MORNING BUSINESS; Congressional Record Vol. 167, No. 21
(Senate - February 04, 2021)

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[Pages S446-S468]
From the Congressional Record Online through the Government Publishing Office [www.gpo.gov]




                            MORNING BUSINESS

                                 ______
                                 

                           BUDGET RESOLUTION


                            Amendment No. 54

  Mr. VAN HOLLEN. Mr. President, I opposed amendment No. 54 proposed by 
Senator Young because it could prevent more than 3.5 million American 
citizens with Social Security numbers, including 2 million children, 
from receiving vital relief if anyone else in their household lacks a 
Social Security number or uses an Individual Taxpayer Identification 
number to file their taxes. Before Congress passed an omnibus Covid 
relief package in December 2020, these mixed-status families were 
excluded from receiving economic impact payments, including their 
American citizen children. It is simply wrong and constitutionally 
suspect to discriminate against this group of American citizens.


                            Amendment No. 48

  Mr. President, I opposed amendment No. 48 proposed by Senator Blunt. 
Getting our kids back in school is an urgent priority. Children, 
parents, and educators all struggle with remote learning, especially 
when far too many children don't have adequate access to the internet. 
But if we are to open safely and keep kids in school, we must follow 
evidence-based public health guidance from experts that protects all 
members of our school communities: students, parents, educators, and 
staff, alike. Vaccines for educators is a critical step, but schools 
must have the necessary guidance and resources to implement mitigation 
strategies to safely reopen, including funds for ventilation 
improvements, PPE, and robust testing and contact tracing. This 
amendment would be counterproductive--dangerously penalizing schools, 
disregarding State and local public health guidance, and blocking 
access to billions of dollars for our educators and students when they 
need it most.
  The Biden administration has called for cross-agency collaboration to 
provide guidance and for Congress to provide an additional $ 130 
billion in emergency K-12 funding, so our schools can safely return to 
in-person learning. American families, children, and educators can't 
afford for us to waste any more time; it is time for Congress to act.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER (Ms. Baldwin). The senior Senator from 
Wisconsin.


                           Amendment No. 542

  Mr. JOHNSON. Madam President, on behalf of myself and Senator 
Tuberville, I call up amendment No. 542 and ask that it be reported by 
number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The bill clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Wisconsin [Mr. Johnson], for himself and 
     Mr. Tuberville, proposes an amendment numbered 542.

  The amendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
    protecting American taxpayers and the border, which may include 
  prohibiting the cancellation of contracts for physical barriers and 
   other border security measures for which funds already have been 
obligated and for which penalties will be incurred in the case of such 
   cancellation and prohibiting the use of funds for payment of such 
                               penalties)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   PROTECTING AMERICAN TAXPAYERS FROM THE COSTS 
                   ASSOCIATED WITH CANCELLING CONTRACTS RELATING 
                   TO BORDER SECURITY.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     protecting American taxpayers and the United States border, 
     which may include prohibiting the cancellation of contracts 
     for physical barriers and other border security measures for 
     which funds already have been obligated, by the amounts 
     provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided 
     that such legislation would not increase the deficit over 
     either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2030.

  Mr. JOHNSON. Madam President, in 2006, the Secure Fence Act was 
signed into law, authorizing 700 miles of double-layer fencing along 
the southwest border. It passed this Chamber on a vote of 80 to 19, 
with 26 Senate Democrats voting to secure the border. Among the 
Democratic Senators voting for it were then-Senators Obama, Biden, 
Clinton, and current Senators Schumer, Feinstein, Carper, and Wyden.
  In the end, only 36 miles of double fencing was actually constructed, 
which, in the end, combined with a very low bar for asylum claims and 
DACA, created the catalyst for a humanitarian crisis in 2014 of 
unaccompanied minors and family units coming in, with the crisis 
peaking in the summer of 2019. In reaction, President Trump enacted a 
number of policies, including construction of 700 miles of wall.
  Now, we didn't construct all of it, but we contracted 700 miles, 
completed 450, and, as of today, 250 miles are contracted but not 
built.
  Unfortunately, the Biden administration is now reversing all of these 
policies.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator's time has expired.
  Mr. JOHNSON. I have 2 minutes, don't I?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. One minute.
  Mr. JOHNSON. I was told 2.
  Well, anyway, my amendment--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator's time has expired.
  Mr. JOHNSON.--will prevent cancellation of those contracts, saving 
taxpayers the cancellation costs and securing the borders.
  I urge support of my amendment.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator's time has expired.
  The junior Senator from Michigan.
  Mr. PETERS. Madam President, we need to have a secure border with a 
strategic mix of personnel, technology, and barriers, and the Biden 
administration has initiated a comprehensive review of southern border 
security. But this amendment would force the last administration's 
misguided, simplistic border wall decisions on President Biden.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senate will be in order.
  Mr. PETERS. We are in the midst of an unprecedented pandemic and 
recession. The legislation before us must focus on families trying to 
put food on the table and struggling small businesses, not ensuring 
well-connected government contractors get rich.
  The President's decision about our borders will be guided by what is 
best

[[Page S447]]

for our national security and for taxpayers. Right now, we need to 
focus on the struggling Americans who need our help and not big 
government contractors.
  (Chorus of Hear! Hear!)


                       Vote on Amendment No. 542

  Mr. JOHNSON. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will call the roll.
  The legislative clerk called the roll
  The result was announced--yeas 50, nays 50, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 33 Leg.]

                                YEAS--50

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Manchin
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--50

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Collins
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden
  The amendment (No. 542) was rejected
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The senior Senator from Utah.


                           Amendment No. 821

  Mr. LEE. Madam President, I call up my amendment numbered 821 and ask 
that it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Utah [Mr. Lee] proposes an amendment 
     numbered 821.

  The amendment is as follows:

  (Purpose: To establish a spending-neutral reserve fund relating to 
       prohibiting infringement on the free exercise of religion)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. SPENDING-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   PROHIBITING INFRINGEMENT ON THE FREE EXERCISE 
                   OF RELIGION.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     prohibiting infringement on the free exercise of religion in 
     employment, in commerce, in social services, in faith and 
     community partnerships, or in access to housing, health care, 
     or education, by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
     those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
     raise new revenue and would not increase the deficit over 
     either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2030.

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator is recognized.
  Mr. LEE. Madam President, the right to live by faith--any faith of 
our choosing or no faith at all, if we choose--is part of what defines 
us and allows us to live out our lives in dignity and respect. It is 
also what makes for a well-ordered society. It provides relief for 
those who are suffering.
  Members of our communities, citizens of our country, were able to 
live out their lives with religious freedom prior to the pandemic. With 
the pandemic and the corresponding growth of government, we have seen 
some of those rights threatened and infringed.
  I introduce this amendment for the simple purpose of making sure that 
we, as the Senate, have the ability to protect the religious freedom of 
all Americans, even when--especially when--government is growing as a 
result of a crisis.
  I urge each of my colleagues to support this and, with it, freedom of 
religion.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The majority whip.
  Mr. DURBIN. Madam President, in this ragtag, middle-of-the-night 
procedure, the Senator from Utah asks a basic question: What if my 
freedom conflicts with your freedom? Specifically, what if my freedom 
of religious belief says that I don't have to sell my home to an 
African American? What if my religious belief says that I don't have to 
pay women the same thing as men who work for me? What if my religious 
belief says that I can discriminate against a person because of their 
sexual orientation?
  I read the Senator's amendment as saying the answer is obvious: 
religion prevails.
  I don't think it is that simple. It is not that simple in this 
building or across the street in the Supreme Court.
  If we are dealing with the fundamental question of discrimination 
based on religious belief, we all want to make certain that we 
acknowledge and respect religious belief, but we also feel pretty 
strongly about the rights of individuals when it comes to their gender, 
their identity, their sexual orientation, their color, the fact that 
they may be disabled.
  Arguing that religious belief would allow me to discriminate with 
impunity is a pretty large question to assert at this time of night.
  I hope my colleagues will join me in opposing this Lee amendment.
  Mr. LEE. Madam President, I ask unanimous consent for 15 seconds to 
respond.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  Mr. LEE. Madam President, there is absolutely nothing in this 
amendment and absolutely nothing about the suggestion that we ought to 
respect religious freedom that suggests what my friend and colleague 
from Illinois has just suggested.
  It is offensive to the cause of religious freedom. It is contrary to 
the Supreme Court's ruling in Employment Division v. Smith and the 
Religious Freedom Restoration Act. It is contrary to the Constitution 
for people to sue religious orders, forcing nuns to purchase 
contraceptive coverage.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator's time has expired.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 821

  Mr. LEE. I ask for the yeas and nays and demand a vote on religious 
freedom.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The bill clerk called the roll
  The result was announced--yeas 50, nays 50, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 34 Leg.]

                                YEAS--50

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Manchin
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--50

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Collins
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden
  The amendment (No. 821) was rejected
  The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. Markey). The Senator from Texas.


                           Amendment No. 558

  Mr. CORNYN. I call up my amendment No. 558 and ask it be reported by 
number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk read as follows:


[[Page S448]]


  

       The Senator from Texas (Mr. Cornyn) proposes an amendment 
     numbered 558.

  The amendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
                          funding the police)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO FUNDING 
                   THE POLICE.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     funding the Nation's police through programs that are in 
     within the jurisdiction of any committee of the Senate 
     instructed under section 2002, which may include funding for 
     law enforcement officer safety programs and fusion centers to 
     protect the United States from domestic and international 
     terrorists administered by the Department of Homeland 
     Security, mental and behavioral health intervention programs 
     administered by the Department of Health and Human Services, 
     programs administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs 
     to increase the hiring of military veterans as law 
     enforcement officers, gang and youth violence education 
     programs administered by the Department of Health and Human 
     Services, and the Department of Education, by the amounts 
     provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided 
     that such legislation would not increase the deficit over 
     either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2030.

  Mr. CORNYN. Mr. President, the amendment I offered would create a 
deficit-neutral reserve fund to provide additional resources to our 
Nation's law enforcement officers.
  We know that the money provided by the Federal Government could be 
used for a number of reasons, like deescalation training, crime 
victims' outreach programs, mental health and drug treatment programs 
to reduce recidivism, and the like. This money could also be used to 
support the efforts to combat domestic and international terrorism.
  I encourage my colleagues to support this amendment. We have a chance 
to show that we back the blue by voting yes on this amendment. I ask my 
colleagues to vote for it.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 558

  Mr. President, I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  Who yields time?
  Mr. SCHUMER. We yield back our time.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. All time is yielded back.
  The question is on agreeing to the amendment.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk called the roll
  The result was announced--yeas 100, nays 0, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 35 Leg.]

                               YEAS--100

     Baldwin
     Barrasso
     Bennet
     Blackburn
     Blumenthal
     Blunt
     Booker
     Boozman
     Braun
     Brown
     Burr
     Cantwell
     Capito
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Coons
     Cornyn
     Cortez Masto
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Ernst
     Feinstein
     Fischer
     Gillibrand
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hassan
     Hawley
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kaine
     Kelly
     Kennedy
     King
     Klobuchar
     Lankford
     Leahy
     Lee
     Lujan
     Lummis
     Manchin
     Markey
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Paul
     Peters
     Portman
     Reed
     Risch
     Romney
     Rosen
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sanders
     Sasse
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shaheen
     Shelby
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Sullivan
     Tester
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wicker
     Wyden
     Young
  The amendment (No. 558) was agreed to
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Arkansas.


                            Amendment No. 66

  Mr. COTTON. Mr. President, I call up my amendment, No. 66, and ask 
that it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Arkansas [Mr. Cotton] proposes an 
     amendment numbered 66.

  The amendment is as follows:

(Purpose: To create a point of order against a provision in legislation 
that would increase the number of justices on the Supreme Court of the 
                             United States)

       At the appropriate place in title IV, add the following:

     SEC. 4___. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST INCREASING THE NUMBER OF 
                   JUSTICES ON THE SUPREME COURT OF THE UNITED 
                   STATES.

       (a) Point of Order.--In the Senate, it shall not be in 
     order to consider a provision in a bill, joint resolution, 
     motion, amendment, amendment between the Houses, or 
     conference report that would increase the number of justices 
     on the Supreme Court of the United States.
       (b) Waiver and Appeal.--Subsection (a) may be waived or 
     suspended in the Senate only by an affirmative vote of three-
     fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn. An affirmative 
     vote of three-fifths of the Members of the Senate, duly 
     chosen and sworn, shall be required to sustain an appeal of 
     the ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised under 
     subsection (a).

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Arkansas.
  Mr. COTTON. Mr. President, last year, in certain fringe quarters of 
the Democratic Party, it seemed popular to call for packing the Supreme 
Court--for expanding the number of Justices on the Court--because you 
don't like their political rulings. Now, obviously, all Republicans 
opposed such a radical idea. Yet many Democratic politicians, to 
include Joe Biden and to include a few Senators in this Chamber 
tonight, contorted themselves to avoid taking a position on this issue. 
They twisted themselves into pretzels on the campaign trail to simply 
say that we ought not pack the Supreme Court because we don't like 
their rulings.
  I offer a simple amendment, an amendment that is backed by famous 
liberals like Ruth Bader Ginsburg, that we should not pack the Supreme 
Court.
  Now, I understand the Democrats are going to raise a point of order, 
saying this is not germane--yet more contortions to avoid taking a 
simple stance on this issue. So I would invite my Democratic colleagues 
who have said they don't want to pack the Court to simply waive this 
point of order, and let's have an up-or-down vote on one of the most 
fundamental tenets of the rule of law--that you do not pack the Court 
because you don't like the way they rule.
  I yield back my time, and I encourage your support.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Illinois.
  Mr. DURBIN. Mr. President, the Constitution does not stipulate the 
number of Supreme Court Justices. That is up to Congress. Congress has 
a long history of altering the makeup of the Court. The number of 
Justices changed six times before we arrived at the number nine. This 
amendment chooses to ignore the history.
  For the record, there is exactly one living Senator who has 
effectively changed the size of the Supreme Court. He is Senator 
McConnell, who shrank the Court to eight seats for nearly a year, in 
the last year of the Obama Presidency, by refusing to fill the Scalia 
vacancy. Now President Biden has established a bipartisan commission to 
study Supreme Court reform. Let them do their work.


