Daily Digest

Thursday, July 11, 2019

Daily Digest

Senate

Chamber Action

Routine Proceedings, pages S4779–S4811

Measures Introduced: Twenty-four bills and one resolution were introduced, as follows: S. 2086–2109, and S. Res. 274.
Pages S4806–07

Measures Reported:

S. 1309, to identify and combat corruption in countries, to establish a tiered system of countries with respect to levels of corruption by their governments and their efforts to combat such corruption, and to assess United States assistance to designated countries in order to advance anti-corruption efforts in those countries and better serve United States taxpayers, with an amendment in the nature of a substitute.
Page S4806


Phipps Nomination--Cloture: Senate began consideration of the nomination of Peter Joseph Phipps, of Pennsylvania, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Third Circuit.
Page S4795

A motion was entered to close further debate on the nomination, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, and pursuant to the unanimous-consent agreement of Thursday, July 11, 2019, a vote on cloture will occur at 5:30 p.m. on Monday, July 15, 2019.
Page S4795

Prior to the consideration of this nomination, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S4795

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination.
Page S4795

A unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that Senate resume consideration of the nomination at approximately 3 p.m., on Monday, July 15, 2019; that the cloture motions filed during the session of Thursday, July 11, 2019 ripen at 5:30 p.m., on Monday, July 15, 2019; and that the first-degree filing deadline for amendments to the treaties on which cloture motions were filed during the session of Thursday, July 11, 2019 be 3:30 p.m., on Monday, July 15, 2019.
Page S4811


Protocol Amending the Tax Convention With Spain--Cloture: Senate began consideration of the Protocol Amending the Convention between the United States of America and the Kingdom of Spain for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the Prevention of Fiscal Evasion with Respect to Taxes on Income and its Protocol, signed at Madrid on February 22, 1990 (Treaty Doc. 113–4), taking action on the following amendments proposed thereto:
Page S4795

Pending:

McConnell Amendment No. 910, to change the enactment date.
Page S4795

McConnell Amendment No. 911 (to Amendment No. 910), of a perfecting nature.
Page S4795

A motion was entered to close further debate on the treaty, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of the nomination of Peter Joseph Phipps, of Pennsylvania, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Third Circuit.
Page S4795

Prior to the consideration of this treaty, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S4795

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the treaty.
Page S4795


Protocol Amending Tax Convention With Swiss Confederation--Cloture: Senate began consideration of Protocol Amending the Convention between the United States of America and the Swiss Confederation for the Avoidance of Double Taxation with Respect to Taxes on Income, signed at Washington on October 2, 1996, signed on September 23, 2009, at Washington, as corrected by an exchange of notes effected November 16, 2010 and a related agreement effected by an exchange of notes on September 23, 2009 (Treaty Doc. 112–1), taking action on the following amendments proposed thereto:
Page S4795

Pending:

McConnell Amendment No. 912, to change the enactment date.
Page S4795

McConnell Amendment No. 913 (to Amendment No. 912), of a perfecting nature.
Page S4796

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A motion was entered to close further debate on the treaty, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of the Protocol Amending the Tax Convention with Spain (Treaty Doc. 113–4).
Page S4796

Prior to the consideration of this treaty, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S4795

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the treaty.
Page S4795


Protocol Amending the Tax Convention With Japan--Cloture: Senate began consideration of The Protocol Amending the Convention between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of Japan for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the Prevention of Fiscal Evasion with respect to Taxes on Income and a related agreement entered into by an exchange of notes (together the ``proposed Protocol''), both signed on January 24, 2013, at Washington, together with correcting notes exchanged March 9 and March 29, 2013 (Treaty Doc. 114–1), taking action on the following amendments proposed thereto:
Page S4796

Pending:

McConnell Amendment No. 914, to change the enactment date.
Page S4796

McConnell Amendment No. 915 (to Amendment No. 914), of a perfecting nature.
Page S4796

A motion was entered to close further debate on the treaty, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of Protocol Amending Tax Convention with Swiss Confederation (Treaty Doc. 112–1).
Page S4796

Prior to the consideration of this treaty, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S4796

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the treaty.
Page S4796


Protocol Amending Tax Convention With Luxembourg--Cloture: Senate began consideration of Protocol Amending the Convention between the Government of the United States of America and the Government of the Grand Duchy of Luxembourg for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the Prevention of Fiscal Evasion with Respect to Taxes on Income and Capital, signed on May 20, 2009, at Luxembourg (the ``proposed Protocol'') and a related agreement effected by the exchange of notes also signed on May 20, 2009 (Treaty Doc. 111–8), taking action on the following amendments proposed thereto:
Page S4796

Pending:

McConnell Amendment No. 916, to change the enactment date.
Page S4796

McConnell Amendment No. 917 (to Amendment No. 916), of a perfecting nature.
Page S4796

A motion was entered to close further debate on the treaty, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of Protocol Amending the Tax Convention with Japan (Treaty Doc. 114–1).
Pages S4796–97

Prior to the consideration of this treaty, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S4796

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the treaty.
Page S4796


Corker Nomination--Cloture: Senate began consideration of the nomination of Clifton L. Corker, to be United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Tennessee.
Page S4797

A motion was entered to close further debate on the nomination, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of the Protocol Amending Tax Convention with Luxembourg (Treaty Doc. 111–8).
Page S4797

Prior to the consideration of this nomination, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S4797

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination.
Page S4797


Blanchard Nomination--Cloture: Senate began consideration of the nomination of Lynda Blanchard, of Alabama, to be Ambassador to the Republic of Slovenia, Department of State.
Page S4797

A motion was entered to close further debate on the nomination, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of the nomination of Clifton L. Corker, to be United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Tennessee.
Page S4797

Prior to the consideration of this nomination, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S4797

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination.
Page S4797


Tapia Nomination--Cloture: Senate began consideration of the nomination of Donald R. Tapia, of Arizona, to be Ambassador to Jamaica, Department of State.
Pages S4797–S4802

[Page:D812]


A motion was entered to close further debate on the nomination, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of the nomination of Lynda Blanchard, of Alabama, to be Ambassador to the Republic of Slovenia, Department of State.
Page S4797

Prior to the consideration of this nomination, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S4797

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination.
Page S4797


Nominations Confirmed: Senate confirmed the following nominations:

By 56 yeas 37 nays (Vote No. EX. 200), Robert L. King, of Kentucky, to be Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education, Department of Education.
Pages S4782–86

By 54 yeas 39 nays (Vote No. EX. 201), John P. Pallasch, of Kentucky, to be an Assistant Secretary of Labor.
Pages S4786–87

By 52 yeas 38 nays (Vote No. EX. 203), Peter C. Wright, of Michigan, to be Assistant Administrator, Office of Solid Waste, Environmental Protection Agency.
Pages S4787–95

During consideration of this nomination today, Senate also took the following action:

By 53 yeas to 39 nays (Vote No. EX. 202), Senate agreed to the motion to close further debate on the nomination.
Page S4787


Messages from the House:
Page S4804


Measures Referred:
Page S4804


Executive Communications:
Pages S4804–05


Petitions and Memorials:
Pages S4805–06


Executive Reports of Committees:
Page S4806


Additional Cosponsors:
Pages S4807–09


Statements on Introduced Bills/Resolutions:
Pages S4809–10


Additional Statements:
Pages S4802–04


Amendments Submitted:
Pages S4810–11


Authorities for Committees to Meet:
Page S4811


Privileges of the Floor:
Page S4811


Record Votes: Four record votes were taken today. (Total–203)
Pages S4786–87, S4794–95


Adjournment: Senate convened at 9:30 a.m. and adjourned at 3:26 p.m., until 3 p.m. on Monday, July 15, 2019. (For Senate's program, see the remarks of the Majority Leader in today's Record on page S4811.)

Committee Meetings

(Committees not listed did not meet)

NOMINATION

Committee on Armed Services: Committee concluded a hearing to examine the nomination of Gen. Mark A. Milley, for reappointment to the grade of General, and to be Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff in the United States Army, after the nominee testified and answered questions in his own behalf.

SEMIANNUAL MONETARY POLICY REPORT

Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs: Committee concluded a hearing to examine the Semiannual Monetary Policy Report to the Congress, after receiving testimony from Jerome H. Powell, Chairman, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System.

U.S. LNG IN EVOLVING GLOBAL MARKETS

Committee on Energy and Natural Resources: Committee concluded a hearing to examine evolving global natural gas markets, the increasingly important role of United States liquefied natural gas, and the competitive outlook, after receiving testimony from Steven E. Winberg, Assistant Secretary of Energy for Fossil Energy; Dennis V. Arriola, Sempra Energy, San Diego, California; and Melanie Hart, Center for American Progress, Charlie Riedl, Center for Liquefied Natural Gas, and Nikos Tsafos, Center for Strategic and International Studies, all of Washington, D.C.

BUSINESS MEETING

Committee on the Judiciary: Committee ordered favorably reported the nomination of Monica David Morris, of Florida, to be a Commissioner of the United States Parole Commission, Department of Justice.

INTELLIGENCE

Select Committee on Intelligence: Committee met in closed session to receive a briefing on certain intelligence matters from officials of the intelligence community.

[Page:D813]

House of Representatives

Chamber Action


Public Bills and Resolutions Introduced: 38 public bills, H.R. 3694–3731; and 1 resolution, H. Res. 484 were introduced.
Pages H5725–27


Additional Cosponsors:
Pages H5728–29


Reports Filed: Reports were filed today as follows:

H.R. 1306, to amend the Disaster Recovery Reform Act to develop a study regarding streamlining and consolidating information collection and preliminary damage assessments, and for other purposes (H. Rept. 116–145);

H.R. 1311, to amend the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act to ensure that unmet needs after a major disaster are met (H. Rept. 116–146);

H.R. 2502, to amend title 40, United States Code, to require certain prospectuses for public buildings to be made publicly available, and for other purposes (H. Rept. 116–147);

H.R. 1984, to amend chapter 11 of title 31, United States Code, to require the Director of the Office of Management and Budget to annually submit to Congress a report on all disaster-related assistance provided by the Federal Government (H. Rept. 116–148);

H.R. 1365, to make technical corrections to the Guam World War II Loyalty Recognition Act (H. Rept. 116–149);

H.R. 582, to provide for increases in the Federal minimum wage, and for other purposes, with an amendment (H. Rept. 116–150); and

H.R. 3494, to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2020 for intelligence and intelligence-related activities of the United States Government, the Community Management Account, and the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and Disability System, and for other purposes, with an amendment (H. Rept. 116–151, Part 1).
Page H5725


Speaker: Read a letter from the Speaker wherein she appointed Representative Cuellar to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.
Page H5587


Recess: The House recessed at 10:49 a.m. and reconvened at 12 noon.
Page H5592


Guest Chaplain: The prayer was offered by the Guest Chaplain, Dr. George S. Dillard, Peachtree City Christian Church, Peachtree City, Georgia.
Page H5592


