DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2019; Congressional Record Vol. 166, No. 77
(House of Representatives - April 23, 2020)

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     DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR, ENVIRONMENT, AND RELATED AGENCIES 
                        APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 2019

  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I move to suspend the rules and concur in 
the Senate amendment to the bill (H.R. 266) making appropriations for 
the Department of the Interior, environment, and related agencies for 
the fiscal year ending September 30, 2019, and for other purposes.
  The Clerk read the title of the bill.
  The text of the Senate amendment is as follows:
  Senate amendment:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the following:

     SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

       This Act may be cited as the ``Paycheck Protection Program 
     and Health Care Enhancement Act''.

     SEC. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

       The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title.
Sec. 2. Table of contents.
Sec. 3. References.

                  DIVISION A--SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS

Sec. 101. Amendments to the Paycheck Protection Program, economic 
              injury disaster loans, and emergency grants.
Sec. 102. Emergency designation.

    DIVISION B--ADDITIONAL EMERGENCY APPROPRIATIONS FOR CORONAVIRUS 
                                RESPONSE

     SEC. 3. REFERENCES.

       Except as expressly provided otherwise, any reference to 
     ``this Act'' contained in any division of this Act shall be 
     treated as referring only to the provisions of that division.

[[Page H1921]]

  


                  DIVISION A--SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAMS

     SEC. 101. AMENDMENTS TO THE PAYCHECK PROTECTION PROGRAM, 
                   ECONOMIC INJURY DISASTER LOANS, AND EMERGENCY 
                   GRANTS.

       (a) Increased Authority for Commitments and Appropriations 
     for Paycheck Protection Program.--Title I of division A of 
     the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act 
     (Public Law 116-136) is amended--
       (1) in section 1102(b)(1), by striking ``$349,000,000,000'' 
     and inserting ``$659,000,000,000''; and
       (2) in section 1107(a)(1), by striking ``$349,000,000,000'' 
     and inserting ``$670,335,000,000''.
       (b) Increased Authorization for Emergency EIDL Grants.--
     Section 1110(e)(7) of division A of the Coronavirus Aid, 
     Relief, and Economic Security Act (Public Law 116-136) is 
     amended by striking ``$10,000,000,000'' and inserting 
     ``$20,000,000,000''.
       (c) Eligibility of Agricultural Enterprises for Economic 
     Injury Disaster Loans and Emergency Grants.--Section 
     1110(a)(2) of division A of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and 
     Economic Security Act (Public Law 116-136) is amended--
       (1) in subparagraph (D), by striking ``or'' at the end;
       (2) in subparagraph (E), by striking the period at the end 
     and inserting ``; or''; and
       (3) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(F) an agricultural enterprise (as defined in section 
     18(b) of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 647(b)) with not 
     more than 500 employees.''.
       (d) Set Aside for Insured Depository Institutions, Credit 
     Unions, and Community Financial Institutions.--Section 
     7(a)(36) of the Small Business Act (15 U.S.C. 636(a)(36)) is 
     amended--
       (1) in subparagraph (A)--
       (A) in clause (viii), by striking ``and'' at the end;
       (B) in clause (ix), by striking the period at the end and 
     inserting a semicolon; and
       (C) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(x) the term `community development financial 
     institution' has the meaning given the term in section 103 of 
     the Riegle Community Development and Regulatory Improvement 
     Act of 1994 (12 U.S.C. 4702));
       ``(xi) the term `community financial institutions' means--

       ``(I) a community development financial institution;
       ``(II) a minority depository institution, as defined in 
     section 308 of the Financial Institutions Reform, Recovery, 
     and Enforcement Act of 1989 (12 U.S.C. 1463 note);
       ``(III) a development company that is certified under title 
     V of the Small Business Investment Act of 1958 (15 U.S.C. 695 
     et seq.); and
       ``(IV) an intermediary, as defined in section 7(m)(11); and

       ``(xii) the term `credit union' means a State credit union 
     or a Federal credit union, as those terms are defined, 
     respectively, in section 101 of the Federal Credit Union Act 
     (12 U.S.C. 1752).''; and
       (2) by adding at the end the following:
       ``(S) Set-aside for insured depository institutions, credit 
     unions, and community financial institutions.--
       ``(i) Insured depository institutions and credit unions.--
     In making loan guarantees under this paragraph after the date 
     of enactment of this clause, the Administrator shall 
     guarantee not less than $30,000,000,000 in loans made by--

       ``(I) insured depository institutions with consolidated 
     assets of not less than $10,000,000,000 and less than 
     $50,000,000,000; and
       ``(II) credit unions with consolidated assets of not less 
     than $10,000,000,000 and less than $50,000,000,000.

       ``(ii) Community financial institutions, small insured 
     depository institutions, and credit unions.--In making loan 
     guarantees under this paragraph after the date of enactment 
     of this clause, the Administrator shall guarantee not less 
     than $30,000,000,000 in loans made by--

       ``(I) community financial institutions;
       ``(II) insured depository institutions with consolidated 
     assets of less than $10,000,000,000; and
       ``(III) credit unions with consolidated assets of less than 
     $10,000,000,000.''.

     SEC. 102. EMERGENCY DESIGNATION.

       (a) In General.--The amounts provided under this division 
     are designated as an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 4(g) of the Statutory Pay-As-You-Go Act of 2010 (2 
     U.S.C. 933(g)).
       (b) Designation in Senate.--In the Senate, this division is 
     designated as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     4112(a) of H. Con. Res. 71 (115th Congress), the concurrent 
     resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2018.

    DIVISION B--ADDITIONAL EMERGENCY APPROPRIATIONS FOR CORONAVIRUS 
                                RESPONSE

        The following sums are hereby appropriated, out of any 
     money in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the 
     fiscal year ending September 30, 2020, and for other 
     purposes, namely:

                                TITLE I

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

                        Office of the Secretary

            public health and social services emergency fund

                     (including transfer of funds)

       For an additional amount for ``Public Health and Social 
     Services Emergency Fund'', $75,000,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended, to prevent, prepare for, and 
     respond to coronavirus, domestically or internationally, for 
     necessary expenses to reimburse, through grants or other 
     mechanisms, eligible health care providers for health care 
     related expenses or lost revenues that are attributable to 
     coronavirus:  Provided, That these funds may not be used to 
     reimburse expenses or losses that have been reimbursed from 
     other sources or that other sources are obligated to 
     reimburse:  Provided further, That recipients of payments 
     under this paragraph in this Act shall submit reports and 
     maintain documentation as the Secretary of Health and Human 
     Services (referred to in this paragraph as the ``Secretary'') 
     determines are needed to ensure compliance with conditions 
     that are imposed by this paragraph in this Act for such 
     payments, and such reports and documentation shall be in such 
     form, with such content, and in such time as the Secretary 
     may prescribe for such purpose:  Provided further, That 
     ``eligible health care providers'' means public entities, 
     Medicare or Medicaid enrolled suppliers and providers, and 
     such for-profit entities and not-for-profit entities not 
     otherwise described in this proviso as the Secretary may 
     specify, within the United States (including territories), 
     that provide diagnoses, testing, or care for individuals with 
     possible or actual cases of COVID-19:  Provided further, That 
     the Secretary shall, on a rolling basis, review applications 
     and make payments under this paragraph in this Act:  Provided 
     further, That funds appropriated under this paragraph in this 
     Act shall be available for building or construction of 
     temporary structures, leasing of properties, medical supplies 
     and equipment including personal protective equipment and 
     testing supplies, increased workforce and trainings, 
     emergency operation centers, retrofitting facilities, and 
     surge capacity:  Provided further, That, in this paragraph, 
     the term ``payment'' means a pre-payment, prospective 
     payment, or retrospective payment, as determined appropriate 
     by the Secretary:  Provided further, That payments under this 
     paragraph in this Act shall be made in consideration of the 
     most efficient payment systems practicable to provide 
     emergency payment:  Provided further, That to be eligible for 
     a payment under this paragraph in this Act, an eligible 
     health care provider shall submit to the Secretary an 
     application that includes a statement justifying the need of 
     the provider for the payment and the eligible health care 
     provider shall have a valid tax identification number:  
     Provided further, That, not later than 3 years after final 
     payments are made under this paragraph in this Act, the 
     Office of Inspector General of the Department of Health and 
     Human Services shall transmit a final report on audit 
     findings with respect to this program to the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
     Senate:  Provided further, That nothing in this paragraph 
     limits the authority of the Inspector General or the 
     Comptroller General to conduct audits of interim payments at 
     an earlier date:  Provided further, That not later than 60 
     days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary 
     shall provide a report to the Committees on Appropriations of 
     the House of Representatives and the Senate on obligation of 
     funds, including obligations to such eligible health care 
     providers summarized by State of the payment receipt:  
     Provided further, That such reports shall be updated and 
     submitted to such Committees every 60 days until funds are 
     expended:  Provided further, That such amount is designated 
     by the Congress as being for an emergency requirement 
     pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget 
     and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
       For an additional amount for ``Public Health and Social 
     Services Emergency Fund'', $25,000,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended, to prevent, prepare for, and 
     respond to coronavirus, domestically or internationally, for 
     necessary expenses to research, develop, validate, 
     manufacture, purchase, administer, and expand capacity for 
     COVID-19 tests to effectively monitor and suppress COVID-19, 
     including tests for both active infection and prior exposure, 
     including molecular, antigen, and serological tests, the 
     manufacturing, procurement and distribution of tests, testing 
     equipment and testing supplies, including personal protective 
     equipment needed for administering tests, the development and 
     validation of rapid, molecular point-of-care tests, and other 
     tests, support for workforce, epidemiology, to scale up 
     academic, commercial, public health, and hospital 
     laboratories, to conduct surveillance and contact tracing, 
     support development of COVID-19 testing plans, and other 
     related activities related to COVID-19 testing:  Provided, 
     That of the amount appropriated under this paragraph in this 
     Act, not less than $11,000,000,000 shall be for States, 
     localities, territories, tribes, tribal organizations, urban 
     Indian health organizations, or health service providers to 
     tribes for necessary expenses to develop, purchase, 
     administer, process, and analyze COVID-19 tests, including 
     support for workforce, epidemiology, use by employers or in 
     other settings, scale up of testing by public health, 
     academic, commercial, and hospital laboratories, and 
     community-based testing sites, health care facilities, and 
     other entities engaged in COVID-19 testing, conduct 
     surveillance, trace contacts, and other related activities 
     related to COVID-19 testing:  Provided further, That of the 
     amount identified in the preceding proviso, not less than 
     $2,000,000,000 shall be allocated to States, localities, and 
     territories according to the formula that applied to the 
     Public Health Emergency Preparedness cooperative agreement in 
     fiscal year 2019, not less than $4,250,000,000 shall be 
     allocated to States, localities, and territories according to 
     a formula methodology that is based on relative number of 
     cases of COVID-19, and not less than $750,000,000 shall be 
     allocated in coordination with the Director of the Indian 
     Health Service, to tribes, tribal organizations, urban Indian 
     health organizations, or health service providers to tribes:  
     Provided further, That the Secretary of Health and Human 
     Services (referred to in

[[Page H1922]]

     this paragraph as the ``Secretary'') may satisfy the funding 
     thresholds outlined in the first and second provisos under 
     this paragraph in this Act by making awards through other 
     grant or cooperative agreement mechanisms:  Provided further, 
     That not later than 30 days after the date of enactment of 
     this Act, the Governor or designee of each State, locality, 
     territory, tribe, or tribal organization receiving funds 
     pursuant to this Act shall submit to the Secretary its plan 
     for COVID-19 testing, including goals for the remainder of 
     calendar year 2020, to include: (1) the number of tests 
     needed, month-by-month, to include diagnostic, serological, 
     and other tests, as appropriate; (2) month-by-month estimates 
     of laboratory and testing capacity, including related to 
     workforce, equipment and supplies, and available tests; and 
     (3) a description of how the State, locality, territory, 
     tribe, or tribal organization will use its resources for 
     testing, including as it relates to easing any COVID-19 
     community mitigation policies:  Provided further, That the 
     Secretary shall submit such formula methodology identified in 
     the first proviso under this paragraph in this Act to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House of Representatives 
     and the Senate one day prior to awarding such funds:  
     Provided further, That such funds identified in the first and 
     second provisos under this paragraph in this Act shall be 
     allocated within 30 days of the date of enactment of this 
     Act:  Provided further, That of the amount appropriated under 
     this paragraph in this Act, not less than $1,000,000,000 
     shall be transferred to the ``Centers for Disease Control and 
     Prevention--CDC-Wide Activities and Program Support'' for 
     surveillance, epidemiology, laboratory capacity expansion, 
     contact tracing, public health data surveillance and 
     analytics infrastructure modernization, disseminating 
     information about testing, and workforce support necessary to 
     expand and improve COVID-19 testing:  Provided further, That 
     of the amount appropriated under this paragraph in this Act, 
     not less than $306,000,000 shall be transferred to the 
     ``National Institutes of Health--National Cancer Institute'' 
     to develop, validate, improve, and implement serological 
     testing and associated technologies for the purposes 
     specified under this paragraph in this Act:  Provided 
     further, That of the amount appropriated under this paragraph 
     in this Act, not less than $500,000,000 shall be transferred 
     to the ``National Institutes of Health--National Institute of 
     Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering'' to accelerate 
     research, development, and implementation of point of care 
     and other rapid testing related to coronavirus:  Provided 
     further, That of the amount appropriated under this paragraph 
     in this Act, not less than $1,000,000,000 shall be 
     transferred to the ``National Institutes of Health--Office of 
     the Director'' to develop, validate, improve, and implement 
     testing and associated technologies; to accelerate research, 
     development, and implementation of point of care and other 
     rapid testing; and for partnerships with governmental and 
     non-governmental entities to research, develop, and implement 
     the activities outlined in this proviso:  Provided further, 
     That funds in the preceding proviso may be transferred to the 
     accounts of the Institutes and Centers of the National 
     Institutes of Health (referred to in this paragraph as the 
     ``NIH'') for the purposes specified in the preceding proviso: 
      Provided further, That the transfer authority provided in 
     the preceding proviso is in addition to all other transfer 
     authority available to the NIH:  Provided further, That of 
     the amount appropriated under this paragraph in this Act, not 
     less than $1,000,000,000 shall be available to the Biomedical 
     Advanced Research and Development Authority for necessary 
     expenses of advanced research, development, manufacturing, 
     production, and purchase of diagnostic, serologic, or other 
     COVID-19 tests or related supplies, and other activities 
     related to COVID-19 testing at the discretion of the 
     Secretary:  Provided further, That of the amount appropriated 
     under this paragraph in this Act, $22,000,000, shall be 
     transferred to the ``Department of Health and Human 
     Services--Food and Drug Administration--Salaries and 
     Expenses'' to support activities associated with diagnostic, 
     serological, antigen, and other tests, and related 
     administrative activities:  Provided further, That the amount 
     appropriated under this paragraph in this Act may be used for 
     grants for the rent, lease, purchase, acquisition, 
     construction, alteration, renovation, or equipping of non-
     federally owned facilities to improve preparedness and 
     response capability at the State and local level for 
     diagnostic, serologic, or other COVID-19 tests, or related 
     supplies:  Provided further, That the amount appropriated 
     under this paragraph in this Act may be used for 
     construction, alteration, renovation, or equipping of non-
     federally owned facilities for the production of diagnostic, 
     serologic, or other COVID-19 tests, or related supplies, 
     where the Secretary determines that such a contract is 
     necessary to secure, or for the production of, sufficient 
     amounts of such tests or related supplies:  Provided further, 
     That funds appropriated under this paragraph in this Act may 
     be used for purchase of medical supplies and equipment, 
     including personal protective equipment and testing supplies 
     to be used for administering tests, increased workforce and 
     trainings, emergency operation centers, and surge capacity 
     for diagnostic, serologic, or other COVID-19 tests, or 
     related supplies:  Provided further, That products purchased 
     with funds appropriated under this paragraph in this Act may, 
     at the discretion of the Secretary, be deposited in the 
     Strategic National Stockpile under section 319F-2 of the 
     Public Health Service Act:  Provided further, That of the 
     amount appropriated under this paragraph in this Act, 
     $600,000,000 shall be transferred to ``Health Resources and 
     Services Administration--Primary Health Care'' for grants 
     under the Health Centers program, as defined by section 330 
     of the Public Health Service Act, and for grants to federally 
     qualified health centers, as defined in section 
     1861(aa)(4)(B) of the Social Security Act:  Provided further, 
     That sections 330(e)(6)(A)(iii), 330(e)(6)(B)(iii), and 
     330(r)(2)(B) of the Public Health Service Act shall not apply 
     to funds provided under the previous proviso:  Provided 
     further, That of the amount appropriated under this paragraph 
     in this Act, $225,000,000 shall be used to provide additional 
     funding for COVID-19 testing and related expenses, through 
     grants or other mechanisms, to rural health clinics as 
     defined in section 1861(aa)(2) of the Social Security Act, 
     with such funds also available to such entities for building 
     or construction of temporary structures, leasing of 
     properties, and retrofitting facilities as necessary to 
     support COVID-19 testing:  Provided further, That such funds 
     shall be distributed using the procedures developed for the 
     Provider Relief Fund authorized under the third paragraph 
     under this heading in division B of the Coronavirus Aid, 
     Relief, and Economic Security Act (Public Law 116-136); may 
     be distributed using contracts or agreements established for 
     such program; and shall be subject to the process 
     requirements applicable to such program:  Provided further, 
     That the Secretary may specify a minimum amount for each 
     eligible entity accepting assistance under the two previous 
     provisos:  Provided further, That up to $1,000,000,000 of 
     funds provided under this paragraph in this Act may be used 
     to cover the cost of testing for the uninsured, using the 
     definitions applicable to funds provided under this heading 
     in Public Law 116-127:  Provided further, That not later than 
     21 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the 
     Secretary, in coordination with other appropriate departments 
     and agencies, shall issue a report on COVID-19 testing:  
     Provided further, That such report shall include data on 
     demographic characteristics, including, in a de-identified 
     and disaggregated manner, race, ethnicity, age, sex, 
     geographic region and other relevant factors of individuals 
     tested for or diagnosed with COVID-19, to the extent such 
     information is available:  Provided further, That such report 
     shall include information on the number and rates of cases, 
     hospitalizations, and deaths as a result of COVID-19:  
     Provided further, That such report shall be submitted to the 
     Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate, and the 
     Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of 
     Representatives and the Committee on Health, Education, 
     Labor, and Pensions of the Senate, and updated and 
     resubmitted to such Committees, as necessary, every 30 days 
     until the end of the COVID-19 public health emergency first 
     declared by the Secretary on January 31, 2020:  Provided 
     further, That not later than 180 days after the date of 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall issue a report on 
     the number of positive diagnoses, hospitalizations, and 
     deaths as a result of COVID-19, disaggregated nationally by 
     race, ethnicity, age, sex, geographic region, and other 
     relevant factors:  Provided further, That such report shall 
     include epidemiological analysis of such data:  Provided 
     further, That not later than 30 days after the date of the 
     enactment of this Act, the Secretary, in coordination with 
     other departments and agencies, as appropriate, shall report 
     to the Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate, 
     the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the House of 
     Representatives, and the Committee on Health, Education, 
     Labor, and Pensions of the Senate on a COVID-19 strategic 
     testing plan:  Provided further, That such plan shall assist 
     States, localities, territories, tribes, tribal 
     organizations, and urban Indian health organizations, in 
     understanding COVID-19 testing for both active infection and 
     prior exposure, including hospital-based testing, high-
     complexity laboratory testing, point-of-care testing, mobile-
     testing units, testing for employers and other settings, and 
     other tests as necessary:  Provided further, That such plan 
     shall include estimates of testing production that account 
     for new and emerging technologies, as well as guidelines for 
     testing:  Provided further, That such plan shall address how 
     the Secretary will increase domestic testing capacity, 
     including testing supplies; and address disparities in all 
     communities:  Provided further, That such plan shall outline 
     Federal resources that are available to support the testing 
     plans of each State, locality, territory, tribe, tribal 
     organization, and urban Indian health organization:  Provided 
     further, That such plan shall be updated every 90 days until 
     funds are expended:  Provided further, That such amount is 
     designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                     GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS TITLE

                     (including transfer of funds)

       Sec. 101.  The requirements, authorities, and conditions 
     described in sections 18108, 18109, and 18112 of division B 
     of the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act 
     (Public Law 116-136) shall apply to funds appropriated in 
     this Act to the Department of Health and Human Services.
       Sec. 102.  Funds appropriated by this Act under the heading 
     ``Department of Health and Human Services'', except for the 
     amounts specified in the first paragraph and the first and 
     second provisos in the second paragraph under the heading 
     ``Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund'', may be 
     transferred to, and merged with, other appropriation accounts 
     under the headings ``Centers for Disease Control and 
     Prevention'', ``Public Health and Social Services Emergency 
     Fund'', ``Food and Drug Administration'', and ``National 
     Institutes of Health'' to prevent, prepare for, and respond 
     to coronavirus following consultation with the Office of 
     Management and Budget:  Provided, That the Committees on 
     Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate 
     shall be notified 10 days in advance of any such transfer:

[[Page H1923]]

      Provided further, That, upon a determination that all or 
     part of the funds transferred from an appropriation by this 
     Act are not necessary, such amounts may be transferred back 
     to that appropriation:  Provided further, That none of the 
     funds made available by this Act may be transferred pursuant 
     to the authority in section 205 of division A of Public Law 
     116-94 or section 241(a) of the Public Health Service Act.
       Sec. 103.  Of the funds appropriated by this Act under the 
     heading ``Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund'', 
     up to $6,000,000 shall be transferred to, and merged with, 
     funds made available under the heading ``Office of the 
     Secretary, Office of Inspector General'', and shall remain 
     available until expended, for oversight of activities 
     supported with funds appropriated to the Department of Health 
     and Human Services to prevent, prepare for, and respond to 
     coronavirus, domestically or internationally:  Provided, That 
     the Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human 
     Services shall consult with the Committees on Appropriations 
     of the House of Representatives and the Senate prior to 
     obligating such funds:  Provided further, That the transfer 
     authority provided by this section is in addition to any 
     other transfer authority provided by law.

                                TITLE II

                          INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

                     Small Business Administration

                         salaries and expenses

       For an additional amount for ``Salaries and Expenses'', 
     $2,100,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2021, 
     to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus, 
     domestically or internationally:  Provided, That such amount 
     is designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                     disaster loans program account

       For an additional amount for ``Disaster Loans Program 
     Account'' for the cost of direct loans authorized by section 
     7(b) of the Small Business Act, $50,000,000,000, to remain 
     available until expended, to prevent, prepare for, and 
     respond to coronavirus, domestically or internationally:  
     Provided, That such amount is designated by the Congress as 
     being for an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
     251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985.

                         emergency eidl grants

       For an additional amount for ``Emergency EIDL Grants'' for 
     the cost of emergency EIDL grants authorized by section 1110 
     of division A of the CARES Act (Public Law 116-136), 
     $10,000,000,000, to remain available until expended, to 
     prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus, 
     domestically or internationally:  Provided, That such amount 
     is designated by the Congress as being for an emergency 
     requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
     Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.

                               TITLE III

                      GENERAL PROVISIONS--THIS ACT

       Sec. 301.  Each amount appropriated or made available by 
     this Act is in addition to amounts otherwise appropriated for 
     the fiscal year involved.
       Sec. 302.  No part of any appropriation contained in this 
     Act shall remain available for obligation beyond the current 
     fiscal year unless expressly so provided herein.
       Sec. 303.  Unless otherwise provided for by this Act, the 
     additional amounts appropriated by this Act to appropriations 
     accounts shall be available under the authorities and 
     conditions applicable to such appropriations accounts for 
     fiscal year 2020.
       Sec. 304.  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
     funds made available in this Act, or transferred pursuant to 
     authorization granted in this Act, may only be used to 
     prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus.
       Sec. 305.  In this Act, the term ``coronavirus'' means 
     SARS-CoV-2 or another coronavirus with pandemic potential.
       Sec. 306.  Each amount designated in this Act by the 
     Congress as being for an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985 shall be available (or rescinded 
     or transferred, if applicable) only if the President 
     subsequently so designates all such amounts and transmits 
     such designations to the Congress.
       Sec. 307.  Any amount appropriated by this Act, designated 
     by the Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to 
     section 251(b)(2)(A)(i) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
     Deficit Control Act of 1985 and subsequently so designated by 
     the President, and transferred pursuant to transfer 
     authorities provided by this Act shall retain such 
     designation.

                           budgetary effects

       Sec. 308. (a) Statutory PAYGO Scorecards.--The budgetary 
     effects of this division shall not be entered on either PAYGO 
     scorecard maintained pursuant to section 4(d) of the 
     Statutory Pay As-You-Go Act of 2010.
       (b) Senate PAYGO Scorecards.--The budgetary effects of this 
     division shall not be entered on any PAYGO scorecard 
     maintained for purposes of section 4106 of H. Con. Res. 71 
     (115th Congress).
       (c) Classification of Budgetary Effects.--Notwithstanding 
     Rule 3 of the Budget Scorekeeping Guidelines set forth in the 
     joint explanatory statement of the committee of conference 
     accompanying Conference Report 105-217 and section 250(c)(7) 
     and (c)(8) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985, the budgetary effects of this division 
     shall be estimated for purposes of section 251 of such Act.
       This division may be cited as the ``Additional Emergency 
     Appropriations for Coronavirus Response''.

  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to the order of the House of today, 
the gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. Neal) and the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Brady) each will control 60 minutes.
  The Chair recognizes the gentleman from Massachusetts.


