,000,000:  Provided, That 
     such amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985:  Provided further, That none of the funds appropriated 
     in this Act to the Legal Services Corporation shall be 
     expended for any purpose prohibited or limited by, or 
     contrary to any of the provisions of, sections 501, 502, 503, 
     504, 505, and 506 of Public Law 105-119, and all funds 
     appropriated in this Act to the Legal Services Corporation 
     shall be subject to the same terms and conditions set forth 
     in such sections, except that all references in sections 502 
     and 503 to 1997 and 1998 shall be deemed to refer instead to 
     2018 and 2019, respectively, and except that sections 501 and 
     503 of Public Law 104-134 (referenced by Public Law 105-119) 
     shall not apply to the amount made available under this 
     heading:  Provided further, That, for the purposes of this 
     Act, the Legal Services Corporation shall be considered an 
     agency of the United States Government.

                               TITLE III

                         DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

                Operation and Maintenance, Marine Corps

       For an additional amount for ``Operation and Maintenance, 
     Marine Corps'', $200,000,000, for necessary expenses related 
     to the consequences of Hurricanes Michael and Florence:  
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985:  Provided further, That notwithstanding 
     section 284 of title 10, United States Code, or any other 
     provision of law, funds made available under this

[[Page H3693]]

     heading may only be used for the purposes specifically 
     described under this heading.

                  Operation and Maintenance, Air Force

       For an additional amount for ``Operation and Maintenance, 
     Air Force'', $400,000,000, for necessary expenses related to 
     the consequences of Hurricanes Michael and Florence:  
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985:  Provided further, That notwithstanding 
     section 284 of title 10, United States Code, or any other 
     provision of law, funds made available under this heading may 
     only be used for the purposes specifically described under 
     this heading.

                                TITLE IV

                       CORPS OF ENGINEERS--CIVIL

                         DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

                             investigations

       For an additional amount for ``Investigations'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the completion, or initiation 
     and completion, of flood and storm damage reduction, 
     including shore protection, studies which are currently 
     authorized or which are authorized after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, to reduce risk from future floods and 
     hurricanes, at full Federal expense, $35,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended, in States and insular areas that 
     were impacted by Hurricanes Florence and Michael, Typhoon 
     Mangkhut, Super Typhoon Yutu, and Tropical Storm Gita:  
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985:  Provided further, That the Assistant 
     Secretary of the Army for Civil Works shall provide a monthly 
     report directly to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
     House and the Senate detailing the allocation and obligation 
     of these funds, including new studies selected to be 
     initiated using funds provided under this heading, beginning 
     not later than 60 days after the date of enactment of this 
     Act.

                              construction

       For an additional amount for ``Construction'' for necessary 
     expenses, $740,000,000, to remain available until expended, 
     to construct flood and storm damage reduction, including 
     shore protection, projects which are currently authorized or 
     which are authorized after the date of enactment of this Act, 
     and flood and storm damage reduction, including shore 
     protection, projects which have signed Chief's Reports as of 
     the date of enactment of this Act or which are studied using 
     funds provided under the heading ``Investigations'' if the 
     Secretary determines such projects to be technically 
     feasible, economically justified, and environmentally 
     acceptable, in States and insular areas that were impacted by 
     Hurricanes Florence and Michael, Typhoon Mangkhut, Super 
     Typhoon Yutu, and Tropical Storm Gita:  Provided, That 
     projects receiving funds provided under the first proviso in 
     ``Corps of Engineers-Civil--Department of the Army--
     Construction'' in Public Law 115-123 shall not be eligible 
     for funding provided under this heading:  Provided further, 
     That for projects receiving funding under this heading, the 
     provisions of section 902 of the Water Resources Development 
     Act of 1986 shall not apply to these funds:  Provided 
     further, That the completion of ongoing construction projects 
     receiving funds provided under this heading shall be at full 
     Federal expense with respect to such funds:  Provided 
     further, That using funds provided under this heading, the 
     non-Federal cash contribution for projects other than ongoing 
     construction projects shall be financed in accordance with 
     the provisions of section 103(k) of Public Law 99-662 over a 
     period of 30 years from the date of completion of the project 
     or separable element: Provided further, That of this amount, 
     $45,000,000 shall be used to initiate, at full Federal 
     expense, construction of authorized Corps of Engineers 
     ecosystem restoration projects that have incidental flood 
     risk management benefits in areas impacted by Hurricanes Irma 
     and Maria:  Provided further, That up to $25,000,000 of the 
     funds made available under this heading shall be used for 
     continuing authorities projects to reduce the risk of 
     flooding and storm damage:  Provided further, That any 
     projects using funds appropriated under this heading shall be 
     initiated only after non-Federal interests have entered into 
     binding agreements with the Secretary requiring, where 
     applicable, the non-Federal interests to pay 100 percent of 
     the operation, maintenance, repair, replacement, and 
     rehabilitation costs of the project and to hold and save the 
     United States free from damages due to the construction or 
     operation and maintenance of the project, except for damages 
     due to the fault or negligence of the United States or its 
     contractors:  Provided further, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985:  
     Provided further, That the Assistant Secretary of the Army 
     for Civil Works shall provide a monthly report directly to 
     the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate detailing the allocation and 
     obligation of these funds, beginning not later than 60 days 
     after the date of the enactment of this Act.

                   mississippi river and tributaries

       For an additional amount for ``Mississippi River and 
     Tributaries'' for necessary expenses to address emergency 
     situations at Corps of Engineers projects and rehabilitate 
     and repair damages to Corps of Engineers projects, caused by 
     natural disasters, including disasters in 2019, $575,000,000, 
     to remain available until expended:  Provided, That such 
     amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985:  Provided further, That the Assistant Secretary of the 
     Army for Civil Works shall provide a monthly report directly 
     to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate detailing the allocation and 
     obligation of these funds, beginning not later than 60 days 
     after the date of enactment of this Act.

                       operation and maintenance

       For an additional amount for ``Operation and Maintenance'' 
     for necessary expenses to dredge Federal navigation projects 
     in response to, and repair damages to Corps of Engineers 
     Federal projects caused by, natural disasters, including 
     disasters in 2019, $908,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended, of which such sums as are necessary to cover the 
     Federal share of eligible operation and maintenance costs for 
     coastal harbors and channels, and for inland harbors shall be 
     derived from the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund:  Provided, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985:  Provided further, That the Assistant Secretary of the 
     Army for Civil Works shall provide a monthly report directly 
     to the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate detailing the allocation and 
     obligation of these funds, beginning not later than 60 days 
     after the date of enactment of this Act.

                 flood control and coastal emergencies

       For an additional amount for ``Flood Control and Coastal 
     Emergencies'', as authorized by section 5 of the Act of 
     August 18, 1941 (33 U.S.C. 701n), for necessary expenses to 
     prepare for flood, hurricane and other natural disasters and 
     support emergency operations, repairs, and other activities 
     in response to such disasters, including disasters in 2019, 
     as authorized by law, $510,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended:  Provided, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985:  Provided further, That the 
     Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works shall provide 
     a monthly report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
     House of Representatives and the Senate detailing the 
     allocation and obligation of these funds, beginning not later 
     than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act.

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                          Central Utah Project

                central utah project completion account

       For an additional amount for ``Central Utah Project 
     Completion Account'', $350,000, to be deposited into the Utah 
     Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Account for use by 
     the Utah Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Commission, 
     to remain available until expended, for expenses necessary in 
     carrying out fire remediation activities related to wildfires 
     in 2018:  Provided, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                         Bureau of Reclamation

                      water and related resources

       For an additional amount for ``Water and Related 
     Resources'', $17,000,000, to remain available until expended, 
     for fire remediation and suppression emergency assistance 
     related to wildfires in 2017 and 2018:  Provided, That such 
     amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                          DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

                            ENERGY PROGRAMS

                          electricity delivery

       For an additional amount for ``Electricity Delivery'', 
     $15,500,000, to remain available until expended, for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricanes 
     Harvey, Irma, and Maria, and Super Typhoon Yutu, including 
     technical assistance related to electric grids:  Provided, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985:  Provided further, That the Assistant Secretary of 
     Electricity Delivery shall provide a monthly report to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate detailing the allocation and obligation of 
     these funds, beginning not later than 60 days after the date 
     of enactment of this Act.

                                TITLE V

                    DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

               SECURITY, ENFORCEMENT, AND INVESTIGATIONS

                              Coast Guard

                         operations and support

       For an additional amount for ``Operations and Support'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricanes 
     Michael, Florence, and Lane, Tropical Storm Gordon, and 
     Typhoon Mangkhut, $48,977,000; of which $46,977,000 shall 
     remain available until September 30, 2020, and of which 
     $2,000,000 shall remain available until September 30, 2023, 
     for environmental compliance and restoration:  Provided, That 
     such amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

              procurement, construction, and improvements

       For an additional amount for ``Procurement, Construction, 
     and Improvements'' for necessary

[[Page H3694]]

     expenses related to the consequences of Hurricanes Michael, 
     Florence, and Lane, Tropical Storm Gordon, and Typhoon 
     Mangkhut, $476,755,000, to remain available until September 
     30, 2023:  Provided, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                     GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS TITLE

       Sec. 501. (a) In General.--The Federal share of assistance 
     provided for DR-4336-PR, DR-4339-PR, DR-4340-USVI and DR-
     4335-USVI under sections 403, 406, and 407 of the Robert T. 
     Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 
     U.S.C. 5170b and 5173) shall be 100 percent of the eligible 
     costs under such sections.
       (b) Applicability.--The Federal share provided by 
     subsection (a) shall apply to disaster assistance applied for 
     before, on, or after the date of enactment of this Act.
       Sec. 502.  The Administrator of the Federal Emergency 
     Management Agency shall provide assistance, pursuant to 
     section 428 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
     Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq.), for 
     critical services as defined in section 406 of the Robert T. 
     Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act for the 
     duration of the recovery for incidents DR-4404, DR-4396, and 
     DR-4398 to--
       (1) replace or restore the function of a facility or system 
     to industry standards without regard to the pre-disaster 
     condition of the facility or system; and
       (2) replace or restore components of the facility or system 
     not damaged by the disaster where necessary to fully 
     effectuate the replacement or restoration of disaster-damaged 
     components to restore the function of the facility or system 
     to industry standards.
       Sec. 503.  Section 20601 of Public Law 115-123 (132 Stat. 
     85) is amended by striking ``may'' and inserting ``shall''.  
     Provided, That the amounts provided by this section are 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985:  
     Provided further, That amounts repurposed under this heading 
     that were previously designated by the Congress as an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 are designated by the 
     Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.
       Sec. 504. (a) In General.--The President shall make a 
     contribution under section 406 of the Robert T. Stafford 
     Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5172) 
     for each eligible rural medical facility that was damaged or 
     destroyed by a major disaster during calendar year 2015, 
     regardless of whether the operations of such medical facility 
     were subsequently carried out in a temporary replacement 
     facility. Such contribution shall be sufficient to provide 
     for a full permanent replacement of each such medical 
     facility to the resiliency standards described in subsection 
     (b).
       (b) Resiliency Standards.--A permanent replacement facility 
     provided for under this section shall meet--
       (1) the definition of resilient developed pursuant to 
     section 406(e) of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
     Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5172(e)); and
       (2) any relevant consensus-based codes, specifications, and 
     standards.
       (c) Temporary Replacement Facility.--In any case in which 
     the President, acting through the Federal Emergency 
     Management Agency, has provided funding to lease or purchase 
     a temporary replacement facility to house the operations of 
     an eligible rural medical facility for which a permanent 
     replacement facility is required under this section, the 
     President shall continue such funding until a permanent 
     replacement facility is operational, including for any period 
     of time for which funding has not otherwise been provided.
       (d) Hospital Successor Entity.--A transfer in ownership of 
     an eligible rural medical facility or of a permanent 
     replacement facility, or the execution of a transaction by 
     the owner of an eligible rural medical facility resulting in 
     different ownership of a permanent replacement facility, 
     shall not affect the requirement in subsection (a) to provide 
     for a full replacement of the facility for which funds are 
     provided under this section, provided that such funds are 
     provided to an entity otherwise eligible for assistance under 
     section 406 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
     Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5172).
       (e) Definition of Eligible Rural Medical Facility.--In this 
     section, the term ``eligible rural medical facility'' means a 
     private nonprofit hospital facility--
       (1) located in a county with a population below 40,000, as 
     determined by the most recent decennial census;
       (2) that sustained damage during calendar year 2015 that 
     was eligible for financial assistance under section 406 of 
     the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency 
     Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5172); and
       (3) that was closed following damage sustained during a 
     major disaster and remains closed as of the date of enactment 
     of this Act.
       (f) The amounts provided by this section are designated by 
     the Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant 
     to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
       Sec. 505. (a) In General.--The President shall make a 
     contribution under section 406 of the Robert T. Stafford 
     Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5172) 
     to the applicable State or local government for each eligible 
     hydroelectric facility that was damaged or destroyed by a 
     major disaster during calendar year 2015 to carry out the 
     improvements for which such contribution was provided under 
     this section.
       (b) Contribution.--Each contribution provided for 
     improvements to an eligible hydroelectric facility under 
     subsection (a) shall be sufficient to--
       (1) rebuild canal embankments to meet all applicable 
     guidelines in the Engineering Guidelines for the Evaluation 
     of Hydropower Projects prepared by the Federal Energy 
     Regulatory Commission;
       (2) restore all other water-control and retaining 
     structures to meet all applicable such Engineering 
     Guidelines; and
       (3) provide for either--
       (A) the restoration of the eligible hydroelectric facility 
     to full operation of its function as a primary water source 
     and hydroelectric power supply; or
       (B) the establishment of an alternative primary water 
     source and the restoration of the full operation of the 
     hydroelectric power supply function of the eligible 
     hydroelectric facility pursuant to the requirements of 
     subsection (c).
       (c) Alternative Contribution.--A contribution may cover the 
     establishment of an alternative primary water source under 
     subsection (b)(3)(B) only if--
       (1) the water source could provide redundancy to the water 
     supply provided by an eligible hydroelectric facility;
       (2) the water source is approved by any applicable 
     regulatory agencies; and
       (3) the cost of the establishment of such water source and 
     the restoration of the full operation of the hydroelectric 
     power supply function of the eligible hydroelectric facility 
     is less than the cost of restoring the eligible hydroelectric 
     facility to full operation as described under subsection 
     (b)(3)(A).
       (d) Resiliency Standards.--An improvement carried out under 
     this section shall meet the definition of resilient developed 
     pursuant to section 406(e) of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster 
     Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5172(e)).
       (e) Definition of Eligible Hydroelectric Facility.--In this 
     section, the term ``eligible hydroelectric facility'' means a 
     hydroelectric facility that--
       (1) is part of a system that provides the primary water 
     source for more than 200,000 people;
       (2) sustained damage eligible for financial assistance 
     under section 406 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief 
     and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5172);
       (3) is licensed by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission 
     under part I of the Federal Power Act (16 U.S.C. 792 et 
     seq.); and
       (4) has been assigned a significant hazard potential 
     classification in accordance with chapter 1 of the 
     Engineering Guidelines for the Evaluation of Hydropower 
     Projects prepared by the Federal Energy Regulatory 
     Commission.
       (f) The amounts provided by this section are designated by 
     the Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant 
     to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
       Sec. 506. In implementing section 502 of this Act or 
     section 20601 of Public Law 115-123, the Administrator shall 
     include the costs associated with addressing pre-disaster 
     condition, undamaged components, codes and standards, and 
     industry standards in the cost of repair when calculating the 
     percentage in section 206.226(f) of title 44, Code of Federal 
     Regulations: Provided, That the amounts provided by this 
     section are designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985: Provided further, That amounts repurposed under this 
     heading that were previously designated by the Congress as an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 are designated by the 
     Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                                TITLE VI

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                United States Fish and Wildlife Service

                              construction

       For an additional amount for ``Construction'' for necessary 
     expenses related to the consequences of Hurricanes Florence, 
     Lane, and Michael, and flooding associated with major 
     declared disaster DR-4365, and calendar year 2018 
     earthquakes, $82,400,000, to remain available until expended: 
      Provided, That of this amount $50,000,000 shall be used to 
     restore and rebuild national wildlife refuges and increase 
     the resiliency and capacity of coastal habitat and 
     infrastructure to withstand storms and reduce the amount of 
     damage caused by such storms:  Provided further, That such 
     amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                         National Park Service

                       historic preservation fund

       For an additional amount for the ``Historic Preservation 
     Fund'' for necessary expenses related to the consequences of 
     Hurricanes Florence and Michael, and Typhoon Yutu, 
     $50,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2022, 
     including costs to States and territories necessary to 
     complete compliance activities required by section 306108 of 
     title 54, United States Code (formerly section 106 of the 
     National Historic Preservation Act) and costs needed to 
     administer the program:  Provided, That grants shall only be 
     available for areas that have received a major disaster 
     declaration pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster 
     Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq.): 
      Provided further, That individual grants shall

[[Page H3695]]

     not be subject to a non-Federal matching requirement:  
     Provided further, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                              construction

       For an additional amount for ``Construction'' for necessary 
     expenses related to the consequences of Hurricanes Florence 
     and Michael, Typhoons Yutu and Mangkhut, and calendar year 
     2018 wildfires, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions, 
     $78,000,000, to remain available until expended:  Provided, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                    United States Geological Survey

                 surveys, investigations, and research

       For an additional amount for ``Surveys, Investigations, and 
     Research'' for necessary expenses related to the consequences 
     of Hurricanes Florence and Michael, and calendar year 2018 
     wildfires, earthquake damage associated with emergency 
     declaration EM-3410, and in those areas impacted by a major 
     disaster declared pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster 
     Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq.) 
     with respect to calendar year 2018 wildfires or volcanic 
     eruptions, $98,500,000, to remain available until expended:  
     Provided, That of this amount, $72,310,000 is for costs 
     related to the repair and replacement of equipment and 
     facilities damaged by disasters in 2018:  Provided further, 
     That, not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of 
     this Act, the Survey shall submit a report to the Committees 
     on Appropriations that describes the potential options to 
     replace the facility damaged by the 2018 volcano disaster 
     along with cost estimates and a description of how the Survey 
     will provide direct access for monitoring volcanic activity 
     and the potential threat to at-risk communities:  Provided 
     further, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                          Departmental Offices

                            Insular Affairs

                       assistance to territories

       For an additional amount for ``Technical Assistance'' for 
     financial management expenses related to the consequences of 
     Typhoon Yutu, $2,000,000, to remain available until expended: 
      Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                      Office of Inspector General

                         salaries and expenses

       For an additional amount for ``Salaries and Expenses'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of major 
     disasters declared pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford 
     Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 
     et seq.) in 2018, $1,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended:  Provided, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                    ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

                         Science and Technology

       For an additional amount for ``Science and Technology'' for 
     necessary expenses related to improving preparedness of the 
     water sector, $600,000, to remain available until expended:  
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