                             Point of Order

  Mr. President, come to think of it, should we be changing the Senate 
rules in the budget resolution? I think not.
  In fact, Mr. President, as a result, I raise a point of order that 
the pending amendment is not germane to the underlying resolution. 
Therefore, it violates section 305(b)(2) of the Congressional Budget 
Act of 1974.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Arkansas.


                            Motion to Waive

  Mr. COTTON. Mr. President, in accordance with section 904 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 and the waiver provisions of all 
applicable budget resolutions, I move to waive all applicable sections 
of that act and applicable budget resolutions for purposes of amendment 
No. 66.


                        Vote on Motion to Waive

  Mr. President, I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?

[[Page S449]]

  There is a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant bill clerk called the roll.
  The yeas and nays resulted--yeas 50, nays 50, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 36 Leg.]

                                YEAS--50

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--50

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Manchin
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyde
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. On this vote, there are 50 yeas and 50 nays.
  Three-fifths of the Senators duly chosen and sworn not having voted 
in the affirmative, the motion is not agreed to.
  The point of order is sustained and the amendment falls.
  The majority leader.
  Mr. SCHUMER. Mr. President, we are going to now do 10-minute votes. 
The Members should be warned. Stay in your seats. We are not holding 
the vote open.
  Not exactly, says Gary, but close enough. You know who runs the show 
around here. All right, for 10 minutes or as close as we can come to 
it.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Louisiana.


                           Amendment No. 483

  Mr. CASSIDY. Mr. President, I call up my amendment, No. 483, and I 
ask that it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Louisiana [Mr. Cassidy] proposes an 
     amendment numbered 483.

  The amendment is as follows:

  (Purpose: To create a point of order against legislation that would 
             provide Economic Impact Payments to prisoners)

       At the appropriate place in title IV, add the following:

     SEC. 4___. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST PROVIDING ECONOMIC IMPACT 
                   PAYMENTS TO PRISONERS.

       (a) Point of Order.--It shall not be in order in the Senate 
     to consider any bill, joint resolution, motion, amendment, 
     amendment between the Houses, or conference report that 
     would, as part of any extension or reauthorization of 
     Economic Impact Payments under section 6428 or 6428A of the 
     Internal Revenue Code of 1986 or any establishment of any 
     similar rebate or credit, allow for such rebate or credit to 
     be provided to any individual who is incarcerated in a 
     Federal or State prison.
       (b) Waiver and Appeal.--Subsection (a) may be waived or 
     suspended in the Senate only by an affirmative vote of three-
     fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn. An affirmative 
     vote of three-fifths of the Members of the Senate, duly 
     chosen and sworn, shall be required to sustain an appeal of 
     the ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised under 
     subsection (a).

  Mr. CASSIDY. Mr. President, I rise in support of my amendment which 
would prevent taxpayer dollars from going toward economic impact 
payments for prisoners.
  You may not realize it, but the first $1,200 checks we sent went to 
every inmate in the United States. And I am thinking: That can't be 
right. And I am told it was a drafting error.
  Well, then we sent out the last checks, and I said: We have got to 
stop this. And I was told that there were those who wished that those 
checks go to inmates.
  When my constituents hear about that, they think it is a total 
example about how Congress is incontinent in spending money.
  Now, prisoners do not contribute to the tax base. Taxpayers are 
already paying the entirety of their care, and they cannot reasonably 
stimulate the economy, and still they are eligible for stimulus checks.
  I argue that all spending on COVID relief must be targeted toward 
real needs. This is a perfect example of untargeted, inappropriate 
spending. I ask that my colleagues support this commonsense amendment.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Oregon.


                             Point of Order

  Mr. WYDEN. Mr. President, I have been advised that inclusion of this 
amendment in the budget resolution would be corrosive to the privileged 
status of the resolution. Since this amendment contains material 
inappropriate for inclusion in a budget resolution, its adoption could 
jeopardize the privilege of this resolution, which would completely 
halt, again, efforts to provide this essential, critical pandemic 
relief.
  Additionally, this amendment is not germane to the budget resolution 
as required by law. Accordingly, I raise a point of order that the 
pending amendment violates section 305(b)(2) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Louisiana.


                            Motion to Waive

  Mr. CASSIDY. Mr. President, pursuant to section 904 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, and the waiver provisions of 
applicable budget resolutions, I move to waive all applicable sections 
of that act and applicable budget resolutions for purposes of Senate 
amendment No. 483.
  I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk called the roll
  The yeas and nays resulted--yeas 50, nays 50, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 37 Leg.]

                                YEAS--50

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--50

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Manchin
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden
  The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. Manchin). On this vote, the yeas are 50, 
and the nays are 50.
  Three-fifths of the Senators duly chosen and sworn not having voted 
in the affirmative, the motion is not agreed to.
  The point of order is sustained, and the amendment falls.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The majority leader.
  Mr. SCHUMER. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that it be in 
order to call up the following amendments in the order listed and that 
the amendments be reported by number and that the amendments alternate 
with a Democratic amendment when one is available to be called up: 
Kennedy, No. 782, SBA/riots; Paul, No. 441, roads; Lee, No. 770, oil 
and gas on Federal lands; Cruz, No. 811, employment-based visas; Scott, 
No. 872, border security; Capito, No. 655, navigable waters; Lankford, 
No. 837, State and local/religion.
  This is not the last list, my colleagues. There are another 10. So if 
we stay in our chairs, we might make it by sunrise, but we really have 
to cooperate here. Those are the ones we have so far.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection?

[[Page S450]]

  Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Louisiana.


                           Amendment No. 782

  Mr. KENNEDY. Mr. President, I call up my amendment No. 782 and ask 
that it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The senior assistant bill clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Louisiana [Mr. Kennedy] proposes an 
     amendment numbered 782.

  The amendment is as follows

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
preventing the provision of Small Business Administration assistance to 
any individual convicted of a misdemeanor or felony for actions during 
            or in connection with a riot or civil disorder)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   PREVENTING THE PROVISION OF SMALL BUSINESS 
                   ADMINISTRATION ASSISTANCE TO ANY INDIVIDUAL 
                   CONVICTED OF A MISDEMEANOR OR FELONY FOR 
                   ACTIONS DURING OR IN CONNECTION WITH A RIOT OR 
                   CIVIL DISORDER.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     preventing the provision of Small Business Administration 
     assistance to any individual convicted of a misdemeanor or 
     felony for actions during or in connection with a riot or 
     civil disorder by the amounts provided in such legislation 
     for those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
     increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
     fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the period of the total of 
     fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

  Mr. KENNEDY. Mr. President, we guarantee freedom of speech in 
America. Unlike other countries, we also guarantee freedom after 
speech. One form of freedom of speech is the right to peacefully 
protest. That doesn't mean that violence as a part of protest is or 
should be legal in our country. In fact, it is not. Without order, 
there can be no justice.
  We have had, unfortunately, riots throughout this year. In fact, if 
you look at the numbers, we have had over 50 deaths in our country this 
year from riots, including here at our own Capitol, and this is the 
most expensive period of riots in our history.
  My amendment would prohibit the SBA from providing assistance, such 
as the Paycheck Protection Program, the Economic Injury Disaster Loans, 
7(a) loans, and other small business assistance, to anyone who has been 
convicted during the past year of a felony or a misdemeanor during and 
in connection with a riot.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Maryland.
  Mr. CARDIN. Mr. President, I rise in opposition to the amendment. We 
all know about the inequities in our criminal justice system, and we 
have worked together to try to bridge some of those inequities. The SBA 
tools help to bridge the inequities in regard to the opportunities in 
America.
  The Kennedy amendment would attempt to impose a lifetime prohibition 
for a conviction of a misdemeanor for a civil disorder. It may have 
happened 10, 20, 30 years ago. A person may have paid their price for 
that, but this is moving in the wrong direction, and I would urge my 
colleagues to reject this amendment.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Louisiana.
  Mr. KENNEDY. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent for an additional 
30 seconds to respond.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection?
  (A number of Senators objecting.)
  The objection is heard.
  Mr. KENNEDY. Mr. President, do I have any additional time from my 
original time?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator's time has expired.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 782

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the amendment.
  Mr. KENNEDY. Mr. President, I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant bill clerk called the roll.
  The result was announced--yeas 49, nays 51, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 38 Leg.]

                                YEAS--49

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--51

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Collins
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Manchin
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden
  The amendment (No. 782) was rejected.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The majority leader.
  Mr. SCHUMER. Mr. President, we all want to finish this process. If we 
all stay in our seats, we could avoid the recount and save a bunch of 
minutes for each vote. I would urge and plead with every Member to stay 
in their seat so we can get this done as quickly as possible.
  I yield the floor.
  (Chorus of Hear! Hear!)
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Kentucky.


                           Amendment No. 441

  Mr. PAUL. Mr. President, I call up my amendment No. 441 and ask that 
it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The senior assistant bill clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Kentucky [Mr. Paul] proposes an amendment 
     numbered 441.

  The amendment is as follows:

 (Purpose: To build roads at home instead of building them around the 
                                 world)

       On page 8, line 24, decrease the amount by $26,482,952,000.
       On page 8, line 25, decrease the amount by $26,482,952,000.
       On page 9, line 3, decrease the amount by $27,012,611,040.
       On page 9, line 4, decrease the amount by $27,012,611,040.
       On page 9, line 7, decrease the amount by 
     $27,552,863,260.80.
       On page 9, line 8, decrease the amount by 
     $27,552,863,260.80.
       On page 9, line 11, decrease the amount by $28,103,920,526.
       On page 9, line 12, decrease the amount by $28,103,920,526.
       On page 9, line 15, decrease the amount by 
     $28,655,998,936.50.
       On page 9, line 16, decrease the amount by 
     $28,655,998,936.50.
       On page 9, line 19, decrease the amount by 
     $29,239,318,915.30.
       On page 9, line 20, decrease the amount by 
     $29,239,318,915.30.
       On page 9, line 23, decrease the amount by 
     $29,824,105,293.60.
       On page 9, line 24, decrease the amount by 
     $29,824,105,293.60.
       On page 10, line 2, decrease the amount by 
     $30,420,587,399.40.
       On page 10, line 3, decrease the amount by 
     $30,420,587,399.40.
       On page 10, line 6, decrease the amount by 
     $31,028,999,147.40.
       On page 10, line 7, decrease the amount by 
     $31,028,999,147.40.
       On page 10, line 10, decrease the amount by 
     $31,649,579,130.40.
       On page 10, line 11, decrease the amount by 
     $31,649,579,130.40.
       On page 18, line 23, increase the amount by 
     $26,482,952,000.
       On page 18, line 24, increase the amount by 
     $26,482,952,000.
       On page 19, line 2, increase the amount by $27,012,611,040.
       On page 19, line 3, increase the amount by $27,012,611,040.
       On page 19, line 6, increase the amount by 
     $27,552,863,260.80.
       On page 19, line 7, increase the amount by 
     $27,552,863,260.80.
       On page 19, line 10, increase the amount by 
     $28,103,920,526.
       On page 19, line 11, increase the amount by 
     $28,103,920,526.
       On page 19, line 14, increase the amount by 
     $28,655,998,936.50.

[[Page S451]]

       On page 19, line 15, increase the amount by 
     $28,655,998,936.50.
       On page 19, line 18, increase the amount by 
     $29,239,318,915.30.
       On page 19, line 19, increase the amount by 
     $29,239,318,915.30.
       On page 19, line 22, increase the amount by 
     $29,824,105,293.60.
       On page 19, line 23, increase the amount by 
     $29,824,105,293.60.
       On page 20, line 2, increase the amount by 
     $30,420,587,399.40.
       On page 20, line 3, increase the amount by 
     $30,420,587,399.40.
       On page 20, line 6, increase the amount by 
     $31,028,999,147.40.
       On page 20, line 7, increase the amount by 
     $31,028,999,147.40.
       On page 20, line 10, increase the amount by 
     $31,649,579,130.40.
       On page 20, line 11, increase the amount by 
     $31,649,579,130.40.

  Mr. PAUL. Probably nothing makes Americans madder than to see their 
hard-earned tax dollars sent overseas to boondoggle after boondoggle--
countries that laugh at us, burn our flag, take our money, and then ask 
for more. Meanwhile, our roads and bridges are crumbling in our 
country. We can't fix our own infrastructure because we keep building 
roads and bridges in other countries.
  My amendment would take the $26 billion we send in foreign aid 
welfare and keep it here and put it into our infrastructure in our 
country.
  I urge a ``yes'' vote.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Vermont.
  Mr. SANDERS. I urge a ``no'' vote on the amendment.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from South Carolina.
  Mr. GRAHAM. Mr. President, I know it is late, but this is important. 
I have been to Iraq and Afghanistan 56 times. If you think this makes 
us safe, cutting all assistance to all allies everywhere--people are 
fighting and dying on behalf of this country. The least we can do, if 
you are in the fight, make sure you can come home and not have to go 
back. The best way to continue endless wars is to ignore the fact that 
when we leave, bad things happen.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 441

  Mr. SCHUMER. Vote.
  Mr. PAUL. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The legislative clerk called the roll.
  The result was announced--yeas 8, nays 92, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 39 Leg.]

                                YEAS--8

     Blackburn
     Braun
     Hagerty
     Lee
     Lummis
     Paul
     Scott (FL)
     Tuberville

                                NAYS--92

     Baldwin
     Barrasso
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Blunt
     Booker
     Boozman
     Brown
     Burr
     Cantwell
     Capito
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Coons
     Cornyn
     Cortez Masto
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Ernst
     Feinstein
     Fischer
     Gillibrand
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hassan
     Hawley
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kaine
     Kelly
     Kennedy
     King
     Klobuchar
     Lankford
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Manchin
     Markey
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Portman
     Reed
     Risch
     Romney
     Rosen
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sanders
     Sasse
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Scott (SC)
     Shaheen
     Shelby
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Sullivan
     Tester
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wicker
     Wyden
     Young
  The amendment (No. 441) was rejected.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Utah.