National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020: The House considered H.R. 2500, to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2020 for military activities of the Department of Defense and for military construction, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal year. Consideration is expected to resume tomorrow, July 12th.
Pages H5594–H5724

Agreed to:

Smith (WA) amendment (No. 1 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that was debated on July 10th that increases oversight and transparency of civilian casualties (by a recorded vote of 236 ayes to 193 noes, Roll No. 438);
Page H5606

Speier amendment (No. 3 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that was debated on July 10th that requires that qualifications for eligibility to serve in an armed force account only for the ability of an individual to meet gender-neutral occupational standards and not include any criteria relating to the race, color, national origin, religion, or sex (including gender identity or sexual orientation) of an individual (by a recorded vote of 242 ayes to 187 noes, Roll No. 439);
Pages H5606–07

Speier amendment (No. 6 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that was debated on July 10th that enhances access to high-quality family planning education by requiring DOD to establish a standardized educational program across all branches of the military to be provided during the first year of service for a member (by a recorded vote of 231 ayes to 199 noes, Roll No. 440);
Pages H5607–08

Brindisi amendment (No. 9 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that was debated on July 10th that reinstates the Berry Amendment's DOD domestic sourcing requirement for stainless steel flatware, also adding a ``dinner ware'' domestic sourcing requirement (by a recorded vote of 243 ayes to 187 noes, Roll No. 441);
Page H5608

Torres (CA) amendment (No. 10 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that was debated on July 10th that prohibits the President from removing items from Categories 1–3 of the United States Munitions List (by a recorded vote of 225 ayes to 205 noes, Roll No. 442);
Pages H5608–09

Connolly amendment (No. 11 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that was debated on July 10th that prohibits the elimination of the Office of Personnel Management (by a recorded vote of 247 ayes to 182 noes, Roll No. 443);
Pages H5609–10

Shalala amendment (No. 14 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that was debated on July 10th that requires the DOD Secretary to publish on its website the distribution of DOD Tuition Assistance Funds at institutions of higher education; audit any proprietary institution receiving DOD Tuition Assistance funds that fails to meet the Financial Responsibility Standards in the Higher Education Act of 1965 under Section 498(c) and publish the results of the audit on its website (by a recorded vote of 251 ayes to 178 noes, Roll No. 444);
Page H5610

[Page:D814]


Omar amendment (No. 17 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that was debated on July 10th that requires reporting on financial costs and national security benefits for overseas military operations, including permanent military installations and bases (by a recorded vote of 219 ayes to 210 noes, Roll No. 445);
Pages H5610–11

Smith (WA) amendment (No. 19 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that was debated on July 10th that amends the current statutory prohibition on members of Congress contracting with the federal government to include the President, Vice President, and any Cabinet member (by a recorded vote of 243 ayes to 186 noes with one answering ``present'', Roll No. 446);
Pages H5611–12

Sherman amendment (No. 21 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that prohibits funds from being used to transfer defense articles or services to Azerbaijan unless the President certifies to Congress that the articles or services do not threaten civil aviation (by a recorded vote of 234 ayes to 195 noes, Roll No. 447);
Pages H5595–96, H5612

Ted Lieu (CA) amendment (No. 23 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that prohibits funds from the Special Defense Acquisition Fund to aid Saudi Arabia or the United Arab Emirates if such assistance could be used to conduct or continue hostilities in Yemen (by a recorded vote of 239 ayes to 187 noes, Roll No. 448);
Pages H5596, 5612–13

Ted Lieu (CA) amendment (No. 24 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that prohibits funds from being used to transfer any defense articles or services to Saudi Arabia or the United Arab Emirates under the emergency authority of the Arms Export Control Act that circumvents congressional review (by a recorded vote of 246 ayes to 180 noes, Roll No. 449);
Pages H5596–98, H5613–14

Smith (WA) amendment (No. 26 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that prohibits support to and participation in the Saudi-led coalition's military operations against the Houthis in Yemen (by a recorded vote of 240 ayes to 185 noes, Roll No. 450);
Pages H5598–99, H5614

Cicilline amendment (No. 27 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that repeals existing restrictions on the United States from transferring and exporting weapons, and defense articles and services to the Republic of Cyprus (by a recorded vote of 252 ayes to 173 noes, Roll No. 451);
Pages H5599–H5601, H5614–15

Engel amendment (No. 29 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that improves current law related to policies and planning to ensure civilian protection, including procedures for incidents involving civilian casualties (by a recorded vote of 241 ayes to 183 noes, Roll No. 452);
Pages H5601–03, H5615–16

Engel amendment (No. 31 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that expresses that the U.S. should seek to extend the New START Treaty, unless Russia is in material breach of the Treaty, or the U.S. and Russia have entered into a new agreement that has equal or greater constraints, transparency, and verification measures on Russia's nuclear forces; prohibits use of funds to withdraw from New START; requires DNI, Secretary of State, and Secretary of Defense reports detailing the consequences of the Treaty's lapse and impact on US nuclear modernization plan; requires Presidential certification regarding future of the Treaty before its potential expiration (by a recorded vote of 236 ayes to 189 noes, Roll No. 453);
Pages H5603–06, H5616

Langevin amendment (No. 35 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that increases by $20,000,000 Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation budget to conduct research and development on low-enriched uranium for naval reactors, decreases the National Nuclear Security Agency federal expenses and other expenditures budget by a similar amount;
Pages H5622–24

Smith (WA) en bloc amendment No. 5 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143: Sherman (No. 20) that directs the Administration to issue a prohibition against Americans trading in new Russian sovereign debt, subject to review by the Administration and Congress following each national mid-term and presidential election; Jayapal (No. 37) that requires the Defense Department to submit to Congress annual reports on employment or compensation of retired general or flag officers by foreign governments for emoluments clause purposes; Aguilar (No. 38) that requires a feasibility study on Department of Defense using two Federal Bureau of Investigation databases to screen potential enlistees for ties to white nationalist organizations; Porter (No. 40) that repeals the delay in the payday lending rule as it relates to servicemembers, veterans and surviving spouses; Ocasio-Cortez (No. 43) that allocates $10,000,000 for the purchase, deployment and operation of closed detonation chambers on Vieques, Puerto Rico; Torres (CA) (No. 47) that directs the Office of Management and Budget to categorize public safety telecommunicators as a protective service occupation under the Standard Occupational Classification System; Fortenberry (No. 147) that provides a Sense of Congress supporting the conditions for security of displaced Christians and other religious minorities in Northern Iraq and to enable their safe return home; Foster (No. 148) that amends the testing requirement for the Ground-based Midcourse Defense System to include the use of threat-representative countermeasures; Foster (No. 149) that extends the congressional notification period to 180 days if the Secretary of Defense chooses to terminate its contract with the JASON scientific advisory group and requires that the Secretary receive congressional approval; also clarifies that JASON provides scientific and technical advice to multiple Federal agencies, including the Department of Defense; Foster (No. 150) that requires an independent study on the impacts of missile defense development and deployment; Foxx (No. 151) that expresses the Sense of Congress that (1) NATO is central to U.S.-European defense matters and (2) military cooperation in Europe by NATO member countries should complement NATO efforts and should not hinder military system interoperability and burden sharing among NATO allies; Frankel (FL) (No. 152) that requires the Director of National Intelligence to submit an intelligence assessment on the relationship between women and violent extremism and terrorism; Gaetz (No. 153) that requires a report to Congress on contracts being forcibly terminated based on foreign governments' actions that impeded the ability of the contractor to perform their contract; Gaetz (No. 154) that promotes posthumously LT. Col. Dick Cole to the rank of colonel; Gallagher (No. 155) that directs the President to submit to Congress a report on ZTE's compliance with the settlement agreement it reached with the Department of Commerce on June 8, 2018; Gallagher (No. 156) that restores $75 million for National Security Innovation Capital to fund the commercialization and scaling of dual use, hardware-based critical to the military but currently underserved by the private venture capital and often funded by strategic and persistent capital from China; Gallagher (No. 157) that prohibits the Secretary of Commerce from removing Huawei from the Entity List maintained by the Bureau of Industry and Security until the Secretary certifies that Huawei and its officers have not engaged in sanctions violations or IP theft in the preceding five years, and that Huawei does not pose an ongoing threat to US or allied telecommunications and infrastructure; Gallego (No. 158) that requires a report on the National Guard's capacity to meet Homeland Defense missions; Gallego (No. 159) that changes eligibility of telecommunications goods and services to be provided to DoD installations in U.S. Territories in the Pacific Ocean to restrict ownership by or significant components from U.S. adversaries; Garamendi (No. 160) that extends the authority to carry out the backup Global Positioning System capability demonstration, which is a current expiring directive authority from the FY18 NDAA, by an additional 18 months, and extends the report submission an additional 18 months; Garamendi (No. 161) that ensures departing servicemembers and veterans can more easily credit their military sea service toward earning a Merchant Mariner Credential needed to sail US-flagged vessels; González-Colón (PR) (No. 162) that requires the Secretary of Defense to review the effects on preparedness to provide support to States and territories in connection with natural disasters, threats, and emergencies prior to inactivating any Army watercraft unit; González-Colón (PR) (No. 163) that directs GAO to complete a study and submit a report to the congressional defense committees on the status of the Federal cleanup and decontamination process in the former military training sites located on the island-municipalities of Vieques and Culebra, Puerto Rico; shall include an analysis of the pace of ongoing environmental restoration efforts and potential challenges and alternatives to accelerate the completion of such process; González-Colón (PR) (No. 164) that expresses the sense of Congress that combating transnational criminal organizations and illicit narcotics trafficking across the transit zone and the Caribbean basin is critical to the national security of the United States and that the Department of Defense (DoD) should work with the Department of Homeland Security, the Department of State, and other relevant Federal, State, local, and international partners to improve surveillance capabilities and maximize the effectiveness of counterdrug operations in the region; and Gosar (No. 165) that ensures that the United States will eliminate dependency on rare earth materials from China by fiscal year 2035;
Pages H5624–31

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Takano amendment (No. 39 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that any member of the Armed Forces and their respective spouse, widow, widower, parent, son or daughter is eligible for parole in place under the Immigration and Nationality Act;
Pages H5631–32

Huffman amendment (No. 46 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that takes land into trust as part of the reservation of the Lytton Rancheria;
Pages H5636–38

Frankel amendment (No. 34 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that prohibits funding for missiles noncompliant with the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty until the Secretary of Defense meets certain conditions (by a recorded vote of 215 ayes to 214 noes, Roll No. 456);
Pages H5620–22, H5639–40

