Daily Digest

Thursday, June 20, 2019

Daily Digest

Senate

Chamber Action

Routine Proceedings, pages S4131–S4196

Measures Introduced: Twenty-seven bills and six resolutions were introduced, as follows: S. 1915–1941, S. Res. 254–258, and S. Con. Res. 20.
Pages S4168–69

Measures Passed:

Resolutions of Disapproval of Proposed Transfers of Certain Defense Articles and Services:

By 53 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 177), Senate passed S.J. Res. 36, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed transfer to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, the Kingdom of Spain, and the Italian Republic of certain defense articles and services.
Page S4142

By 53 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 178), Senate passed S.J. Res. 38, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed export to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland of certain defense articles and services.
Page S4142

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 27, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed transfer to the United Arab Emirates, United Kingdom and Australia certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 28, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed foreign military sale to the United Arab Emirates of certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 29, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed foreign military sale to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 30, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed foreign military sale to the United Arab Emirates of certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 31, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed foreign military sale to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 32, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed foreign military sale to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 33, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed foreign military sale to the United Arab Emirates of certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 34, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed foreign military sale to the United Arab Emirates of certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 35, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed foreign military sale to the United Arab Emirates of certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 37, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed export to the United Arab Emirates, the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and the Republic of France of certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 39, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed export to the United Arab Emirates and United Kingdom of certain defense articles, including technical data and defense services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 40, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed export to India, Israel, Republic of Korea, and Kingdom of Saudi Arabia of certain defense articles, including technical data and defense services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 41, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed export to the Government of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland of technical data and defense services.
Pages S4142–45

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By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 42, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed export to the United Arab Emirates and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland of certain defense articles, including technical data and defense services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 43, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed transfer to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 44, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed retransfer of certain defense articles from the United Arab Emirates to the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 45, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed transfer to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 46, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed transfer to the United Arab Emirates certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 47, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed transfer to the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. 179), Senate passed S.J. Res. 48, providing for congressional disapproval of the proposed transfer to the United Arab Emirates certain defense articles and services.
Pages S4142–45


American Eagle Day: Senate agreed to S. Res. 257, designating June 20, 2019, as ``American Eagle Day'' and celebrating the recovery and restoration of the bald eagle, the national symbol of the United States.
Page S4195


National Brain Tumor Awareness Month: Senate agreed to S. Res. 258, expressing support for the designation of May 2019 as ``National Brain Tumor Awareness Month''.
Page S4195


World Elder Abuse Awareness Day: Committee on the Judiciary was discharged from further consideration of S. Res. 242, designating June 15, 2019, as ``World Elder Abuse Awareness Day'', and the resolution was then agreed to.
Page S4195


Northern Mariana Islands Long-Term Legal Residents Relief Act: Senate passed H.R. 559, to amend section 6 of the Joint Resolution entitled ``A Joint Resolution to approve the Covenant To Establish a Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands in Political Union with the United States of America, and for other purposes''.
Page S4195

Measures Considered:

National Defense Authorization Act--Agreement: Senate continued consideration of the motion to proceed to consideration of S. 1790, to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2020 for military activities of the Department of Defense, for military construction, and for defense activities of the Department of Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal year, post-cloture.
Pages S4145–51, S4151–62

A unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that notwithstanding Rule XXII, the post-cloture time on the motion to proceed to consideration of the bill expire at 5:30 p.m., on Monday, June 24, 2019.
Page S4151

A unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that at approximately 3 p.m. on Monday, June 24, 2019, Senate resume consideration of the motion to proceed to consideration of the bill, post-cloture, under the previous order.
Pages S4195–96


Vote Correction--Agreement: A unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that Senator Whitehouse be permitted to change his vote from nay to yea on Vote No. 176 since it will not affect the outcome.
Page S4150


Nominations Confirmed: Senate confirmed the following nominations:

By 86 yeas to 5 nays (Vote No. EX. 180), Rita Baranwal, of Pennsylvania, to be an Assistant Secretary of Energy (Nuclear Energy).
Page S4151

Seth Daniel Appleton, of Missouri, to be an Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

Dino Falaschetti, of Montana, to be Director, Office of Financial Research, Department of the Treasury, for a term of six years.

Robert Hunter Kurtz, of Virginia, to be an Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.

Bimal Patel, of Georgia, to be an Assistant Secretary of the Treasury.

Allison Herren Lee, of Colorado, to be a Member of the Securities and Exchange Commission for a term expiring June 5, 2022.

Keith Krach, of California, to be an Under Secretary of State (Economic Growth, Energy, and the Environment).

[Page:D720]

Keith Krach, of California, to be United States Alternate Governor of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.

Keith Krach, of California, to be United States Alternate Governor of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development for a term of five years; United States Alternate Governor of the Inter-American Development Bank for a term of five years.

Jeffrey L. Eberhardt, of Wisconsin, to be Special Representative of the President for Nuclear Nonproliferation, with the rank of Ambassador.
Page S4151


Executive Communications:
Pages S4166–67


Petitions and Memorials:
Pages S4167–68


Executive Reports of Committees:
Page S4168


Additional Cosponsors:
Pages S4169–72


Statements on Introduced Bills/Resolutions:
Pages S4172–76


Additional Statements:
Pages S4165–66


Amendments Submitted:
Pages S4179–94


Authorities for Committees to Meet:
Pages S4194–95


Privileges of the Floor:
Page S4195


Record Votes: Four record votes were taken today. (Total--180)
Pages S4142–43, S4151


Adjournment: Senate convened at 9:30 a.m. and adjourned at 4:57 p.m., until 3 p.m. on Monday, June 24, 2019. (For Senate's program, see the remarks of the Majority Leader in today's Record on pages S4195–96.)

Committee Meetings

(Committees not listed did not meet)

COLLECTION OF BENEFICIAL OWNERSHIP INFORMATION

Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs: Committee concluded a hearing to examine outside perspectives on the collection of beneficial ownership information, after receiving testimony from Greg Baer, Bank Policy Institute, Karen Harned, National Federation of Independent Business Small Business Legal Center, and Gary Kalman, Financial Accountability and Corporate Transparency Coalition, all of Washington, D.C.

CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION OVERSIGHT

Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation: Subcommittee on Manufacturing, Trade, and Consumer Protection concluded an oversight hearing to examine the Consumer Product Safety Commission, after receiving testimony from Ann Marie Buerkle, Acting Chairman, and Robert S. Adler, Dana Baiocco, Peter A. Feldman, and Elliot F. Kaye, each a Commissioner, all of the Consumer Product Safety Commission.

BUSINESS MEETING

Committee on Energy and Natural Resources: Committee ordered favorably reported the nomination of Robert Wallace, of Wyoming, to be Assistant Secretary for Fish and Wildlife, Department of the Interior.

ADVANCED GEOTHERMAL ENERGY

Committee on Energy and Natural Resources: Committee concluded a hearing to examine opportunities and challenges for advanced geothermal energy development in the United States, after receiving testimony from Daniel R. Simmons, Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, and Katherine R. Young, Geothermal Program Manager, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, both of the Department of Energy; Tim Spisak, State Director for New Mexico, Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas, Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior; Tim Latimer, Fervo Energy, San Francisco, California; and Paul A. Thomsen, ORMAT Technologies, Reno, Nevada, on behalf of the Geothermal Resource Council.

NOMINATION

Committee on Foreign Relations: Committee concluded a hearing to examine the nominations of Andrew P. Bremberg, of Virginia, to be Representative of the United States of America to the Office of the United Nations and Other International Organizations in Geneva, with the rank of Ambassador, Philip S. Goldberg, of the District of Columbia, to be Ambassador to the Republic of Colombia, Doug Manchester, of California, to be Ambassador to the Commonwealth of The Bahamas, Adrian Zuckerman, of New Jersey, to be Ambassador to Romania, Richard B. Norland, of Iowa, to be Ambassador to Libya, Jonathan R. Cohen, of California, to be Ambassador to the Arab Republic of Egypt, and John Rakolta, Jr., of Michigan, to be Ambassador to the United Arab Emirates, all of the Department of State, after the nominees testified and answered questions in their own behalf.

BUSINESS MEETING

Committee on the Judiciary: Committee ordered favorably reported the nominations of Daniel Aaron Bress, of California, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Ninth Circuit, Mary S. McElroy, to be United States District Judge for the District of Rhode Island, Gary Richard Brown, Diane Gujarati, Eric Ross Komitee, and Rachel P. Kovner, each to be a United States District Judge for the Eastern District of New York, Stephanie Dawkins Davis, to be United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Michigan, Stephanie A. Gallagher, to be United States District Judge for the District of Maryland, Lewis J. Liman, and Mary Kay Vyskocil, both to be a United States District Judge for the Southern District of New York, Martha Maria Pacold, Mary M. Rowland, and Steven C. Seeger, each to be a United States District Judge for the Northern District of Illinois, Jason K. Pulliam, to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Texas, John L. Sinatra, Jr., to be United States District Judge for the Western District of New York, Frank William Volk, to be United States District Judge for the Southern District of West Virginia, David Austin Tapp, of Kentucky, to be a Judge of the United States Court of Federal Claims, and Edward W. Felten, of New Jersey, to be a Member of the Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board.

[Page:D721]

INTELLIGENCE

Select Committee on Intelligence: Committee held closed hearings on intelligence matters, receiving testimony from officials of the intelligence community.

Committee recessed subject to the call.

House of Representatives

Chamber Action


Public Bills and Resolutions Introduced: 25 public bills, H.R. 3373–3397; and 5 resolutions, H.J. Res. 68; and H. Res. 452–455 were introduced.
Pages H5005–06


Additional Cosponsors:
Pages H5007–08


Report Filed: A report was filed today as follows:

H.R. 1815, to require the Securities and Exchange Commission, when developing rules and regulations about disclosures to retail investors, to conduct investor testing, including a survey and interviews of retail investors, and for other purposes, with an amendment (H. Rept. 116–123).
Page H5005


Speaker: Read a letter from the Speaker wherein she appointed Representative Watson Coleman to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.
Page H4921


Recess: The House recessed at 9:50 a.m. and reconvened at 10 a.m.
Page H4926


Guest Chaplain: The prayer was offered by the Guest Chaplain, Very Rev. Canon Martini Shaw, Historic African Episcopal Church of St. Thomas, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
Pages H4926–27


Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2020: The House considered of H.R. 3055, making appropriations for the Departments of Commerce and Justice, Science, and Related Agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2020. Consideration is expected to resume tomorrow, June 21st.
Pages H4929–78, H4978–97

Agreed to:

Crow amendment (No. 65 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that ensures that the U.S. Census Bureau follow existing law and not share data or information gathered, especially through data sharing agreements, with any department, bureau, or agency and penalizes disclosure of information by Census employees;
Pages H4930–31

Dean amendment (No. 66 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases funding for the John R. Justice Program by $2,000,000, to provide student loan repayment assistance for public defenders and prosecutors; this program is intended to serve as an incentive for qualified individuals to enter and continue employment as public defenders or prosecutors--without this vital funding, the program will continue to fall short of its mission;
Page H4931

Escobar amendment (No. 68 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that prohibits funds from being used to enforce the zero-tolerance prosecution policy at the Department of Justice;
Pages H4931–32

Horn amendment (No. 71 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that decreases and increases funding by $2.5 million for Byrne Justice Assistance Grants Memorial funding dedicated to training to improve police responses to people with developmental disabilities or mental illnesses;
Pages H4933–34

Golden amendment (No. 72 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases funding for the veterans treatment courts program by $1,000,000;
Page H4934

Malinowski amendment (No. 73 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases funding for the National Security Division by $1,000,000 to be directed towards the Domestic Terrorism Counsel;
Pages H4934–35

Neguse amendment (No. 75 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases funding by $1 million for the NASA Office of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Engagement, for the purposes of supporting the NASA Space Grant College and Fellowship Program;
Page H4935

[Page:D722]


Neguse amendment (No. 76 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases and decreases funding for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) by $5 million in order to encourage states to continue to improve their criminal and mental records for the National Instant Criminal Background Check System;
Pages H4935–36

Ocasio-Cortez amendment (No. 78 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that moves $5 million from the DEA (enforcement) to the Comprehensive Opioid Abuse Program (treatment) in keeping with the growing consensus to treat drug addiction as a public health issue;
Page H4936

Omar amendment (No. 79 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases and decreases funding for the Federal Prison System by $1 million to express concern with the use of solitary confinement within the Federal Bureau of Prisons or the United States Marshals Service;
Pages H4936–37