                             General Leave

  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I ask unanimous consent that all Members 
have 5 legislative days to revise and extend their remarks and include 
extraneous material on the bill under consideration.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Is there objection to the request of the 
gentleman from Massachusetts?
  There was no objection.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Madam Speaker, we are here today in these very trying and 
unprecedented times to act on an emergency interim funding package that 
I am pleased has strong bipartisan support. But we did not arrive here 
without significant efforts by our Democratic colleagues.
  When we began negotiations with the Senate, we were presented with an 
insufficient proposal that did not address the public health crisis 
that has now claimed the lives of nearly 48,000 Americans. The measures 
that we fought for will now bring real relief to the American people 
and prioritizes resources to combat this virus. This means more funding 
for hospitals and healthcare workers. It also means resources 
designated for testing.
  I am encouraged that the administration has committed to a national 
testing strategy which will be necessary to reopen our economy. We are 
all painfully aware that the American people are worried about their 
health, their jobs, the economy, and what life will look like after the 
emergency subsides. It is our responsibility to give our communities 
the confidence that we will get through this crisis, and that, 
eventually, we will return to normal lives.
  To do this, we must protect our small businesses on Main Street, and 
that is why we fought to increase funding for the Paycheck Protection 
Program and target the funds to community-based lenders, small banks, 
and credit unions. The legislation before us today is a marked 
improvement from where the Senate majority started, but I want to be 
clear: This does not come close to addressing the staggering needs of 
the American family. That is why my fellow chairs and I have already 
begun working on COVID four.
  Our next legislative package must be grounded in the understanding 
that restarting our economy can only happen when Americans are healthy 
and have the confidence to return to work. For our part, the Committee 
on Ways and Means will prioritize funding for hospitals and assistance 
for those on the front lines--and I know Mr. Brady agrees with us on 
that--as we proceed.
  In addition, our State and local governments are feeling the pain of 
slashed revenue from this pandemic. Without our support, essential 
workers who have been risking their lives are at risk of losing their 
jobs.
  Finally, we must look at what the most vulnerable in our country are 
facing by putting money into their pockets with another round of 
stimulus payments so they can pay for essentials. Similarly, we need to 
extend Federal unemployment compensation into the fall and help take 
the pressure off of overwhelmed State governments at the moment.
  Since this crisis began, Members and staff have made Herculean 
efforts to address the challenges we are now facing. We still have much 
work to do to ensure that we put the needs of our neighbors first, and 
we need to acknowledge--and I know Mr. Brady feels as I do--the work of 
the Committee on Ways and Means' staffers in bringing us to this 
moment. Together, we will rise to this challenge.
  Madam Speaker, I urge my colleagues to support this legislation, and 
I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Madam Speaker, the coronavirus launched an unprecedented attack on 
Americans' health in the best economy our Nation has experienced in 
decades. America responded with an unprecedented effort to contain the 
virus, led

[[Page H1924]]

by President Trump and the healthcare community. Congress responded by 
working with the President to deliver not one, not two, but three 
bipartisan measures to combat the health and economic damage of COVID-
19.
  The battle continues amidst signs that in some regions we are 
flattening the curve and beginning to reopen the economy safely as 
health conditions on the ground permit. This fourth bill replenishes 
the crucial help for Main Street businesses and local healthcare 
providers, while devoting more resources to producing more tests and 
distributing them more quickly.
  It adds $320 billion in crucial funding to the Paycheck Protection 
Program to help keep our local businesses afloat. It boosts funding for 
local healthcare providers by another $75 billion. It expands our 
States' testing capacities and ensures more resources for our Nation-
wide effort to continue locking down this virus. It is targeted. It 
will have an immediate impact, and it deserves strong bipartisan 
support.
  Once President Trump signed the CARES Act into law merely 4 weeks 
ago, then moved with historic speed to provide forgivable loans to 
small businesses, it soon became clear more dollars are needed to keep 
workers on local payrolls.
  So far, the Paycheck Protection Program is helping nearly 1.6 million 
local businesses, impacting and helping save 30 million jobs for local 
construction, retail, manufacturing, healthcare, hospitality, and 
service businesses. Despite media portrayals, the average loan is 
around $200,000--that is Main Street--and more often than not, it is 
provided by a community bank. These dollars are reaching small 
businesses. And when funding ran out, Republicans and President Trump 
urged Congress to quickly replenish them.

                              {time}  1145

  It is unfortunate that Speaker Pelosi decided to hold up this bill 
nearly 16 days while small businesses and their workers desperately 
fought to hold on, especially minority-owned businesses in underserved 
communities. They suffered, and during this unnecessary delay, 
America's jobless numbers climbed to 26 million.
  How many jobs could we have saved if partisan politics had not reared 
its ugly head?
  This emergency funding is just that; it is funding. It doesn't adjust 
the design of the Paycheck Protection Program nor does it address the 
flawed unemployment design that pays some Americans more than they make 
at work. It takes what is working for businesses and healthcare 
providers and replenishes it, which is why it has earned the support of 
a number of organizations like the American Hospital Association and 
the National Federation of Independent Business.
  Today's bill makes it possible for families to stay connected to 
their work. Local businesses can keep their lights on. And once we get 
to the other end of this, we will return to a safe, healthy America for 
our seniors, our children, and our grandchildren.
  I will conclude with this: The President is right. We can continue to 
apply maximum pressure on the coronavirus while reopening our economy 
safely and responsibly. Not only can we, we must, if we hope to prevent 
hurting working families and the jobless with an unnecessarily extended 
economic recession marked by shortages of needed day-to-day supplies 
and serious healthcare problems created by long-term unemployment.
  This isn't a choice between lives and livelihoods. We must do both. 
With the President, State and local leaders, healthcare providers, and 
local businesses all working together, I am convinced we can.
  How? The way we tackle every adversity our Nation has faced: with 
American ingenuity, know-how, and common sense.
  Today, we help our small businesses and healthcare heroes. Tomorrow, 
Congress and President Trump will continue to work together to identify 
practical ways to help businesses create safe, healthy workplaces, 
jump-start this economic rebound, and accelerate a return to work for 
those who are jobless or furloughed. I urge all my colleagues to 
support it.
  Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
California (Ms. Pelosi), whose career has been marked by a steadfast 
determination to expand healthcare coverage for all members of the 
American family and continues to be a champion for the least, the last, 
and the lost, who are feeling part of the grip of this pandemic.
  Ms. PELOSI. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding, and I 
thank him for managing this important legislation on the floor of the 
House. I also commend him for the work that he did in the previous 
legislation that we have had.
  As has been acknowledged, this is the fourth bipartisan bill that we 
have brought to the floor to address the coronavirus pandemic, and this 
is a very important piece of legislation.
  So we come to the floor with such heartache, with such sorrow for 
those who have lost their lives and for their loved ones, for those who 
are suffering from the virus assault now, and for those who are in 
doubt about their economic situation. It is about the lives and the 
livelihood of the American people; that is what this is about.
  Nearly 900,000 Americans have been diagnosed and are sick. Nearly 
50,000 have tragically died. Oh, my goodness. We have to be prayerful, 
prayerful about this assault again on the lives and livelihoods of the 
American people.
  Countless hospitals and healthcare systems remain swamped with cases, 
and far too many frontline workers still do not have the personal 
protective equipment that they need.
  And just this morning, we learned that more than 4 million workers 
filed for unemployment last week, with more than 26 million having lost 
their jobs during this pandemic so far.
  So, as we work to protect the American people, we have to make 
decisions. We recognize that the key to opening up our economy, the key 
to opening that door, the threshold we must cross, is a scientific one: 
testing, testing, testing, testing; contact tracing; isolation; of 
course, treatment; and, best of all, prevention. But the key is 
scientific, and we must make our decision in that way.
  So here we are, and I say this in terms of the overarching. The 
American people have told us, when we did our earlier bill, they do not 
want any taxpayer dollars going to enriching shareholders, dividends, 
bonuses, CEO pay, all of that. They want their taxpayer dollars to keep 
people in their jobs.
  The oversight of that is exactly what we passed, we will pass--we 
passed by voice vote earlier, we will vote on later. That is very 
important. It is very important to the American people to have 
confidence, as they make their sacrifices, that their taxpayer dollars 
that they pay are not being squandered.
  Our colleagues have said: Why do we need oversight? We have all these 
committees that do oversight--and I hope they will--but they have other 
work to do as well.
  And as the Republicans have put forth select committees themselves--
Benghazi; trying to destroy Planned Parenthood, which did not have any 
urgency for the American people--this has an urgency to the American 
people.
  We need a select committee whose focus, whose purpose is to address 
the challenge that the coronavirus places on us. That is one.
  Two, the American people want their checks. They want their checks, 
and that is what we are doing with the PPP and the direct payments and 
other initiatives that are there, and we need to do more.
  And third, and we haven't done enough in this regard, they want our 
heroes, our healthcare providers, our police and fire, our first 
responders, our emergency services folks, our transit people, everyone, 
our food service folks, they want everyone to have the equipment that 
they need to do their jobs.

  Our healthcare workers are on the front line, as are the others. 
Emergency services, police, and fire, some of them are the first people 
to respond to a 911 call. They are in the line of defense, and they do 
not have the PPE, the personal protective equipment, that they need, 
and we owe them.
  We are not worthy of thanking them, thanking them, praising them, 
unless we support them, and that is not being done sufficiently. That 
is what we have

[[Page H1925]]

to do in the next bill--I call it the Heroes Act--when we will come 
together to support our heroes.
  Unfortunately, there was not enough interest in this bill right here 
on the part of others to join us in supporting our heroes, our 
healthcare workers, our police and fire, emergency services, in the 
form of supporting State and local government.
  When you hear State and local, it might sound bureaucratic, but it 
isn't. Those are the people who meet the needs of the American people 
and are on the front line of fighting this virus.
  So, when we finish this--and I am pleased to hear the distinguished 
chairman of the Ways and Means Committee, Mr. Neal, talk about the fact 
that we are already preparing for that. We have been for a while, 
because we just didn't really know that this interim bill would come 
up. But when it did, again, we had to meet the needs of the American 
people.
  I am so proud that all of the bills we are passing, as has been 
acknowledged, have been done in a bipartisan way, and the next bill 
will be as well.
  But let me just correct the Record, because the distinguished 
gentleman from Texas said we held up this bill, and I want to correct 
that Record because nothing could be further from the truth, and 
perhaps he isn't aware, but let me inform.
  Two weeks ago, the distinguished Secretary of the Treasury called me 
and said: I need a quarter of a trillion in 48 hours.
  Oh, really? Well, I don't know about that. Let's see what we can do. 
Let's see. Why do you need that?
  That was April 7. The next day, on April 8, Democrats came together, 
House and Senate Democrats, and made a proposal that went beyond the 
$250 billion for the PPP, a program that we helped shape and that we 
fully support, supporting our small businesses, the entrepreneurship of 
America, the optimism of America, the creators of jobs and wealth and 
community in our country. So we are there with that.
  But we saw some evidence that everything wasn't being done as we had 
hoped, and so we proposed, 1 day later, that we would have additional 
funding for small businesses, a $60 billion set-aside for the smallest 
of small businesses: women, minority-owned businesses, rural America, 
veterans, Native American communities, and the rest, who were not, 
shall we say, as bankable as some others, the underbanked, $60 billion.
  Another $60 billion, we said, for all of our small businesses: $50 
billion of it for the EIDL, the disaster assistance loans, put $50 
billion there. That $50 billion is leveraged to over $300 billion in 
lending, easier lending for some than PPP because it is just a loan; it 
is not about the bank deciding. And then the other $10 billion--we 
wanted 15, we got 10 for the grants.
  So there we got 60 and 60, 120, and then another $100 billion for the 
hospitals. That was on April 8, $100 billion for the hospitals, 
divided: hospitals, 75; testing, $25 billion.
  The Senate Republicans went to the floor the next day, on April 9, 
which was the 24 hours from the request of the quarter of a trillion 
dollars. Mitch McConnell went to the floor and said: This is it, 250, 
not one penny more. This is what it is.
  The Senate Democrats objected, offered an amendment that includes 
what we are voting on today. Mitch McConnell said: Absolutely not. That 
was it.
  So for 1 week, he kept saying: I am going to bring it up again on 
Monday. I am going to bring it up on Thursday. For 1 week there was 
that delay.
  Finally, that was Thursday of last week, there was interest in 
negotiation. And what we have on the floor today is the result of not 
time that we delayed the legislation, but the time that the Republicans 
refused to accept the fact that we needed $100 billion for our 
hospitals and our testing, that we needed more money for those who do 
not have sophisticated banking relationships, where we can have 
community development financial institutions reach into communities 
where they know the businesses, the neighborhood, the community, the 
people, the customers, the clients.
  So we should be very, very proud of the work that was done by 
Chairwoman Nydia Velazquez of the Small Business Committee and 
Chairwoman Maxine Waters, chair of the Financial Services Committee, 
banks, small business coming with an idea that was rejected out of hand 
by the leader of the Senate: Don't even bring that around. It is only 
this; that is it, or else you don't support small business.
  So when I hear, during the previous debate on the other bill and then 
this distinguished ranking member on the Ways and Means Committee, whom 
I respect, and he knows that, say we delayed this, no, you delayed this 
because--now, this isn't about assignment. This is about taking 
responsibility.
  Without the discussion over this past weekend which resulted in the 
Senate passing the bill unanimously, Mitch McConnell, who wasn't going 
to do one more penny, unanimously passing the bill, and then saying it 
has all this additional help that we initiated, that he initiated. He 
resisted it, but he initiated it.
  So I think it is really important for people to understand what this 
fight is about. It is not about trickle-down. We were successful in 
turning the CARES Act from a corporate-oriented, trickle-down bill to a 
workers-first, bubble-up bill, and we were proud of that and that it 
passed and was signed by the President.
  Once again, they just had the 250. We fully support that. We helped 
create that. But that isn't the end of the day for what else we needed 
to do.
  And while I understand that they are resistant to helping those at 
the lower end of the scale, I can't understand why they resisted $100 
billion for the hospitals and the testing, because that was central to 
meeting the needs, the health needs of the American people. I want 
more, of course. I want more than that.
  So now we go to the next bill. I call it the Heroes Act. We fully 
support that. We helped create that. But that isn't the end of the day 
for what else we needed to do.
  And while I understand that they are resistant to helping those at 
the lower end of the scale, I can't understand why they resisted $100 
billion for the hospitals and the testing, because that was centra

                              {time}  1200

  Unfortunately, they do not want to put the heroes into this bill 
today as fully as they should by supporting State and local.
  And what does the distinguished leader on the Senate side, Mr. 
McConnell, say? I am not doing any more bills. I think the States 
should go bankrupt.
  Oh, really? And not pay the healthcare workers and public hospitals, 
the first responders and the rest? Oh, really? What made you think that 
was a good idea? It is just more notion mongering to get attention, I 
guess.
  And so I came to this floor fully happy in terms of our 
bipartisanship, totally sad about what it is in terms of the lives of 
America's families and the uncertainty they face and the illness that 
some are suffering and the loss of life that many others, tens of 
thousands, have suffered.
  But to hear them say we held up this bill, when they are doing today, 
with great pride, exactly what the Senate Democrats asked them to do on 
April 9. So I just wanted to set the record straight on that.
  Again, I want to thank Maxine Waters and Nydia Velazquez and I want 
to thank Frank Pallone for the great work that he did and the staff of 
all of those committees.
  We are voting on the floor today with a strong agreement that sets a 
path that we had in the CARES Act, the issues that were addressed in 
the CARES Act. Of course, we had State and local in the CARES Act; they 
wouldn't go there here.
  So what we are doing is we are helping small businesses. We are 
strengthening the Paycheck Protection Program. It is $310 billion, 
including that critical $60 billion reserved for underserved rural, 
urban, and Tribal communities.
  By supporting small businesses that cannot access the PPP, we secured 
$50 billion for emergency assistance lending. That will be leveraged 
into over $300 billion in disaster assistance loans and $10 billion 
more for grants to small businesses.
  For hospitals, providers, and health workers: We secured $75 billion 
for health providers, which are losing revenue every day, and for 
physicians and health workers who are risking their lives because they 
don't have PPE.
  In one of the New York hospitals, I heard a nurse say on TV that when 
she went to meet the needs of the patients, she was given not the 
regular gown and mask and gloves and the rest. She was

[[Page H1926]]

given a New York Yankees rain poncho. Others were wearing garbage bags. 
Some of them said they were wearing medical waste on their faces 
because they could not change the mask, and they would go to maybe four 
patients instead of the one and discard.
  So again, we thank them, we honor them, we revere them. But we have 
no right to do that unless we support them with what they need. They 
are risking their lives to save other lives, and now they may lose 
their jobs unless we do our Heroes Act, which I look forward to doing.
  For testing: We secured $25 billion for testing, which is key, 
central, to reopening our economy and resuming our lives.
  The administration has also agreed--and this is very positive--to a 
national testing strategy that will increase domestic testing capacity 
and address disparities, including across race, ethnicity, and 
geographic regions.
  Unfortunately, as I mentioned, the administration was not ready to 
include funding for our heroes, our healthcare, fire, EMS, and other 
essential workers, for the postal system, which is essential to us now 
in getting information and materials where they need to be. And that is 
why CARES 2 must be about our Heroes Act, focusing on support for 
healthcare and essential workers. And I can't say it enough.
  And then with that overarching concern for them, OSHA, so they have 
safety in the workplace, family and medical leave, so that they can 
meet the needs of their families, COBRA for those who have lost their 
jobs. And we need full funding for COBRA, and I hope the administration 
will be receptive to that. Pension, additional UI, and more indirect 
payments and more.
  So let us be clear, the health and safety of our country will be 
endangered if we cannot pay the heroes who sacrifice to keep us safe. 
They are being fired as we speak. Mr. Schumer was referencing hospitals 
in his State where people were let go from public hospitals. But that 
is not unusual. Our teachers, the custodians of our children, are being 
let go. We have to face that, and we have to do it very soon and next.
  And it is unacceptable that Leader McConnell thinks that no further 
legislation is needed. That is what he said: No further legislation is 
needed. And he thinks our heroic workers can wait and our States who 
hire them should go bankrupt.
  As CARES 2 protects the lives and livelihoods of the American people, 
it must also protect the life of the American democracy: safeguarding 
the integrity of our elections and supporting voting by mail.
  So, again, it is the lives of the people, the livelihood of the 
people, the life of our democracy.
  Again, our prayers are with those who are suffering. His Holiness, 
Pope Francis--and I quote him all the time--he said weeks ago, his 
world prayer, that God would enlighten those who have responsibility to 
take responsibility for those in their care.
  Let us hope that we can all be prayerful, take responsibility, do the 
job for the American people. We have an extraordinary opportunity to do 
that.
  But we must do so in a way that keeps them safe, as we want to open 
our economy and do so--again, science, science, science, and science. 
Let us show the same courage and strength and move with great urgency 
to provide the support that they need, that they provide to others.
  And, again, we have our differences, there is no question. I heard 
the gentleman speak out against the $600 for people who are unemployed. 
I think that we have to do whatever we can to recognize that public 
policy has a role here, that governance carries with it responsibility 
and opportunity and results and progress for the American people and 
that science and governance are the answers to meeting the healthcare 
needs and meeting the needs of our economy as we go forward.

  So I thank our colleagues for their leadership, Maxine Waters, Nydia 
Velazquez, Frank Pallone, our distinguished chair of the Ways and Means 
Committee, for his work, and so many people.
  Again, right now, as we speak, the Agriculture Committee is meeting. 
And as some of our colleagues have said, we can't do SNAP? They turned 
down SNAP, food stamps, at a time when America is hungry?
  We have our differences, but we are coming together on this 
particular bill, and I am proud of that. It is bipartisan, it is 
urgent, and let us get on with it so that we can get on to supporting 
our heroes in a way that is worthy of their sacrifice.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield myself 30 seconds.
  I respectfully remember a different history where only one fund was 
out of money, those for our small businesses. The President asked for 
us to move quickly, and it was blocked in the Senate by those who said 
there is no proof small businesses need this money. And I remember the 
Speaker herself saying there is no data that shows small businesses 
need money. Those critical funds were blocked and held up for 16 days. 
This agreement we have today could have been agreed to in 5 minutes.
  Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. 
Chabot), the leading Republican on the Small Business Committee.
  Mr. CHABOT. Madam Speaker, this has not been an easy time for 
America's small businesses. As the ranking member of the House Small 
Business Committee, I hear daily from owners of restaurants and hair 
salons and small retailers and manufacturers and grocers and others, 
about the gut-wrenching choices that they have been forced to make 
recently.
  Fortunately, the Paycheck Protection Program, created under the CARES 
Act, has already helped small businesses save millions of jobs and 
cover essential expenses.
  One company, for example, New York Bagel, survived the Great 
Depression and World War II during its 99 years of operation. This 
Ferndale, Michigan, business was forced to close due to the 
coronavirus. But thanks to the Paycheck Protection Program, their 
employees are still getting paid.
  After losing 70 percent of their business, Woodyard Bar-B-Que in 
Kansas City was only a week or two away from laying off workers or even 
closing permanently. Their paycheck protection loan will allow them to 
stay in business.
  These examples are only a fraction of those who have been helped. 
Understandably, this program has been very popular. In fact, demand was 
so high that funding was exhausted within 2 weeks of the program being 
started up. Over a million-and-a-half loans have been processed, with 
nearly 60,000 in my home State of Ohio alone.
  Madam Speaker, small businesses are resilient. Start-ups are 
pioneering new techniques for sanitizing masks and surfaces. 
Neighborhood grocers are bravely staying open to provide necessary 
supplies, yes, including toilet paper, for their communities.
  Small manufacturers are retooling to make personal protective 
equipment for frontline workers. These small businesses and 
entrepreneurs make the America we all know and love.
  Congress should have passed this legislation last week, but to those 
small businesses who already applied and are waiting to hear, or those 
who are yet to apply for this relief, finally, help is on the way.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Alabama (Ms. Sewell), a member of the Ways and Means Committee.
  Ms. SEWELL of Alabama. Madam Speaker, today I rise in support of this 
bill to provide additional resources for small, local, and minority-
owned businesses and nonprofits under the Paycheck Protection Program, 
as well as to provide resources for our hospitals and for testing.
  Madam Speaker, the Paycheck Protection Program has not been without 
its controversy. I have heard too many stories of frustrated business 
owners who have not been able to access the program due to a lack of 
existing relationships with a lender or difficulty navigating the 
complex application process. And these are issues that are 
disproportionately harming local, rural, and minority-owned businesses 
that make up the heart of my district.
  Madam Speaker, I am glad that we are taking steps today to address 
the inequities and indirectly and directly allow funding for lenders 
that service the truly local barber shops, beauty shops, restaurants on 
Main Street across this country. These are the businesses that are the 
lifeline of so many

[[Page H1927]]

of our local economies, and it is important that we make sure that this 
lending gets to these vitally important businesses.
  I hope that this bill will offer some relief to these businesses, and 
I urge my colleagues to support this bill.
  I also ask our leaders and the lenders to know that we are watching 
them. We want the truly small, local businesses to get their fair 
share.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Oregon (Mr. Walden), the lead Republican on the Energy and Commerce 
Committee.
  Mr. WALDEN. Madam Speaker, I want to thank my colleague from Texas 
for his leadership on this issue.
  I, too, rise in support of the Paycheck Protection Program and the 
Health Care Enhancement Act. This provides a fourth installment of 
funds to continue to address the impact of the COVID-19 virus on the 
American people.
  We have heard all the stories about how people have lost their lives, 
lost their loved ones, lost their business, lost their jobs. This bill 
will replenish the Paycheck Protection Program for small businesses, 
and it will provide additional funding for healthcare providers and 
expanded testing.
  And I am glad we are finally here. For too long, Democrat leaders in 
the House and Senate played partisan politics. They needlessly delayed 
the initial passage of the CARES Act, and then they prevented a quick 
replenishment of the funds for the PPP. That left our small businesses 
and the people they employ in the lurch.
  With record unemployment claims, we have seen that every single day, 
every day, counts in this pandemic. That is why Republicans and 
President Trump were so adamant over the last two weeks about the need 
to not let these programs run out of money. We all knew that was going 
to happen. We could have done this unanimously.
  Painfully, Democrats took an ice-cream break while small businesses 
were left empty-handed, a pointless weeklong shuttering of the Paycheck 
Protection Program that hurt Americans and undoubtedly cost thousands 
of jobs.
  As a member of the President's bipartisan task force on reopening the 
economy, I remain committed to ensuring that there are resources and 
strategies in place for widespread testing that our health and economic 
experts have said is needed to reopen the country.
  And while I support additional funding for healthcare-related 
expenses, it should never have been at the expense of bankrupting more 
small employers and throwing more people into the unemployment lines.
  The American people's plight should not be used as leverage for 
partisan priorities, especially in the midst of a crisis. We must move 
forward in a united way that puts the needs of the American people 
first.
  Now, let's pass this measure, get it to the President's desk, so we 
can begin to safely reopen this country.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, let me describe hospitals as a priority.
  With that, Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
Rhode Island (Mr. Langevin).

                              {time}  1215

  Mr. LANGEVIN. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  I rise in strong support of the Paycheck Protection Program and 
Health Care Enhancement Act.
  COVID-19 is a crisis with few parallels in world history. Yet I have 
been amazed by the resilience of my fellow Rhode Islanders: the 
tenacity of our small businesses and the dedication and bravery of our 
frontline healthcare workers.
  This bill is for them. It refills the coffers of the Paycheck 
Protection Program, which is a vital lifeline for so many small 
businesses. Thanks to House Democrats' efforts, it backstops our 
hospitals, community health centers, and nursing homes and funds the 
nationwide testing strategy.
  This cannot be the end of the work of Congress to help Americans 
weather the storm, but it is another vital step as we confront this 
crisis.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 4 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
Texas (Ms. Granger), the top Republican on the Appropriations 
Committee.
  Ms. GRANGER. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  I rise today in support of the Paycheck Protection Program and the 
Health Care Enhancement Act, which provides nearly $500 billion for 
economic recovery and public health efforts in response to the 
coronavirus pandemic.
  The cornerstone of this legislation is the support for small 
businesses through the PPP, the Paycheck Protection Program. These PPP 
loans, which can be completely forgiven, are essential for small 
businesses to continue paying their employees and cover operating 
costs.
  To illustrate how crucial this loan has been to the 30 million small 
businesses in this country, the SBA supported more loans in the first 
14 days of the PPP than it did in the last 14 years. In total, more 
than $340 billion has been provided to more than 1.6 million American 
small businesses.
  An additional $60 billion is provided in this bill for another key 
source of assistance for small business: economic injury disaster loans 
and grants. Borrowers can get loans at low interest rates and then 
repay them over a long period of time, up to 30 years.
  This legislation also provides $100 billion for critical healthcare 
initiatives. These funds will support our heroes on the front lines and 
allow us to deploy more tests so we know where the virus is having the 
most impact. With this information, we can begin safely reopening our 
communities and restarting our economy.
  While it took much too long to get this bill to the floor today, I 
want to thank my colleagues for coming together to deliver results for 
the American people whose health and livelihoods depend on it.
  I urge my colleagues to join me in voting on this measure to continue 
supporting our Nation's small businesses, their hardworking employees, 
and our critical healthcare workers.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from New 
Mexico (Mr. Lujan), the well-regarded Congressman who also has the 
title of Assistant Speaker.
  Mr. LUJAN. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  In the face of this crisis, I have seen so many New Mexicans step up. 
They have gathered fabric scraps, distributed masks, checked in with 
their neighbors, and showed their resilience over and over. But so many 
people, small businesses, and communities continue to struggle.
  Today, we approve $360 billion for small businesses, $75 billion for 
our hospitals and frontline workers who are doing heroic work to save 
lives, and $25 billion so that more people can be tested for this 
deadly virus.
  But our work is not done. Everyone knows this is not enough, and due 
to Republican opposition, this package fails to provide necessary 
relief to our local, State, and Tribal governments. Mitch McConnell 
said local governments should file for bankruptcy to make themselves 
whole.
  I had the honor this last week to participate in a townhall with the 
Navajo Nation, and I heard firsthand their struggles. They need 
resources, water, and testing. We need to do more for them, and we need 
to do more for the people of New Mexico and everyone living in the 
United States of America.
  Small businesses must be prioritized by approving these loans and 
grants. The American people are counting on us. Let's act.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1\1/2\ minutes to the gentleman 
from Texas (Mr. McCaul), the Republican leader of the Foreign Affairs 
Committee.
  Mr. McCAUL. Madam Speaker, I thank my good friend from Texas (Mr. 
Brady) for yielding and for his great leadership on this bill.
  Today, America is in a crisis. Not since the Spanish flu of 1918 has 
the world faced a global pandemic of such epic proportions. This virus, 
which came out of Wuhan, China, has created fear and devastation across 
the globe.
  COVID-19 has infected more than 2.6 million people around the world 
and killed nearly 200,000. It has paralyzed our economy, forcing more 
than 26 million Americans into unemployment in just a few short weeks. 
And that is why we took the risk, Madam Speaker, to fly back here today 
so we can do our job and vote for this important legislation.

[[Page H1928]]

  This rescue package throws a lifeline to small businesses and the 
American worker to keep them whole during this hard time. It provides 
much-needed funding for testing and for our hospitals that need it 
desperately.
  In closing, I want to take this opportunity to thank the brave 
American heroes who are on the front line today: our doctors, nurses, 
and first responders who are risking their lives every day. We honor 
their sacrifice to our Nation.
  At the end of the day, as Americans, we are all in this together, and 
together we will get through this hard time and be stronger than ever 
before.