Ted Lieu (CA) amendment (No. 44 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that prohibits funds from being obligated or expended at properties owned by the President or that bear his name (enumerated in the amendment); a waiver is made available if the President reimburses the Department of the Treasury for the amount associated with the expense (by a recorded vote of 223 ayes to 205 noes with one answering ``present'', Roll No. 457);
Pages H5632–34, H5640

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Raskin amendment (No. 45 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that prohibits military parades and exhibitions for political purposes (by a recorded vote of 221 ayes to 207 noes, Roll No. 458);
Pages H5634–36, H5640–41

Pappas amendment (No. 48 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that requires the EPA to revise the list of toxic pollutants under the Federal Water Pollution Control Act to include per and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and publish effluent and pretreatment standards;
Pages H5641–42

Smith (WA) en bloc amendment No. 6 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143: Dean (No. 125) that authorizes an additional $5 million for the nationwide CDC ATSDR PFAS health study; Dean (No. 126) that directs the Secretary of the Navy to publish a military specification for a fluorine-free fire fighting agent by 2023 to ensure it can be used by 2025; prohibits usage on or after September 30th, 2025; limits the ability for the Secretary of Defense to use a waiver for a period that exceeds one year--current waiver period is up to 6 years; Dingell (No. 131) that prohibits the Defense Logistics Agency from using any food contact substances to assemble or package meals ready-to-eat (MRE) with PFAS chemicals beginning in FY2021; Kildee (No. 218) that requires GAO to conduct a review of DoD's response to PFAS contamination in and around military bases; Levin (MI) (No. 251) that requires the Secretary of Defense to ensure that all incineration of materials containing PFAS is conducted in a manner that eliminates PFAS while also ensuring that no PFAS is emitted into the air; that all incineration is conducted in accordance with the requirements of the Clean Air Act; that materials containing PFAS and designated for disposal are stored safely; and that no incineration be conducted at any facility that violated the requirements of the Clean Air Act during the year preceding the date of disposal; Pappas (No. 310) that creates an online clearinghouse of information for members of the Armed Services to find information about exposure to PFAS and treatment for associated health conditions; Turner (No. 382) that requires the Secretary of Defense to enter into agreements with municipalities or municipal drinking water utilities located adjacent to military installations to share monitoring data relating to perfluoroalkyl substances, polyfluoroalkyl substances, and other emerging contaminants collected on military installations; Kildee (No. 410) that authorizes $5 million for the first year of a five year study by the USGS to survey for PFAS contamination across the country; and Dingell (No. 418) that requires the Department of Defense to enter into cooperative agreements with states to mitigate PFAS contamination resulting from their facilities;
Pages H5646–50

