Daily Digest

Thursday, July 23, 2020

Daily Digest

HIGHLIGHTS

    Senate passed S. 4049, National Defense Authorization Act, as amended.

Senate

Chamber Action

Routine Proceedings, pages S4433–S4489

Measures Introduced: Twenty-seven bills and two resolutions were introduced, as follows: S. 4290–4316, S. Res. 657, and S. Con. Res. 41.
Pages S4470–71

Measures Reported:

S. 3461, to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 2600 Wesley Street in Greenville, Texas, as the ``Audie Murphy Post Office Building''.

S. 3462, to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 909 West Holiday Drive in Fate, Texas, as the ``Ralph Hall Post Office''.

S. 3839, to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 2719 South Webster Street in Kokomo, Indiana, as the ``Opha May Johnson Post Office''.

S. 4126, to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 104 East Main Street in Port Washington, Wisconsin, as the ``Joseph G. Demler Post Office''.
Page S4470

Measures Passed:

National Defense Authorization Act: By 86 yeas to 14 nays (Vote No. 140), Senate passed S. 4049, to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2021 for military activities of the Department of Defense, for military construction, and for defense activities of the Department of Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal year, after taking action on the following amendments and motion proposed thereto:
Pages S4434–48

Adopted:

McConnell (for Portman) Amendment No. 2080 (to Amendment No. 2301), to require an element in annual reports on cyber science and technology activities on work with academic consortia on high priority cybersecurity research activities in Department of Defense capabilities.
Page S4434

By 88 yeas to 12 nays (Vote No. 138), Inhofe Amendment No. 2301, in the nature of a substitute.
Pages S4434–35

During consideration of this measure today, Senate also took the following action:

By 86 yeas to 14 nays (Vote No. 139), three-fifths of those Senators duly chosen and sworn, having voted in the affirmative, Senate agreed to the motion to close further debate on the bill.
Page S4435

A unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that notwithstanding the passage of S. 4049, the Clerk be authorized to correct the instruction line on Reed (for Cantwell/Manchin) Amendment No. 2417 (to Amendment No. 2301), to modify the requirements for the Department of Energy response to the review by the Nuclear Weapons Council of the budget of the National Nuclear Security Administration.
Page S4449


Protect 2020 Recovery Rebates: Committee on Finance was discharged from further consideration of S. 3841, to protect 2020 recovery rebates for individuals from assignment or garnishment, and the bill was then passed.
Pages S4488–89

A unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that the bill be held at the desk, and should the Senate receive from the House of Representatives a bill, the text of which is identical to that of S. 3841, Senate proceed to its immediate consideration, the bill be considered read a third time and passed, the motion to reconsider be considered made and laid upon the table, with no intervening action or debate, and S. 3841 be indefinitely postponed.
Page S4488

Appointments:
Independent Mexico Labor Expert Board: The Chair, on behalf of the President pro tempore, upon the recommendation of the Democratic Leader, pursuant to Public Law 116–113, and in consultation with the Ranking Member of the Senate Committee on Finance, appointed the following individuals to the Independent Mexico Labor Expert Board: Sandra M. Polaski of the District of Columbia and Timothy J. Beaty of Virginia.
Page S4488


Message from the President: Senate received the following message from the President of the United States:

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Transmitting, pursuant to law, a report on the continuation of the national emergency that was originally declared in Executive Order 13882 of July 26, 2019, with respect to the situation in Mali; which was referred to the Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs. (PM–56)
Page S4468


Hardy Nomination--Agreement: Senate resumed consideration of the nomination of William Scott Hardy, to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Pennsylvania.
Pages S4448–49

During consideration of this nomination today, Senate also took the following action:

By 60 yeas to 32 nays (Vote No. EX. 141), Senate agreed to the motion to close further debate on the nomination.
Page S4449

A unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that notwithstanding Rule XXII, the post-cloture time on the nomination be considered expired and the vote on confirmation of the nomination occur at 5:30 p.m., on Monday, July 27, 2020.
Page S4489

A unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that at approximately 4 p.m., on Monday, July 27, 2020, Senate resume consideration of the nomination.
Page S4489


Joseph Nomination--Cloture: David Cleveland Joseph, of Louisiana, to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Louisiana.
Page S4456

A motion was entered to close further debate on the nomination, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of the nomination of William Scott Hardy, to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Pennsylvania.
Page S4456

Prior to the consideration of this nomination, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S4456

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination.
Page S4456


Wade Nomination--Cloture: Senate began consideration of the nomination of Dana T. Wade, of the District of Columbia, to be an Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.
Page S4456

A motion was entered to close further debate on the nomination, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of the nomination of David Cleveland Joseph, of Louisiana, to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Louisiana.
Page S4456

Prior to the consideration of this nomination, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S4456

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination.
Page S4456


Kaplan Nomination--Cloture: Senate began consideration of the nomination of Marvin Kaplan, of Kansas, to be a Member of the National Labor Relations Board.
Page S4456

A motion was entered to close further debate on the nomination, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of the nomination of Dana T. Wade, of the District of Columbia, to be an Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.
Page S4456

Prior to the consideration of this nomination, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S4456

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination.
Page S4456


McFerran Nomination--Cloture: Senate began consideration of the nomination of Lauren McGarity McFerran, of the District of Columbia, to be a Member of the National Labor Relations Board.
Page S4456

A motion was entered to close further debate on the nomination, and, in accordance with the provisions of Rule XXII of the Standing Rules of the Senate, a vote on cloture will occur upon disposition of the nomination of Marvin Kaplan, of Kansas, to be a Member of the National Labor Relations Board.
Page S4456

Prior to the consideration of this nomination, Senate took the following action:

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Legislative Session.
Page S4456

Senate agreed to the motion to proceed to Executive Session to consider the nomination.
Page S4456


Nominations Confirmed: Senate confirmed the following nominations:

Grant C. Jaquith, of New York, to be a Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims for the term of fifteen years.