          Leaking Underground Storage Tank Trust Fund Program

       For an additional amount for ``Leaking Underground Storage 
     Tank Fund'' for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricanes Florence and Michael, calendar 
     year 2018 earthquakes, and Typhoon Yutu, $1,500,000, to 
     remain available until expended:  Provided, That such amount 
     is designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                   State and Tribal Assistance Grants

       For additional amounts for ``State and Tribal Assistance 
     Grants'' for necessary expenses related to the consequences 
     of Hurricanes Florence and Michael and calendar year 2018 
     earthquakes for the hazardous waste financial assistance 
     grants program, $1,500,000, to remain available until 
     expended; for necessary expenses related to the consequences 
     of Typhoon Yutu for the hazardous waste financial assistance 
     grants program and for other solid waste management 
     activities, $56,000,000, to remain available until expended, 
     provided that none of these funds shall be subject to section 
     3011(b) of the Solid Waste Disposal Act; and for grants under 
     section 106 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, 
     $5,000,000, to remain available until expended, to address 
     impacts of Hurricane Florence, Hurricane Michael, Typhoon 
     Yutu, and calendar year 2018 wildfires, notwithstanding 
     subsections (b), (e), and (f), of such section:  Provided, 
     That such amounts are designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.
       For an additional amount for ``State and Tribal Assistance 
     Grants'', $349,400,000 to remain available until expended, of 
     which $53,300,000 shall be for capitalization grants for the 
     Clean Water State Revolving Funds under title VI of the 
     Federal Water Pollution Control Act, and of which 
     $296,100,000 shall be for capitalization grants under section 
     1452 of the Safe Drinking Water Act:  Provided, That 
     notwithstanding section 604(a) of the Federal Water Pollution 
     Control Act and section 1452(a)(1)(D) of the Safe Drinking 
     Water Act, funds appropriated herein shall be provided to 
     States or Territories in EPA Regions 4, 9, and 10 in amounts 
     determined by the Administrator for wastewater treatment 
     works and drinking water facilities impacted by Hurricanes 
     Florence and Michael, Typhoon Yutu, and calendar year 2018 
     wildfires and earthquakes:  Provided further, That 
     notwithstanding the requirements of section 603(i) of the 
     Federal Water Pollution Control Act and section 1452(d) of 
     the Safe Drinking Water Act, for the funds appropriated 
     herein, each State shall use not less than 20 percent but not 
     more than 30 percent of the amount of its capitalization 
     grants to provide additional subsidization to eligible 
     recipients in the form of forgiveness of principal, negative 
     interest loans or grants or any combination of these:  
     Provided further, That the Administrator shall retain 
     $10,400,000 of the funds appropriated herein for grants for 
     drinking water facilities and waste water treatment plants 
     impacted by Typhoon Yutu:  Provided further, That the funds 
     appropriated herein shall be used for eligible projects whose 
     purpose is to reduce flood or fire damage risk and 
     vulnerability or to enhance resiliency to rapid hydrologic 
     change or natural disaster at treatment works as defined by 
     section 212 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act or any 
     eligible facilities under section 1452 of the Safe Drinking 
     Water Act, and for other eligible tasks at such treatment 
     works or facilities necessary to further such purposes:  
     Provided further, That the Administrator of the Environmental 
     Protection Agency may retain up to $1,000,000 of the funds 
     appropriated herein for management and oversight:  Provided 
     further, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.
       In addition, for an additional amount for ``State and 
     Tribal Assistance Grants'', $500,000,000, to remain available 
     until expended, of which $261,000,000 shall be for 
     capitalization grants for the Clean Water State Revolving 
     Funds under title VI of the Federal Water Pollution Control 
     Act, and of which $239,000,000 shall be for capitalization 
     grants under section 1452 of the Safe Drinking Water Act:  
     Provided, That notwithstanding section 604(a) of the Federal 
     Water Pollution Control Act and section 1452(a)(1)(D) of the 
     Safe Drinking Water Act, funds appropriated herein shall be 
     provided to States or Territories in EPA Regions 2, 4, and 6 
     in amounts determined by the Administrator for wastewater and 
     drinking water treatment works and facilities impacted by 
     Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria:  Provided further, That, 
     for Region 2, such funds allocated from funds appropriated 
     herein shall not be subject to the matching or cost share 
     requirements of sections 602(b)(2), 602(b)(3) of the Federal 
     Water Pollution Control Act nor the matching requirements of 
     section 1452(e) of the Safe Drinking Water Act:  Provided 
     further, That, for Region 2, notwithstanding the requirements 
     of section 603(i) of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act 
     and section 1452(d) of the Safe Drinking Water Act, each 
     State and Territory shall use the full amount of its 
     capitalization grants allocated from funds appropriated 
     herein to provide additional subsidization to eligible 
     recipients in the form of forgiveness of principal, negative 
     interest loans or grants or any combination of these:  
     Provided further, That, for Regions 4 and 6, notwithstanding 
     the requirements of section 603(i) of the Federal Water 
     Pollution Control Act and section 1452(d) of the Safe 
     Drinking Water Act, for the funds allocated, each State shall 
     use not less than 20 percent but not more than 30 percent 
     amount of its capitalization grants allocated from funds 
     appropriated herein to provide additional subsidization to 
     eligible recipients in the form of forgiveness of principal, 
     negative interest loans or grants or any combination of 
     these:  Provided further, That the Administrator shall retain 
     $74,600,000 of the funds appropriated herein for grants to 
     any State or territory that has not established a water 
     pollution control revolving fund pursuant to title VI of the 
     Federal Water Pollution Control Act or section 1452 of the 
     Safe Drinking Water Act for drinking water facilities and 
     waste water treatment plants impacted by Hurricanes Irma and 
     Maria:  Provided further, That the funds appropriated herein 
     shall only be used for eligible projects whose purpose is to 
     reduce flood damage risk and vulnerability or to enhance 
     resiliency to rapid hydrologic change or a natural disaster 
     at treatment works as defined by section 212 of the Federal 
     Water Pollution Control Act or any eligible facilities under 
     section 1452 of the Safe Drinking Water Act, and for other 
     eligible tasks at such treatment works or facilities 
     necessary to further such purposes:  Provided further, That, 
     for Region 2, notwithstanding section 603(d)(2) of the 
     Federal Water Pollution Control Act and section 1452(f)(2) of 
     the Safe Drinking Water Act, funds allocated from funds 
     appropriated herein may be used to make loans or to buy, 
     refinance or restructure the debt obligations of eligible 
     recipients only where such debt was incurred on or after 
     September 20, 2017:  Provided further, That the Administrator 
     of the Environmental Protection Agency may retain up to 
     $1,000,000 of the funds appropriated herein for management 
     and oversight:  Provided further, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

[[Page H3696]]

  


                            RELATED AGENCIES

                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

                             Forest Service

                     forest and rangeland research

       For an additional amount for ``Forest and Rangeland 
     Research'' for necessary expenses related to the consequences 
     of Hurricanes Florence and Michael, and the calendar year 
     2018 wildfires, $1,000,000, to remain available until 
     expended for the forest inventory and analysis program:  
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                       state and private forestry

       For an additional amount for ``State and Private Forestry'' 
     for necessary expenses related to the consequences of 
     Hurricanes Florence and Michael, and the calendar year 2018 
     wildfires, $12,000,000, to remain available until expended:  
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                         national forest system

       For an additional amount for ``National Forest System'' for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricanes 
     Florence and Michael, and the calendar year 2018 wildfires, 
     $84,960,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
     That of this amount $21,000,000 shall be used for hazardous 
     fuels management activities: Provided further, That such 
     amount is designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                  capital improvement and maintenance

       For an additional amount for ``Capital Improvement and 
     Maintenance'' for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricanes Florence and Michael, and the 
     calendar year 2018 wildfires, $36,040,000, to remain 
     available until expended:  Provided, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                        wildland fire management

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Wildland Fire Management'', 
     $720,271,000, to remain available through September 30, 2022, 
     for urgent wildland fire suppression operations:  Provided, 
     That such funds shall be solely available to be transferred 
     to and merged with other appropriations accounts from which 
     funds were previously transferred for wildland fire 
     suppression in fiscal year 2018 to fully repay those amounts: 
      Provided further, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

                     National Institutes of Health

          national institute of environmental health sciences

       For an additional amount for ``National Institute of 
     Environmental Health Sciences'' for necessary expenses in 
     carrying out activities set forth in section 311(a) of the 
     Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
     Liability Act of 1980 (42 U.S.C. 9660(a)) and section 126(g) 
     of the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 
     related to the consequences of major disasters declared 
     pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
     Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq.) in 2018, 
     $1,000,000, to remain available until expended:  Provided, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                     GENERAL PROVISION--THIS TITLE

       Sec. 601.  Not later than 45 days after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the agencies receiving funds 
     appropriated by this title shall provide a detailed operating 
     plan of anticipated uses of funds made available in this 
     title by State and Territory, and by program, project, and 
     activity, to the Committees on Appropriations:  Provided, 
     That no such funds shall be obligated before the operating 
     plans are provided to the Committees:  Provided further, That 
     such plans shall be updated, including obligations to date, 
     and submitted to the Committees on Appropriations every 60 
     days until all such funds are expended.

                               TITLE VII

                          DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

                 Employment and Training Administration

                    training and employment services

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Training and Employment 
     Services'', $50,000,000, for the dislocated workers 
     assistance national reserve for necessary expenses directly 
     related to the consequences of Hurricanes Florence and 
     Michael, Typhoon Mangkhut, Super Typhoon Yutu, wildfires 
     occurring in calendar year 2018, and tornadoes and floods 
     occurring in calendar year 2019, to remain available through 
     September 30, 2020: Provided, That the Secretary of Labor may 
     transfer up to $1,000,000 of such funds to any other 
     Department of Labor account for reconstruction and recovery 
     needs, including worker protection activities: Provided 
     further, That these sums may be used to replace grant funds 
     previously obligated to the impacted areas: Provided further, 
     That of the amount provided, up to $500,000, to remain 
     available until expended, shall be transferred to ``Office of 
     Inspector General'' for oversight of activities responding to 
     such consequences:  Provided further, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

       Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

                health surveillance and program support

       For an additional amount for ``Health Surveillance and 
     Program Support'', $30,000,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2019, for grants, contracts and cooperative 
     agreements for behavioral health treatment, crisis 
     counseling, and other related helplines, and for other 
     similar programs to provide support to individuals impacted 
     by Hurricanes Florence and Michael, Typhoon Mangkhut, Super 
     Typhoon Yutu, wildfires occurring in 2018, and tornadoes and 
     floods occurring in calendar year 2019 in those areas for 
     which a major disaster or emergency has been declared under 
     section 401 or 501 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief 
     and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5170 and 5191):  
     Provided, That obligations incurred for the purposes provided 
     herein prior to the date of enactment of this Act may be 
     charged to funds appropriated under this heading:  Provided 
     further, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                Administration for Children and Families

                      social services block grant

       For an additional amount for ``Social Services Block 
     Grant'', $250,000,000, which shall remain available through 
     September 30, 2020, for necessary expenses directly related 
     to the consequences of Hurricanes Florence and Michael, 
     Typhoon Mangkhut, Super Typhoon Yutu, wildfires occurring in 
     2018, and tornadoes and floods occurring in calendar year 
     2019 in those areas for which a major disaster or emergency 
     has been declared under section 401 or 501 of the Robert T. 
     Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 
     U.S.C. 5170 and 5191):  Provided, That notwithstanding 
     section 2002 of the Social Security Act, the distribution of 
     such amount shall be limited to States directly affected by 
     these events:  Provided further, That the time limits in 
     section 2002(c) of the Social Security Act shall not apply to 
     funds appropriated in this paragraph that are used for 
     renovation, repair or construction:  Provided further, That 
     funds appropriated in this paragraph are in addition to the 
     entitlement grants authorized by section 2002(a)(1) of the 
     Social Security Act and shall not be available for such 
     entitlement grants:  Provided further, That in addition to 
     other uses permitted by title XX of the Social Security Act, 
     funds appropriated in this paragraph may be used for health 
     services (including mental health services), and for costs of 
     renovating, repairing, and construction of health care 
     facilities (including mental health facilities), child care 
     centers, and other social services facilities:  Provided 
     further, That of the amount provided, up to $1,000,000, to 
     remain available until expended, shall be transferred to 
     ``Office of the Secretary--Office of Inspector General'' for 
     oversight of activities responding to such hurricanes, 
     typhoons, wildfires, tornadoes, and floods:  Provided 
     further, That funds appropriated in this paragraph shall not 
     be available for costs that are reimbursed by the Federal 
     Emergency Management Agency, under a contract for insurance, 
     or by self-insurance:  Provided further, That obligations 
     incurred for the purposes provided herein prior to the date 
     of enactment of this Act may be charged to funds appropriated 
     under this heading:  Provided further, That up to $3,000,000 
     may be used to supplement amounts available for the necessary 
     expenses of administering subtitle A of title XX of the 
     Social Security Act:  Provided further, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                children and families services programs

       For an additional amount for ``Children and Families 
     Services Programs'', $60,000,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2021, for Head Start programs, including making 
     payments under the Head Start Act, for necessary expenses 
     directly related to the consequences of Hurricanes Florence 
     and Michael, Typhoon Mangkhut, Super Typhoon Yutu, wildfires 
     occurring in 2018, and tornadoes and floods occurring in 
     calendar year 2019 in those areas for which a major disaster 
     or emergency has been declared under section 401 or 501 of 
     the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency 
     Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5170 and 5191):  Provided, That 
     none of the funds appropriated in this paragraph shall be 
     included in the calculation of the ``base grant'' in 
     subsequent fiscal years, as such term is defined in sections 
     640(a)(7)(A), 641A(h)(1)(B), or 645(d)(3) of the Head Start 
     Act:  Provided further, That funds appropriated in this 
     paragraph are not subject to the allocation requirements of 
     section 640(a) of the Head Start Act:  Provided further, That 
     funds appropriated in this paragraph shall not be available 
     for costs that are reimbursed by the Federal Emergency 
     Management Agency, under a contract for insurance, or by 
     self-insurance:  Provided further, That up to $2,000,000 
     shall be available for Federal administrative expenses:  
     Provided further, That obligations incurred for the purposes 
     provided herein prior to the date of enactment of this Act 
     may be charged to funds appropriated under this heading:  
     Provided further, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement

[[Page H3697]]

     pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget 
     and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                        DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

                      hurricane education recovery

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Hurricane Education 
     Recovery'' for necessary expenses related to the consequences 
     of Hurricanes Florence and Michael, Typhoon Mangkhut, Super 
     Typhoon Yutu, the wildfires, earthquakes, and volcanic 
     eruptions occurring in calendar year 2018, and tornadoes and 
     floods occurring in calendar year 2019 in those areas for 
     which a major disaster or emergency has been declared under 
     section 401 or 501 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief 
     and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5170 and 5191) 
     (referred to under this heading as a ``covered disaster or 
     emergency''), $165,000,000, to remain available through 
     September 30, 2019:  Provided, That such assistance may be 
     provided through any of the programs authorized under this 
     heading in title VIII of subdivision 1 of division B of 
     Public Law 115-123 (as amended by Public Law 115-141), as 
     determined by the Secretary of Education, and subject to the 
     terms and conditions that applied to those programs, except 
     that references to dates and school years in Public Law 115-
     123 shall be deemed to be the corresponding dates and school 
     years for the covered disaster or emergency:  Provided 
     further, That the Secretary of Education may determine the 
     amounts to be used for each such program and shall notify the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate of these amounts not later than 7 days prior 
     to obligation:  Provided further, That $2,000,000 of the 
     funds made available under this heading, to remain available 
     until expended, shall be transferred to the Office of the 
     Inspector General of the Department of Education for 
     oversight of activities supported with funds appropriated 
     under this heading, and up to $1,000,000 of the funds made 
     available under this heading shall be for program 
     administration:  Provided further, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                     GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS TITLE

       Sec. 701. (a) Section 1108(g)(5) of the Social Security Act 
     (42 U.S.C. 1308(g)(5)) is amended--
       (1) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``and (E)'' and 
     inserting ``(E), and (F)'';
       (2) in subparagraph (C), in the matter preceding clause 
     (i), by striking ``and (E)'' and inserting ``and (F)'';
       (3) by redesignating subparagraph (E) as subparagraph (F);
       (4) by inserting after subparagraph (D), the following:
       ``(E) Subject to subparagraph (F), for the period beginning 
     January 1, 2019, and ending September 30, 2019, the amount of 
     the increase otherwise provided under subparagraph (A) for 
     the Northern Mariana Islands shall be further increased by 
     $36,000,000.''; and
       (5) in subparagraph (F) (as redesignated by paragraph (3) 
     of this section)--
       (A) by striking ``title XIX, during'' and inserting ``title 
     XIX--
       ``(i) during'';
       (B) by striking ``and (D)'' and inserting ``, (D), and 
     (E)'';
       (C) by striking ``and the Virgin Islands'' each place it 
     appears and inserting ``, the Virgin Islands, and the 
     Northern Mariana Islands'';
       (D) by striking the period at the end and inserting ``; 
     and''; and
       (E) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(ii) for the period beginning January 1, 2019, and ending 
     September 30, 2019, with respect to payments to Guam and 
     American Samoa from the additional funds provided under 
     subparagraph (A), the Secretary shall increase the Federal 
     medical assistance percentage or other rate that would 
     otherwise apply to such payments to 100 percent.''.
       (b) The amounts provided by the amendments made by 
     subsection (a) are designated by the Congress as being for an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of 
     the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.
       Sec. 702.  Not later than 30 days after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretaries of Labor, Health and 
     Human Services, and Education shall provide a detailed spend 
     plan of anticipated uses of funds made available in this 
     title, including estimated personnel and administrative 
     costs, to the Committees on Appropriations: Provided, That 
     such plans shall be updated and submitted to the Committees 
     on Appropriations every 60 days until all funds are expended 
     or expire.
       Sec. 703.  The second proviso under the heading ``Hurricane 
     Education Recovery'' under the heading ``Department of 
     Education'' under title VIII of subdivision 1 of division B 
     of the Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 (Public Law 115-123; 132 
     Stat. 95) is amended--
       (1) in paragraph (2)--
       (A) in subparagraph (I), by striking ``and'' after the 
     semicolon; and
       (B) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(K) assistance provided to an eligible entity under this 
     heading, including assistance provided to an eligible entity 
     before the date of enactment of the Supplemental 
     Appropriations Act, 2019, may be used by the eligible entity 
     for a purpose described in section 406 of the Robert T. 
     Stafford Disaster and Relief Emergency Act (42 U.S.C. 5172), 
     notwithstanding section 102(e)(3) of title IV of division B 
     of Public Law 109-148 (119 Stat. 2794), if the eligible 
     entity will receive funds for that purpose under such section 
     406; and
       ``(L) any duplicative Federal assistance provided under 
     this heading to an eligible entity may be retained by the 
     entity and used for other activities to restart school 
     operations in accordance with this paragraph;'';
       (2) in paragraph (9), by striking ``and'' after the 
     semicolon;
       (3) by redesignating paragraph (10) as paragraph (11); and
       (4) by inserting after paragraph (9) the following:
       ``(10) amounts available under paragraph (4) that exceed 
     the amount required to meet the need for such funds as 
     determined by the Secretary as of December 31, 2018, shall be 
     available to carry out paragraph (3); and'':

     Provided, That amounts repurposed pursuant to this section 
     that were previously designated by the Congress as an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act are designated by the Congress 
     as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                               TITLE VIII

                           LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

                    Government Accountability Office

                         salaries and expenses

       For an additional amount for ``Salaries and Expenses'', 
     $10,000,000, to remain available until expended, for audits 
     and investigations related to Hurricanes Florence, Lane, and 
     Michael, Typhoons Yutu and Mangkhut, the calendar year 2018 
     wildfires, earthquakes, and volcano eruptions, and other 
     disasters declared pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford 
     Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 
     et seq.):  Provided, That, not later than 90 days after the 
     date of enactment of this Act, the Government Accountability 
     Office shall submit to the Committees on Appropriations of 
     the House of Representatives and the Senate a spend plan 
     specifying funding estimates for audits and investigations of 
     any such declared disasters occurring in 2018 and identifying 
     funding estimates or carryover balances, if any, that may be 
     available for audits and investigations of any other such 
     declared disasters:  Provided further, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                                TITLE IX

                         DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

              Military Construction, Navy and Marine Corps

       For an additional amount for ``Military Construction, Navy 
     and Marine Corps'', $115,000,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2023, for planning and design related to the 
     consequences of Hurricanes Florence and Michael on Navy and 
     Marine Corps installations:  Provided, That none of the funds 
     shall be available for obligation until the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     receive a master plan for the installations and a form 1391 
     for each specific project:  Provided further, That, not later 
     than 60 days after enactment of this Act, the Secretary of 
     the Navy, or his designee, shall submit to the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     a detailed expenditure plan for funds provided under this 
     heading:  Provided further, That such amount is designated by 
     the Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant 
     to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985:  Provided further, 
     That notwithstanding section 2808 of title 10, United States 
     Code, or any other provision of law, funds made available 
     under this heading may only be used for the purposes 
     specifically described under this heading.