  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
South Carolina (Mr. Clyburn), the very capable Democratic whip.
  Mr. CLYBURN. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding me 
time.
  Madam Speaker I rise today in support of this emergency spending 
package. I believe this legislation moves us a step closer to my vision 
of making America's greatness accessible and affordable for all.
  The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare the inequities in our healthcare 
system that are having dramatic negative impacts on health outcomes in 
minority communities.
  Martin Luther King, Jr., observed back in 1966: ``Of all the forms of 
inequality, injustice in health is the most shocking and the most 
inhuman because it often results in physical death.'' How prescient.
  To know the full extent of how this virus is ravaging communities of 
color, we must test, test, test. That is why I am pleased there is $25 
billion in this package for testing, which allows for my advocacy of 
mobile testing.
  We must make testing accessible and affordable for rural and 
persistent-poverty communities facing obstacles due to a lack of 
transportation.
  This pandemic has also laid bare the inequities in our financial 
system. The first round of funding through the Paycheck Protection 
Program went to businesses with long-term banking relationships. Many 
small family and minority-owned businesses and nonprofit organizations 
were shut out. That is why Democrats insisted that $60 billion be 
reserved in this package for community-based lenders, such as community 
development, financial institutions, minority depository institutions, 
and credit unions.
  This legislation is not perfect, but it is a step towards making some 
much-needed relief accessible and affordable.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. LaMalfa).
  Mr. LaMALFA. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  April 1, Secretary Mnuchin warned us that the PPP has high demand and 
will likely need more funding.
  April 4, President Trump tweeted out a statement supporting more 
funding a day after the program opened up.
  April 7, Secretary Mnuchin requests more funding for the program, 
warning that we will run out.
  April 9, Senate Democrats block replenishing this funding, winning 
praise from fellow Democrats.
  Members, colleagues, we had ample warning of the funding running out 
on numerous occasions during this month of April that we have been 
away. How many small restaurants, hairdressers, bookstores, et cetera, 
in your districts have suffered and closed because the majority is too 
busy looking at the election in November to see today's crisis in 
April?
  Yet, so after all this time and the travel it took us all to get here 
wearing masks, what is the first thing we bring up? A duplicative, 
partisan select subcommittee to make a political spectacle of the 
virus.
  I sit as a member on the Transportation Committee. We can oversee the 
oversight of FEMA just fine.
  Our Commerce Committee can have oversight of HHS. We don't need 
extra, duplicative committees.
  We are 22 days behind. We need to get back to work and put the people 
back to work and get this done.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Nevada (Mr. Horsford), a well-regarded Congressman.
  Mr. HORSFORD. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  I rise today to speak in favor of this emergency coronavirus 
supplemental package.
  I am glad that we are delivering for the people of Nevada, including 
bringing home billions of dollars of additional funding for Nevada's 
270,000 small businesses and nonprofits. We also are positioning our 
country for recovery in voting for $25 billion for COVID-19 testing.
  This bipartisan agreement is one of the many steps that we must take 
to provide the American people with the relief they need. However, for 
Senate majority Leader McConnell to suggest that our States and local 
governments should be bankrupt in order to be made whole is outrageous. 
These are our heroes. They are on the front lines.
  I urge this body to pass this legislation and to work with us now to 
pass the Heroes Act.
  Mr. BRADY. I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Michigan (Mr. 
Mitchell).
  Mr. MITCHELL. Madam Speaker, I rise in support of H.R. 266, which 
provides badly needed financial support for small businesses and 
hospitals. Our Nation continues to struggle with the health and 
economic impacts of COVID-19.
  But I must also comment on the function of Congress. We passed the 
CARES Act almost 30 days ago. Since then, the lights have been off 
here. Today, we vote for one crucial item and depart again.
  I will vote ``aye'' on the relief package, but I stress Congress must 
get back to work here in the Capitol. We all must resume our full 
duties and obligations to the Constitution and, most importantly, to 
the American people. We took an oath to preserve and protect both.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield to the distinguished Congresswoman 
from Ohio (Mrs. Beatty).
  Mrs. BEATTY. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  I rise with the good, the bad, and the ugly for small businesses.
  The good: Democrats fought hard and won in providing more than $310 
billion for small businesses.
  The bad: It may not be enough.
  The ugly: Thousands and thousands of small businesses and minority 
businesses may be left out again.
  The past weeks of economic history and trends offer reasonable 
predictions of what we should do in this financial assistance funding 
bill.

  The longstanding economic inequalities already undermine any ability 
to close the wealth gap, and COVID-19 will undeniably exacerbate this 
paradigm.
  I am asking that we match the language that the Democrats fought so 
hard for. It is not enough just to allocate funding to institutions; we 
must hold the Secretary of the Treasury accountable that minority and 
small businesses will not be left out.
  Just like in the film ``The Good, the Bad and the Ugly,'' we must be 
the one to shoot the COVID-19 noose to save small businesses. I know 
that we will do more in the weeks to come because this a great victory 
for Democrats, but still not enough.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Joyce), a member of the Small Business Committee.
  Mr. JOYCE of Pennsylvania. Madam Speaker, all of us want our small 
businesses to survive this economic crisis. All of us want to save 
American livelihoods. All of us want to get Americans back to work.
  For weeks, I have talked to workers, small business owners, farmers 
in Pennsylvania who are counting on the Paycheck Protection Act.
  Today, we are offering these Pennsylvanians an opportunity to keep 
their workers paid and emerge stronger on the other side of this 
unprecedented challenge by protecting our workforce and safeguarding 
our economy.
  Truly these are difficult days, but we know there is light ahead.
  The people of Pennsylvania are resilient. The people of our great 
Nation are resilient. Together, we will weather the storm.
  We cannot allow a virus to destroy the American Dream.

                              {time}  1230

  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Michigan (Mrs. Lawrence), a well-known advocate for the people of 
Michigan.

[[Page H1929]]

  

  Mrs. LAWRENCE. Madam Speaker, I rise today in support of the latest 
COVID-19 relief package.
  In my State of Michigan, the numbers are devastating. There are more 
than 33,000 confirmed cases. I want to add another number today: over 
2,800 deaths. I just got a phone call that another dear friend of mine 
has passed. Nearly 1.2 million people have filed for unemployment.
  That is why I am back here today.
  We, however, have a lot more work to do. The package is not perfect. 
More work must be done to provide assistance to our States and our 
local governments, to ensure the continuous operation of the Postal 
Service, where there is a statement that neither snow nor rain nor 
gloom of night should stay the completion of mail delivery. The COVID 
virus is devastating the Postal Service.
  I want you to know that the $484 billion measure will provide 
desperately needed financial support.
  I stand here today with my heart broken in support of this bill.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Puerto Rico (Miss Gonzalez-Colon).
  Miss GONZALEZ-COLON of Puerto Rico. Madam Speaker, I rise in support 
of this emergency legislation that prioritizes to replenish emergency 
relief for all small businesses and hospitals across the Nation.
  The Paycheck Protection Program has, without doubt, been instrumental 
in helping small businesses in Puerto Rico and America keep their 
employees paid through this unprecedented crisis.
  Lenders in Puerto Rico approved more than 2,800 of these loans, 
disbursing a total of $658 million before the funds ran out. We have 
got less than .17 percent of all the Nation's PPP loans, making us 
jurisdiction number 52.
  I expect this bill now would allow the rest of those small businesses 
to get it and to get it now.
  The island's economy has been greatly impacted, just like the people 
here on the mainland. And now with more than 150,000 employees that are 
out of work and the small businesses that are out of business, it is 
imperative that we support this bill and immediately provide vital aid 
to American businesses across the Nation, which are the lifeblood of 
our economy.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from North 
Carolina (Mr. Butterfield), a very capable Congressman and a close 
friend of mine.
  Mr. BUTTERFIELD. Madam Speaker, I thank Chairman Neal for yielding.
  Madam Speaker, I rise to thank and commend my colleagues for their 
work on this $480 billion legislation.
  On April 7, as the Speaker said, Republicans wanted $250 billion, but 
no more.
  After Democratic demands, Republicans finally agreed to increase the 
$250 billion to $480 billion to include our priorities. An additional 
$60 billion was set aside for small banks and community development 
financial institutions and credit unions.
  We were determined to add billions for small community lenders. We 
wrote into the legislation that these loans will be forgiven if 
properly used for paycheck protection.
  I call on Secretary Mnuchin to follow through on his commitment to 
Chairs Waters and Velazquez to ensure that these small lenders get the 
money; make sure the money gets into the hands of African American, 
Latino, women, and veteran-owned businesses; make sure the money gets 
into the hands of nonprofits and churches.
  I call on the Small Business Administration to furnish data on the 
approved lenders authorized to originate these loans, provide a report 
to us by race and ethnicity as to whether diverse entities are 
receiving these loans and grants.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Tennessee (Mr. Kustoff).
  Mr. KUSTOFF of Tennessee. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for 
yielding.
  Madam Speaker, I rise today in support of the Paycheck Protection 
Program and Health Care Enhancement Act.
  There is no doubt that our small businesses in west Tennessee and 
across the Nation have felt the brunt of the economic effects of the 
coronavirus.
  The Paycheck Protection Program has saved small businesses in west 
Tennessee and also allowed them to keep their employees on the payroll.
  Now, I am disappointed that the Democrats didn't allow a vote on this 
funding before today, but I am appreciative of the vote.
  I look forward to voting for this funding today that will give 
American small businesses the resources to maintain their livelihoods 
and weather the storm.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Illinois (Ms. Kelly), a real champion of small business.
  Ms. KELLY of Illinois. Madam Speaker, I support this legislation 
because hospitals and small businesses in our communities need relief.
  Our communities need this bridge over troubled waters.
  This legislation rightfully invests $300-plus billion into the 
backbone of our economy: small businesses. It puts $75 billion into our 
Nation's hospitals and ensures that those serving our most vulnerable 
receive the resources they need to save lives. It invests $25 billion 
in testing.
  As the chair of the CBC Health Braintrust, we must make sure that the 
testing goes into the areas disproportionately affected, like the Black 
and Brown communities.

  This legislation includes language developed by me, along with 
Congresswomen Bass, Lee, and Pressley, as well as Senators Warren, 
Harris, and Booker, to ensure that we collect and analyze racial data 
related to the obvious disparity in COVID-19.
  The better data made possible by this bill must effectively direct 
resources into our communities where needed, not where best connected.
  Let us also remember the postal workers, the State and local 
governments, our teachers. They need our resources also.
  Madam Speaker, I want to give my condolences to Senator Warren for 
losing her brother to COVID-19.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Michigan (Mr. Huizenga).
  Mr. HUIZENGA. Madam Speaker, while we have many different approaches 
about restarting our economy, we should all agree the Paycheck 
Protection Program has provided a vital lifeline to small businesses 
and communities across America, including west Michigan.
  For example, media reports are that Macatawa Bank, a community bank 
based in Holland, Michigan, was able to process over $300 million in 
PPP loans. This will help keep paychecks coming to more than 27,000 
hardworking people in west Michigan.
  In Wellington, Michigan, I heard from an owner of a bowling alley 
whose business was literally saved by the PPP. His employees are 
getting paid, he can pay his bills, and his business has avoided 
bankruptcy.
  Even with these successes, I have heard from employers across my 
district waiting to receive their loan. While I am glad that is 
happening today, it shouldn't have taken this long.
  Now, Madam Speaker, as we discuss the next steps the Federal 
Government can take, I encourage the Speaker and my colleagues to 
support H.R. 6433, a bill I introduced on April 3, the Heroes Act, as a 
way to say thank you to the first responders and medical professionals 
risking their lives on a daily basis to save the lives of others.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Oregon (Mr. Blumenauer), a very influential member of the Ways and 
Means Committee.
  Mr. BLUMENAUER. Madam Speaker, I thank Chairman Neal for yielding me 
time.
  I am in awe of the countless unsung heroes who made it possible for 
all of us to get here safely today. We thank them.
  I am here not just to vote for badly needed additional relief, but in 
support of the Speaker and our leadership in their successful effort 
resisting the Republicans and the Senate in fighting against making it 
better.
  But I am here to give voice to my fellow Oregonians, who know so much 
more needs to be done, that it is outrageous that big banks and the 
Trump administration gave too much to the

[[Page H1930]]

wrong people and not enough to those most in need.
  The administration can do something that costs taxpayers nothing: 
clarify the PPP provisions with a simple answer on how exactly the 
forgiveness provisions are going to work.
  I was on the phone until 1 a.m. last night with a small businesswoman 
in Portland who, because of this lack of clarity, is unsure if she 
should even accept the loan that she has been given.
  We must do better for the small businesses and the millions of jobs 
that depend upon them.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Wisconsin (Mr. Grothman).
  Mr. GROTHMAN. Madam Speaker, like all bills, this bill comes down to 
how it is implemented.
  Right now we have a problem, and I hope that bureaucracy does a 
better job of implementing it.
  The PPP in this program is going to, I believe, a lot of businesses 
that are actually even better off because of the virus, because it is 
being so sloppily administered. I hope in the future, if we pass this 
bill, that people pay attention to that.
  I also realize a lot of money is going to hospitals who have relied 
on predictions coming out of Washington that they were going to get a 
lot of patients that they may not be getting.
  Right now in my district and many other districts, nurses and other 
hospital personnel are being laid off and hospitals are losing money 
because they were expecting a deluge of patients that never came, 
gratefully.
  I hope in the future that the recommendations out of Washington are 
more on target and the employees of my hospitals can get back to work 
as we begin to do colonoscopies, mammograms, hips, knees, and 
diagnostic tests one more time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Jeffries), who has done a remarkable job during this trying 
period as the chair of the Democratic Caucus.
  Mr. JEFFRIES. Madam Speaker, I thank the distinguished chair for his 
tremendous leadership.
  Madam Speaker, I rise in strong support of this emergency spending 
legislation. More must be done, but it is a strong step in the right 
direction.
  The COVID-19 pandemic is ravaging America. Small businesses are 
shuttered. Thousands have died. Millions of Americans are unemployed.
  Rome is burning.
  We can either put out the fire or watch our great Nation go down in 
flames.
  This bill will help family-owned businesses, help women-owned 
businesses, help minority-owned businesses, help small family farmers, 
and help our hospitals and our nursing homes.
  Yes, it is not perfect, but we cannot allow the perfect to be the 
enemy of the good.
  We are here to legislate, not just pontificate.
  Vote ``yes'' and live to fight another day.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Kentucky (Mr. Guthrie).
  Mr. GUTHRIE. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman, my friend, for 
yielding.
  Madam Speaker, the PPP program came out with astonishing speed. The 
President and the Secretary implemented the legislation we passed, 
bipartisan, in astonishing speed, but there were criteria to get the 
money because we were spending $350 billion.
  I did have smaller banks and smaller businesses who did not have 
experience working with the SBA, with the Federal Government, who 
needed to come up to speed. I think all of us, hopefully, were home, 
and I certainly was, talking to our small businesses, our small banks, 
getting them online and getting them ready.
  I had small businesses saying, I don't have my 2019 taxes prepared 
yet, and I have to have that to show my income for 2019.
  But it all came together right before we ran out of money, at least 
in my district. Everybody was in the portal or the small businesses 
were ready. And that is what we wanted, was $250 billion to go forward, 
keep the program running, and they would be flush today.
  Doing the things we are doing now today, they are important too, they 
are bipartisan, we agree, but we didn't have to have this interlude.
  So help is on the way.
  Our small businesses are now ready. It did take some time for some 
smaller banks and smaller businesses, but I am proud to say they are 
ready, and I am proud to vote for this bill today.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Beyer), an ambassador, Congressman, successful 
businessman, and member of the Ways and Means Committee.
  Mr. BEYER. Madam Speaker, I thank the chairman for yielding.
  I rise in support of this legislation to protect jobs, support small 
businesses, and save lives.
  It is good that we agree on this funding, but Americans need more, 
much more.
  As of this morning, 26 million Americans have lost their jobs, in 
some States as many as one-third of their workforce.
  Workers need our help in a way that doesn't stop or expire. Congress 
will have to do more to save small businesses both in funding, in 
making changes, and exercising oversight to ensure that it goes to 
small businesses.
  State and local governments desperately need our help. The idea that 
we would tell States and localities to bear the brunt and then let them 
go bankrupt, and lay off medical workers, police, firefighters, and 
teachers is despicable, and we must reject it.
  Letting State and local governments flounder would dangerously weaken 
the response ahead of the virus' second expected wave.
  The American people deserve and need to be able to participate in 
their democracy safely, without having to risk their lives, and 
Congress should support State efforts to set up voting by mail.
  Finally, postal workers are risking their lives every day to deliver 
our mail. They deserve our support, and the Federal Government needs to 
keep their agency from going bankrupt.
  Only Congress can achieve these things, and we cannot delay. The need 
in this country is urgent, and the American people are depending on us.

                              {time}  1245

  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I am proud to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Texas (Mr. Roy).
  Mr. ROY. Madam Speaker, I have one question: Where has Congress been?
  Forty-three percent of American households have had a significant or 
total pay cut; 26 million Americans have filed for unemployment; 
schools are shut down, placing burdens on families; and hospitals are 
laying off doctors and nurses. Where has Congress been?
  Congress has met twice: first, to pass a $2 trillion bill that in 
many cases is harming the very businesses it purports to help; now, 
again, to spend more borrowed money without asking the important 
questions--no hearings, no oversight.
  Today, I am holding my nose voting for a bill I had no chance to 
shape because there are 700,000 businesses closed by the power of 
government on the outside looking in while Harvard qualifies for $9 
million.
  But this is it, Madam Speaker, enough. No more half-assed 
legislating. No more picking winners and losers. No more asking a small 
restaurant to gamble, to borrow money in hopes that money will be 
forgiven by their government if they rehire people. They can't rehire 
because those same overlords are paying workers more in unemployment 
than to do their job.
  Congress must convene not just today, but every day until America is 
back on track. Our job is to make policies that will save lives by 
moving us forward with deliberation, facts, and balanced reason, not 
reaction, panic, and fear.
  Congress should be here, Madam Speaker.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members are reminded to refrain from using 
profanity in debate.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I am pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
gentlewoman from California (Ms. Judy Chu), a very well-regarded 
gentlewoman and a member of the Ways and Means Committee.
  Ms. JUDY CHU of California. Madam Speaker, I rise today in strong 
support of the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement 
Act.

[[Page H1931]]

  In order to reopen our economy and conquer this virus, we need to 
have a real count of who has been infected, but we still don't know the 
true impact of this pandemic because our Nation is facing a severe 
shortage of COVID-19 tests. That is why it is so important that 
Democrats fought to include $25 billion in this package to expand our 
testing capacity.
  Also of critical importance is that this legislation has the Paycheck 
Protection Program set aside $60 billion in lending authority for small 
community lenders, helping the countless small businesses turned away 
by big banks, like my constituent Tony, a dentist who has had a 
business account with Bank of America since 1983 but was denied the 
opportunity to even apply for PPP. This set-aside authority gives our 
smallest businesses the resources and hope they need that they can 
survive this pandemic.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I am proud to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Arkansas (Mr. Hill), a leader of the Financial Services 
Committee and newly appointed member of the Congressional Oversight 
Commission for the CARES Act.
  Mr. HILL of Arkansas. Madam Speaker, I thank the chairman for 
yielding.
  I rise in support of the Paycheck Protection Program Increase Act. In 
Arkansas, there are more than 13,000 pending PPP loan applications, 
representing over $1.1 billion, Madam Speaker, of loans in limbo. 
Likewise, many await the SBA's disaster loan funding and wait for it 
now.
  The timing of this additional funding is critical, and yet, again, I 
regret the delay by many leaders on the other side playing politics one 
more time with the livelihoods of our constituents.
  After the passage of this important package, I am confident that our 
employers and our consumers will prudently be able to combine common 
sense and follow the CDC precautions and get back to work, back to 
seeing patients, back to the barbershop, back to their faith 
communities, and back to some semblance of normalcy.
  Americans always come together in times of crisis. We will defeat 
this foreign invader. We will get our economy back to full capacity.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Higgins), champion of all things Buffalo and a member of the 
Ways and Means Committee.
  Mr. HIGGINS of New York. Madam Speaker, I thank Chairman Neal for 
yielding.
  This disaster relief bill includes $360 billion for paycheck 
protection for American workers; $75 billion for our courageous 
healthcare workers and the institutions that they work at; and $25 
billion for virus testing to bend, break, and crush the disease curve.
  Sadly, New York's State, county, and local governments were kicked 
out of this disaster relief bill, and the Senate majority leader's 
arrogant advice for them to include bankruptcy is insulting and 
arrogant.
  What we need at the time of national crisis, a national emergency, is 
we need leaders who possess goodness, humility, courage, and a sense 
that we are all in this together, a sense of national solidarity.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members are advised to refrain from engaging 
in personalities toward the United States Senate.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I am proud to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Illinois (Mr. Rodney Davis), Republican leader of the 
House Administration Committee.
  Mr. RODNEY DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Speaker, I thank Ranking Member 
Brady and Chairman Neal.
  I really appreciate the opportunity to come here to once again remind 
our colleagues that, if there is one thing that we ought to do right in 
this institution, it is to help Americans recover from a disaster that 
they didn't ask for. We did that by coming together for the CARES Act.
  The PPP program in Illinois, alone, has made 69,893 loans to our Main 
Street businesses, worth almost $16 billion. But I want to tell you 
about one person who still has a need: Lindy McDonald of Myler 
Automotive Repair in Champaign, Illinois. She kept all of her 
employees. She is keeping her business going even though customers are 
down. She is still in the queue to get funded by what we do today.

  Vote ``yes'' for this legislation, and I thank you for the 
bipartisanship.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Illinois (Mr. Danny K. Davis), chairman of the Subcommittee on Worker & 
Family Support.
  Mr. DANNY K. DAVIS of Illinois. Madam Speaker, the coronavirus has 
brought to national attention the huge disparities in health status and 
economic status of African Americans and other population groups in 
this country.
  We have seen how some financial institutions overlooked and denied 
small, struggling businesses. This bill will do something about both. I 
hope it does, and I am confident that it will.
  After we have arrested the coronavirus, let's do something different 
and help equalize America so that Blacks and other population groups 
are not dying in disproportion to our population.
  Let's make America the great equalizer, the America that has never 
been and yet the America that we know can and must be, and let's save 
our Postal Service.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I am pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Pennsylvania (Mr. Meuser).
  Mr. MEUSER. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman from Texas for 
yielding.
  Madam Speaker, the coronavirus pandemic has resulted in an 
unprecedented public health and economic crisis. While frontline 
providers are fighting to keep us all safe, the deliberate slowdown of 
our economy has caused significant disruption for employers and 
employees throughout the country.
  In Pennsylvania, the Payroll Protection Program has, in a period of 
12 days, processed over 70,000 loans, totaling $15.7 billion, to help 
small businesses make payroll and save jobs. I thank our community 
banks and small businesses and the SBA for everything that was done.
  The severity of this crisis, however, necessitates additional funding 
for this program. For the past 2 weeks, Republicans in Congress have 
advocated for additional appropriations while Democrat leadership has 
permitted such delays to continue.
  It has been extremely disruptive for businesses that it took this 
long for the PPP to be increased. Businesses need some certainty. They 
do not have the luxury of waiting for partisan political games. Let's 
not let this happen again, particularly during the course of this 
crisis.
  Our country must now focus our efforts on planning to get back to 
work while maintaining a high level of safety standards. With new 
funding in place, we can continue to fight the virus, stay safe, and 
get our economy roaring again.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I am pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from New York (Mr. Suozzi), a champion of all things New York 
and a member of the Ways and Means Committee.
  Mr. SUOZZI. Madam Speaker, I support this legislation. I am 
concerned, however, that the banks are focused on big small businesses 
and have ignored the smaller small businesses seeking $100,000 or less.
  I am asking my colleagues to send a clear message to the banks and to 
Secretary Mnuchin: We will be watching. We need you to fight for the 
little guys.
  There are a lot of good things in this bill, including something we 
in New York have pushed for: money for hospitals based on the rate of 
infection. But we need more.
  My three counties are in the top five in the Nation in confirmed 
cases. New York has over 30 percent of the cases and 30 percent of the 
deaths. Previously, this administration gave New York hospitals less 
money than Texas, which has only 3 percent of the cases. How does that 
make sense?
  Now Senator McConnell is saying let's bankrupt our hardest hit States 
and local governments.
  Madam Speaker, my State subsidizes Senator McConnell's State and has 
for decades. The grim reaper is telling my State and others to drop 
dead.
  Well, I have a message for you: We are going to fight you. Most 
Democrats and Republicans have put aside ideological differences for 
the common

[[Page H1932]]

good. We must continue to fight for New York, for my district, and for 
the little guy.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members are reminded to address their 
remarks to the Chair.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I am proud to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from North Carolina (Mr. Bishop), a leader in the small 
business community.
  Mr. BISHOP of North Carolina. Madam Speaker, I thank the ranking 
member for yielding.
  In my 1 minute, let me tell you about Hornwood, Inc.--talk about a 
survivor. Hornwood is a specialty textile manufacturer in operation 74 
years. It manufacturers products for the U.S. military, many specialty 
applications, and now components for PPE.
  Hornwood's main facility is in Anson County, among the most 
economically challenged counties in North Carolina. Hornwood employs 
almost 400, the largest employer in that county.
  Although it is designated essential, its revenues plummeted as 
government shut down the economy. Without a PPP loan, despite being 
essential, Hornwood must shut down imminently. It applied for PPP on 
the second day, but its application was caught in a snafu and the funds 
ran out.
  The 2 weeks consumed by the majority's exercise of leverage may well 
prove the fatal difference for Hornwood and thousands of other small 
businesses, but I am glad we are here finally to finish the job.
  To Hornwood and all of the others: Keep surviving.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I am delighted to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from California (Mr. Gomez), a well-regarded member of the 
Ways and Means Committee.
  Mr. GOMEZ. Madam Speaker, I rise in support of this package because I 
have small businesses in my district that are closing, after being in 
business for decades, right before our eyes. This bill is better than 
what the Republicans originally proposed.
  And make no mistake about it, if it wasn't for Democrats pushing to 
make changes, the businesses, the true small businesses--not the 
publicly traded companies--would still continue to be left behind. 
There would be no money for hospitals, no money for PPEs, no money for 
testing. It is the push of the Democrats that made this bill better and 
is why I am supporting it.
  I also want to be clear that this virus is on a different timeline. 
No matter what people think, no matter what people say, this is just 
the end of the beginning and not the beginning of the end.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I am pleased to yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from Michigan (Mr. Bergman).
  Mr. BERGMAN. Madam Speaker, I rise today in support of the Paycheck 
Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act.
  Less than a month ago, I stood on this floor and urged my colleagues 
to support our small businesses by passing the CARES Act. Today, I am 
here again asking the House to pass this bill and get it to the 
President's desk so we can give our small businesses and healthcare 
providers the additional assistance they need.
  This bill provides an extra $75 billion to our hospitals and $25 
billion for expanded testing capacity, with resources specifically set 
aside for community health centers and rural health clinics. These 
additional funds will have a dramatic impact in rural areas like 
Michigan's First District, where access to testing has lagged and our 
rural healthcare facilities are struggling to keep their doors open.
  This legislation also refills the Paycheck Protection Program, 
critical for the Upper Peninsula and northern Michigan's small 
businesses. This temporary, targeted relief is our opportunity to send 
a strong message to our Main Street businesses that we want them to be 
able to open their doors when it is time to open our economy back up.
  I urge my colleagues to support this bill.