Smith (WA) en bloc amendment No. 7 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143: Gottheimer (No. 166) that adds ``adversary actions that threaten freedom of navigation on the international waterways, including attacks on foreign ships and crews'' to the matters to be studied in the study on Mobility Capability Requirements; Gottheimer (No. 167) that directs the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of State to send Congress recommendations to improve the Cooperative Threat Reduction Program; Gottheimer (No. 168) that adds Hamas, Hizballah, Palestine Islamic Jihad, al-Shabaab, Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps to the organizations prohibited from being provided weapons; Gottheimer (No. 169) that adds ``anti-Semitism'' to the list of questions about workplace experiences on DOD surveys; Graves (LA) (No. 170) that extends the expiration of the exemption from enhanced competition requirements for no-cost contracts for the purchase of property and services by executive agencies; Graves (LA) (No. 171) that authorizes the service secretaries to award the Vietnam Service medal to veterans who participated in Operation End Sweep; Graves (LA) (No. 172) that requires a report regarding management of military commissaries and exchanges to the congressional defense committees; Graves (LA) (No. 173) that allows the National Guard to be reimbursed in a timely manner in response to an emergency declared under the Stafford Act; Green (TN) (No. 174) that assesses the availability and usage of the assistance of chaplains, houses of worship, and other spiritual resources for members of the Armed Forces of all self-identified religious affiliations in order to help counter the tragic rate of military suicides; Haaland (No. 175) that requires the Secretaries of Defense and State to report on human rights of Brazil's security forces in light of potential increased security cooperation; Haaland (No. 176) that prohibits the Department of Defense from contracting with companies that do not have a sexual harassment policy; Hagedorn (No. 177) that parrots the language found in OMB memorandums M–11–32 and M–12–16 as closely as possible, directing agencies to accelerate payment of small business prime contractors to the fullest extent possible, with a goal of 15 days after receipt of proper invoice; extends this accelerated payment objective to other-than-small prime contractors that subcontract with small businesses on the condition that the prime contractors agree to accelerate payments to their small sub-contractors; Hastings (No. 178) that requires contractors to submit total Independent Research and Development spending to the Defense Technical Information Center, who will provide access to the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, the Director of the Defense Contract Audit Agency, and Director of the Defense Contract Management Agency; requires the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering to report to Congress on the cost expended and trends related to Independent Research and Development spending; Hastings (No. 179) that requires contractors to submit total Bid and Proposal spending to the Director of the Defense Contract Audit Agency, who will provide access to the Principal Director for Defense Pricing and Contracting to fulfill DoD reporting requirements; Hastings (No. 180) that Repeals the Defense Cost Accounting Standards Board as duplicative of the Cost Accounting Standards Board under the Office of Procurement Policy; Hastings (No. 181) that Establishes a joint Military Transition Outreach Pilot Program for contacting service-members 30, 60, and 90 days post-separation and/or retirement from active duty, to improve communication between the veteran and DoD related to benefits and other general concerns; Hastings (No. 182) that expresses the sense of Congress that the United States has strong and enduring interests in the security and prosperity of Oceania and the Western Pacific region and should expeditiously begin negotiations on the renewal of the Compacts of Free Association (COFA); Heck (No. 183) that requires the Services as part of their annual financial literacy education briefing, to include information on free credit monitoring available to servicemembers under the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act; Heck (No. 184) that improves emergency response, requires the DoD Fire and Emergency Services Working Group to implement a plan to address any deficiencies with interoperability caused by incompatibility between the DoD communications system and that of and civilian agencies; Higgins (NY) (No. 185) that authorizes the Secretary of Defense to contribute up to $5 million to the National Maritime Heritage Grant Program; Hill (CA) (No. 186) that directs the Office of the Secretary of Defense to strengthen the domestic industrial base for small un-manned aircraft systems; Hollingsworth (No. 187) expressing a Sense of the House of Representatives that the Defense Health Agency should increase re-search and development efforts regarding bioprinting and biofabricating of human tissues in austere military environments; Horn (No. 188) that allows all retired air traffic controllers who are FERS employees and working as instructors or supervisors to keep the annuity they paid into during their careers as air traffic controllers regardless of how many hours a week they work training the next generation of air traffic controllers for the FAA; and Kendra Horn (OK) (No. 189) that direct the Department of Defense IG to conduct an audit of each of the military services and DoD agencies as applicable to determine if there has been any excess profit or excessive cost escalation in sole source, commercial depot maintenance contracts, including parts, supplies, equipment and maintenance services;
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Kendra Horn (OK) en bloc amendment No. 8 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143: Horsford (No. 191) that increases funding for Air Force University Research Initiatives by $5,000,000; Houlahan (No. 192) that allows contracting officers the ability to provide unsuccessful offerors of certain task or delivery orders a brief explanation as to why the offeror lost the award; Houlahan (No. 193) that extends death benefits to members of the Armed Forces participating in the Career Intermission Program; Houlahan (No. 194) that requires the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to Congress assessing the potential military, intelligence, and logistical threats facing U.S. military infrastructure due to Chinese military assets in Djibouti; Jackson Lee (No. 195) that adds report to be submitted within 220 days following enactment on Capacity to Provide Disaster Survivors with Emergency Short Term Housing; Jackson Lee (No. 196) that condemns the actions of Boko Haram and directs that the Secretary of Defense submit a report on efforts to combat Boko Haram; Jackson Lee (No. 197) that requires Secretary of Defense to report to Congress programs and procedures employed to ensure students studying abroad through Department of Defense National Security Education Programs are trained to recognize, resist, and report against recruitment efforts by agents of foreign governments; Jackson Lee (No. 198) that requires report on Maternity Mortality Rates for military members and their dependents; Jackson Lee (No. 199) that requires report to be submitted to Congress within 240 days following enactment on the risks posed by debris in low earth orbit and to make recommendations on remediation of risks and outline plans to reduce the incident of space debris; Jackson Lee (No. 200) that requires that a report from the Secretary of Defense 240 days after the date of the enactment to the congressional defense committees that accounts for all of the efforts, programs, initiatives, and investments of the Department of Defense to train elementary, secondary, and postsecondary students in fields related to cybersecurity, cyber defense, and cyber operations; Jackson Lee (No. 201) that provides authorization for a $10 million increase in funding for increased collaboration with NIH to combat Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Jackson Lee (No. 202) that provides authorization for $2.5 million increase in funding to combat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); Jackson Lee (No. 203) that directs the Secretary of Defense to promulgate regulations to ensure that candidates granted admission to attend a military academy undergo screening for speech disorders and be provided the results of the screening test and a list of warfare unrestricted line (URL) Officer positions and occupation specialists that require successful performance on the speech test; academy students shall have the option of undergoing speech therapy to reduce speech disorders or impediments; Jackson Lee (No. 204) that adds to the objectives of the Artificial Intelligence Education Strategy to include instruction on the ``opportunities and risks'' posed by advancements in AI; Jayapal (No. 205) that increases available funding for the National Guard Suicide Prevention Pilot Program by $5,000,000; Jayapal (No. 206) that directs federal agencies to initiate debarment proceedings for contractors with repeat and willful wage theft violations; Jeffries (No. 207) that adds a requirement to the DOD's annual report on the military and security developments involving People's Republic of China about the nature of China and Russia's strategic cooperation; specifically, the amendment requires the DOD to include in their annual report an evaluation of what strategic objectives Russia and China share and are acting on and what objectives they misalign on; Johnson (TX) (No. 208) that requires an annual update of the climate vulnerability and risk assessment tool by the Secretary of Defense in consultation with requisite Federal agencies; Johnson (TX) (No. 209) that adds the inclusion of cultural competence and diversity to the strategy for the recruitment and retention of mental health providers for members of the Armed Forces; Johnson (TX) (No. 210) that mandates the installation and maintenance of an appropriate number of carbon monoxide detectors in each unit of military family housing on military posts and bases; Joyce (No. 211) that requires the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to Congress describing projects awaiting evaluation from the Realty Governance Board and an assessment of the impact such projects would have on the overall security of the requesting installation; Kaptur (No. 212) that expands DOD's authority to operate the youth civil-military STEM program, STARBASE, to allow participation and collaboration with the Coast Guard; Keating (No. 213) that requires the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of State, to ensure the meaningful inclusion of Afghan women in peace negotiations; Keating (No. 214) that establishes a coordinator for ISIS detainee issues; and Kelly (IL) (No. 215) that requires the Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness to submit a report to Congress on military spouse financial literacy efforts;
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Kendra Horn (OK) en bloc amendment No. 9 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143: Khanna (No. 216) that authorizes $10M to be available to develop and prepare a monitoring and verification program related to the phased denuclearization of North Korea, in coordination with relevant international partners and organizations; Kildee (No. 219) that requires the DoD to train service members on the threat posed by foreign misinformation campaigns, including by Russia, that actively target service members and their families; Kildee (No. 220) that requires the DoD certify that it is complying with HUD's regulations to protect service members and their families against lead-based paint in military housing; would also require the DoD to create regulations to allow independent testing of lead hazards in military housing; Kildee (No. 221) that requires the DoD to report to Congress on civilian casualties caused by Saudi airstrikes in Yemen and whether the Saudi strikes would have complied with the DoD's rules of engagement and interpretation of international law; Kilmer (No. 222) that directs the Secretary of the Defense to conduct a study on the status of the transition from the National Geospatial-Intelligence Agency to the National Reconnaissance Office of the leadership role in acquiring commercial satellite remote sensing data on behalf of the Department of Defense and the Intelligence Community; Kilmer (No. 223) that directs the Secretary of the Navy to enter into an agreement with a Federally funded research and development center with relevant expertise to conduct an assessment of the impacts resulting from the Navy's suspension in 2016 of the Accelerated Promotion Program; the Secretary shall submit to the congressional defense committees a report on the results of the evaluation by not later than June 1, 2020, and shall provide interim briefings upon request; King (IA) (No. 224) that requires an additional requirement in ``Matters to be Included'' under Section 1246 to require an assessment of China's expansion of its surveillance state; any correlation of such expansion with its oppression of its citizens and its threat to United States national security interests around the world; and an overview of the extent to which such surveillance corresponds to the overall respect for, or lack thereof, human rights within its own borders; Kinzinger (No. 225) that prohibits divestiture from the RC–26B manned intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) platform, permits the use of resources authorized by the legislation for support of the RC–26B, allows the National Guard to enter into at least one memorandum of agreement with other federal entities for the purposes of mission support, and requires a re-port detailing how the Air Force intends to provide manned or un-manned ISR mission support in the event the platform is divested; Krishnamoorthi (No. 226) that requires the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to Congress on the effectiveness of readiness contracts in meeting the military's prescription drug supply needs and how the contractual approach can be a model for responding to drug shortages in the civilian health care market; Krishnamoorthi (No. 227) that adds ``carbon monoxide'', to Section 2815 of the bill on page 1008; Krishnamoorthi (No. 228) that allows the Secretary of Defense to coordinate with workforce development organizations in implementing the Junior Reserve Officers' Training Corps (JROTC) Computer Science and Cybersecurity Program; Kuster (NH) (No. 229) that requires board for the correction of military records and discharge review boards to consult with a expert in trauma specific to sexual assault, intimate partner violence, or spousal abuse when reviewing applicant claims based on sexual assault, intimate partner violence, or spousal abuse; Kuster (NH) (No. 230) that requires members of boards for the correction of military records and discharge review boards receive training in sexual trauma, intimate partner violence, spousal abuse, and the various responses of individuals to trauma; Kuster (NH) (No. 231) that requires the Secretary of Defense enact policies and procedures to register civilian protection orders on military bases; Kuster (NH) (No. 232) that requires the Undersecretary for Acquisition and Sustainment submit a report to Congress evaluating service-level best practices for collecting real property data and implement service-wide guidance based off these best practices; Kuster (NH) (No. 233) that requires GAO complete a study on partnerships between military installations and civilian domestic and sexual violence response organizations to improve collaboration and services provided to survivors of sexual and domestic violence; LaMalfa (No. 234) that reaffirms the action of the Secretary of the Interior to take land into trust for the benefit of the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Mission Indians; Lamb (No. 235) that directs the Secretary of Defense to carry out a program on musculoskeletal injury prevention research to identify risk factors for musculoskeletal injuries among members of the Armed Forces and to create a better understanding for adaptive bone formation during initial entry military training; Lamb (No. 236) that requires the Interagency Program Office of the Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs to demonstrate that it has achieved interoperability in the implementation of electronic health records; requires the Office to manage the configuration of the electronic health records, consult with clinicians, and survey clinicians and patients; defines ``interoperability'' and ``seamless health care''; Lamborn (No. 237) that requires a report and brief from Under Secretary of Defense for R&E on potential need for a multi-object kill vehicle (MOKV) in future architecture of the Ballistic Missile Defense System, including: an assessment of technology readiness level of needed components and operational system; cost and comprehensive development and testing schedule to deploy such system by 2025; an assessment of if MOKV was considered in the Redesigned Kill Vehicle program re-baseline as a replacement for future Ground-Based Midcourse Defense (GMD) kill vehicles; a concept of operations of how an MOKV capability could be employed and how it compares to alternative GMD interceptors; and Lamborn (No. 238) that modifies the current bill language to prohibit the use of funds to enter into a global household goods contract until after the Comptroller General reports back to congressional defense committees on a comprehensive study analyzing the effects of outsourcing the defense personal property program to a private entity or entities, a cost-benefit analysis, and recommendations for changes to the strategy;
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Kendra Horn (OK) en bloc amendment No. 10 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143: Langevin (No. 239) that adds cybersecurity metrics as a required component of acquisitions using the new Section 801 authority: ``ESTABLISHMENT OF ACQUISITION PATHWAYS FOR SOFTWARE APPLICATIONS AND SOFTWARE UPGRADES''; Langevin (No. 240) that requires the President to provide the congressional defense committees with a copy of all National Security Presidential Memorandums relating to DoD operations in cyberspace; Langevin (No. 241) that extends Section 1202 of Title 10, support of special operations for irregular warfare, for three years; Langevin (No. 242) that strengthens current written notifications of Section 127e of Title 10, support of special operations to combat terrorism; Larsen (WA) (No. 243) that increases funding for the Defense Language and National Security Education Office by $13,404,000 for Chinese language and culture studies; Larsen (No. 244) that amends Section 1089 to require the Interagency Working Group to provide best practices to grantees at the time of agreement and to develop a risk mitigation plan; Larsen (No. 245) that modifies Section 1091(b) of the Fiscal Year 2019 National Defense Authorization Act to require that the Secretary of Defense develop a transition plan for institutions of higher education to develop independent Chinese language programs; Lawrence (No. 246) that requires the Secretary of Defense to share lessons learned and best practices on progress of gender integration implementation in the Armed Forces; Lawrence (No. 247) that states that the Secretary of Defense shall require each of the military departments to examine successful strategies in use by foreign military services to recruit and retain women, and to consider potential best practices for implementation in the United States Armed Forces, as recommended by the Defense Advisory Committee on Women in the Services; Lee (NV) (No. 248) that requires DOD to update service branch abuse programs to explicitly include gambling disorder within six months of enactment; Lee (NV) (No. 249) that clarifies the purpose of the interagency program office to include decision-making on functional, technical, and programmatic activities to promote interoperability of electronic health records and requires the Secretaries of the Departments to allocate sufficient resources and authorities for management of the activities of the office, including budget and staffing; mandates reports to Congress and the public on the activities of the office; Lesko (No. 250) that expresses a sense of the House of Representatives that it's critical for the Air Force to have the capability to train against advanced air adversary and that the Air Force's use of F–35As as aggressor aircraft reflects a recognition of the need to field a modernized aggressor fleet. Requires a report from the Air Force on strategy for modernizing the organic aggressor fleet; Levin (MI) (No. 252) that directs GAO to submit a report regarding the number of defense contractors in the last five years who have been found to have committed willful or repeat violations of the Occupational Safety and Health Act and the Fair Labor Standards Act; Levin (CA) (No. 253) that authorizes an additional $5 million for Naval University Research Initiatives, which improve the quality of defense research at universities and support the education of engineers and scientists in disciplines critical to national defense needs; Levin (CA) (No. 254) that directs a 1-year independent assessment and 5-year longitudinal study of the Transition Assistance Program, as in Sections 6 and 7 of H.R. 2326; Levin (CA) (No. 255) that directs the Secretary of Defense to report on the Department's Combating Trafficking Persons Initiative; Ted Lieu (CA) (No. 256) that prohibits in-flight refueling to non-United States aircraft that engage in hostilities in the ongoing civil war in Yemen for two years, or until a specific authorization has been enacted; Ted Lieu (CA) (No. 257) that requires a report to Congress detailing the U.S. strategy for Libya; Loebsack (No. 258) that extends Temporary Installation Reutilization Authority for leasing excess space at Army arsenals, depots, and plants through September 30, 2025; requires the Secretary of the Army to determine the logistical, information technology, and security requirements to create an internal listing service of Army assets available for lease at Arsenals, depots, and plants; Loebsack (No. 259) that requires the Secretary of Defense to perform an assessment of the Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math, as well as Maintenance and Manufacturing (STEM) workforce for organizations within the DOD, identify the types and quantities of STEM jobs needed to support future mission work, and identify a plan of action to address the STEM jobs gap; Lowenthal (No. 260) that notwithstanding any provision of law to the contrary, the Department of Defense may continue to consider and select heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems that utilize variable refrigerant flow as an option for use in Department of Defense facilities; Lucas (No. 261) that expands an already existing Department of Defense reporting requirement on solid rocket motors to include the National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Luján (No. 262) that expresses the sense of Congress that the Secretary of Energy should ensure that each laboratory operating contractor or plant or site manager of a National Nuclear Security Administration facility adopt generally accepted and consistent accounting practices for laboratory, plant, or site directed research and development; Luján (No. 263) that directs Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering and the Director of the Advanced Manufacturing Office to write a report on the feasibility and benefits of a multiyear entrepreneurial fellowship program; report will include information on the program's costs, benefits, and plan for implementation; and Luján (No. 264) that amends the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act to include a Congressional apology to the states of New Mexico, Idaho, Colorado, Arizona, Utah, Texas, Wyoming, Oregon, Washington, South Dakota, North Dakota, Nevada, Guam, and the Northern Mariana Islands;
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Kendra Horn (OK) en bloc amendment No. 11 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143: Luria (No. 265) that calls attention to musculoskeletal injuries, one of the top injuries facing warfighters, recognizes the importance of tissue repair innovations for these injuries, and encourages continued research and innovation that is occurring within the Navy's Wound Care Research program; Luria (No. 266) that directs the Department of Defense to conduct a study on how it could enter into more energy savings performance contracts (ESPCs); Lynch (No. 267) that reestablishes the Commission on Wartime Contracting and requires it to to examine federal agency contracting funded by OCO; federal agency contracting for the logistical support of coalition forces operating under the 2001 or 2002 AUMF; and federal agency contracting for the performance of security functions in countries where coalition forces are operating under the 2001 or 2002 AUMF; Sean Patrick Maloney (NY) (No. 268) that improves the ability of separating or retiring members of the Armed Forces to seek state veterans services by enabling them to elect to have their DD–214 shared with county veterans service officers; Sean Patrick Maloney (NY) (No. 269) that ensures the availability of certain medical services at U.S. Service Academies, including emergency room services, orthopedic services, general surgery services and gynecological services; Mast (No. 270) that expands eligibility of military MWR housing in order to give financial relief to allow Foreign Service Officers (FSOs) who temporarily lose housing allowance while on mandatory Home Leave status to rent military housing; McBath (No. 271) that exempts from the calculation of monthly income a disabled veteran's disability payments from the VA and DoD during bankruptcy proceedings; McGovern (No. 272) that authorizes and increases by $11 million the Wounded Warrior Service Dog Program, decreases Operations and Maintenance Defense-Wise by $11 million; McKinley (No. 273) that adds the Secretary of Energy to the list of people the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment should consult when establishing guidance as outlined in Section 807--Acquisition and Disposal of Certain Rare Earth Materials; McKinley (No. 274) that clarifies that the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment should not acquire items simply containing rare earth materials, but should instead focus on acquiring materials with high concentrations of rare earth materials; McKinley (No. 275) that clarifies that the guidance for best value contracting methods should consider if and when sole source contracts with universities or other entities are appropriate; McKinley (No. 276) that requires the Department of Defense to submit a report to Congress regarding the resources and authorities the Secretary determines necessary to identify the effects of the National Guard Youth Challenge Program on graduates of that program during the five years immediately preceding the date of the report; McNerney (No. 277) that requires the Department of Defense to submit a plan to reduce facility water consumption intensity by 2 percent annually through the end of fiscal year 2025; Meadows (No. 278) that requires a report on the feasibility of revising the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement to include requirements relating to ``consumption-based solutions'' to provide capabilities that are metered and billed based on actual usage, with the ability to scale capacity up or down, in line with defense acquisition system reforms identified by the Section 809 Panel created by the FY2016 NDAA; Meadows (No. 279) that makes delinquent or unpaid federal taxes one of the data elements federal contractors are required to disclose and periodically update in the Federal Awardee Performance and Integrity Information System (FAPIIS); Meadows (No. 280) that authorizes the service acquisition executive of the relevant military department, in administering software acquisition pathways, to delegate responsibilities under Sec. 801(d) to a program executive officer (or equivalent) to facilitate more rapid acquisition of software applications and software upgrades; Meadows (No. 281) that requires a briefing from the Secretary of Defense detailing how the Trusted Capital Marketplace pilot program will 1) align with critical defense requirements and 2) become self-sustaining; Meadows (No. 282) that establishes that it is the policy of the United States to prevent the financing of al-Shabaab by combatting illicit trafficking and encouraging compliance with international bans on trafficked goods which finance al-Shabaab; requires a Defense and State Department report on: a) the previous and current engagement of the departments with relevant national and subnational governments, b) recommendations to end trafficking that finances al-Shabaab, and c) the underlying forces leading to continued widespread trafficking; Meadows (No. 283) that expresses the sense of Congress that the ability of Mongolia, a consistent troop contributor to United States combat operations and partner of NATO, to protect its sovereignty, democracy, and ability to pursue an independent foreign policy is relevant to the national security interests of the United States; Meng (No. 284) that requires the Department of Defense to submit a report on the number of military installations that may have lead service lines, what steps DOD has taken to replace such lines, and whether DOD has established an awareness campaign to inform military service members and their families of these service lines; Meng (No. 285) that permits any member of the armed services who gives birth to be exempt from deployment for 12 months after such birth unless they request deployment; Meng (No. 286) that permanently authorizes the Suicide Prevention and Resilience Program; Miller (No. 287) that adds a provision stating that the last surviving World War II Medal of Honor recipient will be permitted to lay in honor in the rotunda of the Capitol upon death; Mitchell (No. 288) that applies the FY18 NDAA's increase of the micro-purchase threshold to acquisitions conducted through the issuance of task and delivery orders under multiple award contracts; Moore (No. 289) that expresses the Sense of Congress about the need for the leadership of the National Capital Consortium Psychiatry Residency program to maintain a workplace free of racial, gender or other forms of discrimination or harassment; and Moore (No. 290) that calls for a report and recommendations from the Air Force and Defense Logistics Agency on the need for and/or benefits of constructing new or maintaining direct fuel pipeline connections at appropriate Air National Guard and Reserve Installations including any barriers that may impede such projects;
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Kendra Horn (OK) en bloc amendment No. 12 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143: Morelle (No. 291) that increases funding for the facility operations and target production within the Inertial Confinement Fusion ignition and High Yield program by $5,000,000 to support laser direct drive; decreases funding for management, technology, and production within the Stockpile Services by $5,000,000; Mullin (No. 292) that requires the Department of Defense to report to Congress on the number of its medical providers who were dropped by their medical malpractice insurers prior to being employed by DOD; Murphy (No. 293) that adds a new section to Title II (RDT&E), Sub-title C (Reports and Other Matters) requiring the Secretary of Defense to contract with a federally funded research and development center to prepare a report for the congressional defense committees on the development of hypersonic weapons capabilities by foreign nations and the threat posed by such capabilities to United States territory, forces and overseas bases, and allies; Murphy (No. 294) that makes a technical correction to Section 1108 of the Fiscal Year 2019 National Defense Authorization Act (P.L. 115–232) to enable federal agencies to use expedited hiring authority for post-secondary students in the manner intended by Section 1108; Napolitano (No. 295) that increases funding for the National Guard Youth ChalleNGe Program by $50 million; Norman (No. 296) that revises the effective date of a DoD pilot program on bid protests to ensure DoD has audited business systems in place prior to initiating the pilot program; Norman (No. 297) that authorizes a public-private pilot program to train and place veterans as cybersecurity personnel with the DoD; O'Halleran (No. 298) that Includes the U.S. Naval Observatory and its associated facilities in the DOD's ``Master Plan for Infrastructure Required to Support Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Missions (Title II, Subtitle C, Sec. 232)''; O'Halleran (No. 299) that requires DOD and the Defense Health Agency (DHA) to submit a report to Congress on the implementation and results of DHA's June 2018 guidance on first fill opioid prescriptions to TRICARE beneficiaries for acute post-operative pain; Omar (No. 300) that requires contractors performing DoD contracts in foreign countries to report possible cases of gross violations of human rights; Omar (No. 301) that prohibits the use of funds to establish any permanent military base or installation in Somalia; Panetta (No. 302) that authorizes the Army to carry out a pilot program to construct new military housing in diverse climate regions in the United States utilizing the All-American Abode design by the United States Military Academy; Panetta (No. 303) that requires a report on the legal services the Department of Defense may provide to servicemembers harmed by a health or environmental hazard while living in military housing and dissemination of the information at all U.S. installations; Panetta (No. 304) that requires the Department of Defense to provide a plan to improve the collection and monitoring of information, both financial and non-financial, regarding intergovernmental support agreements; Panetta (No. 305) that requires a report on the efforts of the Department of Defense to improve innovation investments and management; Panetta (No. 306) that expresses sense of Congress that the Army should continue to invest in research, development, test, and evaluation programs to mature future vertical lift technologies; Panetta (No. 307) that provides a full military honors ceremony--including funeral escort platoon, military band, firing party, and horse-drawn caisson--to Medal of Honor recipients and Prisoners of War eligible for burial at Arlington National Cemetery; Panetta (No. 308) that reaffirms strong Congressional support for NATO and prohibits the use of funds to withdraw from the alliance; Panetta (No. 309) that improves coordination between the federal government, industry, and academia to ensure global superiority of the United States in quantum information science necessary for meeting national security requirements; Perlmutter (No. 311) that makes technical changes to the Advisory Board on Toxic Substances and Worker Health within the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act and extends the authorization for the Office of the Ombudsman; Perry (No. 312) that requires the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to Congress on the threat information sharing between the Department and the Defense Industrial Base, including academic institutions; Peters (No. 313) that establishes a pilot program to provide friends and family of servicemembers a better understanding of the rigors, challenges, and needs associated with military service; Phillips (No. 314) that instructs the Defense Intelligence Agency to provide a report to the Committee on Armed Services and other committees, describing the detailed military capabilities of China and Russia; the report must include a survey of any national training centers and an evaluation of the respective nation's military and logistical readiness relative to those of the United States; the Defense Intelligence Agency may make use of or add to any existing reports completed by the Agency in order to respond to the reporting requirement; Phillips (No. 315) that requires the Secretary of the Army to submit a report to congress, listing any areas, such as Nike missile sites, that were once used by the military and that have since been reassigned to local governments, as well as the nature of any pollutants that remain on these lands as a result of the military's activities; and Pingree (No. 316) that directs DOD to ensure that Sexual Assault Response Coordinators advise servicemembers who report instances of military sexual trauma about the eligibility of such members for health and benefits services at the Department of Veterans Affairs;
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Kendra Horn (OK) en bloc amendment No. 13 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143: Plaskett (No. 317) that requires a report regarding transition from Overseas Housing Allowance to Basic Allowance for Housing for servicemembers in the U.S. territories; Price (No. 318) that requires a report from the President on the status of deconfliction channels with Iran to prevent miscalculation; Porter (No. 319) that requires the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Sustainment to investigate all reports of reprisals against a member of the Armed Forces for reporting an issue relating to a privatized military housing unit; Porter (No. 320) that preserves the requirement for the Director of Operational Test and Evaluation to produce a public annual report; Porter (No. 321) that increases funding for Army University Research Initiatives by $5,000,000; Porter (No. 322) that allows servicemembers to have a private right of action in the event that credit reporting bureaus engage in misconduct related to free credit monitoring; Porter (No. 323) that requires the Secretary of Defense to develop partnerships with civilian academic medical centers and teaching hospitals to improve combat casualty care for personnel of the Armed Forces; Porter (No. 324) that makes spouses and other dependents of active duty members of the Armed Forces eligible for the Direct Employment Pilot Program; Price (No. 325) that enables DOD to award three-year competitive grants to DODEA schools and to local education agencies that host a JROTC program for the establishment, improvement, or expansion of world language programs in elementary and secondary schools; Quigley (No. 326) that establishes a pilot program on partnerships with civilian organizations for specialized medical skills training program and advanced orthopedic skills training; Ratcliffe (No. 327) that requires DOD to provide a report looking into the feasibility of establishing a high-level, interagency U.S.-Taiwan working group for coordinating responses to merging issues related to cybersecurity; Rice (NY) (No. 328) that requires the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Secretary of Homeland Security, to conduct an assessment of the impact that the construction of any planned or proposed border wall would have on the volume of illegal narcotics entering the United States; Riggleman (No. 329) that directs the Secretary of Defense to Develop a plan, cost estimate, and schedule for a pilot program to train skilled technicians for immediate placement in the defense industrial base, including critical shipbuilding skills such as welding, metrology, quality assurance, machining, and additive manufacturing; Roby (No. 330) that provides clarity that the authority in section 1521 can be used for the specific purposes enumerated in (H) and (I) in order to give more flexibility for CSTC–A to pursue some of the programs they believe will be helpful; Ruiz (No. 331) that requires DOD to conduct an implementation plan to phase out the use of the 9 burn pits included in the DOD report on burn pits to Congress issued in April 2019; Ruiz (No. 332) that requires DOD to provide Congress and the VA with a list of the locations of military bases, posts, forward operating bases, combat outposts, and any other locations at which open-air burn pits have been used; Ruiz (No. 333) that requires DOD to provide a detailed report to Congress on the status, methodology, and culmination timeline of all the research and studies being conducted to assess the health effects of burn pits; Ruiz (No. 334) that requires DOD to implement mandatory training for all medical providers working under DOD on the potential health effects of burn pits and its early detection, as well as other airborne hazards, such as PFAS, mold, or depleted uranium; Rutherford (No. 335) that amends the recurring report required by the FY 2019 NDAA to include an evaluation on the effectiveness of the Transition Assistance Program for female members of the Armed Forces; Rutherford (No. 336) that provides U.S. Special Operations Command procurement authority for Light Attack aircraft in support of the Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) Combat Air Advisor (CAA) mission; also directs the Secretary of the Air Force to obligate, or transfer to USSOCOM, the necessary funds that have been made available for light attack aircraft to procure the required number of aircraft for Air Combat Command's Air Ground Operations School and AFSOC's CAA mission; Sablan (No. 337) that allows community college students holding or expecting to receive an associate degree to apply for the new Technology and National Security Fellowship program authorized in Section 239 of the bill; Schakowsky (No. 338) that tasks the Inspector General of the Department of Defense to analyze all contracts and task orders that provide private security firms access to U.S. theaters of military operations in order to compile a report that will inform Congress about the size of the contracting force; the total value of the contracts; the number of persons operating on the contracts that have been wounded or killed; and the disciplinary actions that have been taken against individual contractors; Schiff (No. 339) that authorizes inclusion on the Vietnam Veterans Memorial of the names of seventy-four crew members of the USS Frank E. Evans killed on June 3, 1969; Schiff (No. 340) that authorizes military judges in any proceeding of a military commission at United States Naval Station, Guantanamo Bay, Cuba to order arrangements for remote public viewing of the proceedings via internet; Schneider (No. 341) that authorizes for five years the Boots to Business program which helps transitioning service members and veterans become entrepreneurs and create jobs through a standardized three-step entrepreneurship training track while giving access to resources in their local communities; and Schrader (No. 342) that exempts members of the Armed Forces who voluntarily separated from active duty, are involuntarily recalled, and incur a 100 percent service-connected disability during that time from the requirement to repay voluntary separation pay;
Pages H5682–86