                    Military Construction, Air Force

       For an additional amount for ``Military Construction, Air 
     Force'', $700,000,000, to remain available until September 
     30, 2023, for planning and design, and construction expenses 
     related to the consequences of Hurricane Michael:  Provided, 
     That none of the funds shall be available for obligation 
     until the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate receive a basing plan and 
     future mission requirements for installations significantly 
     damaged by Hurricane Michael:  Provided further, That, not 
     later than 60 days after enactment of this Act, the Secretary 
     of the Air Force, or his designee, shall submit to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate a detailed expenditure plan for funds provided 
     under this heading:  Provided further, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985:  
     Provided further, That notwithstanding section 2808 of title 
     10, United States Code, or any other provision of law, funds 
     made available under this heading may only be used for the 
     purposes specifically described under this heading.

               Military Construction, Army National Guard

       For an additional amount for ``Military Construction, Army 
     National Guard'', $42,400,000, to remain available until 
     September 30, 2023, for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of Hurricanes Florence and Michael:  Provided, 
     That none of the funds shall be available for obligation 
     until the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate receive form 1391 for each 
     specific request:  Provided further, That, not later than 60 
     days after enactment of this Act, the Director of the Army 
     National Guard, or his designee, shall submit to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate a detailed expenditure plan for funds provided 
     under this

[[Page H3698]]

     heading:  Provided further, That such funds may be obligated 
     or expended for planning and design and military construction 
     projects not otherwise authorized by law:  Provided further, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985:  Provided further, That notwithstanding section 2808 of 
     title 10, United States Code, or any other provision of law, 
     funds made available under this heading may only be used for 
     the purposes specifically described under this heading.

                     DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS

                     Veterans Health Administration

                           medical facilities

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Medical Facilities'', 
     $3,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2023, for 
     necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricanes 
     Florence and Michael and Typhoons Mangkhut and Yutu:  
     Provided, That the Secretary of Veterans Affairs, upon 
     determination that such action is necessary to address needs 
     as a result of the consequences of Hurricanes Florence and 
     Michael and Typhoons Mangkhut and Yutu, may transfer such 
     funds to any discretionary account of the Department of 
     Veterans Affairs:  Provided further, That before a transfer 
     may take place, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall 
     submit notice thereof to the Committee on Appropriations of 
     the House of Representatives and the Senate:  Provided 
     further, That none of these funds shall be available for 
     obligation until the Secretary of Veterans Affairs submits to 
     the Committees on Appropriations of the House of 
     Representatives and the Senate a detailed expenditure plan 
     for funds provided under this heading:  Provided further, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                                TITLE X

                      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

                     Federal Transit Administration

             public transportation emergency relief program

       For an additional amount for the ``Public Transportation 
     Emergency Relief Program'' as authorized under section 5324 
     of title 49, United States Code, $10,542,000 to remain 
     available until expended, for transit systems affected by 
     major declared disasters occurring in calendar year 2018:  
     Provided, That not more than three-quarters of 1 percent of 
     the funds for public transportation emergency relief shall be 
     available for administrative expenses and ongoing program 
     management oversight as authorized under sections 5334 and 
     5338(f)(2) of such title and shall be in addition to any 
     other appropriations for such purpose:  Provided further, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985.

                    Federal Aviation Administration

                               operations

                    (airport and airway trust fund)

       Of the amounts made available for ``Federal Aviation 
     Administration--Operations'' in division B of the Bipartisan 
     Budget Act of 2018 (Public Law 115-123), up to $18,000,000 
     shall also be available for necessary expenses related to the 
     consequences of major declared disasters occurring in 
     calendar year 2018:  Provided, That amounts repurposed under 
     this heading that were previously designated by the Congress 
     as an emergency requirement pursuant to the Balanced Budget 
     and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 are designated by 
     the Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                     Federal Highway Administration

                        emergency relief program

       For an additional amount for the Emergency Relief Program 
     as authorized under section 125 of title 23, United States 
     Code, $1,650,000,000, to remain available until expended:  
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

              DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

                   Community Planning and Development

                       community development fund

                     (including transfers of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Community Development 
     Fund'', $2,210,000,000, to remain available until expended, 
     for necessary expenses for activities authorized under title 
     I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (42 
     U.S.C. 5301 et seq.) related to disaster relief, long-term 
     recovery, restoration of infrastructure and housing, economic 
     revitalization, and mitigation in the most impacted and 
     distressed areas resulting from a major disaster that 
     occurred in 2018 or 2019 (except as otherwise provided under 
     this heading) pursuant to the Robert T. Stafford Disaster 
     Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5121 et seq.): 
      Provided, That funds shall be awarded directly to the State, 
     unit of general local government, or Indian tribe (as such 
     term is defined in section 102 of the Housing and Community 
     Development Act of 1974) at the discretion of the Secretary: 
     Provided further, That of the amounts made available under 
     this heading $150,000,000 shall be allocated to meet unmet 
     needs for restoration of infrastructure for grantees that 
     received allocations for disasters that occurred in 2017 
     (excluding grantees that received allocations related to 
     disasters specified in section 501(a) of title V of this Act) 
     under this heading of division B of Public Law 115-56 and 
     title XI of subdivision 1 of division B of Public Law 115-
     123: Provided further, That of the amounts provided in the 
     previous proviso, the Secretary's determination of unmet 
     needs for restoration of infrastructure shall not take into 
     account mitigation-specific allocations:  Provided further, 
     That any funds made available under this heading and under 
     the same heading in Public Law 115-254 that remain available, 
     after the funds under such headings have been allocated for 
     necessary expenses for activities authorized under such 
     headings, shall be allocated to grantees receiving awards for 
     disasters that occurred in 2018 or 2019, for mitigation 
     activities in the most impacted and distressed areas 
     resulting from a major disaster that occurred in 2018 or 
     2019:  Provided further, That allocations under the previous 
     proviso shall be made in the same proportion that the amount 
     of funds each grantee received or will receive under this 
     heading for unmet needs related to disasters that occurred in 
     2018 or 2019 and the same heading in division I of Public Law 
     115-254 bears to the amount of all funds provided to all 
     grantees that received allocations for disasters that 
     occurred in 2018 or 2019:  Provided further, That of the 
     amounts made available under the text preceding the first 
     proviso under this heading and under the same heading in 
     Public Law 115-254, the Secretary shall allocate to all such 
     grantees an aggregate amount not less than 33 percent of the 
     sum of such amounts of funds within 120 days after the date 
     of enactment of this Act based on the best available data, 
     and shall allocate no less than 100 percent of such funds by 
     no later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this 
     Act:  Provided further, That the Secretary shall not prohibit 
     the use of funds made available under this heading and the 
     same heading in Public Law 115-254 for non-Federal share as 
     authorized by section 105(a)(9) of the Housing and Community 
     Development Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5305(a)(9)):  Provided 
     further, That of the amounts made available under this 
     heading, grantees may establish grant programs to assist 
     small businesses for working capital purposes to aid in 
     recovery:  Provided further, That as a condition of making 
     any grant, the Secretary shall certify in advance that such 
     grantee has in place proficient financial controls and 
     procurement processes and has established adequate procedures 
     to prevent any duplication of benefits as defined by section 
     312 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency 
     Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5155), to ensure timely expenditure 
     of funds, to maintain comprehensive websites regarding all 
     disaster recovery activities assisted with these funds, and 
     to detect and prevent waste, fraud, and abuse of funds:  
     Provided further, That with respect to any such duplication 
     of benefits, the Secretary shall act in accordance with 
     section 1210 of Public Law 115-254 (132 Stat. 3442) and 
     section 312 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
     Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5155):  Provided further, 
     That the Secretary shall require grantees to maintain on a 
     public website information containing common reporting 
     criteria established by the Department that permits 
     individuals and entities awaiting assistance and the general 
     public to see how all grant funds are used, including copies 
     of all relevant procurement documents, grantee administrative 
     contracts and details of ongoing procurement processes, as 
     determined by the Secretary:  Provided further, That prior to 
     the obligation of funds a grantee shall submit a plan to the 
     Secretary for approval detailing the proposed use of all 
     funds, including criteria for eligibility and how the use of 
     these funds will address long-term recovery and restoration 
     of infrastructure and housing, economic revitalization, and 
     mitigation in the most impacted and distressed areas:  
     Provided further, That such funds may not be used for 
     activities reimbursed by, or for which funds have been made 
     available by, the Federal Emergency Management Agency or the 
     Army Corps of Engineers, in excess of the authorized amount 
     of the project or its components:  Provided further, That 
     funds allocated under this heading shall not be considered 
     relevant to the non-disaster formula allocations made 
     pursuant to section 106 of the Housing and Community 
     Development Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5306):  Provided further, 
     That a State, unit of general local government, or Indian 
     tribe may use up to 5 percent of its allocation for 
     administrative costs:  Provided further, That the first 
     proviso under this heading in the Supplemental Appropriations 
     for Disaster Relief Requirements Act, 2018 (division I of 
     Public Law 115-254) is amended by striking ``State or unit of 
     general local government'' and inserting ``State, unit of 
     general local government, or Indian tribe (as such term is 
     defined in section 102 of the Housing and Community 
     Development Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5302))'':  Provided 
     further, That the sixth proviso under this heading in the 
     Supplemental Appropriations for Disaster Relief Requirements 
     Act, 2018 (division I of Public Law 115-254) is amended by 
     striking ``State or subdivision thereof'' and inserting 
     ``State, unit of general local government, or Indian tribe 
     (as such term is defined in section 102 of the Housing and 
     Community Development Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5302))'':  
     Provided further, That in administering the funds under this 
     heading, the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development may 
     waive, or specify alternative requirements for, any provision 
     of any statute or regulation that the Secretary administers 
     in connection with the obligation by the Secretary or the use 
     by the recipient of these funds (except for requirements 
     related to fair housing, nondiscrimination, labor standards, 
     and the environment), if the Secretary finds that good cause 
     exists for the waiver or alternative requirement and such 
     waiver or alternative requirement would not be inconsistent 
     with the overall purpose of title I of the Housing and 
     Community Development Act of 1974:  Provided further, That, 
     notwithstanding the preceding proviso,

[[Page H3699]]

     recipients of funds provided under this heading that use such 
     funds to supplement Federal assistance provided under section 
     402, 403, 404, 406, 407, 408(c)(4), or 502 of the Robert T. 
     Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 
     U.S.C. 5121 et seq.) may adopt, without review or public 
     comment, any environmental review, approval, or permit 
     performed by a Federal agency, and such adoption shall 
     satisfy the responsibilities of the recipient with respect to 
     such environmental review, approval or permit:  Provided 
     further, That, notwithstanding section 104(g)(2) of the 
     Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 
     5304(g)(2)), the Secretary may, upon receipt of a request for 
     release of funds and certification, immediately approve the 
     release of funds for an activity or project assisted under 
     this heading if the recipient has adopted an environmental 
     review, approval or permit under the preceding proviso or the 
     activity or project is categorically excluded from review 
     under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 
     U.S.C. 4321 et seq.):  Provided further, That the Secretary 
     shall publish via notice in the Federal Register any waiver, 
     or alternative requirement, to any statute or regulation that 
     the Secretary administers pursuant to title I of the Housing 
     and Community Development Act of 1974 no later than 5 days 
     before the effective date of such waiver or alternative 
     requirement:  Provided further, That of the amounts made 
     available under this heading, up to $5,000,000 shall be made 
     available for capacity building and technical assistance, 
     including assistance on contracting and procurement 
     processes, to support States, units of general local 
     government, or Indian tribes (and their subrecipients) that 
     receive allocations pursuant to this heading, received 
     disaster recovery allocations under the same heading in 
     Public Law 115-254, or may receive similar allocations for 
     disaster recovery in future appropriations Acts:  Provided 
     further, That of the amounts made available under this 
     heading and under the same heading in Public Law 115-254, up 
     to $2,500,000 shall be transferred, in aggregate, to 
     ``Department of Housing and Urban Development--Program Office 
     Salaries and Expenses--Community Planning and Development'' 
     for necessary costs, including information technology costs, 
     of administering and overseeing the obligation and 
     expenditure of amounts under this heading:  Provided further, 
     That the amount specified in the preceding proviso shall be 
     combined with funds appropriated under the same heading and 
     for the same purpose in Public Law 115-254 and the aggregate 
     of such amounts shall be available for any of the same such 
     purposes specified under this heading or the same heading in 
     Public Law 115-254 without limitation:  Provided further, 
     That such amount is designated by the Congress as being for 
     an emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) 
     of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
     1985:  Provided further, That amounts repurposed under this 
     heading that were previously designated by the Congress as an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act are designated by the Congress 
     as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                     GENERAL PROVISION--THIS TITLE

       Sec. 1001. (a) Amounts previously made available for 
     activities authorized under title I of the Housing and 
     Community Development Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5301 et seq.) 
     related to disaster relief, long-term recovery, restoration 
     of infrastructure and housing, economic revitalization, and 
     mitigation in the most impacted and distressed areas 
     resulting from a major disaster, including funds provided 
     under section 145 of division C of Public Law 114-223, 
     section 192 of division C of Public Law 114-223 (as added by 
     section 101(3) of division A of Public Law 114-254), section 
     421 of division K of Public Law 115-31, and any mitigation 
     funding provided under the heading ``Department of Housing 
     and Urban Development--Community Planning and Development--
     Community Development Fund'' of Public Law 115-123, that were 
     allocated in response to Hurricane Matthew, may be used 
     interchangeably and without limitation for the same 
     activities in the most impacted and distressed areas related 
     to Hurricane Florence. In addition, any funds provided under 
     the heading ``Department of Housing and Urban Development--
     Community Planning and Development--Community Development 
     Fund'' in this Act or in division I of Public Law 115-254 
     that are allocated in response to Hurricane Florence may be 
     used interchangeably and without limitation for the same 
     activities in the most impacted and distressed areas related 
     to Hurricane Matthew. Until HUD publishes the Federal 
     Register Notice implementing this provision, grantees may 
     submit for HUD approval revised plans for the use of funds 
     related to Hurricane Matthew that expand the eligible 
     beneficiaries of existing programs contained in such 
     previously approved plans to include those impacted by 
     Hurricane Florence. Approval of any such revised plans shall 
     include the execution of revised grant terms and conditions 
     as necessary. Once the implementing Notice is published, any 
     additional action plan revisions shall follow the 
     requirements contained therein.
       (b) Amounts made available for administrative costs for 
     activities authorized under title I of the Housing and 
     Community Development Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5301 et seq.) 
     related to disaster relief, long-term recovery, restoration 
     of infrastructure and housing, economic revitalization, and 
     mitigation in the most impacted and distressed areas under 
     this Act or any future Act, and amounts previously provided 
     under section 420 of division L of Public Law 114-113, 
     section 145 of division C of Public Law 114-223, section 192 
     of division C of Public Law 114-223 (as added by section 
     101(3) of division A of Public Law 114-254), section 421 of 
     division K of Public Law 115-31, and under the heading 
     ``Department of Housing and Urban Development--Community 
     Planning and Development--Community Development Fund'' of 
     division B of Public Law 115-56, Public Law 115-123, and 
     Public Law 115-254, shall be available for eligible 
     administrative costs of the grantee related to any disaster 
     relief funding identified in this subsection without regard 
     to the particular disaster appropriation from which such 
     funds originated.
       (c) The additional uses pursuant to this section for 
     amounts that were previously designated by the Congress, 
     respectively, as an emergency requirement or as being for 
     disaster relief pursuant to the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act are designated by the Congress as being 
     for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985 or as being for disaster relief pursuant 
     to section 251(b)(2)(D) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                                TITLE XI

                    GENERAL SERVICES ADMINISTRATION

                        Real Property Activities

                         federal buildings fund

       For an additional amount, to be deposited in the Federal 
     Buildings Fund, $91,200,000, to remain available until 
     expended, for necessary expenses related to the consequences 
     of Hurricane Florence for repair and alteration of buildings 
     under the custody and control of the Administrator of General 
     Services, and real property management and related activities 
     not otherwise provided for: Provided, That such amount may be 
     used to reimburse the Fund for obligations incurred for this 
     purpose prior to the date of the enactment of this Act: 
     Provided further, That such amount is designated by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                               TITLE XII

                      GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS ACT

       Sec. 1101.  Each amount appropriated or made available by 
     this Act is in addition to amounts otherwise appropriated for 
     the fiscal year involved.
       Sec. 1102.  No part of any appropriation contained in this 
     Act shall remain available for obligation beyond the current 
     fiscal year unless expressly so provided herein.
       Sec. 1103.  Unless otherwise provided for by this Act, the 
     additional amounts appropriated by this division to 
     appropriations accounts shall be available under the 
     authorities and conditions applicable to such appropriations 
     accounts for fiscal year 2019.
       Sec. 1104.  Each amount designated in this Act by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985 shall be available (or rescinded 
     or transferred, if applicable) only if the President 
     subsequently so designates all such amounts and transmits 
     such designations to the Congress.
       Sec. 1105.  Any amount appropriated by this Act designated 
     by the Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985 and subsequently so designated by 
     the President, and transferred pursuant to transfer 
     authorities provided by this division shall retain such 
     designation.
       Sec. 1106.  Of all amounts made available for mitigation 
     activities under the heading ``Department of Housing and 
     Urban Development--Community Development Fund'' in Public Law 
     115-123, the Secretary shall publish in the Federal Register 
     the allocations to all eligible grantees, and the necessary 
     administrative requirements applicable to such allocations 
     within 90 days after enactment of this Act:
       (1) For any plans or amendments addressing the use of any 
     funds provided under Public Law 115-123 and received by the 
     Secretary prior to December 22, 2018, the Secretary shall 
     review pending amendments within 15 days of enactment of this 
     Act and pending plans within 30 days of enactment of this 
     Act.
       (2) After the date of this Act, the Secretary may not apply 
     the statutory waiver or alternative requirement authority 
     provided by Public Law 115-123 to extend or otherwise alter 
     existing statutory and regulatory provisions governing the 
     timeline for review of required grantee plans.
       Provided, That the amounts provided by this section are 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985:  
     Provided further, That amounts repurposed under this heading 
     that were previously designated by the Congress as an 
     emergency requirement pursuant to the Balanced Budget and 
     Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 are designated by the 
     Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.
       Sec. 1107. (a) Financing.--Section 1309(a) of the National 
     Flood Insurance Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 4016(a)) is amended by 
     striking ``May 31, 2019'' and inserting ``September 30, 
     2019''.
       (b) Program Expiration.--Section 1319 of the National Flood 
     Insurance Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 4026) is amended by striking 
     ``May 31, 2019'' and inserting ``September 30, 2019''.
       (c) Retroactive Effective Date.--If this Act is enacted 
     after May 31, 2019, the amendments made by subsections (a) 
     and (b) shall take effect as if enacted on May 31, 2019.
        This Act may be cited as the ``Supplemental Appropriations 
     Act, 2019''.