                              {time}  1300

  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentlewoman from 
California (Ms. Waters), the chairwoman of the Financial Services 
Committee, who is a major author of this legislation.
  Ms. WATERS. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for his leadership 
and tough negotiations in support of this legislation, H.R. 266.
  I not only rise in support of this legislation, the Enhancement Act, 
I also would like to rise in support of what we are doing for the 
Health Care Enhancement Act in this bill.
  And I am going to take a moment to dedicate this legislation to my 
dear sister, who is dying in a hospital in St. Louis, Missouri, right 
now, infected by the coronavirus.
  This legislation provides $370 billion in funding for small 
businesses, as well as $100 billion for hospitals and coronavirus 
testing. I am pleased that we have been able to set aside $60 billion 
for our Nation's community development financial institutions, minority 
depository institutions, community banks, credit unions, certified 
development companies, and microlenders to directly lend to their small 
business customers, who are often minority-owned businesses.
  Small businesses and their workers all across the country are in dire 
need of assistance and will benefit from this bill. And so with that, 
Congress must now immediately turn to the next package of legislation 
to provide relief during the pandemic. We need to do much more to help 
renters, homeowners, people experiencing homelessness, and mom-and-pop 
landlords.
  As chairwoman of the Financial Services Committee, I am already 
working on additional coronavirus relief legislation, including 
legislation that creates a $100 billion emergency rental assistance 
fund and a $75 billion homeowner assistance fund.
  Madam Speaker, I support H.R. 266, and look forward to working with 
my colleagues on the next relief package.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, our prayers are with Chairwoman Waters, her 
sister, and her family.
  Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Tennessee (Mr. 
Fleischmann), one of the leaders of the Committee on Appropriations.
  Mr. FLEISCHMANN. Madam Speaker, I rise in support of this, the fourth 
bill.
  At a time of adversity, I would like to reach out to my colleagues on 
both sides of the aisle. The American people are concerned, but we are 
optimistic. The American people are worried, but we will come through 
this adversity. I think of the people I represent in Tennessee, but we 
are coming together as a Nation during this time like I have never seen 
us come together before. At a time of difficulty, we have an 
opportunity to actually seize this moment and move our great Nation 
forward. So, yes, am I concerned? Yes, I am concerned. Of course, I am. 
But we will see better days in this great Nation.
  Madam Speaker, let us never forget, we in this Chamber represent the 
people of the greatest Nation in the world. We shall prevail.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, we certainly express our best to Maxine 
Waters and her family at this challenging time.
  Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from Texas (Ms. 
Jackson Lee), the distinguished congresswoman.
  Ms. JACKSON LEE. Madam Speaker, let me acknowledge that people are 
dying. That sometime in the future, we may have one-sixth of the number 
of people that died in World War II in the battles on behalf of the 
United States.
  I rise because I support this legislation because it has universal 
testing for COVID-19. It is a matter of life and death. And I call upon 
using this $25 billion for testing nursing homes and all essential 
workers. They must be assured that they are safe.
  I join with the Congressional Black Caucus to make sure that we have 
concentrated voluntary testing in areas where there have been high 
deaths, contact tracing to identify the people, which has been 
included, antibody tests, working with our communities and faith-based. 
And, yes, The Nickel in the Fifth Ward, where Mickey Leland and Barbara 
Jordan work; that is a restaurant. I want them to be part of those who 
will get now the new dollars, the $60 billion that is going to help the 
very, very small. And I want to stand in the way of the Ruth's Chris 
and the Shake Shacks, the large corporations, to make sure that they 
understand that we are sharing with each other. So small businesses now 
with minority banks and CDFIs can do this.

[[Page H1933]]

  Finally, our hospitals that have been on the front lines. They need 
to be reimbursed and those who are Medicare focused, not just Medicaid 
focused, not just Medicare focused.
  And, yes, I want hero pay for our transit workers and hero pay for 
our professionals.
  Madam Speaker, I support this legislation now to save lives.
  Madam Speaker, as a senior member of the Committees on the Judiciary 
and on Homeland Security, and founder and Co-Chair of the Congressional 
Coronavirus Taskforce, I rise in strong support of the ``Paycheck 
Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act,'' an interim 
measure that supplements the CARES Act, the assistance and relief 
package passed by Congress providing more than $2 trillion to address 
the adverse health and economic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  But more must be done, and it is our obligation to ensure that the 
necessary assistance is provided, and that our decisions are informed 
by science, based on evidence, and put the physical safety and economic 
security and livelihoods of the American people foremost.
  Every day, we see the need for further action to combat the 
coronavirus crisis.
  To date, there are more than 800,000 confirmed cases, over 43,000 
dead, including 20,196 cases and 547 deaths in my home state of Texas.
  On top of that, by taking the necessary measures to slow the pandemic 
and `flatten the curve' so as not to overwhelm the nation's health care 
system, economic activity in the United States has experienced a severe 
shock to the system.
  More than 22 million initial unemployment claims in the past month 
alone.
  In addition, on March 23, 2020, the Dow Jones Industrial Average 
(DJIA) dipped to 18,321.62, which is even lower than it was on Election 
Night 2016, and far below the 19,827 mark where it stood on January 20, 
2017.
  In other words, Madam Speaker, all the gains that were made to the 
stock market and heralded by this Administration as evidence of its 
genius have been wiped out, depleting the retirement savings and 401ks 
of millions of ordinary Americans.
  Democrats dramatically changed the package originally proposed by the 
Senate from an insufficient Republican plan that left behind hospitals 
and health workers but did nothing to aid the survival of the most 
vulnerable small businesses on Main Street.
  That is why Democrats in Congress insisted on, fought for, and 
succeeded in shepherding into law the CARES Act, established the 
Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), a new guaranteed loan program at the 
Small Business Administration (SBA) to help small businesses cover 
payroll and other expenses during the crisis, with 100 percent of the 
amount eligible for forgiveness if employers retain employees.
  The CARES Act also created the Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program, 
a new $10 billion grant program, leveraging SBA's Office of Disaster 
Assistance to provide small businesses with much needed capital in a 
timely manner.
  Congress intended that these programs would provide immediate 
financial support to secure the survival of the small business 
community, which is the backbone of the national economy.
  As the economic impact of the coronavirus pandemic becomes clearer 
and more far-reaching, it will be necessary to replenish the Paycheck 
Protection Program (PPP) and Economic Injury Disaster Loan program 
(EIDL) funding made available under the CARES Act.
  The legislation before us replenishes these funds, and importantly, 
sets aside a portion of those funds be deposited in Community 
Development Financial Institutions (CDFIs), minority depository 
institutions (MDIs), certified development companies, microloan 
intermediaries, and State or Federal Credit Unions to ensure that 
economically distressed or disadvantaged communities have access to the 
capital needed to revive and regenerate their local economies.
  Specifically, the legislation before us strengthens the Paycheck 
Protection Program with $310 billion in additional funding and $50 
billion for SBA disaster lending, translating into more than $350 
billion in loans, and $10 billion in SBA disaster grants.
  Additionally, and importantly, this legislation directs that $30 
billion be deposited in banks and credit unions with less than $10 
billion in assets, as well as all Community Development Financial 
Institutions (CDFIs), MDIs, certified development companies (CDCs), and 
microlenders that are PPP lenders.
  Madam Speaker, another reason I strongly support this legislation is 
because it provides $75 billion to provide hospitals and health care 
workers on the frontlines the necessary resources, especially personal 
protective equipment (PPE) to battle the coronavirus pandemic and care 
for its victims.
  We have all seen the heart-wrenching stories of courageous doctors, 
nurses, ambulance drivers, orderlies, and others selflessly striving to 
save others while putting themselves in harm's way because of the 
severe shortage of PPE.
  Madam Speaker, the current president fancies calling himself a ``War 
President.''
  For anyone who needs reminding, the nation's greatest wartime 
presidents made sure that American troops on the frontlines were 
trained, equipped, and protected in battle.
  I also support this legislation because it provides as I requested 
$25 billion for diagnostic testing and contact tracing promised at no 
charge to the person.
  This funding will help states and local jurisdiction conduct 
necessary COVID-19 testing in local jails, juvenile detention centers, 
and elsewhere in the criminal justice system.
  Testing is the key to reopening the economy and resuming our lives, 
and to prevent, prepare for, and respond to coronavirus, domestically 
or internationally, for necessary expenses to research, develop, 
validate, manufacture, purchase, administer, and expand capacity for 
COVID-19 tests to effectively monitor and suppress COVID-19, including 
tests for both active infection and 19 prior exposure.
  If we cannot see where COVID-19 is within a community, there is no 
reliable way to prevent its spread other than quarantine.
  If we do not dramatically increase testing, we will remain prisoners 
of COVID-19 until we have a vaccine widely available, which is not 
expected to occur until early 2021.
  Universal testing for COVID-19 is a matter of life and death for 
millions of Americans, but it is also a salvation for millions of 
others who are living desperate lives behind locked doors.
  The liberation of millions hinges on getting testing in every 
community so that we can shine a light on where COVID-19 is and where 
it is not present.
  The lack of testing early on and the continued lack of testing is 
costing trillions in lost economic output and it will continue to cost 
much more as we struggle to save lives through social distancing and 
providing adequate universal access to COVID-19 needed medicines, 
equipment, and PPE to protect medical personnel.
  Madam Speaker, based on the limited data available to date, it is 
clear that African Americans are at higher risk of contracting COVID-19 
and experiencing the worst outcomes.
  An April 2020 analysis by the Washington Post of available data and 
census demographics shows that counties that are majority-black have 
three times the rate of infections and almost six times the rate of 
deaths as counties where white residents are in the majority.
  Madam Speaker, African Americans are 26 percent of the population in 
Milwaukee County, Wisconsin but account for 73 percent of COVID-19 
related deaths; comparable numbers in Chicago, Illinois and Washington, 
D.C. are 32 percent and 46 percent of the population but 67 percent and 
58 percent of COVID-19 deaths respectively.
  Faced with this grim reality, I am particularly pleased that the 
legislation before us directs the Secretary of Health and Human 
Services to collect, publicly release, and report to Congress racial 
and demographic data on COVID-19 in order to identify and address 
racial disparities in the response.
  But Madam Speaker, we all recognize the legislation before us is only 
an interim measure and more must and will be done to protect our nation 
and make our people whole.
  In the next supplement to the CARES Act, I look forward to working 
with my colleagues to include the following priorities:
  1. Hero pay for mass transit workers;
  2. Increased childcare direct payment assistance to essential 
workers;
  3. Additional funding for CDC data collection and research regarding 
disparate impact of COVID-19 on African Americans and Latinos;
  4. Expanded Medicaid payments to local counties in states that have 
not accepted the expanded Medicaid;
  5. Medical shelters creating extra COVID-19 hospital beds to be 
funded at 100 percent so counties like Harris County in my home state 
of Texas is not subsidizing all of its neighboring counties; and
  6. Funding for an additional cash distribution of $2,000 per adult 
and $500 per child.
  Madam Speaker, the occasion demands that we rise, and I urge all 
Members to join me in voting to pass the Senate Amendment to H.R. 266, 
the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act.
  Mr. BRADY. Mr. Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Ferguson), the chief deputy whip, a key member of the 
Committee on Ways and Means.
  Mr. FERGUSON. Madam Speaker, I rise in support of the legislation.
  This is important for our communities and our small businesses back 
home. We are in a real battle. On one front, we have our incredible 
healthcare workers, our frontline healthcare workers, our first 
responders, and hospital administrators that

[[Page H1934]]

are fighting out there. And those heroes, we owe a debt of gratitude. 
This bill will provide important resources, particularly for our rural 
hospitals.
  But there is an economic disaster as well. And I would like to say 
thank you to another group of unexpected heroes that are out there 
working very, very hard every single day, and those are our community 
bankers in our small, rural communities.
  These bankers have been working long hours, helping the small 
business in their communities that they serve. And I will tell you, 
there are going to be a lot of stories that come out about good things 
and bad things that happen with this program, but I could not be more 
grateful for the men and women in our small community banks out there 
putting in long hours, long days, doing their dead-level best to help 
the communities that they serve.
  Madam Speaker, again, I ask that all colleagues support this 
legislation.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
New York (Mrs. Carolyn B. Maloney), the chairperson of the Committee on 
Oversight and Reform.
  Mrs. CAROLYN B. MALONEY of New York. Madam Speaker, I support this 
bill, which provides an additional $310 billion for PPP loans. And 
while this is desperately needed, it almost certainly will not be 
enough.
  I am glad that an additional $60 billion is being set aside for 
community banks, credit unions, minority banks, and CDFIs. And as chair 
of the Committee on Oversight and Reform, I promise I will watch the 
$60 billion like a hawk to make sure that it goes to the communities 
that we intended.
  But I also want to mention another key priority: The postal service, 
which is running out of money and must be funded soon.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Florida (Mr. Waltz).
  Mr. WALTZ. Madam Speaker, we are hearing a lot today about Democrats 
support this; Republicans support that. I don't think this is the time 
for that. Americans don't care. They don't care about party. This virus 
doesn't care. They care about this Congress getting things done and 
about America pulling through.
  This is a good day for our businesses, for our hospitals, but I think 
a silver lining in all of this will be all of us seeing America pull 
together.
  And I think the other silver lining will be us drastically changing 
how we view our relationship with China, and understanding the Chinese 
Communist Party is not our friend, they are manipulating international 
organizations, they are hoarding supplies, have brought manufacturing 
away from a place where we, as America, can benefit. We must bring that 
manufacturing home. We will do that on the other side of this.
  Madam Speaker, I am proud to introduce legislation today to not only 
bring our pharmaceuticals home, but our technology and our business 
that China is preying on right now, as we speak. Wake up America. We 
are in a cold war, and we have to do better.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
Connecticut (Ms. DeLauro), a fully capable member of the Committee on 
Ways and Means.
  Ms. DeLAURO. Madam Speaker, this economic relief package is for small 
businesses, finally.
  I am proud that we also secured $25 billion to expand testing, with 
$11 billion to increase State and local testing capacity; $1 billion 
for the CDC, $1.8 billion for the NIH, $1 billion for BARDA, money for 
the Food and Drug Administration and money for community health 
centers. This is not everything we wanted.
  Next, we need relief for States and localities, SNAP benefits, paid 
family leave and paid sick days, and the expansion of the Child Tax 
Credit. Vote ``yes'' to continue working for people.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Arrington), a fellow Texan, and key member of the Committee 
on Ways and Means.
  Mr. ARRINGTON. Madam Speaker, these resources are a lifeline to our 
fellow Americans, whose lives and livelihoods have been turned upside 
down through no fault of their own.
  They aren't just numbers on some government spreadsheet. They are 
healthcare workers who rush to the front lines in this battle, risking 
their lives for our safety. They are family farmers, independent energy 
producers, and small businesses of all kinds who listened to their 
leaders, did their part, made their sacrifices and stayed home, 
shuttered their businesses, all to keep their communities and their 
country safe.
  This temporary support will compensate them partly, but more 
importantly, will help them get on their feet so that they can keep 
their employees on the payroll and off the unemployment roll. These 
folks are the heartbeat of America. They are the lifeblood of this 
economy, and they--not the government--will lead one of the greatest 
American comebacks in our history.
  Madam Speaker, let's suit up, let's strap it on, and let's get 
America back to work.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Takano), chairperson of the Committee on Veterans' 
Affairs.
  Mr. TAKANO. Madam Speaker, H.R. 266 provides billions of dollars in 
funding for small businesses, hospitals, and much-needed testing. This 
is a bill that works for the people, not just the favorite clients of 
the big banks.
  I have heard from small business owners in Riverside County who have 
struggled to receive the help they need after the original funds ran 
dry. This bill strengthens the Paycheck Protection Program by providing 
an additional $310 billion to help small businesses stay afloat.

  Further, this bill ensures that true small businesses--not large, 
multimillion-dollar corporations--have access to these funds.
  Madam Speaker, I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes'' on H.R. 266. The 
well-being of the American people depends on it.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
South Carolina (Mr. Wilson).
  Mr. WILSON of South Carolina. Madam Speaker, I support the 
legislation.
  I am grateful that President Donald Trump has succeeded with an 
agreement to address the destructive impact of the Wuhan virus. Our 
families, small businesses, and hospitals need this support to maintain 
jobs now more than ever.
  The Paycheck Protection Program has been successful in supporting 
small businesses in maintaining jobs, already saving 30 million jobs. A 
real-world example of success was on Fox Business News last week with 
Melissa Francis interviewing Bill Dukes of the Blue Marlin restaurant 
in Columbia, praising Scott Hagler of the Security Federal Bank for 
saving jobs.
  This agreement will help families but, sadly, there was a delay 
because of partisan politics, letting no disaster go to waste.
  In conclusion, God bless our troops, and we will never forget 
September the 11th in the global war on terrorism.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Florida (Mrs. Murphy), a very capable member of the Committee on Ways 
and Means.
  Mrs. MURPHY of Florida. Madam Speaker, today's bill is a positive 
step and has my full support, but it took too long. Next time let's 
skip the partisan games and just do our jobs.
  We must be aggressive and smart. We should spare no expense when it 
comes to testing, treatments, and vaccines. And we must support workers 
and business owners who bear no blame for this crisis.
  We should keep workers tethered to their jobs and to their 
healthcare. And aid should be swift and direct rather than through 
complicated and time-consuming programs. For workers who do lose their 
jobs, Congress has provided billions to support them.
  Sadly, this support has been delayed in States like Florida, whose 
unemployment system is marred by incompetence and indifference. 
Congress must demand better. Our country confronts a deadly, serious 
crisis. As leaders, we must unite to combat COVID-19.
  My fellow Blue Dog colleagues and I will continue pushing for more 
bipartisan cooperation to get the job done for the American people.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Texas

[[Page H1935]]

(Mr. Hurd), a member of the Committee on Appropriations, and a fellow 
Texan.
  Mr. HURD of Texas. Madam Speaker, 134,700--that is the number of 
small businesses in my home State of Texas that have received Paycheck 
Protection Program loans amounting to more than $28.4 billion.
  This money helps small business owners catch their breath because 
they didn't have to fire their employees. This money prevented 
thousands from going on unemployment and standing in line at already-
overrun food banks.
  Madam Speaker, this money has been a Band-Aid helping small 
businesses stop bleeding. This program has and will help many survive 
this moment of darkness. More funding for PPP will save jobs. More 
funding for testing will save lives. Let's get it done. No more delays.
  Madam Speaker, I am proud a solution to add funds to this program 
finally came about, but I am disappointed partisanship delayed it. Our 
neighbors and communities are stepping up and working together to help 
one another. Congress should follow that lead.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Bera).
  Mr. BERA. Madam Speaker, we are in the middle of a global pandemic. 
This isn't a Republican virus or Democratic virus. It doesn't recognize 
the color of your skin or the country of your origin. It doesn't know 
what god you worship.
  We are in this together, not just as a city, a State, a country. We 
are in this together--all of us--and we will get out of this together. 
Let's find our human kindness and our better nature. We will persevere. 
We will be more resilient. And we will come out stronger and kinder and 
gentler.

                              {time}  1315

  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Missouri (Mrs. Wagner), a member of the Financial Services Committee.
  Mrs. WAGNER. Madam Speaker, I am here today to call on colleagues to 
support the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement 
Act, legislation that is poised to be a lifeline to my constituents in 
Missouri's Second Congressional District during this pandemic.
  This bill includes $310 billion in increased funding for the Paycheck 
Protection Program, a program that has helped keep open thousands of 
Missouri businesses, including Martha's Hands, a St. Louis-based home 
healthcare provider with over 200 employees. My office worked with 
Martha's Hands to secure these vital PPP funds so that they will be 
able to pay their employees and keep their doors open to help the most 
fragile in our community.
  There are small businesses and workers just like them all over that 
are dependent. They are the backbone of our economy.
  Madam Speaker, we fought to also include $75 billion for hospitals 
and healthcare providers so the frontline healthcare heroes are taken 
care of and $25 billion for critical COVID-19 testing so we can better 
understand the spread of this virus, to save lives, and to have the 
confidence to reopen our communities.
  Madam Speaker, I urgently ask everyone to vote ``yes'' on this 
legislation.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
Washington (Ms. Schrier).
  Ms. SCHRIER. Madam Speaker, today's bill is critical for small 
businesses in my district that are desperately waiting for this 
financial lifeline.
  The funding for testing is also critical as our country is woefully 
behind. We need 10 to 20 times current levels of testing to know who is 
infected and isolate them and to find emerging hot spots. Without that, 
we are flying blind, and we will see new surges. Widespread testing is 
key to moving forward.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Montana (Mr. Gianforte).
  Mr. GIANFORTE. Madam Speaker, I rise today in support of reopening 
the Paycheck Protection Program after an unnecessary lapse in funding.
  In just 2 weeks after the launch, the program provided over 13,000 
loans in Montana, totaling $1.4 billion. It has helped small businesses 
stay open and keep workers on the payroll.
  But as the well quickly ran dry on this critical lifeline for small 
businesses and workers, the Speaker and the Senate Democratic Leader, 
Chuck Schumer, stood on the sidelines and failed to work with 
Republicans to keep this program running.
  When Senate Majority Leader McConnell moved to increase funding, 
Democrats objected, refusing to allow immediate action. That is 
outrageous.
  At last, we are doing the right thing by small businesses and 
workers, but it is overdue, and it has been needlessly held up with 
partisan games.
  I urge my colleagues to stand with small businesses and workers today 
and pass the Paycheck Protection Program.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
Utah (Mr. McAdams).
  Mr. McADAMS. Madam Speaker, Utah families are suffering and worrying 
about how they are going to survive this crisis financially. This 
legislation provides additional funds for the Paycheck Protection 
Program to cover payroll and other essential expenses for small 
businesses, and it keeps paychecks coming for employees. We must make 
sure that this money makes it to the small businesses and hardworking 
families that deserve it.
  This bill also provides critical support to our hospitals that are 
saving lives and money for testing so we can move safely and 
responsibly to reopen the economy.
  This is critical economic support. I support this bipartisan 
legislation.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Kentucky (Mr. Barr), a member of the Financial Services Committee.
  Mr. BARR. Madam Speaker, for America's struggling small businesses, 
there is just no substitute for safely reopening the economy; but until 
that happens, the Paycheck Protection Program is a lifeline.
  The first wave of funding delivered $350 billion in forgivable loans 
to 1.6 million firms nationwide, including over $4 billion to save jobs 
in my home State of Kentucky.
  For the Wells family at Green Tree Forest Products, the funds meant 
that they could keep their sawmill open and retain 93 employees in 
eastern Kentucky.
  For Upper Right Marketing, a Lexington tourism company impacted by 
the postponement of the Kentucky Derby and the closure of the Kentucky 
Bourbon Trail, funding arrived the day before the company was set to 
lay off 30 employees.
  So it is unfortunate that some in this House dithered the last 7 
days, making partisan demands after the program ran out of money and an 
additional 4\1/2\ million Americans filed for unemployment.
  But today's replenishment of funding restores hope for workers, 
families, and business owners, including Dennis from Lexington, who has 
operated a car repair shop for 17 years, has 10 employees, but has yet 
to receive a loan.
  Congress must ensure that, by flattening the curve, we don't flatten 
small business with it. I urge my colleagues to vote ``yes.''
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, let me inquire as to how much time is 
remaining on each side.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Massachusetts has 31 
minutes remaining. The gentleman from Texas has 24\1/2\ minutes 
remaining.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
Minnesota (Ms. Craig).
  Ms. CRAIG. Madam Speaker, I rise in strong support today for America 
and Minnesota's small businesses.
  Whether it is a florist in Apple Valley, the Cannon River Winery, or 
a food shelf in Eagan, I have heard the urgent need for funding 
assistance to survive the impacts of COVID-19. But we must do more.
  I am grateful that we are going to add additional support to small 
businesses and nonprofits by funding the Paycheck Protection Program 
and the Economic Injury Disaster Loan Program today to keep small 
businesses and the American Dream alive.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Crenshaw).
  Mr. CRENSHAW. Madam Speaker, I rise today where we should have been a

[[Page H1936]]

week ago when the Treasury warned us that the small business program 
needed refunding. It is a program we already authorized. It is a 
program that Americans need desperately to keep their payrolls whole 
during this crisis.
  But, in predictable fashion, it was delayed. My colleagues will claim 
victory for this delay, claiming ``wins'' for additional funding. But 
they know that this vote today could have easily been agreed to last 
week.
  We are asking our grocers to stock our shelves, truckers to drive, 
and nurses and doctors to risk their lives, but Congress can't even 
bother to vote to help small businesses in time. In fact, many want to 
vote from home or by proxy. If you think that is leadership, then I 
would encourage you to rethink what it means to be a Representative.
  Leadership is courage to lead from the front. It is steadfast 
judgment free from cynical opportunism. Leadership means acting worthy 
of the people we represent. If we are to survive this historic crisis, 
we might collectively stiffen our spines and demonstrate to the 
American people what that looks like.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
Texas (Ms. Escobar).
  Ms. ESCOBAR. Madam Speaker, I rise to support this interim package.
  I have spent every day in my district speaking to constituents and 
stakeholders battered by this health and economic crisis. I am grateful 
to Speaker Pelosi and Democratic colleagues who fought for additional 
money for small businesses, fixed problems we saw after the first round 
of funding, and added money for hospitals.
  I am disappointed by Republican colleagues who refused to include 
local and State governments, but we will keep fighting for them and so 
many others who were left out.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 2 minutes to the gentleman from 
Louisiana (Mr. Scalise), the Republican Whip.
  Mr. SCALISE. Madam Speaker, I thank my colleague from Texas for 
yielding.
  Most importantly, I want to thank all of those hardworking families 
across this country, people who are struggling through this crisis, who 
are adhering to the guidance from the President and their Governors. 
But they want us to get back to work. They want us to work together to 
help them through this critical time, to focus on finding a cure as we 
are seeing so many advances in medicine, on testing, and on therapies 
that may work.
  In the meantime, we are all learning how to deal with this disease 
better, how to socially distance. Even if you go to the grocery store 
now, people are being more cautious.
  We also need to make sure that we help those families hold on through 
this time, that we help those small businesses that are struggling 
through this time. The Paycheck Protection Program has been incredibly 
successful as a lifeline to those small businesses.
  President Trump called on us weeks ago to come and replenish this 
fund that has been used by so many businesses to hang on, and yet there 
were cries from the other side. In fact, one of the leaders of the main 
caucus on the opposition side called the Paycheck Protection Program 
leverage, that they should hold out from re-funding to get other 
things.
  This isn't about leveraging families who are struggling and hanging 
on and businesses that barely can make it while you try to go for other 
items. Help those people who are in need. Negotiate on other things 
that we can get agreement on, but don't hold hostages during this time.
  I reached out to so many small businesses and heard from people in my 
district and all around this country. We saw another 4.4 million people 
lose their jobs just this week, and yet there were businesses holding 
on, waiting for this money that didn't get it for the last 2 weeks 
while this leverage game was played.
  I just talked to one company, Delta Electronics in Harvey, Louisiana: 
``We laid off two of our three employees. . . . We are about 7 days 
away from shutting our doors down for good and possibly declaring 
bankruptcy.''
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield the gentleman from Louisiana an 
additional 1 minute.
  Mr. SCALISE. ``We are about 7 days away from shutting our doors down 
for good and possibly declaring bankruptcy. We don't know what else to 
do. I'm tired of crying myself to sleep every night wondering what 
tomorrow holds. Will we lose everything we worked for? Our house? Our 
retirement?''
  ``Enough is enough.''
  They had to wait an extra 2 weeks. Hopefully, that company can hold 
on.
  MJ's Grill in Columbia, South Carolina: ``We are a small, family-run 
restaurant that has a staff of 16. We have had to cut our staffing down 
to eight and those employees work limited hours. I open and close the 
kitchen every day without taking a paycheck to try and keep the doors 
open. We are quickly approaching the hard-line decision of closing our 
doors permanently.''
  These are stories that go on and on, heartbreaking stories from 
businesses that just want to hold on to keep their family business 
going, to keep those employees, that represent millions of people.
  Stop thinking of them as leverage and start thinking of them as our 
neighbors. Just like we applaud our frontline workers, the men and 
women in the hospitals, the nurses, the doctors who are keeping us 
safe, let's work to keep everybody safe and get through this and open 
our economy back again. Let's pass this bill.