Porter amendment (No. 81 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases funding for the court-appointed special advocate and guardian ad litem program to $12,500,000;
Page H4937

Porter amendment (No. 82 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases funding to reduce the sexual assault kit backlog to $50,000,000;
Pages H4937–38

Pressley amendment (No. 83 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that directs an additional $3,000,000 to DOJ's Children of Incarcerated Parents program to support reentry services and family reunification upon release;
Page H4938

Pressley amendment (No. 84 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases and decreases funding by $2,000,000 for Byrne Justice Assistance Grants Memorial funding to support community-based violence prevention programs;
Pages H4938–39

Bishop (GA) en bloc amendment No. 3 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119: Jackson Lee (No. 91) that increases funding by $2,000,000 for the USDA agency that provides grant research funding for ``1890s Land Grant Universities,'' which are 28 Historically Black Colleges and Universities; Yoho (No. 92) that decreases and increases funds by $5,000,000 to support the research and development of an African Swine Fever vaccine at the Agricultural Research Service; McNerney (No. 93) that increases and decreases by $100,000 for FDA to undertake a process to make lawful a safe level for conventional foods and dietary supplements containing Cannabidiol (CBD) so long as the products are compliant with all other FDA rules and regulations; Rodney Davis (IL) (No. 94) that increases and decreases funds by $5,000,000 for the National Institute of Food and Agriculture's Agriculture and Food Research Initiative; Welch (No. 95) that increases funding for Dairy Business Innovation Initiatives by $10 million; reduces funding for USDA Office of the Chief Information Officer by a corresponding amount; Welch (No. 96) that increases funding for the Acer Access Program by $1 million; reduces funding from USDA Agriculture Marketing Services by a corresponding amount; Sablan (No. 98) that increases and decreases reserve funding in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program by $10,000,000 to allow the Food and Nutrition Service to maintain the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands Nutritional Assistance Program at FY19 eligibility and benefit standards; Sewell (AL) (No. 100) that adds and removes funding from the Rural Water and Waste Disposal Program Account within USDA's Rural Utilities Service to prioritize the ongoing efforts to address inadequate wastewater infrastructure in rural and unincorporated communities, specifically those where families or individuals have straight-pipe septic systems or failing decentralized sewage treatment systems; Bera (No. 102) that increases and decreases the Child Nutrition Programs account by $2,000,000 to support funding for School Breakfast Expansion Grants that help increase participation through programs such as Breakfast after the Bell; González-Colón (No. 103) that provides $1.996 million to carry out the Reimbursement Transportation Cost Payment Program (RTCP) for Geographically Disadvantaged Farmers and Ranchers, which reimburses producers in the non-contiguous states and territories for a portion of the cost to transport agricultural commodities or inputs used to produce an agricultural commodity that is offset by a corresponding reduction in the Office of Communications; Sean Patrick Maloney (NY) (No. 104) that decreases funding for the National Institute of Food and Agriculture by $5 million and increases the funding for the National Institute of Food and Agriculture to increase funding for the Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education program; Veasey (No. 106) that increases and decreases funding by $12,000,000 for Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) distributed to states for the purposes of combating Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD); Steil (No. 107) that increases and decreased by $1,500,000 to express the Congressional intent that the Dairy Business Innovation Initiatives should be funded at that level; Plaskett (No. 108) that provides for funding of the micro-grants for food security program at the authorized level of $10 million; Plaskett (No. 109) that provides for inclusion of the insular territories of the United States within the meaning of the term ``persistent poverty counties''; Joyce (No. 110) that increases and decreases account by $15,000,000 to support a study on preventing the spread of Chronic Wasting Disease; Lamb (No. 111) that provides an additional $200,000 for school nutrition programs and directs those resources to Technical Assistance for the Farm-to-School program; Panetta (No. 112) that adds and removes $1 from the Office of the Under Secretary for Research, Education, and Economics for the purpose of instructing the REE Office to finalize a review, as required by the FY19 Farm Bill (Public Law 115–334), of the programs of the Department of Agriculture that may be more effectively used to accelerate the development and use of automation or mechanization in the production or processing of specialty crops; Cox (No. 113) that strikes ``1980, 1990'', and insert ``1990'' to expand the time range for 102030 funding, a formula to fight persistent poverty; Neguse (No. 116) that transfers $1 million in funding to the USDA Office of the Inspector General for expenses necessary for the enforcement of anti-animal fighting statutes; Craig (No. 117) that increases by $353,000 the Rural Energy for American Program to spur rural renewable energy investment; Craig (No. 118) that strikes and adds $1,000,000 to express the importance of broadband access to rural communities, schools, and small businesses; Trone (No. 119) that increases funding for Community Connect Grants by $5 million to expand broadband deployment into rural communities that are underserved by private sector investment; Trone (No. 120) that increases funding for Rural Health and Safety Education Program by $1 million to combat the opioid epidemic in rural communities; Axne (No. 122) that increases and decreases by $1 funds to support the Economic Research Service submit a report to Congress on the impacts of tariffs on U.S. soybean farmers in light of Russian efforts to expand agricultural exports to China; Lee (NV) (No. 123) that provides an additional $500,000 to Team Nutrition of the Child Nutrition Programs Account to encourage peer to peer learning among school nutrition staff to create healthy school environments; makes a corresponding reduction in the Departmental Administration sub-account of the Office of the Secretary; Pressley (No. 124) that increases by $1,000,000 funding for the Farm-to-School Grant Program; and Slotkin (No. 125) that increases and decreases the Farm and Ranch Stress Assistance Network (FRSAN) program by $10 million to fund this critically important program that provides vital mental health resources for farmers and ranchers;
Pages H4940–43

[Page:D723]


Underwood amendment (No. 115 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that prevents funds from being used to remove existing information about climate change from official publications;
Pages H4945–48