  The CHAIR. No further amendment to the bill, as amended, is in order 
except those printed in part C of House

[[Page H3700]]

Report 116-51. Each such further amendment may be offered only in the 
order printed in the report, by a Member designated in the report, 
shall be considered read, shall be debatable for the time specified in 
the report, equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an 
opponent, shall not be subject to amendment, and shall not be subject 
to a demand for division of the question.


               Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Perlmutter

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 1 printed in 
part C of House Report 116-51.
  Mr. PERLMUTTER. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 11, line 14, insert ``(increased by $5,000,000)'' 
     after the dollar amount.
       Page 11, line 22, insert ``(increased by $5,000,000)'' 
     after the dollar amount.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 357, the gentleman from 
Colorado (Mr. Perlmutter) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Colorado.
  Mr. PERLMUTTER. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Madam Chair, as we work to rebuild from hurricanes, flooding, and 
other natural disasters through this supplemental appropriations bill, 
I am glad the Appropriations Committee included funding to improve U.S. 
weather forecasting, modeling, and computing capabilities.
  Improving our forecasting abilities can save lives and protect 
property, which is exactly the mission charged to the National Weather 
Service. My amendment adds an additional $5 million for NOAA's weather 
forecasting, modeling, and cloud computing programs and helps 
accelerate implementation of the new Earth Prediction Innovation 
Center, or EPIC, for short.
  Congress authorized EPIC late last year to serve as a center of 
excellence to create an agile, focused, and measurable approach to 
community involvement in improving weather forecasting. The center will 
create a community global weather research modeling system that is 
publicly available to encourage collaboration. It will also strengthen 
NOAA's ability to undertake innovative research projects.
  Importantly, EPIC has an opportunity to continue breaking down 
barriers by accelerating the transfer of research to operations and 
operations to research, which will improve our weather forecasting 
enterprise. Improving these capabilities will help everyone across the 
country, and I urge all my colleagues to support my amendment.
  Madam Chair, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from New York (Mr. 
Serrano).
  Mr. SERRANO. Madam Chair, I rise in strong support of my friend from 
Colorado's amendment which would increase funding to improve NOAA's 
weather forecasting abilities.
  This is an issue that we have to deal with. This is an issue that has 
to be dealt with in a proper way. This amendment does that. As chairman 
of the subcommittee that oversees this section of the bill, I approve 
of, and I hope my colleagues will vote for, the amendment.
  Mr. PERLMUTTER. Madam Chair, I thank the gentleman, and as there is 
no opposition, I will close.
  Madam Chair, I would urge support for this amendment. I see my 
friend, Mr. Dunn, who has been in front of the Rules Committee half a 
dozen times on issues relating to this disaster relief bill and the 
impact that it has had on his State, Florida, and all of the Southeast 
United States and throughout the Midwest.
  We have heard the gentlewoman from Texas make a great case for this 
bill, generally.
  Madam Chair, I urge support of my amendment, and I urge support of 
the overall disaster relief bill. We need it now, not later.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Colorado (Mr. Perlmutter).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from Colorado will be postponed.


               Amendment No. 2 Offered by Mrs. Radewagen

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 2 printed in 
part C of House Report 116-51.
  Mrs. RADEWAGEN. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 9, line 8, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $13,000,000)''.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 357, the gentlewoman from 
American Samoa (Mrs. Radewagen) and a Member opposed each will control 
5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from American Samoa.
  Mrs. RADEWAGEN. Madam Chair, I rise to offer an amendment, and I 
yield myself as much time as I may consume.
  Madam Chair, I rise for the purpose of offering an amendment to 
provide an increase in American Samoa's nutritional assistance grant 
funding by $13 million in order to ensure food security for the 
American Samoan population due to damages sustained by Cyclone Gita in 
February 2018.
  Cyclone Gita's ravaging 100-miles-per-hour-plus winds and torrential 
rains of over 30 inches devastated family farms and small farm 
businesses, farms that most American Samoans need for their immediate 
and extended families for subsistence purposes or to generate small 
business income. Cyclone Gita wiped out an entire growing season for 
the American Samoan farmer.
  But this is a hand up, not a hand out, Madam Chair. This emergency 
food aid, along with the additional Medicaid funding Federal matching 
support in this bill, will allow American Samoans to get back on their 
feet and fight for their community and country. It is what we do best.
  American Samoa has been the number one Army recruiting station in 
America for 2 of the last 5 years and suffered the worst casualty rate 
in the Iraq war, both on a per capita basis. This bill will truly help 
our local veterans, soldiers, and their families, churches, and greater 
community get back to their fighting weight.
  Madam Chair, I thank Chairman McGovern for his leadership on 
nutritional assistance programs for so many years and Ranking Member 
Cole and the Rules Committee members for listening to my testimony and 
providing this opportunity.
  I thank Chairwoman Lowey and Ranking Member Granger for their 
consideration, as well as thanks to Ag Subcommittee Chairman Bishop and 
Ranking Member Aderholt.
  I thank President Trump for swiftly declaring an emergency and FEMA 
for their response, and especially our Governor, Lolo Moliga, and his 
staff at home and in D.C., who have been so helpful on this request, 
and for his leadership in the recovery efforts.
  Madam Chair, I ask again for your support for this emergency food 
assistance need for American Samoa.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. Madam Chair, I claim the time in opposition to 
the amendment, even though I am not opposed to it.
  The CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. Madam Chair, on October 10, 2018, my district 
took a direct hit from Hurricane Michael, one of the most powerful 
storms to make landfall in U.S. history. It slammed into the Florida 
panhandle and drove through much of the Southeast, leaving a path of 
destruction all the way up to Virginia.
  In Georgia, many producers suffered nearly 100 percent crop losses. 
Hurricane Michael killed more than 2 million chickens and devastated 
the Georgia cotton crop, which was nearing peak harvest and was on 
track to be the best crop in years. This is the third straight year 
hurricane damage caused significant losses to peanut, pecan, cotton, 
vegetable, landscaping, and the agri-tourism industries.

[[Page H3701]]

  The Carolinas also suffered billions in damages a month earlier from 
Hurricane Florence. Californians had another devastating fire season, 
including both the largest and deadliest fires on record. In Hawaii, 
volcanic activity cost pineapple farmers nearly $30 million in damages. 
Americans in the Mariana Islands and American Samoa were also hit by 
cyclones.
  To meet these needs, this House passed and sent to the Senate an 
emergency supplemental appropriations bill on January 16 that allocated 
$14 billion in emergency spending to help families and communities 
recover from these hurricanes, wildfires, and other natural disasters.
  Agriculture provided $3 billion for crop losses, $150 million for the 
Rural Community Facilities Program, $480 million for the Emergency 
Forest Restoration Program, and $125 million for the Emergency 
Watershed Program. They provided $600 million in desperately needed 
funds to help with Puerto Rico's continued recovery from Hurricane 
Diane in 2017.
  Madam Chair, I thank my fellow Georgian, Austin Scott, and the 
bipartisan leadership, the House leadership, our committees for quickly 
getting this bill passed. But as we passed it and sent it to the 
Senate, the Trump Office of Management and Budget issued a Statement of 
Administration Policy saying that FEMA had enough money and that this 
money was not needed. That could not be further from the truth. I 
disagree. Farmers and communities in all of the impacted States 
disagree, and even the USDA disagrees.
  The emergency supplemental appropriations bill has been stalled in 
the Senate for 4 long months, with no action and no relief for 
Americans who are suffering. American farmers are living through the 
worst economic crisis in 30 years, driven by low commodity prices, 
trade war pressures, and natural disasters. Those impacted have had 
their patience stretched thin and cannot wait any longer for disaster 
assistance that they were promised.
  Right now, due to the disaster losses, farmers can't pay their 
operational loans from last year, nor can they get new loans to plant 
and operate this year. Planting season is now. We already are in the 
growing season, with conditions permitting normal growth. If we miss 
this window, it will have lasting effects on agriculture production, 
including food, fiber, building materials, and fuel, that will increase 
costs for American consumers all over this country.
  We are about to enter the 2019 hurricane season, which starts June 1. 
So today I am once again supporting this emergency supplemental bill, 
as more disasters have hit since the last bill passed, the latest being 
terrible floods in the Midwest and tornadoes that ripped through 
Georgia and Alabama.
  This expanded supplemental bill will provide for the needs of those 
who suffered in those disasters and will add $3 billion, bringing the 
appropriations total to $17.2 billion, which will cover all disasters 
and get much-needed funds to those who were devastated and affected by 
Hurricane Michael.

                              {time}  1000

  From coast to coast throughout the territories, there is an urgent 
need for this disaster bill. As I said last October, after touring the 
damage from Hurricane Michael with the President, Vice President, and 
the Secretary of Agriculture, responding to natural disasters and 
helping our communities recover is a responsibility that we all share, 
regardless of ideology or political affiliation. Failure to respond now 
will result in failures later and suffering later throughout this 
country.
  Madam Chair, I urge my House and Senate colleagues to support this 
bill to finally bring relief to our long-suffering communities.
  Madam Chair, I support the gentlewoman's amendment, and I yield back 
the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from American Samoa (Mrs. Radewagen).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 3 Offered by Mr. Sablan

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 3 printed in 
part C of House Report 116-51.
  Mr. SABLAN. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 37, line 23, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $8,800,000)''.
       Page 37, line 24, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $8,800,000)''.
       Page 38, line 21, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $8,800,000)''.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 357, the gentleman from the 
Northern Mariana Islands (Mr. Sablan) and a Member opposed each will 
control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from the Northern Mariana Islands.
  Mr. SABLAN. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Madam Chair, Congress will depend on the expertise of Federal 
agencies to tell us how much funding is needed by communities 
recovering from disaster.
  That was the case when the House passed H.R. 268 on January 16. We 
set aside $10.4 million in that bill for water and sewer recovery for 
areas impacted by Super Typhoon Yutu, and we relied on the 
Environmental Protection Agency to verify that amount.
  But, as happens in recovery situations, preliminarily estimates were 
not completely accurate. When debris is removed, unseen damage is 
revealed.
  In March, after the House passed H.R. 268, EPA revised its estimate 
of the cost for repairing sewer systems in the Marianas. But H.R. 2157, 
the bill now under consideration, has not taken that new March estimate 
from EPA into account. H.R. 2157 simply repeats what was in H.R. 268, 
the January bill.
  The amendment I am offering instead relies on EPA's new, updated 
assessment of the true need.
  Madam Chair, I include in the Record EPA's estimate.

EPA-Related Projects To Support Typhoon Yutu Recovery in CNMI Community 
Planning and Capacity Building, Infrastructure Systems, and Natural and 
                   Cultural Resources, March 20, 2019

       Smart, Safe Growth. Implement next phase of the ongoing 
     FEMA-funded, EPA-managed Smart, Safe Growth project which has 
     helped the CNMI identify policies and practices to encourage 
     sustainable growth and long-term resiliency. Using 
     contractors and direct assistance, help the CNMI government 
     analyze and implement recent International Building Codes and 
     incorporate smart safe growth practices into local permit 
     decisions and longterm planning. Cost: $1.5M
       Treatment for PFAS-contaminated well. Provide Granular 
     Activated Carbon (GAC) treatment for 6 drinking water wells 
     contaminated by PFAS (associated with fire retardant). 
     Benefit: would add about one-half million gallons per day 
     (0.5 MGD) to Saipan's water supply; would significantly 
     improve the ability to recover drinking water availability 
     and safety in another disaster. Cost: $2.5M
       New Dandan 1.0 MG water tank. Install a new 1.0 MG tank 
     next to the existing 0.5 MG Dandan water tank to enhance 
     water delivery during a disaster and meet projected long-term 
     system demand. Cost: $4.0M
       Waterline and service line replacement. Replace 
     deteriorating waterlines (Texas Rd to Oleai, San Antonio/
     Afetnas, and San Roque distribution systems), and 
     deteriorating service lines to homes and businesses (San 
     Roque, Tanapag service areas). Benefit: would significantly 
     reduce leaks and improve drinking water system integrity; 
     would improve drinking water resiliency during a disaster. 
     Cost: $7.5M
       New Kagman Reservoir. Start construction of USDA NRCS-
     proposed 75 MG Water reservoir, delayed 25 years due to lack 
     of funding. Benefit: would eliminate agriculture use of CUC 
     drinking water for farming, increase drinking water supply by 
     30 percent, reduce drinking water salinity, and improve 
     drinking water quality. Cost: $8M
       SCADA (water and sewer). Expand Supervisory Control and 
     Data Acquisition (SCADA), an electronic network control 
     system, from the current pilot (serving one water tank 
     system) to a utility-wide system for drinking water and 
     wastewater. Benefit: would improve water monitoring, water 
     production, water billing, water distribution management, and 
     wastewater conveyance and treatment management; would 
     decrease water loss, waste, and energy consumption; and 
     facilitate better strategic planning and decisions. Cost: 
     $5.0M
       Agingan Wastewater Treatment Plant upgrades. Numerous 
     upgrades are necessary for the WWTP to meet EPA permit 
     conditions. As a result of previous deficiencies and damage 
     inflicted by Typhoon Yutu, about 1 MGD of barely-treated 
     sewage effluent is discharged to the ocean on an ongoing 
     basis. Upgrades needed include: aerator replacement, VFD 
     drive installation, sludge dewatering screw press, headworks 
     rehab, electrical rehab, corroded pipe support replacement, 
     and hydrogen sulfide controls. Benefits: provide adequate 
     wastewater treatment to protect human health and the 
     environment. Cost: $2.4M
       Sadog Tasi Wastewater Treatment Plant upgrades. Situation 
     is similar to Agingan

[[Page H3702]]

     WWTP with even additional needed upgrades, including 
     clarifier retrofit and improvements to sludge digester. Cost: 
     $3.2M
       Lift Station upgrades. Lift stations need new pumps, piping 
     and valves, VFD controls, generator overhaul, and wetwell 
     aeration to improve compliance, as well as gates, fencing, 
     and lighting to improve security. Backup generators damaged 
     by flooding and high winds also need improvements. Benefit: 
     would reduce sewage spills and overflows on land and 
     nearshore, both following a disaster and on a long-term 
     basis. Cost: $8.4M
       Lower Base and Beach Road Sewer system replacement. Replace 
     the deteriorating old (pre-Trust Territories era) sewage 
     collection system in Lower Base (Saipan's main industrial 
     area), including installation of one new lift station Along 
     Beach Road, replace deteriorating old sewage lines as CNMI 
     DPW makes roadway improvements. (Note the Beach Road project 
     cost includes only Phase I at $2.5M; the entire project would 
     cost $12M.) Cost: $7.0M
       Marpi Landfill improvements. Debris from Typhoon Yutu and 
     other recent typhoons are enough to ``fill half a Rose 
     Bowl.'' Much of the debris is lying on open ground next to 
     the existing Marpi Landfill, exacerbating an already non-
     compliant situation. The landfill's Cell #1 is already 
     overcapacity. Cell #2 has been constructed but requires 
     repairs and additional enhancements before it is RCRA-
     compliant and can accept waste. Cell #3 is designed but 
     requires construction in order to accommodate typhoon debris 
     as well as Saipan's regular municipal waste. Cost: $32M ($12M 
     for Cell #2 repairs + $20M for Cell #3 construction)
       Tinian landfill construction. No landfill currently exists 
     on Tinian. A new landfill is needed to accommodate typhoon 
     debris as well as municipal waste. Cost: $12M
       Rota landfill construction. No landfill currently exists on 
     Rota. A new landfill is needed to accommodate typhoon debris 
     as well as municipal waste. Cost $12M
       Provide a Sustainability Advisor for recovery operations. 
     This position will advise the FEMA Interagency Recovery 
     Coordination team, Recovery Support Functions (RSFs), 
     Federal, territorial and local officials on sustainable 
     communities, climate change adaptation and low-impact growth, 
     materials and products for recovery planners in the 
     adaptation of sustainable, green, and resilient principles 
     and practices.
       Access to EPA's Recovery/Sustainability HQ blanket purchase 
     agreement (BPA) capacity that can provide expect subject 
     matter assistance. This blanket purchase agreement is focused 
     on technical assistance related to assessing policy barriers 
     and facilitating planning workshops which covers a range of 
     topics related to community revitalization. The core subject 
     matter of the assistance will center upon community 
     revitalization, but the expertise required includes topics 
     such as:
       Strategies for encouraging redevelopment in distressed 
     neighborhoods
       Resiliency/hazard mitigation/sustainable long-term recovery
       Green infrastructure and complete streets
       Equitable development
       Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and scenario planning 
     tools
       Community wealth building strategies in collaboration with 
     anchor institutions,
       Economic diversification through place-based local food 
     system expansion,
       Improving human health through healthy community design
       Broadband internet as a catalyst for workforce and small 
     business development
       Revitalization strategies based on recreational assets
       Public engagement, including with hard-to-reach or 
     environmentally overburdened populations.
       Air Quality & Energy. Provide staff expertise on energy 
     efficiency (including EnergySTAR resources), renewable 
     energy, and electric vehicle readiness to assist with 
     rebuilding efforts.
       Drinking Water Systems. Develop and increase the capacity 
     and resiliency of public water systems by supporting capacity 
     development and operator certification programs.
       Brownfields and Land Revitalization. Help the CNMI identify 
     brownfields that support long-term sustainability planning 
     efforts and can be redeveloped for a higher public use. 
     Ensure brownfields redevelopment and land revitalization are 
     included as priorities in local planning efforts; advance the 
     reuse of sites perceived as being contaminated post- and pre-
     typhoon.