  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Ruiz).
  Mr. RUIZ. Madam Speaker, the coronavirus has upended life as we know 
it.
  Healthcare workers need personal protective equipment and hospitals 
need supplies.
  Small businesses and small farmers need financial security to weather 
this storm.
  America needs a national testing regime to safely and efficiently get 
this country back to work.
  Underserved rural communities need doctors and increased access to 
care.
  The Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act will 
provide much-needed relief to millions across the country and help save 
lives.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentleman has expired.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield the gentleman from California 
another 10 seconds.
  Mr. RUIZ. Because of the urgency, I urge you to vote ``yes.'' 
However, State and local governments and Tribal nations across the 
country need funding, too, to provide essential services for our 
essential frontline workers: paramedics, law enforcement, firefighters.
  We must include the Coronavirus Relief Act, $250 billion for local 
government for populations less than 500,000 in the next act because 
small cities' firefighters and paramedics in my district matter, too.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from New 
Jersey (Mr. Smith).
  Mr. SMITH of New Jersey. Madam Speaker, in New Jersey, 100,000 people 
have tested positive for COVID-19, with more than 5,000 suffering 
death. Forty percent of those who have died are women and men in 
nursing homes and veterans in long-term care homes. We grieve their 
loss.
  My constituents have shown remarkable strength, resolve, and 
resiliency, especially those in healthcare, first responders, postal 
workers, truckers, supermarket employees, and more. Without their 
courage and sacrifice, things would be far worse.
  Signs outside of CentraState Medical Center in Freehold say it all: 
Heroes Work Here.
  For our hospitals, the $70 billion in this legislation, on top of the 
$100 billion for the CARES Act, is critically needed to sustain our 
overworked, cash-starved hospitals that risk insolvency, in large part, 
because they have been compelled by law to postpone elective surgeries.
  A few days ago, Secretary Mnuchin said 30 million jobs have been 
saved by the Paycheck Protection Program, the PPP. Today's $310 billion 
replenishment continues and expands this historic bridge to assist 
businesses with forgivable loans to prevent layoffs and bankruptcy.

                              {time}  1330

  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
New

[[Page H1937]]

York (Ms. Clarke), the vice chair of the Energy and Commerce Committee.
  Ms. CLARKE of New York. Madam Speaker, I rise today to stand up for 
the 15,000-plus New Yorkers and thousands of Americans who have lost 
their lives due to the coronavirus and to stand up for the tens of 
thousands of healthcare and essential community workers whose lives are 
on the line as I stand here.
  Today, we are voting on a $480 billion interim relief package that 
includes $370 billion for small business loans and grants, $60 billion 
of which will go to mom-and-pop, underbanked, and cash-and-carry, $75 
billion for hospitals and healthcare facilities and $25 billion for a 
national testing strategy.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Arizona (Mr. Schweikert), a key member of the Ways and Means Committee.
  Mr. SCHWEIKERT. Madam Speaker, how many of us have had the phone 
calls over the last couple of weeks where we are talking to that small 
businessperson, and you can almost hear the tears on the other side of 
the call? You can hear the stress, almost panic that they are about to 
hurt the very people that they work with, because their business is 
failing, because they are desperate for what we made a promise to do, 
that payroll protection money that functionally ran out a couple of 
weeks ago. We knew the math, and we engaged in a type of cruelty around 
here because we sat here and engaged in partisan--we are better than 
this. We knew what we had to do. Let's never do this again.
  For Arizona, what we are about to vote on is 202,000 jobs. And the 
fact of the matter is, they should have had those two weeks ago. Let's 
make this happen.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
Texas (Mr. Green).
  Mr. GREEN of Texas. Madam Speaker, with all due respect to the 
President, if you want to make America great again, Mr. President, have 
the Senate pass a bill to protect first responders by sending money to 
local governments.
  If you want to make America great again, put money in the pockets of 
the persons who are in food lines miles long so that they can feed 
their families.
  If you want to make America great again, admit that what you said was 
a hoax and let the healthcare workers and advisors give the advice on 
healthcare.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Ms. Jackson Lee). Members are reminded to 
address their remarks to the Chair.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, you may also remind Members that we are not 
to engage in personalities on the House floor.
  Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. 
Gonzalez), a leader in the Financial Services Committee.
  Mr. GONZALEZ of Ohio. Madam Speaker, I rise in support of the 
Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act.
  Throughout this crisis, our small businesses have done everything we 
have asked, and it is past time that we add this necessary funding to 
help them maintain payroll and survive this crisis.
  But we all know that this cannot be the end of our work in response 
to COVID-19. Local leaders across my northeast Ohio district have made 
it clear that their finances are in dire shape. This is forcing 
difficult decisions about essential services, including fire 
departments and police officers.
  While we should not bail out badly run States and cities, it is vital 
that we provide targeted funding to municipalities like Parma, North 
Canton, Medina, Orrville, Rootstown, and Green, municipalities that 
have done things the right way and need our help.
  I look forward to working with all of my colleagues on this.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
Wisconsin (Mr. Pocan).
  Mr. POCAN. Madam Speaker, I support the bill before us today, but we 
all know it is not enough. Much more must be done. In the next 
comprehensive aid package, we must put people first.
  But something also must be done about the horrific Federal response 
to testing. FEMA and the Trump administration have been nonexistent in 
getting States like Wisconsin the test kits, reagents, and PPE we need 
to reopen.
  If the President forces us to open too soon, more people will get 
sick and die, and the economy will suffer, and that will be on the 
President's hands.
  This isn't a reality show. American lives are at stake. Get us our 
supplies now.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentlewoman from 
Indiana (Mrs. Walorski), a key leader of the Ways and Means Committee.
  Mrs. WALORSKI. Madam Speaker, I want to give a shout-out to the 
healthcare workers in Indiana's Second District while I am standing 
here supporting this legislation. What a phenomenal job and risk they 
have taken.
  I am supporting this legislation today, but this delay was long, too 
long, completely avoidable. Two weeks ago, Democrats blocked attempts 
to replenish PPP and ensure small businesses could continue making 
payroll and rent. They said there was no data supporting more funding, 
even though the program ran out of money only a week later.
  PPP has helped so many small businesses across my district save jobs. 
But others have been waiting for loans they urgently needed while 
Democrats played games with workers' livelihoods.
  As one frustrated small business owner wrote to me: I saw the Speaker 
laughing it up on late night television, showing off her stash of high-
end ice cream, while I and other small business owners don't know how 
we will make the next payroll.
  I tell you what, ladies and gentlemen: Times are tough. Small 
business needs everything we can give them in a bipartisan way. I 
strongly urge support of this bill.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
Virginia (Mr. Connolly).
  Mr. CONNOLLY. Madam Speaker, I don't know what my friend from Indiana 
is talking about.
  I do know this: Thank God the Democrats insisted that this bill help 
the small businesses intended to be supported. Too many big guys got 
supported over the little guys, and that is what we are trying to fight 
for today.
  Second point, we have got to help State and local governments. They 
cannot be allowed to go bankrupt. That is social Darwinism at its 
worst.
  And, thirdly, we have got to help our postal workers and the Postal 
Service who serve all Americans.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Kansas (Mr. Estes), a key member of the Ways and Means Committee.
  Mr. ESTES. Madam Speaker, 2 weeks ago, my Republican colleagues and I 
asked for more funding for the Paycheck Protection Program. More than 
1.6 million small businesses and their employees were helped before the 
money ran out, including $4.3 billion in PPP loans for more than 26,000 
small businesses in Kansas.
  Now, hundreds of thousands of applications sit, because Congress 
would not act in time. As a result, small business owners are laying 
off employees, they are losing the businesses that they worked so hard 
to build.
  This bill will save 201,000 Kansas jobs. While late, this bill 
provides more funding to the program, representing a small step towards 
reopening America. This money will save businesses and jobs and allows 
more hardworking Americans to provide for their families.
  Increased testing is a vital step in our return to normalcy. This 
bill provides $75 billion for healthcare providers and another $25 
billion for testing capacity to combat the virus. Testing is critical 
to reopening Kansas and getting America going again.
  Today, I am grateful for the Americans who stepped up to help their 
neighbors in this unprecedented time, and I will continue to show up 
for Kansas by supporting this legislation.
  Mr. NEAL. I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from New York (Mr. 
Nadler), chairman of the Judiciary Committee.
  Mr. NADLER. Madam Speaker, small businesses in my district are 
desperate for assistance, but stymied by a lack of funding and unfair 
treatment by the big banks and the SBA.
  I support this legislation, because it is absolutely imperative that 
we get

[[Page H1938]]

small businesses a new round of funding and support.
  I am also pleased this bill provides significant funding for 
hospitals and for expanded testing without which we cannot safely 
reopen the businesses and other establishments we are trying to save.
  I am disappointed that despite the best efforts of my Democratic 
colleagues, the bill does not give State and local governments the 
funding and flexibility they desperately need.
  We must provide for these and other unmet needs in the next bill. But 
right now, the funds in this bill are desperately needed, and we must 
vote yes.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Florida (Mr. Mast).
  Mr. MAST. Madam Speaker, we are a body of 435 representatives. That 
is true. There is only one that can demand that that gavel go up and 
down.
  And I have a very simple question for this body: Can anybody, will 
anybody, in this body stand and say that the Speaker has demanded that 
we act here with the urgency that our people require, with the urgency 
that this body is capable of?
  You believe this body has acted with the urgency we are capable of, 
that our people require?
  I think it is sad that there are people that believe that we have 
acted in urgency. There has been no haste by this body.
  It will be said of this time that those who could do the most did the 
least.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from New 
Jersey (Mr. Payne).
  Mr. PAYNE. Madam Speaker, I thank the chairman, I thank the Speaker, 
and I would say to my friend on the other side of the aisle, there was 
no urgency in February when this was first brought to the President's 
attention.
  Madam Speaker, I rise today to support the fourth coronavirus 
stimulus. It is good to see both parties can come together to aid the 
country during a national crisis.
  But we must have accountability for the money that we provide, and we 
must get it to the people that need it the most.
  Like many Members, I was not happy to hear of small businesses that 
could not get funds. We must do a better job in getting the funds to 
the people that need it the most, and that should be our commitment.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Illinois (Mr. Bost).
  Mr. BOST. Madam Speaker, the last time I stood in this Chamber was 
the first day that my district reported a COVID-19 fatality. At that 
time, on March 27, my district had just 27 confirmed cases. As of 
today, the 12th District has 50 deaths and 862 confirmed cases.
  COVID-19 has rattled our communities across this country, and our top 
priority should be and should always be keeping people safe.
  But the virus has also forced our economy to a grinding halt. Our 
small businesses are desperate for a lifeline. And for many, that 
lifeline is the PPP.
  In Illinois, almost 70,000 loans were approved before funding ran 
out. But funding should have never been allowed to run out. We should 
have done our job. We should have come back, and politics should not 
have been played.
  The COVID-19 virus is not Republican; it is not Democrat. This 
hurting economy is not Republican; it is not Democrat. But yet we held 
it up, and we will never know how many small businesses failed because 
politics was played rather than getting our job done.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
Rhode Island (Mr. Cicilline), the chairman of the Democratic messaging 
committee.

  Mr. CICILLINE. Madam Speaker, I rise to support the interim relief 
package.
  Thanks to the strong leadership of the Speaker and our outstanding 
committee chairs, this bill helps our smallest small businesses, our 
hospitals, and a national testing strategy, which were not included in 
Senator McConnell's original bill. So thanks again for their 
leadership.
  Madam Speaker, we also have to work hard to flatten this curve, and 
we have to do a lot more for America's working families.
  In the next phase of relief, we need to include recurring direct cash 
payments to workers, additional small business relief, aid to States 
and cities to pay first responders and their healthcare heroes that are 
on the front lines, and even more in unemployment benefits.
  Our response must meet the gravity of the moment. I hope my 
colleagues on the other side of the aisle will join with us to make 
sure we respond to this issue in the way that is necessary and not 
resist efforts to help hospitals, to help workers, to help expand 
testing, all of the things we know we need to do to defeat this 
pandemic.
  Thank goodness we stood up. Otherwise, we wouldn't have $75 million 
for healthcare workers, $25 million for testing, and all of the other 
things which are in this bill to help the smallest of small businesses.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Florida (Mr. Spano).
  Mr. SPANO. Madam Speaker, as the sole Florida Member serving on the 
house Small Business Committee, I rise today in support of replenishing 
the Paycheck Protection Program.
  While the program is far from perfect, it has been undeniably 
effective. Before the original funds were exhausted, 88,000 businesses 
in my home State of Florida received almost $18 billion in forgivable 
loans, money that saved jobs and businesses, all in just 13 days.
  Beyond numbers, what is important is the people that this program 
serves. I think of a family-owned bowling alley that has been in my 
district for almost 30 years, one that I took my kids to when they were 
growing up. With their PPP loan, they are now able to keep and pay 
their 90 employees and stay in business, so now my grandchildren can go 
there, too.
  I think of a home healthcare provider that cares for senior citizens. 
With their PPP loan, they have kept a dozen employees on the payroll 
and can continue to care for our Greatest Generation.
  While no government program is perfect, this one undeniably helps 
people in difficult times, and for that I support it.

                              {time}  1345

  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Levin).
  Mr. LEVIN of California. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for 
yielding.
  The American people are generous and strong, and we will get through 
this if we stay united.
  To the mom-and-pop businesses in my district that haven't received a 
dime and the community health centers struggling to help their 
patients, they are why I got on a flight last night, and they are why 
we need to pass this bill today.
  In the weeks ahead, it should be everyone's priority in this 
government to help our heroes on the front lines and those most in 
need, regardless of what State or city they are in. We are the United 
States of America, and we must stay united.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Nebraska (Mr. Fortenberry), a key member of the Appropriations 
Committee.
  Mr. FORTENBERRY. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Steve called me recently. He has one of the businesses that has been 
hardest hit by coronavirus. He is down 90 percent. We talked through 
some issues. Steve decided to fight back. He got in line early for the 
Paycheck Protection Program and made a decision to bring his employees 
back, and then he had a virtual ribbon cutting where he announced his 
reopening.
  Madam Speaker, our country is in dire need of some good news, and 
this PPP has been a bright spot in the trauma that we have all faced 
here.
  Where I live, Madam Speaker, the banker knows the farmer, the banker 
knows the barber, the banker knows the cafe owner. CPAs, financial 
advisers, credit unions, we have all pitched in. This is what I call 
community solidarity.
  It was clear from the beginning that this program would run out of 
money, and we have reached that point. This has been a bipartisan 
airlift, a lifesaver for so many people who make things with their own 
two hands and take care of others under their employ. I wholeheartedly 
support this bill.

[[Page H1939]]

  

  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from New 
Jersey (Mr. Kim).
  Mr. KIM. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Madam Speaker, 5,000 of my fellow New Jerseyans have died and many 
more will in the weeks to come, and still we can't get enough tests for 
those who need it.
  We are the richest, most powerful country in the world, and we are 
now tired of excuses. We need a national testing program to let us know 
if our loved ones are healthy or sick so we can reopen our country and 
help our small businesses.
  That is our challenge. It is what history will judge us by. Let's get 
it done.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Arizona (Mr. Biggs).
  Mr. BIGGS. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  The current bill provides $12 billion to jurisdictions that 
specifically authorize and encourage the use of surveillance and 
contact tracing. The bill does not define these terms.
  Does it allow big tech companies to surveil and trace American 
citizens and then turn that accumulated information over to the 
government?
  How will this data be secured, stored, et cetera?
  There are many questions that go unanswered. Not the least of these, 
however, is the question of how much longer the American people 
acquiesce to unconstitutional and crushing government action.
  We need to open up America now. I call on our Governors to free their 
citizens immediately.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
Florida (Mr. Soto).
  Mr. SOTO. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  The true question we face in this pandemic is not when we will get 
out of this crisis, but how we will get out of this crisis. And the 
keys to our economic freedom lie in this bill: $25 billion for testing 
and monitoring; $75 billion for treatment, a national testing strategy; 
finally, additional business help for our small businesses, including 
$370 billion and $60 billion for our smallest, most vulnerable 
businesses.
  If we commit to continue to focus on how to survive this pandemic, 
then, my fellow Americans, we will.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. McCarthy), the leader of the Republican Conference.
  Mr. McCARTHY. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding, and 
I thank him for his service.
  Before I begin, I want to thank all of us for spending the time to be 
here today.
  Madam Speaker, I want to say to the families who are battling this 
virus or to the families who have lost a loved one, if we would all 
pause to think about that, not only did they lose a loved one, but they 
couldn't even be near them or with them in their time of need. I want 
them to know, from a Republican and Democrat side, for the entire 
Congress: You are in our prayers, and you will stay in our prayers.
  I also want to give a sincere thank-you to all of the essential 
workers on the front lines of this crisis, not from the Republican 
leader, but from a very grateful nation.
  For the medical professionals, the doctors, the nurses, the 
receptionists, we thank you for going to work. We know the fear that it 
brings; we know the fear that it brings when you go home to your 
families; and we are grateful.
  To the farmers who make sure we have food grown in America that is 
safe and the truck drivers who drive through the night to replenish the 
stores that we walk in and keep our distance to have the food; to the 
postal workers, the warehouse workers, the clerks inside those stores 
who every day go to work, you are making a meaningful and measurable 
difference in the lives of our entire Nation.

  We will be forever grateful for those who kept us safe, kept us 
healthy, and kept us fed. They deserve a government that strives to 
meet that very same level of dedication.
  That is the promise I will make: that we will bring the same 
dedication that you bring to help others that you don't even know, and 
we should rise to that occasion. This is a commitment we make to every 
American. We will fight this virus together until we defeat it 
together.
  We did not ask for this virus. We did not invite it. It came from a 
distant land. But together, we will defeat it, not only for our 
country, but for the world.
  To do that, Congress must act, and we will continue to act even if 
some in this body want to play politics. Even if we get something held 
up, we will stay at the table until we bring people together.
  We want to put people before politics. Our entire effort will be 
bipartisan. After all, public health and a strong economy are not a 
Democrat or Republican issue.
  Unfortunately, Madam Speaker, we watched the other side within our 
own Speaker of the House interject politics where it did not belong: 
into an oversight body of our necessary relief funds.
  Now I want everybody to understand what the CARES Act did, the CARES 
Act that got held up for more than a week. Yes, at the end of the day 
it changed from that one Sunday night. Kennedy Center and others got 
some more money, but it didn't change for what the work was going to be 
done, for the people who needed it.
  Yes, some people, unfortunately, got laid off because it was delayed. 
It wasn't a bright moment for this body that week. But inside that 
CARES Act, not only did we provide resources, we provided 
accountability.
  You see, every single committee in Congress has an oversight. We have 
a committee just designed for oversight. But we wanted to make 
something to make sure it was bipartisan, so we created three new 
entities in the CARES Act just for oversight.
  The first is called the Pandemic Response Accountability Committee. 
It is made up of inspectors general, not Republicans or Democrats. They 
are independent and professional.
  The second is a Special Inspector General for Pandemic Recovery. This 
individual is appointed by the President, confirmed by the Senate, and 
lasts for 5 years. And we gave $25 million to make sure they had the 
resources to make it happen.
  But that wasn't enough. We created a third one. Now, this one is the 
Congressional Oversight Commission, with commissioners. This body is 
appointed by congressional leadership.
  On our side of the aisle, we appointed French Hill. Why? First, he is 
a statesman. He worked at the Treasury Department. He knows things 
backwards and forwards, so they can't ever fool French Hill.
  I was very excited when I heard, on the other side of the aisle, they 
appointed Donna Shalala, the former Secretary of HHS.
  You see, this body won't be weighted by one side or the other. All 
four leaders, Republican and Democrat, appoint one, so it is equal.
  And then you know what happens for a chair? Mitch McConnell and 
Speaker Pelosi decide who to become the chair. I think the American 
public says that is right. But they don't go and hide inside a corner. 
They literally report to Congress every 30 days.
  I was proud of that accomplishment. That is what America expects from 
us: no politics, but the very best on there, and report back.
  But today, when we come back because it was delayed, to give small 
business the resources it takes to keep people employed, now we added a 
little politics to the game. You see, today, we will vote on a new 
Oversight Committee.
  Will it be equal? Will it be the same number of Republicans and 
Democrats like the congressional one? No.
  Will it be the same when it comes to the inspectors general, where it 
won't care about politics? No, sad to say not.
  You see, this committee will be the only committee weighted 
politically. There will be seven Democrats and five Republicans. This 
committee was announced before they even told the mission of what this 
committee should do. They even announced the chair of the committee.
  Now, I respect the chair greatly, Madam Speaker. He has one of the 
best political minds I know. Joe Biden will tell you that. You see, our 
dear friend Congressman Clyburn should be credited with getting Joe 
Biden the nomination. While he failed in all the other States, South 
Carolina was critical.

[[Page H1940]]

  He did politics very well in the endorsement. He turned the tide of 
the Democrat nomination. And they will have a nominee, and a lot of 
that will go to  Jim Clyburn, and he deserves the credit politically 
for what he was able to accomplish.
  We do not question his political abilities. He is the majority whip. 
He knows how to gather votes. He knows how to make the political 
argument. But, Madam Speaker, this is the same individual who said that 
the pandemic presented the perfect opportunity to restructure things to 
fit our own vision.
  I do not question his appointment. I wonder why this committee. If 
that was his view, why wasn't he put on the congressional oversight 
that was equal with the number of Republicans and the number of 
Democrats?
  The public does not want to see politics. Why would we waste our time 
bringing people back to create a political committee? I guess the vote 
will tell us differently.
  It is interesting to know why we are here. At 8:30 today, we actually 
found the reason, 4.4 million more reasons why we are here. How many of 
those 4.4 million would not have gotten a pink slip last week had we 
listened more than 2 weeks ago, on April 7, when we said the program we 
created that was so successful, that was able to do the number of loans 
in 14 days that it took the SBA to do in 14 years, that there was such 
a need out there that maybe we would overcome politics for that 
one moment. Could it be too much to read that it was one simple page?

  I thought there was a moment in time it would happen. I thought we 
could say yes on a unanimous consent, this is a program we all had just 
voted for and surely just 2 weeks before.
  Yes, that was tough to get that bill through. Yes, we had to have it 
held up on the other side. That was wrong that other millions were laid 
off. But this was the moment to learn from that mistake on the other 
side before. We did not learn. It was played again.
  To those 4.4 million Americans who were laid off this week: Congress 
owes you an apology. You did not have to have that happen.
  To the small business owner: I understand this greatly. At age 20, I 
created my first business. I know where you make these decisions. You 
make these decisions on the kitchen table.
  If you ever had a small business, you realize you are the first to 
work, you are the last to leave, and you are the last to be paid. You 
know those who work with you are not just employees, they are your 
family. You know their children's names. You are there at their 
weddings; you are there when they graduated; and you are proud of them. 
You never want to have to say you are going to lay them off.
  They put everything into their business to succeed, and government 
told them they had to shut down for the health of the Nation. They made 
a sacrifice. But they got sacrificed for politics last week.
  Shame on this body.
  I have listened to this debate thoroughly. I have listened to the 
other side.

                              {time}  1400

  When you look at what we accomplished in those 14 days alone, we 
saved 30 million jobs. We all could have put a tweet out today not 
having to be in here and say we saved 34 million jobs, but, no, 4 
million more lost because somehow people felt good with politics.
  I listened to debate on the other side. Some actually said they don't 
want to be here today: We shouldn't have folded and actually came 
together. We should have used leverage even further, used that 
political leverage to hold people up.
  I have even seen some people on the other side of the aisle say they 
loved to see it when the price of oil dropped, when no one had seen it 
before, and the idea that millions in our energy industry are going to 
get laid off, too.
  It doesn't matter about politics. There will be Democrats and 
Republicans both that get laid off.
  Then I listened as we come back here, Madam Speaker, and I tried to 
listen to the other side. I tried to understand: Why would you hold it 
up? What is different?
  I listened to the debates. I listened to the leadership talk. It was 
amazing to me. In listening to it, the only thing I could think is what 
Shakespeare would say: ``The lady doth protest too much, methinks.''
  If you have to explain as hard as you can and spin with as much 
political might as you can why you laid 4.4 million people off because 
you felt better to tell Mitch McConnell that a program that put out 
funds and saved 30 million jobs, that you were going to hold it up to 
prove a point, that is not what I would want to hear in history.
  Madam Speaker, as I said earlier, it is our responsibility to act, to 
put our differences aside and do what is right for the American public.
  Now more than ever, the American people deserve a Congress that acts 
with leadership, dedication, and resilience. Anything we do in this 
Chamber that deals with COVID should be bipartisan, from legislation to 
deliberation to voting.
  Yes, I stayed up until 2 a.m. to see what the majority wanted to put 
forward. We all work hard to get here. We all almost have about the 
same size districts, because every 10 years we take a Census to figure 
that out.
  Our constituents make a decision every 2 years to lend their voice to 
the person they want to represent them. They did not lend their voice 
to give that proxy to somebody else they cannot hold accountable. They 
did not lend that voice to wait until 2 a.m. to change more than 200 
years of history because somebody wanted to have more power than the 
job of the majority themselves.
  We are living in one of the greatest turning points in history. This 
is not a time for indifference, selfishness, or division.
  We are going to help America get through this. We are going to do 
this together. In the end, we are going to be stronger, healthier, and 
more united than ever before. Why? Because we are Americans, and that 
is who we are.
  This body will raise debates. This body plays politics many times, 
but now is not the moment for politics. Now is not the moment to say: 
Let's hold something up even if somebody is going to be punished, 
because somehow I will get a political advantage.
  Finally, when people come together, the statement should not be: 
Let's hold more leverage, because it is okay because, when we come to 
the floor, we will spin it and say it was not us.
  But when we are long gone, history will write about this day. They 
will write about that day on April 7 when America witnessed something 
they have never seen before, when one stood before the Chamber in the 
Senate and requested to add exactly what we are doing today to a 
program to keep people hired in all the places we know and love in our 
neighborhood, and one party sent two people, in the middle of COVID, 
onto the floor to raise a simple hand to say they object. That was the 
only thing holding the money up between the American public and those 
4.4 million who unfortunately went to a different job today: the 
unemployment line.
  I don't know how anybody could be proud of that, but, Madam Speaker, 
I am always an optimist. I know what has been before us. I know the 
challenge. Today, we are going to display to the American public that 
we can work just as those truck drivers, those medical professionals, 
the checkers at my local Vons, or the paramedic who comes when the call 
is requested. They are essential. I think it is essential to this 
country to show we can do our job not in a partisan way.
  So when the moment comes, you will have two votes. You have already 
voted, all of us here in the Chambers, to add three more committees 
that are bipartisan for the accountability of this money going forward. 
The country is asking you to keep that together.
  So you will have a choice. Now you can cast a new vote to put in 
something partisan that we have never seen before with an individual 
who is one of the best political minds around, who believes that this 
virus is more about restructuring government in their view than solving 
a problem. Then you are going to have another vote, a vote to continue 
the funding that we already asked for more than 2 weeks ago.
  This time, after twice holding up money from the American public, I 
just ask all in this Chamber to learn from this. Let's not hold up 
again our ability to help and work in a bipartisan manner to not only 
open this Chamber, but to work for the American public and solve this 
problem once and for all.

