NATIONAL PURPLE HEART HALL OF HONOR COMMEMORATIVE COIN ACT; Congressional Record Vol. 165, No. 151
(House of Representatives - September 19, 2019)

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[Pages H7816-H7818]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




       NATIONAL PURPLE HEART HALL OF HONOR COMMEMORATIVE COIN ACT

  Mr. SAN NICOLAS. Madam Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and pass 
the bill (H.R. 1830) to require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint 
coins in commemoration of the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, as 
amended.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The text of the bill is as follows:

                               H.R. 1830

       Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of 
     the United States of America in Congress assembled,

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``National Purple Heart Hall 
     of Honor Commemorative Coin Act''.

     SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

       The Congress finds the following:
       (1) The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor's mission is--
       (A) to commemorate the extraordinary sacrifice of America's 
     servicemen and servicewomen who were killed or wounded by 
     enemy action; and
       (B) to collect and preserve the stories of Purple Heart 
     recipients from all branches of service and across 
     generations to ensure that all recipients are represented.
       (2) The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor first opened 
     its doors on November 10, 2006, in New Windsor, NY.
       (3) The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor is co-located 
     with the New Windsor Cantonment State Historic Site.
       (4) The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor is the first to 
     recognize the estimated 1.8 million U.S. servicemembers 
     wounded or killed in action representing recipients from the 
     Civil War to the present day, serving as a living memorial to 
     their sacrifice by sharing their stories through interviews, 
     exhibits and the Roll of Honor, an interactive computer 
     database of each recipient enrolled.

     SEC. 3. COIN SPECIFICATIONS.

       (a) Denominations.--The Secretary of the Treasury 
     (hereafter in this Act referred to as the ``Secretary'') 
     shall mint and issue the following coins:
       (1) $5 gold coins.--Not more than 50,000 $5 coins, which 
     shall--
       (A) weigh 8.359 grams;
       (B) have a diameter of 0.850 inches; and
       (C) contain 90 percent gold and 10 percent alloy.
       (2) $1 silver coins.--Not more than 400,000 $1 coins, which 
     shall--
       (A) weigh 26.73 grams;
       (B) have a diameter of 1.500 inches; and
       (C) contain not less than 90 percent silver.
       (3) Half-dollar clad coins.--Not more than 750,000 half-
     dollar coins which shall--
       (A) weigh 11.34 grams;
       (B) have a diameter of 1.205 inches; and
       (C) be minted to the specifications for half-dollar coins 
     contained in section 5112(b) of title 31, United States Code.
       (b) Legal Tender.--The coins minted under this Act shall be 
     legal tender, as provided in section 5103 of title 31, United 
     States Code.
       (c) Numismatic Items.--For purposes of section 5134 of 
     title 31, United States Code, all coins minted under this Act 
     shall be considered to be numismatic items.

     SEC. 4. DESIGN OF COINS.

       (a) Design Requirements.--
       (1) In general.--The design of the coins minted under this 
     Act shall be emblematic of the National Purple Heart Hall of 
     Honor.
       (2) Designation and inscriptions.--On each coin minted 
     under this Act there shall be--
       (A) a designation of the value of the coin;
       (B) an inscription of the year ``2021''; and
       (C) inscriptions of the words ``Liberty'', ``In God We 
     Trust'', ``United States of America'', and ``E Pluribus 
     Unum''.
       (b) Selection.--The design for the coins minted under this 
     Act shall be--
       (1) selected by the Secretary after consultation with the 
     Commission of Fine Arts and the National Purple Heart Hall of 
     Honor, Inc.; and
       (2) reviewed by the Citizens Coinage Advisory Committee.

     SEC. 5. ISSUANCE OF COINS.

       (a) Quality of Coins.--Coins minted under this Act shall be 
     issued in uncirculated and proof qualities.
       (b) Mint Facility.--Only the West Point Mint may be used to 
     strike any particular quality of the coins minted under this 
     Act.
       (c) Period for Issuance.--The Secretary may issue coins 
     minted under this Act only during the 1-year period beginning 
     on January 1, 2021.