  Mr. SABLAN. EPA reports that funds will be needed to upgrade the 
Agingan and Sadog Tasi wastewater treatment plants ``as a result of 
damage inflicted by Typhoon Yutu,'' and for lift stations and backup 
generators that were ``damaged by flooding and high winds.'' EPA says 
these projects cost $14 million.
  My amendment takes into account funding already in the base bill, 
however, and asks only for an increase of $8.8 million. Again, this 
requested increase is based on EPA's estimates only available after 
passage of H.R. 268, the bill on which H.R. 2157 is based.
  Madam Chair, I ask my colleagues for their support of my amendment, 
and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mrs. RADEWAGEN. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition to the amendment, 
although I am not opposed to it.
  The CHAIR. Without objection, the gentlewoman from American Samoa is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mrs. RADEWAGEN. Madam Chair, I rise in support of Vice Chairman 
Sablan's amendment to provide much-needed emergency funding to repair 
the wastewater treatment plants devastated by Typhoon Yutu.
  I thank the vice chairman for his leadership on disaster assistance 
and for securing a Medicaid hearing for the U.S. territories. The 
upcoming hearing will provide an opportunity for territory Medicaid 
issues to be brought to the forefront of Congress so that we can solve 
our access and funding issues, ensuring future equity and 
accountability for our Medicaid programs.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. SABLAN. Madam Chair, I have no further speakers. I ask for 
support of Sablan amendment No. 3 and the underlying bill, H.R. 2157.
  Madam Chair, I thank my colleague and friend from American Samoa for 
her support of the bill, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from the Northern Mariana Islands (Mr. Sablan).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from the Northern Mariana 
Islands will be postponed.


                  Amendment No. 4 Offered by Mr. Dunn

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 4 printed in 
part C of House Report 116-51.
  Mr. DUNN. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 58, line 5, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $385,000,000)''.
       Page 59, line 3, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $300,000,000)''.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 357, the gentleman from 
Florida (Mr. Dunn) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Florida.
  Mr. DUNN. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Madam Chair, my amendment increases military construction funding in 
the bill for the Air Force and the United States Marine Corps.
  Last year, Hurricanes Florence and Michael destroyed two of our 
Nation's premier combat and training bases.
  Camp Lejeune in North Carolina sustained $3.6 billion in damages due 
to Hurricane Florence. Lejeune is critical to our Nation's defenses not 
only for the Marine Corps, but it is also home to a major Navy command 
and a Coast Guard command.
  The base's unique access to two deepwater ports allows for rapid 
seaborne deployments. It also has vast amounts of land and deep 
training resources. This is what makes Camp Lejeune the home of 
``Expeditionary Forces in Readiness.''
  Tyndall Air Force Base, in my district in Florida, took a direct hit 
from a Category 5 storm, Hurricane Michael. Tyndall is home to the 
largest F-22 base in the world. It is one of only two Air Force bases 
that has immediate access to the Eglin Gulf Test and Training Range, a 
range that is like no other in the world. Our airmen are able to train 
and test on the next generation of supersonic and hypersonic aircraft 
and weapons systems in a live-fire environment.
  A few months ago, President Trump came, and he ordered the Air Force 
to make Tyndall a fifth-generation Air Force base outfitted with three 
squadrons of F-35s and a squadron of MQ-9s. This rebuild will cost $2.7 
billion in military construction alone, and it will make Tyndall the 
base of the future.
  My amendment will raise MILCON funding in fiscal year 2019 up to $500 
million for the Marine Corps and up to $1 billion for the Air Force. 
This is only a downpayment to help these services continue on their 
rebuilds.
  This funding is crucial for our military. Our Nation's defense is in 
crisis, and our readiness will continue to deteriorate if we do not 
provide the necessary funds to our armed services immediately.

[[Page H3703]]

  I would like to make a couple of other points that sometimes seem to 
get lost in our discussions.
  The Federal Government knows that it self-insures the military. From 
the moment the storms occurred, it was 100 percent certain that we were 
going to need a disaster supplemental. By law, the funds cannot come 
from FEMA, and they cannot come from HUD. They must be directly 
appropriated by this Congress.
  Hurricane Michael was a unique storm. It was more like a tornado than 
a hurricane, but it was a tornado that was 80 miles wide and 120 miles 
deep. In my district, we have 3 million acres of land that is crushed.
  By way of comparison, in 2017, three hurricanes affected Florida: 
Hermine, Maria, and Irma. Fifty counties were affected.
  Just the county that Tyndall Air Force base sits in has already 
cleaned up 30 million cubic yards of debris, compared with less than 3 
million in those 50 counties in 2017. Nobody in the history of America 
has ever seen this much debris. We estimate that we are 20 percent of 
the way through our debris cleanup, and we have done more than anybody 
has ever seen in history.
  What are we going to do with these bases? Well, we are going to 
rebuild them. Of course, we are going to rebuild them. We love our 
military, and we need our military.
  I have never been prouder of any group than I have been of the airmen 
at Tyndall and the job that they have done to stand that base back up. 
They already have the first Air Force headquarters up and running, and 
that is air defense for all of North America. And we are ready to take 
back the F-22 training mission.
  Madam Chair, I am proud to say that Tyndall has done a great job 
rebuilding, and I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. WASSERMAN SCHULTZ. Madam Chair, I rise in opposition to the 
amendment, although I am not opposed to it.
  The CHAIR. Without objection, the gentlewoman from Florida is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Ms. WASSERMAN SCHULTZ. Madam Chair, I toured Tyndall Air Force Base a 
couple of months ago with Congressman Dunn. I commend the gentleman for 
offering this amendment, and I have enjoyed working with him on making 
sure that we can prioritize this vital funding. I appreciate the 
ranking member and Chairwoman Lowey's support.
  Congressman Lawson also joined us in February to survey the 
devastating damage Tyndall sustained because of Hurricane Michael. It 
was very clear to me, back in February, that Tyndall urgently needs 
supplemental funds to rebuild.

  Tyndall Air Force Base, which is in my home State as well, 
encompasses 29,000 acres in southeastern Dade County. Within the base, 
facilities amount to a total replacement value of $3.48 billion.
  Tyndall accounts for 37 percent of Dade County's economy. The base 
serves a population of 3,393 Active military personnel, as well as 
9,383 retirees from all service branches.
  The supplemental before us contains $700 million for ``Military 
Construction, Air Force'' for planning and design and construction as 
requested by the Air Force to support relocation of F-22s, F-35 
beddown, and facilities necessary to begin the rebuilding of the 
installation. That number is now outdated and must be increased to meet 
the Air Force's needs.
  The Dunn amendment, plus what is currently included in the 
supplemental, is a good first step to helping Tyndall rebuild and get 
back on its feet.
  I am also pleased the gentleman from Florida included funds for the 
Marine Corps. As all of us know, North Carolina was hit by Hurricane 
Florence, which devastated all of the Marine Corps facilities in North 
Carolina.
  The Marine Corps community continues to face daily challenges 
following Hurricane Florence. Although the storm made landfall on 
December 14, 2018, marines at Camp Lejeune, Marine Corps Air Station 
New River, and Marine Corps Air Station Cherry Point are still 
recovering.
  Camp Lejeune, New River, and Cherry Point heavily contribute to 
Marine Corps readiness, and Camp Lejeune is home to the Second Marine 
Expeditionary Force, which oversees and maintains a third of the Marine 
Corps' combat operating power. Several headquarters buildings, training 
facilities, and aircraft hangars were affected by Hurricane Florence.
  While II MEF is now able to meet operational commitments, its 
training environments remain degraded. Currently, marines are working 
in compromised facilities and temporary trailers. Furthermore, marines 
headed to Camp Lejeune are being told to look for housing off base due 
to a lack of availability of on-base housing and substantial damage 
caused by the storm.
  Like the Air Force number, the Marine Corps number is also now 
outdated. I support the $385 million increase to this account, as well.
  The Trump administration, unfortunately, still has not submitted an 
emergency supplemental for these and other disasters. Frankly, these 
facilities need relief, and they need it now.

                              {time}  1015

  It has been over 200 days since Hurricane Michael and Florence 
devastated North Carolina and Florida. It should not be taking this 
long to provide the necessary and vital funding to these locations.
  Stunningly, I want to repeat, the President has not even proposed 
emergency supplemental funding for these disasters, and this morning, 
actually had the gall to urge Republicans to vote against this vital 
legislation.
  Madam Chair, I urge all Members to support the Dunn amendment, and I 
reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. DUNN. Madam Chair, I yield the balance of my time to the 
gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Granger), my friend and colleague.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Chair, I rise in support of the gentleman's 
amendment. These funds are critical to repairing and rebuilding our 
military bases affected by the recent storms.
  I look forward to working with the gentleman to secure critical 
funding for our military in a final agreement that can be signed by the 
President.
  I urge a ``yes'' vote on this amendment.
  Mr. DUNN. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. WASSERMAN SCHULTZ. Madam Chair, I am a strong supporter of our 
armed forces. I fully support the rebuilding of Tyndall Air Force Base 
and the North Carolina Marine Corps Bases and urge Members to support 
the Dunn amendment. I commend the gentleman for his advocacy for his 
community and for our home State, as well as the underlying legislation 
so we can make sure that we can finally help these military communities 
rebuild.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from Florida (Mr. Dunn).
  The amendment was agreed to.


               Amendment No. 5 Offered by Mr. Cunningham

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 5 printed in 
part C of House Report 116-51.
  Mr. CUNNINGHAM. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 16, line 12, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $270,000,000)''.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 357, the gentleman from South 
Carolina (Mr. Cunningham) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from South Carolina.
  Mr. CUNNINGHAM. Madam Chair, my bipartisan amendment will allow the 
Air Force to repair and rebuild bases that were badly damaged by recent 
natural disasters and will restore funding for critical projects aboard 
the Nuclear Power Training Unit at Joint Base Charleston.
  Without the additional $270 million my amendment provides, the Air 
Force has stated that they will need to divert funding from projects 
across the country to rebuild Tyndall and Offutt Air Force Bases.
  This would have disastrous effects on the readiness of our armed 
forces and on our national security.

[[Page H3704]]

  The operational success of our Navy is dependent on highly trained 
crews. The NPTU uses real nuclear power plants aboard retired 
submarines to train sailors to operate and maintain our nuclear power 
fleet.
  And starting this month, the Lowcountry will be the only place in the 
Nation where sailors can learn these highly technical skills, which are 
fundamental to our Navy's ability to maintain its worldwide presence 
and ensure the security of the global commons.
  That is why it is urgent that we pass this amendment and ensure the 
NPTU has the resources to modernize and repair its training facilities 
and ensure that the pipeline of newly trained nuclear operators is not 
disrupted.
  Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Madam Chair, I ask unanimous consent to claim time in 
opposition, although I do not oppose the amendment.
  The CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from 
Indiana?
  There was no objection.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Madam Chair, I rise in support of the gentleman's 
amendment.
  We are still waiting for a final damage assessment, and we understand 
that the Air Force has just adjusted its original fiscal assessment.
  The underlying bill includes $400 million for the airport. The 
Cunningham amendment will increase the amount to a total of $670 
million.
  The need for additional funding is acute. I have two of my colleagues 
who will also speak on that need.
  I would simply point out that I deeply regret at this late date that 
the administration still has not made official requests to fund the 
needs of both the Air Force and the Marines in the recovery from last 
fall's hurricane.
  Absent a comprehensive request, the funds necessary to address the 
extensive damage for these key installations will be provided in an 
inefficient and piecemeal fashion.
  I would urge the administration, and particularly, the Office of 
Management and Budget and the Secretary of Defense, to finally send a 
full and detailed cost assessment to Congress and properly prioritize 
rebuilding of these installations.
  I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman from Nebraska (Mr. 
Fortenberry), my colleague.
  Mr. FORTENBERRY. Madam Chair, first, let me thank Chairman Visclosky 
for the time and for his efforts here, as well as the gentleman from 
South Carolina (Mr. Cunningham), for offering this very important 
amendment to the bill.
  Madam Chair, it is pretty jarring when you stand in your district at 
a major piece of America's military infrastructure, Offutt Air Force 
Base, and it is a third underwater.
  Offutt Air Force Base is also home to Strategic Command, which is the 
command that is in charge of our nuclear enterprise here and around the 
world.
  In March of this year, a furious slurry of soil and water and ice 
rushed down the Platte and Elkhorn Rivers. It crossed over the 
Missouri, hit the Iowa levee, blew it out, dug a 62-foot hole, and then 
water began to come back up the Missouri River.
  Offutt Air Force Base sits at the confluence of the Platte and 
Missouri Rivers, and this is what forced the flooding.
  I am very grateful, again, to my colleagues for recognizing that this 
is a disaster that needs national attention, along with the other 
natural disasters that have hit our country, particularly Tyndall Air 
Force Base, as well.
  This amendment provides the funds to the Air Force operations and 
maintenance accounts to rebuild essential military infrastructure in my 
district and around the country. It will help us rebuild hangars and 
other buildings at Offutt, and this is in dire need.
  I am pleased that my colleagues have recognized that this package, 
$120 million of which could potentially go to Offutt, is also essential 
for helping our Nation rebound from the various natural disasters that 
have hit us.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Madam Chair, I yield the balance of my time to the 
gentleman from Nebraska (Mr. Bacon).
  Mr. BACON. Madam Chair, I appreciate the bipartisan work here to 
support our bases that need to be rebuilt.
  I urge the support of this amendment to increase the Air Force O&M 
budget in the Disaster Aid Package to a total of $670 million for 
recovery of the military bases that sustained extensive damage by the 
recent storms.
  In March, my district in my home State of Nebraska experienced 
devastating floods where lives were lost and the scale of the 
destruction made it the worst natural disaster in our 152-year history 
as a State.
  The damage to Nebraska's infrastructure, agriculture, and local 
economy is extensive and includes Offutt Air Force Base, one of the two 
largest employers in our area.
  At the height of the storm, one-third of the base was under water, 
3,000 people were displaced from their work centers, and 1.2 million 
square feet of mission space was lost. The flight line was inoperable, 
with a third of the runway under water. Many structures incurred 
significant damages, and critical systems were destroyed.

  Our Nation owes a debt of gratitude to those men and women at Offutt 
that worked relentlessly to save what they could. The mission impact 
and cost to the taxpayers would have been worse without their heroic 
efforts.
  So I am very grateful for the bipartisan leadership here and the 
teamwork by Representatives Cunningham, Fortenberry, Dunn, and so many 
others to make this a reality.
  You know, Offutt is one of the two primary intelligence surveillance 
reconnaissance hubs in our country, and it is the home of StratComm, so 
it is vital that we get this done.
  Madam Chair, I thank the gentleman for yielding, and we need to 
support this amendment.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Madam Chair, I support the amendment, and I yield back 
the balance of my time.
  Mr. CUNNINGHAM. Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Florida (Mr. Dunn).
  Mr. DUNN. Madam Chair, I rise today because the United States Air 
Force is in desperate need of our help.
  I am proud to cosponsor this amendment that raises the Air Force 
funding levels for fiscal year 2019.
  Our amendment brings the operations and maintenance account up to 
$670 million, which is the minimum the Air Force needs to continue to 
rebuild Offutt and Tyndall Air Force Bases.
  On October 10th, Tyndall--in my district--took a direct hit from 
Category 5 Hurricane Michael.
  Now, 7 months later, no supplemental funding has been provided. That 
is irresponsible.
  On May 1, Secretary Wilson was forced to halt all work rebuilding 
Tyndall due to lack of funds. This is a severe blow to our Nation's 
military readiness.
  These bases are critical to our Nation's defense for both combat and 
training missions, and some of the missions literally cannot be 
duplicated anywhere else in the world.
  Madam Chair, our ability to defend America is suffering. My district 
and many other districts across our Nation are suffering from 
hurricanes, fires, and floods.
  Madam Chair, I urge a ``yes'' vote on the amendment.
  Mr. CUNNINGHAM. Madam Chair, I thank my colleagues Mr. Dunn, Mr. 
Fortenberry, and Mr. Bacon for their commitment, and for joining me in 
offering this bipartisan amendment. I also thank the men and women of 
our Armed Forces.
  I urge all my colleagues on both sides of the aisle to vote in favor 
of this bipartisan commonsense amendment.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from South Carolina (Mr. Cunningham).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 6 Offered by Mr. Huffman

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 6 printed in 
part C of House Report 116-51.
  Mr. HUFFMAN. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title) insert the 
     following:

     SEC. ___.

       None of the funds made available by this Act may be used to 
     enforce section 668.105(h)

[[Page H3705]]

     of title 23, Code of Federal Regulations, for any projects in 
     response to disasters that occurred in fiscal year 2017 or 
     thereafter.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 357, the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Huffman) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from California.
  Mr. HUFFMAN. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Madam Chair, I thank Chairwoman Lowey for her work on this disaster 
supplemental, as well as her broader efforts to advance this disaster 
funding. It is unfortunate that our colleagues in the Senate have not 
yet acted to deliver disaster relief to communities across the country.
  My amendment responds to the needs of communities who are rebuilding 
their highway infrastructure after disasters.
  I am joined in these efforts by my colleagues, Harley Rouda and Norma 
Torres from California. I thank them for their support. And I would 
also like to thank the California State Association of Counties for 
their important work on this issue in support of this amendment.
  We need to send a clear message to the Federal Highway 
Administration.
  Congress expects FHWA to work with communities who are simply seeking 
reasonable extensions for the use of their emergency relief funding.
  Under current policy, the FHWA requires that when a road or highway 
suffers serious damage, the State or local agency receiving Federal 
assistance must begin the construction project within 2 years of the 
disaster.
  And we all agree that Federal money should get out the door as 
quickly as possible.
  But this well-intended policy allows for extensions, if there are 
reasonable difficulties in moving toward construction.
  Sometimes it just takes longer than expected to scope a project, to 
finalize all the permits. In other cases, the scale of the disaster 
itself means that counties simply don't have the capacity to move all 
their projects to construction within 2 years, even though they are 
moving as quickly as they can and doing everything right.
  The problem is, in a recent decision, FHWA began denying a series of 
extension requests, including one in Humboldt County, in my district.
  My amendment would pause FHWA's ability to deny these extensions 
moving forward. And I hope this amendment gives FHWA the opportunity to 
correct course and to get back to working with communities who are 
trying to rebuild as quickly as they can.
  Communities across the country, especially those in California 
recovering from flood and fire, are now facing the possibility of 
paying back millions of dollars that they desperately need, adding 
insult to injury.
  How widespread is this problem?
  Well, State-wide in California, FHWA denied 66 out of 73 projects 
requesting an extension. So we need some help, and we need this 
amendment.

