Daily Digest

Monday, July 20, 2020

Daily Digest

Senate

Chamber Action

Routine Proceedings, pages S4251–S4308

Measures Introduced: Twenty-one bills and one resolution were introduced, as follows: S. 4212–4232, and S. Res. 652.
Pages S4263–64

Measures Reported:

S. 3398, to establish a National Commission on Online Child Sexual Exploitation Prevention, with an amendment in the nature of a substitute.
Page S4263


National Defense Authorization Act--Agreement: A unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that at 11:45 a.m., on Tuesday, July 21, 2020, all time with respect to Schatz Amendment No. 2252, and Inhofe Amendment No. 2411, expire and Senate vote on or in relation to those amendments in that order; and that at 4 p.m., all debate time with respect to Shaheen Amendment No. 1729, and Cornyn Amendment No. 2244, expire and Senate vote on or in relation to those amendments in that order, with all other provisions under the order of Thursday, July 2, 2020, remaining in effect with respect to these amendments.
Page S4262

A unanimous-consent agreement was reached providing that at approximately 10 a.m., on Tuesday, July 21, 2020, Senate resume consideration of S. 4049, to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2021 for military activities of the Department of Defense, for military construction, and for defense activities of the Department of Energy, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal year.
Page S4306


Nominations Confirmed: Senate confirmed the following nominations:

By 51 yeas to 45 nays (Vote No. EX. 131), Russell Vought, of Virginia, to be Director of the Office of Management and Budget.
Pages S4252–59

10 Air Force nominations in the rank of general.

11 Army nominations in the rank of general.

1 Marine Corps nomination in the rank of general.

18 Navy nominations in the rank of admiral.

Routine lists in the Air Force, Army, and Navy.
Pages S4260–62


Messages from the House:
Page S4263


Measures Placed on the Calendar:
Page S4263


Enrolled Bills Presented:
Page S4263


Additional Cosponsors:
Pages S4264–67


Statements on Introduced Bills/Resolutions:
Pages S4267–70


Additional Statements:
Pages S4262–63


Amendments Submitted:
Pages S4270–S4306


Record Votes: One record vote was taken today. (Total--131)
Page S4259


Adjournment: Senate convened at 3 p.m. and adjourned at 7:06 p.m., until 10 a.m. on Tuesday, July 21, 2020. (For Senate's program, see the remarks of the Majority Leader in today's Record on page S4306.)

Committee Meetings

(Committees not listed did not meet)

No committee meetings were held.

[Page:D597]

House of Representatives

Chamber Action


Public Bills and Resolutions Introduced: 24 public bills, H.R. 7670–7693; and 3 resolutions, H. Res. 1054–1056, were introduced.
Pages H3586–87


Additional Cosponsors:
Pages H3588–89


Reports Filed: A report was filed on Friday, July 17 as follows:

H.R. 7668, making appropriations for Financial Services and General Government for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2021, and for other purposes (H. Rept. 116–456).

Reports were filed today as follows:

H. Res. 1053, providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 6395) to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2021 for military activities of the Department of Defense and for military construction, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal year, and for other purposes; providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 7027) making additional supplemental appropriations for disaster relief requirements for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2020, and for other purposes; providing for consideration of the bill (H.R. 7327) making additional supplemental appropriations for disaster relief requirements for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2020, and for other purposes; and providing for consideration of the Senate amendments to the bill (H.R. 1957) to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to modernize and improve the Internal Revenue Service, and for other purposes (H. Rept. 116–457); and

H.R. 7669, making appropriations for the Department of Homeland Security for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2021, and for other purposes (H. Rept. 116–458).
Page H3586


Speaker: Read a letter from the Speaker wherein she appointed Representative Cuellar to act as Speaker pro tempore for today.
Page H3095


Recess: The House recessed at 9:22 a.m. and reconvened at 10 a.m.
Page H3098


Whole Number of the House: The Chair announced to the House that, in light of the passing of the gentleman from Georgia, Mr. Lewis, the whole number of the House is 430.
Page H3098


Moment of Silence: The House observed a moment of silence in memory of the late Honorable John Lewis.
Page H3108


Expressing the profound sorrow of the House of Representatives on the death of the Honorable John Lewis: The House agreed to H. Res. 1054, expressing the profound sorrow of the House of Representatives on the death of the Honorable John Lewis.
Page H3108


Extending the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Program of the Department of Homeland Security: The House agreed to take from the Speaker's table and pass S. 4148, to extend the Chemical Facility Anti-Terrorism Standards Program of the Department of Homeland Security.
Page H3109


Safeguarding America's First Responders Act of 2020: The House agreed to take from the Speaker's table and pass S. 3607, to extend public safety officer death benefits to public safety officers whose death is caused by COVID–19.
Pages H3109–10


Veteran Treatment Court Coordination Act: The House agreed to take from the Speaker's table and concur in the Senate amendment to H.R. 886, to direct the Attorney General to establish and carry out a Veteran Treatment Court Program.
Page H3110


Department of Veterans Affairs Contracting Preference Consistency Act: The House agreed to take from the Speaker's table and concur in the Senate amendment to H.R. 4920, to amend title 38, United States Code, to provide for an exception to certain small business contracting requirements applicable to the Department of Veterans Affairs procurement of certain goods and services covered under the Ability One program.
Pages H3110–11


Ryan Kules Specially Adaptive Housing Improvement Act: The House agreed to take from the Speaker's table and concur in the Senate amendment to H.R. 3504, to amend title 38, United States Code, to provide for improvements to the specially adapted housing program of the Department of Veterans Affairs.
Pages H3111–13


Amending the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act to extend lease protections for servicemembers under stop movement orders in response to a local, national, or global emergency: The House agreed to take from the Speaker's table and pass S. 3637, to amend the Servicemembers Civil Relief Act to extend lease protections for servicemembers under stop movement orders in response to a local, national, or global emergency.
Page H3113


Recess: The House recessed at 1:23 p.m. and reconvened at 1:36 p.m.
Pages H3113–14


Recess: The House recessed at 4:58 p.m. and reconvened at 5:11 p.m.
Page H3503


William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021: The House considered H.R. 6395, to authorize appropriations for fiscal year 2021 for military activities of the Department of Defense and for military construction, to prescribe military personnel strengths for such fiscal year. Consideration is expected to resume tomorrow, July 21st.
Pages H3100–08, H3108–09, H3114–H3503, H3503–13

[Page:D598]


Pursuant to the Rule, an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of Rules Committee Print 116–57 shall be considered as adopted, in lieu of the amendment in the nature of a substitute recommended by the Committee on Armed Services now printed in the bill.

Agreed to:

Escobar amendment (No. 3 printed in H. Rept. 116–457) that provides Congress transparency when a President deploys active duty military within the United States during civil unrest by amending the Insurrection Act in Title 10, Chapter 13 of U.S. Code (by a yea-and-nay vote of 215 yeas to 190 nays, Roll No. 141);
Pages H3329–31, H3503

McAdams amendment (No. 4 printed in H. Rept. 116–457) that prohibits any funding for new nuclear testing in FY21 (by a yea-and-nay vote of 227 yeas to 179 nays, Roll No. 142);
Pages H3331–33, H3503–04