                           Amendment No. 770

  Mr. LEE. I call up my amendment No. 770 and ask that it be reported 
by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Utah [Mr. Lee] proposes an amendment 
     numbered 770.

  The amendment is as follows:

(Purpose: To let Federal revenues reflect continued leasing of oil and 
                         gas on Federal lands)

       On page 3, line 12, increase the amount by $1,629,000,000.
       On page 3, line 13, increase the amount by $1,629,000,000.
       On page 3, line 14, increase the amount by $1,629,000,000.
       On page 3, line 15, increase the amount by $1,629,000,000.
       On page 3, line 16, increase the amount by $1,629,000,000.

  Mr. LEE. Mr. President, the Biden administration has taken early and 
sweeping steps to halt oil and gas leasing on Federal public lands. 
This, in addition to being dangerous to our Nation's energy security, 
also presents a very significant economic threat to the stability of 
communities, especially in public-land States like mine, where most of 
our energy is found, where their economies are going to be shut down.
  This amendment would allow the budget numbers to reflect ongoing 
lease revenues that would go to the States and to the Federal 
Government. We need this, and I encourage my colleagues to support it.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Vermont.
  Mr. SANDERS. Mr. President, at a time when climate change poses an 
existential threat to the entire planet, I urge a ``no'' vote.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 770

  Mr. LEE. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The bill clerk called the roll
  The result was announced--yeas 50, nays 50, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 40 Leg.]

                                YEAS--50

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--50

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Manchin
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden
  The amendment (No. 770) was rejected.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Texas.


                           Amendment No. 811

  Mr. CRUZ. Mr. President, I call up my amendment No. 811, and I ask 
that it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The bill clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Texas [Mr. Cruz] proposes an amendment 
     numbered 811.

  The amendment is as follows:

 (Purpose: To create a point of order against the consideration of any 
  legislation that increases employment-based visas until the United 
   States' labor market stabilizes and unemployment levels reach pre-
   pandemic levels, ensuring that Congress prioritizes the needs of 
     American workers who have lost their jobs due to the pandemic)

       At the appropriate place in title IV, insert the following:

     SEC. 4___. POINT OF ORDER AGAINST LEGISLATION THAT INCREASES 
                   THE NUMBER OF VISAS AVAILABLE FOR FOREIGN 
                   WORKERS WHILE AMERICAN UNEMPLOYMENT REMAINS 
                   HIGH.

       (a) Point of Order.--It shall not be in order in the Senate 
     to consider any bill, joint resolution, motion, amendment, 
     amendment between the Houses, or conference report that 
     increases, or has the effect of increasing, the number of 
     foreign workers in the United States by raising the number of 
     authorized employment-based immigrant or nonimmigrant visas 
     or by increasing the number of lawful permanent residents 
     until the United States reaches a seasonally adjusted 
     unemployment rate of 3.5 percent, which was the rate on 
     February 1, 2020--shortly before the COVID-19 pandemic caused 
     an economic crisis, resulting in significant American job 
     losses.

[[Page S452]]

       (b) Waiver and Appeal.--Subsection (a) may be waived or 
     suspended in the Senate only by an affirmative vote of three-
     fifths of the Members, duly chosen and sworn. An affirmative 
     vote of three-fifths of the Members of the Senate, duly 
     chosen and sworn, shall be required to sustain an appeal of 
     the ruling of the Chair on a point of order raised under 
     subsection (a).
  Mr. CRUZ. Mr. President, before this coronavirus pandemic hit this 
country, our economy was booming. Jobs were soaring. Over the last 
year, our country has suffered tens of millions of job losses.
  This amendment creates a point of order against any legislation that 
would increase legal immigration until we return to where we were 
before this pandemic.
  I believe in legal immigration. We are a country built by immigrants, 
but legal immigration is meant to serve the American economy, meant to 
benefit this country and American workers, and I do not believe we 
should be significantly increasing legal immigration at a time when 
tens of millions of Americans are out of work.
  So this amendment is designed to say: Let's put American workers 
first. When American workers go back to work, then we can discuss and 
consider legislation to increase legal immigration, but we shouldn't do 
so until the tens of millions of Americans who have lost their jobs 
return to work.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator's time has expired.
  The Senator from Illinois.
  Mr. DURBIN. Mr. President, the solution sounds so simple, and it is 
simply wrong. May I give you an example?
  Barring additional green cards for hundreds of thousands of immigrant 
workers stuck in the backlog won't help American workers since these 
immigrants are already working here. In fact, it would hurt American 
workers by creating an incentive to hire more guest workers who can be 
paid lower wages.
  This is not the approach we need for coronavirus immigration reform.


                             Point of Order

  Mr. President, I raise a point of order that the pending amendment is 
not germane to the underlying resolution. Therefore, it violates 
section 305(b)(2) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Texas.


                            Motion to Waive

  Mr. CRUZ. Mr. President, pursuant to section 904 of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974 and the waiver provisions of the applicable budget 
resolutions, I move to waive all the applicable sections of the act and 
the applicable budget resolutions for purposes of amendment 811, and I 
ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The legislative clerk called the roll.
  The yeas and nays resulted--yeas 40, nays 60, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 41 Leg.]

                                YEAS--40

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Scott (FL)
     Shelby
     Tillis
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--60

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Collins
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Fischer
     Gillibrand
     Graham
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Manchin
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murkowski
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Paul
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Sasse
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Scott (SC)
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Sullivan
     Tester
     Thune
     Toomey
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyde
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. On this vote, the yeas are 40, the nays are 
60.
  Three-fifths of the Senators duly chosen and sworn not having voted 
in the affirmative, the motion is rejected.
  The point of order is sustained, and the amendment falls.
  The Senator from Florida.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 872

  Mr. SCOTT of Florida. Mr. President, I call up my amendment No. 872, 
and I ask that it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Florida [Mr. Scott] proposes an amendment 
     numbered 872.

  The amendment is as follows:

    (Purpose: To amend the reconciliation instructions for certain 
committees to fund border security and to ensure the enforcement of all 
                           immigration laws)

       On page 47, line 23, strike ``$940,718,000,000'' and insert 
     ``$920,718,000,000''.
       On page 49, line 10, strike ``$1,296,487,000,000'' and 
     insert ``$1,276,487,000,000''.
       On page 50, line 2, strike ``$50,687,000,000'' and insert 
     ``$70,687,000,000''.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Florida.
  Mr. SCOTT of Florida. Mr. President, President Biden's proposed plan 
of open borders and amnesty isn't about practical reforms; it is a 
radical and dangerous subversion of law and order with no effort to 
secure the border. We can and must do better.
  To proceed is reckless and unfair to the American people, kills 
American jobs, and prevents countless families from pursuing the 
opportunity to chase their American dream. American innovation and our 
unique culture are built on legal immigration.
  I am from the great State of Florida. We love immigration in Florida, 
but it has to be legal. We have to give law enforcement and Border 
Patrol the resources they need to do their job, protect American 
families, and stem the tide of the rampant and unyielding illegal 
immigration we have seen for decades at the southern border.
  This amendment ensures that all applicable U.S. Government agencies 
enforce all immigration laws and provides $20 billion for border 
security. I ask everyone to support this amendment.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Oregon.
  Mr. WYDEN. Mr. President, this amendment would cut $20 billion from 
Finance to fund homeland security matters--probably a fence. I strongly 
oppose it. This amendment would cut funds for unemployment insurance, 
payments for families, for things like a border wall that have taken 
our immigration policy backward, not forward.
  Colleagues, I would urge a ``no'' vote.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Florida.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 872

  Mr. SCOTT of Florida. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The bill clerk called the roll
  The result was announced--yeas 50, nays 50, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 42 Leg.]

                                YEAS--50

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--50

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Manchin
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden
  The amendment (No. 872) is rejected.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from West Virginia.


                           Amendment No. 655

  Mrs. CAPITO. Mr. President, I call up my amendment numbered 655 and 
ask that it be reported by number.

[[Page S453]]

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report by number.
  The legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from West Virginia [Mrs. Capito], for herself 
     and Mr. Hoeven, proposes an amendment numbered 655.

  The amendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
 preserving the continued implementation of the consistent, clear, and 
 functional catergories and exclusions of jurisdictional waters in the 
                   Navigable Waters Protection Rule)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO FEDERAL 
                   ENVIRONMENTAL AND WATER POLICIES.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     Federal environmental and water policies, which may include 
     ensuring the effective and efficient implementation of the 
     Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.), 
     preserving consistency and certainty in defining water 
     features within, and exclusions from, Federal jurisdiction 
     under that Act, or limiting or prohibiting efforts to 
     withdraw, revoke, or amend the final rule of the Corps of 
     Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency entitled 
     ``The Navigable Waters Protection Rule: Definition of `Waters 
     of the United States' '' (85 Fed. Reg. 22250 (April 21, 
     2020)), by the amounts provided in such legislation for those 
     purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase 
     the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal 
     years 2021 through 2025 or the period of the total of fiscal 
     years 2021 through 2030.

  Mrs. CAPITO. Mr. President, we know the burden that implementing the 
2015 WOTUS rule would have had on farming, agriculture, energy 
production, and construction activities across this country and in our 
State of West Virginia. The legal challenges that followed resulted in 
years of uncertainty and confusion.
  Finally, in 2020, the EPA announced the Navigable Waters Protection 
Rule as a replacement. It is clear, commonsense policy, and States like 
it. As a matter of fact, the Navigable Waters Rule is now in effect in 
49 States. President Biden has revoked President Trump's executive 
order that led to the Navigable Waters Rule, making it likely the rule 
will be revisited in this administration. Replacing this Navigable 
Waters Rule with something like the 2015 WOTUS rule would completely 
redefine and reframe all water policy and devastate farmers, 
manufacturers, and small business owners.
  We have had enough uncertainty. Let's not create more. This amendment 
would preserve the continued implementation of the Navigable Waters 
Rule. I urge my colleagues to vote in favor of this amendment.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Delaware.
  Mr. CARPER. Mr. President, I would note an irony here: Native of West 
Virginia offering an amendment, objected to by a native of West 
Virginia, presided by a native of West Virginia.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Well represented.
  Mr. CARPER. The Navigable Waters Protection Rule fails to provide 
consistent, clear, and functional categories and exclusions of 
jurisdictional water that are asserted by this amendment.
  The rule also fails to provide critical headwaters and wetlands from 
pollution. That is jeopardizing the source of drinking water for over 
100 million Americans. The Trump rule's failure to protect headwaters 
and wetlands will ensure the transport of pollution downstream, 
contaminating water resources, compromising ecosystem health, and 
enforcing downstream communities to spend unavailable funds to upgrade 
water treatment facilities.
  And, finally, this amendment would have the effects of grading water 
quality, thus forcing new burdens on downstream, disadvantaged 
communities and forcing cities and towns to find resources long lost to 
the battle against COVID to ensure clean drinking water for their 
citizens.
  Reluctantly, I must urge my colleagues to oppose this amendment.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 655

  Mrs. CAPITO. Mr. President, I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER (Mr. Murphy). Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The legislative clerk proceeded to call the roll
  The result was announced--yeas 51, nays 49, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 43 Leg.]

                                YEAS--51

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Manchin
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--49

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden
  The amendment (No. 655) was agreed to.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Oklahoma.


                           Amendment No. 837

  Mr. LANKFORD. Mr. President, I would like to call up my amendment No. 
837 and ask it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Oklahoma (Mr. Lankford) proposes an 
     amendment numbered 837.

  The amendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
          Federal relief funds for State or local governments)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO FEDERAL 
                   RELIEF FUNDS FOR STATE OR LOCAL GOVERNMENTS.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports, relating to 
     adjustments to Federal relief funds for State or local 
     governments within the jurisdiction of the instructed 
     committees, which may include limitations on new or existing 
     Federal COVID-19 relief payments to a State or locality that 
     imposes greater limits on the content of speech, or 
     restrictions on the religious exercise or belief, of houses 
     of worship and faith-based organizations described in section 
     501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 and exempt 
     from taxation under section 501(a) of such Code, than on 
     secular organizations described in that section 501(c)(3) and 
     exempt under that section 501(a), by the amounts provided in 
     such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
     legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Oklahoma.
  Mr. LANKFORD. The First Amendment of our Constitution states that 
Congress shall make no law prohibiting the free exercise of religion. 
This has not been a controversial thing in our history and also does 
not have an asterisk next to it saying, ``Unless there is a pandemic.''
  We don't restrict freedom of religion. We just don't do that. This 
has been a great debate in our Nation over the past year as we have 
seen restrictions on churches and mosques and on synagogues.
  This is a very simple statement. All this is asking for is to make 
sure that we treat faithbased entities the same as we do 
secular entities. It is not asking for special treatment. It is saying 
that if you treat a bar one way, then a block away, you have to treat a 
synagogue the same way; if you treat a store one way, a block away, if 
there is a church, you have to treat them the same way; if there are 
outdoor gatherings that are allowed in the city, there has to be 
outdoor religious gatherings also allowed.
  It is asking for the same treatment, not special treatment. That is 
all that this is--to try to affirm this.

[[Page S454]]

  I didn't think this would be controversial. Quite frankly, I thought 
this would be something we could voice vote, but I am understanding 
this is something we may actually have to take a vote on.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Illinois.
  Mr. DURBIN. In the course of the last year, more than 425,000 
Americans died. We all know the story, and we know it personally.
  Elected officials at every level have been called on to respond to 
this pandemic. Mayors and Governors have had to make critical public 
health choices they didn't believe they would ever face in their 
professional lives. They had to decide whether certain businesses would 
be opened or closed, when to open and close schools, whether or not 
they would have churches that would be open. It was a myriad of 
opportunities to make the right decision or the wrong decision.
  Some of them learned the hard way. Some were courageous; some were 
not. Some listened to the scientific community and some ignored it. But 
I believe most of them tried to do their best.
  Sadly, when it was all said and done, many made wrong decisions in 
terms of when to open and how many people to allow in certain places. 
It was just a fact of life--a novel coronavirus--and they were trying 
to respond to infection and death.
  Sadly, what the Senator from Oklahoma is charging is if there was a 
discrimination against a church in the process--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator's time has expired.
  Mr. DURBIN. The people in the community would be penalized to receive 
less Federal funds because of the decision the Governor had made.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator's time has expired.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 837

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the amendment.
  Mr. LANKFORD. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The bill clerk called the roll.
  The result was announced--yeas 51, nays 49, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 44 Leg.]