McCollum en bloc amendment No. 4 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119: Scanlon (No. 126) that decreases and increases funding by $2 million from the Environmental Programs and Management fund for purposes of EPA enforcement authority over Clean Air Act regulations related to waste-to-energy incinerators; DeGette (No. 138) that removes and adds $3,000,000 from the Environmental Programs and Management fund to instruct EPA to advance environmental justice by implementing environmental enforcement strategies in 100 communities overburdened by serious environmental non-compliance problems and instruct EPA to research the cumulative risks posed by multiple sources of pollution, and to incorporate this information into EPA health assessments; Grijalva (No. 141) that prohibits the Department of the Interior from transferring jurisdictions of National Parks, Wildlife Refuges, and other public lands along the border pursuant to President Trump's declaration of a national emergency to build a wall along the southern border in contravention of Congress; Grijalva (No. 142) that states that none of the funds made available by this Act may be used to implement Executive Order 13817, which treats uranium as a critical mineral for the purposes of expedited permitting under the administration's critical mineral strategy; Luján (NM) (No. 152) that prevents any of the funds made available by this act to be used for further mineral development around the Chaco Culture National Historical Park on federal lands; does not affect the mineral rights of an Indian Tribe or member of an Indian Tribe to trust land or allotment land; Luján (NM) (No. 153) that increases and decreases $1,500,000 for the Rio Puerco Watershed Management Program, as authorized in S. 47, the John D. Dingell, Jr. Conservation, Management, and Recreation Act; Bonamici (No. 155) that increases funding for the EPA Science Advisory Board by $500,000, and decreases funding for the EPA Executive Management and Operations program by $500,000 to support the SAB review of the Strengthening Transparency in Regulatory Science proposed rule; Jeffries (No. 159) that states that none of the funds made available by this Act to the National Park Service may be used to increase the sales of plastic bottles; Jeffries (No. 160) that prohibits funds made available to the National Park Service to be used for the purchase or display of a confederate flag with the exception of specific circumstances where the flags provide historical context; Lowenthal (No. 164) that states that none of the funds made available by this Act may be used to issue a proposed or final rule to replace the Consolidated Federal Oil & Gas and Federal & Indian Coal Valuation Reform final rule; Vargas (No. 169) that increases and decreases by $10,000,000 in order to direct the Environmental Protection Agency to prioritize projects that will drastically reduce pollution flowing across the U.S.-Mexico border; Beyer (No. 170) that prohibits funds to eliminate the requirement that newly built coal power plants capture carbon dioxide emissions; Beyer (No. 171) that increases and decreases $5,000,000 from the Office of the Secretary account for the purpose of maintaining the Interior Department's body camera pilot program; Dingell (No. 172) that prohibits the use of funds in this bill to close or relocate any EPA office that houses emergency responders or a criminal investigation unit; Schneider (No. 175) that increases and decreases $25,000 in funding for the EPA's Environmental Programs and Management account to support EPA public forums and outreach on ethylene oxide to communities identified in the National Air Toxic Assessment to face dangerous emissions levels of this known carcinogen; Horsford (No. 177) that increases and decreases the National Park Service Construction account by $1,000,000 in order to fund the construction of a Visitor's Center at Tule Springs National Monument in Nevada; McEachin (No. 178) that withholds funds for the Department of the Interior's Executive Resources Board unless it is comprised of fifty percent career Senior Executive Service members; O'Halleran (No. 180) that increases by $1 million and decreases by $1 million funding for CFLRP, to highlight the importance of CFLRP to forest restoration, wildfire risk reduction, and rural economic development; O'Halleran (No. 181) that increases and decreases funding by $1 million in the EPA's Superfund Account to highlight the need to increase EPA staffing to meaningfully address over 500 abandoned uranium mines on and near the Navajo Nation; Casten (IL) (No. 182) that prohibits the United States Geological Survey from using funds to limit the use of climate modeling tools; Stevens (No. 192) that adds and removes $2,000,000 from the Environmental Programs and Management account for the purpose of instructing the Environmental Protection Agency to prioritize funding to develop a national recycling strategy to ensure the long-term economic and environmental viability of local recycling programs; and Tlaib (No. 193) that states that none of the funds made available by this Act may be used for the closure of EPA offices in regions that have designated Sulfur Dioxide (2010) Nonattainment Areas;
Pages H4948–51

[Page:D724]


Gosar amendment (No. 140 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases and decreases by $1,720,000 for Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) research in wild and captive populations of cervids;
Page H4963

Smith (MO) amendment (No. 151 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases and decreases the Environmental Program and Management account by $500,000 in order to direct EPA to produce reports on how much environmental measures have improved preceding enactment of USMCA;
Page H4967

McCollum en bloc amendment No. 5 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119: Scott (VA) (No. 134) that increases funding for the 400 Years of African-American History Commission in order for them to carry out their mandate; Schweikert (No. 137) that increases funding in the Environmental Programs and Management account by $1 million for Air Quality Management and decreases funding in the Department of Interior Office of the Secretary account by $1 million; Hudson (No. 145) that increases and decreases the Capital Maintenance and Improvement account to highlight the need for improvements to roads within the Uwharrie National Forest; Matsui (No. 146) that increases and decreases the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act program by $5 million; Moore (No. 149) that increases and decreases funding by $5 million to express support for increased funding for the lead reduction projects grant program which helps low-income homeowners replace lead pipes; Moore (No. 150) that increases funding by $1 million for the Indian Health Services Domestic Violence Prevention Program to allow for additional grants and decreases $1 million from the Office of the Secretary Departmental Operations account; LaMalfa (No. 154) that increases and decreases $10,000,000 from the Forest Service Recreation, Heritage and Wilderness account to the Forest Service Forest Products account to increase timber production on federal land; Brownley (CA) (No. 157) that increases funding for the Wildland fire management account by $1 million, with the intent it be spent on the Joint Fire Science program, offset with a reduction of $1 million from the Office of the Secretary of Interior's administrative account; Kuster (NH) (No. 162) that increases and decreases $1 million in the National Forest System account to highlight the National Avalanche Center which provides training and support to prevent snow avalanche casualties; Ruiz (No. 166) that increases and decreases funding by $2 million from the State and Private Forestry account for the purposes of highlighting Volunteer Fire Assistance Grants; Ted Lieu (CA) (No. 173) that increases and decreases $200,000 to support the Wildlife Detector Dog Program in the Office of Law Enforcement at the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service; Plaskett (No. 174) that provides for inclusion of the insular territories of the United States within the meaning of the term ``persistent poverty counties''; O'Halleran (No. 179) that increases by $7 million and decreases by $7 million funding for Indian Health Service Facilities, to highlight the importance of completing the Hopi Arsenic Mitigation Project, to provide safe drinking water to the Hopi; Casten (No. 183) that increases and decreases funding for Geographic Programs by $1 for the purposes of maintaining the Great Lakes Advisory Board within the Great Lakes Restoration Initiative; Craig (No. 184) that increases and decreases funding by $1,000,000 for the Clean Water Act Section 319 Non-Point Source Pollution Program that is designed to give local and state governments the flexibility to decrease water pollutants through community-based conservation projects; Haaland (No. 185) that increases and decreases funding by $35,000,000 in the Indian Health Service account to support urban Indian health; Haaland (No. 186) that increases and decreases funding by $176,000,000 in the Operation of Indian Programs account to support tribal courts and law enforcement; Levin (MI) (No. 188) that increases and decreases funding by $10 million to support Sewer Overflow Control Grants and prioritize improvements to the Chapaton Retention Basin, a Macomb County, Michigan combined sewer overflow facility, and other projects that protect the Great Lakes and freshwater sources; McAdams (No. 189) that increases and decreases the Wildland Fire Management account by $1 for the purposes of recognizing the important needs of rural counties to be able to properly rehabilitate and remediate burned areas after severe wildfire burn, to ensure our rural communities are prepared for wildfires; and Sherrill (No. 191) that increases and decreases $8,000,000 funding from the Science and Technology Account with the purpose of instructing the EPA to fund the Children's Environmental Health and Disease Prevention Research Centers (agreed by unanimous consent to withdraw the earlier request for a recorded vote to the end that the Chair put the question de novo);
Pages H4956–59, H4977