Smith (WA) en bloc amendment No. 1 consisting of the following amendments printed in H. Rept. 116–457: Carolyn B. Maloney (NY) (No. 1) that cracks down on the illicit use of anonymous shell companies by requiring companies to disclose their true beneficial owners at the time the company is formed; Bergman (No. 2) that creates a cyber attack exception under the Foreign Sovereign Immunities Act (FSIA) to protect U.S. nationals against foreign state-sponsored cyber attacks; Pressley (No. 10) that provides clarifying language to ensure that international students enrolled in an educational program at a college or university offering courses online in order to keep students and faculty safe and mitigate further COVID–19 spread, will be able to remain in their educational program and will continue to meet requirements of their student visa; Thompson (CA) (No. 12) that transfers the Mare Island Naval Cemetery to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs; Walden (No. 14) that establishes the Secretary of Energy and Secretary of Defense as co-chairs of the Nuclear Weapons Council (NWC) to provide Cabinet-level visibility and accountability of our nuclear deterrent and the NWC budget process; Langevin (No. 15) that establishes a National Cyber Director within the Executive Office of the President; Wexton (No. 16) that includes pandemics as an exigency of public business for purposes of federal employee leave roll over; Deutch (No. 18) that requires the Department of State to develop a coordinated strategy to counter white identity terrorism globally, assessing the global threat landscape and applying adequate resourcing to programming, information sharing, and designation authorities where applicable; Torres (CA) (No. 20) that encourages DOD to consider female soldiers who have served with valor as candidates for renaming military bases; Khanna (No. 21) that requires the Comptroller General of the United States to submit to Congress a report on U.S. military support for the Saudi-led coalition's war against the Houthis in Yemen, not later than one year after enactment of this Act; Ted Lieu (CA) (No. 22) that requires the Secretary of State, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense and the Director of National Intelligence, to submit a report to Congress on U.S. policy in Yemen, including diplomatic efforts, humanitarian assistance, and civilian protection; requires GAO to report to Congress on U.S. military support to the Saudi-led coalition in Yemen and expresses a Statement of Policy on the conflict; Cicilline (No. 23) that provides protections from forced arbitration to service members in disputes covered under the Service Members Civil Relief Act (SCRA); Matsui (No. 24) that restores American leadership in semiconductor manufacturing by increasing federal incentives to enable advanced research and development, secure the supply chain, and ensure long-term national security and economic competitiveness; Ted Lieu (CA) (No. 25) that establishes an Office of Subnational Diplomacy at the State Department and requires the appointment of an official to head the office; Young (No. 26) that requires a certification be submitted to Congress before the spouse of a servicemember can be removed from the United States; Richmond (No. 27) that implements a recommendation from the Cyberspace Solarium Commission to require the Department of Homeland Security to establish a cyber incident reporting program; Keating (No. 28) that establishes immunity from seizure under judicial process for culturally significant objects temporarily loaned from Afghanistan to US institutions, under specified conditions, and specifies that US institutions under 22 USC 2459 include cultural, educational, or religious institutions and that objects can be transferred for storage, conservation, scientific research, exhibition or display; Adams (No. 30) that requires the Chief Diversity Officer to create a strategic plan that spurs participation by HBCUs and MSIs in research, development, testing, and evaluation activities; Aguilar (No. 31) that makes permanent a pilot program for the direct commissioning of cyber professionals and would give the services the authority to consider advanced degrees when deciding on the rank of the person obtaining the direct commission; Aguilar (No. 32) that adds to an annual report that must be produced by the Special Inspector General for Racial and Ethnic Disparities in the Armed Forces, the requirement that an annual accounting and detailing of every incident of white supremacist activity documented in the Department of Defense be included; Aguilar (No. 33) that fences off certain funding in order to obtain reports on New START and the post-INF landscape which were required in the FY2020 NDAA and are past due; Allred (No. 34) that requires a report on the measures that can be taken to decrease instances of civilian harm and human rights abuses in the security forces of Burkina Faso, Mali, and Niger, and requires a strategy for the United States to improve and coordinate civilian harm mitigation measures with other militaries operating in the region; Axne (No. 35) that allows Members of the National Guard and Reserve to participate in DOD SkillBridge training; Bacon (No. 36) that requires the State Department to produce an annual report on the effectiveness of US unmanned aerial system export policy; Barr (No. 37) that requires the Department of Defense to carry out a pilot program to determine the prevalence of sleep apnea among members of the Armed Forces while at initial training. Bera (No. 38) that expresses the sense of Congress that natural, accidental, and deliberate biological threats, including infectious disease, are in the core national security interest of the United States, and that Cooperative Threat Reduction Biological Threat Reduction Program is critical to addressing those threats. Bera (No. 39) that requires DoD to conduct a study and submit a report to Congress identifying financial hardships as a result of the COVID–19 pandemic, evaluating best practices for providing financial assistance to servicemembers, and preventing future disruptions; Bera (No. 40) that directs DOD to develop staffing recommendations for antimicrobial stewardship programs at DOD medical treatment facilities, recommendations on the use of diagnostics to improve those programs, and a plan to implement such recommendations; Bera (No. 41) that requires Secretary of Defense, in coordination with Secretary of State, to report on efforts to prevent, detect, respond to biological threats, including bilateral and multilateral efforts; Beyer (No. 42) that requires DoD to fulfill recommendations of its 2018 report by working to mitigate helicopter noise in the National Capital Region by establishing: (1) a noise inquiry website to track and analyze complaints; and (2) a helicopter noise abatement working group; Beyer (No. 43) that continues authorization for the Direct Air Capture and Blue Carbon Removal Technology Program. Biggs (No. 44) that expresses a sense of Congress about the importance of the U.S.-Israel relationship; Bilirakis (No. 45) that requires the Defense Health Agency to produce a report on the feasibility, efficacy, and cost of expanding coverage for chiropractic care to military families and retirees under the TRICARE Program; Bilirakis (No. 46) that requires a feasibility study on increased rotational deployments to Greece and enhanced United States-Greece diplomatic engagement; Blunt Rochester (No. 47) that includes a Sense of Congress honoring Dover Air Force Base, its two airlift wings, and the Center for Mortuary Affairs for their distinguished service; Blunt Rochester (No. 48) that increases the budget for hypersonic prototyping (line 048) by $5 million and decreases the budget for contractor logistics & systems (line 080) by $5 million; Blunt Rochester (No. 49) that increases the solder systems-advanced development (PE 0603827A) line by $7 million for body armor development; Boyle (No. 50) that expresses the Sense of Congress that the United States should reaffirm support for an enduring strategic partnership between the United States and Ukraine and support for Ukraine's sovereignty and territorial integrity; Boyle (No. 51) that expresses the Sense of Congress reaffirming the commitment of the United States to NATO; Brindisi (No. 52) that directs the Department of Agriculture (USDA) to implement a public service announcement campaign to address the mental health of farmers and ranchers, including television, radio, print, outdoor, and digital public service announcements; Brown (MD) (No. 53) that ensures that the Olympics and Paralympics receive equivalent security assistance from the Department of Defense; Brownley (CA) (No. 54) that directs the Comptroller General of the United States to conduct a study of women involuntarily separated from the Armed Forces due to pregnancy or parenthood from 1951–1976, include any racial or ethnic disparities, discrepancies in uniformity of those separations, and identify recommendations for improving access to resources for those former members of the Armed Forces through the Department of Veterans Affairs; Brownley (CA) (No. 55) that establishes a federal grant program to help states create and implement a Seal of Biliteracy program that encourages and recognizes high school students who achieve proficiency in both English and at least one other language; Brownley (CA) (No. 56) that requires a joint report from the Secretaries of Defense and Veterans Affairs on former members of the armed forces who were discharged under policies discriminating against lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender servicemembers, and who have applied for a discharge upgrade; Buchanan (No. 57) that requires the Department of Defense to produce a study on the potential benefits of and feasibility of requiring all U.S. military bases to have properly functioning MedEvac helicopters and military ambulances stocked with appropriate emergency medical supplies; Buck (No. 58) that prohibits federal employees from downloading or using TikTok on any technology device issued by the United States government; Burgess (No. 59) that requires the DoD to report to Congress on the current state of Energy Savings Performance Contracts; Bustos (No. 60) that requires the Department of Defense to report data on how the Secretary of Defense determined whether to authorize fulltime National Guard duty for states' COVID–19 responses (to include whether the costs of Soldier and Airmen benefits were a factor) and requires the Secretary to provide recommendations to improve the process; Bustos (No. 61) that revises authority of certain family members of a servicemember who dies or becomes catastrophically ill or injured while in military service to terminate a property lease or motor vehicle lease executed by the servicemember; Bustos (No. 62) that establishes a pilot program for developing an online real estate tool of existing inventory of space available at Army installations to enable efficient use by authorized government and private sector actors; Byrne (No. 63) that requires government contracting officers to file their commercial item determinations to the DoD Commercial Item Group so that all military services can have access to them in; Carbajal (No. 64) that requires the Department of Defense, in consultation with the Department of Veterans Affairs, to develop guidelines regarding the consideration and use of unofficial sources of information in determining benefits eligibility when a veteran's service records are incomplete due to damage caused to the records while in the possession of the Department of Defense; Carbajal (No. 65) that provides the Space Development Agency special hiring authority to attract experts in science and engineering; Carson (IN) (No. 66) that authorizes $5,000,000 for a pancreatic cancer early detection initiative (EDI) under the Congressionally Directed Medical Research Programs (CDMRP) at the Department of Defense (DoD); Case (No. 67) that adds a sense of Congress that lands throughout the State of Hawai'i currently owned and leased by the Department of Defense or in which the Department of Defense otherwise has a real property interest are critical to maintaining the readiness of the Armed Forces now stationed or to be stationed in Hawai'i and throughout the Indo-Pacific region and elsewhere. Also includes reporting requirements to provide transparency of efforts to resolve this land use challenges; Castro (TX) (No. 68) that provides military medical treatment facilities additional flexibility when billing civilian trauma patients; Castro (TX) (No. 69) that directs the Administrator of USAID to incorporate early childhood development into current programming and in partner countries, and protects children in adversity; Castro (TX) (No. 70) that calls on the respective Department of Defense and military departments offices for public affairs to work to ensure that the projects that they are involved in and provide consultation services for in film, television, and publishing, accurately represent all servicemembers in the Armed Forces; Chabot (No. 71) that requires a report on internal displacement and killings of citizens of several countries of the former USSR in illegally occupied territory in those countries; Chabot (No. 72) that increases Air Force research funding by $3 million for the National Center for Hardware and Embedded Systems Security and Trust (CHEST); Chabot (No. 73) that requires the President to produce a whole-of-government strategy to impose costs on and achieve deterrence toward China for cyber-enabled corporate espionage and personal data theft; Chabot (No. 74) that expresses the sense of Congress on crossborder violence in the Galwan Valley and Congress's concern toward the growing territorial claims of the People's Republic of China; Cicilline (No. 75) that establishes the Southern New England Regional Commission, which would assist in the development of defense manufacturing in Southern New England; Cicilline (No. 76) that requires a report to Congress on care and treatment available and accessible to servicemembers and their spouses for pregnancy, postpartum depression, and other pregnancy-related mood disorders; Clarke (NY) (No. 77) that requires reports to Congress on the defense and military implications of deepfake videos; Clarke (NY) (No. 78) that instructs the Steering Committee on Emerging Technology to establish a Deepfake Working Group to assess the national security implications of machine-manipulated media, such as deepfake videos; Clarke (NY) (No. 79) that expresses the sense of Congress with respect to enhancing engagement with the Caribbean region; Clarke (NY) (No. 80) that expands and clarifies the mandate of entities authorized by the National Artificial Intelligence Initiative Act to include combatting discriminatory algorithmic bias against protected classes of persons; Clarke (NY) (No. 81) that prohibits the use of certain DoD funds on the acquisition of artificial intelligence systems unless such systems have been or will be vetted for discriminatory algorithmic bias against protected classes of person; Clarke (NY) (No. 82) expressing the sense of Congress with respect to the importance of preparing for catastrophic critical infrastructure failure events, and requires DoD to assess gaps in existing critical infrastructure resilience strategies; Clarke (NY) (No. 83) that adds questions to DOD workplace climate surveys with respect to xenophobic incidents; Cohen (No. 84) that directs the Department of Defense to submit a report to Congress a list of countries that have consented to host Russian military forces and a list of countries where Russian military forces are deployed in violation of the territorial sovereignty of countries; Cohen (No. 85) that directs the Department of Defense to submit a report to Congress on its progress in modernizing its financial management enterprise; Cohen (No. 86) that directs the Comptroller General of the United States to study the school-to-prison pipeline and the advantages of using restorative practices in schools; Cole (No. 87) that aligns medical benefits offered under TRICARE's Extended Care Health Option (ECHO) program for special needs dependents with current state offerings available under Medicaid Home and Community-Based Services (HCBS) waivers; Collins (GA) (No. 88) that expands Tricare Reserve Select coverage of hearing aid devices to the dependents of National Guard members and members of Reserve components; Connolly (No. 89) that reforms and codifies the Federal Risk and Authorization Management Program (FedRAMP); Connolly (No. 90) that re-establishes the government-wide lead for pandemic response, establishes an Interagency Review Council charged with implementing U.S. commitments under the Global Health Security Agenda, and requires a global health security strategy; Connolly (No. 91) that codifies existing policy requiring DoD to report to National Instant Criminal Background Check System (NICS) servicemembers with felony domestic violence convictions who are prohibited from purchasing firearms pursuant to current law; Connolly (No. 92) that clarifies that qualifying subcontractors and subgrantees are afforded whistleblower protections against reprisal when disclosing information about gross mismanagement or waste of federal funds; Connolly (No. 93) that authorizes permanently the United States Patent and Trademark Office teleworking pilot program established by the Telework Enhancement Act of 2010; Cooper (No. 94) that requires federal agencies to report on their federal program activities and provide that information to OMB; Correa (No. 95) that directs the Secretary of Defense to conduct a study and report on ROTC recruitment; Correa (No. 96) that directs the Secretaries of Defense and Veterans' Affairs to conduct a study and report on the feasibility of having a VA representative present at separations courses to set up premium eBenefits accounts to streamline the identity verification process; Cox (CA) (No. 97) that requires a report on unclaimed funds (within 180 days) at VA in order to determine: how much there is in possible discretionary funding for future fiscal years and a way to keep unclaimed funds beyond the point of claim eligibility at VA so as to serve as pay-for for other projects and programs; Cox (CA) (No. 98) that requires a report regarding the transportation of the remains of decedents under the jurisdiction of the Secretary of a military department pursuant to section 1481 of title 10, United States Code; Cox (CA) (No. 99) that requires a report/cost analysis to be done (within 120 days) on the cost of providing TRICARE to every individual currently in the Health Professions Scholarship Program which is run by Army, Navy, Air Force; Craig (No. 100) that adds $30 Million to the Army Community Services account to provide family assistance, victim advocacy, financial counseling, employment readiness, and other similar support services at installations where 500 or more military members are assigned; Crawford (No. 101) that postpones conditional designation of Explosive Ordnance Disposal Corps as a basic branch of the Army, directs EOD commandant to ensure EOD soldiers receive enhanced combat mobility training to support special operations (airborne, air assault, combat diver, etc.); Crawford (No. 102) that adds Explosive Ordnance Disposal to the list of Special Operations Activities in Section 167(k) of Title 10, USC. 103; Crawford (No. 103) that streamlines service EOD equipment acquisitions; Crawford (No. 104) that requires the federally funded research and development corporation to solicit input from relevant nonprofit organizations, such as the National Defense Industrial Association EOD Committee, United States Army EOD Association, United States Bomb Technician Association, and the EOD Warrior Foundation when conducting the study directed by Section 1702; Crenshaw (No. 105) that establishes the use of the same system and rank structure in Space Force as is used in the Navy; Crist (No. 106) that reports on the effect of COVID–19 on the space industrial base and space programs of the Department of Defense; Crist (No. 107) that requires a report on the use of the juvenile health care records of dependents when they try to join the military as an adult; Crist (No. 108) that directs GAO to study the transferability of military certifications to civilian occupational licenses and certifications; Crow (No. 109) that updates the space strategy and assessment requirement to include Iran and North Korea, and adds the Director of National Intelligence as a tasked senior official; Crow (No. 110) that directs the Secretary of Health and Human Services to clarify the roles and responsibilities of the agencies tasked with executing the national biodefense strategy; and requires a report by the Secretary of Defense on pandemic/biodefense organization, authorities, and roles and responsibilities specific to the Department of Defense; Cuellar (No. 111) that encourages contact between members of the Armed Forces who are participating in the Transition Assistance Program and local communities to promote employment opportunities; Cunningham (No. 112) that requires the Department of Defense to provide a National Guard member separating from active service after full-time duty in support of the government response to COVID–19 with the transitional health benefits provided to a separating active-duty reservist; Curtis (No. 113) that adds a mandate to the State Department's Annual Report on Human Rights Practices to report on the use of advanced technology surveillance equipment; Rodney Davis (IL) (No. 114) that directs the National Institute of Standards and Technology to carry out a program that will improve the United States' capacity for verifying and manufacturing advanced microelectronics; Davis (CA) (No. 115) that fences funding until required Nuclear Weapons Council briefings are provided and requires additional updates to Congress; DeFazio (No. 116) that includes four acts amending Title 46 relating to and supporting the maritime industry; DeFazio (No. 117) that adds the Elijah E. Cummings Coast Guard Authorization Act of 2020, which reauthorizes the Coast Guard and Federal Maritime Commission (FMC), and includes report requirements, demonstration program authorizations, and new regulatory mandates for the Coast Guard that will help them better execute their 11 statutory missions; DelBene (No. 118) that specifically adds domestic content preferences for aluminum for funds administered by the Department of Defense, Federal Highway Administration, Federal Transit Administration, Federal Railroad Administration, Federal Aviation Administration, and Amtrak; DelBene (No. 119) that requires the Secretary of Defense to submit a report on how authorities under the Defense Production Act could be used to increase activities related to refining aluminum and the development of processing and manufacturing capabilities for aluminum; Delgado (No. 120) that requires the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to publish a report regarding veterans who receive VA benefits, including those who receive benefits under the Transition Assistance Program; Delgado (No. 121) that clarifies Congressional intent by requiring manufacturers to disclose all PFAS discharges over 100 lbs; Deutch (No. 122) that adds the Robert Levinson Hostage Recovery and Hostage-Taking Accountability Act, which codifies US government hostage recovery and response policy, increases US government support to families of hostages, and authorizes sanctions against those who engage in hostagetaking; Engel (No. 123) that requires U.S. government prioritization of democratic governance, anti-corruption efforts, security and prosperity in the Northern Triangle; and puts in place targeted sanctions to fight corruption in the region; Engel (No. 124) that authorizes the President to make direct loans for the purchase of NATO-interoperable equipment to NATO allies that meet democratic benchmarks; authorizes rewards for providing information on foreign election interference; requires reports on NATO members' contributions to the alliance, the capability and capacity requirements of Ukraine's navy and air force, malign Russian and Chinese influence in Serbia, and potential violations of CAATSA; Engel (No. 125) that amends Sec. 1041 (Support of Special Operations to Combat Terrorism) to include reporting on the entities with which foreign forces receiving US support are in hostilities and steps taken to ensure support is consistent with United States objectives and human rights; clarifies authority related to war powers and laws of armed conflict; 126. Engel (No. 126) that provides support to the transitional government of Sudan, promotes accountability for human rights abuses, and encourages fiscal transparency; Engel (No. 127) that comprises elements of the Department of State Authorization Act that passed the House in July 2019 on suspension, which strengthen the management and operations of the State Department, including measures to bolster embassy and information security, recruit and retain a diverse workforce, and improve the Department's capacity to carry out public diplomacy and anti-corruption activities; Engel (No. 128) that establishes an independent commission in the legislative branch to assess and make recommendations to Congress and the President regarding United States counterterrorism objectives, priorities, capabilities, policies, programs, activities and legal frameworks in an era when the United States confronts evolving terrorism threats and a growing number of other domestic and international challenges; Engel (No. 129) that establishes a program to prevent, mitigate, and respond to civilian harm as a result of military operations conducted by the Somalia National Army, the African Union Mission in Somalia, and during operations in which U.S. Armed Forces provide operational support to these entities; Engel (No. 130) that includes findings on the national security importance of the U.S.-Japan alliance and U.S. troops stationed in Japan; Eshoo (No. 131) that amends existing biannual reporting requirements related to the DOD's Joint Artificial Intelligence Center (JAIC) to include a description of the contribution to the development by the JAIC and DOD to AI standards; Eshoo (No. 132) that amends existing biannual reporting requirements related to the DOD's Joint Artificial Intelligence Center to include position descriptions for roles that servicemembers take after the conclusion of their assignment with the JAIC; Evans (No. 133) that allows participants in a contracting program to extend their participation for an additional year; Finkenauer (No. 134) that extends university consortia contracts until 2026 and requires the Defense Department to enter into no fewer than four pilot contracts and report to Congress; Fitzpatrick (No. 135) that improves Department of Defense and landlord response to identification and remediation of severe environmental health hazards in military housing; Fletcher (No. 136) that ensures servicemembers are able to finish the Skillsbridge job training program once admitted; Fortenberry (No. 137) that expresses a sense of Congress that it is in the best interests of the stability of the region for Egypt, Ethiopia, and Sudan to immediately reach a just and equitable agreement regarding the filling and operation of the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam; Foxx (NC) (No. 138) that requires the Department of Defense to consult with stakeholders to develop guidelines for the acquisition of intellectual property (e.g., technological processes), to include model forms and definitions of key terms; Frankel (No. 139) that requires the Department of Defense, in coordination with the Department of State, to conduct a pilot partner country assessment on the barriers to women's participation in the national security forces of six participating partner countries; Gabbard (No. 140) that clarifies the Department of Defense policy on over the counter products with a small amount of hemp in them that are legal under Federal law; Gabbard (No. 141) that requires the President, in consultation with the Secretary of State, the Secretary of the Treasury, the Secretary of Commerce, the Administrator of the United States Agency for International Development, and the United States Ambassador to the United Nations to submit a report to Congress on humanitarian impacts of all comprehensive sanctions; Gabbard (No. 142) that exempts the Uniformed Services University from the Paperwork Reduction Act and allows for quicker access to doctoral papers and experiment results among the wider scientific community; Gabbard (No. 144) that requires a report by the Office of Inspector General of all service members discharged in the last 20 years, for bad conduct and dishonorable discharges, reviewing the demographics (including sex, age, religion, tribal affiliation, ethnicity, heritage), reason for discharge, whether complaints were filed within their chain of command for any reason, including but not limited to fraud, waste, abuse, noncompliance with federal or military law, sexual assault, sexual abuse, or sexual trauma; Gallagher (No. 145) that directs GAO to do a report on ZTE's compliance with the settlement agreement it reached with the Department of Commerce on June 8, 2018; Gallagher (No. 146) that requires a briefing on the supply chain for small unmanned aircraft system components; Gallagher (No. 147) that prohibits federal operation or procurement of certain foreign-made unmanned aircraft systems; Gohmert (No. 148) that outlines the instruction that no soldier may brief another on a pending case because they are potential jury members; Golden (No. 149) that requires the Department of Defense (DOD) and Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to ask servicemembers and veterans who have tested positive for a virus designated by the federal government as a pandemic, including COVID–19, if they were previously exposed to burn pits, so they can properly address their medical needs and ensure they receive proper care; Golden (No. 150) that makes the National Parks and Federal Recreational Lands Pass Program free for Gold Star Families; Gonzalez (OH) (No. 151) that directs the U.S. Governor for the World Bank to instruct the U.S. representative to the Bank that it is U.S. policy to pursue China's graduation from World Bank assistance, consistent with the Bank's eligibility criteria and requires the Governor to report to Congress on U.S. efforts to secure China's graduation; González-Colón (PR) (No. 152) that expresses the House of Representatives' support for the designation of ``National Borinqueneers Day'' in honor of the 65th Infantry Regiment, a U.S. Army unit consisting mostly of soldiers from Puerto Rico that was awarded the Congressional Gold Medal on April 13, 2016; González-Colón (PR) (No. 153) that requires DOD to brief congressional defense committees on the feasibility, benefits, and costs of extending eligibility to enroll in TRICARE Prime to eligible beneficiaries who reside in Puerto Rico and other United States territories; Gosar (No. 154) that directs the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Sustainment to issue guidance that ensures the elimination of United States dependency on rare earth materials from China by fiscal year 2035; Gottheimer (No. 155) that requires the Secretary of Defense, in coordination with the Secretary of State, to report to Congress on the use of online social media by U.S. State Department-designated foreign terrorist organizations, and the threat posed to U.S. national security by online radicalization; Gottheimer (No. 156) that ensures members of the National Guard responding to the COVID–19 pandemic are provided with 14 days of housing to quarantine safely; Gottheimer (No. 157) that ensures public disclosure of results from lead and copper testing at Department of Defense Education Activity (DoDEA) schools; Gottheimer (No. 158) that requires the Under Secretary of Defense for Personnel and Readiness to prepare an annual report to Congress containing an analysis of the nationwide costs of living for members of the Department of Defense; Graves (LA) (No. 159) that authorizes the service secretaries to award the Vietnam Service medal to veterans who participated in Operation End Sweep; Graves (LA) (No. 160) that authorizes the National Guard to be reimbursed in a timely manner in response to an emergency declared under the Stafford Act; Green (TX) (No. 161) GAO study to assess and analyze the state and availability of insurance coverage in the United States for cybersecurity risks and provide recommendations; Green (TN) (No. 162) that enhances CISA's ability to both protect federal civilian networks and provide useful threat intelligence to critical infrastructure by authorizing continuous threat hunting on the .gov domain; Haaland (No. 163) that prevents US taxpayer money from assisting Bolsonaro in relocating indigenous or Quilombola communities in Brazil; Haaland (No. 164) that ensures Armed Forces members are not unduly affected due to pregnancy, childbirth, or medical condition arising from pregnancy or childbirth; Hagedorn (No. 165) that requires a contracting officer to consider the relevant past performance experience of first-tier small business subcontractors and small business joint venture members; Harder (CA) (No. 166) that revises the conditions allowing a service member to terminate a telecommunications service contract after the service member receives military orders to relocate; and Crow (CO) (No. 407) that makes a variety of clarifying edits about the terrorist organizations referenced and adds the Director of the Central Intelligence Agency as a covered official for the required report (by a yea-and-nay vote of 336 yeas to 71 nays, Roll No. 143);
Pages H3379–H3503, H3504–05