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Kendra Horn (OK) en bloc amendment No. 14 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143: Schrader (No. 343) that calls for recently separated servicemembers to receive a notice of their rights under the Servicemember Civil Relief Act 180 days following the end of their military service; Schrader (No. 344) that requires the DOD Chief Management Officer to release public versions of the mandated cost savings reports submitted to Congress; Schrier (No. 345) that directs the Secretary of the Navy to adhere to competitive procedures to better ensure small and medium defense contractors can compete with respect to any task order or delivery order issued for a dual aircraft carrier contract for CVN–80 and CVN–81; Austin Scott (GA) (No. 346) that requires all military chaplains receive their religious endorsement badge or insignia upon their commissioning; Scott (VA) (No. 347) that requires the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to Congress on the status of each of the 91 priority recommendations that the Secretary has not implemented in report GAO–19–366SP; Shalala (No. 348) that requires that all OC–135B Open Skies Treaty aircraft recapitalization request for proposals (RFP) be open to a full competitive bidding process from a wide variety of contracts, including those that prioritize existing recently manufactured low hour/low-cycle aircraft; Sherman (No. 349) that adds a sense of Congress regarding improving U.S.-India defense cooperation and requires a report on cooperation in the Western Indian Ocean; Sherrill (No. 350) that expresses the Sense of Congress that Army Contracting Command--New Jersey plays a vital role in support of major weapons, armaments, and ammunition systems for the Army and other Department of Defense customers; Shimkus (No. 351) that expands U.S. funding for the Baltic States of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania to $125 million in order to expand their military and cyber-security infrastructure; Smith (WA) (No. 352) that authorizes the Department of Energy to impose civil penalties on contractors who retaliate against nuclear safety whistleblowers; Smith (WA) (No. 353) that prohibits the use of funds by the Department of Energy for applying its interpretation of high-level radioactive waste with respect to waste located in the State of Washington; Smith (NJ) (No. 354) that requires a pilot program on a one-stop online application to assist members of the Armed Forces and veterans participating in the Transition Assistance Program; Smith (NJ) (No. 355) that directs the Inspector General of the Department of Defense to initiate an investigation into the Department's possible involvement in the bioweaponization of ticks and other insects; Smith (NJ) (No. 356) that requires GAO to conduct a study of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and its practices and protocols for identifying misclassification at federal construction projects; Soto (No. 357) that increases funding for the manufacturing science and technology program by $5 million for anti-tamper heterogeneous integrated microelectronics; reduces funding for Army procurement by the same amount; Soto (No. 358) that directs the Secretary of Defense to establish trusted supply chain and operational security standards for the purchase of microelectronics products and services by the Department; Soto (No. 359) that directs the Secretary of Defense to conduct, and submit to Congress, an assessment to determine the required size and composition of its operational medical and dental personnel who support the wartime mission; Soto (No. 360) that directs the Undersecretary of Defense for Research and Engineering to provide to the congressional defense committees a briefing on the potential use of distributed ledger technology for defense purposes; Spanberger (No. 361) that requires the President's report under Sec. 1264 of the NDAA for FY18 include a list of foreign forces, groups, and individuals for which a determination has been made that force could legally be used under the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force, including the legal and factual basis, whether force has been used, and the criteria for designating an individual as lawfully targetable; Spanberger (No. 362) that requires that the Secretary of Defense upgrade the capacity of military criminal investigative organizations in order to confront the misuse of DoD computer networks to access and trade child pornography; also requires DoD to enter into collaborative agreements with appropriate government and child protection and other organizations; Speier (No. 363) that increases funding for the Defense Security Service by $5,206,997 for the purposes of procurement of advanced cyber threat detection sensors, hunt and response mechanisms, and commercial cyber threat intelligence to ensure Defense Industrial Base networks remain protected from nation state adversaries; Speier (No. 364) that allows the Secretary of Defense to refer military members for mental health services within the TRICARE network if services cannot be provided at a military medical facility within 15 days; Speier (No. 365) that renames the Lejeune High School at Camp Lejeune for recently deceased Congressman and member of the House Armed Services Committee, Walter B. Jones; Stanton (No. 366) that allows certain veterans who are enrolled in their respective service's Wounded Warriors Program to continue their enrollment in the Military Services Adaptive Sports Programs for an additional year after separation; Stauber (No. 367) that requires the Secretary of the Navy to submit a report to the appropriate congressional defense committees a report on the feasibility of doing maintenance work on naval vessels at shipyards other than shipyards in the vessels' homeport; and Zeldin (No. 417) that requires a report on the relationship between the Lebanese Armed Forces and Hizballah;
Pages H5686–92