Scott J. Laurer, of Virginia, to be a Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims for the term of fifteen years.
Page S4489


Messages from the House:
Page S4468


Measures Held at the Desk:
Page S4469


Executive Communications:
Pages S4469–70


Executive Reports of Committees:
Page S4470


Additional Cosponsors:
Pages S4471–74


Statements on Introduced Bills/Resolutions:
Pages S4474–76


Additional Statements:
Pages S4466–68


Amendments Submitted:
Pages S4477–88


Authorities for Committees to Meet:
Page S4488


Privileges of the Floor:
Page S4488


Record Votes: Four record votes were taken today. (Total--141)
Pages S4434–35, S4448–49


Adjournment: Senate convened at 9:30 a.m. and adjourned at 5:24 p.m., until 4 p.m. on Monday, July 27, 2020. (For Senate's program, see the remarks of the Majority Leader in today's Record on page S4489.)

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Committee Meetings

(Committees not listed did not meet)

U.S. SPECTRUM POLICY

Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation: Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, Innovation, and the Internet concluded a hearing to examine the state of United States spectrum policy, after receiving testimony from Tom Power, CTIA, Washington, D.C.; H. Mark Gibson, CommScope, Inc., Ashburn, Virginia; Roslyn Layton, Aalborg University, Copenhagen, Denmark; and Michael Calabrese, New America Open Technology Institute, Palo Alto, California.

COVID–19 AND PUBLIC LANDS, FORESTS, AND NATIONAL PARKS

Committee on Energy and Natural Resources: Committee concluded an oversight hearing to examine the impacts of the COVID–19 pandemic on users of public lands, forests, and national parks, after receiving testimony from Kelly R. Hepler, Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, Pierre, South Dakota; Douglas Kemper, Colorado Water Congress, Denver; and Ethan L. Lane, National Cattlemen's Beef Association, Will Shafroth, National Park Foundation, and Jessica Turner, Outdoor Recreation Roundtable, all of Washington, D.C.

NOMINATIONS

Committee on Foreign Relations: Committee concluded a hearing to examine the nominations of Lisa S. Kenna, of Vermont, to be Ambassador to the Republic of Peru, Leora Rosenberg Levy, of Connecticut, to be Ambassador to the Republic of Chile, who was introduced by Senator Murphy, Aldona Z. Wos, of North Carolina, to be Ambassador to Canada, and William W. Popp, of Missouri, to be Ambassador to the Republic of Guatemala, all of the Department of State, after the nominees testified and answered questions in their own behalf.

BUSINESS MEETING

Committee on the Judiciary: Committee ordered favorably reported the nominations of John W. Holcomb, to be United States District Judge for the Central District of California, Brett H. Ludwig, to be United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Wisconsin, R. Shireen Matthews, and Todd Wallace Robinson, both to be a United States District Judge for the Southern District of California, and Christy Criswell Wiegand, to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Pennsylvania.

MINORITY SMALL BUSINESSES

Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship: Committee concluded a hearing to examine capital access for minority small businesses, focusing on COVID–19 resources for an equitable and sustainable recovery, including S. 3742, to establish a program in the Department of the Treasury to allocate funds to States, units of general local government, and Indian Tribes to provide assistance to certain small businesses, S. 2549, to allow nonprofit child care providers to participate in the loan programs of the Small Business Administration, H.R. 748, to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to repeal the excise tax on high cost employer-sponsored health coverage, and H.R. 6800, making emergency supplemental appropriations for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2020, after receiving testimony from Talibah M. Bayles, TMB Tax and Financial Services, Birmingham, Alabama; Ron Busby, U.S. Black Chambers, Inc., and Marla Bilonick, Latino Economic Development Center, both of Washington, D.C.; and Fabiana Estrada, ACCION, Miami, Florida.

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House of Representatives

Chamber Action


Public Bills and Resolutions Introduced: 35 public bills, H.R. 7733–7767; and 4 resolutions, H. Con. Res. 104; and H. Res. 1062–1064, were introduced.
Pages H3836–38


Additional Cosponsors:
Page H3839


Reports Filed: There were no reports filed today.

Speaker: Read a letter from the Speaker wherein she appointed Representative Cuellar to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.
Page H3695


Recess: The House recessed at 9:45 a.m. and reconvened at 10 a.m.
Pages H3699–H3700


Privileged Resolution--Intent to Offer: Representative Gohmert announced his intent to offer a privileged resolution.
Pages H3701–02


Point of Personal Privilege: Representative Ocasio-Cortez rose to a point of personal privilege and was recognized to proceed for one hour.
Pages H3702–08


Recess: The House recessed at 1:50 p.m. and reconvened at 2:04 p.m.
Page H3715


Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2021: The House considered H.R. 7608, making appropriations for the Department of State, foreign operations, and related programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2021. Consideration is expected to resume tomorrow, July 24th.
Pages H3715–H3829

Pursuant to the Rule, an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of Rules Committee Print 116–59 shall be considered as adopted.
Page H3708

Agreed to:

Lowey en bloc amendment No. 1 consisting of the following amendments printed in H. Rept. 116–459: Barr (No. 2) that increases and decreases by $25 million the United States International Development Finance Corporation to counter China's Belt and Road Initiative; Jackson Lee (No. 11) that increases by $1,000,000 and decreases by $1,000,000 to combat the trafficking of endangered species; Jackson Lee (No. 12) that increases by $1,000,000 and decreases by $1,000,000 to combat the practice of Female Genital Mutilation; Levin (MI) (No. 14) that prohibits the use of funds to support the forced relocation of refugees to the remote island of Bhasan Char, where more than 300 Rohingya refugees have been held; Lynch (No. 16) that provides for an increase of $1.5 M to Non-proliferation, Antiterrorism, Demining And Related Programs for increased Counterterrorism financing activities; McCaul (No. 19) that decreases the Capital Investment Fund and increases the Nonproliferation, Anti-Terrorism, Demining and Related Programs Account by $25,000,000; Murphy (FL) (No. 20) that provides that, of the $3.34 billion appropriated for the Department of State's Economic Support Fund, funding made available for programs to promote democracy and the rule of law in Venezuela shall be increased by $3 million, from $30 million to $33 million; Perry (No. 26) that reduces and increases the budgetary authority for the Global Health Programs Account by the same amount for the purpose of combatting the prevalence of Female Genital Mutilation around the world; Rose (NY) (No. 30) that decreases the Overseas Program account by $500,000 and increases the Diplomatic Policy and Support account by $500,000 for the purpose of increasing the budget for the Office of the Special Envoy To Monitor and Combat Anti-Semitism; Schweikert (No. 32) that increases and decreases Development Assistance by $1,000,000 to highlight the importance of mitigating aquatic plastic pollution; Titus (No. 34) that increases and decreases by $1 million the Diplomatic Programs Office of International Religious Freedom account for the purpose of encouraging the State Department to denounce Turkey for taking formal action to change the status of Hagia Sophia, a UNESCO World Heritage Site spiritually significant to people of many faiths and backgrounds, from a museum to a mosque; and to engage with Turkey for the purpose of returning its status to a museum so as to welcome people of all faiths and those who have marveled at its architectural and artistic splendor; Wagner (No. 35) that increases by $5 million funding for child protection compacts, raising the overall funding level for the International Narcotics and Law Enforcement account to $50 million and for programs to combat trafficking in persons to $72 million; decreases by the same amount funds for necessary expenses of the Department of State and Foreign Service not otherwise provided for, Overseas Programs; Adams (No. 37) that increases funding by $3,000,000 for the Office of Urban Agriculture; Cohen (No. 38) that provides $750,000 in funding for the USDA's Office of Inspector General to complete an audit report of the USDA's Animal Plant and Health Inspection Service's Administration of the Horse Protection Program, Enforcement of the Horse Protection Act, and the Slaughter Horse Transport Program no later than July 31st, 2021; Courtney (No. 40) that provides $750,000 for the National Institute of Food and Agriculture's Agriculture and Food Research Initiative to research innovative practices to increase carbon storage in agricultural land, including Enhanced Rock Weathering; research priority areas should include: carbon sequestration, practices for practical application, air quality impacts on surrounding communities, impact on soil health, and health impacts on workers and consumers; Rodney Davis (IL) (No. 41) that increases and de-creases funds by $10,000,000 for the National Institute of Food and Agriculture's Agriculture and Food Research Initiative; González-Colón (PR) (No. 42) that increases the amount for the Nutrition Assistance Program in Puerto Rico by $528,585,000 for Fiscal Year 2021; Gottheimer (No. 43) that increases and decreases the Agriculture Processing, Research, and Marketing Programs account by $5.7 billion to highlight the losses American dairy farmers have faced during the COVID–19 pandemic, and to call for additional resources to help dairy farmers; Graves (LA) (No. 44) that increases and decreases the USDA–ARS buildings and facilities account by $1 million; Jackson Lee (No. 45) that clarifies that nothing in the bill restricts the authority of the Secretary of Agriculture or any federal agency head from providing assistance and benefits to victims of trafficking as permitted by 22 U.S.C.  7105(b) of the Victims of Trafficking and Violence Protection Act of 2000; Jackson Lee (No. 46) that increases funding by $2,000,000 for the USDA agency that provides grant research funding for ``1890s Land Grant Universities,'' which are 28 Historically Black Colleges and Universities; LaMalfa (No. 47) that increases funding for the distance learning, telemedicine, and broadband program by $25,000,000, offset by a decrease in the Office of the Chief Information Officer fund by $5,000,000 and a decrease in the Agriculture Buildings and Facilities by $20,000,000; LaMalfa (No. 48) that increases and decreases $50,000,000 for Rural Utilities Service's Distance Learning, Telemedicine, and Broadband Program for the purpose of expanding broadband in areas that do not currently have broadband; Sean Patrick Maloney (NY) (No. 49) that increases funding for the Crop Protection and Pest