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Gallego amendment (No. 13 printed in H. Rept. 116–457) that clarifies and extends sanctions related to the construction of the Nord Stream II pipeline;
Pages H3505–06

Adams amendment (No. 17 printed in H. Rept. 116–457) that extends CARES student loan protections for private student loan borrowers who were left out of the CARES Act; this includes a pause in borrower payment obligations, accrual of interest, negative credit reporting, and debt collection; additionally, since the CARES student loan protections expire on September 30, 2020, this amendment extends the private student loan protections an additional year until September 30, 2021;
Pages H3506–08

Houlahan amendment (No. 19 printed in H. Rept. 116–457) that requires that any Federal law enforcement officer deployed pursuant to 10 USC 253 be clearly identified by name and agency visible on their uniform or other clothing;
Pages H3508–10

Panetta amendment (No. 167 printed in H. Rept. 116–457) that expresses the sense of Congress that the decision to withdraw from the Treaty on Open Skies did not comply with Section 1234(a) of the 2020 National Defense Authorization Act and that confidence and security building measures remain vital to the strategic interests of our NATO allies and partners;
Pages H3511–13

Smith (WA) en bloc amendment No. 2 consisting of the following amendments printed in H. Rept. 116–457: Hastings (No. 168) that expresses the sense of Congress that the Department of Defense should develop an integrated master plan for pursuing Net Zero initiatives and reductions in fossil fuels; Hayes (No. 169) that increases authorized funding levels for Air Force university research, development, test and evaluation initiatives by $5,000,000; Higgins (NY) (No. 170) that authorizes the Secretary of Defense to contribute $5,000,000 to support the National Maritime Heritage Grants program; Hill (AR) (No. 171) that extends the WWI Valor Medals Review by two years; Hill (AR) (No. 172) that establishes a United States policy at the international financial institutions (IFIs) to pursue greater transparency with respect to the terms and conditions of financing by the People's Republic of China to IFI member countries; Horn (No. 173) that authorizes appropriations to establish a federal initiative to accelerate and coordinate Federal investments and facilitate new public-private partnerships in research, standards, and education in artificial intelligence in order to ensure the United States leads the world in the development and use of trustworthy artificial intelligence systems; Horn (No. 174) that increases the funding authorization for Air Force Reserve Contractor Systems Support; Horsford (No. 175) that strikes section 2844 and replaces it with a new section to rectify inconsistencies, remove the dispute resolution provision, promote management coordination, and clarify the Secretary of the Interior has administrative jurisdiction over refuge lands, the Secretary of the Air Force has primary jurisdiction over bombing impact areas, and the refuge is managed subject to the Refuge Administration Act; Houlahan (No. 176) that increases the authorization for the CDC study of PFAS health implications from $10 million to $15 million; Houlahan (No.177) that requires DOD to assess each DOD component's cyber hygiene and requires a GAO assessment of that report; Hudson (No. 178) that requires the Commander of USSOCOM to submit a report on the Preservation of the Force and Family (POTFF) program's types of professional employment and ability to meet current and future needs; Jackson Lee (No. 179) that implements a recommendation made by the Cyberspace Solarium Commission to require the Secretary of Homeland Security to develop a strategy to implement Domain-based Message Authentication, Reporting, and Conformance (DMARC) standard across U.S.-based email providers; Jackson Lee (No. 180) that requires the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the Under Secretary of Homeland Security for Intelligence and Analysis, and the Director of National Intelligence to report to Congress, in not less than 180 days, an evaluation of the nature and extent of the domestic terror threat and domestic terrorist groups; Jackson Lee (No. 181) that provides authorization for $2.5 million increase in funding to combat post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD); Jackson Lee (No. 182) that directs the Secretary of Defense to report on the number of military bases, installations, and facilities that are named after African Americans; and directs each Secretary responsible for a branch of the military to establish a review process to consider the naming of military installations and covered defense property under the jurisdiction of that Secretary after African Americans who served in the Armed Forces with honor, heroism, and distinction and are deserving of recognition; Jackson Lee (No. 183) that provides authorization for a $10 million increase in funding for increased collaboration with NIH to combat Triple Negative Breast Cancer; Jayapal (No. 184) that directs federal agencies to initiate debarment proceedings for contractors with repeat and willful wage theft violations; Jeffries (No. 185) that encourages the Department of Defense to build partnerships with minority and women-owned Department of Defense contractors to establish STEM apprenticeships and internships; Johnson (GA) (No. 186) that renews a reporting requirement on U.S. Government foreign police training and equipping programs for FYs 2023, 2024, and 2025; Johnson (LA) (No. 187) that requires a report from the Secretary of Defense on the activities of China's United Front Work Department in the United States and the extent to which these activities pose a threat to U.S. national security and national defense; Johnson (LA) (No. 188) that expresses the sense of Congress that the Secretary of Defense should include in existing reporting, an assessment of and recommendations to address, gaps or vulnerabilities within the National Technology and Industrial Base Sector that enable theft of intellectual property critical to the development and long-term sustainability of defense technologies; Johnson (LA) (No. 189) that expresses a sense of Congress for the United States and its allies at NATO Summits to prioritize deterring Russian aggression; Johnson (LA) (No. 190) that directs the Secretary of Defense to assess the extent to which the government of Afghanistan is combatting gross human rights violations and promoting religious freedom in the region; Johnson (LA) (No. 191) that requires Defense Secretary to consider additional installations for purposes of the 5G test bed program; Joyce (No. 192) that directs SBA to develop a training curriculum on category management for staff of Federal agencies with procurement or acquisition responsibilities; Keating (No. 193) that requires that if POTUS invokes the Defense Production Act in the context of a global pandemic, the US shall coordinate with NATO and other allied countries to address supply chain gaps and promote access to vaccines and other remedies; Keating (No. 194) that requires a strategy for U.S.engagement in Afghanistan subsequent to any Afghan reconciliation agreement to support the implementation of commitments to women and girls? inclusion and empowerment and protection of basic human rights in Afghanistan; Keating (No. 195) that establishes an interagency task force to coordinate U.S. government efforts to fight foreign public corruption and a fund to support those efforts; Keating (No. 196) that requires reporting on financial and non-financial institutions operating outside of the United States, classes of transactions, jurisdictions outside of the United States, and accounts for which there are reasonable grounds to conclude are of primary money laundering concern in connection with Russian illicit finance; Keating (No. 197) that reforms the authorities of the CEO of the US Agency for Global Media and International Broadcasting Advisory Board; Keller (No. 198) that requires the Secretary to prioritize domestic procurement of tungsten and tungsten powder to meet defense needs; Khanna (No. 199) that expresses a sense of the Congress that the National Science Foundation is critical to the expansion of the frontiers of scientific knowledge and advancing American technological leadership in key technologies, and that in order to continue to achieve its mission in the face of rising challenges from strategic competitors, the National Science Foundation should receive a significant increase in funding, expand its use of its existing authorities to carry out new and innovative types of activities, consider new authorities that it may need, and increase existing activities such as the convergence accelerators aimed at accelerating the translation of fundamental research for the economic and national security benefit of the United States; Kildee (No. 200) that requires DoD to set up a dissent channel to allow members of the Armed Forces and civilian employees to express views regarding US national security policy without fear of retribution; Kildee (No. 201) that requires the DoD to create and implement a training program for members of the Armed Forces and employees of DoD regarding foreign disinformation campaigns targeting them; Kilmer (No. 202) that expands the quality of life criteria for the Defense Communities Infrastructure Program to include projects that address 'installation commuter workforce issues' to help improve the quality of life for active duty and civilian workforce living off base; Kilmer (No. 203) that extends the authorization of the current overtime rate authority for Department of the Navy employees performing work aboard or dockside in support of the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier forward deployed in Japan which is set to expire on 30 September 2021; Kilmer (No. 204) that requires the Science and Technology Directorate in the Department of Homeland Security to report at specified intervals on the state of digital content forgery technology; Kinzinger (No. 205) that requires a determination on the imposition of sanctions with respect to the Government of Turkey's acquisition of the S–400 air and missile defense system from the Russian Federation; Kinzinger (No. 206) that prohibits the divestment of the RC–26B ISR/IAA platform; Kirkpatrick (No. 207) that amends Section 2684a of title 10, United States Code, to facilitate agreements with States and other Federal agencies in order to limit encroachments and other constraints on military training, testing, and operations; Kirkpatrick (No. 208) that adds language to ensure greater transparency from the USAF with the A10 aircraft re-wing effort; Krishnamoorthi (No. 209) that requires the Secretary of Defense to provide a report to Congress on the effectiveness of readiness contracts in meeting the military's prescription drug supply needs and how the contractual approach can be a model for responding to drug shortages in the civilian health care market; Krishnamoorthi (No. 210) that expresses the sense of Congress on cross-border violence between the Government of the People's Republic of China and India and the growing territorial claims of the government of the People's Republic of China; Kuster (No. 211) that directs GAO to study the vulnerabilities created by foreign call centers supporting the Department of Defense; Kuster (No. 212) that directs the Secretary of Veterans' Affairs to study the cause for post-9/11 veterans who are women experiencing joblessness at a higher rate than the rest of the veterans community; Kuster (No. 213) that directs the Army Corp of Engineers, Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) to reopen all childcare facilities closed in FY20; Kuster (No. 214) that directs the Department of Defense to consider the role of overdose reversal drugs in their policy and data tracking to prevent opioid overdoses; Kustoff (No. 215) that Expresses Congressional intent that the Secretary of the Army may convey to the City of Milan, Tennessee parcels of real property of the Milan Army Ammunition Plant, Tennessee, consisting of approximately 292 acres and commonly referred to as Parcels A, B and C; Lamb (No. 216) that authorizes members of the U.S. Coast Guard to participate in the Department of Defense's SkillBridge program, which connects transitioning servicemembers with workforce training opportunities; Lamb (No. 217) that directs the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to establish a Center for Artificial Intelligence within the National Center for Environmental Information (NCEI); Lamborn (No. 218) that requires the SecDef, in consultation with SecAF and CSO, to report on DOD processes and procedures for identifying and securing frequency licenses for national security space ground assets; Langevin (No. 219) that allows CISA to issue administrative subpoenas to ISPs to identify and warn entities of cyber security vulnerabilities; Langevin (No. 220) that codifies the responsibilities of the sector risk management agencies with regard to assessing and defending against cyber risks; Latta (No. 221) that directs the Secretary of Defense to establish performance measures regarding the Armed Forces' Credentialing Opportunities OnLine (COOL) programs so that entities interested in the success of separating service-members can accurately gauge the success and effectiveness of such programs; Lawrence (No. 222) that states that each Secretary of a military department shall--(1) share lessons learned and best practices on the progress of plans to integrate members of the Armed Forces who identify as States that each Secretary of a military department shall--(1) share lessons learned and best practices on the progress of plans to integrate members of the Armed Forces who identify as belonging to a minority group into the military department under the jurisdiction of the Secretary and (2) strategically communicate such progress with other military departments and the public; Lawrence (No. 223) that directs the Secretary of Defense to develop a policy that defines conscious and unconscious gender bias and provides guidance to eliminate conscious and unconscious gender bias; Lawrence (No. 224) that requires each Secretary of a military department to develop and implement policies to ensure that the career of a member of the Armed Forces is not negatively affected as a result of such member becoming pregnant; Levin (MI) (No. 225) that places a moratorium on the incineration of PFAS materials by the DOD until the Secretary of Defense finalizes guidance on the PFAS safe disposal regulations required by section 330 of the NDAA for Fiscal Year 2020 and requires the Secretary of Defense to submit an annual report on all PFAS incineration by the DOD each year to the EPA Administrator, beginning one year after publication of the final PFAS safe disposal regulation guidelines; Levin (MI) (No. 226) that modifies the section on public disclosure of DOD testing for PFAS on military installations and former defense sites to require the publication of results online within seven days, or within 30 days if the results are put into the Federal Register; Levin (MI) (No. 227) that guarantees servicemembers won't be forced to shoulder any additional cost for blood testing related to PFAS exposure; Levin (CA) (No. 228) that expands SCRA protections to a servicemember who receives military orders for a PCS, enters into a telecommunications contract, then receives a stop movement order from DoD in response to a local, national, or global emergency for a period of not less than 30 days which prevents them from using the contract; Levin (CA) (No. 229) that makes technical changes to DoD Transition Assistance Program (TAP) counseling pathway factors regarding disability and discharge; Levin (CA) (No. 230) that Adds Transition Assistance Program (TAP) counseling pathway factors regarding childcare requirements, employment status of household members, location of duty station, effects of operational and personnel tempo on the member and household, and Indian status; Levin (CA) (No. 231) that adds $5 million to the Naval University Research Initiative and reduces the Army's Service-Wide Communications account by $5 million; Lipinski (No. 232) that requires the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering to coordinate with the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy on the social science, management science, and information science research in order to facilitate transition of research findings into Department strategic documents; Lucas (No. 233) that requires the Secretary of the Interior to deliver a report to Congress containing the status of the Oklahoma City National Memorial and a summary of non-Federal funding that has been raised by the memorial; Luria (No. 234) that expresses the sense of Congress that the U.S. affirms our commitments to our Pacific allies of Japan and the Republic of Korea; Luria (No. 235) that calls attention to musculoskeletal injuries, one of the top injuries facing warfighters, recognizes the importance of tissue repair innovations for these injuries, and encourages continued research and innovation that is occurring within the Navy's Wound Care Research program; Luria (No. 236) that prohibits the use of authorized funds to deactivate, unman, or sell Army watercraft assets until the Secretary of Defense has certified receipt of the Army Watercraft Study and that the review, analysis, and recommendations made in the AWS are considered; Lynch (No. 237) that reauthorizes the independent and bipartisan Commission on Wartime Contracting to ensure greater oversight of U.S. overseas contracting and reconstruction spending in Afghanistan, Iraq, Syria, and other war zones; Lynch (No. 238) that requires the immediate declassification of previously public data related to the progress of U.S. security and reconstruction efforts in Afghanistan; Lynch (No. 239) that establishes within the Department of the Treasury the Kleptocracy Asset Recovery Rewards Program; Malinowski (No. 240) that requires the Secretary of State to provide a certification on whether state-sanctioned intimidation and harassment by the Egyptian government against Americans and their families constitutes a ``pattern of acts of intimidation or harassment,'' which would trigger a suspension of security assistance under section 6 of the Arms Export Control Act; Malinowski (No. 241) that provides for robust reporting and strategy requirements on the Afghan peace negotiations, evolving conditions on the ground, and monitoring of agreement implementation; Malinowski (No. 242) that imposes robust export control policy requirements on the Commerce Department to address the surveillance