                                YEAS--51

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Manchin
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--49

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden
  The amendment (No. 837) was agreed to.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The majority leader.
  Mr. SCHUMER. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that, upon 
disposition of the Lankford amendment, No. 837, it be in order to call 
up the following amendments in the order listed, the amendments be 
reported by number, and the amendments alternate with a Democratic 
amendment when one is available to be called up: Crapo No. 55, Hoeven 
No. 887, Portman No. 816, Romney No. 803, and Lee No. 253.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection?
  Without objection, it is so ordered.
  The Senator from Idaho.


                            Amendment No. 55

  Mr. CRAPO. Mr. President, I call up my amendment, No. 55, and ask 
that it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The bill clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Idaho [Mr. Crapo], for himself and Mr. 
     Portman, proposes an amendment numbered 55.

  The amendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
 permanently extending the income tax rate reductions for individuals 
         and small businesses provided under Public Law 115-97)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PERMANENT 
                   EXTENSION OF LOWER TAX RATES FOR INDIVIDUALS 
                   AND SMALL BUSINESSES.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     reducing the tax liability of individuals and small 
     businesses, which may include permanently extending the 
     reductions to Federal income tax rates for individuals and 
     small businesses provided under Public Law 115-97, by the 
     amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
     provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
     over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2030.

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Idaho.
  Mr. CRAPO. Mr. President, this amendment simply makes permanent the 
individual and small business tax rate reductions and reforms from the 
TCJA.
  The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, the TCJA, gave American workers and 
families more cash in their pockets by significantly lowering 
individual tax rates, nearly doubling the standard deduction, and 
doubling the child tax credit. For American businesses, the TCJA 
lowered the tax rate and provided parity for small businesses operating 
in passthrough form. It also encouraged investment in the United States 
through the immediate expensing of property and equipment.
  From the beginning of the previous administration up to the beginning 
of the pandemic early last year, the economy added more than 7 million 
jobs. Every U.S. metropolitan area had enjoyed income gains in 2018. 
Low-income workers were experiencing the highest wage growth in nearly 
a decade.
  We need to give our economy its best shot at recovering to 
prepandemic levels. This means strengthening that pro-growth policy we 
have put into place by making permanent these expiring tax provisions 
from the TCJA.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator's time has expired.
  The Senator from Oregon.
  Mr. WYDEN. Mr. President, this now will put the Senate on record as 
to what the Senate thinks about the 2017 Trump tax law--the $2 trillion 
bill that overwhelmingly benefited corporations and the wealthy. It 
opened new special interest loopholes, and it increased incentives to 
ship American jobs overseas.
  The Senate needs to fix our broken Tax Code, starting with the 
proposition that everybody, including those at the top, pay their fair 
share. Locking in the Trump tax handouts to those at the top would take 
America in the wrong direction. This is not the vehicle to debate these 
tax changes. I strongly urge a ``no'' vote.


                        Vote on Amendment No. 55

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the amendment.
  Mr. CRAPO. Mr. President, I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There is a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The legislative clerk called the roll
  The result was announced--yeas 50, nays 50, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 45 Leg.]

                                YEAS--50

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski

[[Page S455]]


     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--50

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Manchin
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden
  The amendment (No. 55) was rejected.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from North Dakota.


                           Amendment No. 887

  Mr. HOEVEN. Mr. President, I call up my amendment No. 887 and ask 
that it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from North Dakota [Mr. Hoeven] proposes an 
     amendment numbered 887.

  The amendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
prohibiting a Federal carbon tax and preventing American job losses and 
  regressive household utility bill, home heating, and gasoline price 
                               increases)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   PROHIBITING ESTABLISHMENT OF FEDERAL TAX ON 
                   CARBON EMISSIONS.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     changes in Federal tax laws, which may include limiting or 
     prohibiting the establishment of a Federal tax on carbon 
     emissions, by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
     those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
     increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
     fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the period of the total of 
     fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

  Mr. HOEVEN. Mr. President, this amendment ensures that we don't 
implement a carbon tax, and I am joined on it by Senator Lankford and 
Senator Cramer.
  Simply put, a carbon tax is a national energy tax, and it is a 
regressive tax. Raising the cost of energy through a tax or fee hits 
hard-working families the most, making it more expensive to heat their 
homes, drive to work, and put food on the table.
  In addition to keeping the lights on, every sector of our economy 
depends on access to affordable and reliable supplies of energy. A 
carbon tax increases the cost on our manufacturers, exporting American 
jobs abroad to other countries with fewer environmental regulations, 
meaning global emissions would actually increase. Instead of pushing 
new taxes, we must, instead, focus on innovation and making emerging 
technologies like carbon capture, utilization, and storage, or CCUS, 
commercially viable.
  I urge my colleagues to vote yes on this amendment.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator's time has expired.
  The Senator from Oregon.
  Mr. WYDEN. Mr. President and colleagues, I strongly urge opposition 
to this amendment. It simply makes no sense to take any tool--any 
tool--off the table in the existential fight against climate change.
  Obstructing the fight against climate change costs money due to 
cleanups from bigger storms, fires, and floods, and it costs America 
jobs.
  Move over, this is a budget focused on COVID recovery. This is a 
separate issue, colleagues, and it deserves its own debate. I would 
urge a ``no'' vote.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from North Dakota.
  Mr. HOEVEN. Mr. President, stand up for working families and vote 
yes.
  I ask for the yeas and nays.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 887

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The bill clerk called the roll
  The result was announced--yeas 50, nays 50, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 46 Leg.]

                                YEAS--50

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--50

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Manchin
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden
  The amendment (No. 887) was rejected.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Ohio.


                           Amendment No. 816

  Mr. PORTMAN. Mr. President, I call up my amendment No. 816 and ask 
that it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, the clerk will report the 
amendment by number.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Ohio [Mr. Portman] proposes an amendment 
     numbered 816.

  The amendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
    requiring the President to keep the people of the United States 
informed, through a website, of the amount of funds made available for 
       relief from the COVID-19 pandemic that have been expended)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROVIDING 
                   INFORMATION ONLINE REGARDING THE EXPENDITURE OF 
                   COVID-19 RELIEF FUNDS.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     increasing Government spending transparency, which may 
     include requiring the President to make available online 
     information regarding the amount of funds made available for 
     relief from the COVID-19 pandemic that have been expended, by 
     the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
     provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
     over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2030.

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Ohio.
  Mr. PORTMAN. Colleagues, this amendment shouldn't even be necessary, 
but it is.
  We are being asked to spend another $1.9 trillion to deal with the 
coronavirus pandemic, and yet we have no idea how much of the $900 
billion that we just enacted 5\1/2\ weeks ago has gone out the door. We 
don't know. We don't know how it has been used.
  For that matter, we don't know how much of the roughly $2 trillion of 
additional coronavirus funding has gone out the door. So we need to 
have that information to be able to legislate responsibly, to be sure 
that we are doing the right thing here to help the folks whom we 
represent.
  I am going to ask for a voice vote on this. I hope we get it, but I 
would also like to yield to my colleague from West Virginia, Mr. 
Manchin.
  Mr. MANCHIN. Mr. President, I also support this and, I think, 
basically, that transparency is something we all want, and that is all 
we have asked for--to see the numbers and work from there in an honest 
fashion.
  I support it.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Vermont.
  Mr. SANDERS. Mr. President, I support this amendment. I hope we can 
do it through a voice vote.

[[Page S456]]

  



                       Vote on Amendment No. 816

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the amendment.
  The amendment (No. 816) was agreed to.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Utah.


                           Amendment No. 803

  Mr. ROMNEY. Mr. President, I call up my amendment No. 803 and ask it 
be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, the clerk will report the 
amendment by number.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Utah [Mr. Romney], for himself and others, 
     proposes an amendment numbered 803.

  The amendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
creating bipartisan congressional committees to improve the solvency of 
                       major Federal trust funds)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO IMPROVING 
                   THE SOLVENCY OF FEDERAL TRUST FUNDS.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     improving the solvency of major Federal trust funds, which 
     may include developing recommendations and legislation to 
     rescue programs that support surface transportation, health 
     care services, and financial protection and security for 
     individuals, by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
     those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
     increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
     fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the period of the total of 
     fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

  Mr. ROMNEY. Mr. President, the most predictable fiscal crisis our 
Nation faces is the looming insolvency of our Federal trust funds. That 
is why a group of 12 Senators put together an act to enable Congress to 
get ahead of this problem before it becomes insoluble.
  These colleagues include Democrat Senators Manchin, Warner, Sinema, 
King, and Jones.
  Last year we introduced this legislation called the TRUST Act to 
create three bipartisan, bicameral committees to rescue each of our 
major trust funds. This enables Congress to form those committees.
  I would note that failure to do so would imperil the solvency of the 
Social Security and Medicare trust funds and speed us along the road 
even further to crushing national debt.
  I am happy to take this amendment by voice vote, but I yield my time 
to Senator Angus King.
  Mr. KING. Mr. President, this is a looming financial crisis that 
everyone in this room knows is happening, and it is one that we can 
prevent, but every day we delay it gets harder.
  This is a very reasonable approach, putting a bipartisan group 
together to bring us solutions.
  I urge my colleagues to support this and hope we can pass this 
amendment by voice vote.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Vermont.
  Mr. SANDERS. Mr. President, I regretfully oppose this amendment 
because I fear, at the end of the day, what will happen is that we will 
be cutting Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid, and impacting some 
of the most vulnerable people in this country.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 803

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the amendment.
  Mr. SANDERS. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There does not appear to be a sufficient second.
  Mr. SCHUMER. Mr. President, I suggest the absence of a quorum.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk proceeded to call the roll.
  Mr. SCHUMER. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that the order 
for the quorum call be rescinded.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  Mr. SCHUMER. Mr. President, I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk called the roll
  The result was announced--yeas 71, nays 29, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 47 Leg.]

                                YEAS--71

     Barrasso
     Bennet
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cardin
     Carper
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Coons
     Cornyn
     Cortez Masto
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Ernst
     Feinstein
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hassan
     Hawley
     Hickenlooper
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kaine
     Kennedy
     King
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Manchin
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Merkley
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Murphy
     Paul
     Peters
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rosen
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shaheen
     Shelby
     Sinema
     Sullivan
     Tester
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Warner
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--29

     Baldwin
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Casey
     Gillibrand
     Heinrich
     Hirono
     Kelly
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Markey
     Menendez
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Reed
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Van Hollen
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden
  The amendment (No. 803) was agreed to.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Utah.


                           Amendment No. 253

  Mr. LEE. Mr. President, I call up my amendment No. 253 and ask that 
it be reported by number.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Utah [Mr. Lee], for himself and others, 
     proposes an amendment numbered 253.

  The amendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
                   expanding health savings accounts)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO EXPANDING 
                   HEALTH SAVINGS ACCOUNTS.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     expanding health savings accounts by the amounts provided in 
     such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
     legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.
  Mr. LEE. Mr. President, health savings accounts are good for the 
American people. They increase the availability that families have--the 
access that families have to healthcare. They make it more affordable, 
and they also bring about competition in healthcare, which tends to 
bring up quality and also bring down cost. That is good for everyone.
  Now, the expansion of the use of health savings accounts could be 
encouraged by allowing any health insurance plan to be considered HSA 
eligible, by increasing the maximum HSA contributions, and by allowing 
for more preventive and health maintenance expenses to be covered, 
including the use of dietary supplements and nutritional supplements. 
This would not directly affect ObamaCare, and expanding HSAs would 
simply give Americans more opportunities and would bring down cost 
while increasing the quality of the healthcare they receive.
  I urge my colleagues to support this amendment.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Oregon.
  Mr. WYDEN. Mr. President, I rise in opposition to the amendment. This 
is an amendment, once again, that tries to stack the deck in terms of 
healthcare choices, and, in this case, the proponents want to make 
health savings accounts the driving force of the American healthcare 
system. I think that is a mistake.
  I urge a ``no'' vote.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 253

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the amendment.
  Mr. LEE. I call for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.

[[Page S457]]

  The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant bill clerk called the roll.
  The result was announced--yeas 53, nays 47, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 48 Leg.]

                                YEAS--53

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kelly
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Manchin
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sinema
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--47

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden
  The amendment (No. 253) was agreed to.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The majority leader.
  Mr. SCHUMER. Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that it be in 
order to call up the following amendments in the order listed, the 
amendments be reported by number, and the amendments alternate with a 
Democratic amendment when one is available.
  We are not doing the Lee amendment. He withdrew it. Kudos to Mr. Lee.
  We have Cruz No. 871, Murkowski No. 806, Sullivan No. 461, Rubio No. 
651, and Sanders No. 804.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection?
  Without objection, it is so ordered.
  Mr. SCHUMER. Mr. President, before we go to the amendment, please sit 
in your--we are getting closer to the end. When everyone was in their 
seats, it took us only 5 minutes to do these. Could people please 
resume sitting in their seats.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Texas.


                           Amendment No. 871

  Mr. CRUZ. Mr. President, I call up my amendment No. 871 and ask that 
it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Texas [Mr. Cruz] proposes an amendment 
     numbered 871.

  The amendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
           conventional biofuel credit cap during a pandemic)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

      SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   CONVENTIONAL BIOFUEL CREDIT CAP DURING A 
                   PANDEMIC.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     reducing compliance costs and supporting job creation, 
     including the EPA Administrator making available for sale to 
     obligated parties conventional biofuel credits at 10 cents 
     per gallon, during any period in which a national emergency 
     has been declared with respect to a pandemic, by the amounts 
     provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided 
     that such legislation would not increase the deficit over 
     either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2030.