     SEC. 6. SALE OF COINS.

       (a) Sale Price.--The coins issued under this Act shall be 
     sold by the Secretary at a price equal to the sum of--
       (1) the face value of the coins;
       (2) the surcharge provided in section 7(a) with respect to 
     such coins; and
       (3) the cost of designing and issuing the coins (including 
     labor, materials, dies, use of machinery, overhead expenses, 
     marketing, and shipping).
       (b) Bulk Sales.--The Secretary shall make bulk sales of the 
     coins issued under this Act at a reasonable discount.
       (c) Prepaid Orders.--
       (1) In general.--The Secretary shall accept prepaid orders 
     for the coins minted under this Act before the issuance of 
     such coins.
       (2) Discount.--Sale prices with respect to prepaid orders 
     under paragraph (1) shall be at a reasonable discount.

     SEC. 7. SURCHARGES.

       (a) In General.--All sales of coins issued under this Act 
     shall include a surcharge of--
       (1) $35 per coin for the $5 coin;
       (2) $10 per coin for the $1 coin; and
       (3) $5 per coin for the half-dollar coin.
       (b) Distribution.--Subject to section 5134(f)(1) of title 
     31, United States Code, all surcharges received by the 
     Secretary from the sale of coins issued under this Act shall 
     be promptly paid by the Secretary to the National Purple 
     Heart Hall of Honor, Inc., to support the mission of the 
     National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, Inc., including capital 
     improvements to the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor 
     facilities.
       (c) Audits.--The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, Inc., 
     shall be subject to the audit requirements of section 
     5134(f)(2) of title 31, United States Code, with regard to 
     the amounts received under subsection (b).
       (d) Limitation.--Notwithstanding subsection (a), no 
     surcharge may be included with respect to the issuance under 
     this Act of any coin during a calendar year if, as of the 
     time of such issuance, the issuance of such coin would result 
     in the number of commemorative coin programs issued during 
     such year to exceed the annual 2 commemorative coin program 
     issuance limitation under section 5112(m)(1) of title 31, 
     United States Code (as in effect on the date of the enactment 
     of this Act). The Secretary of the Treasury may issue 
     guidance to carry out this subsection.

     SEC. 8. DETERMINATION OF BUDGETARY EFFECTS.

       The budgetary effects of this Act, for the purpose of 
     complying with the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010, shall 
     be determined by reference to the latest statement titled 
     ``Budgetary Effects of PAYGO Legislation'' for this Act, 
     submitted for printing in the Congressional Record by the 
     Chairman of the House Budget Committee, provided that such 
     statement has been submitted prior to the vote on passage.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the rule, the gentleman from 
Guam (Mr. San Nicolas) and the gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. 
McHenry) each will control 20 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Guam.

[[Page H7817]]

  