regime being used to target, track, and persecute Uighurs in Xinjiang; Sean Patrick Maloney (NY) (No. 243) that requires the inclusion of United States Service Academies during the establishment of a comprehensive mentoring program and career development framework with measurable metric and outcomes to retain the best and brightest and increase diversity; Sean Patrick Maloney (NY) (No. 244) that ensures the availability of certain medical services at U.S. Service Academies, including emergency room services, orthopedic services, general surgery services and gynecological services; Sean Patrick Maloney (NY) (No. 245) that requires the Sec Def and the Secretaries of the Military Services to include United States Service Academies when establishing goals for increasing women and minorities; Sean Patrick Maloney (NY) (No. 246) that requires all military service academies to submit a report to the Secretary of Defense and Congress to include: (1) Anonymized Equal Opportunity Claims and determinations of academies over the past 20 years, (2) Results of a climate survey of cadets conducted by an external entity, (3) A review of educational and extracurricular instruction to include; (a) A review of courses to ensure the inclusion of minority communities in authorship and course content, and; (b) A review of faculty and staff demographics to determine diversity recruitment practices at these institutions; Marshall (No. 247) that authorizes modifications to the First Division Monument to honor members of the First Infantry Division of the U.S. Army who gave the ultimate sacrifice during Operation Desert Storm and the Global War on Terror; Mast (No. 248) that authorizes the Department of Defense to reinstate and transfer officers in medical specialties in the reserve components of the armed forces previously retired honorably or under honorable conditions; McAdams (No. 249) that directs GAO to study the shared features among trafficking networks, including facilitators, finances, and proceeds; McBath (No. 250) that reduces funding by $5 million for operations & maintenance, Army, admin, and servicewide activities and communications; increases funding for university research by $5 million; McCaul (No. 251) that adds the text of Leveraging Information on Foreign Traffickers (LIFT) Act; McCaul (No. 252) that establishes the Open Technology Fund to promote global internet freedom by countering internet censorship and repressive surveillance by authoritarian regimes; McGovern (No. 253) that requires the release of Department of Defense documents on the 1981 El Mozote massacre in El Salvador to judicial authorities; McGovern (No. 254) that expressed a Sense of Congress relating to payment of amounts owed by Kuwait to about 45 U.S. hospitals and medical institutions since 2018; McGovern (No. 255) that encourages the protection and promotion of internationally recognized human rights during and after the novel coronavirus pandemic, through reporting, orientation of foreign assistance programming, conditioning of security sector assistance, provision of DOD guidance, and ongoing tracking of the misuse of emergency powers or surveillance capacities; McGovern (No. 256) that requires the completion of a review of Department of Defense compliance with the ``Principles Related to the Protection of Medical Care Provided by Impartial Humanitarian Organizations During Armed Conflict''; McGovern (No. 257) that establishes the Wounded Warrior Service Dog Program, which supports veterans and service members by funding nonprofit organizations who have been established for the purpose of training and providing service dogs; McGovern (No. 258) that prohibits the commercial export of covered defense articles and services and covered munitions items to the Hong Kong Police Force; McGovern (No. 259) that requires reporting on allegations that United States security sector assistance provided to the Government of Colombia was used by or on behalf of the government for purposes of unlawful surveillance or intelligence gathering directed at the civilian population, including human rights defenders, judicial personnel, journalists, and the political opposition, and to identify steps to prevent recurrence; and to encourage accountability for individuals in Colombia alleged to be responsible; McKinley (No. 260) that requires the Department of Defense to submit a report to Congress regarding the resources and authorities the Secretary determines necessary to identify the effects of the National Guard Youth Challenge Program on graduates of that program during the five years immediately preceding the date of the report; McKinley (No. 261) that requires the Secretary of Defense to, no later than 180 days after enactment of this Act, submit to Congress a report regarding partnerships with institutions of higher education for rare earth material supply chain security; Meeks (No. 262) that requires public companies to disclose the racial, ethnic, and gender composition of their boards of directors and executive officers, as well as the status of any of those directors and officers as a veteran; Meeks (No. 263) that requires the Department of Defense to create an Assistant Deputy Secretary for Environment and Resilience after conducting a study on the issue and reporting its findings to Congress; Meng (No. 264) that Adds into the sense of Congress on burden sharing by partners and allies a provision to engage South Korea and Japan in fair and equitable negotiations regarding their respective special measures agreements; Meng (No. 265) that adds an assessment of barriers to English language learners into evaluation of barriers to minority participation in the Armed Forces; Meng (No. 266) that permanently authorizes to National Guard Suicide Prevention program; Meng (No. 267) that requires all written materials prepared by the DOD for the general public relating to COVID–19 be translated into other languages; Mitchell (No. 268) that waives passport fees for family members obtaining a passport for the purpose of visiting an injured service member overseas; Moore (No. 269) that encourages the Defense Department to continue to take steps to address maternal mortality, including establishing a Maternal Mortality Review Committee; Moulton (No. 270) that requires the National Security Innovation Network (NSIN) to leverage commercial software platforms and databases to enable DoD to access information on private sector, venture capital, and technology solutions to DoD innovation challenges; Moulton (No. 271) that requires the Director of National Intelligence to contract with a federally funded research and development center to conduct a study on identifying and addressing threats that individually or collectively affect national security, financial security, or both; Murphy (NC) (No. 272) that states the responsibility of the Navy for military construction requirements for certain fleet readiness requirements; Murphy (FL) (No. 273) that requires the Secretary of State and the Secretary of Defense to submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report regarding the political, economic, health, and humanitarian crisis in Venezuela, and its implications for United States national security and regional security and stability; Norman (No. 274) that tasks the Secretary of Defense to prepare a report to Congress on programs funded by OCO, the manner and extent to which the Secretary plans to shift the funding of each such program in the ensuing fiscal years, and a plan on how said funding will be transitioned in accordance with the PBR; Norman (No. 275) that directs the Department of Energy (DOE) to establish a research program in artificial intelligence and high performance computing focused on the development of tools to solve big data challenges associated with veterans' healthcare and the Department of Veterans Affairs activities in identifying potential health risks and challenges in veteran populations; Norton (No. 276) that directs the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force to submit a report to Congress on all selections during the preceding five-year period under the Small Business Innovation Research Program or the Small Business Technology Transfer Program that were not followed with funding awards; Ocasio-Cortez (No. 277) that prohibits the use of funds for aerial fumigation in Colombia; Olson (No. 278) that requires are report on the support for democratic reforms by the government of the Republic of Georgia; Olson (No. 279) that examines how AI can enhance opportunities for different geographic regions, underrepresented populations, and our nation's workforce, among other areas; Omar (No. 280) that expands the reporting requirements in the event of a troop withdrawal from Africa to include reporting on the expected impact of such withdrawal on 1) the frequency of airstrikes in Africa and 2) human rights; Pallone (No. 281) that requires a report from the Secretary of Defense, in collaboration with the Secretary of State, addressing allegations that some units of foreign countries that have participated in security cooperation programs under section 333 of title 10, U.S.C. may have also committed gross violations of internationally recognized human rights before or while receiving U.S. security assistance; Panetta (No. 282) that requires DOD evaluate expanded use of TRICARE pregnancy resources for servicemembers and their spouses; Panetta (No. 283) that authorizes faculty at military educational institutions to accept research grants to support scientific, literary, and educational efforts; Panetta (No. 284) that requires annual public assessment of contractor performance metrics for privatized military housing--including, tenant satisfaction, maintenance management, project safety, and financial management; Panetta (No. 285) that affirms Congressional support for the National Nuclear Security Administration and requires GAO review the hiring, training, and retention of a diverse and highly-educated national security workforce; Panetta (No. 286) that requires progress reports on maritime security and domain awareness; Panetta (No. 287) that enhances support services for Special Operations Forces, their families, and supporting personnel; Panetta (No. 288) that requires a report on the future role of the Naval Postgraduate School in space education, including a description of additional resources necessary to meet evolving DOD space-related needs; Pappas (No. 289) that increases funding for the Backpackable Communications System (BPCS) by $5 million; Pence (No. 290) that allows for the inclusion of ``off-road vehicles'', such as construction or agricultural equipment, in section 316 regarding the replacement of non-tactical motor vehicles at the end of service life; Pence (No. 291) that extends by 2 years the sunset date for Sec. 1651 of the FY2019 NDAA (Public Law 115–232; 32 U.S.C. 501 note) Pilot Program on Regional Cybersecurity Training Center for the Army National Guard; Perlmutter (No. 292) that inserts a Sense of Congress supporting the Office of the Ombudsman as an important resource for claimants of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program and urges the Secretary of Labor to maintain the longstanding policy of allocating funds for the Office of the Ombudsman should there be a lapse in appropriation; Perlmutter (No. 293) that requires NIST and NIOSH to conduct a study on the use of PFAS chemicals in firefighting equipment and the risk of exposure faced by firefighter; creates a grant program for additional research and improvements to firefighting equipment to reduce exposure to PFAS; Perry (No. 294) that directs the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with relevant Federal departments and agencies, to prepare an assessment on the People's Liberation Army of the People's Republic of China 2035 modernization targets; Peters (No. 295) that expands eligibility for HUD–VA Supportive Housing (VASH) voucher program to allow veterans with other-than-honorable discharges to access supportive housing vouchers; Phillips (No. 296) that amends section 1210A(h) of the FY20 NDAA (PL 116–92) to extend the deadline for DoD support for stabilization activities from Dec 31, 2020 to Dec 31, 2021; Phillips (No. 297) that creates a statement of policy that the State Department, in coordination with DoD and USAID, should play a critical role in the prevention of atrocities and mitigation of fragility; Phillips (No. 298) that requires the DoD to produce a report and briefing on officer training in irregular warfare; Phillips (No. 299) that requires the Secretary of Defense to report on the efficacy of using point of collection testing devices to modernize the drug demand reduction program random urinalysis testing; Phillips (No. 300) that requires the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the Secretary of the VA, to conduct a report on the effectiveness of the presence of CVSOs at demobilization centers; Phillips (No. 301) that requires GAO to deliver a report on the analysis of the Department of Defense processes for responding to congressional reporting requirements in the annual NDAAs and accompanying committee reports; Phillips (No. 302) that extends casualty assistant officer privileges to families in the case a surviving spouse dies with dependent children if such services are requested by the dependent child or their guardian; Phillips (No. 303) that requires the Director of the Peace Corps to conduct a report to Congress on its plans to resume operations after the coronavirus pandemic; Pingree (No. 304) that requires a report on sexual abuse and harassment of recruits during pre-entry medical exams; Plaskett (No. 305) that provides for continuation of current waiver authority for HBCUs in areas impacted by Hurricane Maria to use pre-disaster FY'17 enrollment data for purposes of post-disaster Title III HBCU funding; Plaskett (No. 306) that provides assistance to small businesses located in U.S. territories in securing opportunities in the federal marketplace, as recommended by the Congressional Task Force on Economic Growth in Puerto Rico; Porter (No. 307) that requires that Inspector General vacancies be filled by qualified individuals currently serving in the office of an Inspector General; Porter (No. 308) that increases funding for Army University Research Initiatives by $5,000,000; Porter (No. 309) that allows servicemembers to have a private right of action in the event that credit reporting bureaus engage in misconduct related to free credit monitoring; Porter (No. 310) that increases transparency of annual Department of Defense legislative requests for the National Defense Authorization Act; Porter (No. 311) that directs the GAO to conduct a study on predatory social media targeting service members, military families, and veterans; Posey (No. 312) that requires the Secretary of the Air Force provide a briefing on the potential use of a modular civil supersonic aircraft with a militaryengineered front section to host multiple mission payloads; Reschenthaler (No. 313) that expresses a Sense of Congress that the additive manufacturing and machine learning initiative of the Army has the potential to accelerate the ability to deploy additive manufacturing capabilities in expeditionary settings and strengthen the United States defense industrial supply chain; Reschenthaler (No. 314) that states that the Secretary of the Army shall develop a comprehensive, long-term strategy, which shall include a risk assessment, gap analysis, proposed courses of action, investment options, and a sustainment plan, for the development, production, procurement and modernization of cannon and large caliber weapons tubes that mitigates identified risks and gaps to the Army and the defense industrial base; Reschenthaler (No. 315) that authorizes the President to transfer two excess OLIVER HAZARD PERRY class guided missile frigates to the Government of Egypt, upon certifying that certain conditions are met; Reschenthaler (No. 316) that designates an official serving within the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering to work with the academic and research communities to protect academic research funded by the Department of Defense from undue foreign influences and threats; Rice (NY) (No. 317) that increases transparency of contracts issued in support of the border wall by broadening the requirements for the type of contract actions that DOD must report publicly, and by requiring any modifications over $7 million to be made public; Rice (NY) (No. 318) that implements a recommendation from the Cyberspace Solarium Commission by authorizing the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency to provide shared cybersecurity services to agencies, upon request, to assist in meeting Federal Information Security Modernization Act requirements and other agency functions; Richmond (No. 319) that implements a recommendation from the Cyberspace Solarium Commission that there be established at the Department of Homeland Security a Joint Planning Office to coordinate cybersecurity planning and readiness across the Federal government, State and local government, and critical infrastructure owners and operators; Richmond (No. 320) that implements a recommendation from the Cyberspace Solarium Commission that establishes a fixed 5-year term for the Director of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency and establishes minimum qualifications for the CISA Director; Riggleman (No. 321) that requires the Secretary of the Treasury to submit to Congress 1) a copy of licenses authorizing financial institutions to provide services benefitting a state sponsor of terrorism, and 2) a report on foreign financial institutions conducting significant transactions for persons sanctioned for international terrorism and human rights violations; Rose (No. 322) that amends Title 37 to direct the Secretary of Defense to allow no more than one military housing area in a municipality with a population of over 500,000; Rose (No. 323) that amends Section 452(c) of Title 37 USC to include fares and tolls as reimbursable expenses for service-related travel; Rouda (No. 324) that directs GAO to study lapses in TRICARE coverage for National Guard or Reserve personnel as a result of duty status changes; Ruiz (No. 325) that requires DOD to provide a report to Congress on the status and culmination timeline of all studies being conducted or funded by DOD to assess the health effects of burn pits, including potential challenges and recommendations to Congress to help DOD culminate the studies; Ruiz (No. 326) that requires DOD to implement mandatory training for all medical providers working under DOD on the potential health effects of burn pits; Ruiz (No. 327) that requires DOD to include a separate, stand-alone question