[Page:D725]


Blumenauer amendment (No. 17 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that was debated on June 19th that prohibits the Department of Justice from interfering with state cannabis programs (by a recorded vote of 267 ayes to 165 noes, Roll No. 370);
Page H4980

Stevens amendment (No. 85 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that removes and adds $2,000,000 from the Legal Activities account at the Department of Justice for the purpose of instructing the Environment and Natural Resources Division to allocate more resources to the enforcement of animal cruelty laws (by a recorded vote of 381 ayes to 50 noes, Roll No. 373);
Pages H4939, H4982

Underwood amendment (No. 89 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that prevents the Department of Justice from using federal funds for litigation that undermines the Affordable Care Act (by a recorded vote of 238 ayes to 194 noes, Roll No. 374);
Pages H4939–40, H4982–83

Pence amendment (No. 105 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases funding for the rural broadband Distance Learning and Telemedicine Grant Program by $25,000,000, offset by an equal decrease in the Department of Agriculture's Buildings and Facilities funding (by a recorded vote of 425 ayes to 6 noes, Roll No. 376);
Pages H4944–45, H4984

Spanberger amendment (No. 114 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases funding for USDA's Rural E-Connectivity (ReCon-nect) program, which makes loans and grants for broadband deployment in rural communities by $55 million; (by a recorded vote of 408 ayes to 22 noes, Roll No. 377);
Pages H4945, H4984–85

Wasserman Schultz amendment (No. 128 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that prohibits any funds from being expended by the Department of the Interior to conduct oil and gas pre-leasing, leasing, and related activities in outer continental shelf planning areas around Florida (by a recorded vote of 252 ayes to 178 noes, Roll No. 378);
Pages H4951–52, H4985–86

Pallone amendment (No. 132 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that establishes a Department of Interior moratorium on oil and gas drilling and related activities in the Atlantic, including the North Atlantic, Mid-Atlantic, and the South Atlantic Outer Continental Shelf Planning Areas (by a recorded vote of 247 ayes to 185 noes, Roll No. 379);
Pages H4953–54, H4986

Buchanan amendment (No. 133 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that prevents funds from being used by USFWS to issue permits for the importation of elephant or lion trophies from Zimbabwe, Zambia or Tanzania (by a recorded vote of 239 ayes to 192 noes, Roll No. 380);
Pages H4954–56, H4986–87

Blumenauer amendment (No. 136 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that prevents any funds in this bill from being used to plan, design, study, or construct, for the purpose of harvesting timber by private entities or individuals, a forest development road in the Tongass National Forest (by a recorded vote of 243 ayes to 188 noes, Roll No. 382);
Pages H4960–62, H4988

[Page:D726]


Cunningham amendment (No. 167 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that states that none of the funds in this Act can be used by BOEM to issue permits for oil and gas exploration, including for seismic airgun blasting, in the Atlantic (by a recorded vote of 245 ayes to 187 noes, Roll No. 391);
Pages H4973–74, H4994

Cunningham amendment (No. 168 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases and decreases funding by $5,000,000 to prioritize the Land and Water Conservation Fund (by a recorded vote of 325 ayes to 107 noes, Roll No. 392);
Pages H4974–75, H4994–95

Carbajal amendment (No. 176 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that states that none of the funds made available by this Act may be used on offshore oil and gas leasing off the Washington/Oregon, Northern California, Central California, and Southern California Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Planning Areas for FY2020 (by a recorded vote of 238 ayes to 192 noes, Roll No. 393);
Pages H4975–76, H4995–96

Hill (CA) amendment (No. 187 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that increases DOI and Forest Service accounts for wildfire preparedness, wildfire suppression operations, emergency rehabilitation, and hazardous fuels management by $7 million, offset with a reduction in the increase to the Working Capital Fund (by a recorded vote of 377 ayes to 55 noes, Roll No. 394); and
Pages H4976–77, H4996

Schrier amendment (No. 190 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that prohibits funds to be used for undermining the EPA Mercury and Air Toxics Standard (MATS) (by a recorded vote of 253 ayes to 177 noes, Roll No. 395).
Pages H4977, H4996–97

Rejected:

Young amendment (No. 129 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that sought to prohibit the use of funds made available to be used for the EPA's rule on emissions from small remote incinerators in Alaska;
Pages H4952–53

Rutherford amendment (No. 3 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that was debated on June 19th that sought to increase the NOAA Operations, Research, and Facilities account by $3.5 million for third party data collection of reef fish in the South Atlantic; offset by decreasing the National Telecommunications and Information Administration (NTIA), Salaries and Expenses account to FY19 levels (by a recorded vote of 186 ayes to 245 noes with one answering ``present'', Roll No. 368);
Pages H4978–79

King (IA) amendment (No. 9 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that was debated on June 19th that sought to strike lines 14–18 (Section 534, pg. 107), which states that none of the funds made available in this Act or any other Act may be used by the Department of Commerce to incorporate into the 2020 Decennial Census any question that was not included in the 2018 End-to-End Census Test in Providence County, Rhode Island (by a recorded vote of 192 ayes to 240 noes, Roll No. 369);
Pages H4979–80