                              {time}  1030

  We need this amendment. This amendment will not address all of the 
problems caused by FHWA's extension denials, but it gives them an 
opportunity to reconsider their decisions and make things right.
  As a member of the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee, I am 
committed to working with my colleagues to establish clear guidelines 
on how the FHWA should manage emergency relief funds going forward; but 
for now, I urge adoption of this amendment, and I reserve the balance 
of my time.
  Mr. PRICE of North Carolina. Madam Chair, I ask unanimous consent to 
claim the time in opposition to this amendment, though I am not, in 
fact, opposed.
  The CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from 
North Carolina?
  There was no objection.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PRICE of North Carolina. Madam Chair, I want to thank the 
gentleman from California for introducing this amendment and 
highlighting the issue of the FHWA not granting extensions when they 
are needed and when they are justified.
  It is important to highlight the issue, and as chairman of the 
Transportation, and Housing and Urban Development, and Related Agencies 
Subcommittee, I am aware of the issue and aware of the delays that 
affect certain Federal highway emergency relief projects in California.
  Now, the amendment as drafted would have no practical effect on the 
funds to administer the program because they are not provided in this 
particular bill, but I look forward to working with the gentleman and 
coordinating with the Appropriations Committee, with the authorizing 
committee, to address this issue in a tangible way.
  Madam Chair, I have no objection to the amendment, and I yield back 
the balance of my time.
  Mr. HUFFMAN. Madam Chair, I thank the gentleman from North Carolina 
for his comments.
  Madam Chair, the purpose of this supplemental appropriations bill is 
to help communities rebuild from disasters, and my amendment simply 
ensures that we give communities reasonable time to rebuild and 
recover.
  We shouldn't be yanking the rug out from under them before they have 
gotten themselves back on their feet. For that reason, I urge adoption 
of this amendment, and I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the gentleman 
from California (Mr. Huffman).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Ms GRANGER. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentleman from California will be 
postponed.


                 Amendment No. 7 Offered by Ms. Schrier

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 7 printed in 
part C of House Report 116-51.
  Ms. SCHRIER. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       At the end of the bill (before the short title) insert the 
     following:
       Sec. __.  None of the funds in this Act shall be made 
     available to implement paragraph (3) of section 412(g) of the 
     Agricultural Research, Extension, and Education Reform Act of 
     1998 (7 U.S.C. 7632(g)).

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 357, the gentlewoman from 
Washington (Ms. Schrier) and a Member opposed each will control 5 
minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Washington.
  Ms. SCHRIER. Madam Chair, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Madam Chair, I rise today to draw attention to an important issue 
that I hope we can begin to address.
  Research is at the core of our ever-changing agriculture industry, 
including in my district. Our farms rely on research from land grant 
universities like Washington State University to build resilience in 
the face of a changing climate, to manage pests and diseases, and to 
respond to drought stresses. As the number one USDA research and 
expenditures university in the country, Washington State University's 
work helps farmers in my district expand new varieties of economic 
powerhouse crops like pears, cherries, wine grapes, apples, potatoes, 
and hops.
  Prior to the recent farm bill signed into law last December, the USDA 
could exempt nonprofit and land grant universities like Washington 
State University from a requirement that Specialty Crop Research 
Initiative grant recipients match the Federal Government dollar for 
dollar. It is really important to note that this waiver authority for 
matching requirements is available to every other ag research program 
in the farm bill except specialty crop research.
  During consideration of the recently passed farm bill, a Senate-
originated provision that dropped the exemption was included. This will 
have devastating impacts on agriculture in my district and around the 
country.
  Washington is the second most agriculturally diverse State in the 
Nation, growing everything from potatoes to peppermint, apples to 
azaleas, and wine grapes to barley and wheat. Washington State 
University partners with the USDA to make the State of Washington one 
of the largest and most successful agriculture enterprises in the 
world.

[[Page H3706]]

  From the beginning, Washington farmers, WSU, Washington State 
Department of Agriculture, and the USDA have joined forces to improve 
the productivity, efficiency, and safety of products coming from our 
State's fields and pastures.
  For example, in 2018, WSU received more than $5 million in funding to 
research pests threatening grapes, onions, garlic, and other specialty 
crops. This important research, which supports our State's diverse 
agricultural economy, would be jeopardized under the matching 
requirement authorized last year.
  This bipartisan amendment would underscore congressional support for 
vital public research like the work at Washington State University. I 
urge my colleagues to vote in favor of this amendment, and I reserve 
the balance of my time.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. Madam Chair, I claim the time in opposition, 
although I support the amendment.
  The CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. Madam Chair, I understand that this sudden 
reversal in the program was disconcerting for many of the universities 
and researchers that have received funding in the past and hope to do 
so in the future. Based on that, I have no objection to this amendment, 
and I fully support it.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. SCHRIER. Madam Chair, in summary, I would like to encourage my 
colleagues to support this amendment. It will fund research throughout 
the country and end a process that is unfair to specialty crop farmers.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Washington (Ms. Schrier).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                Amendment No. 8 Offered by Mrs. Fletcher

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 8 printed in 
part C of House Report 116-51.
  Mrs. FLETCHER. Madam Chairwoman, I have an amendment at the desk and 
I ask for its consideration.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 76, line 4, strike ``90 days'' and insert ``14 days''.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 357, the gentlewoman from 
Texas (Mrs. Fletcher) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Texas.
  Mrs. FLETCHER. Madam Chairwoman, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Madam Chairwoman, as I stand here this morning, my district and the 
entire Houston region are underwater again. A severe rainstorm swept 
across the Houston area last night. Our bayous, creeks, and tributaries 
are over their banks. Rivers are cresting near record levels and may 
surpass them before the weekend is over. Nearly 90,000 residents have 
gone without power, and many are trapped by floodwaters.
  Parts of our area had up to 7 inches of rainfall within just a few 
hours last night, and it is still raining. It is the worst rainfall we 
have had since Hurricane Harvey. And last night, I heard from my 
constituents, it felt like Harvey and they were afraid.
  As Members of this body will recall, Hurricane Harvey hit Houston and 
the Gulf Coast in August of 2017. It dumped nearly 60 inches of rain; 
it claimed 68 lives; and it caused an estimate of $125 billion in 
damages. It was the second most expensive hurricane in United States 
history.
  Members of this body responded to Harvey's devastation. In February 
of 2018, this body appropriated more than $4 billion to Texas, through 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Development 
Block Grant Disaster Recovery funds, explicitly to rebuild and mitigate 
against future storms, storms like the one we are having right now.
  But nearly a year and a half after those appropriations were made, 
those funds have not arrived. Why? Because the Department of Housing 
and Urban Development has not published the rule governing the fund's 
use in the Federal Register.
  Most recently, HUD told our State agencies that the rules were set to 
publish on May 1 of this year; but again, the day has come and gone, 
and all we have is silence.
  This is unconscionable. It is for this reason that I offer this 
amendment today. My amendment requires the publication of the rule 
governing the 2017 CDBG-DR fund's release within 14 days.
  I am joined in this amendment by my Republican colleagues as 
cosponsors, and I would like to thank Mr. Graves and Mr. Rouzer for 
cosponsoring this truly bipartisan amendment. I know they have worked 
tirelessly on these issues for a while, and I appreciate their 
partnership on this issue.
  I also thank my colleague and cosponsor from Houston, Congresswoman 
Sheila Jackson Lee.
  I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. Jackson Lee).
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Chairwoman, allow me to thank my very 
important sponsor of this amendment and, as well, our Republican 
colleagues for their leadership. We are underwater in Houston. We are 
concerned about Puerto Rico and support the underlying bill. If this 
amendment passes, we will be able to help all of those who have been 
impacted by disaster: 203,000 homes, 12,700 of which were destroyed.
  Four billion dollars are important dollars, and to have that delay 
really hinders those who are suffering now. You can imagine that we 
will be going home to overflowing bayous and homes and people who are 
in fear. Therefore, this amendment, particularly in the shortening of 
the time, recognizes that disasters mean emergencies, and people in 
emergencies are desperate and they need help.
  So I am delighted to support this amendment and will join with the 
gentlewoman as we move forward on improving how FEMA responds, as well, 
to these disasters and how we can work further with the Army Corps of 
Engineers.
  This important amendment is going to be a lifesaver for so many by 
shortening the time in which these regulations will be able to be 
rendered, and I thank the gentlewoman for yielding and her leadership.
  Madam Chair, I rise in strong support of the Fletcher-Jackson Lee 
Amendment to, H.R. 2157, the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 2019.
  The Fletcher-Jackson Lee Amendment shortens the time requirement of 
the publication of rules of the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development Community Development Fund in Public Law 115-123.
  Flooding is a serious problem in Houston, today areas of the city are 
experiencing high water placing residents, businesses and city services 
at risk.
  I am in strong support of this amendment because of the desperate 
situation of those who have lost their homes during disasters and the 
unacceptable length of time victims have had to wait for housing 
assistance.
  Hurricane Harvey was the largest housing disaster in our nation's 
history.
  Hurricane Harvey damaged 203,000 homes, of which 12,700 were 
destroyed.
  The nine-county Houston metro area impacted by Hurricane Harvey 
covers 9,444 square miles, an area larger than five states, including 
New Hampshire, New Jersey and Connecticut.
  Harris County covers 1,778 square miles, enough space to fit New York 
City, Philadelphia, Boston, Chicago, Seattle, Austin and Dallas, with 
room still to spare.
  Hurricane Harvey dropped 21 trillion gallons of rainfall on Texas and 
Louisiana, most of it on the Houston Metroplex.
  The underlying bill is a comprehensive emergency disaster 
supplemental bill to help meet the urgent needs of American communities 
still struggling to recover from recent hurricanes, typhoons, 
wildfires, floods and other natural disasters.
  This robust disaster package includes $17.2 billion in long overdue 
emergency spending for disaster-stricken communities across our nation 
and territories.
  It builds on the legislation that passed the House in January--
including an additional $3 billion to address the urgent needs of those 
living in the Midwest (Nebraska, Missouri, South Dakota, Iowa and 
Kansas) and South (Mississippi, Alabama, Florida, Georgia and the 
Carolinas) who have been devastated by flooding and tornadoes in recent 
months.
  This bill also provides some additional disaster assistance to 
communities continuing to recover from Hurricane Harvey.
  House Democrats are standing up and taking action to help communities 
across the United States and in Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana 
Islands, Guam, the U.S. Virgin Islands and American Samoa recover and 
heal

[[Page H3707]]

from devastating disasters--these communities should not be held 
hostage because of President Trump's personal contempt for Puerto Rico.
  Senate Republicans should come to their senses and join Democrats in 
advancing this bill and speeding relief to millions of Americans.
  Included in this legislation is critical funding for:
  Infrastructure and community development to rebuild our 
transportation systems and repair housing, businesses and public 
infrastructure;
  Farmers and rural communities to bolster the farmer safety net and 
restore disaster-damaged lands;
  Social services, mental health, education and dislocated worker 
initiatives to invest in the well-being of children, workers and 
families in disaster-struck areas-- including providing critical 
nutrition and Medicaid assistance for Puerto Rico and U.S. territories;
  DOD and Veterans Affairs to repair and rebuild hurricane-damaged 
bases and facilities; and
  Disaster resiliency to mitigating damage and costs from future 
disasters which are becoming more frequent as a result of climate 
change.
  American families hit by natural disasters deserve to know that their 
government will stand with them throughout the road to recovery.
  Democrats are committed to delivering this assistance to our fellow 
Americans as they work to rebuild their lives and their communities.
  Another reason I strongly support this bill is that H.R. 2157, the 
``Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2019,'' provides much needed and 
long overdue relief to Americans in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin 
Islands still suffering from the ravages of Hurricanes Maria and Irma, 
as well as relief to victims of Hurricane Michael which struck Alabama, 
Florida, and Georgia in October 2018 and to the victims of the 
Midwestern floods that have caused so much damage in Nebraska, 
Missouri, South Dakota, Iowa, and Kansas.
  Madam Chair, H.R. 2157, the ``Supplemental Appropriations Act of 
2019,'' provides much needed and long overdue relief to Americans in 
Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands still suffering from the 
ravages of Hurricanes Maria and Irma, as well as relief to victims of 
Hurricane Michael which struck Alabama, Florida, and Georgia in October 
2018 and to the victims of the Midwestern floods.
  I support this legislation and offered an amendment that would have 
provided additional funding for electricity delivery and necessary 
expenses related to the consequences of Hurricanes Harvey, Maria, Irma, 
and Maria, and Super Typhoon Yutu including technical assistance 
related to electric grids.
  As the representative of the Eighteenth Congressional District of 
Texas, which was ground zero for Hurricane Harvey, I regularly hear 
from constituents expressing their concern with ineffective and 
inadequate FEMA mechanisms put in place to help rectify the damage 
caused by natural disasters.
  That is why I also offered an amendment to H.R. 2157 that would 
prohibits funds in the bill from being used to prevent the FEMA 
Administrator from monitoring the response given to disaster victims in 
order to ensure quality control or becoming aware of complaints 
regarding the response given to disaster victims and having in place a 
mechanism to address such complaints.
  A third Jackson Lee amendment to H.R. 2157 would have provided a 
minimum of $1 million for wastewater and drinking water treatment works 
and facilities impacted by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria.
  Hurricane Sandy inflicted more than $70 billion in damages in 2012, 
and Matthew cost the U.S. about $10.3 billion in 2016. With Harvey, an 
estimated 13 million people were affected, nearly 135,000 homes damaged 
or destroyed in the historic flooding, and up to a million cars were 
wrecked.
  Hurricane Harvey ranks as the second-most costly hurricane to hit the 
U.S. mainland since 1900, causing more than $125 billion in damage.
  Our residents need more money than for single-family home repairs, 
whether it is disaster recovery or general housing dollars and I will 
continue to stride on behalf of the neighborhoods and on behalf of 
hard-working homeowners who deserve these funds, so they can continue 
on with their lives and return to their homes.
  Victims of natural disasters are entitled to know who to contact when 
issues related to FEMA arise and to be assured that their questions are 
answered, and complaints addressed.
  Allocating funding for measures such as Electricity Delivery for 
necessary expenses related to the consequences of Hurricanes Harvey, 
Maria, Irma, and Super Typhoon Yutu, is vital to negate the effects of 
these catastrophic events from significantly worsening.
  Hospitals, first-responders, and a number of other vital institutions 
that help our communities recover from the aftereffects of natural 
disasters need access to electricity.
  Moreover, with the severity of natural disasters and the ranging of 
their locations we must be proactive in our preparation for recovery.
  Alternatively, water is the most essential recourse known to man.
  A human can go for more than three weeks without food--Mahatma Gandhi 
survived 21 days of complete starvation--but water is a different 
story.
  At least 60 percent of the adult body is made of it and every living 
cell in the body needs it to keep functioning.
  Under extreme conditions an adult can lose 1 to 1.5 liters of sweat 
per hour and if that lost water is not replaced, the total volume of 
body fluid can fall quickly and, most dangerously, blood volume may 
drop.
  We do not have the luxury of not preparing for hurricanes, floods. 
earthquakes, mudslides, tornados or other natural disasters.
  With these events it is not a question of if, but when.
  For these reasons, I urge my colleagues to support the rule and the 
underlying legislation.
  Mrs. FLETCHER. Madam Chair, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Chair, I claim the time in opposition, although I 
am not opposed to the amendment.
  The CHAIR. Without objection, the gentlewoman from Texas is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Chair, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. McCarthy), the minority leader.
  Mr. McCARTHY. Madam Chairwoman, I thank Congresswoman Kay Granger for 
yielding me the time, and I thank the gentlewoman for offering this 
amendment. You will see me vote for this amendment.
  Madam Chairwoman, I rise to ask a simple question to this body: What 
is our mission? Are we here to make positive change for our fellow 
Americans, to solve problems, to respond in times of hardship, or are 
we here to message?
  I would say, collectively, together, the answer should be we are here 
to make the change to help those in hardship. These are the moments in 
time when people do not ask if you are a Republican or a Democrat.
  When Houston was flooded, I was down there that week touring with 
Members from both sides of the aisle, and nobody was arguing from 
either side.
  When Puerto Rico was hit, it was then, as I was the majority leader 
and Congressman Steny Hoyer, at the time, was the whip, now the 
majority leader, that we put a codel together with the Republicans and 
Democrats. We just didn't go to the Keys. We went to Puerto Rico and 
the Virgin Islands together to work to help to make sure we rebuilt.
  When California had the devastating fire, one of the worst we have 
ever seen, I flew with the President. When we landed, we were met by 
the Governor of California and the Governor-elect. Not only did we tour 
together and were of different parties, but we talked about how to 
rebuild. We flew down because California has more than just one 
devastation and one fire. We talked and we bonded on the basis of how 
we would work together. That is what America expects.
  The bill that we will have on the floor today does not meet the 
criteria of both of us working together, and that is just not right. 
But yesterday, with the work of Congresswoman Kay Granger and the 
others in the Appropriations Committee, we put together one in working 
with the Senate Republicans on Senate Appropriations and made an offer 
to the Democratic side.

                              {time}  1045

  I want to publicly say that to everyone. I know we can do better, and 
I know we can solve this. I made a commitment to the majority leader, 
Steny Hoyer: let's work together and be right back here next week and 
get this solved. This has gone on too long, too much hardship, and we 
could rise to the occasion.
  The information I have gotten back from the majority leader is that, 
yes, he wants to work with us; yes, they want to move this bill today. 
But I don't want to move a bill for the sake of saying I moved a bill. 
I want to make law and help those in need.
  I have spoken to the President, and I have spoken to the leader on 
the Senate side. I believe we can solve this all by next week.