about burn pit exposure in the Post Deployment Health Assessments (DD Form 2796) to increase reporting of Burn Pit Exposure; Ruiz (No. 328) that require DOD and VA to expand Burn Pits Registry to include Egypt and Syria; Ruppersberger (No. 329) that requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to conduct a review of the ability of the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency of the Department of Homeland Security to fulfill its current mission requirements; Sablan (No. 330) that ensures the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands is eligible for the SBA's Small Business Development Center (SBDC) and Federal and State Technology (FAST) programs; San Nicolas (No. 331) that extends H–2B exemptions contained in Section 1045 of P.L. 115–232 for skilled construction labor related to military realignment projects to civilian projects throughout Guam; Schakowsky (No. 332) that requires the DOD Inspector General to (1) analyze all contracts and task orders that provide private security firms access to U.S. theaters of military operations and (2) compile a report that will inform Congress about the size of the contracting force; the total value of the contracts; the number of persons operating on the contracts that have been wounded or killed; and the disciplinary actions that have been taken against individual contractors; Schakowsky (No. 333) that requires (1) defense contractors to submit detailed annual reports to DOD regarding former senior DOD officials who are subsequently employed by contractors, (2) certify that those employees are in compliance with post-government ethics rules, and (3) make these reports and certifications public; Schiff (No. 334) that requires the Secretary of Defense to order the names of the 74 sailors who died in the USS Frank E. Evans disaster in 1969 be added to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Wall; Schneider (No. 335) that codifies into law the existing, successful Boots to Business program that provides entrepreneurial training for servicemembers transitioning to civilian life; Schneider (No. 336) that amends Sec. 536 to include the number of individuals discharged due to prohibited activities under DOD Instruction 1325.06 and a description of the circumstances that led to such discharges; Schrader (No. 337) that requires DOD to inform service members who receive a Basic Allowance for Housing about their rights under Federal law; Schrader (No. 338) that requires to DOD to report to relevant Congressional committees on efforts to implement recommendations from the 2015 Defense Business Board cost savings study and provide alternative solutions for unachievable items from those recommendations; Schrier (No. 339) that requires an assessment of the Firefighter Property Program (FFP) and the Federal Excess Personal Property Program (FEPP) implementation, training, best practices, and equipment distribution; requires a report to Congress on findings and any recommendations to more efficiently increase firefighting and emergency service capabilities while taking into account geographical wildfire risk; Schrier (No. 340) that requires an evaluation of career opportunities in education, software, small business, and teleworking under the Military Spousal Employment Partnership (MSEP). Requests MSEP partner with the Department of Labor to expand career opportunities in these fields with an evaluation to follow one year after implementation; Schweikert (No. 341) that requires the Secretary of Defense to conduct a study and submit a report to Congress on increasing telehealth and telemedicine services across all military departments; Schweikert (No. 342) that requires a study on seawater mining for critical minerals for defense industrial base applications; Schweikert (No. 343) that requires the Secretary of Defense to submit a report to Congress regarding recommendations on cyber hygiene practices; additionally, requires DOD to assess each DOD component's cyber hygiene and requires a GAO assessment of that report; Shalala (No. 344) that establishes limitations of funds to Confucius Institutes unless the institution ensures that any agreement includes provisions to protect academic freedom at the institution and prohibits the application of any foreign law on any campus of the institution; Shalala (No. 345) that requires the establishment of procedures by which surviving remarried spouses with dependent children receive ongoing access to on-base facilities, MWRs, exchanges, and commissary privileges; Sherman (No. 346) that prevents funds from being spent on the production of a Nonproliferation Assessment Statement with a country that has not signed an Additional Protocol agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency; Sherman (No. 347) that requires certain issuers of securities to establish that they are not owned or controlled by a foreign government; Sherrill (No. 348) that establishes a traineeship program administered by the Department of Defense, aimed at growing domestic science and technology talent in areas of importance to national security; Sires (No. 349) that requests a report detailing ongoing support and a strategy for future cooperation between the United States government and Mexican security forces, in light of changes to the Mexican security apparatus during President Lopez Obrador's tenure; Slotkin (No. 350) that expresses the Sense of Congress that the President should take seriously all threats to U.S. armed forces from state and non-state actors; study intelligence assessments with rigor, particularly when concerning threats to U.S. personnel; take all actions possible to ensure protection of US personnel; Slotkin (No. 351) that requires the Secretary of DHS, in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, to administer a large-scale exercise to test the United States ability to respond to a cyber attack against critical infrastructure; Smith (NJ) (No. 352) that directs the Secretary of Defense to enhance training and research within the Naval Aviation Anti-Submarine Warfare Division as it relates to threats presented by miniature manned submersible vessels; Smith (NJ) (No. 353) that requires the GAO to conduct a study of the possible experimentation of ticks, insects, or vector-borne agents by the DOD between 1950 and 1977 for use as a bioweapon; Soto (No. 354) that adds ``advanced sensors manufacturing'' to the items considered within the updated approach to ensuring the continued production of cutting-edge microelectrics for national security needs; Soto (No. 355) that adds ``distributed ledger technologies'' to the definition of ``emerging technologies'' so that it be included in the assessment of what must be done for the United States to maintain their technological edge performed by the newly formed Steering Committee on Emerging Technology and Security Needs; Soto (No. 356) that enumerates the elements of an uncompleted briefing from the FY20 NDAA conference report on the potential use of distributed ledger technologies for defense purposes by the Under Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering and adds a reporting requirement; Spanberger (No. 357) that adds components to the Department of Defense's Climate Change Roadmap Report pertaining to how climate change may exacerbate existing threats and worsens emerging threats to the national security of the United States including tensions related to drought, famine, infectious disease, geoengineering, energy transitions, extreme weather, migration, and competition for scarce resources; adds to the report a Top 10 List of such threats; Spanberger (No. 358) that requires the Sec. of Defense to work with Sec. of Ag to review the potential to incorporate innovative wood product technologies in constructing or renovating facilities owned or managed by DOD; within 180 days of enactment, the Sec. must provide a report to relevant committees on both the (1) potential for use of these materials and (2) any barriers to their us; Speier (No. 359) that amends the Uniform Code of Military Justice to modify the standard for factual sufficiency review of cases before military appellate courts; Speier (No. 360) that requires a Comptroller General study of procedures for investigating missing persons by the Armed Forces; Speier (No. 361) that establish confidential reporting option for sexual harassment complaints made by military service members; Speier (No. 362) that directs the Secretary of State, in coordination with the Secretary of Defense, to submit a plan to double the percentage of foreign female participants in the International Military Education and Training program (IMET) within ten years, and to submit a report every two years up until ten years on progress made toward that goal; Stanton (No. 363) that requires the Secretary of the Air Force to provide a briefing on the efforts to harden and modernize the nuclear weapons storage and maintenance facilities of the Air Force; Stefanik (No. 364) that allows for admission of essential scientists and technical experts to promote and protect the national security innovation base; Steil (No. 365) that requires the Secretary of Defense in consultation with the Secretary of State to submit a report to the appropriate congressional committees on the short- and long-term threats posed by Iranian-backed militias in Iraq to Iraq and to United States persons and interests; Suozzi (No. 366) that includes Section 106, 109, and 110 of S.3930; Takano (No. 367) that establishes within the Department of Veterans Affairs an office of cyber engagement to work with veterans, federal agencies, and social media platforms to identify cyber risks, including identity theft, to veterans and their families, as well as determine ways to address these risks, and provide information to veterans; Takano (No. 368) that ensures that no consolidation or transition to alternative content delivery methods may occur within the Defense Media Activity until a period of 180 days has elapsed following the date on which the Secretary of Defense submits to the congressional defense committees a report; Taylor (No. 369) that amends the Defense Production Act of 1950 to require congressional certifications following assessments by the Committee on Foreign Investment in the United States (CFIUS), consistent with procedures governing certifications pursuant to CFIUS reviews and investigations; Tipton (No. 370) that directs the U.S. representative at the international financial institutions (World Bank, International Monetary Fund, etc.) to support non-discrimination for Taiwan nationals seeking employment at the institutions and requires the Secretary of the Treasury to submit updates to Congress on progress in advancing this policy, and provides for flexibility through waiver authorities; Titus (No. 371) that strengthens cooperative threat reduction programs and efforts to prevent, detect, counter, and respond to threats of weapons of mass destruction terrorism; Tlaib (No. 372) that requires the report in section 264 on F–35 physiological episodes and mitigation to include any long-term effects, including potential effects, of the episode on the crew member and any additional care requirements that the crew member may need; Tlaib (No. 373) that requires an action plan for addressing AFFF usage and spills no later than 30 days after submitting notice of usage or spills and descriptions of actions taken to arrest and clean up spills as well as coordination with local and State authorities and environmental protection agencies; Torres Small (NM) (No. 374) that provides compensation and credit for retired pay purposes for maternity leave taken by members of the National Guard and Reserve components; Torres Small (NM) (No. 375) that establishes additional requirements, such as an annual report on the status of DHS acquisitions and preparing cost estimates and schedules consistent with best practices identified by the GAO, for DHS acquisitions that are estimated to require total expenditures of at least $300 million; Torres Small (NM) (No. 376) that requires the Secretary of DHS to submit to Congress a plan for increasing to 100 percent the rate of scanning of commercial and passenger vehicles and freight rail traffic entering the United States using large-scale non-intrusive inspection technology; Torres (CA) (No. 377) that creates a National Supply Chain Database run by the Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Centers to connect small and mid-size manufacturers and prevent supply chain disruptions; Torres (CA) (No. 378) that encourages collaboration between the Manufacturing USA Institutes and the Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Centers to better serve small and mid-size manufacturers; Torres (CA) (No. 379) that requires a certification from the Secretary of Defense to Congress before transfers can take place of vehicles to Guatemala. Includes a clawback provision for future transfers; Trahan (No. 380) that authorizes the Secretary of Defense to initiative a pilot program through the award of grants to treat Members of the Armed Forces who suffer from Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) using a comprehensive and multidisciplinary approach; Turner (No. 381) that clarifies existing law authorizing a contracting officer to presume that a prior commercial item determination shall serve as a determination for subsequent procurement of components or parts associated with the initial commercial product or maintenance and repair service; Turner (No. 382) that adds to the section of the Uniform Code of Military Justice that outlines the victim's rights; Vargas (No. 383) that provides that the Defense Production Act be used to meet the country's most critical needs to combat COVID–19, in specifying as scarce and critical materials certain supplies used to fight and reduce the impact of the virus; Veasey (No. 384) that prohibits federal airport improvement funds from being used to purchase passenger boarding bridges from companies that have violated intellectual property (IP) rights and threaten the national security of the U.S.; Veasey (No. 385) that extends from 12 months to 24 months the time period to which an agency must refer when categorizing a manufacturer as a small business based on its average employment; Vela (No. 386) that gives the Secretaries of the military departments the authority to allow senior enlisted personnel to attend senior level and intermediate level officer professional military education courses if specific requirements are met; Wagner (No. 387) that requires the Secretary of State to develop a strategy for engagement with Southeast Asia and the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN); Walorski (No. 388) that directs the Comptroller General of the United States to submit a report to the House Armed Services Committee and the Senate Armed Services Committee on impediments to expanding agile program and project management within the Department of Defense; Waters (No. 389) directs the Secretary of Defense to ensure emerging technologies procured and used by the military are tested for algorithmic bias and discriminatory outcomes; Welch (No. 390) that requires the history of respiratory illnesses and information contained on the beneficiary from the burn pits registry to be included in the TRICARE Beneficiary COVID–19 Registry; Welch (No. 391) that requires the DoD IG to submit a report on the dollar amount of waste, fraud, and abuse found in Defense Production Act spending during COVID–19 and recommendations on how to combat this in future pandemics; Wenstrup (No. 392) that adds two components to the report required by Sec. 712 of the NDAA regarding vulnerabilities to DoD's drugs, biological products, and critical medical supplies; Wenstrup (No. 393) that requires DOD, in consultation with other relevant Federal agencies, to conduct a targeted study and classified report to Congress on DOD's Joint Deployment Formulary (JDF), which is a core list of pharmaceutical items that are required for theater-level care for the first 30 days of contingency operations; Wexton (No. 394) that requires the Secretary of Defense to issue rules to require companies that sell certain manufactured goods in the military commissary and exchange systems to certify that the goods were not manufactured with forced labor; Wexton (No. 395) that requires the Director of National Intelligence to report to Congress on foreign influence campaigns targeting federal elections; Wexton (No. 396) that requires the Department of Defense and Department of Veterans Affairs to conduct a study on substance use disorders among members of the Armed Services and Veterans during the COVID–19 public health emergency; Wexton (No. 397) that directs Military-Civilian Task Force on Domestic Violence to analyze and develop recommendations to improve access to resources for survivors throughout the stages of military service; Woodall (No. 398) that increases transparency and accountability in the Unified Facilities Criteria Program for the procurement of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems; Yoho (No. 399) that requires a report on efforts to decrease civilian casualties and related destruction by Afghan Security Forces and hold Taliban forces accountable for civilian harm; Yoho (No. 400) that recognizes the strategic ``Third Neighbor'' security relationship between the United States and Mongolia; Yoho (No. 401) that establishes a pilot program for the Navy to experiment with the use of Liquified Natural Gas for fueling their ships; Young (No. 402) that deems the vessel M/V LISERON to be prescribe a tonnage measurement as a small passenger vessel, less than 100 gross tons, as measured under chapter 145 of title 46, United States Code, for mariner licensing and credentialing purposes; Young (No. 403) that calls for the Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs to assign responsibility for the Arctic Region to the Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for the Western Hemisphere or any other Deputy Assistant Secretary that the Secretary considers appropriate; Young (No. 404) that establishes a National Shipper Advisory Committee to advise the Federal Maritime Commission (FMC) on policies related to the competitiveness, reliability, integrity, and fairness of the international ocean freight delivery system; Young (No. 405) that requires that a plan be submitted to Congress on a plan to establish a DOD Regional Center for Security Studies for the Arctic and that after the submission of the plan that DOD may establish the center; and Zeldin (No. 406) that requires the Department of State to review vetting procedures for diplomatic visas provided for international military educational training programs in annual country strategy reports.
Pages H3513–84