Management Program under the National Institute of Food and Agriculture by $1 million; Neguse (No. 50) that transfers $1 million in funding to the USDA Office of the Inspector General for expenses necessary for the enforcement of anti-animal cruelty statutes; Panetta (No. 51) that removes and adds $5,000,000 from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Office of the Undersecretary for Research, Education, and Economics for the purpose of instructing the Office of the Chief Scientist to complete a strategic plan for the Agriculture Advanced Research and Development Authority (AGARDA) not later than 180 days after the enactment of this Act; Panetta (No. 52) that increases and decreases funding within the USDA's Office of the Secretary by $500,000,000 to elevate the need for an emergency program through USDA's Farm Service Agency focused on reimbursing producers, processors, and other agricultural employers for personal protective equipment and other safety measures for their employees; Plaskett (No. 53) that provides for funding of the micro-grants for food security program at the authorized level of $10 million; Scalise (No. 54) that decreases by $6,000,000 the USDA Office of the General Counsel account and increases by $6,000,000 the amount for the Center for Food Safety and Applied Nutrition account; this increase is to carry out the activities in Section 778 of this Title to implement options for regulating the export of shrimp to the United States from other countries; Sherrill (No. 55) that provides $10 million for the FDA's Center for Drug Evaluation and Research; Soto (No. 56) that increases funding by $1 million for High-Priority Research And Extension Initiatives--Fertilizer Management Initiative at the Department of Agriculture--National Institute of Food and Agriculture authorized in Sec. 7209 in the 2018 Farm Bill; Soto (No. 57) that increases and decreases funding by $2,276,000 for the collaborative effort of the Office of Regulatory Affairs and other offices within the FDA to provide further re-sources and further implementation of the Food and Veterinary Medicine Program Strategic Plan to enhance the security and reliability of U.S. supply chains during COVID–19 for food, pharmaceuticals, and other essential medical equipment and supplies through technologies such as blockchain; Welch (No. 59) that increases funding for Dairy Business Innovation Initiatives by $5 million; reduces funding for USDA Office of the General Counsel by a corresponding amount; Welch (No. 60) that increases and decreases funding for FDA Salaries and Expenses by $5 million for the purpose of enforcing dairy standards of identity; Barragán (No. 63) that transfers $1 million in funding from the Department of Interior Operations to the Environmental Protection Agency's Targeted Airshed Grant Program; Cohen (No. 69) that increases and decreases funds to require the Bureau of Land Management to utilize $11,000,000 of its Wild Horse and Burro Program budget to implement PZP humane, reversible fertility control to manage wild horse populations; Courtney (No. 71) that increases and decreases funds by $300,000 to highlight the New England Scenic National Trail (NET); Dingell (No. 73) that prohibits funds from being used to (1) withdraw the Environmental Protection Agency's Notice of Proposed Rulemaking to designate PFOA and PFOS as hazardous substances under section 102 of CERCLA; and (2) to withdraw EPA's preliminary regulatory determination to regulate PFOA and PFOS as drinking water contaminants under the Safe Drinking Water Act; Escobar (No. 75) that increases and decreases funding by $1 million for the construction of water and wastewater projects along the United States-Mexico Border under the State and Tribal Assistance Grants account, to highlight the continued lack of high quality colonia water infrastructure and encourage the EPA to prioritize projects benefiting colonias; Gottheimer (No. 79) that increases funding for the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum by $1 million to expand outreach initiatives to educate more Americans about the history of the Holocaust and antisemitism and other forms of hatred, bigotry, and intolerance; Hudson (No. 80) that increases the EPA Science and Technology account by $2 million to study the relationship between PFAS exposure and susceptibility to COVID–19; Hudson (No. 81) that increases and decreases by $2,487,000 funds appropriated for the development of Effluent Limit Guidelines as part of the EPA's PFAS Action Plan to emphasize the need to include the chemical GenX; Hudson (No. 82) that increases and decreases funding by $466,173,000 to the Capital Improvement and Maintenance Account to highlight the need for Forest Service road construction; Schweikert (No. 99) that decreases Departmental Operations by $500,000 and increases Environmental Programs and Management by $500,000, to highlight the need for the Environmental Protection Agency to focus on implementing new technologies for mobile air quality monitoring; Sherrill (No. 100) that provides an additional $2,000,000 for the United States Geological Survey to be used to perform surveys, investigations, and research for harmful algal blooms; Speier (No. 104) that increases and decreases funding to clarify that pending Water Infrastructure Finance and Innovation Act Program applicants should not be required to restart the application process in order for the agency to assess applications against project eligibility criteria; Barr (No. 106) that transfers $5,000,000 from the VHA's Medical Community of Care Account to the VHA's Medical Services account for the explicit use for