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Kendra Horn (OK) en bloc amendment No. 15 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143: Stefanik (No. 369) that provides a technical correction to the Catch a Serial Offender Program and preserves the nature of a restricted report of military sexual assault; Stefanik (No. 370) that makes a technical change to a provision in last year's NDAA that requires a consolidated budget display for small business research grants; the clarification adds Under Secretary of Defense; Stivers (No. 371) that directs the Department of Defense to submit an annual report on findings of the Millennium Cohort Study regarding the gynecological and perinatal health of servicewomen; Suozzi (No. 372) that requires the Secretary of the Navy to conduct a third-party quality review of all radium testing conducted by contractors at locations where the Navy is undertaking projects and activities relating to environmental cleanup; Takano (No. 373) that requires the Secretary of Defense to report to Congress on its current and future plans to consolidate Defense Media Activity; Thompson (CA) (No. 374) that requires the Secretary of Defense to report to Congress on its current and future plans to consolidate Defense Media Activity; prohibits funding for such consolidation until at least 180 days have elapsed following the day on which the Secretary of Defense submits the required report; Torres Small (NM) (No. 376) that requires the DoD to establish a pilot program to provide broadband access to military families and medical facilities on remote or isolated military installation; Torres (CA) (No. 377) that directs the National Security Commission on Defense Research at Historically Black Colleges and Universities and Other Minority Serving Institutions, in consultation with the Secretary of Education, to make available a list identifying eligible institutions; Torres (CA) (No. 378) that requires the President to impose sanctions on Central American officials previously named in reports to Congress; Torres (CA) (No. 379) that prohibits the provision of vehicles to joint task forces including the Ministry of Defense or the Ministry of the Interior of Guatemala, unless the Secretary of Defense has certified to appropriate Congressional committees that such ministries have made a credible commitment to only use such vehicles for their intended purpose; Torres (CA) (No. 380) that mandates the Department of Defense provide a briefing on its efforts to address manipulated media content, specifically deepfakes, from adversarial sources, and provides a $5 million increase for the Department of Defense's Media Forensics Program; Torres (CA) (No. 381) that requires the Department of Defense, in consultation with the Manufacturing Extension Partnership program, to develop policies to assist small- and mid-sized manufacturers to meet cybersecurity requirements; Turner (No. 383) that requires the President to prescribe regulations pertaining to the expansion of matters that may be reviewed by military judges and military magistrates prior to the referral of charges in the interest of efficiency in military justice; Turner (No. 384) that directs the Secretary of Defense to establish a policy that preserves the victims preference for a restricted report in the event a sexual assault allegation was inadvertantly disclosed or reported by an unprotected third party; Turner (No. 385) that directs the Secretary of Defense to establish comprehensive training standards for Commanders on their role as it pertains to all stages of military justice in connection with the sexual assault by servicemembers against servicemembers; Velázquez (No. 387) that requires a report as to the number of contracts awarded to program participants under the Small Business Program prescribed in 15 USC 637(a); Velázquez (No. 388) that provides permanent authorization to the Department of Defense Mentor Protege Program and requires annual submission of reports regarding the Program; Velázquez (No. 389) that amends subsection 15(x) of the Small Business Act to allow prime contractors the ability to double the value of a subcontract for purposes of the subcontracting goals; Velázquez (No. 390) that amends subsection 15(x) of the Small Business Act granting small businesses in the Virgin Islands, American Samoa, Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands the contracting credit provided therein; Wagner (No. 391) that instructs the Secretary of Defense to brief the Committee on Armed Services and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Armed Services and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate on the utility and feasibility of establishing a multinational regional security education center based in Southeast Asia to offer year-round training and educational courses for Indo-Pacific civilian and military security personnel, including English-language training, rule of law and legal studies, security, governance and institution-building courses, and budget and procurement training; Wagner (No. 392) that requires that all foreign persons receiving training in IMET professional military education programs participate in human rights training; Walden (No. 393) that allows Air Force reserve component personnel to provide pilot training and instruction to address our nation's pilot shortage; and Walorski (No. 394) that recognizes the honorable service of military working dogs and soldier handlers in the Tactical Explosive Detection Dog (TEDD) program and encourages the Army to prioritize adoption of the dogs to former TEDD handlers;
Pages H5692–97