Proceedings Postponed:

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Omar amendment (No. 5 printed in H. Rept. 116–457) that seeks to establish a policy framework for the accelerated withdrawal of U.S. forces from Afghanistan;
Pages H3333–35

Jayapal amendment (No. 6 printed in H. Rept. 116–457) that seeks to strikes the statutory requirement that the Pentagon provide annual Unfunded Priorities lists to Congress;
Pages H3335–36

DeGette amendment (No. 7 printed in H. Rept. 116–457) that seeks to add the text of H.R. 2546, the Protecting America's Wilderness Act;
Pages H3336–63

Neguse amendment (No. 8 printed in H. Rept. 116–457) that seeks to add the text of H.R. 823, the Colorado Outdoor Recreation and Economy Act to the bill and withdraws, permanently one million acres of public land surrounding Grand Canyon National Park that are already (as of 2012) subject to a 20-year moratorium on new mining claims;
Pages H3363–74

Pocan amendment (No. 9 printed in H. Rept. 116–457) that seeks to reduce overall authorization level by 10%;
Pages H3374–75

Dean amendment (No. 11 printed in H. Rept. 116–457) that seeks to provide up to $10,000 in immediate assistance to pay down the balance of private student loans; and
Pages H3375–79

Takano amendment (No. 29 printed in H. Rept. 116–457) that seeks to close a federal loophole by making military education benefits such as Department of Defense Tuition Assistance count as federal educational assistance funds and limits the availability of federal funds for proprietary for-profit institutions unless the institution derives at least 10% of funds from sources other than federal funds.
Pages H3510–11

H. Res. 1053, the rule providing for consideration of the bills (H.R. 6395), (H.R. 7027), (H.R. 7327) and the Senate amendments to the bill (H.R. 1957) was agreed to by a yea-and-nay vote of 224 yeas to 166 nays, Roll No. 140, after the previous question was ordered by a yea-and-nay vote of 220 yeas to 162 nays, Roll No. 139.
Pages H3100–08


Committee Resignation: Read a letter from Representative Watkins wherein he resigned from the Committee on Education and Labor, the Committee on Veterans' Affairs, and the Committee on Foreign Affairs.
Page H3584


Quorum Calls--Votes: Five yea-and-nay votes developed during the proceedings of today and appear on pages H3107–08, H3109, H3503, H3503–04, and H3504–05.

Adjournment: The House met at 9 a.m. and at 8:42 p.m., pursuant to House Resolution 1054, it stands adjourned until 9 a.m. tomorrow, July 21st, as a further mark of respect to the memory of the late Honorable John Lewis.

Committee Meetings

DEFENDING AGAINST FUTURE CYBERATTACKS: EVALUATING THE CYBERSPACE SOLARIUM COMMISSION RECOMMENDATIONS

Committee on Homeland Security: On July 17, 2020, Subcommittee on Cybersecurity, Infrastructure Protection, and Innovation held a hearing entitled ``Defending Against Future Cyberattacks: Evaluating the Cyberspace Solarium Commission Recommendations''. Testimony was heard from the following Cyberspace Solarium Commission officials: Senator King, Co-Chair; Representative Gallagher, Co-Chair; Suzanne Spaulding, Commissioner; and Samantha Ravich, Commissioner.

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EXPLORING THE FEASIBILITY AND SECURITY OF TECHNOLOGY TO CONDUCT REMOTE VOTING IN THE HOUSE

Committee on House Administration: On July 17, 2020, Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``Exploring the Feasibility and Security of Technology to Conduct Remote Voting in the House''. Testimony was heard from Cheryl L. Johnson, Clerk, House of Representatives; and public witnesses.