equine assisted therapy within the VA's Adaptive Sports Grant (ASG) Program, given the promising results reported using equine assisted therapy for veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder; Bergman (No. 107) that increases and decreases funding in the Veterans Health Administration Medical Services' account by $300,000,000 to focus additional efforts within the Office of Rural Health on solutions that will bring more connectivity to Veterans living in rural and remote areas; Carbajal (No. 108) that increases and decreases funding by $5,000,000 to direct the Secretary to change the phone system to have local Community Based Outpatient Center answer calls rather than having all calls routed to the major VA Medical Centers in an effort to reduce wait times for veterans on the phone and to provide more timely health services; Carbajal (No. 109) that provides $3 million for the Veterans Transportation Program to assist veterans in attending all their medical appointments in a timely manner; Craig (No. 111) that increases the Veterans Health Administration Medical Services' account by $1.5M to expand the Rural Health Resource Centers program; Golden (No. 113) that increases and decreases funding in the Veterans Minor Construction account to focus additional efforts to provide better access to long-term beds for veterans suffering from substance use disorder; Gottheimer (No. 114) that increases funding for the VA Office of the Inspector General by $1.3 million to expand oversight of state-run veterans' homes supported and monitored by the VA, many of which have been afflicted by the COVID–19 pandemic; Gottheimer (No. 115) that increases funding for VA medical community care by $1 million to expand access for veterans who are unable to visit a VA Medical Center; reduces VA Departmental Administration, General Administration by $1 million; Graves (LA) (No. 116) that increases and decreases the VA's Medical Facilities account to highlight the urgent need to streamline the VA lease process to meet the critical care needs of America's veterans; Hartzler (No. 117) that amends Division D to increase and decrease by $5 million the VA's medical services account in order to direct that $5 million be used to provide funding for the VA to utilize non-profit post traumatic growth organizations as a treatment for PTSD; Hill (AR) (No. 118) that increases by $1 million the Office of General Counsel for the purposes of training state-level veteran service officers; Kim (No. 119) that increases funding by $1,000,000 for VA medical services to expand access to ride share programs for veterans going to community-based outpatient clinics in urban and suburban areas with parking and transportation limitations that are also facing ongoing delays in acquiring replacement facilities; LaMalfa (No. 121) that increases and decreases by $1 million the VA Departmental Administration, General Administration account, to highlight the need for veterans to receive legal assistance from State VA-approved lawyers willing to provide pro-bono services, and to coordinate with State VAs to ensure veterans are made aware of such assistance; Lipinski (No. 122) that increases funding for construction grants of veterans state extended care facilities by $3 million, with the additional funding intended to provide support to assist states acquire, construct, alter and remodel nursing home, hospital, and domiciliary care facilities to help adapt to needs associated with stopping the spread of COVID–19 and meet other needs; reduces funding for Departmental Administration, General Administration by the corresponding amount; Lynch (No. 123) that provides for an increase of $1.5 million for suicide prevention efforts through the PREVENTS Initiative offset by a reduction from the General Administration account; Murphy (FL) (No. 125) that increases funding for Veterans Health Administration, Medical Services by $1.5 million, with the additional funding intended for the Telehealth and Connected Care account, which supports home telehealth, home telehealth prosthetics, and clinic-based telehealth; reduces funding for Departmental Administration, General Administration by the corresponding amount; Norton (No. 126) that increases and decreases funding by $1 million for the Veterans Benefits Administration to provide support to law school clinical programs that assist veterans with legal matters; Pappas (No. 127) that ensures that $5 million of the funds appropriated to the Office of Resolution Management is spent on completing VA's EEO Program Manager realignment initiative at VBA and VHA in accordance with VA policy; Porter (No. 128) that increases the Veterans Health Administration Medical Services' account by $2 million for the purpose of increasing gender-specific care for women; Ruiz (No. 129) that increases and decreases funding to VA Medical Services account to conduct educational outreach to veterans to enroll in the burn pits registry, additional research using the registry, and other activities concerning the maintenance of the registry; Sherrill (No. 130) that increases funding for the Burn Pits Center of Excellence by $1,000,000; Waters (No. 131) that authorizes an additional $2,000,000 for the purpose of expenses in the administration of veterans' medical, hospital, nursing home, domiciliary, construction, supply, and research activities; and Welch (No. 132) that increases and decreases the Medical Research and Prosthetics Account for the purpose to encourage the VA to study the impact of COVID–19 on veterans who have been exposed to burn pits and other airborne hazards during their service;
Pages H3799–H3806