                             General Leave

  Mr. SAN NICOLAS. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all 
Members may have 5 legislative days within which to revise and extend 
their remarks on this legislation and to insert extraneous material 
thereon.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Guam?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. SAN NICOLAS. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Madam Speaker, I rise in strong support of H.R. 1830, the National 
Purple Heart Hall of Honor Commemorative Coin Act.
  I want to thank the gentleman from New York (Mr. Sean Patrick 
Maloney) as well as Representatives Takano and Gallagher for their work 
on this bill which would honor the Purple Heart Hall of Honor.
  The Purple Heart was established by General and future President 
George Washington in 1782 and is one of the oldest and most recognized 
American military medals awarded to servicemembers who were killed or 
wounded by enemy action.
  The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor is located in New Windsor, 
New York, just 2 miles from the town of Newburgh, where General 
Washington signed the order creating the Purple Heart. Its mission is 
to collect and preserve the stories of Purple Heart recipients from all 
branches of the Armed Forces from the time of its creation.
  The Hall of Honor is a memorial to the brave men and women who have 
been wounded or died during combat, and work ensures that their 
sacrifices are not forgotten. Currently, there are over 200,000 names 
installed at the Hall of Honor.
  This bill would provide tangible support to the Hall of Honor by 
directing the West Point Mint to produce commemorative coins in 
recognition of the work of the Hall of Honor. Proceeds from the sale of 
this coin would fund improvements to the museum itself to help expand 
the understanding and respect for those who have served and sacrificed.
  Additionally, proceeds would go toward special projects like the 
Purple Heart Patriot Project, which provides resources for Purple Heart 
recipients and their families from all across the Nation to visit the 
National Purple Heart Hall of Honor Museum.
  I thank Mr. Maloney, Mr. Takano, and Mr. Gallagher for joining me in 
introducing this bill this Congress, and I urge Members to vote 
``yes.''
  Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. McHENRY. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may 
consume.
  Madam Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 1830, the National Purple 
Heart Hall of Honor Commemorative Coin Act.
  I would like to thank the gentleman from New York (Mr. Sean Patrick 
Maloney) for his work on this important bipartisan legislation. I thank 
him for his hard work and sincere advocacy for Purple Heart, those that 
our Nation honors with the Purple Heart and who have sacrificed to 
honor us as a nation.
  The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor is a New York State facility 
that is dedicated to collecting, preserving, and sharing the stories of 
all Purple Heart recipients from all branches of service and across all 
conflicts.
  Enrollments at the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor are voluntary 
and are made by Purple Heart recipients, their families or friends. 
Currently, there are 1,095 Purple Heart recipients enrolled from the 
great State of North Carolina, representing World War I, World War II, 
Korea, Vietnam, Somalia, Operation Enduring Freedom, and Operation 
Iraqi Freedom.
  These courageous men and women are recognized by the National Purple 
Heart Hall of Honor because, surprisingly, there is no comprehensive 
list of recipients maintained by the Federal Government. That is a 
separate issue we can deal with at a separate time.
  But I think it is important, the work that Congressman Maloney has 
taken upon himself and the enormous labor it takes to get a bill like 
this to the House floor.
  In fact, the only award for which there is no list is the Medal of 
Honor.
  Madam Speaker, the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor is an 
organization that deserves the recognition and the commemorative coin 
that this bill will strike. I urge my colleagues to support this bill. 
It is another good piece of bipartisan legislation.
  Again, I want to commend the author of the legislation, Mr. Maloney, 
for his hard work and advocacy on behalf of those who have received the 
Purple Heart.
  Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. SAN NICOLAS. Madam Speaker, I yield 5 minutes to the gentleman 
from New York (Mr. Sean Patrick Maloney), chairman of the Coast Guard 
and Maritime Transportation Subcommittee.
  Mr. SEAN PATRICK MALONEY of New York. Madam Speaker, I rise today in 
support of my bill, the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor 
Commemorative Coin Act, and urge my colleagues to support its passage.
  The National Purple Heart Hall of Honor, located in my district in 
New Windsor, New York, has a mission to collect and preserve the 
stories of Purple Heart recipients from all service branches and across 
generations so we can ensure that all recipients are remembered. The 
hall also serves as a living memorial to our veterans' sacrifice.
  My bill would honor the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor and all 
our Purple Heart recipients with a commemorative coin produced at the 
United States Mint at West Point, right down the road. Proceeds from 
the sale of the coin would be directed to the National Purple Heart 
Hall of Honor, Incorporated, for projects and programs that raise 
awareness about the National Purple Heart Hall of Honor and pay tribute 
to the memory and sacrifices of all our servicemen and -women who were 
wounded or killed in combat.