[[Page H1941]]

  

  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, a reminder that our job here is never to 
acquiesce to the other Chamber. By any objective measurement, this is a 
much-improved piece of legislation.
  Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from Washington 
(Ms. Jayapal), whose heartfelt expressions on behalf of her 
constituents this week were well noted.
  Ms. JAYAPAL. Madam Speaker, in days, we will lose more American lives 
than we lost during the Vietnam war, 26 million Americans unemployed 
from COVID, body bags piling up, and insufficient testing and PPE.

  Democrats took a bad Republican proposal and we made it better, but 
this is far from enough. CARES four has to meet the scale of this 
crisis with a bold paycheck guarantee that stops mass unemployment, an 
essential workers package, and State and local government funding.
  Every minute, Madam Speaker, is a death, a family devastated, a 
business shuttered. We must think and deliver better.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Fitzpatrick).
  Mr. FITZPATRICK. Madam Speaker, we are here today to replenish the 
Paycheck Protection Program, and that is a good thing.
  We should have been here last week when the program ran out of money, 
and we will be back in the same position next week if we don't fix the 
PPP.
  There are over 700,000 applications currently in the queue, and if 
the Treasury Department does not establish guardrails to differentiate 
between well-capitalized brokerage firms and undercapitalized mom-and-
pop shops, we will not be helping the people who need us the most right 
now.
  We need to get these small businesses and nonprofits every single 
penny they need to survive, and we must hold China accountable for 
every single penny.
  Madam Speaker, this is not the time to be attacking each other. We 
must get through this crisis together. We must have each other's back. 
Let's have each other's back. Let's think with our hearts and our 
heads, and let's march through this together.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
Ohio (Ms. Kaptur).
  Ms. KAPTUR. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  Madam Speaker, this economic boost is desperately needed as our 
Nation sits on such a dangerous precipice.
  The bill offers hope to millions and millions of Americans, our small 
businesses, hospitals, and those on the front lines, yet I am troubled 
by the limited insight into how the last $2 trillion was spent and why 
so much has yet to be disbursed. It seems little went to those who need 
it most, while those with access had their takings.
  Unfortunately, today's bill drastically shortchanges America's local 
communities and first responders as calls and pressure to reopen mount. 
Without data, it is shortsighted. It also offers no assistance to our 
postal service, whose jobs hang in the balance.
  Madam Speaker, Congress must move America forward a step at a time. 
Lives are at stake. I urge my colleagues to vote for this important 
bill.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Ohio 
(Mr. Davidson).
  Mr. DAVIDSON of Ohio. Madam Speaker, I appreciate the gentleman for 
yielding.
  This bill is a Band-Aid, and it doesn't even cover the wound. It is 
better than no bandage, but it won't stop the bleeding in our economy, 
and it won't stop this virus.
  In light of COVID-19 and the reaction to it, Congress urgently needs 
to lead by example and get into full session safely, but fully 
functional, laser focused, 24/7, in full compliance with the House 
rules for debate, amendment, and voting.
  Every one of us has a duty to balance and consider public health and 
our economy, but every single one of us swore an oath to support and 
defend our Constitution, to defend freedom and represent our 
constituents.
  It is time to support and defend it. It is time for us to occupy this 
House and man our duty station and win.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
South Carolina (Mr. Cunningham).
  Mr. CUNNINGHAM. Madam Speaker, today I will vote to extend a lifeline 
to small businesses, shore up our hospitals, and expand testing so we 
can reopen our economy, but it is unacceptable that it has taken this 
long.
  Supporting hospitals and small businesses is not partisan, but, 
again, politics is obstructing policy.
  This bill fails to ensure relief goes only to small businesses that 
need it most instead of large corporations, nor does it help States 
respond to this unprecedented crisis.
  We cannot wait until the next disaster forces both sides to the 
table. Our constituents deserve more from their Representatives. Let's 
come together and get our country back to work.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Ms. Castor of Florida). Without objection, 
the gentleman from Ohio (Mr. Davidson) controls the time of the 
gentleman from Texas.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. DAVIDSON of Ohio. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the 
gentleman from South Carolina (Mr. Norman).
  Mr. NORMAN. Madam Speaker, I rise today to support a lifeline for our 
small businesses, for our first responders, for our hospitals, but I 
also rise today to say now is the time to stop writing checks on money 
we don't have that is mortgaging the future of this great country. I 
was not sent here to bankrupt this country.
  Secondly, we need to get our businesses to open the doors and do what 
Americans have always been allowed to do, which is go to work. Now is 
the time. There is one person who can do that, and that is the Speaker 
of the House. I urge her to get us back to work.
  We are getting paid; many Americans are not.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Maryland (Mr. Hoyer), the distinguished majority leader.
  Mr. HOYER. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for yielding.
  I have heard a number of people, including my friend, the minority 
leader, stand up and say we need to act in a bipartisan fashion, and 
the next statement is a partisan attack on one of our Members. It is 
either schizophrenia or a lack of understanding of what this Congress 
has been doing over the last few weeks.
  I don't know about you, Madam Speaker, but I have been working 6 
hours, 7 hours on the phone and another 3 or 4 hours reviewing the 
materials that have gotten us here today.
  Why did it take so long? Because it took 2 weeks for my Republican 
colleagues--and this is a partisan statement, I understand that, but I 
think we ought to all be realistic.
  We are all trying to get to a place where America and Americans are 
safe and where our economy is working, because the statistics we see 
are statistics of pain and of fear and of anxiety about tomorrow.

                              {time}  1415

  So what have we been doing? We have been on the phone with one 
another. I have talked to the minority leader numerous times over the 
last 2 weeks, not only on this particular piece of legislation, but on 
the process going forward.
  So if anybody on that side is saying that Congress is not working, 
they must be speaking for themselves, because every one of these 
colleagues on my side of the aisle--and I believe on their side of the 
aisle--has been working very hard: in touch with their local 
government, in touch with their Governor, in touch with their 
healthcare delivery people, anybody who works in a hospital or a 
healthcare center or a federally qualified health center. They are 
working hard.
  Let us not denigrate ourselves or this institution or our commitment 
to the American people because that is blatant partisanship.
  We waited 2 weeks, Madam Speaker, that is correct. What for? So that 
the proposal that we made 2 weeks ago--or 3 weeks ago--which has now 
effectively been accepted by the Republicans would be accepted. That is 
what we waited for.
  And what did we get? $120 billion additional money for small 
business. And be assured, we are talking about for the small business. 
What this bill does is puts $120 billion, in addition, $370 billion, 
for small business.
  Now, we are talking about bipartisanship. The first bill we did 
dealing

[[Page H1942]]

with coronavirus on this floor passed 415-2. It doesn't sound like 
partisanship to me. It sounds like we came together and agreed on how 
we could help. And it wasn't enough.
  And then on phase two, which we passed on March 14, 10 days later, is 
Congress not working? Ten days later, we passed 363-40. It doesn't 
sound like partisanship to me.
  And then phase three we passed on March 27, 13 days later, on a voice 
vote, with only one Member in the Senate or the House demurring.
  It doesn't sound like partisanship to me, Madam Speaker, and I don't 
think today's vote will be a partisan vote. I certainly hope it will 
not be.
  Why? Because for the last 2 weeks, we have been working with one 
another to try to get to a place where we think we are giving the 
needed resources, because we think the initial request was 
shortchanging hospitals, shortchanging testing. It still shortchanges 
our States and local government, and so we will need another bill to 
try to get there.
  Madam Speaker, on Tuesday, the Senate came together to pass this 
legislation in a bipartisan way. Now, unlike the House, no Senators 
came to the floor except three or four. They did it by unanimous 
consent. We are not able to do that--although I think this bill will 
pass overwhelmingly--because some of our Republican friends wanted to 
vote.
  Fine. We are here. We are wearing masks. I am not wearing a mask 
while I am speaking, but as soon as I stop speaking, I am going to put 
my mask back on as I turn around to go among us. Congress is doing its 
job.
  And I want to tell the American people one more time: Members are 
working daily to respond to the coronavirus that is putting our people 
and our country and our economy at risk.
  Last month, we enacted emergency legislation that included more than 
$2 trillion in assistance for workers, veterans, small businesses, 
healthcare systems, and communities dealing with the spread of 
coronavirus. One of the programs we created together was the Paycheck 
Protection Program to try to keep people on a payroll, even if they 
could not go to work because health professionals say don't congregate.
  The Paycheck Protection Program provides loans to small businesses 
that will be forgiven--that will be forgiven--if they keep their 
workers on the payroll. The need was so great that the initial $350 
billion, as has been pointed out, in funding, Madam Speaker, was 
exhausted in a matter of days. So, today, we are providing another $310 
billion for that program, and an additional $60 billion for the most 
at-risk small businesses.
  Critically, $60 billion of that, as I just said, will be set aside 
for smaller banks where they focus on community development financial 
institutions that service businesses in rural and minority communities 
that were left out of the initial program.
  I bet if you ask your small businesses or rural people, your 
hospitals or those State officials who are saying testing is essential, 
I bet they would say: I am glad you waited because you got us resources 
that we needed.
  That wasn't in the initial proposal, of course, that came from the 
administration, and it was objected to, and the leader in the Senate 
would not provide for such sums.
  More help is still needed, of course, for nonprofits as well as small 
and minority-owned businesses, those in underbanked communities and the 
self-employed. Those must be, Madam Speaker, priorities in the next 
bill that, clearly, is going to be necessary.
  In addition to the increased funding for the Paycheck Protection 
Program, Democrats insisted on recapitalizing economic injury disaster 
loans as well, providing an additional $60 billion for this program, 
which can be leveraged to $300 billion.
  Yes, we asked for, we worked for, we negotiated to get small 
businesses, minority businesses, businesses that couldn't get into the 
system that the other bigger businesses got in--some so big that they 
were ashamed and gave the money back.
  We are also providing an additional $75 billion for hospitals and, 
crucially, $25 billion for testing.
  I guarantee you, not one of your hospitals is going to call you up 
and say: You should have acted sooner and not had the hospitals in 
there--not one of them. And no Governor or county executive or mayor or 
county commissioner or county council person is going to say: Gee whiz, 
we didn't want that money for testing.
  We will not be able to return our economy to normal operations, Madam 
Speaker, without a robust testing system in place to know we can safely 
go to work without putting workers at risk and to identify those who 
have coronavirus so we can take necessary steps to isolate them and 
trace those with whom they came in contact, because that is how we win 
this battle.

  This bill is an interim step, the fourth interim step as we continue 
to work on the next major piece of legislation. I hope we can include, 
by the way, Madam Speaker, in the next bill, provisions that, 
unfortunately, we were unable to secure in this bill.
  First of all, we shortchanged--we are all in the Nation's Capital. 
Millions of Americans come here, and we gave Wyoming and Vermont--small 
States, less population than the District of Columbia, the Nation's 
Capital, to which millions of your constituents will come. We 
shortchanged them by giving them 40 percent of what we gave the 
smallest States, smaller than the District of Columbia.
  We wanted to add that $700 million in this bill. Unfortunately, we 
couldn't get agreement on that. I think that was penny-wise and pound-
foolish for those of us who want our constituents to visit Washington 
to see their government.
  We also must include more help for State and local governments. They 
have been on the front lines of fighting this scourge and, as a result, 
have spent a lot of resources they budgeted for other issues, including 
employees, including police and fire and health workers. We need to do 
that. We wanted to do it in this bill. But those of you who argue for 
delay, I will bet that you are going to vote in the next tranche for 
additional State and local help--maybe not all of you. Why you are 
delaying that help is beyond me.
  This, by the way, is not an abstract accounting problem. We are 
talking about States and counties across the country being able to keep 
teachers, first responders as tax revenues collapse due to the 
necessary social distancing.
  This pandemic, Madam Speaker, has shown a spotlight on the stark 
disparities in health status and treatment of African Americans in 
particular and minority communities in general. That reality is an 
indefensible and unacceptable one.
  While we do include new ways of tracking certain data relating to 
racial disparities in this pandemic, there is more we must do, not 
simply for those who are at greater risk, but for all of us who wear a 
mask; not because we don't want to be with one another, but because 
this pandemic has made us a risk to others, to our neighbors, our 
friends, our family.
  Furthermore, we need to do more to protect our elections. My Governor 
has ordered that an election that is coming up next Tuesday be all by 
mail. Now, in Wisconsin, the Governor tried to do that and Republicans 
fought us. The Republican speaker of the Wisconsin House was covered 
from head to toe in a gown, super mask, and gloves.
  Do we want to ask all of our citizens to be so at risk because they 
are exercising their franchise to vote in America? I surely think that 
is not the case.
  And so we need some additional money to facilitate, because they 
didn't plan on it, because they didn't plan on this pandemic, to allow 
our citizens to vote, to encourage them to vote, to facilitate their 
vote, to welcome their vote, and to provide for a way that they can do 
it safely without endangering themselves or others.
  Furthermore, we need to do more to protect our elections in this 
administration. I am glad that the House is moving forward today with 
the creation of a select committee to oversee the coronavirus response.
  Now, my friends on the other side of the aisle had eight different 
partisan commissions overseeing what happened in Benghazi where four 
American lives were tragically lost. 44,575 Americans have lost their 
lives. Is it too much to ask that we would have a special committee to 
make sure that the money that we are appropriating in historic amounts 
is spent correctly?

[[Page H1943]]

  Congress has a responsibility to ensure that the extraordinary sums 
we have authorized and appropriated are disbursed efficiently and 
consistent with our intent. Such great sums can not only be a source of 
economic recovery, but, surely, everyone on this floor knows that that 
sum of money on the table can also be a magnet for waste, fraud, abuse, 
and, yes, criminality. We owe the American people, as we appropriate 
unbelievable sums, to make sure that the American people are the ones 
advantaged.
  Any time Congress spends taxpayer money, particularly in such large 
amounts, we owe it to the American people to know where that money is 
going and to ensure that it is being spent as directed.
  Now, I know the President of the United States said he is going to do 
the oversight. I don't think that is what the Framers had in mind in 
terms of checks and balances.
  And in the most efficient and ethical ways possible, we must know 
which programs are working best, which aren't, and that way we can 
modify what we do in the future.
  Madam Speaker, I want to thank Speaker Pelosi. I want to thank the 
chair of the Small Business Committee, and I want to thank the chair of 
the Financial Services Committee. I want to thank the chair of the 
Education and Labor Committee.
  I want to thank Mr. Neal, who is on the floor, and many other chairs, 
Mr. Peterson, who is very nervous about not having a nutrition program 
in this bill, which we wanted. That would have delayed it further 
because, of course, we didn't get support on the other side of the 
aisle for that. But people are in incredibly long food lines because 
their nutritional health, as well as their psychological health, is at 
risk because they can't get food.

                              {time}  1430

  I thank Speaker Pelosi for having the courage and the wisdom to stand 
up and say, ``We need these items.'' And we have gotten a lot of them. 
We asked for $500 billion total. This is $484 billion total.
  My, my, my, you held out for 2 weeks for a $16 billion savings.
  I also thank our Members who have been working--let me repeat this 
once again, Madam Speaker. These Members, those Members, have been 
working round-the-clock to make sure their communities are safe, to 
make sure their hospitals are getting what they need, to make sure that 
their teachers are teaching kids at home. Everybody has been working 
hard. You may not see us, but millions and millions and millions of 
Americans are working at home. They are teleworking. That is 
essentially what we have been doing--teleworking. And don't tell them 
they are not working, because they know they are working. They have 
been a credit to their districts. Every Member--Republican, Democrat--I 
presume, and I only know about the Democrats--225 of our 234 have been 
on the phone 2\1/2\ hours a day talking back and forth between one 
another to see what policies we need. They have been a credit to their 
districts, to the institutions of the House and this Nation, spending 
hours on the phone, through videoconference, making sure that Congress 
is doing its job, and talking to State and local leaders and healthcare 
providers.
  Let me thank the Members and staff who volunteered to be here on the 
floor. We will go off the floor and we won't be as exposed as they are. 
They are all wearing masks. They are wearing masks because they know 
there is a risk. Perhaps not as great a risk as those courageous 
individuals who work in our hospitals and our healthcare providers in 
many different modes, but courageous and patriotic, nonetheless. Thank 
you, staff.
  I thank those who are working in our grocery stores, our police, our 
fire, our truck drivers, who are getting food and products from here to 
there; EMS personnel who respond to emergencies; delivery workers. And 
every time I go to the grocery store--and I hope all of you do it--I 
thank those people who are stocking the shelves. I thank those people 
who are checking us out. I thank those people who are putting the carts 
where they need to be. They are the best of America, and we owe it to 
them to do all we can to bring this pandemic to an end as quickly and 
safely as possible. We all want to go back to work in the regular 
fashion. The Democratic-led House will continue to do everything 
possible, working with our Republican friends, who we believe want the 
same objective, a safe America, a working America.
  We want to help small businesses, workers, and their families get 
through this crisis, and to ensure that our courageous healthcare 
workers who are on the front lines have all the support necessary to 
win this fight against COVID-19.
  Madam Speaker, I hope, and I pray that every Member of Congress will 
vote for America and Americans, and vote for this bill. We may need 
more, but we certainly need to do this this day and get more assistance 
to the American people.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Without objection, the gentleman from Texas 
(Mr. Brady) controls the time.
  There was no objection.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield myself 30 seconds. Let me fact-
check the absurd claim that Congress has left State and local 
governments behind.
  We fund one-third of State budgets year-to-year. We have already 
given $150 billion direct aid to State and local governments. Some 
Democrat governors haven't even sent it down to their local 
communities.
  $260 billion in State unemployment; $100 billion for State and local 
hospitals in healthcare; $45 billion for State and local disaster aid; 
$30 billion for State and local schools and colleges; $25 billion for 
State and local mass transit; and more Medicaid money for our State and 
local governments. That claim is simply absurd.
  Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from Idaho (Mr. 
Fulcher).
  Mr. FULCHER. Madam Speaker, a month ago we stood on the floor and we 
authorized a $2.2 trillion stimulus package. Today, we will authorize 
another $480 billion to keep it going. By law, the U.S. economy is 
mostly shut down. As long as that is the case, we have an obligation to 
facilitate relief. So with anxiety, I will support an extension of the 
Paycheck Protection Program.
  Madam Speaker, most of the Members have not been here the last month. 
We have been working, but we have been working from home due to health 
concerns. And by most of Congress not being here, that means only a few 
negotiate the deals, and these are very big deals.
  Madam Speaker, our job is here. No more bypassing of regular order. 
This virus may threaten our health, but when all of us aren't involved 
in the work of Congress, our Republic is threatened.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, the gentleman has already said that he 
intends to visit the issue immediately of more aid for State and local 
governments, and be assured, based upon the negotiations and 
discussions we have had in our caucus, that opportunity will present 
itself in the near future.
  Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
Massachusetts (Ms. Pressley).
  Ms. PRESSLEY. Madam Speaker, families are in crisis, food pantry 
lines around the block, rent is due again in 8 days. The community 
health centers and hospital workers in my district are desperate. This 
is a crisis within a crisis, exacerbating every inequity that already 
existed. This Chamber will determine how many more lives we are robbed 
of. Now is not the time for a back-pass.
  Our Nation is crying out. The people are crying out, and we must 
answer their cries in the CARES package with a bill that puts the 
people first. Now is not the time to rest. We took an oath. People are 
counting on us. They deserve healthcare and economic housing justice. 
We cannot continue to leave out our immigrant neighbors and minority-
owned small businesses.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Georgia (Mr. Carter).
  Mr. CARTER of Georgia. Madam Speaker, I thank the gentleman for 
yielding.
  Madam Speaker, I rise today in support of this legislation. This very 
important legislation, the Paycheck Protection Program, has proven to 
be a great program that has saved many small businesses in the First 
Congressional District of Georgia, and there

[[Page H1944]]

are many small businesses that still need this program. Therefore, the 
extra funding that we are sending here today is going to be utilized 
and utilized in a great way by these small businesses.
  Also, there are $75 billion in there for hospitals, and hospitals--
particularly rural hospitals--are extremely important in this scenario 
as well. We need to make sure that money gets to them.
  Oh, by the way, speaking of hospitals, Madam Speaker, heroes come and 
go but legends last forever. We have heard that before. Today, our 
heroes are wearing white lab coats. They are our doctors, our 
pharmacists, our healthcare workers, our nurses, who are providing 
healthcare services, risking their own health in order to provide these 
healthcare services to our citizens. I thank them for that. Our country 
thanks them for that. Their service will be legendary.
  And finally, Madam Speaker, for all of those in the First 
Congressional District and throughout our country who have lost loved 
ones, our thoughts and prayers are with you.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
New York (Ms. Ocasio-Cortez).
  Ms. OCASIO-CORTEZ. Madam Speaker, on behalf of my constituents in the 
Bronx and Queens, New York's 14th Congressional District, the most 
impacted district in America, calling people losing their families 
every day, it is a joke when Republicans say that they have urgency 
around this bill.
  The only folks that they have urgency around are folks like Ruth's 
Chris Steak House and Shake Shack. Those are the people getting 
assistance in this bill. You are not trying to fix this bill for moms 
and pops. And we have to fight to fund hospitals, fight to fund 
testing. That is what we are fighting for in this bill. It is 
unconscionable. If you had urgency, you would legislate like rent was 
due on May 1st and make sure that you include rent and mortgage relief 
for our constituents.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Members are reminded to address their 
remarks to the Chair.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I yield 1 minute to the gentleman from 
Florida (Mr. Bilirakis).
  Mr. BILIRAKIS. Madam Speaker, I appreciate the ranking member 
yielding me the time.
  Madam Speaker, since the establishment of the PPP, I have heard from 
countless local, small businesses that the application process was 
difficult to navigate. In response to these revelations, I submitted to 
leadership a letter asking that any future funding for PPP loans 
contain a set-aside for the truly small businesses, like the mom and 
pops.
  I was pleased to see this take its form in today's funding package 
that sets aside funds for small community banks and credit unions, 
which have a good track record working with our small businesses.
  Madam Speaker, it would be a tragedy if we lost these mom-and-pop 
businesses. I have a business in my district. It is Faklis' Department 
Store and Shoe Repair. They have been around since 1912, Madam Speaker. 
I don't want to see them go. The store was established by Greek 
immigrants and passed on from generation to generation. It would be a 
great tragedy if we lost them. They survived World War II, of course, 
World War I, and the Great Depression. Let's save our small businesses. 
They are the backbone of America.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
Illinois (Ms. Underwood).
  Ms. UNDERWOOD. Madam Speaker, I rise today in support of the Paycheck 
Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act. This urgently 
needed legislation will help provide almost $700 billion in additional 
grants and loans to small businesses and farmers reeling from the 
coronavirus crisis. It invests $75 billion in providers, $25 billion in 
testing, and requires the administration to develop a national plan for 
testing, so once our businesses reopen, they can stay open.
  Congress has more to do. Frontline workers need PPE. Families and 
communities need relief. But this bill is a necessary interim fix to 
keep needed-funds flowing to small businesses and our health system.
  Madam Speaker, I urge my colleagues to support it.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
Pennsylvania (Mr. Lamb).
  Mr. LAMB. Madam Speaker, a Senator said yesterday he would let local 
governments go bankrupt. And while he said that, our local county 
executive was busy loading food into people's cars. Cars that had 
toolboxes and work boots in them, and people who were nonetheless 
hungry.

  If the Senator has his way, it is these people whose towns will go 
bankrupt. He talks about the economy. And I asked, ``What happens to an 
economy where entire towns of firefighters and teachers and others lose 
their paycheck or their pension?''
  We are moving the ball today, but no one should mistake this for a 
touchdown. The Senator would send our best players off the field. The 
American people will never accept that, and neither should we.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
Illinois (Mr. Krishnamoorthi).
  Mr. KRISHNAMOORTHI. Madam Speaker, I rise in support of this 
legislation. As a small business person, I am glad that it helps small 
businesses. As the husband of a physician who is treating COVID 
patients today, I am glad that it helps hospitals. But as an American, 
I am glad that we are coming together to help those whose lives are 
falling apart. We must do more, but let's come back together again and 
resolve to do this in a bipartisan fashion once again.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
Florida (Ms. Mucarsel-Powell).
  Ms. MUCARSEL-POWELL. Madam Speaker, South Florida is hurting. My 
community is calling me in tears because they don't know how they are 
going to make payments or keep their businesses afloat, and hospital 
workers are afraid of losing their jobs. And to make matters worse, 
Floridians--over 1 million Floridians--still cannot access unemployment 
benefits.
  Although I am happy to support this legislation to support our small 
businesses, we need to make sure that it is those small mom-and-pop 
businesses, minority-owned businesses, women-owned businesses, veteran-
owned businesses, that receive that funding. We have not done enough 
for America. We need to continue to work.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Rose).

                              {time}  1445

  Mr. ROSE of New York. Madam Speaker, I rise today because I agree 
with my colleagues across the aisle. We should have been here weeks 
ago: weeks ago to get more money for our hospitals, weeks ago to 
protect testing, weeks ago to improve this program for small 
businesses.
  But, alas, only in Washington, D.C., would we wait weeks when we all 
agree. But let's move forward because our frontline workers right now 
cannot afford for us to stand by for politics.
  Leader McConnell said to our cities and States, to our cops and 
firemen and teachers, he told them to drop dead. Well, why don't we put 
politics aside, rise up, and tell him that we put the country first.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
New Jersey (Ms. Sherrill).
  Ms. SHERRILL. Madam Speaker, I am going to vote for this bill because 
it provides desperately needed money for small businesses and 
hospitals. But we have got to do better by our State and local 
governments. We must support the work of our cops, firefighters, EMTs, 
and teachers.
  New Jersey is critical in the fight against this virus. We have more 
scientists and engineers per square mile than anywhere in the world and 
the best education system in the country,

[[Page H1945]]

so supporting our State and local governments in New Jersey is key to 
beating this virus and taking care of Americans.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
Michigan (Ms. Slotkin).
  Ms. SLOTKIN. Madam Speaker, I support this legislation as a critical 
lifeline to small businesses coping with the crisis and the hospitals 
on the front lines of this war.
  SBA loan programs are vital to Main Street businesses across my 
district, and I am proud to support them. But this must-pass bill 
should also include support for America's smallest and medium-sized 
communities who face the very real possibility of eliminating basic 
services without our support.
  The same police and fire, health department and sanitation workers 
who are risking their lives every day now have their jobs at risk. They 
deserve better. We should give them better. Let's do it.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
Pennsylvania (Ms. Dean).
  Ms. DEAN. Madam Speaker, shame on those who would not tell the truth 
during a pandemic. Though more help is needed, I rise in support of 
this interim funding bill.
  These dollars must actually make it to those who need it: small 
family businesses, minority- and women-owned businesses, so many I have 
talked to over these last few weeks. Their future and our economy 
depends upon it.
  For healthcare workers saving lives, we have the responsibility to do 
all we can to help protect those who are saving our families' lives.
  To reopen our country, we need testing, testing, testing. I look 
forward to the next more robust and even more equitable bill of relief 
for the people.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
Connecticut (Mr. Himes).
  Mr. HIMES. Madam Speaker, I rise today in strong support of the aid 
that we will deliver today.
  My small State of Connecticut will soon pass 2,000 fatalities. These 
are our neighbors. These are people we know and love.
  Madam Speaker, I celebrate the bipartisanship that will be 
demonstrated today. It will save lives.
  Our small businesses are critical to our economy and to opportunity, 
but so are our hospitals and the heroes who work in those hospitals. So 
are our EMTs and our paramedics and our police officers and our 
firefighters. I say that not to make a political point, but to say that 
they will need our help in the coming days, and we need to tease out 
more bipartisanship to get that done quickly.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Rouda).
  Mr. ROUDA. Madam Speaker, I rise today in support of this 
legislation.
  But let's be clear: 50,000 of our fellow Americans have already died. 
We have 26 million Americans out of work. We have tens of thousands of 
small businesses that will not be able to participate in this 
legislation because we haven't funded it enough, and we have cities 
clearly looking at the prospect of bankruptcy.
  So we do have a lot more work to do, and I hope we can continue to 
work in a bipartisan fashion, stop the partisan sniping, and do what we 
were meant to do here to protect our country.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
Florida (Ms. Wasserman Schultz).
  Ms. WASSERMAN SCHULTZ. Madam Speaker, healthcare workers and small 
businesses are struggling to stay alive. That is why Democrats fought 
to ensure hospitals and Main Street get this jolt of relief.
  We walled off billions in new Paycheck Protection Program funds for 
smaller community banks and credit unions so Wall Street doesn't vacuum 
it all up.
  Let's face it: If healthcare workers cannot safely protect us, 
America's economy stops. So Democrats secured $75 billion for 
healthcare providers and $25 billion more for testing. Without mass 
testing, we can not fully reopen, and we end up voting for endless 
relief packages.
  Without Democrats' push for truly small businesses, big business 
would have continued to cut the line.