Banks amendment (No. 36 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that was debated on June 19th that sought to reduce amounts made available in Division A, other than amounts made available to the Department of Defense, by 14 percent (by a recorded vote of 135 ayes to 296 noes, Roll No. 371);
Pages H4980–81

Golden amendment (No. 70 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that sought to state that none of the funds may be used for NOAA to utilize a North Atlantic right whale Risk Reduction Decision Support Tool (by a recorded vote of 84 ayes to 345 noes, Roll No. 372);
Pages H4932–33, H4981–82

Banks amendment (No. 99 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that sought to reduce spending for each amount in Division B by 14 percent (by a recorded vote of 113 ayes to 318 noes, Roll No. 375);
Pages H4943, H4983–84

Duncan amendment (No. 135 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that sought to prohibit the use of funds made available by this Act may be used to enforce the final Clean Power Plan rules (by a recorded vote of 192 ayes to 240 noes, Roll No. 381);
Pages H4959–60, H4987–88

Gosar amendment (No. 139 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that sought to prohibit funds for carrying out EPA's Endangerment Finding (by a recorded vote of 178 ayes to 254 noes, Roll No. 383);
Pages H4962–63, H4988–89

Duncan amendment (No. 143 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that sought to strike section 118 from the bill that prevents energy leases in ANWR (by a recorded vote of 198 ayes to 233 noes, Roll No. 384);
Pages H4963–65, H4989–90

Mullin amendment (No. 147 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that sought to prohibit funds from being used to enforce the Obama Administration–s Methane Rule, entitled ``Oil and Natural Gas Sector: Emission Standards for New, Reconstructed, and Modified Sources'' (by a recorded vote of 191 ayes to 241 noes, Roll No. 385);
Pages H4965–66, H4990

Mullin amendment (No. 148 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that sought to prohibit the use of funds to prepare, propose, or promulgate any regulation or guidance that references or relies on analysis of the cost of social carbon under certain Technical Support Documents published by the Interagency Working Group on Social Cost of Carbon (by a recorded vote of 189 ayes to 243 noes, Roll No. 386);
Pages H4966–67, H4990–91

[Page:D727]


Graves (LA) amendment (No. 158 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that sought to strike section 117 of division C which prohibits funds for a new Proposed Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing Program and Notice of Intent to Prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Plan (by a recorded vote of 193 ayes to 239 noes, Roll No. 387);
Pages H4968–69, H4991–92

Hice (GA) amendment (No. 161 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that sought to decrease each amount made available by this Act (other than an amount required to be made available by a provision of law) by 23.6 percent to match the President's budget request (by a recorded vote of 128 ayes to 304 noes, Roll No. 388);
Pages H4970–71, H4992

Banks amendment (No. 163 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that sought to reduce spending for each amount available in Division C by 14 percent (by a recorded vote of 132 ayes to 299 noes, Roll No. 389); and
Pages H4971–72, H4992–93

Biggs amendment (No. 165 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that sought to state that none of the funds made available by this Act can be used for the Integrated Risk Information System of the Environmental Protection Agency (by a recorded vote of 157 ayes to 275 noes, Roll No. 390).
Pages H4972–73, H4993–94

Withdrawn:

Biggs amendment (No. 101 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that was offered and subsequently withdrawn that would have prevented funds from being used to finalize, implement, or enforce the draft guidance issued by the Food and Drug Administration in December of 2017 titled ``Drug Products Labeled as Homeopathic: Guidance for FDA Staff and Industry''; and
Pages H4943–44

Newhouse amendment (No. 156 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–119) that was offered and subsequently withdrawn that would have prohibited any funds in the bill from being used to either alter or terminate the Interagency Agreement between the U.S. Departments of Labor and Agriculture that governs the Job Corps Civilian Conservation Center (CCC) program, and prohibited any funds in the bill from being used to close any of the 25 CCCs that are currently operating.
Pages H4967–68

H. Res. 445, the rule providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 3055) and relating to consideration of the bill (H.R. 2740) was agreed to yesterday, June 19th.

Recess: The House recessed at 4:37 p.m. and reconvened at 4:49 p.m.
Page H4978


Senate Referrals: S.J. Res. 39 was held at the desk. S.J. Res. 40 was held at the desk. S.J. Res. 41 was held at the desk. S.J. Res. 42 was held at the desk. S.J. Res. 43 was held at the desk. S.J. Res. 44 was held at the desk. S.J. Res. 45 was held at the desk. S.J. Res. 46 was held at the desk. S.J. Res. 47 was held at the desk. S.J. Res. 48 was held at the desk.
Pages H4969–70


Senate Message: Message received from the Senate today appears on pages H4969–70.

Quorum Calls--Votes: Twenty-eight recorded votes developed during the proceedings of today and appear on pages H4978–79, H4979–80, H4980, H4980–81, H4981–82, H4982, H4982–83, H4983–84, H4984, H4984–85, H4985–86, H4986, H4986–87, H4987–88, H4988, H4988–89, H4989–90, H4990, H4990–91, H4991–92, H4992, H4992–93, H4993–94, H4994, H4994–95, H4995–96, H4996, and H4996–97. There were no quorum calls.

Adjournment: The House met at 9 a.m. and adjourned at 8:26 p.m.

Committee Meetings

HOW FARM POLICY HELPS FARMERS IN ADVERSE CONDITIONS

Committee on Agriculture: Subcommittee on General Farm Commodities and Risk Management held a hearing entitled ``How Farm Policy Helps Farmers in Adverse Conditions''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

THE POTENTIAL IMPLICATIONS OF ELIMINATING BROAD-BASED CATEGORICAL ELIGIBILITY FOR SNAP HOUSEHOLDS

Committee on Agriculture: Subcommittee on Nutrition, Oversight, and Department Operations held a hearing entitled ``The Potential Implications of Eliminating Broad-Based Categorical Eligibility for SNAP Households''. Testimony was heard from Mandela Barnes, Lieutenant Governor, Wisconsin; John Davis, Executive Director, Mississippi Department of Human Services; and public witnesses.

BREATHLESS AND BETRAYED: WHAT IS MSHA DOING TO PROTECT MINERS FROM THE RESURGENCE OF BLACK LUNG DISEASE?