  Mr. CRUZ. Mr. President, this amendment is designed to provide relief 
to the tens of thousands of blue collar workers that work in refineries 
across this country. Refineries right now purchase what are called 
RINs, which are artificial regulatory licenses that they must purchase. 
They were originally designed to be at 1 or 2 cents apiece. In the past 
year, they have skyrocketed. In the past year, RINs have skyrocketed up 
to $1.12 apiece, the highest level since 2013. That is a 650-percent 
increase in the past year. Just a year ago they were trading at 15 
cents. What does that mean? That means $15 billion in regulatory cost 
for refineries.
  And let me say something importantly: Not one penny of that $15 
billion goes to corn farmers or ethanol producers. It goes to Wall 
Street speculators. So this amendment would provide--it would cap RINs 
at 10 cents apiece. What that would mean is this is a choice between do 
you want millions of dollars to go to Wall Street speculators or do you 
want the money to go to blue collar workers and refineries?
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Iowa.
  Mr. GRASSLEY. Mr. President, I want to speak in opposition to it. I 
ask unanimous consent to speak for 1 minute.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there objection?
  Without objection, the Senator from Iowa is recognized for 1 minute.
  Mr. GRASSLEY. Mr. President, can you imagine the free market person 
that Senator Cruz is wanting the government to set prices? This is 
dirty Big Oil versus clean-burning ethanol.
  (Applause.)
  And for the benefit of people on the other side of the aisle, I had 
conversations with Mr. Regan this week. He said that your President--
our President--was for ethanol. He also said, and I know, campaigning 
in Iowa, Biden campaigned for ethanol.
  So this is an opportunity. And this business that this isn't going to 
cost anything--EPA itself said that there is no compliance cost. And 
EPA in the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals made very clear that these 
waivers for small refineries were violating the law.
  (Applause.)
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Illinois.
  Ms. DUCKWORTH. Mr. President, this amendment is a direct attack on 
the Midwest and America's hundreds of thousands of farmers. Capping the 
price of biofuel credits at 10 cents per gallon would stifle the RIN 
market and destroy the Renewable Fuel Standard Program.
  When my good friend the Senator from Texas last proposed this 10 cent 
cap in 2017 and 2018, it was opposed by the National Corn Growers 
Association, the American Soybean Association, and the American Farm 
Bureau, to name just a few. Now, farmers get up pretty darn early in 
the morning, but, even tonight, I did not bother to call any of these 
associations to get their response on this amendment.
  So I will quote the National Farmers Union's previous president, who, 
in 2017 and 2018, said that not only is a RIN cap harmful to American 
agriculture, it is a sellout of America's farmers and a handout to 
refiners.
  America's corn and soybean growers have suffered for years under the 
Trump administration's anti-biofuel policies.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator's time has expired.
  Ms. DUCKWORTH. I urge all my colleagues to oppose this amendment.
  (Applause.)


                       Vote on Amendment No. 871

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the amendment.
  Mr. CRUZ. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk called the roll.
  The result was announced--yeas 26, nays 74, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 49 Leg.]

                                YEAS--26

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Cornyn
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Hagerty
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Manchin
     McConnell
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Risch
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker

                                NAYS--74

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Blunt
     Booker
     Boozman
     Braun
     Brown
     Burr
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Collins
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Ernst
     Feinstein
     Fischer
     Gillibrand
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hassan

[[Page S458]]


     Hawley
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Hoeven
     Johnson
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Markey
     Marshall
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Moran
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Portman
     Reed
     Romney
     Rosen
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sanders
     Sasse
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Scott (FL)
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Thune
     Tillis
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden
     Young
  The amendment (No. 871) was rejected.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Alaska.


                           Amendment No. 806

  Ms. MURKOWSKI. Mr. President, I call up my amendment No. 806 and ask 
that it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The senior assistant bill clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Alaska [Ms. Murkowski] proposes an 
     amendment numbered 806.

  The amendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
prohibiting actions by the executive branch that would make the United 
  States more reliant on countries with weaker environmental or labor 
        standards for oil, gas, or hardrock mineral production)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   PROHIBITING ACTIONS BY THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH 
                   THAT WOULD MAKE THE UNITED STATES MORE RELIANT 
                   ON COUNTRIES WITH WEAKER ENVIRONMENTAL OR LABOR 
                   STANDARDS FOR OIL, GAS, OR HARDROCK MINERAL 
                   PRODUCTION.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     prohibiting actions by the executive branch that would cause 
     the United States to import larger quantities of oil, gas, or 
     hardrock minerals from countries that have weaker 
     environmental or labor standards by the amounts provided in 
     such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
     legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

  Ms. MURKOWSKI. Mr. President, this one is pretty simple and, 
hopefully, it can be pretty agreeable and we move quickly.
  What I am aiming to do today is to prevent the executive branch from 
taking actions that increase our country's reliance on foreign sources 
of oil and gas or hard rock minerals. We are going to keep using oil 
and gas for a while here. I think we recognize that.
  The EIA, Energy Information Administration, forecasts consumption of 
oil and gas will rise by 5.6 million barrels per day this year and 
continue rising in the future. So what we are doing--what we are at 
risk of doing is to limit resource development in this country, put 
good-paying jobs at risk, including in my State, making States more 
dependent on fossil and mineral resources from overseas, oftentimes 
from our foreign adversaries.
  We have great resources in this country, folks--from natural gas that 
powers our homes; minerals like graphite and lithium, which we need in 
our renewable technologies, and we produce them here in this country in 
a more environmentally responsible manner--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator's time has expired.
  Ms. MURKOWSKI.--and with higher labor standards than elsewhere in the 
world.
  I would urge my colleagues to accept, and I would ask for a voice 
vote.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Vermont.
  Mr. SANDERS. Mr. President, we accept the amendment and urge a voice 
vote.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 806

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the adoption of 
the amendment.
  The amendment (No. 806) was agreed to.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Alaska.


                           Amendment No. 461

  Mr. SULLIVAN. Mr. President, I call up my amendment No. 461 and ask 
that it be reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Alaska [Mr. Sullivan] proposes an 
     amendment numbered 461.

  The amendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
 expanding natural gas as a vital fuel source to reduce greenhouse gas 
 emissions and provide reliable and affordable heat, electricity, and 
                   transportation fuel for consumers)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO EXPANDING 
                   NATURAL GAS AS A VITAL FUEL SOURCE TO PROVIDE 
                   EMISSIONS REDUCTIONS, AFFORDABLE ENERGY PRICES 
                   FOR CONSUMERS, AND RELIABLE ELECTRICITY.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     expanding natural gas as a vital fuel source to reduce 
     greenhouse gas emissions and provide reliable and affordable 
     heat, electricity, and transportation fuel for consumers by 
     the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
     provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
     over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2030.

  Mr. SULLIVAN. Mr. President, prior to the pandemic over the last 
several years, our country did something remarkable. We grew our 
economy, created millions of good-paying energy jobs, and reduced 
greenhouse gas emissions.
  In fact, from 2005 to 2017, the United States reduced greenhouse gas 
emissions by almost 15 percent--way more than any other country in the 
world. How did we do that? The dramatic increase in America's 
production of clean-burning natural gas was largely responsible for all 
of this.
  So my amendment is very simple. It calls for the continued expansion 
of American natural gas production and energy infrastructure to create 
more jobs, grow our economy, and reduce greenhouse gas emissions.
  This is what President Biden said about this issue just a few years 
ago--
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator's time has expired.
  Mr. SULLIVAN. Are you sure you don't want to hear that?
  I urge my colleagues to support this commonsense, pro-jobs amendment. 
And I am happy to take this amendment by a voice vote.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Vermont.


                             Point of Order

  Mr. SANDERS. Mr. President, I have been advised that inclusion of 
this amendment in the budget resolution would be corrosive to the 
privilege status of the resolution. Since this amendment contains 
material inappropriate for inclusion in a budget resolution, its 
adoption could jeopardize the privilege of this resolution, which would 
completely halt our efforts to provide critical pandemic relief.
  Additionally, this amendment is not germane to the budget resolution 
as required by law. Accordingly, I raise a point of order that the 
pending amendment violates section 305(b)(2) of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Alaska.


                            Motion to Waive

  Mr. SULLIVAN. Mr. President, pursuant to section 904 of the 
Congressional Budget Act, I move to waive and ask for the yeas and 
nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant bill clerk called the roll
  The yeas and nays resulted--yeas 51, nays 49, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 50 Leg.]

                                YEAS--51

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Manchin
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman

[[Page S459]]


     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--49

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyde
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. On this vote, the yeas are 51, the nays are 
49.
  Three-fifths of the Senators duly chosen and sworn not having voted 
in the affirmative, the motion is rejected.
  The point of order is sustained, and the amendment falls.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Florida.


                           Amendment No. 651

  Mr. RUBIO. I call up my amendment 651 and ask that it be reported by 
number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Florida [Mr. Rubio] proposes an amendment 
     numbered 651.

  The amendment is as follows:

   (Purpose: To establish a deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to 
    catch-and-release policies and the Migrant Protection Protocols)

       At the end of title III, add the following:

     SEC. 3___. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO CATCH-
                   AND-RELEASE POLICIES AND MIGRANT PROTECTION 
                   PROTOCOLS.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     ensuring the enforcement of laws, consistent with the Migrant 
     Protection Protocols, by the amounts provided in such 
     legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
     legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

  Mr. RUBIO. Mr. President, starting 7 days ago, if you arrived at the 
border of the United States with children, you were allowed to stay in 
the country on a notice to appear.
  I have tremendous compassion for the extraordinary challenges and 
horrifying conditions in which people live in the Western Hemisphere 
and Central America and the like. There is nothing compassionate about 
this policy. What this is doing, what is happening right now--and I 
have seen it, and I have talked to people; you can talk to the 
government officials in these countries--is these evil traffickers who 
take money from these people, who push them through the jungles, who 
abuse them, who sometimes kill them and do horrifying things, are now 
out there marketing this. They are going around telling people 
throughout the Western Hemisphere: You can now get into the United 
States and come with children because, if you do, they are going to 
give you a little piece of paper, and they are going to let you go on a 
Greyhound bus anywhere you want in the country, and you never have to 
show up again.
  This is going to create chaos on the border, and it is inhumane to 
lure people to this country with a policy that is encouraging these 
traffickers to go out and do this to them.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The Senator from Illinois.
  Mr. DURBIN. The Senator from Florida is asking us to lock in the 
relationship with Remain in Mexico and the Migrant Protection 
Protocols. The new President, Joe Biden, is in the process of reviewing 
that at the very moment. The question is whether we are going to adopt 
the Rubio amendment and tie his hands to accept the outcome.
  Allow this President, elected by a large majority of the American 
people, a chance to lead and to respond to a real challenge. Vote no on 
the Rubio amendment.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 651

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on adoption of the amendment.
  Mr. BARRASSO. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk called the roll
  The result was announced--yeas 50, nays 50, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 51 Leg.]

                                YEAS--50

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--50

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Manchin
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyde
  The amendment (No. 651) was rejected.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The majority leader.


                           Amendment No. 888

  Mr. SCHUMER. Mr. President, I am about to offer a substitute 
amendment that is the last step we need to ensure that the House can 
move forward expeditiously and help bring the bold relief the American 
people so need.
  Mr. President, I ask unanimous consent that it be in order to call up 
amendment No. 888, and that if the amendment is agreed to, it be in 
order to call up the McConnell amendment; thereto, notwithstanding 
adoption of the Schumer-Sanders amendment 888, that these be the only 
amendments remaining in order.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Without objection, it is so ordered.
  Mr. SCHUMER. I call up my amendment No. 888 and ask that it be 
reported by number.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from New York [Mr. Schumer], for himself and 
     Mr. Sanders, proposes an amendment numbered 888.

  The amendment is as follows:
  (Purpose: In the nature of a substitute.)
  (The amendment is printed in today's Record under ``Text of 
Amendments.'')


                       Vote on Amendment No. 888

  The PRESIDING OFFICER. The question is on agreeing to the amendment.
  Mr. SCHUMER. I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The PRESIDING OFFICER. Is there a sufficient second?
  There appears to be a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The legislative clerk proceeded to call the roll
  The result was announced--yeas 50, nays 50, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 52 Leg.]

                                YEAS--50

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Manchin
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden

                                NAYS--50

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr

[[Page S460]]


     Capito
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young
  The VICE PRESIDENT. On this vote, the yeas are 50, the nays are 50.
  The Senate being equally divided, the Vice President votes in the 
affirmative, and the amendment is agreed to.
  The amendment (No. 888) was agreed to.
  The VICE PRESIDENT. The Republican leader.


                           Amendment No. 889

  Mr. McCONNELL. Madam President, I call up my amendment No. 889 and I 
ask that it be reported by number.
  The VICE PRESIDENT. The clerk will report the amendment by number.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk read as follows:

       The Senator from Kentucky [Mr. McConnell] proposes an 
     amendment numbered 889.

  The amendment is as follows:
  (Purpose: To improve the resolution.)
  (The amendment is printed in today's Record under ``Text of 
Amendments.'')
  Mr. McCONNELL. Colleagues, what they have done here is to reverse 
three important amendments that were adopted on a bipartisan basis. 
They, in effect, have taken out the proposal that prevented checks from 
going to illegals, they have taken out support for fracking, and they 
have taken out support for the Keystone Pipeline So they are trying to 
reverse what they previously adopted along with us on a bipartisan 
basis.

  I would urge the adoption of my amendment.


                       Vote on Amendment No. 889

  Mr. THUNE. Madam President, I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The VICE PRESIDENT. The question is on agreeing to the amendment.
  Is there a sufficient second?
  There is a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The senior assistant legislative clerk called the roll
  The result was announced--yeas 50, nays 50, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 53 Leg.]

                                YEAS--50

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young

                                NAYS--50

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Manchin
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden
  The amendment (No. 889) was rejected.
  The VICE PRESIDENT. The Senator from Vermont.
  Mr. SANDERS. Madam President, we now come to the end of a debate that 
has gone on for over 14 hours, and we end this debate at a moment in 
which our country faces more crises, more pain, and more anxiety than 
at any time since the Great Depression. With the passage of this 
resolution, we have the opportunity not only to address the pandemic, 
to address the economic collapse, and to address the reality that 
millions of our kids have seen their educations disrupted, but we have 
the opportunity to give hope to the American people and restore faith 
in our government by telling them that, tonight, we understand the pain 
that they are experiencing, and we are going to do something very 
significant about it.
  In the strongest possible terms, I ask for a ``yes'' vote on this 
enormously important budget resolution.