  We will rescue schools and local governments in CARES Act 2. Right 
now, this is the adrenaline shot that the healthcare system needs.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Sherman).
  Mr. SHERMAN. Madam Speaker, we need to shift from the economic to the 
biological focus on defeating this disease.
  Everyone should wear a mask, including you, Mr. President, whenever 
you might be within 6 feet.
  And we need to provide free masks to the homeless and others.
  We need more money for better paid sick leave so all those with 
symptoms can stay home.
  And so far, only one-tenth of 1 percent of the coronavirus money has 
gone for medical research to prevent and treat the virus.
  Now, I am pleased this bill has money for testing and to develop new 
tests. The next bill needs $5 billion to research therapeutics.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
California (Mrs. Torres).
  Mrs. TORRES of California. Madam Speaker, I rise in support of this 
bill and to highlight the need for reliable testing.
  Last week, Pastor Joseph Owes succumbed to COVID-19. He was a pillar 
in our community, hosted food banks, health fairs, job and financial 
literacy workshops to help his community.
  He tried repeatedly to get tested but was denied time and time again 
because testing hasn't been available in my community. If he had been 
tested and treated earlier, he would still be here with us today.
  Without tests, we don't know who has COVID and we can't open up our 
economy.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
Minnesota (Ms. Omar).
  Ms. OMAR. Madam Speaker, people in my State of Minnesota are hurting, 
and I am sure everyone represents a State that is hurting.
  It is indefensible for us not to support to replenish the PPP, but it 
is also indefensible for us not to focus on replenishing the coffers of 
Americans and focus on making sure they are able to support paying 
their rent, making sure that our cities and States are not going 
bankrupt, and making sure American families are not dying of hunger.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
New Mexico (Ms. Torres Small).
  Ms. TORRES SMALL of New Mexico. Madam Speaker, I rise to get 
Americans the support to keep them safe and make sure New Mexicans and 
rural communities get their fair share. By refilling small business 
forgivable loans and dedicating money to small lenders, this package 
will help New Mexicans who were crowded out of the first wave of 
funding.
  I am also voting to save rural hospitals and to get testing and masks 
and gloves and gowns, all the things we need to keep us safe and to 
rebuild our economy.
  There is still so much work to be done, and let's do that next step 
together.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, might I inquire as to how much time is 
remaining on both sides.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The gentleman from Massachusetts has 12\1/2\

[[Page H1946]]

minutes remaining. The gentleman from Texas has 4 minutes remaining.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from New 
York (Mr. Espaillat).
  Mr. ESPAILLAT. Madam Speaker, in the Northwest Bronx, in Washington 
Heights, Inwood, in Harlem and East Harlem, this pandemic is still 
ravaging Black and Brown lives. The economic plight this virus will 
leave will be unprecedented.
  I am glad we are providing $60 billion for small businesses and 
fought for funding for hospitals and testing, but we must come back.
  Mitch McConnell's words are equivalent to Gerald Ford's words: Drop 
dead, New York.
  But we will come back.
  We must support State and local governments. We must support our 
communities. Our people are dying.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Carbajal).
  Mr. CARBAJAL. Madam Speaker, I rise in support of this bipartisan 
relief package. The funds we are adding to the PPP and EIDL programs 
will go a long way in providing necessary support to small businesses. 
I am glad that small farms and ranches will now be eligible for the 
EIDL program and that we have secured additional resources for 
hospitals, workers, and testing.
  While this is another great bipartisan step forward, more must be 
done, especially for our States, cities, and local governments. People 
are hurting. Time is of the essence. We must act now.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentlewoman from 
Michigan (Ms. Tlaib).
  Ms. TLAIB. Madam Speaker, this bill is only necessary because, in the 
last bill, Republicans prioritized a half-trillion-dollar gift to 
corporations that turned around and laid off workers who bailed them 
out.
  Our people need us to prioritize public health and testing, and they 
need recurring monthly relief payments now.
  This is Skylar Herbert. You need to see her face because there needs 
to be a human face to this pandemic. She is 5 years old, died from 
coronavirus. Skylar loved dressing up and performing, and she loved and 
adored being in kindergarten. Her death should be a wake-up call that 
we must act in urgency.

  Her father, a firefighter, her mother a police officer, first 
responders, and the amount of guilt that they feel because maybe they 
didn't have access to testing, that is exactly why they are out there 
telling her story every single day.
  Please, let's act now in urgency.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. The time of the gentlewoman has expired.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield the gentlewoman from Michigan an 
additional 1 minute.
  Ms. TLAIB. I urge my colleagues to please do more to save lives. It 
is immoral for us to walk away and take a month off when people, our 
neighbors, are dying and losing loved ones.
  So, in memory of Skylar, in honor of her, please let's expand public 
health funding and testing for everyone.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.
  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield 30 seconds to the gentleman from 
California (Mr. Cox).
  Mr. COX of California. Madam Speaker, I hear my colleagues on the 
other side today, one after another, crying about the replenishment of 
the PPP. They wanted to keep it as originally designed, where 4 percent 
of the borrowers got 45 percent of the money. I think the farms and 
dairies and small mom-and-pop shops in my district and across the 
country should get loans before big steakhouses.
  I am proud of the work my Caucus has done to make the PPP a more 
equitable program, plus getting sorely needed funds for hospitals and 
testing, which we all know is what is required to reopen our economy.
  Mr. BRADY. Madam Speaker, I continue to reserve the balance of my 
time.

                              {time}  1500

  Mr. NEAL. Madam Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume as 
I prepare to close.
  Madam Speaker, I want to thank many Members and staff who made sure 
this final product conveyed the values of the Democratic Caucus and 
will bring real life and relief to the American people.
  First, I want to thank the Speaker, who has provided tremendous 
leadership to get this deal over the line.
  Next, our deepest gratitude to fellow committee chairs and their 
contributions and shrewd negotiation of this package.
  Small Business Committee Chairwoman Velazquez and Financial Services 
Committee Chairwoman Waters deserve our thanks for securing funding for 
small businesses that will need it the most.
  Thanks to Frank Pallone from the Energy and Commerce Committee for 
fighting for national testing as a strategy and securing funding to 
combat this public health crisis.
  Each coronavirus relief package has been a herculean effort, and this 
one is no different.
  With that, I want to close and wish good health to our colleagues and 
our fellow Americans, and I urge my colleagues to support this 
legislation.
  Mr. Speaker, I reserve the balance of my time.
  Mr. BRADY. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself as much time as I may consume. 
I am prepared to close.
  Mr. Speaker, I want to thank Chairman Neal for his leadership and 
close working relationship on these key issues.
  Look, this bill is 16 days too late, despite all of the denials you 
heard. We could have agreed on this bill in 16 minutes, Republicans and 
Democrats, but it got held up for all sorts of extracurricular stuff. 
We should have come together. It was delayed. Real people lost their 
jobs as a result.
  Secondly, I want to thank President Trump, Vice President Pence, the 
entire Cabinet, and everyone in the government who has done a 
remarkable job standing up the small business program in 7 days, in 
sending out individual rebate checks in 18 days rather than 70 months 
that it took the last time there were rebate checks. I want to thank 
that leadership in this coronavirus crisis, both on the healthcare side 
and with the economic challenges we face.
  I want to thank Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy, who has done a 
remarkable job leading the Republicans in the House through each of 
these key emergency aid bills. I want to thank the leadership that 
supports him, ranking members who work with our Democratic colleagues 
to put together a bill we think is critical and urgent.
  There is a guiding quote that I have kept as my computer screen saver 
for many years here in my office. It reads: ``I cannot give you the 
formula for success, but I can give you the formula for failure, which 
is: Try to please everybody.''
  This bill doesn't try to please everybody or do everything. It 
focuses on replenishing small business loan programs that local 
businesses and their workers desperately need. It provides more funding 
for our hospitals and healthcare workers who man the front lines of 
this pandemic. It commits more of your tax dollars producing and 
distributing tests to communities that need them. These are immediate, 
urgent priorities right now, and we need to act right now.
  I would point out, also, Mr. Speaker, that those who say we are not 
committed to State and local communities, this Congress, Republicans 
joined Democrats, sending $150 billion down to our State and local 
communities.
  Unlike some Democratic Governors who are holding their dollars at the 
State capitol and refuse to share it with local communities, our 
Governor in Texas announced more than a week ago he was developing an 
approach to make sure all of our communities on the front line are 
getting help. Governors who are withholding that aid to small 
communities ought to be ashamed of themselves.
  Finally, let's continue, after this work is done today, to work 
together with President Trump to apply maximum pressure to the 
coronavirus, help businesses create safe, healthy workplaces. Let's 
jump-start the economic rebound and accelerate a return to

[[Page H1947]]

work for those who are jobless or furloughed.
  I urge strong and bipartisan support for this bill.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Mr. NEAL. Mr. Speaker, I yield myself such time as I may consume.
  Mr. Speaker, we need to establish clarity in the Record.
  This legislation is much improved over what came over to us from the 
Senate. This includes an additional $75 billion for our hospitals, $60 
billion that is directed at people at the bottom end of the small 
business community.
  In addition, we all agree in this Chamber that the following has to 
occur: testing, testing, testing. That was not in the legislation until 
we decided on this side to establish that as a marker. This 
legislation, on every basis, has been improved.
  And let me just say this: President Trump has said more money for 
State and local governments, Republican Governors across the country 
and Democratic Governors, including the Republican Governor of 
Massachusetts who has spoken to me personally on this issue, as we go 
forward.
  This is about the police, the fire, the EMTs. This is about the 
schoolteachers. This is about those individuals who make a difference 
in our lives, the postal workers every day, and not to forget those 
individuals whom we depend on and we have come to see just how 
important they are to all of us in the last few weeks. That is what the 
additional phase four will look like.
  And with that, Mr. Speaker, with gratitude, I want to recognize the 
gentlewoman from New York. I must tell you that not only did she do a 
great job with authoring this legislation, but her patience in 
answering questions from colleagues during the course of the last 2 
weeks has been remarkable.
  Mr. Speaker, I yield the balance of my time to the gentlewoman from 
New York (Ms. Velazquez).
  Ms. VELAZQUEZ. Mr. Speaker, by providing $310 billion for PPP, this 
bill will allow the program to reopen and more small businesses to 
secure capital and keep employees on payroll--$310 billion.

  When the Senate passed their bill, they passed $250 billion for small 
businesses. So it is not enough to pour funding into a program if loans 
are not reaching the intended businesses. All of us have been concerned 
by reports of big banks prioritizing large firms for this assistance.
  Over 80 publicly traded companies have received loans through the 
PPP. Examples like this come to mind: Ruth's Chris Steak House 
restaurant got two loans for $20 million. And we have all this, 80 
publicly traded companies. This underscores the need for oversight.
  If the administration's implementation means giant companies secure 
loans while small businesses are left waiting, that problem must be 
corrected promptly. That is not what Congress intended, and the 
American people expect better.
  By the way, today, this morning, as the chair of the House Small 
Business Committee, I held a hearing entitled, Member Day Hearing on 
COVID-19 Response and Recovery. Fifty-six Members of this Chamber, 
Republicans and Democrats, all of them, came before the committee 
today, and every one, Republican and Democrat, expressed the fact that 
we needed more transparency, that we needed data, and that we needed to 
fight to make sure that this program serves every small business in 
every part of the country.
  That is why my colleagues and I fought in this package to secure $60 
billion in PPP funds set aside specifically for mission-based, 
community-oriented lenders. With this set-aside, more underserved small 
businesses will get loans.
  In addition, this bill provides $60 billion for the Economic Injury 
Disaster Loan program, the EIDL program. Again, when they sent the bill 
from the Senate to the House, it didn't have any money for the EIDL 
program, for the disaster loan program.
  Everyone who testified today before my committee was asking how we 
are going to make sure that their businesses, their constituents, will 
get disaster loans. Well, we have good news for them. The Democrats 
fought and secured not only $50 billion, but $10 billion in grants.
  And I heard complaints about the fact that the grants program ran out 
of money and that people really like that program, the grants program. 
Well, I wanted $100 billion; we secured $10 billion. Again, we are 
putting in $10 billion in this bill that was not part of what Senator 
Mitch McConnell sent to us.
  I thank Speaker Pelosi, Minority Leader Schumer, and Chairwoman 
Waters for their efforts to include all these provisions, particularly 
the $60 billion carved out for minority businesses, for women-owned 
businesses, for veterans' businesses, for farmers to have a chance to 
secure a loan.
  While this legislation is a building block, more must be done. In 
future legislation, we must help businesses shuttered for longer than 8 
weeks.
  This bill also does not address problems that let big companies 
snatch up loans meant for small businesses. To those large publicly 
traded companies who have already benefitted, I would suggest now would 
be a time to exhibit some good corporate citizenship by returning those 
funds.
  To the small businesses out there who have not yet received help, 
whom my office hears from daily, I say this: We are not finished.
  Getting these programs restarted and loans out the door is critical. 
Because of the improvements that we made to this bill, I will say that 
help is on the way and that we will hold the agencies accountable, that 
we must adhere to transparency, and that we must provide the data that 
we need in order to assess if this program is working as it was 
intended.
  As chair of the Small Business Committee, I will fight tooth and nail 
for small businesses that have not yet received any assistance.
  Mr. Speaker, let me remind the Senate majority leader that there are 
two Chambers. You can be sure that in this Chamber, I will be fighting 
nonstop for hard-hit States like New York.
  Mr. NEAL. Mr. Speaker, I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. GARCIA of Texas. Mr. Speaker, today, I will be supporting this 
bipartisan relief bill.
  It will give small businesses access to additional funds that will 
help them keep their doors open.
  And, it will also assist hospitals overwhelmed by this virus, get 
health care workers the protective gear they need, and help expand 
rapid testing nationwide.
  While this bill will do a lot of good, it still does not go far 
enough for my state of Texas and people across America.
  Texas is 49th out of 50 states for testing per capita, and in large 
cities like Houston nearly 60 percent of COVID-19 related deaths were 
of African Americans and nearly 20 percent Latino.
  We need to do more to help community health clinics helping poor 
people, expand mobile testing sites in hard hit communities, and deploy 
rapid testing nationwide now.
  And we also need to ensure that we are getting more direct aid into 
the hands of folks across America.
  This is critical as we work to responsibly open our country.
  We must put working families first and I urge my colleagues on the 
other side of the aisle to join us in getting this done in the next 
package.
  Ms. BONAMICI. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H.R. 266, the 
Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act. This 
interim legislation is critical to support our small businesses and 
healthcare systems, but we must do much more to support families, 
communities, and our economy.
  In the wake of the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic, Congress acted 
swiftly to provide funding for hospitals and healthcare facilities, 
schools, states and localities, and small businesses. Unfortunately, 
the funding was not sufficient to meet the need and too many small 
businesses are left wondering if they can survive. I have heard from 
small business owners from across Northwest Oregon who were unable to 
access the Paycheck Protection Program and Economic Injury Disaster 
Loan and Grant funding. They described their frustration as the money 
was quickly exhausted; a significant amount going to large restaurant 
chains while small mom and pop businesses were left out. The pandemic 
continues to ravage communities and our economy remains largely shut 
down through no fault of the small business owners and workers who need 
our help in this unprecedented time. The bill before us today will 
provide the assistance those businesses need. The bill includes $310 
billion in additional funding for the Paycheck Protection Program, with 
$60 billion of that funding dedicated for lending by community-based 
and small- and mid-sized lenders, including credit unions, community 
banks,

[[Page H1948]]

and other institutions that are prepared to lend to that small 
businesses that have traditionally been overlooked, such as minority-
owned businesses, businesses owned by women and veterans, and small 
businesses in our rural communities. We must make sure this money gets 
to mom and pop businesses.
  The bill also bolsters the Economic Injury Disaster Loan and Grant 
programs by providing $60 billion in funding, and expanding the program 
so farmers and many agricultural enterprises are eligible. The programs 
provide funding for small businesses to cover operating expenses, but 
were similarly underfunded for the demand.
  H.R. 266 also provides $75 billion in much-needed funding for our 
hospitals and healthcare facilities. We know that these facilities are 
operating without the resources they need, and are unable to cover 
expenses because they can't perform elective procedures during stay 
home orders. The bill also includes $25 billion to expand testing, 
including funding for states and localities, the Centers for Disease 
Control, the National Institutes of Health, the Biomedical Advanced 
Research and Development Authority, and the Food and Drug 
Administration. We need to vastly expand testing capabilities if we are 
going to be able to get a handle on this pandemic, so I am thankful 
that this funding was included.
  The funding included in this bill is critical to help our country, 
but we must do so much more to support workers, small businesses, and 
communities. Our work is far from done. I am continuing to fight for 
robust child care support, increased funding and capabilities for the 
Low Income Home Energy Assistance Program, funding for workers and our 
workforce system through the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act, 
and expanded access to capital through our credit unions to make it 
easier for them to lend to small businesses. I am also fighting to make 
sure that our state and local governments receive more funding, 
students and teachers have the resources they need, that people receive 
additional economic impact payments, and that our immigrant community 
is included in future relief efforts. I'm also advocating for workplace 
protection standards and essential pay for frontline workers during 
this pandemic. I am extremely disappointed that this bill doesn't 
recognize the increased number of people who are now food insecure and 
lack additional SNAP benefits that individuals and families desperately 
need. As we move forward, I will continue to fight for robust 
legislation to help individuals, families, and our communities and 
small businesses around the country.
  Ms. MOORE. Mr. Speaker, I support this imperfect interim agreement. 
But I want to be clear, while it funds some key priorities, it leaves 
behind additional key assistance that we can provide to households, 
individuals, and state and local governments that are the tip of the 
spear in the fight against COVID-19. As we take up this bill, I 
recognize that it is a much better bill than the one Senate Majority 
Leader Mitch McConnell tried to ram through the Senate last week. 
Thanks to those who worked so hard to help accomplish that.
  That being said, it is clear that this Congress has much more work to 
do to support the American people, our heroic public health and health 
professionals on the front line of this pandemic while fighting to get 
basic protective equipment, and to help support state, local, and 
tribal governments that are leading this response.
  This legislation will temporarily refill the Paycheck Protection 
Program but if the experience of the first week of this program is any 
indication, demand will again quickly overwhelm this program and the 
program's funds will be quickly depleted. And while I support the 
changes to direct funds into the hands of some of the most vulnerable 
small businesses, that addresses just one of the numerous concerns 
about this program that my office has heard. And I know other Members 
have heard as well. More changes are needed not only to increase 
transparency and protect the taxpayer, but also to help this program 
work better for more vulnerable small businesses, not just larger 
corporations or friends of the Trump Administration.
  I am also pleased that the bill includes additional funding to 
support our hospitals and other health providers that daily work to 
test, diagnose, treat those affected with this illness. They have saved 
countless lives. However, so far, the Administration has only released 
$30 billion of the first $100 billion provided by Congress a few weeks 
ago, with little if any of that money shipped out so far going to 
children's hospitals, community health centers or Medicaid providers, 
among others who are struggling.
  The Administration needs to be more transparent about how it will 
distribute the remaining funds from the first round and the additional 
funding in this bill and how it will determine key terms, such as hot 
spots that it reportedly wants to target. And it needs to get these 
dollars out soon. Weeks more of delay is not acceptable.
  Additional funding provided for our public health efforts through 
CDC, HRSA, and NIH is appreciated. But since this is a public health 
emergency, much more funding is needed especially as state and local 
governments are challenged by an economic slowdown that has imperiled 
their revenues.
  There is more to be done and that must be done soon. We need another 
strong comprehensive bill in line with the CARES act that responds to 
emerging needs. Access to Personal Protective Equipment remains a 
struggle and testing remains a challenge even while the Administration 
pats itself on the back on both fronts.
  Additionally, we need to ensure that critical programs that serve 
populations that will be hit the hardest by any economic downturn, like 
TANF and SNAP, are granted funding and flexibility to help people 
through these trying times. Having tried to take care of everybody 
else, our next package needs to look out for the least, the last, and 
the lost.
  Lastly, one of the truly missed opportunities is funding to support 
safe and secure elections in this environment. Unfortunately, my state 
of Wisconsin has become an unwelcomed example of what happens when 
partisanship, rather than people's well-being, guides decisions about 
holding elections in this environment. In the city of Milwaukee, the 
largest city in the State, there were only 5 polling stations 
available. You can guess the result . . . long lines that both 
discouraged voting and raised a potential health threat to both voters 
and poll workers.
  We know more elections will be held soon and regardless of decisions 
about reopening states and cities, they must take place in the safest 
and securest possible environment we can ensure. That requires funding. 
Funding to support a full panoply of voting options including absentee 
ballots and extended early voting periods. We also need funding to 
ensure localities have an adequate number of polling places and funds 
to ensure that all votes cast are counted accurately and fairly. And 
that's just to list a few of the reasons why funding to protect our 
election security is so fundamentally needed. In the recent Wisconsin 
election, nearly 80% of the ballots cast were absentee. But even there 
you had issues as you had people request a ballot who did not get one 
or had one sent after the elections, there were also issues with stacks 
of undelivered absentee ballots, and ballots returned because they did 
not have a postmark. The longer we delay providing these funds, the 
less likely we will get, despite the best efforts by hardworking state 
and local officials, a fair election.
  I yield back the balance of my time.
  Ms. DeGETTE. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of the interim 
emergency corona virus package being considered today.
  The last two months have been some of the hardest in our nation's 
history. The toll that this virus has taken on our economy and, more 
importantly, on American lives, has been staggering. Over the last few 
weeks, my office has received thousands of calls and emails from 
constituents who need help obtaining the important economic relief 
provisions secured by Congress.
  While some small businesses and nonprofits in my district were able 
to access programs like the Paycheck Protection Program, many more were 
shut out from these critical funds.
  Let's be clear--large companies and corporations never should have 
been allowed to receive funds meant for small businesses.
  Now, it's up to us to begin to make this right and ensure that those 
small businesses most in need get access to replenished relief funds. 
Countless American jobs--and lives--are on the line.
  The legislation before us today would provide an additional $310 
billion in funding for the Paycheck Protection Program, including 
billions intended for businesses in underserved rural, urban and tribal 
communities. It also provides $50 billion for additional emergency 
disaster lending, translating into more than $350 billion in loans, and 
another $10 billion in emergency disaster grants.
  In addition, this package continues our efforts to provide health 
care workers with the life-saving protective equipment they need to do 
their jobs safely and effectively by directing $75 billion toward 
hospitals and other health care providers.
  Also of great importance to me is the $25 billion this package 
secures for testing, which is key to quickly and safely reopening the 
country. These funds will be critical in facilitating the large-scale 
production and rapid deployment of precise coronavirus testing--which 
public health experts agree is necessary to determine when people can 
get out of their homes and back into schools, the workforce and 
society.
  Despite these important provisions, this package falls short in a 
number of areas.
  For one, it is unacceptable that Republicans blocked more funding for 
state and local governments on the frontlines of this crisis. Right 
now, every American is benefiting from the