Committee on Education and Labor: Subcommittee on Workforce Protections held a hearing entitled ``Breathless and Betrayed: What is MSHA Doing to Protect Miners from the Resurgence of Black Lung Disease?''. Testimony was heard from John Howard, M.D., Director, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Department of Health and Human Services; David Zatezalo, Assistant Secretary of Labor for Mine Safety and Health, Department of Labor; Cindy S. Brown Barnes, Director, Education, Workforce, and Income Security, Government Accountability Office; and public witnesses.

[Page:D728]

DRIVING IN REVERSE: THE ADMINISTRATION'S ROLLBACK OF FUEL ECONOMY AND CLEAN CAR STANDARDS

Committee on Energy and Commerce: Subcommittee on Consumer Protection and Commerce; and Subcommittee on Environment and Climate Change held a joint hearing entitled ``Driving in Reverse: The Administration's Rollback of Fuel Economy and Clean Car Standards''. Testimony was heard from William L. Wehrum, Assistant Administrator, Office of Air and Radiation, Environmental Protection Agency; Heidi King, Deputy Administrator, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, Department of Transportation; and public witnesses.

STRENGTHENING HEALTH CARE IN THE U.S. TERRITORIES FOR TODAY AND INTO THE FUTURE

Committee on Energy and Commerce: Subcommittee on Health held a hearing entitled ``Strengthening Health Care in the U.S. Territories for Today and Into the Future''. Testimony was heard from Anne Schwartz, Executive Director, Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission; Angela Avila, Executive Director, Administración de Seguros de Salud de Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico Health Insurance Administration; Maria Theresa Arcangel, Chief Administrator, Guam Division of Public Welfare; Michal Rhymer-Browne, Assistant Commissioner, Department of Human Services, U.S. Virgin Islands; Helen C. Sablan, Medicaid Director, Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands State Medicaid Agency; and a public witness.

DIVERSITY IN THE BOARDROOM; EXAMINING PROPOSALS TO INCREASE THE DIVERSITY OF AMERICA'S BOARDS

Committee on Financial Services: Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``Diversity in the Boardroom; Examining Proposals to Increase the Diversity of America's Boards''. Testimony was heard from Chelsa Gurkin, Acting Director, Education, Workforce and Income Security Team, Government Accountability Office; and public witnesses.

WHAT'S YOUR HOME WORTH? A REVIEW OF THE APPRAISAL INDUSTRY

Committee on Financial Services: Subcommittee on Housing, Community Development, and Insurance held a hearing entitled ``What's Your Home Worth? A Review of the Appraisal Industry''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURES

Committee on Foreign Affairs: Full Committee held a markup on H.R. 3190, the ``BURMA Act of 2019''; H.R. 2327, the ``Burma Political Prisoners Assistance Act''; H.R. 1632, the ``Southeast Asia Strategy Act''; H.R. 3252, the ``Global Respect Act''; H. Res. 259, expressing the sense of the House of Representatives to support the repatriation of religious and ethnic minorities in Iraq to their ancestral homelands; H. Res. 432, condemning the attacks on peaceful protesters and supporting an immediate peaceful transition to a civilian-led democratic government in Sudan; H. Res. 441, condemning the attack on the AMIA Jewish Community Center in Buenos Aires, Argentina, in July 1994 and expressing the concern of the United States regarding the continuing, 25-year-long delay in the resolution of this case and encouraging accountability for the attack; H. Res. 444, reaffirming the importance of the United States to promote the safety, health, and well-being of refugees and displaced persons; and H.R. 2229, the ``First Responders Passport Act of 2019''. H.R. 3190, H.R. 3252, and H. Res. 441 were ordered reported, without amendment. H.R. 2327, H.R. 1632, H. Res. 259, H. Res. 432, H. Res 444, and H.R. 2229 were ordered reported, as amended.

EXAMINING THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE'S DEPLOYMENT TO THE U.S.-MEXICO BORDER

Committee on Homeland Security: Subcommittee on Border Security, Facilitation, and Operations held a hearing entitled ``Examining the Department of Defense's Deployment to the U.S.-Mexico Border''. Testimony was heard from Carla Provost, Chief, U.S. Border Patrol, U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Department of Homeland Security; Robert Salesses, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Homeland Defense Integration and Defense Support of Civil Authorities, Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy, Department of Defense; and Major General Michael T. McGuire, Adjutant General for Arizona, Director, Arizona Department of Emergency and Military Affairs.

OVERSIGHT OF THE CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE

Committee on House Administration: Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``Oversight of the Congressional Research Service''. Testimony was heard from Mary B. Mazanec, Director, Congressional Research Service, Library of Congress; and a public witness.

[Page:D729]

LESSONS FROM THE MUELLER REPORT, PART II: BIPARTISAN PERSPECTIVES

Committee on the Judiciary: Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``Lessons from the Mueller Report, Part II: Bipartisan Perspectives''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

OIL AND GAS DEVELOPMENT: RESTORING COMMUNITY INPUT AND PUBLIC PARTICIPATION IN LEASING DECISIONS

Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources held a hearing entitled ``Oil and Gas Development: Restoring Community Input and Public Participation in Leasing Decisions''. Testimony was heard from Mike Nedd, Deputy Director, Operations, Bureau of Land Management, Department of the Interior; and public witnesses.

ENSURING QUALITY HEALTH CARE FOR OUR VETERANS

Committee on Oversight and Reform: Subcommittee on Government Operations held a hearing entitled ``Ensuring Quality Health Care for Our Veterans''. Testimony was heard from the following Department of Veterans Affairs officials: Tammy Czarnecki, Assistant Deputy Undersecretary for Health for Administrative Operations, Veterans Health Administration; Michael Heimall, Director, Veteran Affairs Medical Center; and Michael Missal, Inspector General, Office of Inspector General.

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURES

Committee on Science, Space, and Technology: Full Committee held a markup on H.R. 2528, the ``STEM Opportunities Act of 2019''; H.R. 36, the ``Combating Sexual Harassment in Science Act of 2019''; H.R. 3196, the ``Vera Rubin Survey Telescope Designation Act''; and H.R. 3153, the ``Expanding Findings for Federal Opioid Research and Treatment Act''. H.R. 2528 and H.R. 36 were ordered reported, as amended. H.R. 3196 and H.R. 3153 were ordered reported, without amendment.