FORMER FEDERAL RESERVE CHAIRS ON RESPONDING TO OUR NATION'S ECONOMIC CRISIS

Committee on Oversight and Reform: On July 17, 2020, Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis held a hearing entitled ``Former Federal Reserve Chairs on Responding to Our Nation's Economic Crisis''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

FEDERAL IT MODERNIZATION: HOW THE CORONAVIRUS EXPOSED OUTDATED SYSTEMS

Committee on Oversight and Reform: Subcommittee on Government Operations held a hearing entitled ``Federal IT Modernization: How the Coronavirus Exposed Outdated Systems''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

SENATE AMENDMENT TO THE GREAT AMERICAN OUTDOORS ACT; WILLIAM M. (MAC) THORNBERRY NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2021; CHILD CARE IS ESSENTIAL ACT; CHILD CARE FOR ECONOMIC RECOVERY ACT

Committee on Rules: On July 17, 2020, Full Committee held a hearing on the Senate Amendment to H.R. 1957, the ``Great American Outdoors Act''; H.R. 6395, the ``William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021''; H.R. 7027, the ``Child Care Is Essential Act''; and H.R. 7327, the ``Child Care for Economic Recovery Act''. The Committee granted, by record vote of 8–3, a rule providing for consideration of H.R. 6395, the ``William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021'', H.R. 7027, the ``Child Care Is Essential Act'', H.R. 7327, the ``Child Care for Economic Recovery Act'', and Senate Amendment to H.R. 1957, the ``Great American Outdoors Act''. The rule provides for consideration of H.R. 6395, the ``William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021'', under a structured rule. The rule provides one hour of debate equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the Committee on Armed Services. The rule waives all points of order against consideration of the bill. The rule provides that an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of Rules Committee Print 116–57 shall be considered as adopted and the bill, as amended, shall be considered as read. The rule waives all points of order against provisions in the bill, as amended. The rule provides that following debate, each further amendment printed in the Rules Committee report not earlier considered as part of amendments en bloc pursuant to section 3 shall be considered only in the order printed in the report, may be offered only by a Member designated in the report, shall be considered as read, shall be debatable for the time specified in the report equally divided and controlled by the proponent and an opponent, may be withdrawn by the proponent at any time before the question is put thereon, shall not be subject to amendment, and shall not be subject to a demand for division of the question. Section 3 of the rule provides that at any time after debate the chair of the Committee on Armed Services or his designee may offer amendments en bloc consisting of further amendments printed in the Rules Committee report not earlier disposed of. Amendments en bloc shall be considered as read, shall be debatable for 30 minutes equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the Committee on Armed Services or their designees, shall not be subject to amendment, and shall not be subject to a demand for division of the question. The rule waives all points of order against the further amendments printed in the Rules Committee report and amendments en bloc described in section 3. The rule provides one motion to recommit with or without instructions. The rule provides for consideration of H.R. 7027, the ``Child Care Is Essential Act'', under a closed rule. The rule provides one hour of debate equally divided among and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the Committee on Appropriations and the chair and ranking minority member of the Committee on Education and Labor. The rule waives all points of order against consideration of the bill. The rule provides that an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of Rules Committee Print 116–58 shall be considered as adopted and the bill, as amended, shall be considered as read. The rule waives all points of order against provisions in the bill, as amended. The rule provides that clause 2(e) of rule XXI shall not apply during consideration of the bill. The rule provides one motion to recommit with or without instructions. The rule also provides for consideration of H.R. 7327, the ``Child Care for Economic Recovery Act''. The rule provides one hour of debate equally divided among and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the Committee on Appropriations and the chair and ranking minority member of the Committee on Ways and Means. The rule waives all points of order against consideration of the bill. The rule provides that the bill shall be considered as read. The rule waives all points of order against provisions in the bill. The rule provides that clause 2(e) of rule XXI shall not apply during consideration of the bill. The rule provides one motion to recommit. The rule provides for consideration of the Senate amendments to H.R. 1957, the ``Great American Outdoors Act''. The rule makes in order a single motion offered by the chair of the Committee on Natural Resources or his designee that the House concur in the Senate amendments. The rule provides one hour of debate on the motion equally divided and controlled by the chair and ranking minority member of the Committee on Natural Resources. The rule waives all points of order against consideration of the motion and provides that it shall not be subject to a demand for division of the question. The rule provides that the Senate amendments and the motion shall be considered as read. The rule amends H. Res. 967, agreed to May 15, 2020--as amended by House Resolution 1017, agreed to June 25, 2020: in section 4, by striking ``July 31, 2020'' and inserting ``September 21, 2020''; in section 11, by striking ``legislative day of July 31, 2020'' and inserting ``calendar day of September 20, 2020''; and in section 12, by striking ``July 31, 2020'' and inserting ``September 21, 2020''. Testimony was heard from Chairman Grijalva, Chairman Lowey, Chairman Deutch, Chairman Smith of Washington, and Representatives Bishop of Utah, Thornberry, Cole, DeLauro, Sánchez, Wenstrup, Arrington, Jackson Lee, Burgess, Titus, Richmond, Shalala, Crawford, Estes, Gohmert, González-Colón of Puerto Rico, Gosar, Graves of Louisiana, Grothman, Johnson of Louisiana, Keller, Olson, Perry, Smith of New Jersey, Stauber, Wenstrup, Lesko, and Norman.

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FROM LAB TO MARKET: ACCELERATING OUR PROGRESS TOWARD ECONOMIC RECOVERY AND A CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE

Committee on Science, Space, and Technology: On July 17, 2020, Subcommittee on Energy held a hearing entitled ``From Lab to Market: Accelerating our Progress toward Economic Recovery and a Clean Energy Future''. Testimony was heard from public witnesses.

OVERSIGHT OF THE SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION AND DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY PANDEMIC PROGRAMS

Committee on Small Business: On July 17, 2020, Full Committee held a hearing entitled ``Oversight of the Small Business Administration and Department of Treasury Pandemic Programs''. Testimony was heard from Jovita Carranza, Administrator, Small Business Administration; and Steven Mnuchin, Secretary, Department of the Treasury.

THE IMPACT OF COVID–19 ON SOCIAL SECURITY AND ITS BENEFICIARIES

Committee on Ways and Means: On July 17, 2020, Subcommittee on Social Security held a hearing entitled ``The Impact of COVID–19 on Social Security and its Beneficiaries''. Testimony was heard from Stephen C. Goss, Chief Actuary, Social Security Administration; and public witnesses.

Joint Meetings



No joint committee meetings were held.

NEW PUBLIC LAWS

(For last listing of Public Laws, see Daily Digest, p. D510)

S. 3084, to amend title 38, United States Code, to modify the limitation on pay for certain high-level employees and officers of the Department of Veterans Affairs. Signed on July 2, 2020. (Public Law 116–146)

S. 4116, to extend the authority for commitments for the paycheck protection program and separate amounts authorized for other loans under section 7(a) of the Small Business Act. Signed on July 4, 2020. (Public Law 116–147)

S. 4091, to amend section 1113 of the Social Security Act to provide authority for fiscal year 2020 for increased payments for temporary assistance to United States citizens returned from foreign countries. Signed on July 13, 2020. (Public Law 116–148)

H.R. 7440, to impose sanctions with respect to foreign persons involved in the erosion of certain obligations of China with respect to Hong Kong. Signed on July 14, 2020. (Public Law 116–149)

COMMITTEE MEETINGS FOR TUESDAY,

JULY 21, 2020

(Committee meetings are open unless otherwise indicated)

Senate
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Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs, to hold hearings to examine United States government efforts to address ocean plastic pollution internationally, 2 p.m., SD–124.

Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs: to hold hearings to examine the nominations of Hester Maria Peirce, of Ohio, and Caroline A. Crenshaw, of the District of Columbia, both to be a Member of the Securities and Exchange Commission, and Kyle Hauptman, of Maine, to be a Member of the National Credit Union Administration Board, 10 a.m., WEBEX.

Full Committee, business meeting to consider the nominations of Judy Shelton, of California, to be a Member, and Christopher Waller, of Minnesota, both to be a Member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, 2 p.m., SD–106.

Committee on the Budget: business meeting to consider the nomination of Derek Kan, of California, to be Deputy Director of the Office of Management and Budget, 12 noon, SR–301.

Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation: Subcommittee on Manufacturing, Trade, and Consumer Protection, to hold hearings to examine protecting Americans from COVID–19 scams, 2:30 p.m., SD–G50.

Committee on Finance: to hold hearings to examine the nominations of Michael N. Nemelka, of Utah, to be a Deputy United States Trade Representative (Investment, Services, Labor, Environment, Africa, China, and the Western Hemisphere), with the rank of Ambassador, and Christian N. Weiler, of Louisiana, and Alina I. Marshall, of Virginia, both to be a Judge of the United States Tax Court, 10 a.m., SD–215.

Committee on Foreign Relations: to hold hearings to examine the nominations of Marshall Billingslea, of Virginia, to be Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security, C.J. Mahoney, of Kansas, to be Legal Adviser, and Carlos Trujillo, of Florida, to be an Assistant Secretary (Western Hemisphere Affairs), all of the Department of State, 10 a.m., SD–106.

Special Committee on Aging: to hold hearings to examine the COVID–19 pandemic and seniors, focusing on racial health disparities, 9:30 a.m., SD–562.

House

Committee on Agriculture, Subcommittee on Nutrition, Oversight, and Department Operations, hearing entitled ``An Overview of the Farmers to Families Food Box Program'', 1:30 p.m., HVC–210 and Webex.

Committee on Energy and Commerce, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, hearing entitled ``Pathway to a Vaccine: Efforts to Develop a Safe, Effective and Accessible COVID–19 Vaccine'', 10 a.m., Webex.

Committee on Foreign Affairs, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations, hearing entitled ``Consular Affairs and the COVID–19 Crisis: Assessing the State Department's Response to the Pandemic'', 10 a.m., 2172 Rayburn and Webex.

Committee on Natural Resources, Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests, and Public Lands, hearing entitled ``Monumental Decisions: A Long Overdue Reckoning with Racist Symbols on Our Public Lands'', 10 a.m., 1324 Longworth and Webex.

Committee on Veterans' Affairs, Subcommittee on Economic Opportunity, hearing entitled ``Getting Veterans Back to Work After COVID–19'', 10 a.m., HVC–210 and Webex.

CONGRESSIONAL PROGRAM AHEAD

Week of July 21 through July 24, 2020

Senate Chamber

On Tuesday, Senate will resume consideration of S. 4049, National Defense Authorization Act, and vote on or in relation to Schatz Amendment No. 2252, and Inhofe Amendment No. 2411, at 11:45 a.m., and Shaheen Amendment No. 1729, and Cornyn Amendment No. 2244, at 4 p.m.

During the balance of the week, Senate may consider any cleared legislative and executive business.

Senate Committees

(Committee meetings are open unless otherwise indicated)

Committee on Appropriations: July 21, Subcommittee on State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs, to hold hearings to examine United States government efforts to address ocean plastic pollution internationally, 2 p.m., SD–124.

Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs: July 21, to hold hearings to examine the nominations of Hester Maria Peirce, of Ohio, and Caroline A. Crenshaw, of the District of Columbia, both to be a Member of the Securities and Exchange Commission, and Kyle Hauptman, of Maine, to be a Member of the National Credit Union Administration Board, 10 a.m., WEBEX.

July 21, Full Committee, business meeting to consider the nominations of Judy Shelton, of California, to be a Member, and Christopher Waller, of Minnesota, both to be a Member of the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System, 2 p.m., SD–106.

July 22, Subcommittee on Economic Policy, to hold hearings to examine the United States and China, focusing on winning the economic competition, 9:30 a.m., WEBEX.

Committee on the Budget: July 21, business meeting to consider the nomination of Derek Kan, of California, to be Deputy Director of the Office of Management and Budget, 12 noon, SR–301.

Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation: July 21, Subcommittee on Manufacturing, Trade, and Consumer Protection, to hold hearings to examine protecting Americans from COVID–19 scams, 2:30 p.m., SD–G50.

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July 22, Full Committee, business meeting to consider S. 933, to improve data collection and monitoring of the Great Lakes, oceans, bays, estuaries, and coasts, S. 1730, to direct the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to make grants to State and local governments and nongovernmental organizations for purposes of carrying out climate-resilient living shoreline projects that protect coastal communities by supporting ecosystem functions and habitats with the use of natural materials and systems, S. 3152, to require the Federal Communications Commission to incorporate data on maternal health outcomes into its broadband health maps, S. 3771, to require the Secretary of Commerce to establish the Federal Advisory Committee on the Development and Implementation of Artificial Intelligence, S. 3891, to require the Director of the National Institute of Standards and Technology to advance the development of technical standards for artificial intelligence, to establish the National Program to Advance Artificial Intelligence Research, to promote research on artificial intelligence at the National Science Foundation, S. 3958, to amend title 49, United States Code, to permit the use of incentive payments to expedite certain federally financed airport development projects, S. 4144, to amend the Dingell-Johnson Sport Fish Restoration Act with respect to sport fish restoration and recreational boating safety, S. 4162, to provide certainty for airport funding, and the nominations of Joel Szabat, of Maryland, to be Under Secretary of Transportation for Policy, Michael P. O'Rielly, of New York, to be a Member of the Federal Communications Commission, Michael J. Walsh, Jr., of Virginia, to be General Counsel, and Mary A. Toman, of California, to be Under Secretary Economic Affairs, both of the Department of Commerce, and routine lists in the Coast Guard, 9:45 a.m., SD–G50.

July 23, Subcommittee on Communications, Technology, Innovation, and the Internet, to hold hearings to examine the state of United States spectrum policy, 10 a.m., SR–253.

Committee on Energy and Natural Resources: July 22, Subcommittee on Water and Power, to hold hearings to examine S. 2718, to provide for the conduct of certain water security measures in the State of New Mexico, S. 3811, to provide financial assistance for projects to address certain subsidence impacts in the State of California, S. 4188, to provide for drought preparedness and improved water supply reliability, S. 4189, to provide for drought preparedness and improved water supply reliability, and an original bill entitled, ``Water-Energy Technology Demonstration and Deployment Act'', 2:30 p.m., SD–366.