[[Page H1949]]

tireless work our local officials are doing to keep us safe.
  However, without additional support from the federal government, the 
costs of the coronavirus response--on top of the reduced tax revenues 
caused by the economic fallout of the pandemic--threaten to bankrupt 
our communities and undermine public health efforts.
  The fact that some in Congress and the Administration would rather 
bail out big corporations than support the local governments working 
day and night to keep us safe is unacceptable. We will not stop 
fighting until our communities get the support they need.
  We also must continue fighting for the most vulnerable among us. Our 
immigrant communities, incarcerated individuals, undocumented people, 
poor families and many others are still being left out of important 
relief provisions.
  If there's one thing we've learned throughout this pandemic, it's 
that we're all in this together. We have to look out for each other, 
and we have to do our part to take care of one another.
  While I urge my colleagues to come together to pass today's package 
to bring additional relief to our small businesses and health care 
providers, we must continue working to ensure all those suffering from 
this pandemic can be made whole.
  Ms. ESHOO. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of the Paycheck Protection 
and Health Care Enhancement Act. This emergency funding is the fourth 
bipartisan aid package to address the tremendous needs of the American 
people as we fight COVID-19 on both the public health front and the 
economic front.
  The Democratic House has led the way to respond to this emergency. On 
March 4th, when the Administration refused to acknowledge the magnitude 
of this crisis, the House passed bipartisan emergency legislation 
providing four times the amount of funding for public health purposes 
than the Trump Administration originally requested. A week later, the 
House passed the bipartisan Families First Act, which recognized the 
importance of free coronavirus testing and the need for paid sick leave 
and nutrition aid for working families. On March 27th the House passed 
the bipartisan CARES Act putting families and workers first, instead of 
a corporate, trickle-down approach offered by the Senate.
  Today, the bipartisan Paycheck Protection and Health Care Enhancement 
Act continues the House's work to respond to the pandemic. It flips an 
insufficient Republican proposal that left hospitals, Community Health 
Centers, and health care workers behind by nearly doubling the 
resources to provide badly needed assistance to them.
  The legislation contains the following:
  Small businesses: Adds $310 billion to replenish the Paycheck 
Protection Programs, reserving $60 billion of that funding for 
community-based lenders, credit unions and small to midsized community 
banks that work with the smallest of businesses. The bill also adds an 
additional $50 billion in disaster loans at the SBA and $10 billion in 
grants to small businesses and nonprofits.
  $75 billion for hospitals, health systems, Community Health Centers, 
and other health care providers, including funds for Personal 
Protective Equipment for frontline workers.
  For all Americans: $25 billion for testing, the key to reopening the 
economy. Today, approximately one percent of Americans have been 
tested. This legislation calls for a national strategic testing policy 
focused on increasing domestic testing capacity, including testing 
supplies.
  This interim funding package will assist workers, families, small 
businesses, hospitals, and all our health care workers. The American 
people have tremendous needs and I'm proud to support this legislation 
to help meet them. There's so much more to do and I stand ready to work 
to meet our historic challenges. I support this legislation and will 
continue to support swift action by a Congress that aids a scientific 
public health response to the pandemic and a worker-first response to 
the economic crisis.
  Finally, I'd like to take a moment to acknowledge the sorrow being 
felt across the country as families mourn the loss of their loved ones 
to this terrible disease. In tribute to them, we do our work today.
  Mr. LARSON of Connecticut. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of 
the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act.
  Our nation's health and economic recovery are inextricably linked 
during this pandemic. Today's vote is another win in the fight against 
the coronavirus. This legislation strengthens the Paycheck Protection 
Program by allocating an additional $310 billion in funding, with money 
reserved for community-based lenders, small and medium-sized banks, and 
credit unions to reach more small businesses. It also includes vital 
funding for our hospitals and health care workers and money for much 
needed testing.
  While today's additional funding is a win, much more needs to be 
done. Without additional measures for testing, tracking, treatment, and 
ultimately a vaccine, we won't overcome this crisis. We must also do 
more to help individuals suffering from the impact on the economy, as 
well as non-profits not covered under the CARES Act, and state and 
local governments who have been devastated by lost revenues and protect 
essential workers.
  Mr. CARTER of Texas. Mr. Speaker, more than two weeks ago, I called 
for more funding for the Paycheck Protection Program, which has 
provided more than 1.6 million loans to small businesses across the 
country. I strongly support rapid passage of the Paycheck Protection 
Program and Health Care Enhancement Act to support small businesses and 
our nation's health care professionals.
  With this fourth Coronavirus response package, we have secured an 
additional $310 billion for the Paycheck Protection Program, and $60 
billion for Economic Injury Disaster Loans, to help more small 
businesses survive and continue to pay their employees.
  In order to reopen our country, more testing must be made available 
so Americans can safely return to their normal lives and jobs. There is 
a dedicated $25 billion in this legislation to prepare and ramp up 
necessary testing to equip state and local decision makers with 
critical information to reopen our communities and reignite our 
economy. Finally, the $75 billion in additional funds will help 
hospitals and health care workers on the front lines continue to take 
care of those that are battling this illness.
  It is critical that Congress continue working in a bipartisan manner 
to provide aid, relief, and economic security to the nation. With this 
in mind, I oppose passage of a resolution to establish a select 
subcommittee that is duplicative, unnecessary, and most likely a 
politically motivated tool to attack the President during an election 
year. Continuing to work across the aisle to provide our country the 
resources it needs is the only way forward.
  I remain grateful to the incredible health care professionals, first 
responders, and essential service employees who are working tirelessly 
to keep our nation healthy. I also salute Americans who are following 
guidelines and doing their part to flatten the curve for not only their 
own health but for their neighbors.
  The past few weeks have seen our nation unite to fight the 
Coronavirus. While these times have been challenging for all, I know 
that we will get through this.
  Ms. LOFGREN. Mr. Speaker, I support the bipartisan agreement reached 
on the Senate Amendment to H.R. 266, the Paycheck Protection Program 
and Health Care Enhancement Act.
  Many California small businesses were unable to access the first 
round of loans made through the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) 
established under the CARES Act (H.R. 748) because the initial round of 
funds was insufficient to meet the dire needs of our community during 
this time. Even more concerning, the Administration's bungled rollout 
of PPP has sown frustration and confusion at every point of the 
application process, denying many Santa Clara County small businesses a 
lifeline. I outlined my concerns regarding these flaws in my testimony 
to the House Small Business Committee on Thursday, April 23, 2020.
  This bill will provide $310 billion in additional funding for PPP. 
More importantly, it will reserve $60 billion for small- and medium-
sized banks, credit unions, and community-based lenders to ensure our 
relief efforts are reaching all communities. It also adds $10 billion 
to Emergency Economic Injury Disaster Grants and $50 billion to the 
Disaster Loans Program for our small businesses.
  Our hospitals, health centers, and county health officials need the 
additional $75 billion in assistance to maintain necessary resources 
and procure more protective personal equipment for our healthcare 
workers who continue to give and risk so much.
  Additionally, the nation needs the $25 billion for testing to 
guarantee a science-based transition for when communities are ready to 
reopen. A nationwide strategy with a focus on increasing domestic 
testing capacity will be critical for reopening the economy and for 
preventing a second outbreak.
  Four bills and $2 trillion in emergency relief later, more is still 
needed. Specifically, we must provide additional direct funding for 
state and local governments and perform robust oversight on the 
allocation of funds for pandemic relief to prevent fraud and abuse. 
State and local governments need and deserve federal assistance. In 
CARES 2, we must make whole the state and local governments on the 
frontlines of this crisis and ensure our state, county, and city 
officials are equipped to preserve the health and safety of our 
community.
  I will continue to work with my colleagues in the House and Senate to 
address specific community needs in any future legislation.
  Ms. KAPTUR. Mr. Speaker, I rise in support of this economic boost 
desperately needed by

[[Page H1950]]

our communities. Our nation is on a dangerous precipice, an experiment 
with thousands of lives in the balance. This bill offers hope for 
thousands more small businesses, hospitals, and perhaps most 
importantly those on the frontline, with an infusion of $25 billion to 
ramp up desperately needed means to advance widespread testing. Testing 
is the key that offers containment of this virus.
  I am troubled. Troubled by the little insight we have into how the 
last two trillion dollars approved by these hallowed chambers was spent 
by the Trump Administration. We must ask why so much has yet to be 
disbursed. We must question why little help was provided to those who 
need it most, while those with access had their takings.
  I am proud of the work of my colleagues, particularly Small Business 
Chairwoman Nydia Velazquez, Financial Services Chairwoman Maxine 
Waters, and our dedicated Speaker, who fought for $60 billion in 
community lending and a $310 billion infusion into the Paycheck 
Protection Program. This bill provides a great step forward and a vital 
lifeline to small businesses across Northern Ohio.
  Unfortunately, this bill drastically shortchanges the localities now 
forced with overwhelming burdens, huge losses of revenue, huge cuts to 
budgets, forced decisions of laying off first-responders or cut back on 
other life-sustaining services. It also offers no assistance to our 
postal service workers whose jobs hang in the balance.
  Calls to reopen without science and data are short sighted. Shame on 
Republican elected leaders who lead their constituents into the fire. 
What our constituents need is real leadership to keep them safe and 
supported until a bridge to the future for America can safely lead to 
reopening. Lives are at stake.
  Mr. NADLER. Mr. Speaker, in the last few weeks, my office has been 
flooded with calls from small business owners desperate for assistance 
but stymied by the slow response, unfair treatment, and limited funds 
of the small business programs set up by the CARES Act. I support this 
legislation because it is absolutely imperative that we recapitalize 
and improve PPP and EIDL to get small businesses the resources and 
support they need as fairly and efficiently as possible. I am also 
pleased this bill provides significant funding for hospitals and 
expanded testing, without which we cannot safely re-open the small 
businesses and other establishments we are trying to save. I am, 
however, all too aware that this infusion of money simply will not be 
enough to meet demand, and many of the problems my constituents have 
raised with PPP and EIDL are not addressed by this legislation.
  I am disappointed that, despite the best efforts of my Democratic 
colleagues, this bill does not give state and local governments the 
funding and flexibility they desperately need to support their fights 
against COVID-19 and fill the massive revenue gaps they are facing. New 
York State faces a $10 billion loss of tax revenue. While we are the 
epicenter of the pandemic, we're not alone in our budget shortfalls. 
Oklahoma faces a $415 million gap, Arizona is looking at a $1.1 billion 
deficit, and Maryland could face a $2.2 billion shortfall. My 
Republican colleagues must come to the table and support additional 
resources for states and cities and give states additional flexibility 
in how they use the funds, including replacing lost revenue.
  That being said, it is absolutely necessary that we pass this bill 
today and provide the SBA additional resources to support small 
businesses and ensure they make it through this pandemic. Of course 
there is more we need to do. Transit systems need billions in resources 
to stay afloat. Cultural nonprofits need funding and flexibility to re-
open their doors when this pandemic passes. Renters desperately need 
emergency assistance to stay in their homes even with the eviction 
moratorium. The U.S. Postal Service is on the brink of collapse. 
Families need food assistance to keep their kids healthy. Hospitals and 
providers desperately need PPE. Our work is not done, and we cannot 
stop here. But today, we must pass this bill and get this small 
business funding flowing again.
  I appreciate the efforts to get this interim bill done as quickly as 
possible, and I look forward to continuing our efforts to stop this 
pandemic, keep our country safe, and, when public health experts agree, 
thoughtfully and carefully re-open our economy.
  Mr. BALDERSON. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of our nation's 
small businesses. As many of my colleagues are aware, our country's 
economy is built upon and benefits from the millions of entrepreneurs 
and innovators who go to work every single day for a small business. 
Without these small businesses and their employees, the United States 
would not be the economic hub it is today.
  However, Mr. Speaker, these small businesses, along with our entire 
nation, have been presented with an unprecedented enemy. The 2019 novel 
coronavirus has wreaked havoc on our health, our economy, and our day-
to-day lives. Everyday activities like visiting our loved ones, dining 
at our favorite restaurants, or cheering on our favorite teams have 
been placed on hold as we combat this virus. I believe the steps taken 
by this Administration and governors around the country, including 
Governor DeWine in my home state, to minimize the destructiveness of 
the coronavirus should be noted and applauded.
  In Congress, we have worked to provide the necessary aid and relief 
sought by so many. We have extended health benefits--placing public 
health at the forefront of our battle. We have ramped up our equipment 
production to levels unseen for nearly 80 years, when we were fighting 
the Second World War. And perhaps most importantly, we have funded aid 
programs within the Small Business Administration to lift up America's 
small businesses.
  The bill before us, the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care 
Enhancement Act, will continue to support these critical efforts 
through much-needed supplemental funding. Earlier this week, I 
introduced my own resolution to recognize the enormous strain being 
placed upon our economy's engine, the small businesses that are the 
foundation of all our communities. To say that this Congress has come 
to the aid of small businesses would be fair; but, to say that our job 
here is done would be far from true. In fact, it is important now more 
than ever to double down on our support and ensure unwavering 
commitment to Main Street.
  Mr. Speaker, my resolution specifically requests Congress to increase 
its support for America's small businesses. I am extremely pleased to 
see that programs such as the Paycheck Protection Program and the 
Economic Injury Disaster Loan program will receive the money needed to 
continue aiding our nation's small businesses. Of the $349 billion 
appropriated by Congress in the CARES Act for small business relief 
programs, my home state of Ohio received over $14 billion. These 
dollars are going to real businesses and helping communities, both 
large and small, across my district. I hope even more dollars make 
their way to Ohio as we get set to pass this relief bill before us.
  This week, Congress will pass the fourth aid bill to help Americans. 
And much like the previous bill, the CARES Act, the bill before us 
increases funding levels for the Paycheck Protection Program and the 
Economic Injury Disaster Loan program, while also ensuring our health 
care system receives the support it needs.
  In addition to providing $370 billion of relief to small businesses, 
the bill includes $75 billion more for hospitals; the first tranche of 
this money from the CARES Act's fund has already gone out. Hospitals in 
my district have let me know how critical it was to receive this 
support. They have also let me know that more is direly needed. This is 
why we are here today; to respond to those calls for more help. The PPP 
and Health Care Enhancement Act also includes $25 billion for testing. 
I know from Ohio's governor that this is a key piece of the puzzle in 
safely reopening economic activity.
  Congress must not hesitate in its efforts to combat the novel 
coronavirus. Congress must not hesitate in its appropriation of 
additional funds to support America's small businesses. It is 
imperative we use our time here as Representatives of our communities 
and the full capabilities of the federal government to protect 
Americans--both in terms of health and economic security. We will 
defeat this virus and we will emerge from this unprecedented time a 
stronger, more resilient nation. I urge my colleagues to join me in 
supporting this bill and stand with small businesses and those on the 
front lines--without which, our nation would most certainly not be the 
global beacon of opportunity and freedom it is.
  Mr. PALLONE. Mr. Speaker, this emergency legislation makes key 
investments in programs that are critical to helping our hospitals and 
health providers continue to respond to COVID-19.
  It also improves our testing capacity, which will be critical to 
combating the pandemic and reopening out economy.
  This is not a perfect package, but no bipartisan agreement ever is.
  It does not include clearer metrics for the hospital funding that l 
think is necessary to ensuring that funding is distributed in a way 
that is fair and equitable, transparent, and responsive to the areas 
that are treating the highest number of COVID-19 patients.
  I also do not believe that the COVID-19 testing strategy is as strong 
as I would have liked. Right now, the Trump Administration has no clear 
plan, no clear benchmarks, and no clear timelines for setting up a 
national program that will reopen our economy. We must hold this 
Administration accountable for its abysmal response to testing, and I 
hope that we will be able to do more in the next package.
  Having said that, l want to acknowledge the good in this bill, 
because l do believe it will provide some additional relief and 
guidance

[[Page H1951]]

that our states and local governments, territories, tribes, hospitals, 
and providers desperately need. We simply could not afford to wait, and 
thanks to our efforts we are providing some critical relief.
  First, we include another $75 billion for the CARES Provider Relief 
Fund, or the hospital fund. This is $75 billion in addition to the $100 
billion funding provided in CARES.
  These funds can be used to reimburse hospitals or providers for 
expenses or lost revenues as a result of COVID-19.
  The language remains the same as the CARES Act, so it will be 
critical that we continue to fight for clearer metrics for how future 
funding allocations will be distributed so that health care entities 
receive the funding they need to continue to treat patients and keep 
their doors open. We will also fight for transparency so that we have 
more real-time accounting of who is receiving these dollars and how 
much funding they are receiving.
  We also address the critical issue of testing by making an additional 
investment of $25 billion. As the Speaker has been saying, testing is a 
essential component to how we respond, treat, and stop the transmission 
of this virus. Valid, widespread testing is going to be necessary if we 
are to reduce social distancing efforts and reopen parts of our 
economy.
  The $25 billion investment in testing will be used for expenses 
related to all different areas of testing, including: research, 
development, validation, manufacturing, purchasing, administering, and 
expanding capacity for COVID-19 tests. This includes rapid point-of-
care tests and serological tests.
  Of that $25 billion, $11 billion will go to states, localities, 
territories, and tribes to develop, purchase, administer, process, and 
analyze COVID-19 tests. It will also fund scaling-up laboratory 
capacity, contact tracing, monitoring and surveillance, and supporting 
the workforce.
  $2 billion of this $11 billion will go to the States consistent with 
the Public Health Emergency Preparedness grant formula, ensuring every 
state receives funding, and $4.25 billion will be allocated based on a 
state's relative number of COVID-19 cases. Tribes, tribal 
organizations, and urban Indian health organizations will receive $750 
million for testing activities.
  This $25 billion also includes key investments in our federal public 
health agencies--
  $1 billion is provided to CDC for surveillance, epidemiology, 
laboratory capacity expansion, contact tracing, public health data 
surveillance and workforce to support the expansion and improvement of 
COVID-19 testing;
  $1.8 billion is provided to NIH to develop, validate and improve 
testing, including further development of rapid point-of-care and 
serological testing;
  $1 billion is provided to BARDA for advanced research, development, 
manufacturing, production, and purchase of diagnostic, serologic, or 
other COVID-19 tests or related supplies.
  $22 million for the Food and Drug Administration to support 
activities associated with diagnostic, serological, antigen, and other 
tests; and
  $600 million to support testing activities at Community Health 
Centers, and $225 million to support testing activities at rural health 
clinics.
  Finally, the package also includes up to $1 billion to cover the 
costs of testing for the uninsured.
  And there are some other key Democratic priorities that were included 
in the package--reporting on demographic information related to 
testing, diagnoses and hospitalizations, and the requirement of a 
testing plan.
  While the Republicans would not support real-time reporting of 
demographic data, we were able to include regular demographic data 
reporting--that is to be de-identified and disaggregated. This includes 
data on race, ethnicity, age, sex, geographic region, and other factors 
for COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations, and deaths, and epidemiological 
analysis of such data.
  We also were successful in adding a requirement for the 
Administration to submit a COVID-19 strategic testing plan that will 
detail how the Administration will increase domestic testing capacity 
and testing supplies, address disparities, and provide assistance and 
resources to states, localities, territories, and tribes. The plan is 
also required to include estimates of testing production and guidelines 
for testing, as well as an outline of Federal resources that will be 
able to support the testing plans of States, localities, territories, 
tribes, and tribal organizations.
  This is an important provision--the Administration has been running 
away from trying to come to develop a federal testing plan. This 
requires them to do so.
  While I would have required a more detailed report, with clearer 
benchmarks for the activities I just mentioned, including specific 
plans for adequate testing in underserved areas and populations, and 
expanding surveillance and contact tracing, this is a good first step.
  We will all have to work together to hold this Administration 
accountable to produce a clear strategy for testing that will help us 
to reduce the spread of this virus, clearly identify cases and 
individuals with immunity, and expand capacity so that testing can help 
inform what communities may be able to reopen safely and without a 
surge in new cases.
  These will be a priority as well as we draft the next package.
  Ms. JOHNSON of Texas. Mr. Speaker, I rise today in support of H.R. 
266, the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care Enhancement Act. 
Though this bill is far from perfect, it provides much needed temporary 
assistance to small business owners and hospitals impacted as a result 
of the COVID-19 pandemic.
  This bill includes additional funding for the Paycheck Protection 
Program and makes several vital corrections to loopholes in the program 
from the CARES Act. A lack of proper oversight in the previous package 
gave lenders the ability to pick and choose their loanees, therefore 
leaving smaller businesses like hair salons, independent restaurants, 
and dry cleaners, who may not have an established banking relationship, 
left without sufficient financial assistance. I am proud that House 
Democrats fought to include $60 billion in funding designated 
specifically for small and medium-sized lenders, which will go a long 
way in supporting small businesses bearing the brunt of this crisis.
  Additionally, this bill provides critically needed funding and 
resources to support our hospitals, medical clinics, and local testing 
capabilities. We must ensure that when our communities are faced with 
this public health emergency, our healthcare system can provide the 
urgent medical attention they need. Included in this bill is $75 
billion in funding to the Public Health and Social Services Emergency 
Fund to provide resources to the medical frontlines, including for 
personal protective equipment and health provider reimbursements. It 
also designates $25 billion in funding for COVID-19 testing expenses 
and mandates the development of a national strategic testing policy, 
focused on increasing domestic testing capacity, including capacity for 
testing supplies.
  I am fighting for the city of Dallas, and all of the incorporated 
municipalities in my district, that are getting hammered by the 
necessary stay at home orders, to make sure that we receive funding to 
provide for essential services like fire and police.
  As I mentioned before, this bill is far from perfect. Two priorities 
that must be addressed in upcoming packages are the need for increased 
funding to SNAP, due to the exponential need for food assistance in our 
communities, and expanded federal assistance to smaller municipalities 
like the cities of Cedar Hill, DeSoto, Duncanville, and Lancaster, in 
my district. Now, more than ever, we must ensure that the most 
vulnerable among us are protected and that our local governments have 
the resources to support them.
  At the same time, I am inspired to see organizations step up to the 
plate and help people in this time of need. Just last week, the North 
Texas Food Bank, along with the Texas National Guard, Fair Park First, 
Spectra, and In the City for Good distributed 6,500 boxes of food to 
over 2,200 households across the region. Looking at images of cars 
lined up for miles waiting to receive food should serve as a reminder 
of how much more we must do to ensure our constituents are successfully 
able to navigate through this crisis.
  Mr. Speaker, now is the time to provide critical funds and support 
for our neighborhood businesses; owners and employees. Now is the time 
for us to provide critical funds and support to the hospitals who will 
be fighting to keep our friends, family, and neighbors alive through 
this pandemic. It is my sincere hope that the next COVID-19 bill will 
better serve all of our constituents. I urge my colleagues to support 
this bill.
  Ms. ROYBAL-ALLARD. Mr. Speaker, as we continue the fight to help our 
constituents and all Americans as they face the devastating coronavirus 
crisis, I am voting today in strong support of H.R. 266, The Paycheck 
Protection Program and Healthcare Enhancement Act, to help protect 
American families, workers, and small businesses.
  Democrats successfully fought to improve today's interim emergency 
relief package by ensuring greater access for small businesses in 
underserved areas, and by successfully adding billions more in funding 
for testing, hospitals, and the PPE for health care workers who are 
caring for those infected by the coronavirus.
  For small businesses, this final agreement strengthens the Paycheck 
Protection Program with $310 billion in additional funding, more than 
the $250 billion initially requested. Democrats were able to set aside 
$60 billion to help unbanked and underserved businesses get access to 
PPP funding, including minority-owned businesses, urban and rural 
businesses, small ``mom-and-pop'' businesses,

[[Page H1952]]

and smaller nonprofits. This $60 billion includes $30 billion for 
community-based lenders and small banks and credit unions, and another 
$30 billion for medium-sized banks and credit unions. The agreement 
also expands small business support beyond PPP by securing $50 billion 
for Small Business Administration disaster lending, which translates 
into more than $350 billion in loans, and $10 billion in SBA disaster 
grants.
  For hospitals and health care workers, Democrats secured $75 billion 
to help pay for Personal Protective Equipment and other resources. The 
Trump Administration has also agreed to key improvements to be made in 
CARES 2, including significantly lowering the interest rate on advance 
payments, lengthening the repayment schedule, and distributing payments 
from general revenues instead of the Hospital Insurance Fund.
  For all Americans, we added $25 billion for testing, which is pivotal 
to reopening the economy and resuming our lives. The Trump 
Administration has agreed to a national strategic testing policy 
focused on increasing domestic testing capacity, including testing 
supplies.
  I am also voting today to establish a bipartisan House Select 
Committee on the Coronavirus Crisis, which will help ensure we fight 
this pandemic with an efficient, effective, and science-based federal 
response which saves lives and spends taxpayer dollars wisely.
  The legislation we pass today will protect countless American lives 
and livelihoods.
  However, we have much more to do. Next, we must pass a CARES 2 Act 
that builds on the bipartisan CARES Act we passed last month, so we can 
keep helping our families, workers, and small businesses to stay safe, 
stay healthy, and make ends meet.
  And because the Trump Administration made the unconscionable decision 
to reject more funding for state, local, and tribal governments so they 
can pay their essential workers, we must redouble our commitment to 
include that funding in CARES 2. If governments cannot pay first 
responders, transportation personnel, and other crucial workers, we are 
all put at grave risk.
  In these troubling times, the American people are looking to Congress 
for support, guidance, and leadership in the fight against the 
insidious COVID-19 virus. Today, tomorrow, and every day, I will 
continue to do all I can to keep my constituents and my country safe, 
and to provide the resources needed for the development of a vaccine 
that will defeat this virus for good.
  Mr. DeFAZIO. Mr. Speaker, today, I will vote in support of the Senate 
Amendment to H.R. 266--the Paycheck Protection Program and Health Care 
Enhancement Act.
  This legislation builds upon and makes a number of important 
improvements to the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security 
(CARES) Act, which Congress passed less than a month ago to help our 
country continue the fight against COVID-19.
  Specifically, this legislation adds more than $300 billion to the 
Small Business Administration's (SBA) Paycheck Protection Program 
(PPP), which has provided a critical lifeline to small businesses 
around the country as we continue to deal with the economic fall-out 
from this global pandemic. I am proud that Democrats stood our ground 
and were able to carve out $60 billion from this fund for small and 
mid-sized banks, credit unions, and community-based lending 
institutions to help ensure that unbanked and underserved businesses 
can access the PPP. This includes minority-owned businesses, rural 
businesses, small `mom and pop' businesses, and smaller nonprofits that 
too often have been pushed to the back of the line for this program, 
while billion-dollar chains have accessed funding.
  I am also pleased that this legislation includes $60 billion for 
SBA's Economic Injury Disaster Loan (EIDL) and Emergency Economic 
Injury Disaster Grant program. I have heard from dozens of businesses 
who applied for EIDL relief only to never hear back from an overwhelmed 
and underfunded SBA. This funding will allow these emergency programs 
to provide flexible assistance to small businesses and nonprofits.
  Again, thanks to congressional Democrats, this legislation also 
includes an additional $75 billion in relief to hospitals and health 
care providers for expenses or lost revenue attributable to COVID-19. 
While I believe we need much more than $75 billion, these additional 
funds will be crucial for helping providers who are bearing the brunt 
of this crisis, including Community Health Centers and rural providers 
who are facing layoffs and massive revenue shortfalls due to 
cancellation of `elective' procedures.
  Congressional Democrats also fought for and secured $25 billion to 
expand our nation's COVID-19 testing capacity, $11 billion of which 
will go directly to states, localities, territories, and tribes to help 
them bolster testing shortfalls in their communities. Widespread 
testing is the key to fighting this virus, reopening the economy, and 
protecting the health and wellbeing of Americans so that we can safely 
begin to resume our normal lives. We also successfully inserted 
provisions to require the Trump administration to finally create a 
national strategic testing plan that details how our country will 
increase domestic testing capacity, address disparities, and provide 
assistance and resources to states, localities, territories, and 
tribes.
  This legislation is not without glaring omissions, though. 
Unfortunately, despite bipartisan support for additional funding, the 
Trump administration and congressional Republicans refused to add any 
additional funding for state, local, and tribal governments. These 
entities--who are on the front lines of this crisis--are in a dire 
financial position. I will continue to push for this desperately-needed 
investment and to ensure that funding flows directly to smaller 
localities.
  Future legislation must also ensure strong support for families with 
an increase to SNAP benefits to help put food on the table. Republicans 
stonewalled all efforts to include this increase in this legislation.
  For our front-line workers, we are simply not doing enough to support 
them. We need to ensure that any additional legislation mandates that 
the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) implements a 
robust emergency temporary standard to strengthen protective measures 
for our health care workers, first responders, postal carriers, retail 
employees, grocery workers, transportation workers, and more. We should 
also be supporting these individuals with hazard pay as they continue 
to report to work and risk exposure to COVID-19 in order to perform 
their essential duties for the betterment of our communities.
  Congress must also address the critical situation the U.S. Postal 
Service (USPS) is in. Despite bipartisan support for stronger relief, 
the administration forced weak and restrictive aid for USPS into the 
CARES Act. Without significant steps, the Postal Service could cease 
operations by June. For the millions of people who count on the USPS 
every day--including seniors and veterans--this is not an option.
  We can and must also give additional, direct support to the American 
people. This includes additional economic impact payments, more 
comprehensive relief for homeowners and renters, stronger steps for the 
millions of student loan borrowers, and more.
  Congress should also finally take up legislation to reform enormously 
important issues like prescription drug costs and surprise billing. 
These issues have long plagued our broken healthcare system, and they 
will continue to do so once we beat this virus.
  Lastly, we must begin moving to the next phase of this crisis: 
economic recovery. Congress must pass legislation that creates jobs and 
rebuilds our decaying infrastructure. As Chairman of the Transportation 
and Infrastructure Committee, I will continue to push for an 
infrastructure package that repairs the breach left by years of 
neglect--that rebuilds failing bridges, restores crumbling highways, 
and puts people to work on projects with jobs that cannot be exported.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore (Mr. Espaillat). The question is on the 
motion offered by the gentleman from Massachusetts (Mr. Neal) that the 
House suspend the rules and concur in the Senate amendment to the bill, 
H.R. 266.
  The question was taken.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. In the opinion of the Chair, two-thirds 
being in the affirmative, the ayes have it.
  Mr. BRADY. Mr. Speaker, on that I demand the yeas and nays.
  The yeas and nays were ordered.
  The SPEAKER pro tempore. Pursuant to clause 8 of rule XX, further 
proceedings on this motion will be postponed.

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