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Lowey en bloc amendment No. 2 consisting of the following amendments printed in H. Rept. 116–459: Bera (No. 3) that prohibits funds from being used to withdraw from the U.S.-South Korea Mutual Defense Treaty, in light of recent reporting that the administration is considering withdrawing U.S. forces from the Korean peninsula; Cicilline (No. 4) that increases and decreases by $1 million the Diplomatic Programs account for the purpose of discouraging the State Department from using the final report of the Commission on Unalienable Rights as a framework for addressing human rights inside the United States Government, or abroad; to discourage publishing or translating the final report; and to discourage the State Department from pushing aside the modern human rights that the United States helped establish in favor of narrower protections for women, including reproductive rights; for members of the LGBTQI community; and for other minorities; Cohen (No. 5) that prohibits the use of funds to enter into any new contract, grant, or cooperative agreement with any Trump related business listed in the President Trump's Annual Financial Disclosure Report submitted to the Office of Government Ethics as well as certain Trump related properties listed on the Trump Organization's website; Escobar (No. 6) that increases and decreases funding for USAID by $1 million to emphasize the need for a binational COVID–19 testing strategy between the United States and Mexico and encourage the agency to include recommendations for such a strategy in its review of the international response to the COVID–19 pandemic; Foster (No. 7) that increases and decreases by $10,000,000 the Non-proliferation, Anti-terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs (NADR) account to emphasize the need to fund the Synchrotron-Light for Experimental Science and Applications project in order to promote scientific diplomacy and peace in the Middle East; Gottheimer (No. 8) that prohibits funds from being used to promote the sale or export of electronic nicotine delivery systems, or ``e-cigarettes,'' in addition to tobacco products; Grijalva (No. 9) that increases and decreases by $4,000,000 the International Border and Water Commission, United States and Mexico, Construction account, to emphasize the responsibility for the maintenance of the International Outfall Interceptor (IOI); Hastings (No. 10) that increases and decreases $10 million in Economic Support Fund funding for programs benefiting the Ethiopian-Israeli community; Jayapal (No. 13) that increases set-aside for Global Internet Freedom account by $2.5 million, which prioritizes countries whose governments restrict freedom of expression on the Internet, and that are important to the national interest of the United States; Lynch (No. 17) that provides for an increase of $5 million to Non-proliferation, Antiterrorism, Demining And Related Programs for increased demining activities to be offset with a reduction to Human Resources; Malinowski (No. 18) that prohibits use of DOS funds to facilitate the transfer or sale of air-to-ground munitions to Saudi Arabia and the UAE in recognition of the continuing devastation to civilians caused by US-provided weapons in the Yemen conflict; Ocasio-Cortez (No. 21) that increases funding for the Economic Support Fund by $5,000,000 and decreases funding for the International Narcotics Control and Law Enforcement account by the same amount; Ocasio-Cortez (No. 22) that prevents the use of funds to transfer lethal military equipment or crowd control equipment to Bolivia given the recent human rights abuses there; Panetta (No. 23) that prohibits the use of funds to withdraw the United States from NATO; Panetta (No. 24) that prohibits use of funds to withdraw the United States from the World Health Organization; Phillips (No. 27) that provides that, of the $3.34 billion appropriated for the Economic Support Fund and the $900 million appropriated for Development Assistance, funding made available for the Local Works program shall be increased by $5 million, from $50 million to $55 million; Porter (No. 28) that increases and decreases the Democracy Fund account by $2 million to highlight the importance of protecting journalists and civil society activists around the world; Porter (No. 29) that increases and decreases the Economic Support Fund account by $1 million to highlight the importance of programs that help foreign governments and civil society in such countries improve budget transparency; Rouda (No. 31) that increases and decreases the Migration and Refugee Assistance account by $2 million to highlight the contributions of Vietnamese, Laotian, and Cambodian immigrants and to discourage attempts to increase repatriations to those countries; Speier (No. 33) that increases the Economic Support Fund (ESF) by $1,400,000 to fund USAID's demining program in Nagorno-Karabakh and decreases the Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs (ECE) account by $1,400,000; Cohen (No. 39) that prohibits the use of funds to enter into any new contract, grant, or cooperative agreement with any Trump related business listed in the President Trump's Annual Financial Disclosure Report submitted to the Office of Government Ethics as well as certain Trump related properties listed on the Trump Organization's website; Waters (No. 58) that prohibits the use of funds to implement Executive Order 13917, which authorizes the Secretary of Agriculture to use the authorities contained in the Defense Production Act to keep meat and poultry processing facilities operational during the COVID–19 emergency; Adams (No. 61) that increases funding by $2,000,000 for the Environmental Justice program area within the EPA Environmental Programs and Management account; Beyer (No. 64) that increases and decreases funding by $5,000,000 with the intent to ensure US Park Police match other Interior law enforcement and adopt body cameras; Beyer (No. 65) that increases and decreases funds by $500,000 to highlight the need for a GAO study of the civil rights of protesters and the effects of the use of non-lethal tactics during protests on the protesters; Cohen (No. 70) that prohibits the use of funds to enter into any new contract, grant, or cooperative agreement with any Trump related business listed in the President Trump's Annual Financial Disclosure Report submitted to the Office of Government Ethics as well as certain Trump related properties listed on the Trump Organization's website; Dingell (No. 72) that prohibits funds from being used to implement, administer, or enforce the final rule entitled ``Update to the Regulations Implementing the Procedural Provisions of the National Environmental Policy Act'' published by the Council on Environmental Quality in the Federal Register on July 16, 2020; Gottheimer (No. 78) that increases and decreases the U.S. Geological Survey account by $5 million to underscore the need to fight the scourge of Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) in bodies of water in New Jersey and across the country; Huffman (No. 83) that prohibits funds from being used to offer any tracts available for oil and gas leasing in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge; Jackson Lee (No. 84) that increases and decreases funding by $5 million to highlight the need to support culturally competent federal, state, and local public health and environmental protection efforts to address cancer clusters impacting overburdened communities in the gulf coast region, which is home to a refinery row that runs from Mobile to Houston, Texas; Jayapal (No. 85) that prohibits use of funds for enforcement of the National Park Service's final rule that will allow trophy hunting practices to kill hibernating bears and wolf pups on Alaska's federal lands; Lowenthal (No. 87) that limits funds toward oil and gas leasing in the NPRA to protect the Special Areas designated in the 2013 Integrated Activity Plan of the National Petroleum Reserve--Alaska (NPRA); Neguse (No. 91) that increases funding for the Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program (CFLRP) by $5 million; Ocasio-Cortez (No. 92) that increases and decreases funds by $2 million in section 104(k) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) account by $2 million for Brownfields grants with the intent of directing at least 10 percent of such grants be provided to areas in which at least 20 percent of the population has lived under the poverty level over the past 30 years as determined by censuses and the most recent Small Area Income and Poverty Estimates, and that not less than an additional 20 percent of funds be used for projects in low-income community census tracts as defined in 26 U.S.C.  45D(e)(1); O'Halleran (No. 93) that reduces funding of the Office of the Secretary of the Interior by $15 million to preserve funding for relocated Native Americans; Panetta (No. 94) that prohibits funds from being used to nominate or accept a nomination or an expression of interest for any Federal lands for oil and gas leasing within the areas covered by the Bureau of Land Management's Final Central Coast Resource Management Plan Amendment, the Resource Management Plan for the Bakersfield Field Office, or the Carrizo Plain National Monument Resource Management Plan; Porter (No. 97) that prevents funds from being used to reject any application for a grant due to the use of the term ``global warming'' or the term ``climate change'' in the application; Porter (No. 98) that prevents funds from being used for the centralization process established in the EPA's FOIA Regulations Update published on June 26, 2019; Tlaib (No. 105) that doubles the funding level for lead pipe replacement, raising the amount appropriated for reducing lead in drinking water to $1 billion; and Cohen (No. 110) that prohibits the use of funds to enter into any new contract, grant, or cooperative agreement with any Trump related business listed in the President Trump's Annual Financial Disclosure Report submitted to the Office of Government Ethics as well as certain Trump related properties listed on the Trump Organization's website (by a yea-and-nay vote of 223 yeas to 194 nays, Roll No. 160); and
Pages H3806–18, H3822