[[Page H3708]]

  So today when this vote is done, and the messages are given, let's 
not stop. Let's put our committee together, and let's work through this 
weekend and the beginning of next week. I know the very best of us will 
rise to this occasion, and we could be right back here not with a 
debate of partisanship, not with a vote that defines pretty close to 
how we are registered inside this floor, but one united vote that will 
become law that the President will seek to sign.
  We know the outcome of the bill that we will vote on today. The 
President said he is not going to sign it. People are hurting. He wants 
to solve those problems, too. We want to make sure that even the money 
that we have already voted on to deliver gets delivered to the areas 
that need it the most. We want to make sure that we make the 
corrections so that the fires and the floods will not come back as 
severe as they were before from any ability that we have to do to stop 
that.
  I will make this pledge to everyone in this House, all partisanship 
aside, let's do this together. Let's show America that when it comes to 
a time of need that we all put partisanship aside and that we put 
people before politics.
  So, yes, carry on the vote today, but I am not going to be voting for 
it. I want to you know where my heart is. We will be back here next 
week. We will make law, and we will solve this. Just as the offer went 
across the aisle, I know we can do better.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Chair, I yield the balance of my time to the 
gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. Price).
  Mr. PRICE of North Carolina. Madam Chair, I thank my colleague for 
yielding.
  Madam Chair, I do want to speak in strong support of this amendment 
which may well be the most important amendment to be offered this 
morning. I certainly think that with respect to my home State of North 
Carolina where thousands of residents are eagerly awaiting the issuance 
of the Federal Register notice which this amendment references.
  This notice will unlock billions of dollars, CDBG disaster mitigation 
funds, to rebuild communities in North Carolina, Texas, Florida, South 
Carolina, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Georgia, and other 
locations.
  Now, to be clear, while the underlying bill addresses the damage from 
Hurricane Florence which hit North Carolina last September, this 
Federal Register notice we are discussing addresses damage from 
Hurricane Matthew and from other storms, 2016 and 2017 disasters, where 
we are still awaiting relief and recovery.
  Secretary Carson promised during our subcommittee hearing last month 
that the notice we are talking about today would be released on May 1, 
and as far as HUD was concerned that was achieved. But now it is OMB, 
it is the White House. They prevented this notice from being released. 
This so-called review appears to be a change in practice. That is not 
acceptable.
  North Carolina residents have endured two hurricanes in the past 3 
years. They and other storm victims around this country should not have 
to endure more stalling and more slow-walking from President Trump.
  This amendment sends a message that Congress is tired of the 
administration's delays and that we are serious about helping 
communities in need. So I couldn't more strongly support this 
amendment. I commend my colleague and the bipartisan group who have 
offered it.
  Madam Chair, I urge support of the amendment.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mrs. FLETCHER. Madam Chair, I thank my cosponsors and my colleagues 
for their support of this amendment.
  I agree. The time for action is now.
  Madam Chair, for the reasons that we have set forth, I urge all of my 
colleagues to vote in favor of this amendment, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Texas (Mrs. Fletcher).
  The question was taken; and the Chair announced that the ayes 
appeared to have it.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Chair, I demand a recorded vote.
  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, further proceedings on 
the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Texas (Mrs. Fletcher) 
will be postponed.


                  Amendment No. 9 Offered by Mrs. Axne

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 9 printed in 
part C of House Report 116-51.
  Mrs. AXNE. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 4, line 25, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $310,000,000)''.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 357, the gentlewoman from 
Iowa (Mrs. Axne) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Iowa.
  Mrs. AXNE. Madam Chair, it has been almost 2 months since severe 
flooding devastated communities in southwest Iowa and our neighbors in 
Nebraska, Kansas, and Missouri. Entire towns were under water, homes 
were destroyed, and family farms were devastated. Small businesses are 
facing irreparable damage, and many local schools may be forced to 
permanently close their doors.
  I have been down to the flood zones multiple times to speak with 
farmers, homeowners, and business owners who have lost everything. 
Their resilience is inspiring, but the damage is heartbreaking.
  When I helped Lizzie Young and her family muck out her house, I saw 
firsthand how desperately Iowans need that disaster relief.
  David Leuth, a farmer from Percival, has been kayaking out to his 
farm field to assess and repair his damage.
  Fran Par, a Pacific Junction resident whose home remained under water 
for weeks, has been helping repair large city water pumps to move water 
out of the flooded area.
  In Hamburg, Grape Community Hospital, the only rural hospital in the 
area, had to bring in military-operated water tanks just to keep its 
doors open to provide basic services. True to who Iowans are, they are 
now providing space to local businesses inside the hospital so that 
those businesses don't have to leave the area. We want to keep people 
in our State.
  School district superintendents in Mills and Fremont Counties are 
locating displaced students to provide them with transportation and 
meals so they can keep coming to school on a daily basis.
  Iowans need our help. My amendment today increases funding for 
programs that are crucial to helping Iowans and our neighbors rebuild 
and recover.
  My amendment will increase funding for the Emergency Watershed 
Program which is desperately needed for the Midwest to recover. The 
Emergency Watershed Program helps communities quickly address serious 
damages to infrastructure and land and fix imminent hazards to life and 
property caused by natural disasters. From my firsthand experiences in 
the flooded areas, I can attest to the serious damage and hazards that 
these communities face.
  The USDA had to release a new estimate in April for funding for the 
Emergency Watershed Protection program due to the Midwest floods. 
Instead of the $125 million that was the prior estimate, the USDA has 
now estimated they will need $435 million. So my amendment of $310 
million makes sure the USDA has enough money to help the Midwest. 
Without this funding increase, the USDA might not otherwise be able to 
ensure Iowans and our neighbors get the help that they deserve.
  The Emergency Watershed Program funding will be used to remove debris 
from streams, roads, and bridges; it will help repair eroded river and 
stream banks, and it can be used to repair damaged and destroyed 
drainage facilities in communities like Hamburg. This funding can be 
used to repair the more than 40 levees that breached during the 
flooding, and those that didn't break suffered erosion damage from 
overspill from those that are still standing.
  Experts believe it will take years to repair all the damage. Iowans 
don't have that time to wait, and the National Weather Service shows 
the Midwest will remain vulnerable to flooding all spring and summer, 
and rivers are expected to stay high.

[[Page H3709]]

  This Federal aid is vital to rebuilding Iowa communities. The Iowa 
Governor believes we sustained almost $1.6 billion in damages. Early 
estimates also indicate at least $214 million in agriculture-specific 
damage, and we still don't know the true extent of our agriculture 
losses yet.
  We can't afford to wait. We can't let partisan politics stall this 
crucial bill, and we must not turn our backs on our communities when 
they are recovering from devastating damages of natural disasters. That 
is not who we are as Iowans, and that is not who we are as Americans.
  I call on my colleagues on both sides of the aisle and in the House 
and the Senate to get together and work for hardworking Americans.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. Madam Chair, I claim the time in opposition, 
although I support the amendment.
  The CHAIR. Without objection, the gentleman is recognized for 5 
minutes.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. Madam Chair, until the Midwest floods struck, 
the U.S. Department of Agriculture was fairly confident that the 
Emergency Watershed Protection Program needs were fully met with the 
$125 million that was in the bill. However, on April 25, the USDA 
advised us that the estimate had increased to $435 million with large 
funding needs in Iowa and in Nebraska, in particular. This amendment 
would bring the bill to that level. So I am therefore happy to support 
the amendment.
  Madam Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Nebraska (Mr. 
Fortenberry), who is the ranking member of the Subcommittee on 
Agriculture, Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and 
Related Agencies of the Appropriations Committee.
  Mr. FORTENBERRY. Madam Chair, I would like to first recognize and 
thank my good friend, the chair of the Subcommittee on Agriculture, 
Rural Development, Food and Drug Administration, and Related Agencies, 
my leader, Mr. Bishop from Georgia, for yielding me time. I also want 
to thank my colleague, Representative Axne from Iowa, for working in 
partnership together on this important amendment.
  Madam Chair, this is tough stuff. This was one of the most 
destructive weather events in our lifetimes. It was a perfect storm of 
factors that enabled and caused the dislocation and distress across 
many States and multiple communities where I live.
  In Nebraska and in Iowa, lands that were soaked by autumn rains were 
frozen solid, and then they were covered in snow. Then this bomb 
cyclone hit us with a lethal mix of blizzard, rain, and an enormous 
quantity of water, ice, and collected topsoil. It all sped down our 
rivers, creeks, and reservoirs, bursting through dams, levees, and 
other structures designed to hold the torrent back.
  As I said in our previous debate, it is pretty jarring to stand on a 
ridge and look at an Air Force base one-third under water which, again, 
sits at the confluence of the Missouri and Platte Rivers overlooking 
Iowa and Nebraska. The Corps of Engineers said to me that our levee 
system looks like Swiss cheese.
  Now, Madam Chair, while our Midwest constituents are known for their 
hardiness, individuals in our communities can't solve the problem alone 
through just State or local resources. We need a partner with the 
Federal Government to repair badly damaged watersheds so vital to our 
Nation's environmental security.
  The amendment adds $310 million to the $125 million in the bill. 
Approximately 60 percent of the funds will go to the damage caused in 
the Midwest floods as well as communities impacted by Hurricanes 
Florence, Harvey, and Michael.
  On the ground, Madam Chair, in both of our States this program will 
help restore the scarred lands. This important relief will repair and 
reshape eroded stream banks, repair water control structures, repair 
levees, and restore conservation priorities.
  Our communities are getting back on their feet, but we need this 
program quickly to address serious and long-term damages to the 
infrastructure and our land.
  Madam Chair, I thank my colleagues for their consideration.

                              {time}  1100

  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. Madam Chair, I yield 2 minutes to the 
gentleman from Utah (Mr. Curtis).
  Mr. CURTIS. Madam Chair, I rise today in support of this amendment to 
H.R. 2157, increasing funding for the Emergency Watershed Protection 
Program.
  Last year, Utah, like many States in the West, faced devastating 
wildfires that affected areas of my district. The Pole Creek fire and 
Bald Mountain fire, which started on Federal land, collectively burned 
over 117,000 acres and left, damaged, infrastructure and watersheds.
  Many of my communities affected by the fires need assistance to 
rebuild and repair the critical watersheds that they rely on, but they 
have not been able to receive it. For example, Utah County has been 
approved for over $9 million in aid from NRCS through this program, but 
inadequate funding means they won't receive those promised dollars.
  Cleaning up and rebuilding after a wildfire is an important step in 
protecting against future disasters. I am pleased to support this 
amendment that will bring aid to communities like Utah County that have 
been affected by catastrophic natural disasters.
  Mr. BISHOP of Georgia. Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Iowa (Mrs. Axne).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                 Amendment No. 10 Offered by Mrs. Axne

  The CHAIR. It is now in order to consider amendment No. 10 printed in 
part C of House Report 116-51.
  Mrs. AXNE. Madam Chair, I have an amendment at the desk.
  The CHAIR. The Clerk will designate the amendment.
  The text of the amendment is as follows:

       Page 63, line 21, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $500,000,000)''.

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to House Resolution 357, the gentlewoman from 
Iowa (Mrs. Axne) and a Member opposed each will control 5 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentlewoman from Iowa.
  Mrs. AXNE. Madam Chair, my amendment is to increase funding for the 
Federal Highway Administration Emergency Relief program.
  As we have just discussed, I have toured the flood zones in my 
district, and I have experienced firsthand how badly the floodwaters 
have eroded and impacted our roads. The flooding was so severe that as 
of only just this past Wednesday of this week did our major interstate 
I-29 finally fully reopen, and this comes nearly 2 months after the 
flooding began. The closing of I-29 cut off the major north-south 
artery in Iowa that connects the Omaha-Council Bluffs area to Kansas 
City.
  Drivers are forced to travel hours out of their way and find smaller 
two-lane roads and highways to get to where they need to be. The 
resulting truck and traffic damage on our secondary roads is already 
apparent. Residents have suffered as traffic has suddenly doubled and 
tripled, and we still have roads that aren't open yet.
  Mr. and Mrs. Patel, motel owners in Fremont County, are dependent on 
I-29 being open and traffic coming through the area to keep their 
business open, and that is not going to happen without functional 
roads. If our roads remain closed, children can't get to school, 
community members cannot patron local businesses, and grandchildren 
can't spend time with their grandparents.
  The Federal Highway Administration Emergency Relief program will help 
Iowa address our immediate highway repair needs, restore traffic, and 
help restore our facilities.
  Safe and functional roadways are some of the most critical 
infrastructure in any community, let alone one trying to recover from a 
disaster, and this type of Federal aid is vital to rebuilding Iowa 
communities in need.
  Initial estimates from our Governor show we sustained over $1.6 
billion in damages, and that number is growing. Programs like this one 
mean that Iowa and Nebraska can focus on repairing our local roads and 
ensure the Federal Government does its part in paying for those roads.
  I call on my colleagues on both sides of the aisle and in the House 
and the

[[Page H3710]]

Senate to get to work helping hardworking Americans, and I reserve the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. PRICE of North Carolina. Madam Chair, I ask unanimous consent to 
claim the time in opposition, although, in fact, I do support the 
amendment.
  The CHAIR. Is there objection to the request of the gentleman from 
North Carolina?
  There was no objection.
  The CHAIR. The gentleman is recognized for 5 minutes.
  Mr. PRICE of North Carolina. Madam Chair, the Federal Highway 
Administration's latest estimate for the Emergency Relief program 
identified $1.3 billion in projects in disaster-affected areas. This 
bill actually contains something more than that: $1.65 billion. But the 
FHWA estimates do not yet account for the damage from the Midwest 
floods.
  This amendment would rectify that. It would provide the FHWA with 
additional resources to address the damage from the flooding in Iowa 
and other affected States, and then any excess funds would remain 
available for future disasters.
  I thank our colleague for offering this amendment. I think it is 
needed, and I support its adoption.
  Madam Chair, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mrs. AXNE. Madam Chair, I just want to close by thanking my 
colleagues across the aisle and, in particular, Representative 
Fortenberry and Mr. Curtis for helping out all these people in need, 
not just in our communities in Iowa, but across the country. I am 
looking forward to passing this disaster bill today so we can get this 
immediate relief out to folks across this country, including those in 
my own backyard.
  I am grateful for all the work that has been done by the chair of 
Appropriations and the subcommittee chair, Sanford Bishop, to help us 
get where we needed to be on this. I am looking forward to going back 
to Iowa and letting them know we have got the funding necessary to help 
them repair their lives.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  The CHAIR. The question is on the amendment offered by the 
gentlewoman from Iowa (Mrs. Axne).
  The amendment was agreed to.


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR. Pursuant to clause 6 of rule XVIII, proceedings will now 
resume on those amendments printed in part C of House Report 116-51 on 
which further proceedings were postponed, in the following order:
  Amendment No. 1 by Mr. Perlmutter of Colorado.
  Amendment No. 3 by Mr. Sablan of the Northern Mariana Islands.
  Amendment No. 6 by Mr. Huffman of California.
  Amendment No. 8 by Ms. Fletcher of Texas.
  The Chair will reduce to 2 minutes the minimum time for any 
electronic vote after the first vote in this series.


               Amendment No. 1 Offered by Mr. Perlmutter

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentleman from Colorado (Mr. 
Perlmutter) on which further proceedings were postponed and on which 
the ayes prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 247, 
noes 165, not voting 25, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 197]

                               AYES--247

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Axne
     Barragan
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gottheimer
     Green (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hurd (TX)
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Mullin
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     Norton
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radewagen
     Raskin
     Reed
     Rice (NY)
     Rice (SC)
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sablan
     Sanchez
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thornberry
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NOES--165

     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hern, Kevin
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     Kinzinger
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reschenthaler
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Timmons
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--25

     Abraham
     Bass
     Bergman
     Bishop (UT)
     Cardenas
     Cummings
     Davis, Rodney
     Emmer
     Eshoo
     Gabbard
     Hartzler
     Keating
     Kustoff (TN)
     Marshall
     Olson
     Plaskett
     Richmond
     Rooney (FL)
     Ryan
     San Nicolas
     Sarbanes
     Swalwell (CA)
     Van Drew
     Walker
     Wenstrup

                              {time}  1134

  Mr. NEWHOUSE changed his vote from ``aye'' to ``no.''
  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 3 Offered by Mr. Sablan

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentleman from the Northern Mariana 
Islands (Mr. Sablan) on which further

[[Page H3711]]

proceedings were postponed and on which the ayes prevailed by voice 
vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 268, 
noes 143, not voting 26, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 198]

                               AYES--268

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Amodei
     Axne
     Bacon
     Barragan
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brooks (IN)
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buck
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Calvert
     Carbajal
     Carson (IN)
     Carter (TX)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Collins (NY)
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crenshaw
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gottheimer
     Green (TX)
     Grijalva
     Guthrie
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Hurd (TX)
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Joyce (OH)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Mullin
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Newhouse
     Norcross
     Norton
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radewagen
     Raskin
     Reed
     Rice (NY)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sablan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Stevens
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Suozzi
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Turner
     Underwood
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walberg
     Walorski
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth
     Young

                               NOES--143

     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bost
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Carter (GA)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Comer
     Crawford
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hern, Kevin
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (PA)
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Norman
     Nunes
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Steil
     Steube
     Taylor
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walden
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--26

     Abraham
     Bass
     Bergman
     Bishop (UT)
     Cardenas
     Cummings
     Davis, Rodney
     Emmer
     Eshoo
     Gabbard
     Gohmert
     Hartzler
     Keating
     Kustoff (TN)
     Marshall
     Olson
     Pascrell
     Plaskett
     Richmond
     Rooney (FL)
     Ryan
     San Nicolas
     Swalwell (CA)
     Van Drew
     Walker
     Wenstrup


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1140

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                 Amendment No. 6 Offered by Mr. Huffman

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentleman from California (Mr. Huffman) 
on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the ayes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 241, 
noes 168, not voting 28, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 199]

                               AYES--241

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Amodei
     Axne
     Barragan
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Carson (IN)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Graves (LA)
     Green (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Herrera Beutler
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Hurd (TX)
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Mullin
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     Norton
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Reed
     Rice (NY)
     Rogers (AL)
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sablan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Shimkus
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stefanik
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Waltz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

[[Page H3712]]


  


                               NOES--168

     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amash
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bost
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     DesJarlais
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hern, Kevin
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hudson
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smucker
     Spano
     Stauber
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--28

     Abraham
     Bass
     Bergman
     Bishop (UT)
     Brady
     Cardenas
     Cummings
     Davis, Rodney
     Doggett
     Emmer
     Eshoo
     Gabbard
     Hartzler
     Keating
     Kustoff (TN)
     Marshall
     Olson
     Pascrell
     Plaskett
     Radewagen
     Richmond
     Rooney (FL)
     Ryan
     San Nicolas
     Swalwell (CA)
     Van Drew
     Walker
     Wenstrup


                       Announcement by the Chair

  The CHAIR (during the vote). There is 1 minute remaining.

                              {time}  1146

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.


                Amendment No. 8 Offered by Mrs. Fletcher

  The CHAIR. The unfinished business is the demand for a recorded vote 
on the amendment offered by the gentlewoman from Texas (Mrs. Fletcher) 
on which further proceedings were postponed and on which the ayes 
prevailed by voice vote.
  The Clerk will redesignate the amendment.
  The Clerk redesignated the amendment.