                         Vote on S. Con. Res. 5

  Mr. CARDIN. Madam President, I ask for the yeas and nays.
  The VICE PRESIDENT. The question is on agreeing to the concurrent 
resolution, as amended.
  Is there a sufficient second?
  There is a sufficient second.
  The clerk will call the roll.
  The legislative clerk called the roll.
  The yeas and nays resulted--yeas 50, nays 50, as follows:

                      [Rollcall Vote No. 54 Leg.]

                                YEAS--50

     Baldwin
     Bennet
     Blumenthal
     Booker
     Brown
     Cantwell
     Cardin
     Carper
     Casey
     Coons
     Cortez Masto
     Duckworth
     Durbin
     Feinstein
     Gillibrand
     Hassan
     Heinrich
     Hickenlooper
     Hirono
     Kaine
     Kelly
     King
     Klobuchar
     Leahy
     Lujan
     Manchin
     Markey
     Menendez
     Merkley
     Murphy
     Murray
     Ossoff
     Padilla
     Peters
     Reed
     Rosen
     Sanders
     Schatz
     Schumer
     Shaheen
     Sinema
     Smith
     Stabenow
     Tester
     Van Hollen
     Warner
     Warnock
     Warren
     Whitehouse
     Wyden

                                NAYS--50

     Barrasso
     Blackburn
     Blunt
     Boozman
     Braun
     Burr
     Capito
     Cassidy
     Collins
     Cornyn
     Cotton
     Cramer
     Crapo
     Cruz
     Daines
     Ernst
     Fischer
     Graham
     Grassley
     Hagerty
     Hawley
     Hoeven
     Hyde-Smith
     Inhofe
     Johnson
     Kennedy
     Lankford
     Lee
     Lummis
     Marshall
     McConnell
     Moran
     Murkowski
     Paul
     Portman
     Risch
     Romney
     Rounds
     Rubio
     Sasse
     Scott (FL)
     Scott (SC)
     Shelby
     Sullivan
     Thune
     Tillis
     Toomey
     Tuberville
     Wicker
     Young
  The VICE PRESIDENT. On this vote, the yeas are 50, the nays are 50.
  The Senate being equally divided, the Vice President votes in the 
affirmative, and the concurrent resolution, as amended, is adopted.
  The concurrent resolution (S. Con Res. 5), as amended, was agreed to.

                             S. Con. Res. 5

       Resolved by the Senate (the House of Representatives 
     concurring),

     SECTION 1. CONCURRENT RESOLUTION ON THE BUDGET FOR FISCAL 
                   YEAR 2021.

       (a) Declaration.--Congress declares that this resolution is 
     the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2021 
     and that this resolution sets forth the appropriate budgetary 
     levels for fiscal years 2022 through 2030.
       (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this 
     concurrent resolution is as follows:

Sec. 1. Concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2021.

                TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

              Subtitle A--Budgetary Levels in Both Houses

Sec. 1101. Recommended levels and amounts.
Sec. 1102. Major functional categories.

              Subtitle B--Levels and Amounts in the Senate

Sec. 1201. Social security in the Senate.
Sec. 1202. Postal Service discretionary administrative expenses in the 
              Senate.

                        TITLE II--RECONCILIATION

Sec. 2001. Reconciliation in the House of Representatives.
Sec. 2002. Reconciliation in the Senate.

                        TITLE III--RESERVE FUNDS

Sec. 3001. Reserve fund for reconciliation legislation.
Sec. 3002. Reserve fund for deficit-neutral legislation.
Sec. 3003. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to establishing a fund 
              to provide grants to food service and drinking 
              establishments affected by the COVID-19 pandemic.
Sec. 3004. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to preventing tax 
              increases on small businesses during a pandemic.
Sec. 3005. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to the authority of 
              States and other taxing jurisdictions to tax certain 
              income of employees working in other States or taxing 
              jurisdictions.
Sec. 3006. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to targeting economic 
              impact payments to Americans who are suffering from the 
              effects of COVID-19.
Sec. 3007. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to COVID-19 vaccine 
              administration and a public awareness campaign.
Sec. 3008. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to supporting 
              elementary and secondary schools in States with lost 
              revenue due to the Federal moratorium on oil and natural 
              gas leasing on public lands and offshore waters.

[[Page S461]]

Sec. 3009. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to strengthening the 
              Provider Relief Fund.
Sec. 3010. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to improving services 
              and interventions relating to sexual assault, family 
              violence, domestic violence, dating violence, and child 
              abuse.
Sec. 3011. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to supporting 
              hospitality, conventions, trade shows, entertainment, 
              tourism, and travel and their workers.
Sec. 3012. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to maintaining the 
              United States Embassy in Jerusalem, Israel.
Sec. 3013. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to increasing the 
              Federal minimum wage during a global pandemic.
Sec. 3014. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to funding the police.
Sec. 3015. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to providing 
              information online regarding the expenditure of COVID-19 
              relief funds.
Sec. 3016. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to improving the 
              solvency of Federal trust funds.
Sec. 3017. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to Federal 
              environmental and water policies.
Sec. 3018. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to Federal relief 
              funds for State or local governments.
Sec. 3019. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to prohibiting actions 
              by the executive branch that would make the United States 
              more reliant on countries with weaker environmental or 
              labor standards for oil, gas, or hardrock mineral 
              production.
Sec. 3020. Deficit-neutral reserve fund relating to expanding health 
              savings accounts.

                        TITLE IV--OTHER MATTERS

Sec. 4001. Enforcement filing.
Sec. 4002. Budgetary treatment of administrative expenses.
Sec. 4003. Application and effect of changes in allocations, 
              aggregates, and other budgetary levels.
Sec. 4004. Adjustments to reflect changes in concepts and definitions.
Sec. 4005. Adjustment for changes in the baseline.
Sec. 4006. Limitation on advance appropriations.
Sec. 4007. Repeal of supermajority enforcement requirement.
Sec. 4008. Exercise of rulemaking powers.

                TITLE I--RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS

              Subtitle A--Budgetary Levels in Both Houses

     SEC. 1101. RECOMMENDED LEVELS AND AMOUNTS.

       The following budgetary levels are appropriate for each of 
     fiscal years 2021 through 2030:
       (1) Federal revenues.--For purposes of the enforcement of 
     this resolution:
       (A) The recommended levels of Federal revenues are as 
     follows:
       Fiscal year 2021: $2,303,274,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022: $2,768,717,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $2,971,083,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024: $3,092,643,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025: $3,236,199,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $3,514,253,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027: $3,762,577,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028: $3,883,209,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029: $4,007,991,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030: $4,121,665,000,000.
       (B) The amounts by which the aggregate levels of Federal 
     revenues should be changed are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2021: -$15,670,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022: -$17,390,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $102,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024: $226,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025: $216,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $181,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027: $98,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028: -$106,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029: -$121,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030: -$128,000,000.
       (2) New budget authority.--For purposes of the enforcement 
     of this resolution, the appropriate levels of total new 
     budget authority are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2021: $6,020,543,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022: $4,091,342,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $4,011,132,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024: $4,072,784,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025: $4,267,538,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $4,449,047,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027: $4,642,875,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028: $4,960,846,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029: $5,082,932,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030: $5,471,756,000,000.
       (3) Budget outlays.--For purposes of the enforcement of 
     this resolution, the appropriate levels of total budget 
     outlays are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2021: $6,140,857,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022: $4,298,244,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $4,070,343,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024: $4,070,242,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025: $4,250,436,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $4,425,376,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027: $4,606,887,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028: $4,950,170,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029: $5,019,083,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030: $5,419,949,000,000.
       (4) Deficits.--For purposes of the enforcement of this 
     resolution, the amounts of the deficits are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2021: $3,837,583,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022: $1,529,527,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $1,099,260,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024: $977,599,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025: $1,014,237,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $911,123,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027: $844,310,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028: $1,066,961,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029: $1,011,092,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030: $1,298,284,000,000.
       (5) Public debt.--Pursuant to section 301(a)(5) of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 632(a)(5)), the 
     appropriate levels of the public debt are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2021: $29,943,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022: $31,647,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $32,911,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024: $34,102,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025: $35,262,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $36,311,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027: $37,261,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028: $38,443,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029: $39,652,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030: $41,068,000,000,000.
       (6) Debt held by the public.--The appropriate levels of 
     debt held by the public are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2021: $24,081,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022: $25,818,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $27,153,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024: $28,380,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025: $29,610,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $30,730,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027: $31,882,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028: $33,333,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029: $34,768,000,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030: $36,518,000,000,000.

     SEC. 1102. MAJOR FUNCTIONAL CATEGORIES.

       Congress determines and declares that the appropriate 
     levels of new budget authority and outlays for fiscal years 
     2021 through 2030 for each major functional category are:
       (1) National Defense (050):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $762,552,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $748,719,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $776,986,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $766,960,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $792,882,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $773,777,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $810,362,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $782,210,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $828,950,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $804,311,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $847,993,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $821,641,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $868,011,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $840,472,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $888,637,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $865,412,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $909,676,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $874,729,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $931,654,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $901,459,000,000.
       (2) International Affairs (150):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $85,042,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $47,310,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $64,249,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $58,941,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $60,410,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $60,004,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $61,722,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $59,578,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $63,114,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $60,371,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $64,518,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $61,851,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $66,053,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $63,271,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $67,608,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $64,814,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $69,140,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $66,100,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $70,703,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $67,498,000,000.
       (3) General Science, Space, and Technology (250):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $38,543,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $35,563,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $38,029,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $37,267,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $38,791,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $38,167,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $39,609,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $38,841,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $40,471,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $39,604,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $41,342,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $40,432,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $42,249,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $41,291,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $43,169,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $42,181,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:

[[Page S462]]

       (A) New budget authority, $44,096,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $43,095,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $45,065,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $44,035,000,000.
       (4) Energy (270):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $4,057,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $5,280,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $6,050,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $5,076,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $5,730,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $4,542,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $5,834,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $4,760,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $5,948,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $4,857,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $5,819,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $4,810,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $5,928,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $4,886,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $7,846,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $6,806,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $8,318,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $7,337,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $8,502,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $7,601,000,000.
       (5) Natural Resources and Environment (300):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $50,042,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $47,053,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $51,243,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $49,042,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $53,061,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $50,890,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $54,116,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $52,475,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $55,219,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $54,269,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $54,734,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $55,807,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $55,899,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $57,090,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $57,141,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $58,098,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $58,378,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $59,056,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $59,616,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $59,946,000,000.
       (6) Agriculture (350):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $49,067,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $50,970,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $28,047,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $28,576,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $28,130,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $27,794,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $27,909,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $27,424,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $27,496,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $26,898,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $27,675,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $27,055,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $27,535,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $26,873,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $27,715,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $27,072,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $27,752,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $27,083,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $28,058,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $27,392,000,000.
       (7) Commerce and Housing Credit (370):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, -$242,699,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $327,529,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $19,497,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $36,392,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $20,198,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $18,376,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $21,159,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $18,015,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $20,943,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $16,507,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $21,827,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $15,783,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $22,117,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $15,520,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $21,953,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $16,174,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $22,222,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $15,056,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $21,683,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $13,389,000,000.
       (8) Transportation (400):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $206,391,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $185,619,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $104,160,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $119,664,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $104,738,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $112,309,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $105,569,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $105,989,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $106,120,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $108,527,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $107,067,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $111,187,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $108,278,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $113,982,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $109,339,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $116,164,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $110,222,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $118,680,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $111,372,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $121,056,000,000.
       (9) Community and Regional Development (450):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $127,525,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $98,043,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $32,000,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $51,963,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $32,624,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $48,433,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $33,318,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $45,776,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $34,031,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $43,758,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $34,763,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $42,053,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $35,520,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $42,217,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $36,283,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $42,162,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $37,048,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $42,100,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $37,843,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $42,189,000,000.
       (10) Education, Training, Employment, and Social Services 
     (500):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $372,350,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $160,006,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $115,812,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $178,392,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $116,259,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $154,773,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $118,661,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $150,171,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $121,803,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $144,105,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $125,194,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $134,645,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $128,638,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $130,729,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $132,003,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $131,492,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $134,674,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $132,652,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $137,812,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $135,558,000,000.
       (11) Health (550):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $943,093,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $882,818,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $748,503,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $797,760,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $713,126,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $722,016,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $720,847,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $730,335,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $754,383,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $753,709,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $790,057,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $785,131,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $825,982,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $820,641,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $858,454,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $858,986,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $900,409,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $901,525,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $955,814,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $946,672,000,000.
       (12) Medicare (570):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $766,853,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $766,005,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $745,579,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $745,556,000,000.