  Too often, the voices of our veterans are not heard, and, as our 
veterans get older, particularly our World War II veterans, their 
memories and experiences are in danger of being lost. These stories are 
the most powerful record we have to document the sacrifice of our 
soldiers and their families, stories like that of Corporal Richard Lay, 
a New Yorker who served in the Marines during Vietnam. Corporal Lay was 
born in Manhattan to a father who, himself, had served during World War 
II.
  In 1968, during his service in Vietnam, Corporal Lay's unit was 
ambushed by Vietcong soldiers in what he describes as ``a day of 
hell.'' During the mission, he was injured by shrapnel from a nearby 
enemy blast. The Marines wanted to send Corporal Lay back to the United 
States because of his injuries, but he insisted on remaining on the 
front lines with his fellow marines to finish his tour of duty. After 
his tour ended, Corporal Lay went home to serve as a New York City 
Police Officer for 13 years.
  I am reminded of the story of Richard Drago, a sergeant in 1970 
stationed near the Cambodian border in Vietnam. Rich, whom I know, and 
his company were attacked while providing artillery support for forward 
operations. While operating a machine gun, Drago was badly wounded but 
remained unwavering at his post. Without his grit and perseverance, the 
enemy would have surely pushed forward through the United States' 
position.
  We can't forget about the dedication of our military nurses who have 
risked their lives time and again in support of freedom, nurses like 
Beatrice Mary MacDonald, assigned to a British Clearing Hospital as 
chief nurse during World War I, in 1917. Chief Nurse MacDonald and her 
unit served 4 miles behind enemy lines in Belgium, yet German aircraft 
still bombed the hospital where she served, wounding her with shell 
fragments. Due to those injuries, she lost sight in her right eye. 
Chief Nurse MacDonald remained in the Army throughout the war. She is a 
hero, and the first known woman to have earned the Purple Heart.
  In 2013, I had the honor of presenting a long-overdue Purple Heart to 
the family of a World War I veteran, Corporal William B. Tiebout. 
Corporal Tiebout served in the National Guard, enlisted in the Army, 
and was, in May of 1918, wounded in action while serving in Belgium. He 
sustained shrapnel wounds to his legs and was wounded again when his 
military hospital was strafed by German aircraft. He was discharged 
from the Army in 1919 but

[[Page H7818]]

never received his Purple Heart. He served again during World War II 
and responded to another call to defend freedom, enlisting this time in 
the Navy and serving as an aircraft inspector in Bethpage, New York.
  Despite serving in two world wars and being wounded, Corporal Tiebout 
was never awarded the medals he had earned. Presenting the Purple Heart 
to his family was something I will never forget. It was 95 years 
overdue, but time could not diminish the debt we owed to Corporal 
Tiebout for his service to our Nation and his sacrifice in defense of 
our freedom.
  These are the stories that remind us of what it is that is the very 
best in the American spirit. Nothing exemplifies the love of country 
more than the heroism of our Purple Heart veterans, the veterans I just 
highlighted and so many more whose names will never be read out in this 
sacred Hall but whose heroism is precious, nonetheless.
  The Purple Heart Hall of Honor houses hundreds of thousands of 
stories of patriotism and resilience. We have been working for years to 
get this bill passed, and I am so proud and grateful for the support of 
our military service organizations that supported this legislation, 
especially the Military Order of the Purple Heart.
  For volunteers like Stephanie Keegan, who lost a son who served with 
honor and came home with invisible wounds, their efforts will guarantee 
that we will finally produce this coin to honor Purple Heart veterans, 
bolster the important work of the hall and the National Purple Heart 
Honor mission and support the mission of the West Point Mint.
  Congratulations to all, and let's pass this measure in honor of all 
of our wounded heroes and their families.
  Mr. McHENRY. Madam Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. SAN NICOLAS. Madam Speaker, I yield myself the balance of my 
time.
  I want to again thank Mr. Maloney for introducing this legislation, 
and all the cosponsors. We must work to guarantee the stories of our 
Purple Heart recipients are not forgotten. This shows our commitment to 
this important mission and to helping future generations understand the 
recipients' sacrifices.
  Madam Speaker, I urge my colleagues to join me in supporting this 
important piece of legislation, and I yield back the balance of my 
time.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The question is on the motion offered by the 
gentleman from Guam (Mr. San Nicolas) that the House suspend the rules 
and pass the bill, H.R. 1830, as amended.
  The question was taken; and (two-thirds being in the affirmative) the 
rules were suspended and the bill, as amended, was passed.
  A motion to reconsider was laid on the table.

                          ____________________