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Smith (WA) en bloc amendment No. 16 consisting of the following amendments printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143: Waters (No. 395) that increases funding for assistance to schools with significant numbers of military dependent students by $10,000,000 in order to further support local educational agencies that serve military communities and families; Waters (No. 396) that directs the Department of Defense to produce an assessment of the Direct Employment Pilot Program's minority outreach efforts, participation outcomes, and participation rates for individuals specified under subsection (a); Waters (No. 397) that requires applicable emerging technologies procured and used by the Department of Defense to be tested for algorithmic bias and potential discriminatory outcome; Welch (No. 398) that requires the Department of Defense to semi-annually report on monitoring and evaluation measures of direct government-to-government assistance provided to the government of Afghanistan; Welch (No. 399) that requires the Department of Defense to annually report on direct government-to-government assistance provided to the government of Afghanistan; Welch (No. 400) that authorizes assistance for deployment-related support of members of the Armed Forces undergoing deployment and their families beyond the Yellow Ribbon Reintegration Program; Wexton (No. 401) that requires a GAO report on the feasibility of establishing a program for members of the Armed Forces transitioning to civilian intelligence employment; Wild (No. 402) that requires the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Health Affairs to establish a University Affiliated Research Center (UARC) and partner with Academic Health Centers to focus on the unique challenges wounded servicemembers experience; Wittman (No. 403) that Establishes a Cable Security Fleet of United States-documented cable vessels in order to provide installation, maintenance, and repair of submarine cables and related equipment; Yoho (No. 404) technical change to counter-UAS provision ensuring Congressional oversight; Young (No. 405) that provides for a strategic Arctic port designation following a comprehensive DoD evaluation and report; Young (No. 406) that requires the Secretary of the Army to assess cold weather training requirements and develop a plan to increase and expand cold weather training opportunities; Young (No. 407) that requires an independent study and report of Chinese Arctic foreign direct investment, with a focus on the effects of Chinese foreign direct investment on U.S. national security and near peer competition in the Arctic; McCarthy (No. 408) that authorizes funding to assist military installations recovering from earthquakes and other natural disasters in 2019 and requires an earthquake damaged infrastructure restoration master plan be submitted to Congress; Sherrill (No. 409) that increases the authorized funding in the Defense Health Program for TRICARE lead level screening and testing for children by $5 million; LaMalfa (No. 411) that prohibits funds from being used by the U.S. Air Force for the removal of the Over-the-Horizon-Backscatter Radar (OTHB) station located in Modoc County, CA; Luria (No. 412) that assists employees during the relocation process; Phillips (No. 413) that instructs SECDEF to author a report that prioritizes the list of agencies and/or programs in need of funds under Section 385 to Title 10 of U.S. Code, as well as a justification as to why the money is necessary/beneficial; Porter (No. 414) that requires a study on the feasibility and effectiveness of routine neuroimaging modalities in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of brain injury among servicemembers due to blast pressure exposure during combat and training; Porter (No. 415) that requires a GAO report on defense business processes including analyzing the DOD's development of a culture that recognizes the important of business processes and re-engineering initiatives necessary to achieve improved financial management; Tonko (No. 416) that increases by $2 million the funding limitation for the Erie Canalway National Heritage Corridor; Cunningham (No. 419) that makes changes to the Defense Access Roads program to authorize funding towards water management infrastructure; the enhancement or improvement of eligible infrastructure; and infrastructure affected, or projected to be affected, by natural disasters, recurrent flooding, or other environmental conditions; expands funding eligibility to roads to air or sea ports that are necessary for the deployment or sustainment of troops, equipment, or supplies; Rose (No. 420) that requires imposition of sanctions on drug manufacturers who knowingly provide synthetic opioids to traffickers, transnational criminal organizations who mix fentanyl with other drugs and traffic them into the U.S., and financial institutions that assist such entities; authorizes new funding to U.S. law enforcement and intelligence agencies while establishing a Commission on Synthetic Opioid Trafficking to monitor U.S. efforts; Barr (No. 422) that imposes secondary sanctions to cut off Pyongyang's ability to finance its weapons programs by requiring the Secretary of the Treasury to prohibit, or impose strict conditions on, correspondent or payable-through accounts held in the U.S. by foreign financial institutions that knowingly deal with persons involved in trade or other support for North Korea; Engel (No. 426) that ensures reporting to Congress when U.S. forces are involved in hostilities if the President has not determined that the involvement is authorized by Congress and has not reported it pursuant to the War Powers Resolution; Engel (No. 427) that improves congressional oversight of the 2001 Authorization for Use of Military Force (AUMF) by requiring the President to submit reports and provide briefings on actions related to that authority; and Peters (No. 431) that directs the Secretary of Defense to coordinate with oversight entities, such as the HHS Inspector General, to establish a process for military base access in order to perform surprise inspections of facilities used to house, detain, screen, or review migrants, refuges or other persons recently arriving the in United States; and
Pages H5697–5711

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Khanna amendment (No. 217 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that expresses a Sense of Congress that diplomacy is essential for addressing North Korea's nuclear program as a military confrontation would pose extreme risks, and the U.S. should pursue a sustained and credible diplomatic process to achieve the denuclearization of North Korea and an end to the 69-year-long Korean War.
Page H5711

Rejected:

Blumenauer amendment (No. 32 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that sought to require an independent study on options to extend the life of the Minuteman III intercontinental ballistic missiles and delaying the ground-based strategic deterrent program (GBSD); prevent 10% of funds for the Secretary of Defense from being distributed until the study is submitted (by a recorded vote of 164 ayes to 264 noes, Roll No. 454); and
Pages H5616–18, H5638

Blumenauer amendment (No. 33 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that sought to require the Under Secretary for Nuclear Security to conduct a study on the unexpected cost increases for the W80–4 nuclear warhead life extension program and prevents $185 million from being obligated or expended until the study is completed (by a recorded vote of 198 ayes to 229 noes, Roll No. 455).
Pages H5618–20, H5638–39

Proceedings Postponed:

Lee (CA) amendment (No. 49 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that seeks to reduce funding from the Overseas Contingency Operations (OCO) account by $16.8 billion;
Pages H5642–44

Amash amendment (No. 50 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that seeks to repeal section 1022 of the FY2012 NDAA and amend Section 1021 of the FY2012 NDAA to eliminate indefinite military detention of any person detained under AUMF authority in the U.S., territories, or possessions by providing immediate transfer to trial and proceedings by a court established under Article III of the Constitution of the United states or by an appropriate State court;
Pages H5644–46

Tipton amendment (No. 375 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that seeks to express the sense of Congress that military aviation training in Colorado, including the training conducted at the High-Altitude Army National Guard Aviation Training Site, is critical to the national security of the United States and the readiness of the Armed Forces;
Pages H5712–13

Turner amendment (No. 386 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that seeks to strike the provision relating to the prohibition on the use of funds for the deployment of low-yield ballistic missile warheads and requires the Secretary of Defense to certify on the availability of proportional response options;
Pages H5713–14

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Khanna amendment (No. 423 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that seeks to prohibit unauthorized military force in or against Iran;
Pages H5714–18

Lee (CA) amendment (No. 424 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that seeks to repeal the Authorization for Use of Military Force Against Iraq Resolution of 2002;
Pages H5718–19

Lee (CA) amendment (No. 425 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that seeks to express the sense of Congress that the 2001 AUMF has been utilized beyond the scope that Congress intended; and that any new authorization for the use of military force to replace the 2001 AUMF should include a sunset clause, a clear and specific expression of objectives, targets, and geographic scope, and reporting requirements;
Pages H5719–20

Garcia amendment (No. 428 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that seeks to prevent DOD facilities from being used to house or detain unaccompanied migrant children;
Pages H5721–22

Ocasio-Cortez amendment (No. 429 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that seeks to prohibit the President from deploying troops on the southern border if the purpose of this deployment is to enforce immigration law; and
Pages H5722–23

Ocasio-Cortez amendment (No. 430 printed in part B of H. Rept. 116–143) that seeks to prohibit the President from using the authorized funds to detain undocumented immigrants in Department of Defense facilities.
Pages H5723–24

H. Res. 476, the rule providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 2500) was agreed to yesterday, July 10th.

Senate Referral: S. 1811 was referred to the Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure and the Committee on Natural Resources.
Page H5724


Senate Message: Message received from the Senate by the Clerk and subsequently presented to the House today appears on page H5594.

Quorum Calls--Votes: Twenty-one recorded votes developed during the proceedings of today and appear on pages H5606, H5607, H5607–08, H5608, H5609, H5609–10, H5610, H5611, H5611–12, H5612, H5613, H5613–14, H5614, H5615, H5615–16, H5616, H5638, H5639, H5639–40, H5640, and H5641. There were no quorum calls.

Adjournment: The House met at 10 a.m. and adjourned at 10:12 p.m.

Committee Meetings

BUILDING OPPORTUNITY IN RURAL AMERICA THROUGH AFFORDABLE, RELIABLE AND HIGH-SPEED BROADBAND

Committee on Agriculture: Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit held a hearing entitled ``Building Opportunity in Rural America through Affordable, Reliable and High-Speed Broadband''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

MANAGEMENT CHALLENGES AND OVERSIGHT OF DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND UNITED STATES AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS

Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs held a hearing entitled ``Management Challenges and Oversight of Department of State and United States Agency for International Development Programs''. Testimony was heard from Ann Calvaresi Barr, Inspector General, U.S. Agency for International Development; and Steve Linick, Inspector General, Department of State.

SOUTHERN COMMAND

Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Defense held a hearing entitled ``Southern Command''. Testimony was heard from Admiral Craig S. Faller, Commander, U.S. Southern Command. This hearing was closed.