[[Page S463]]

       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $838,359,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $838,200,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $851,671,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $851,452,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $958,756,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $958,451,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $1,026,856,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $1,026,484,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $1,098,460,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $1,098,027,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $1,244,688,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $1,244,201,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $1,184,583,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $1,184,048,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $1,331,736,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $1,331,161,000,000.
       (13) Income Security (600):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $1,845,601,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $1,779,410,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $770,908,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $805,014,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $619,246,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $628,956,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $620,759,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $612,726,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $632,210,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $624,207,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $640,597,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $638,103,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $633,758,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $627,362,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $645,839,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $643,707,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $641,962,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $627,556,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $657,398,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $648,615,000,000.
       (14) Social Security (650):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $40,594,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $40,598,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $42,633,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $42,633,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $45,486,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $45,486,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $48,621,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $48,621,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $52,151,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $52,151,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $62,223,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $62,223,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $68,685,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $68,685,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $73,712,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $73,712,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $78,912,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $78,912,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $83,948,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $83,948,000,000.
       (15) Veterans Benefits and Services (700):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $258,560,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $250,738,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $243,210,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $267,893,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $249,723,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $251,696,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $256,945,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $244,770,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $264,708,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $263,284,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $272,216,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $270,636,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $280,109,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $278,409,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $288,040,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $299,629,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $296,740,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $281,467,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $305,496,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $303,520,000,000.
       (16) Administration of Justice (750):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $72,961,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $74,900,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $76,879,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $73,320,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $74,336,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $73,557,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $75,600,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $75,011,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $76,413,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $76,155,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $78,161,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $77,827,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $80,010,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $79,533,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $81,961,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $80,963,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $83,994,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $82,930,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $92,786,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $91,769,000,000.
       (17) General Government (800):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $375,971,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $376,468,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $24,837,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $24,899,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $24,888,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $24,787,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $25,205,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $24,961,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $25,885,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $25,481,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $26,483,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $26,036,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $27,170,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $26,711,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $27,869,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $27,402,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $28,621,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $28,137,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $29,416,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $28,918,000,000.
       (18) Net Interest (900):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $365,131,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $365,131,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $345,959,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $345,959,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $336,379,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $336,379,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $332,881,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $332,881,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $341,018,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $341,018,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $367,269,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $367,269,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $418,442,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $418,442,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $502,412,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $502,412,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $605,086,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $605,086,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $727,019,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $727,019,000,000.
       (19) Allowances (920):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, -$25,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $0.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, -$33,933,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$27,630,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, -$34,686,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$31,376,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, -$35,495,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$33,380,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, -$36,367,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$34,806,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, -$37,240,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$35,938,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, -$38,152,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$36,942,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, -$38,991,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$37,890,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, -$39,927,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$38,847,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, -$40,906,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$39,817,000,000.
       (20) Undistributed Offsetting Receipts (950):
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, -$101,066,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$101,303,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, -$109,306,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$109,433,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, -$108,548,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$108,423,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, -$102,509,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$102,374,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, -$105,714,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$112,421,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:

[[Page S464]]

       (A) New budget authority, -$108,507,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$107,659,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, -$111,817,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$110,312,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, -$114,832,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$113,327,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, -$118,974,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$117,619,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, -$123,259,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, -$121,979,000,000.

              Subtitle B--Levels and Amounts in the Senate

     SEC. 1201. SOCIAL SECURITY IN THE SENATE.

       (a) Social Security Revenues.--For purposes of Senate 
     enforcement under sections 302 and 311 of the Congressional 
     Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633 and 642), the amounts of 
     revenues of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust 
     Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund are as 
     follows:
       Fiscal year 2021: $898,089,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022: $930,023,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $996,745,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024: $1,040,533,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025: $1,085,441,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $1,133,139,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027: $1,182,469,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028: $1,231,717,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029: $1,279,075,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030: $1,326,172,000,000.
       (b) Social Security Outlays.--For purposes of Senate 
     enforcement under sections 302 and 311 of the Congressional 
     Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633 and 642), the amounts of 
     outlays of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust 
     Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund are as 
     follows:
       Fiscal year 2021: $1,101,575,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022: $1,158,817,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023: $1,222,448,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024: $1,292,270,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025: $1,365,124,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026: $1,434,051,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027: $1,506,794,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028: $1,586,096,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029: $1,666,850,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030: $1,750,666,000,000.
       (c) Social Security Administrative Expenses.--In the 
     Senate, the amounts of new budget authority and budget 
     outlays of the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust 
     Fund and the Federal Disability Insurance Trust Fund for 
     administrative expenses are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $5,650,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $5,665,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $6,345,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $6,318,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $6,502,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $6,462,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $6,672,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $6,629,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $6,856,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $6,808,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $7,048,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $6,998,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $7,247,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $7,195,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $7,458,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $7,403,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $7,678,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $7,621,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $7,908,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $7,847,000,000.

     SEC. 1202. POSTAL SERVICE DISCRETIONARY ADMINISTRATIVE 
                   EXPENSES IN THE SENATE.

       In the Senate, the amounts of new budget authority and 
     budget outlays of the Postal Service for discretionary 
     administrative expenses are as follows:
       Fiscal year 2021:
       (A) New budget authority, $267,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $268,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2022:
       (A) New budget authority, $282,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $282,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2023:
       (A) New budget authority, $289,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $289,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2024:
       (A) New budget authority, $298,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $298,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2025:
       (A) New budget authority, $308,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $308,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2026:
       (A) New budget authority, $317,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $317,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2027:
       (A) New budget authority, $328,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $328,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2028:
       (A) New budget authority, $338,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $338,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2029:
       (A) New budget authority, $350,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $349,000,000.
       Fiscal year 2030:
       (A) New budget authority, $362,000,000.
       (B) Outlays, $361,000,000.

                        TITLE II--RECONCILIATION

     SEC. 2001. RECONCILIATION IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES.

       (a) Committee on Agriculture.--The Committee on Agriculture 
     of the House of Representatives shall submit changes in laws 
     within its jurisdiction to increase the deficit by not more 
     than $16,112,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2030.
       (b) Committee on Education and Labor.--The Committee on 
     Education and Labor of the House of Representatives shall 
     submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction to increase 
     the deficit by not more than $357,926,000,000 for the period 
     of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.
       (c) Committee on Energy and Commerce.--The Committee on 
     Energy and Commerce of the House of Representatives shall 
     submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction to increase 
     the deficit by not more than $188,498,000,000 for the period 
     of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.
       (d) Committee on Financial Services.--The Committee on 
     Financial Services of the House of Representatives shall 
     submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction to increase 
     the deficit by not more than $75,000,000,000 for the period 
     of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.
       (e) Committee on Foreign Affairs.--The Committee on Foreign 
     Affairs of the House of Representatives shall submit changes 
     in laws within its jurisdiction to increase the deficit by 
     not more than $10,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 
     2021 through 2030.
       (f) Committee on Natural Resources.--The Committee on 
     Natural Resources of the House of Representatives shall 
     submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction to increase 
     the deficit by not more than $1,005,000,000 for the period of 
     fiscal years 2021 through 2030.
       (g) Committee on Oversight and Reform.--The Committee on 
     Oversight and Reform of the House of Representatives shall 
     submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction to increase 
     the deficit by not more than $350,690,000,000 for the period 
     of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.
       (h) Committee on Science, Space, and Technology.--The 
     Committee on Science, Space, and Technology of the House of 
     Representatives shall submit changes in laws within its 
     jurisdiction to increase the deficit by not more than 
     $750,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2030.
       (i) Committee on Small Business.--The Committee on Small 
     Business of the House of Representatives shall submit changes 
     in laws within its jurisdiction to increase the deficit by 
     not more than $50,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 
     2021 through 2030.
       (j) Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure.--The 
     Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure of the House 
     of Representatives shall submit changes in laws within its 
     jurisdiction to increase the deficit by not more than 
     $95,620,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2030.
       (k) Committee on Veterans' Affairs.--The Committee on 
     Veterans' Affairs of the House of Representatives shall 
     submit changes in laws within its jurisdiction to increase 
     the deficit by not more than $17,000,000,000 for the period 
     of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.
       (l) Committee on Ways and Means.--The Committee on Ways and 
     Means of the House of Representatives shall submit changes in 
     laws within its jurisdiction to increase the deficit by not 
     more than $940,718,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 
     2021 through 2030.
       (m) Submissions.--In the House of Representatives, not 
     later than February 16, 2021, the committees named in the 
     subsections of this section shall submit their 
     recommendations to the Committee on the Budget of the House 
     of Representatives to carry out this section.

     SEC. 2002. RECONCILIATION IN THE SENATE.

       (a) Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry.--The 
     Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry of the 
     Senate shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction 
     that increase the deficit by not more than $22,717,000,000 
     for the period of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.
       (b) Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs.--The 
     Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs of the 
     Senate shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction 
     that increase the deficit by not more than $89,250,000,000 
     for the period of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.
       (c) Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation.--
     The Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation of the 
     Senate shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction 
     that increase the deficit by not more than $35,903,000,000 
     for the period of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.
       (d) Committee on Environment and Public Works.--The 
     Committee on Environment and Public Works of the Senate shall 
     report changes in laws within its jurisdiction that increase 
     the deficit by not more than $3,206,500,000 for the period of 
     fiscal years 2021 through 2030.
       (e) Committee on Finance.--The Committee on Finance of the 
     Senate shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction 
     that increase the deficit by not more than $1,296,487,000,000 
     for the period of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.
       (f) Committee on Foreign Relations.--The Committee on 
     Foreign Relations of the Senate shall report changes in laws 
     within its jurisdiction that increase the deficit by not more 
     than $10,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2030.

[[Page S465]]

       (g) Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions.--
     The Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions of 
     the Senate shall report changes in laws within its 
     jurisdiction that increase the deficit by not more than 
     $304,956,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2030.
       (h) Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
     Affairs.--The Committee on Homeland Security and Governmental 
     Affairs of the Senate shall report changes in laws within its 
     jurisdiction that increase the deficit by not more than 
     $50,687,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2030.
       (i) Committee on Indian Affairs.--The Committee on Indian 
     Affairs of the Senate shall report changes in laws within its 
     jurisdiction that increase the deficit by not more than 
     $8,604,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2030.
       (j) Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship.--The 
     Committee on Small Business and Entrepreneurship of the 
     Senate shall report changes in laws within its jurisdiction 
     that increase the deficit by not more than $50,000,000,000 
     for the period of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.
       (k) Committee on Veterans' Affairs.--The Committee on 
     Veterans' Affairs of the Senate shall report changes in laws 
     within its jurisdiction that increase the deficit by not more 
     than $17,000,000,000 for the period of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2030.
       (l) Submissions.--In the Senate, not later than February 
     16, 2021, the Committees named in the subsections of this 
     section shall submit their recommendations to the Committee 
     on the Budget of the Senate. Upon receiving all such 
     recommendations, the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     shall report to the Senate a reconciliation bill carrying out 
     all such recommendations without any substantive revision.

                        TITLE III--RESERVE FUNDS

     SEC. 3001. RESERVE FUND FOR RECONCILIATION LEGISLATION.

       (a) House of Representatives.--
       (1) In general.--In the House of the Representatives, the 
     chair of the Committee on the Budget may revise the 
     allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and 
     other appropriate levels in this resolution for any bill or 
     joint resolution considered pursuant to section 2001 
     containing the recommendations of one or more committees, or 
     for one or more amendments to, a conference report on, or an 
     amendment between the Houses in relation to such a bill or 
     joint resolution, by the amounts necessary to accommodate the 
     budgetary effects of the legislation, if the budgetary 
     effects of the legislation comply with the reconciliation 
     instructions under this concurrent resolution.
       (2) Determination of compliance.--For purposes of this 
     section, compliance with the reconciliation instructions 
     under this concurrent resolution shall be determined by the 
     chair of the Committee on the Budget of the House of 
     Representatives.
       (3) Exception for legislation.--The point of order set 
     forth in clause 10 of rule XXI of the House of 
     Representatives shall not apply to reconciliation legislation 
     reported by the Committee on the Budget pursuant to 
     submissions under section 2001.
       (b) Senate.--
       (1) In general.--In the Senate, the Chairman of the 
     Committee on the Budget of the Senate may revise the 
     allocations of a committee or committees, aggregates, and 
     other appropriate levels in this resolution, and make 
     adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for any bill or 
     joint resolution considered pursuant to section 2002 
     containing the recommendations of one or more committees, or 
     for one or more amendments to, a conference report on, or an 
     amendment between the Houses in relation to such a bill or 
     joint resolution, by the amounts necessary to accommodate the 
     budgetary effects of the legislation, if the budgetary 
     effects of the legislation comply with the reconciliation 
     instructions under this concurrent resolution.
       (2) Determination of compliance.--For purposes of this 
     section, compliance with the reconciliation instructions 
     under this concurrent resolution shall be determined by the 
     Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate.
       (3) Exceptions for legislation.--
       (A) Short-term.--Section 404 of S. Con. Res. 13 (111th 
     Congress), the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal 
     year 2010, as amended by section 3201(b)(2) of S. Con. Res. 
     11 (114th Congress), the concurrent resolution on the budget 
     for fiscal year 2016, shall not apply to legislation for 
     which the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the 
     Senate has exercised the authority under paragraph (1).
       (B) Long-term.--Section 3101 of S. Con. Res. 11 (114th 
     Congress), the concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal 
     year 2016, shall not apply to legislation for which the 
     Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate has 
     exercised the authority under paragraph (1).

     SEC. 3002. RESERVE FUND FOR DEFICIT-NEUTRAL LEGISLATION.

       The chair of the Committee on the Budget of the House of 
     Representatives may revise the allocations of a committee or 
     committees, aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this 
     resolution for one or more bills, joint resolutions, 
     amendments, or conference reports by the amounts provided in 
     such legislation, provided that such legislation would not 
     increase the deficit for either of the following time 
     periods: fiscal year 2021 to fiscal year 2025 or fiscal year 
     2021 to fiscal year 2030.

     SEC. 3003. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   ESTABLISHING A FUND TO PROVIDE GRANTS TO FOOD 
                   SERVICE AND DRINKING ESTABLISHMENTS AFFECTED BY 
                   THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     establishing a fund to provide grants to food service and 
     drinking establishments affected by the COVID-19 pandemic by 
     the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
     provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
     over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2030.

     SEC. 3004. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   PREVENTING TAX INCREASES ON SMALL BUSINESSES 
                   DURING A PANDEMIC.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     changes in Federal tax laws, which may include preventing tax 
     increases on small businesses during any period in which a 
     national emergency has been declared with respect to a 
     pandemic, by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
     those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
     increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
     fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the period of the total of 
     fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

     SEC. 3005. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO THE 
                   AUTHORITY OF STATES AND OTHER TAXING 
                   JURISDICTIONS TO TAX CERTAIN INCOME OF 
                   EMPLOYEES WORKING IN OTHER STATES OR TAXING 
                   JURISDICTIONS.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to the 
     authority of States or other taxing jurisdictions to tax 
     certain income of employees for employment duties performed 
     in other States or taxing jurisdictions by the amounts 
     provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided 
     that such legislation would not increase the deficit over 
     either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2030.

     SEC. 3006. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO TARGETING 
                   ECONOMIC IMPACT PAYMENTS TO AMERICANS WHO ARE 
                   SUFFERING FROM THE EFFECTS OF COVID-19.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     targeting economic impact payments to Americans who are 
     suffering from the effects of COVID-19, including provisions 
     to ensure upper-income taxpayers are not eligible, by the 
     amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
     provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
     over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2030.