July 23, Full Committee, to hold an oversight hearing to examine the impacts of the COVID–19 pandemic on users of public lands, forests, and national parks, 10 a.m., SD–366.

Committee on Environment and Public Works: July 22, to hold hearings to examine the increased risk of zoonotic disease from illegal wildlife trafficking, 10 a.m., SD–106.

Committee on Finance: July 21, to hold hearings to examine the nominations of Michael N. Nemelka, of Utah, to be a Deputy United States Trade Representative (Investment, Services, Labor, Environment, Africa, China, and the Western Hemisphere), with the rank of Ambassador, and Christian N. Weiler, of Louisiana, and Alina I. Marshall, of Virginia, both to be a Judge of the United States Tax Court, 10 a.m., SD–215.

Committee on Foreign Relations: July 21, to hold hearings to examine the nominations of Marshall Billingslea, of Virginia, to be Under Secretary for Arms Control and International Security, C.J. Mahoney, of Kansas, to be Legal Adviser, and Carlos Trujillo, of Florida, to be an Assistant Secretary (Western Hemisphere Affairs), all of the Department of State, 10 a.m., SD–106.

July 22, Full Committee, to hold hearings to examine advancing effective United States competition with China, focusing on objectives, priorities, and next steps, 2 p.m., SR–325.

July 23, Full Committee, to hold hearings to examine the nominations of Lisa S. Kenna, of Vermont, to be Ambassador to the Republic of Peru, Leora Rosenberg Levy, of Connecticut, to be Ambassador to the Republic of Chile, and Aldona Z. Wos, of North Carolina, to be Ambassador to Canada, all of the Department of State, 10 a.m., SD–106.

Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs: July 22, business meeting to consider S. 4204, to establish an Interagency Task Force to analyze preparedness for national pandemics, S. 4210, to amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to authorize the transfer of certain equipment during a public health emergency, S. 4153, to require the Federal Emergency Management Agency to evaluate the National Response Framework based on lessons learned from the COVID–19 pandemic, S. 4157, to amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to expand the authority of the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center, S. 4158, to examine the extent of the reliance of the United States on foreign producers for personal protective equipment during the COVID–19 pandemic and produce recommendations to secure the supply chain of personal protective equipment, S. 4133, to modernize the REAL ID Act of 2005, S. 4165, to repeal section 692 of the Post-Katrina Emergency Management Reform Act of 2006, S. 3997, to strengthen the security and integrity of the United States scientific and research enterprise, S. 4200, to establish a program to facilitate the adoption of modern technology by executive agencies, S. 4077, to amend the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 to provide for regulatory impact analyses for certain rules, S. 92, to amend chapter 8 of title 5, United States Code, to provide that major rules of the executive branch shall have no force or effect unless a joint resolution of approval is enacted into law, S. 4138, to amend title 5, United States Code, to make permanent the authority of the United States Patent and Trademark Office to conduct a telework travel expenses program, S. 3287, to modify the governmentwide financial management plan, S. 3455, to prohibit certain individuals from downloading or using TikTok on any device issued by the United States or a government corporation, S. 4024, to establish in the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency of the Department of Homeland Security a Cybersecurity Advisory Committee, S. 2967, to establish the Commission on Intergovernmental Relations of the United States to facilitate the fullest cooperation, coordination, and mutual accountability among all levels of government, S. 3658, to establish an Office of Equal Rights and Community Inclusion at the Federal Emergency Management Agency, S. 4169, to establish a National Commission on United States Counterterrorism Policy, S. 3038, to promote innovative acquisition techniques and procurement strategies, S. 3896, to amend title 5, United States Code, to require the Director of the Office of Personnel Management to establish and maintain a public directory of the individuals occupying Government policy and supporting positions, S. 3461, to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 2600 Wesley Street in Greenville, Texas, as the ``Audie Murphy Post Office Building'', S. 3462, to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 909 West Holiday Drive in Fate, Texas, as the ``Ralph Hall Post Office'', S. 3839, to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 2719 South Webster Street in Kokomo, Indiana, as the ``Opha May Johnson Post Office'', S. 4126, to designate the facility of the United States Postal Service located at 104 East Main Street in Port Washington, Wisconsin, as the ``Joseph G. Demler Post Office'', H.R. 1313, to amend the Implementing Recommendations of the 9 11 Commission Act of 2007 to clarify certain allowable uses of funds for public transportation security assistance grants and establish periods of performance for such grants, H.R. 4727, to amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish a mentor-prot,g, program, H.R. 542, to amend the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to establish the National Urban Security Technology Laboratory, an original bill entitled, ``GAO Database Modernization Act'', an original bill entitled, ``Southwest Border Security Technology Improvement Act of 2020'', and the nominations of Derek Kan, of California, to be Deputy Director of the Office of Management and Budget, and Mark A. Robbins, Carl Ezekiel Ross, and Elizabeth J. Shapiro, each to be an Associate Judge of the Superior Court of the District of Columbia, 10 a.m., SD–215.

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Committee on the Judiciary: July 22, to hold hearings to examine protecting the integrity of college athletics, 2:30 p.m., SD–G50.

July 23, Full Committee, business meeting to consider S. 4212, to amend title 28, United States Code, to strip foreign sovereign immunity of certain foreign states to secure justice for victims of novel coronavirus in the United States, and the nominations of David W. Dugan, and Stephen P. McGlynn, both to be a United States District Judge for the Southern District of Illinois, John W. Holcomb, to be United States District Judge for the Central District of California, Hala Y. Jarbou, to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Michigan, Iain D. Johnston, and Franklin Ulyses Valderrama, both to be a United States District Judge for the Northern District of Illinois, Brett H. Ludwig, to be United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Wisconsin, R. Shireen Matthews, and Todd Wallace Robinson, both to be a United States District Judge for the Southern District of California, Christy Criswell Wiegand, to be United States District Judge for the Western District of Pennsylvania, and Roderick C. Young, to be United States District Judge for the Eastern District of Virginia, 10 a.m., SD–325.

Committee on Rules and Administration: July 22, to hold hearings to examine 2020 general election preparations, 10:30 a.m., SR–301.

Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship: July 23, to hold hearings to examine capital access for minority small businesses, focusing on COVID–19 resources for an equitable and sustainable recovery, 10 a.m., SD–430.

Select Committee on Intelligence: July 22, to hold hearings to examine the nominations of Christopher C. Miller, of Virginia, to be Director of the National Counterterrorism Center, and Patrick Hovakimian, of California, to be General Counsel, both of the Office of the Director of National Intelligence, 10 a.m., SR–325.

Special Committee on Aging: July 21, to hold hearings to examine the COVID–19 pandemic and seniors, focusing on racial health disparities, 9:30 a.m., SD–562.

House Committees

Committee on Education and Labor, July 23, Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education, hearing entitled ``Underfunded and Unprepared: Examining How to Overcome Obstacles to Safely Reopen Public Schools'', 10:15 a.m., 2175 Rayburn and Webex.

Committee on Financial Services, July 23, Full Committee, hearing entitled ``The Heroes Act: Providing for a Strong Economic Recovery from COVID–19'', 2128 Rayburn and Webex.

Committee on Foreign Affairs, July 23, Full Committee, hearing entitled ``The Trump Administration's FY2021 Foreign Assistance Budget Request'', 9:30 a.m., 2172 Rayburn.

Committee on Homeland Security, July 22, Full Committee, hearing entitled ``Examining the National Response to the Worsening Coronavirus Pandemic: Part II'', 9 a.m., 2118 Rayburn and Webex.

Committee on the Judiciary, July 23, Full Committee, markup on H.R. 2678, the ``No President is Above the Law Act''; H.R. 1627, the ``Abuse of the Pardon Prevention Act''; and to Ratify Subcommittee Assignments, 10 a.m., CVC–200 and Webex.

Committee on Natural Resources, July 22, Subcommittee for Indigenous Peoples of the United States, hearing on H.R. 958, the ``Native Youth and Tribal Officer Protection Act''; H.R. 6237, the ``PRC for Native Veterans Act''; H.R. 6535, the ``Coverage for Urban Indian Health Providers Act''; and H.R. 7119, the ``Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium Land Transfer Act of 2020'', 2 p.m., 1324 Longworth and Webex.

July 23, Full Committee, hearing entitled ``The Transformation of the Puerto Rico Electric Power Authority (PREPA)'', 3:30 p.m., 1324 Longworth.

Committee on Oversight and Reform, July 22, Full Committee, hearing entitled ``F–35 Joint Strike Fighter: Ensuring Safety and Accountability in the Government's Trillion Dollar Investment'', 10 a.m., 2154 Rayburn and Webex.

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July 23, Subcommittee on National Security, hearing entitled ``Empowering Women and Girls and Promoting International Security'', 10 a.m., 2154 Rayburn and Webex.

July 24, Subcommittee on Environment, hearing entitled ``FEMA's Natural Disaster Preparedness and Response Efforts During the Coronavirus Pandemic'', 9 a.m., 2154 Rayburn and Webex.

Committee on Rules, July 22, Full Committee, hearing on H.R. 7608, the ``Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2021'' [State, Foreign Operations, Agriculture, Rural Development, Interior, Environment, Military Construction, and Veterans Affairs Appropriations Act, 2021], 2 p.m., Webex.

Committee on Small Business, July 22, Subcommittee on Investigations, Oversight, and Regulations, hearing entitled ``21st Century SBA: An Analysis of SBA's Technology Systems'', 1 p.m., 2360 Rayburn and Webex.

Committee on Veterans' Affairs, July 22, Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations; and Women Veterans Task Force, joint hearing entitled ``Safety for All: Ending Sexual Harassment in the Department of Veterans Affairs'', 2 p.m., HVC–210 and Webex.

July 23, Full Committee, hearing on H.R. 6039, to require the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to seek to enter into an agreement with the city of Vallejo, California, for the transfer of Mare Island Naval Cemetery in Vallejo, California, and for other purposes; H.R. 6082, the ``Forgotten Vietnam Veterans Act''; H.R. 4908, the ``Native American PACT Act''; H.R. 2791, the ``Department of Veterans Affairs Tribal Advisory Committee Act of 2019''; H.R. 4526, the ``Brian Tally VA Employment Transparency Act''; H.R. 3582, to amend title 38, United States Code, to expand the scope of the Advisory Committee on Minority Veterans, and for other purposes; H.R. 96, to amend title 38, United States Code, to require the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to furnish dental care in the same manner as any other medical service, and for other purposes; H.R. 4281, the ``Access to Contraception Expansion for Veterans Act''; H.R. 3010, the ``Honoring All Veterans Act''; H.R. 7163, the ``VA FOIA Reform Act of 2020''; H.R. 7111, the ``Veterans Economic Recovery Act of 2020''; H.R. 2435, the ``Accelerating Veterans Recovery Outdoors Act''; H.R. 7287, to clarify the licensure requirements for contractor medical professionals to perform medical disability examinations for the Department of Veterans Affairs; H.R. 3228, the ``VA Mission Telehealth Clarification Act''; H.R. 6141, the ``Protecting Moms Who Served Act''; H.R. 6493, the ``Veterans Benefits Fairness and Transparency Act''; H.R. 7445, to amend title 38, United States Code, to expand eligibility for home loans from the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to certain members of the reserve components of the Armed Forces; legislation on the Burial Equity for Guards and Reserves Act of 2020; legislation to amend title 38, United States Code, to extend certain employment and reemployment rights to members of the National Guard who perform State active duty; and legislation to amend title 38, United States Code, to clarify the scope of procedural rights of members of the uniformed services with respect to their employment and reemployment rights, and for other purposes, 10 a.m., HVC–210 and Webex.

Committee on Ways and Means, July 23, Subcommittee on Trade, hearing entitled ``Trade, Manufacturing, and Critical Supply Chains: Lessons from COVID–19'', 2 p.m., Webex.

Joint Meetings

Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe: July 23, to hold hearings to examine human rights at home, focusing on media, politics and safety of journalists, 11 a.m., WEBEX.

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Next Meeting of the
SENATE

10 a.m., Tuesday, July 21

Senate Chamber

Program for Tuesday: Senate will resume consideration of S. 4049, National Defense Authorization Act, and vote on or in relation to Schatz Amendment No. 2252, and Inhofe Amendment No. 2411, at 11:45 a.m., and Shaheen Amendment No. 1729, and Cornyn Amendment No. 2244, at 4 p.m.

(Senate will recess following disposition of Inhofe Amendment No. 2411, until 2:15 p.m. for their respective party conferences.)

Next Meeting of the
HOUSE

9 a.m., Tuesday, July 21

House Chamber

Program for Tuesday: Continue consideration of H.R. 6395--William M. (Mac) Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021.







Extensions of Remarks, as inserted in this issue








HOUSE


Axne, Cynthia, Iowa, E646, E647, E650

Brooks, Mo, Ala., E647

Buck, Ken, Colo., E646

Crawford, Eric A. ``Rick'', Ark., E650

Cunningham, Joe, S.C., E649

Davis, Danny K., Ill., E651

Foxx, Virginia, N.C., E649

Graves, Garret, La., E652

Green, Mark E., Tenn., E648, E650

Griffith, H. Morgan, Va., E645, E649

Hudson, Richard, N.C., E646

Jayapal, Pramila, Wash., E646

Levin, Mike, Calif., E648

McCollum, Betty, Minn., E647

Norcross, Donald, N.J., E645, E648, E651

Norton, Eleanor Holmes, The District of Columbia, E648

Smith, Jason, Mo., E645

Stevens, Haley M., Mich., E651

Tlaib, Rashida, Mich., E645

Wilson, Joe, S.C., E652

Wittman, Robert J., Va., E649, E650

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