FROM THE FIELDS TO THE FACTORIES: PREVENTING WORKPLACE INJURY AND DEATH FROM EXCESSIVE HEAT

Committee on Education and Labor: Subcommittee on Workforce Protections held a hearing entitled ``From the Fields to the Factories: Preventing Workplace Injury and Death from Excessive Heat''. Testimony was heard from Representative Judy Chu of California and public witnesses.

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURES

Committee on Energy and Commerce: Subcommittee on Health held a markup on H.R. 2781, the ``EMPOWER for Health Act of 2019''; H.R. 728, the ``Title VIII Nursing Workforce Reauthorization Act of 2019''; H.R. 1058, the ``Autism CARES Act of 2019''; H.R. 2507, the ``Newborn Screening Saves Lives Reauthorization Act of 2019''; H.R. 776, the ``Emergency Medical Services for Children Program Reauthorization Act of 2019''; H.R. 2035, the ``Lifespan Respite Care Reauthorization Act of 2019''; H.R. 2296, the ``FAIR Drug Pricing Act of 2019''; H.R. 2328, the ``Community Health Investment, Modernization, and Excellence Act of 2019''; H.R. 3631, the ``Territories Health Care Improvement Act''; and H.R. 3630, the ``No Surprises Act''. H.R. 2781, H.R. 728, H.R. 1058, H.R. 2507, H.R. 2035, H.R. 2296, and H.R. 2328 were forwarded to the full Committee, as amended. H.R. 776, H.R. 3631, and H.R. 3630 were forwarded to the full Committee, without amendment.

[Page:D829]

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURES

Committee on Financial Services: Full Committee held a markup on H.R. 281, the ``Ensuring Diverse Leadership Act of 2019''; H.R. 1018, the ``Improving Corporate Governance through Diversity Act of 2019''; H.R. 2852, the ``Homebuyer Assistance Act of 2019''; H.R. 3279, the ``Diversity in Corporate Leadership Act of 2019''; H.R. 3614, the ``Restricting Use of Credit Checks for Employment Decisions Act''; H.R. 3618, the ``Free Credit Scores for Consumers Act of 2019''; H.R. 3619, the ``Appraisal Fee Transparency Act of 2019''; H.R. 3620, the ``Strategy and Investment in Rural Housing Preservation Act of 2019''; H.R. 3622, the ``Restoring Unfairly Impaired Credit and Protecting Consumers Act''; and H.R. 3642, the ``Improving Credit Reporting for All Consumers Act''. H.R. 2852, H.R. 3619, H.R. 3620, H.R. 281, H.R. 1018, H.R. 3279, H.R. 3614, H.R. 3618, H.R. 3622, and H.R. 3642 were ordered reported, as amended.

HUMAN RIGHTS IN CUBA: BEYOND THE VENEER OF REFORM

Committee on Foreign Affairs: Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere, Civilian Security, and Trade held a hearing entitled ``Human Rights in Cuba: Beyond the Veneer of Reform''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

THE STATE DEPARTMENT AND USAID FY 2020 OPERATIONS BUDGET

Committee on Foreign Affairs: Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations held a hearing entitled ``The State Department and USAID FY 2020 Operations Budget''. Testimony was heard from Carol Z. Perez, Director General of the Foreign Service and Director of Human Resources, Bureau of Human Resources, Department of State; Douglas Pitkin, Director, Bureau of Budget and Planning, Department of State; Frederick Nutt, Assistant Administrator, Bureau for Management, U.S. Agency for International Development; and Bob Leavitt, Chief Human Capital Officer, U.S. Agency for International Development.

ROAD TO RECOVERY: PUERTO RICO AND THE U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS AFTER HURRICANES IRMA AND MARIA

Committee on Homeland Security: Subcommittee on Emergency Preparedness, Response, and Recovery held a hearing entitled ``Road to Recovery: Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands after Hurricanes Irma and Maria''. Testimony was heard from Chris P. Currie, Director, Homeland Security and Justice, Government Accountability Office; Omar J. Marrero, Executive Director, Central Office for Recovery, Reconstruction, and Resilience (COR3), Puerto Rico; and Adrienne L. Williams-Octalien, Director, Office of Disaster Recovery, Virgin Islands Public Finance Authority, U.S. Virgin Islands.

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURES

Committee on the Judiciary: Full Committee held a markup on a resolution authorizing issuance of subpoenas; H.R. 3311, the ``Small Business Reorganization Act of 2019''; H.R. 3304, the ``National Guard and Reservists Debt Relief Extension Act of 2019''; H.R. 2938, the ``HAVEN Act''; and H.R. 2336, the ``Family Farmer Relief Act of 2019''. The resolution authorizing issuance of subpoenas was ordered reported, as amended. H.R. 3311, H.R. 3304, H.R. 2938, and H.R. 2336 were ordered reported, without amendment.

THE FUTURE OF THE FEDERAL COAL PROGRAM

Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources held a hearing entitled ``The Future of the Federal Coal Program''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

TRIBAL INFRASTRUCTURE: ROADS, BRIDGES, AND BUILDINGS

Committee on Natural Resources: Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States held a hearing entitled ``Tribal Infrastructure: Roads, Bridges, and Buildings''. Testimony was heard from LeRoy Gishi, Chief, Division of Transportation, Office of Indian Services, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Department of Interior; and public witnesses.

IDENTIFYING, PREVENTING, AND TREATING CHILDHOOD TRAUMA: A PERVASIVE PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUE THAT NEEDS GREATER FEDERAL ATTENTION

Committee on Oversight and Reform: Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``Identifying, Preventing, and Treating Childhood Trauma: A Pervasive Public Health Issue That Needs Greater Federal Attention''. Testimony was heard from Charles Patterson, Health Commissioner, Clark County, Ohio; and public witnesses.

[Page:D830]

EARTH'S THERMOMETERS: GLACIAL AND ICE SHEET MELT IN A CHANGING CLIMATE

Committee on Science, Space, and Technology: Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``Earth's Thermometers: Glacial and Ice Sheet Melt in a Changing Climate''. Testimony was heard from Gabriel J. Wolkon, Research Scientist and Manager, Climate and Cryosphere Hazards Program, Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, Alaska Department of Natural Resources; and public witnesses.

BUMPER TO BUMPER: THE NEED FOR A NATIONAL SURFACE TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH AGENDA

Committee on Science, Space, and Technology: Subcommittee on Research and Technology held a hearing entitled ``Bumper to Bumper: The Need for a National Surface Transportation Research Agenda''. Testimony was heard from Tim Henkel, Assistant Commissioner, Modal Planning and Program Management, Minnesota Department of Transportation; Brian Ness, Director, Idaho Department of Transportation; and public witnesses.

SBA MANAGEMENT AND OVERSIGHT OF SCORE

Committee on Small Business: Subcommittee on Investigations, Oversight, and Regulations held a hearing entitled ``SBA Management and Oversight of SCORE''. Testimony was heard from Hannibal Ware, Inspector General, Small Business Administration; and Allen Gutierrez, Associate Administrator, Office of Entrepreneurial Development, Small Business Administration.

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURES

Committee on Veterans' Affairs: Full Committee held a markup on H.R. 2942, to direct the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to carry out the Women's Health Transition Training pilot program through at least fiscal year 2020, and for other purposes; H.R. 2943, to direct the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to make all fact sheets of the Department of Veterans Affairs in English and Spanish; and H.R. 3504, to amend title 38, United States Code, to provide for improvements to the specially adapted housing program of the Department of Veterans Affairs, and for other purposes. H.R. 2942, H.R. 2943, and H.R. 3504 were ordered reported, as amended.

FOSTERING THE NEXT GENERATION OF LEADERS: SETTING MEMBERS UP FOR SUCCESS

Select Committee on the Modernization of Congress: Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``Fostering the Next Generation of Leaders: Setting Members up for Success''. Testimony was heard from Philip Kiko, Chief Administrative Officer, House of Representatives; and public witnesses.

Joint Meetings

No joint committee meetings were held.

COMMITTEE MEETINGS FOR FRIDAY,

JULY 12, 2019

(Committee meetings are open unless otherwise indicated)

Senate

No meetings/hearings scheduled.

House

Committee on Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Energy, hearing entitled ``Keeping The Lights On: Addressing Cyber Threats To The Grid'', 9:30 a.m., 2123 Rayburn.

Committee on the Judiciary, Full Committee, hearing entitled ``Lessons from the Mueller Report, Part III: Constitutional Processes for Addressing Presidential Misconduct'', 9 a.m., 2141 Rayburn.

Committee on Oversight and Reform, Full Committee, hearing entitled ``The Trump Administration's Child Separation Policy: Substantiated Allegations of Mistreatment'', 10 a.m., 2154 Rayburn.

[Page:D831]

Next Meeting of the
SENATE

3 p.m., Monday, July 15

Senate Chamber

Program for Monday: Senate will resume consideration of the nomination of Peter Joseph Phipps, of Pennsylvania, to be United States Circuit Judge for the Third Circuit, and vote on the motion to invoke cloture thereon at 5:30 p.m.

The filing deadline for first-degree amendments to Protocol Amending the Tax Convention with Spain (Treaty Doc. 113–4), Protocol Amending Tax Convention with Swiss Confederation (Treaty Doc. 112–1), Protocol Amending the Tax Convention with Japan (Treaty Doc. 114–1), and Protocol Amending Tax Convention with Luxembourg (Treaty Doc. 111–8), is at 3:30 p.m.

Next Meeting of the
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

9 a.m., Friday, July 12

House Chamber

Program for Friday: Complete consideration of H.R. 2500--National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2020.










Extensions of Remarks, as inserted in this issue








HOUSE


Bergman, Jack, Mich., E899

Blumenauer, Earl, Ore., E902, E905

Brown, Anthony G., Md., E901

Cisneros, Gilbert Ray, Jr., Calif., E897

Cleaver, Emanuel, Mo., E898, E902

Cohen, Steve, Tenn., E898

Collins, Doug, Ga., E905

Correa, J. Luis, Calif., E902, E905

Davis, Danny K., Ill., E904, E906

DeSaulnier, Mark, Calif., E904

Dingell, Debbie, Mich., E900

Huffman, Jared, Calif., E904

Johnson, Eddie Bernice, Tex., E901

Larsen, Rick, Wash., E904

Larson, John B., Conn., E907

Luria, Elaine G., Va., E898, E899, E900, E901, E902, E903, E904, E905, E906, E907

Maloney, Carolyn B., N.Y., E897

McCarthy, Kevin, Calif., E903

Moore, Gwen, Wisc., E900

Norton, Eleanor Holmes, The District of Columbia, E898, E899, E903

Peterson, Collin C., Minn., E906

Rose, Max, N.Y., E897

Rush, Bobby L., Ill., E897

Simpson, Michael K., Idaho, E901

Thompson, Mike, Calif., E899, E901, E906

Wagner, Ann, Mo., E903

Walden, Greg, Ore., E906

Webster, Daniel, Fla., E902

[Page:D832]