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Kennedy (amendment No. 86 printed in H. Rept. 116–459) that prohibits funds from being used by the Department of the Interior to rescind the decision to take the lands of the Mashpee Wampanoag Tribe into federal trust or revoke other associated actions related to the Tribe.
Pages H3826–27

Rejected:

Allen (amendment No. 1 printed in H. Rept. 116–459) that sought to reduce spending in Division A by 5% (by a yea-and-nay vote of 88 yeas to 329 nays, Roll No. 159);
Pages H3798–99, H3821–22

Lowey en bloc amendment No. 3 consisting of the following amendments printed in H. Rept. 116–459: Leutkemeyer (No. 15) that sought to prohibit federal contributions to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCC), and the Green Climate Fund (GCF), which advise governments around the world on climate change; Perry (No. 25) that sought to state that none of the funds made available by this Act may be used for the United Nations Relief and Works Agency; Wilson (No. 36) that sought to require LAF to directly confront terrorism and Hezbollah's influence; Burgess (No. 68) that sought to prohibit funds made available by this Act from being used by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to higher or pay the salary of any officer or employee of the EPA to utilize the Title 42 special pay authority; Duncan (No. 74) that sought to strike Section 436 which prohibits funds made available by this act to be used to issue a permit for the import of a sport-hunted trophy of an elephant or lion taken in Tanzania, Zibabwe, or Zambia; Gosar (No. 76) that sought to prevent funds from being used in contravention of President Trump's Executive Order 13807 (Establishing Discipline and Accountability in the Environmental Review and Permitting Process for Infrastructure Projects); Gosar (No. 77) that sought to prevent funds from being used in contravention of President Trump's Executive Order 13817 (Federal Strategy to Ensure Secure and Reliable Supplies of Critical Minerals); McKinley (No. 88) that sought to prevent funds from being used in contravention of Executive Order 13868, ``Promoting Energy Infrastructure and Economic Growth''; Miller (No. 89) that sought to strike the provision that reduces funding to the United States Park Police by $50,000 per day if the Secretary of the Interior fails to provide Congress information requested in the report within 10 days of enactment of this Act; Miller (No. 90) that sought to strike the provision that blocks funding for finalizing the proposed rule entitled ``Oil and Natural Gas Sector: Emission Standards for New, Reconstructed, and Modified Sources Review'' published by the Environmental Protection Agency; Perry (No. 95) that sought to prohibit the use of funds for the EPA to take any ``backstop'' actions in response to the Watershed Implementation Plan submitted by any jurisdiction pursuant to the Chesapeake Bay TMDL; Perry (No. 96) that sought to prohibit the use of funds to give formal notification under, or prepare, propose, implement, administer, or enforce any rule or recommendation pursuant to section 115 of the Clean Air Act; Smith (MO) (No. 101) that sought to prevent funds from being used to regulate lead in ammunition and fishing tackle under the Toxic Substances Control Act; Gianforte (No. 112) that sought to restore funding to replace aging weapons storage facilities to improve security and safety around our nation's nuclear warheads; King (IA) (No. 120) that sought to strike language that impedes the President's border wall construction, under Division D, Title I; and Miller (No. 124) that sought to strike a provision that would prohibit construction at the southern border, including roads, the border wall, fence, or barrier (by a yea-and-nay vote of 187 yeas to 230 nays, Roll No. 161); and
Pages H3818–21, H3822–23

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Smith (MO) (amendment No. 103 printed in H. Rept. 116–459) that sought to reduce funding for EPA Science and Technology to match the President's FY21 Budget request.
Pages H3828–29

Proceedings Postponed:

Allen (amendment No. 62 printed in H. Rept. 116–459) that seeks to reduce spending in Division C by 5%;
Pages H3823–26

Tonko (amendment No. 67 printed in H. Rept. 116–459) that seeks to prohibit funds from being used by the EPA to finalize, implement, or enforce the proposed rule, ``Review of the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Particulate Matter'' published in the Federal Register by the Environmental Protection Agency on April 30, 2020, which fails to protect, within an adequate margin of safety, communities of color from harmful air pollution during a global public health pandemic, where those communities are experiencing a disproportionately high death rate made worse by decades of exposure to toxic pollution; and
Pages H3824–26

Smith (MO) (amendment No. 102 printed in H. Rept. 116–459) that seeks to reduce funding for the EPA Environmental programs and management to match the President's FY 21 budget request.
Pages H3827–29

H. Res. 1060, the rule providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 7608) was agreed to by a yea-and-nay vote of 230 yeas to 188 nays, Roll No. 158, after the previous question was ordered by a yea-and-nay vote of 230 yeas to 189 nays, Roll No. 157.
Pages H3708–15


Presidential Message: Read a message from the President wherein he notified Congress that the national emergency declared in Executive Order 13882 with respect to the situation in Mali is to continue in effect beyond July 26, 2020--referred to the Committee on Foreign Affairs and ordered to be printed (H. Doc. 116–138).
Page H3715


Senate Referrals: S. 906 was held at the desk. S. 4065 was held at the desk.
Page H3829


Senate Message: Message received from the Senate by the Clerk and subsequently presented to the House today appears on page H3829.

Quorum Calls--Votes: Five yea-and-nay votes developed during the proceedings of today and appear on pages H3713–14, H3714–15, H3821–22, H3822, and H3822–23.

Adjournment: The House met at 9 a.m. and adjourned at 8:41 p.m.

Committee Meetings

ON FARM ENERGY PRODUCTION: IMPACTS ON FARM INCOME AND RURAL COMMUNITIES

Committee on Agriculture: Subcommittee on Commodity Exchanges, Energy, and Credit held a hearing entitled ``On Farm Energy Production: Impacts on Farm Income and Rural Communities''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

UNDERFUNDED AND UNPREPARED: EXAMINING HOW TO OVERCOME OBSTACLES TO SAFELY REOPEN PUBLIC SCHOOLS

Committee on Education and Labor: Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education held a hearing entitled ``Underfunded and Unprepared: Examining How to Overcome Obstacles to Safely Reopen Public Schools''. Testimony was heard from Michael Hinojosa, Superintendent, Dallas Independent School District, Texas; Penny Schwinn, Commissioner of Education, Tennessee Department of Education; and public witnesses.

THE HEROES ACT: PROVIDING FOR A STRONG ECONOMIC RECOVERY FROM COVID–19

Committee on Financial Services: Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``The Heroes Act: Providing for a Strong Economic Recovery from COVID–19''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

THE TRUMP ADMINISTRATION'S FY2021 FOREIGN ASSISTANCE BUDGET REQUEST

Committee on Foreign Affairs: Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``The Trump Administration's FY2021 Foreign Assistance Budget Request''. Testimony was heard from John Barsa, Acting Administrator, U.S. Agency for International Development.