THE IMPORTANCE OF ACCURATE CENSUS DATA TO SMALL BUSINESS FORMATION AND GROWTH

Committee on Small Business: Subcommittee on Economic Growth, Tax, and Capital Access held a hearing entitled ``The Importance of Accurate Census Data to Small Business Formation and Growth''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

THE STATE OF THE RAIL WORKFORCE

Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure: Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials held a hearing entitled ``The State of the Rail Workforce''. Testimony was heard from Ronald L. Batory, Administrator, Federal Railroad Administration, Department of Transportation; and public witnesses.

ENSURING ACCESS TO DISABILITY BENEFITS FOR VETERANS SURVIVORS OF MILITARY SEXUAL TRAUMA

Committee on Veterans' Affairs: Subcommittee on Disability Assistance and Memorial Affairs held a hearing entitled ``Ensuring Access to Disability Benefits for Veterans Survivors of Military Sexual Trauma''. Testimony was heard from Representative Pingree; Willie Clark, Deputy Under Secretary for Field Operations, Veterans Benefits Administration; Beth Murphy, Executive Director, Compensation Service, Veterans Benefits Administration; Margret Bell, National Deputy Director for Military Sexual Trauma, Veterans Health Administration; Steve Bracci, Director, Denver Benefits Inspection, Office of Inspector General, Department of Veterans Affairs; and public witnesses.

BUSINESS MEETING

Committee on Veterans' Affairs: Full Committee held a business meeting to assign Representative Gregorio Kilili Camacho Sablan of Northern Mariana Islands to the Health Subcommittee. The resolution assigning Representative Gregorio Kilili Camacho Sablan of Northern Mariana Islands to the Health Subcommittee passed.

LEGISLATIVE MEASURES

Committee on Veterans' Affairs: Full Committee held a hearing on H.R. 2943, to direct the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to make all fact sheets of the Department of Veterans Affairs in English and Spanish; H.R. 2942, to direct the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to carry out the Women's Health Transition Training pilot program through at least fiscal year 2020, and for other purposes; H.R. 2676, the ``VA Survey of Cannabis Use Act''; H.R. 2677, to require the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to provide training in the use of medical cannabis for all Department of Veterans Affairs primary care providers, and for other purposes; H.R. 712, the ``VA Medicinal Cannabis Research Act of 2019''; H.R. 1647, the ``Veterans Equal Access Act''; H.R. 3083, the ``AIR Acceleration Act''; H.R. 485, the ``VREASA''; legislation on Specially Adaptive Housing; and legislation on Work Study. Testimony was heard from Representatives Correa, Cisneros, David P. Roe of Tennessee, and Bilirakis; Larry Mole, Chief Consultant, Population Health Services, Patient Care Services, Veterans Health Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs; and public witnesses.

[Page:D730]

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURES

Committee on Ways and Means: Full Committee held a markup on H.R. 3298, the ``The Child Care Quality and Access Act of 2019''; H.R. 3299, the ``The Promoting Respect for Individuals' Dignity and Equality Act of 2019''; H.R. 3300, the ``The Economic Mobility Act of 2019''; and H.R. 3301, the ``The Taxpayer Certainty and Disaster Tax Relief Act of 2019''. H.R. 3298, H.R. 3299, H.R. 3300, and H.R. 3301 were ordered reported, as amended.

CULTIVATING DIVERSITY AND IMPROVING RETENTION AMONG CONGRESSIONAL STAFF

Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress: Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``Cultivating Diversity and Improving Retention Among Congressional Staff''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

Joint Meetings



No joint committee meetings were held.

COMMITTEE MEETINGS FOR FRIDAY,

JUNE 21, 2019

(Committee meetings are open unless otherwise indicated)

Senate

No meetings/hearings scheduled.

House

Committee on House Administration, Full Committee, markup on H.R. 2722, a bill to protect elections for public office by providing financial support and enhanced security for the infrastructure used to carry out such elections, and for other purposes, 9 a.m., 1310 Longworth.

Committee on the Judiciary, Subcommittee on Intellectual Property and the Internet, hearing entitled ``The Federal Judiciary in the 21st Century: Ideas for Promoting Ethics, Accountability, and Transparency'', 9 a.m., 2141 Rayburn.

[Page:D731]

Next Meeting of the
SENATE

3 p.m., Monday, June 24

Senate Chamber

Program for Monday: Senate will resume consideration of the motion to proceed to consideration of S. 1790, National Defense Authorization Act, post-cloture.

At 5:30 p.m., all post-cloture time will expire and Senate will vote on the motion to proceed to consideration of the bill.

Next Meeting of the
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

9 a.m., Friday, June 21

House Chamber

Program for Friday: Continue consideration of H.R. 3055--Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2020.




Extensions of Remarks, as inserted in this issue








HOUSE


Barr, Andy, Ky., E809

Bergman, Jack, Mich., E811

Biggs, Andy, Ariz., E805

Burgess, Michael C., Tex., E812

Cleaver, Emanuel, Mo., E804, E806

Conaway, K. Michael, Tex., E803

Crist, Charlie, Fla., E811

Cuellar, Henry, Tex., E807

Cummings, Elijah E., Md., E809

Flores, Bill, Tex., E809

Gomez, Jimmy, Calif., E808

Gonzalez, Vicente, Tex., E810

Green, Al, Tex., E803

Grijalva, Raúl M., Ariz., E803, E804

Hern, Kevin, Okla., E805

Huffman, Jared, Calif., E806

Katko, John, N.Y., E804

Keating, William R., Mass., E812

Kelly, Trent, Miss., E808

Luetkemeyer, Blaine, Mo., E805, E805, E807, E808

Marshall, Roger W., Kans., E806

McNerney, Jerry, Calif., E811

Meng, Grace, N.Y., E808

Neal, Richard E., Mass., E805

Pallone, Frank, Jr., N.J., E807, E810

Pappas, Chris, N.H., E810

Quigley, Mike, Ill., E809

Reed, Tom, N.Y., E804

Rogers, Mike, Ala., E808

Rose, Max, N.Y., E803

Rouzer, David, N.C., E805

Schiff, Adam B., Calif., E803

Sherman, Brad, Calif., E810

Simpson, Michael K., Idaho, E806

Takano, Mark, Calif., E811

Taylor, Van, Tex., E811

Westerman, Bruce, Ark., E808

[Page:D732]