                             Recorded Vote

  The CHAIR. A recorded vote has been demanded.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The CHAIR. This will be a 2-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 393, 
noes 20, not voting 24, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 200]

                               AYES--393

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allen
     Allred
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Axne
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Barragan
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Biggs
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Bost
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brady
     Brindisi
     Brooks (AL)
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carbajal
     Carson (IN)
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Cartwright
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Cline
     Cloud
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Connolly
     Cook
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davids (KS)
     Davidson (OH)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     DesJarlais
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Engel
     Escobar
     Espaillat
     Estes
     Evans
     Ferguson
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Fletcher
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Foxx (NC)
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gonzalez-Colon (PR)
     Gooden
     Gottheimer
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Green (TX)
     Grijalva
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Haaland
     Hagedorn
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (AR)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Huizenga
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Johnson (TX)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Kelly (IL)
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamb
     Lamborn
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Latta
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Lesko
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lucas
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Marchant
     Mast
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McHenry
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meadows
     Meeks
     Meng
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Mullin
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Newhouse
     Norcross
     Norton
     Nunes
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Palazzo
     Pallone
     Palmer
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Pence
     Perlmutter
     Perry
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Posey
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Radewagen
     Raskin
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (NY)
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Rouzer
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Rutherford
     Sablan
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scalise
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Sensenbrenner
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Smucker
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Spano
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stevens
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Suozzi
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Turner
     Underwood
     Upton
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watkins
     Watson Coleman
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Welch
     Westerman
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yarmuth
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                                NOES--20

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Brooks (IN)
     Burgess
     Duffy
     Gallagher
     Gohmert
     Gosar
     Griffith
     Harris
     Luetkemeyer
     Massie
     McClintock
     Norman
     Roby
     Rose, John W.
     Roy
     Schweikert
     Taylor
     Williams

                             NOT VOTING--24

     Abraham
     Bass
     Bergman
     Bishop (UT)
     Cardenas
     Cummings
     Davis, Rodney
     Emmer
     Eshoo
     Gabbard
     Hartzler
     Keating
     Kustoff (TN)
     Marshall
     Olson
     Plaskett
     Richmond
     Rooney (FL)
     Ryan
     San Nicolas
     Swalwell (CA)
     Van Drew
     Walker
     Wenstrup

                              {time}  1202

  So the amendment was agreed to.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The Acting CHAIR (Mr. Veasey). There being no further amendments, 
under the rule, the Committee rises.
  Accordingly, the Committee rose; and the Speaker pro tempore (Ms. 
Finkenauer) having assumed the chair, Mr. Veasey, Acting Chair of the 
Committee of the Whole House on the state of the Union, reported that 
that Committee, having had under consideration the bill (H.R. 2157) 
making supplemental appropriations for the fiscal year ending September 
30, 2019, and for other purposes, and, pursuant to House Resolution 
357, he reported the bill, as amended by that resolution, back to the 
House with sundry further amendments adopted in the Committee of the 
Whole.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Under the rule, the previous question is 
ordered.
  Is a separate vote demanded on any further amendment reported from 
the

[[Page H3713]]

Committee of the Whole? If not, the Chair will put them en gros.
  The amendments were agreed to.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the engrossment and third 
reading of the bill.
  The bill was ordered to be engrossed and read a third time, and was 
read the third time.


                           Motion to Recommit

  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I have a motion to recommit at the desk.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is the gentlewoman opposed to the bill?
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I am in its current form.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The Clerk will report the motion to 
recommit.
  The Clerk read as follows:

       Ms. Granger moves to recommit the bill H.R. 2157 to the 
     Committee on Appropriations with instructions to report the 
     same back to the House forthwith, with the following 
     amendment:
       Page 50, line 3, after the dollar amount, insert 
     ``(increased by $2,880,000,000)''.

  Mr. VISCLOSKY (during the reading). Madam Speaker, I reserve a point 
of order on the gentlewoman's motion.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. A point of order is reserved.
  The Clerk will read.
  The Clerk continued to read.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from Texas is recognized for 
5 minutes.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, my motion amends the bill by adding the 
additional $2.88 billion the administration has said is needed to care 
for the unaccompanied children who continue to flood our southern 
border.
  I am offering this motion because the bill we are considering today 
does not address this need. The funding in this motion is just one 
piece of what is needed to respond to this crisis.
  The children who come across our border without a parent become the 
responsibility of our Federal Government. As of the end of April, 
nearly 13,000 unaccompanied children were in the care of the United 
States Department of Health and Human Services.
  We are told that if these trends continue, the Department will soon 
run out of funds to care for these children and face Antideficiency Act 
violations.
  The gentleman from Texas (Mr. Hurd) offered this same amendment in a 
full committee markup of the Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human 
Services, Education, and Related Agencies' appropriations bill just 2 
days ago. At that time, the chair told us that the amendment would not 
be supported because we could not wait for a regular appropriations 
bill to be enacted.
  We were told this funding was needed now. By including the funds in 
this emergency supplemental bill, we will do just that.
  We are giving our colleagues on the other side of the aisle another 
opportunity today to provide the funding necessary to continue to care 
for these children. Whatever our positions may be on border security, I 
think we can all agree that we have a responsibility to ensure that our 
agencies have sufficient funding to do what we have asked them to do.
  I urge a ``yes'' vote on the motion to recommit, and I yield back the 
balance of my time.
  Mr. VISCLOSKY. Madam Speaker, I withdraw my reservation of a point of 
order.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The reservation of a point of order is 
withdrawn.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I rise in opposition to this motion to 
recommit.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentlewoman from Connecticut is 
recognized for 5 minutes.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, the administration submitted a 
supplemental request last week for an additional $2.9 billion in 
emergency appropriations for the unaccompanied children program.
  We are carefully reviewing that request. We expect the administration 
to provide further details about the proposed use of those funds. We 
have had bicameral, bipartisan meetings to get more details on the 
request, and we expect that in the next several days, but we need 
additional details from the administration before we can sign off on 
this request.
  How many children are expected to be referred by Customs and Border 
Protection over the next few months? What kind of shelter beds are we 
paying for with the $2.9 billion?
  Let's be clear. There are child welfare differences, and major cost 
differences, among traditional beds that are $250 a night, soft-sided 
dormitories, and brick and mortar influx shelters, which run from $750 
to $1,250 per bed per day.
  Does the estimate include appropriate onsite mental health 
professionals and clinicians for facilities so that the children have 
access to the services they are legally required to have? We know they 
have been wanting in those services.
  These staffing ratios are critical, as are legal services and child 
advocates for the most vulnerable children in ORR's care. We need to 
know if these costs have been included in OMB's estimate.
  I assure my colleagues, we are taking this request seriously, but you 
should not be fooled. This bill is not the right vehicle. It is the 
wrong bill for the unaccompanied children program.
  This motion to recommit does not provide funding for unaccompanied 
children. It adds $2.9 million to the account for Head Start.
  Madam Speaker, my friends should have been with us on the 
appropriations bill on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and 
related agencies just 2 days ago. They had a chance to vote for $4.5 
billion for childcare, for child welfare. They said no. They said no to 
this.
  So don't be fooled by this, keeping in mind this is the 1-year 
anniversary of their child abuse policy to separate our kids at the 
border.
  You want to know about unaccompanied kids? You could have cared for 
them last year and every day since.
  Vote ``no'' on the motion to recommit.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members are reminded to address their 
remarks to the Chair.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield to the gentlewoman from Iowa 
(Mrs. Axne).
  Mrs. AXNE. Madam Speaker, passing this disaster supplemental is vital 
to any community that suffered from disasters over these last 18 
months. But I rise today to talk about one community--mine, Iowa's 
Third Congressional District.
  Entire towns were underwater. Many Iowans have had their homes, small 
businesses, and family farms destroyed. Medical centers and schools 
face irreparable damage and may never be able to reopen their doors 
again.
  Parents are worried about where they are going to be able to send 
their kids to school. The lasting impacts on the health and well-being 
of Iowa families and our rural communities are beyond calculation.
  I have been to our flood zones multiple times to speak to farmers, 
homeowners, and business owners who have lost everything. Their 
resilience is inspiring, but the damage is devastating. And Iowans are 
hardworking, taxpaying Americans.
  This motion to recommit is playing partisan politics with people's 
lives, and it is unacceptable.
  I helped Lizzie Young and her family muck out their house. David 
Leuth, a farmer from Percival, has been kayaking out to view his 
fields. Fran Mierzwa from Pacific Junction had her house underwater for 
almost 2 months.
  Great Community Hospital in Hamburg, the only rural hospital in the 
area, had to bring in military-operated water tanks just to keep its 
doors open for basic services. Now, because they are standing up for 
their community, they are providing space for small businesses to 
operate, in hopes that those businesses don't leave the area so that 
community doesn't die.
  If this motion to recommit passes, it will prevent this disaster 
funding from moving forward.

                              {time}  1215

  If this motion to recommit passes, it will prevent disaster funding 
from moving forward. A ``yes'' vote is to tell Iowans and Americans to 
wait longer. A ``yes'' vote is a slap in the face to everybody across 
this country who is suffering from these disasters.
  I am here to tell you Iowans can't afford to wait. None of our 
constituents who have been impacted by floods, tornadoes, or fires can 
afford to wait.

[[Page H3714]]

  Madam Speaker, I urge this body to stop making Americans wait, to 
vote down this motion to recommit, and to pass this bill.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the previous question is 
ordered on the motion to recommit.
  There was no objection.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion to recommit.
  The question was taken; and the Speaker pro tempore announced that 
the noes appeared to have it.


                             Recorded Vote

  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I demand a recorded vote.
  A recorded vote was ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 9 of rule XX, this 5-
minute vote on the motion to recommit will be followed by 5-minutes 
votes on passage of the bill and agreeing to the Speaker's approval of 
the Journal, if ordered.
  This is a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--ayes 189, 
noes 215, not voting 27, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 201]

                               AYES--189

     Aderholt
     Allen
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Bacon
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Bilirakis
     Bost
     Brady
     Brindisi
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (GA)
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Crenshaw
     Crow
     Cunningham
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     Diaz-Balart
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Dunn
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fitzpatrick
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Fortenberry
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Golden
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gooden
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Houlahan
     Hudson
     Hunter
     Hurd (TX)
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Johnson (SD)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Katko
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     LaHood
     LaMalfa
     Lamb
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Luria
     Marchant
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McCaul
     McClintock
     McHenry
     McKinley
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Moulton
     Mullin
     Newhouse
     Norman
     Nunes
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Peterson
     Porter
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reed
     Reschenthaler
     Rice (SC)
     Riggleman
     Roby
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose, John W.
     Rouzer
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Scott, Austin
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Slotkin
     Smith (MO)
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smucker
     Spanberger
     Spano
     Stauber
     Stefanik
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Stivers
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Torres Small (NM)
     Turner
     Upton
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walden
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                               NOES--215

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allred
     Amash
     Axne
     Barragan
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Biggs
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Buck
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Carson (IN)
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crist
     Cuellar
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Engel
     Escobar
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fletcher
     Foster
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Gaetz
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Gohmert
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gosar
     Gottheimer
     Green (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horsford
     Hoyer
     Huffman
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Massie
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Rice (NY)
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Roy
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sires
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stevens
     Suozzi
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Vargas
     Veasey
     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                             NOT VOTING--27

     Abraham
     Bass
     Bergman
     Bishop (UT)
     Cardenas
     Cartwright
     Cummings
     Davis, Rodney
     DesJarlais
     Emmer
     Eshoo
     Gabbard
     Hartzler
     Huizenga
     Keating
     Kustoff (TN)
     Marshall
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Olson
     Richmond
     Rooney (FL)
     Ryan
     Sherrill
     Swalwell (CA)
     Van Drew
     Walker
     Wenstrup

                              {time}  1220

  So the motion to recommit was rejected.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the passage of the bill.
  Pursuant to clause 10 of rule XX, the yeas and nays are ordered.
  This is a 5-minute vote.
  The vote was taken by electronic device, and there were--yeas 257, 
nays 150, not voting 24, as follows:

                             [Roll No. 202]

                               YEAS--257

     Adams
     Aguilar
     Allen
     Allred
     Axne
     Bacon
     Barragan
     Beatty
     Bera
     Beyer
     Bilirakis
     Bishop (GA)
     Blumenauer
     Blunt Rochester
     Bonamici
     Bost
     Boyle, Brendan F.
     Brindisi
     Brown (MD)
     Brownley (CA)
     Bustos
     Butterfield
     Carbajal
     Carson (IN)
     Carter (GA)
     Case
     Casten (IL)
     Castor (FL)
     Castro (TX)
     Chu, Judy
     Cicilline
     Cisneros
     Clark (MA)
     Clarke (NY)
     Clay
     Cleaver
     Clyburn
     Cohen
     Connolly
     Cooper
     Correa
     Costa
     Courtney
     Cox (CA)
     Craig
     Crenshaw
     Crist
     Crow
     Cuellar
     Cunningham
     Davids (KS)
     Davis (CA)
     Davis, Danny K.
     Dean
     DeFazio
     DeGette
     DeLauro
     DelBene
     Delgado
     Demings
     DeSaulnier
     Deutch
     Diaz-Balart
     Dingell
     Doggett
     Doyle, Michael F.
     Dunn
     Engel
     Escobar
     Espaillat
     Evans
     Finkenauer
     Fitzpatrick
     Fletcher
     Fortenberry
     Foster
     Frankel
     Fudge
     Gallego
     Garamendi
     Garcia (IL)
     Garcia (TX)
     Golden
     Gomez
     Gonzalez (TX)
     Gottheimer
     Graves (MO)
     Green (TX)
     Grijalva
     Haaland
     Harder (CA)
     Hastings
     Hayes
     Heck
     Higgins (NY)
     Hill (CA)
     Himes
     Horn, Kendra S.
     Horsford
     Houlahan
     Hoyer
     Hudson
     Huffman
     Hurd (TX)
     Jackson Lee
     Jayapal
     Jeffries
     Johnson (GA)
     Johnson (SD)
     Johnson (TX)
     Kaptur
     Katko
     Kelly (IL)
     Kennedy
     Khanna
     Kildee
     Kilmer
     Kim
     Kind
     King (IA)
     King (NY)
     Kinzinger
     Kirkpatrick
     Krishnamoorthi
     Kuster (NH)
     LaMalfa
     Lamb
     Langevin
     Larsen (WA)
     Larson (CT)
     Lawrence
     Lawson (FL)
     Lee (CA)
     Lee (NV)
     Levin (CA)
     Levin (MI)
     Lewis
     Lieu, Ted
     Lipinski
     Loebsack
     Lofgren
     Lowenthal
     Lowey
     Lujan
     Luria
     Lynch
     Malinowski
     Maloney, Carolyn B.
     Maloney, Sean
     Matsui
     McAdams
     McBath
     McCaul
     McCollum
     McEachin
     McGovern
     McKinley
     McNerney
     Meeks
     Meng
     Moore
     Morelle
     Moulton
     Mucarsel-Powell
     Murphy
     Nadler
     Napolitano
     Neal
     Neguse
     Newhouse
     Norcross
     O'Halleran
     Ocasio-Cortez
     Omar
     Pallone
     Panetta
     Pappas
     Pascrell
     Payne
     Perlmutter
     Peters
     Peterson
     Phillips
     Pingree
     Pocan
     Porter
     Pressley
     Price (NC)
     Quigley
     Raskin
     Reed
     Rice (NY)
     Rice (SC)
     Roby
     Rose (NY)
     Rouda
     Rouzer
     Roybal-Allard
     Ruiz
     Ruppersberger
     Rush
     Sanchez
     Sarbanes
     Scanlon
     Schakowsky
     Schiff
     Schneider
     Schrader
     Schrier
     Scott (VA)
     Scott, Austin
     Scott, David
     Serrano
     Sewell (AL)
     Shalala
     Sherman
     Sherrill
     Sires
     Slotkin
     Smith (NE)
     Smith (NJ)
     Smith (WA)
     Soto
     Spanberger
     Spano
     Speier
     Stanton
     Stefanik
     Stevens
     Stivers
     Suozzi
     Takano
     Thompson (CA)
     Thompson (MS)
     Titus
     Tlaib
     Tonko
     Torres (CA)
     Torres Small (NM)
     Trahan
     Trone
     Underwood
     Upton
     Vargas
     Veasey

[[Page H3715]]


     Vela
     Velazquez
     Visclosky
     Walden
     Wasserman Schultz
     Waters
     Watson Coleman
     Welch
     Wexton
     Wild
     Wilson (FL)
     Yarmuth

                               NAYS--150

     Aderholt
     Amash
     Amodei
     Armstrong
     Arrington
     Babin
     Baird
     Balderson
     Banks
     Barr
     Biggs
     Brady
     Brooks (AL)
     Brooks (IN)
     Buchanan
     Buck
     Bucshon
     Budd
     Burchett
     Burgess
     Byrne
     Calvert
     Carter (TX)
     Chabot
     Cheney
     Cline
     Cloud
     Cole
     Collins (GA)
     Collins (NY)
     Comer
     Conaway
     Cook
     Crawford
     Curtis
     Davidson (OH)
     DesJarlais
     Duffy
     Duncan
     Estes
     Ferguson
     Fleischmann
     Flores
     Foxx (NC)
     Fulcher
     Gaetz
     Gallagher
     Gianforte
     Gibbs
     Gohmert
     Gonzalez (OH)
     Gooden
     Gosar
     Granger
     Graves (GA)
     Graves (LA)
     Green (TN)
     Griffith
     Grothman
     Guest
     Guthrie
     Hagedorn
     Harris
     Hern, Kevin
     Herrera Beutler
     Hice (GA)
     Higgins (LA)
     Hill (AR)
     Holding
     Hollingsworth
     Hunter
     Johnson (LA)
     Johnson (OH)
     Jordan
     Joyce (OH)
     Joyce (PA)
     Kelly (MS)
     Kelly (PA)
     LaHood
     Lamborn
     Latta
     Lesko
     Long
     Loudermilk
     Lucas
     Luetkemeyer
     Marchant
     Massie
     Mast
     McCarthy
     McClintock
     McHenry
     Meadows
     Meuser
     Miller
     Mitchell
     Moolenaar
     Mooney (WV)
     Mullin
     Norman
     Nunes
     Palazzo
     Palmer
     Pence
     Perry
     Posey
     Ratcliffe
     Reschenthaler
     Riggleman
     Rodgers (WA)
     Roe, David P.
     Rogers (AL)
     Rogers (KY)
     Rose, John W.
     Roy
     Rutherford
     Scalise
     Schweikert
     Sensenbrenner
     Shimkus
     Simpson
     Smith (MO)
     Smucker
     Stauber
     Steil
     Steube
     Stewart
     Taylor
     Thompson (PA)
     Thornberry
     Timmons
     Tipton
     Turner
     Wagner
     Walberg
     Walorski
     Waltz
     Watkins
     Weber (TX)
     Webster (FL)
     Westerman
     Williams
     Wilson (SC)
     Wittman
     Womack
     Woodall
     Wright
     Yoho
     Young
     Zeldin

                             NOT VOTING--24

     Abraham
     Bass
     Bergman
     Bishop (UT)
     Cardenas
     Cartwright
     Cummings
     Davis, Rodney
     Emmer
     Eshoo
     Gabbard
     Hartzler
     Huizenga
     Keating
     Kustoff (TN)
     Marshall
     Olson
     Richmond
     Rooney (FL)
     Ryan
     Swalwell (CA)
     Van Drew
     Walker
     Wenstrup

                              {time}  1230

  So the bill was passed.
  The result of the vote was announced as above recorded.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.


                          PERSONAL EXPLANATION

  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Speaker, on Friday, May 10th I 
was absent from the House to attend my daughter's college graduation. 
Due to my absence, I did not record any votes for the day. Had I been 
present, I would have voted ``yea'' on rollcall No. 197; ``yea'' on 
rollcall No. 198; ``nay'' on rollcall No. 199; ``yea'' on rollcall No. 
200; ``yea'' on rollcall No. 201; and ``yea'' on rollcall No. 202

                          ____________________