MISCELLANEOUS MEASURES

Committee on the Judiciary: Full Committee held a markup on H.R. 2678, the ``No President is Above the Law Act''; H.R. 7694, the ``Abuse of the Pardon Prevention Act''; and to Ratify Subcommittee Assignments. H.R. 2678 and H.R. 7694 were ordered reported, as amended. Subcommittee Assignments were approved.

THE TRANSFORMATION OF THE PUERTO RICO ELECTRIC POWER AUTHORITY (PREPA)

Committee on Natural Resources: Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``The Transformation of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA)''. Testimony was heard from Edison Aviles, Chair, Puerto Rico Energy Bureau; Jose Ortiz, Executive Director, Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority; Fermin Fontanes, Executive Director, Puerto Rico Public-Private Partnerships Authority; and public witnesses.

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EMPOWERING WOMEN AND GIRLS AND PROMOTING INTERNATIONAL SECURITY

Committee on Oversight and Reform: Subcommittee on National Security held a hearing entitled ``Empowering Women and Girls and Promoting International Security''. Testimony was heard from Kelley Currie, Ambassador-at-Large for Global Women's Issues, Department of State; Michelle Bekkering, Assistant Administrator, Bureau for Economic Growth, Education and Environment, U.S. Agency for International Development; Stephanie Hammond, Acting Deputy Assistant of Defense for Stability and Humanitarian Affairs, Department of Defense; and Cameron Quinn, Officer for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, Department of Homeland Security.

LEGISLATIVE MEASURES

Committee on Veterans' Affairs: Full Committee held a hearing on H.R. 6039, to require the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to seek to enter into an agreement with the city of Vallejo, California, for the transfer of Mare Island Naval Cemetery in Vallejo, California, and for other purposes; H.R. 6082, the ``Forgotten Vietnam Veterans Act''; H.R. 4908, the ``Native American PACT Act''; H.R. 2791, the ``Department of Veterans Affairs Tribal Advisory Committee Act of 2019''; H.R. 4526, the ``Brian Tally VA Employment Transparency Act''; H.R. 3582, to amend title 38, United States Code, to expand the scope of the Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans, and for other purposes; H.R. 96, to amend title 38, United States Code, to require the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to furnish dental care in the same manner as any other medical service, and for other purposes; H.R. 4281, the ``Access to Contraception Expansion for Veterans Act''; H.R. 3010, the ``Honoring All Veterans Act''; H.R. 7163, the ``VA FOIA Reform Act of 2020''; H.R. 7111, the ``Veterans Economic Recovery Act of 2020''; H.R. 2435, the ``Accelerating Veterans Recovery Outdoors Act''; H.R. 7287, to clarify the licensure requirements for contractor medical professionals to perform medical disability examinations for the Department of Veterans Affairs; H.R. 3228, the ``VA Mission Telehealth Clarification Act''; H.R. 6141, the ``Protecting Moms Who Served Act''; H.R. 6493, the ``Veterans Benefits Fairness and Transparency Act''; H.R. 7445, to amend title 38, United States Code, to expand eligibility for home loans from the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to certain members of the reserve components of the Armed Forces; legislation on the Burial Equity for Guards and Reserves Act of 2020; legislation to amend title 38, United States Code, to extend certain employment and reemployment rights to members of the National Guard who perform State active duty; and legislation to amend title 38, United States Code, to clarify the scope of procedural rights of members of the uniformed services with respect to their employment and reemployment rights, and for other purposes. Testimony was heard from Maria Llorente, Assistant Deputy Undersecretary for Health for Patient Care Services, Veterans Health Administration, Department of Veterans Affairs; and public witnesses.

TRADE, MANUFACTURING, AND CRITICAL SUPPLY CHAINS: LESSONS FROM COVID–19

Committee on Ways and Means: Subcommittee on Trade held a hearing entitled ``Trade, Manufacturing, and Critical Supply Chains: Lessons from COVID–19''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

Joint Meetings



No joint committee meetings were held.

COMMITTEE MEETINGS FOR FRIDAY,

JULY 24, 2020

(Committee meetings are open unless otherwise indicated)

Senate

No meetings/hearings scheduled.

House

Committee on Oversight and Reform, Subcommittee on Environment, hearing entitled ``FEMA's Natural Disaster Preparedness and Response Efforts During the Coronavirus Pandemic'', 9 a.m., 2154 Rayburn and Webex.

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Next Meeting of the
SENATE

4 p.m., Monday, July 27

Senate Chamber

Program for Monday: Senate will resume consideration of the nomination of William Scott Hardy, to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Pennsylvania, with a vote on confirmation thereon at 5:30 p.m.

Next Meeting of the
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

9 a.m., Friday, July 24

House Chamber

Program for Friday: Continue consideration of H.R. 7608--Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2021.


Extensions of Remarks, as inserted in this issue.








HOUSE


Abraham, Ralph Lee, La., E672

Bishop, Sanford D., Jr., Ga., E672

Clyburn, James E., S.C., E673

Costa, Jim, Calif., E668, E670

Cox, TJ, Calif., E671, E672

Davis, Danny K., Ill., E671

Garamendi, John, Calif., E667

Graves, Sam, Mo., E668, E669, E670

Hastings, Alcee L., Fla., E667

Hudson, Richard, N.C., E668

Huffman, Jared, Calif., E669, E671

Luján, Ben Ray, N.M., E671

McKinley, David B., W.Va., E671

Pelosi, Nancy, Calif., E667

Perry, Scott, Pa., E670

Sensenbrenner, F. James, Jr., Wisc., E668

Stefanik, Elise M., N.Y., E669

Stevens, Haley M., Mich., E668, E670

Wilson, Joe, S.C., E669

[Page:D652]