     SEC. 3007. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO COVID-19 
                   VACCINE ADMINISTRATION AND A PUBLIC AWARENESS 
                   CAMPAIGN.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     strengthening and improving the process of distributing 
     COVID-19 vaccines to States, which may include supporting 
     States in implementing a transparent and consistent vaccine 
     administration program and bolstering States' public 
     awareness campaigns to increase awareness and knowledge of 
     the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines 
     (particularly among vulnerable communities, including ethnic 
     minority populations), by the amounts provided in such 
     legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
     legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

     SEC. 3008. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   SUPPORTING ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN 
                   STATES WITH LOST REVENUE DUE TO THE FEDERAL 
                   MORATORIUM ON OIL AND NATURAL GAS LEASING ON 
                   PUBLIC LANDS AND OFFSHORE WATERS.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this

[[Page S466]]

     resolution, and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, 
     for one or more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, 
     amendments between the Houses, motions, or conference reports 
     relating to supporting elementary and secondary schools in 
     States with lost revenue due to the Federal moratorium on oil 
     and natural gas leasing on public lands and offshore waters 
     by the amounts provided in such legislation for those 
     purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase 
     the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal 
     years 2021 through 2025 or the period of the total of fiscal 
     years 2021 through 2030.

     SEC. 3009. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   STRENGTHENING THE PROVIDER RELIEF FUND.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     strengthening the Provider Relief Fund, which may include 
     additional support for rural hospitals in order to preserve 
     jobs and access to specialty services, by the amounts 
     provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided 
     that such legislation would not increase the deficit over 
     either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2030.

     SEC. 3010. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO IMPROVING 
                   SERVICES AND INTERVENTIONS RELATING TO SEXUAL 
                   ASSAULT, FAMILY VIOLENCE, DOMESTIC VIOLENCE, 
                   DATING VIOLENCE, AND CHILD ABUSE.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     improving services and interventions for victims relating to 
     sexual assault, family violence, domestic violence, dating 
     violence, and child abuse, which may include funding for 
     programs and grants authorized by the Violence Against Women 
     Act and the Victims of Child Abuse Act, by the amounts 
     provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided 
     that such legislation would not increase the deficit over 
     either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2030.

     SEC. 3011. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   SUPPORTING HOSPITALITY, CONVENTIONS, TRADE 
                   SHOWS, ENTERTAINMENT, TOURISM, AND TRAVEL AND 
                   THEIR WORKERS.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     supporting struggling Americans in relation to their 
     employment in hospitality, including those in the convention, 
     trade show, entertainment, tourism, and travel industries, 
     which may include legislation that provides relief and 
     recovery incentives, by the amounts provided in such 
     legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
     legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

     SEC. 3012. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   MAINTAINING THE UNITED STATES EMBASSY IN 
                   JERUSALEM, ISRAEL.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to the 
     United States Embassy in Jerusalem, Israel, maintaining its 
     current location in Jerusalem and level of operations, which 
     may include current funding levels and security, by the 
     amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
     provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
     over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2030.

     SEC. 3013. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   INCREASING THE FEDERAL MINIMUM WAGE DURING A 
                   GLOBAL PANDEMIC.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     increasing the Federal minimum wage during a global pandemic, 
     which may include prohibiting the rate from more than 
     doubling to $15 per hour, by the amounts provided in such 
     legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
     legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

     SEC. 3014. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO FUNDING 
                   THE POLICE.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     funding the Nation's police through programs that are in 
     within the jurisdiction of any committee of the Senate 
     instructed under section 2002, which may include funding for 
     law enforcement officer safety programs and fusion centers to 
     protect the United States from domestic and international 
     terrorists administered by the Department of Homeland 
     Security, mental and behavioral health intervention programs 
     administered by the Department of Health and Human Services, 
     programs administered by the Department of Veterans Affairs 
     to increase the hiring of military veterans as law 
     enforcement officers, gang and youth violence education 
     programs administered by the Department of Health and Human 
     Services, and the Department of Education, by the amounts 
     provided in such legislation for those purposes, provided 
     that such legislation would not increase the deficit over 
     either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 
     2030.

     SEC. 3015. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO PROVIDING 
                   INFORMATION ONLINE REGARDING THE EXPENDITURE OF 
                   COVID-19 RELIEF FUNDS.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     increasing Government spending transparency, which may 
     include requiring the President to make available online 
     information regarding the amount of funds made available for 
     relief from the COVID-19 pandemic that have been expended, by 
     the amounts provided in such legislation for those purposes, 
     provided that such legislation would not increase the deficit 
     over either the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2025 or the period of the total of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2030.

     SEC. 3016. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO IMPROVING 
                   THE SOLVENCY OF FEDERAL TRUST FUNDS.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     improving the solvency of major Federal trust funds, which 
     may include developing recommendations and legislation to 
     rescue programs that support surface transportation, health 
     care services, and financial protection and security for 
     individuals, by the amounts provided in such legislation for 
     those purposes, provided that such legislation would not 
     increase the deficit over either the period of the total of 
     fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the period of the total of 
     fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

     SEC. 3017. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO FEDERAL 
                   ENVIRONMENTAL AND WATER POLICIES.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     Federal environmental and water policies, which may include 
     ensuring the effective and efficient implementation of the 
     Federal Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1251 et seq.), 
     preserving consistency and certainty in defining water 
     features within, and exclusions from, Federal jurisdiction 
     under that Act, or limiting or prohibiting efforts to 
     withdraw, revoke, or amend the final rule of the Corps of 
     Engineers and the Environmental Protection Agency entitled 
     ``The Navigable Waters Protection Rule: Definition of `Waters 
     of the United States' '' (85 Fed. Reg. 22250 (April 21, 
     2020)), by the amounts provided in such legislation for those 
     purposes, provided that such legislation would not increase 
     the deficit over either the period of the total of fiscal 
     years 2021 through 2025 or the period of the total of fiscal 
     years 2021 through 2030.

     SEC. 3018. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO FEDERAL 
                   RELIEF FUNDS FOR STATE OR LOCAL GOVERNMENTS.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports, relating to 
     adjustments to Federal relief funds for State or local 
     governments within the jurisdiction of the instructed 
     committees, which may include limitations on new or existing 
     Federal COVID-19 relief payments to a State or locality that 
     imposes

[[Page S467]]

     greater limits on the content of speech, or restrictions on 
     the religious exercise or belief, of houses of worship and 
     faith-based organizations described in section 501(c)(3) of 
     the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 and exempt from taxation 
     under section 501(a) of such Code, than on secular 
     organizations described in that section 501(c)(3) and exempt 
     under that section 501(a), by the amounts provided in such 
     legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
     legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

     SEC. 3019. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO 
                   PROHIBITING ACTIONS BY THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH 
                   THAT WOULD MAKE THE UNITED STATES MORE RELIANT 
                   ON COUNTRIES WITH WEAKER ENVIRONMENTAL OR LABOR 
                   STANDARDS FOR OIL, GAS, OR HARDROCK MINERAL 
                   PRODUCTION.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     prohibiting actions by the executive branch that would cause 
     the United States to import larger quantities of oil, gas, or 
     hardrock minerals from countries that have weaker 
     environmental or labor standards by the amounts provided in 
     such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
     legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

     SEC. 3020. DEFICIT-NEUTRAL RESERVE FUND RELATING TO EXPANDING 
                   HEALTH SAVINGS ACCOUNTS.

       The Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate 
     may revise the allocations of a committee or committees, 
     aggregates, and other appropriate levels in this resolution, 
     and make adjustments to the pay-as-you-go ledger, for one or 
     more bills, joint resolutions, amendments, amendments between 
     the Houses, motions, or conference reports relating to 
     expanding health savings accounts by the amounts provided in 
     such legislation for those purposes, provided that such 
     legislation would not increase the deficit over either the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2025 or the 
     period of the total of fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

                        TITLE IV--OTHER MATTERS

     SEC. 4001. ENFORCEMENT FILING.

       (a) In the House of Representatives.--In the House of 
     Representatives, if a concurrent resolution on the budget for 
     fiscal year 2021 is adopted without the appointment of a 
     committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of the two 
     Houses with respect to this concurrent resolution on the 
     budget, for the purpose of enforcing the Congressional Budget 
     Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.) and applicable rules and 
     requirements set forth in the concurrent resolution on the 
     budget, the allocations provided for in this subsection shall 
     apply in the House of Representatives in the same manner as 
     if such allocations were in a joint explanatory statement 
     accompanying a conference report on the budget for fiscal 
     year 2021. The chair of the Committee on the Budget of the 
     House of Representatives shall submit a statement for 
     publication in the Congressional Record containing--
       (1) for the Committee on Appropriations, committee 
     allocations for fiscal year 2021 consistent with title I for 
     the purpose of enforcing section 302 of the Congressional 
     Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633); and
       (2) for all committees other than the Committee on 
     Appropriations, committee allocations consistent with title I 
     for fiscal year 2021 and for the period of fiscal years 2021 
     through 2030 for the purpose of enforcing 302 of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633).
       (b) In the Senate.--If this concurrent resolution on the 
     budget is agreed to by the Senate and House of 
     Representatives without the appointment of a committee of 
     conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses, the 
     Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may 
     submit a statement for publication in the Congressional 
     Record containing--
       (1) for the Committee on Appropriations, committee 
     allocations for fiscal year 2021 consistent with the levels 
     in title I for the purpose of enforcing section 302 of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633); and
       (2) for all committees other than the Committee on 
     Appropriations, committee allocations for fiscal years 2021, 
     2021 through 2025, and 2021 through 2030 consistent with the 
     levels in title I for the purpose of enforcing section 302 of 
     the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633).

     SEC. 4002. BUDGETARY TREATMENT OF ADMINISTRATIVE EXPENSES.

       (a) In General.--Notwithstanding section 302(a)(1) of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633(a)(1)), 
     section 13301 of the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990 (2 U.S.C. 
     632 note), and section 2009a of title 39, United States Code, 
     the report or the joint explanatory statement, as applicable, 
     accompanying this concurrent resolution on the budget shall 
     include in an allocation under section 302(a) of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633(a)) to the 
     Committee on Appropriations of the applicable House of 
     Congress amounts for the discretionary administrative 
     expenses of the Social Security Administration and the United 
     States Postal Service.
       (b) Special Rule.--In the House of Representatives and the 
     Senate, for purposes of enforcing section 302(f) of the 
     Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 633(f)), estimates 
     of the level of total new budget authority and total outlays 
     provided by a measure shall include any discretionary amounts 
     described in subsection (a).

     SEC. 4003. APPLICATION AND EFFECT OF CHANGES IN ALLOCATIONS, 
                   AGGREGATES, AND OTHER BUDGETARY LEVELS.

       (a) Application.--Any adjustments of allocations, 
     aggregates, and other budgetary levels made pursuant to this 
     concurrent resolution shall--
       (1) apply while that measure is under consideration;
       (2) take effect upon the enactment of that measure; and
       (3) be published in the Congressional Record as soon as 
     practicable.
       (b) Effect of Changed Allocations, Aggregates, and Other 
     Budgetary Levels.--Revised allocations, aggregates, and other 
     budgetary levels resulting from these adjustments shall be 
     considered for the purposes of the Congressional Budget Act 
     of 1974 (2 U.S.C. 621 et seq.) as the allocations, 
     aggregates, and other budgetary levels contained in this 
     concurrent resolution.
       (c) Budget Committee Determinations.--For purposes of this 
     concurrent resolution, the levels of new budget authority, 
     outlays, direct spending, new entitlement authority, 
     revenues, deficits, and surpluses for a fiscal year or period 
     of fiscal years shall be determined on the basis of estimates 
     made by the chair of the Committee on the Budget of the 
     applicable House of Congress.

     SEC. 4004. ADJUSTMENTS TO REFLECT CHANGES IN CONCEPTS AND 
                   DEFINITIONS.

       (a) House of Representatives.--In the House of 
     Representatives, the chair of the Committee on the Budget may 
     adjust the appropriate aggregates, allocations, and other 
     budgetary levels in this concurrent resolution for any change 
     in budgetary concepts and definitions consistent with section 
     251(b)(1) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
     Control Act of 1985 (2 U.S.C. 901(b)(1)).
       (b) Senate.--Upon the enactment of a bill or joint 
     resolution providing for a change in concepts or definitions, 
     the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget of the Senate may 
     make adjustments to the levels and allocations in this 
     resolution in accordance with section 251(b) of the Balanced 
     Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (2 U.S.C. 
     901(b)).

     SEC. 4005. ADJUSTMENT FOR CHANGES IN THE BASELINE.

       The chair of the Committee on the Budget of the House of 
     Representatives and the Chairman of the Committee on the 
     Budget of the Senate may adjust the allocations, aggregates, 
     and other appropriate budgetary levels in this concurrent 
     resolution to reflect changes resulting from the 
     Congressional Budget Office's updates to its baseline for 
     fiscal years 2021 through 2030.

     SEC. 4006. LIMITATION ON ADVANCE APPROPRIATIONS.

       Notwithstanding subsection (d) of section 203 of the 
     Bipartisan Budget Act of 2019 (Public Law 116-37; 133 Stat. 
     1052), such section 203 shall continue to have force and 
     effect in the House of Representatives during fiscal year 
     2021.

     SEC. 4007. REPEAL OF SUPERMAJORITY ENFORCEMENT REQUIREMENT.

       Section 3203 of S. Con. Res. 11 (114th Congress), the 
     concurrent resolution on the budget for fiscal year 2016, is 
     repealed.

     SEC. 4008. EXERCISE OF RULEMAKING POWERS.

       Congress adopts the provisions of this title--
       (1) as an exercise of the rulemaking power of the Senate 
     and the House of Representatives, respectively, and as such 
     they shall be considered as part of the rules of each House 
     or of that House to which they specifically apply, and such 
     rules shall supersede other rules only to the extent that 
     they are inconsistent with such other rules; and
       (2) with full recognition of the constitutional right of 
     either the Senate or the House of Representatives to change 
     those rules (insofar as they relate to that House) at any 
     time, in the same manner, and to the same extent as is the 
     case of any other rule of the Senate or House of 
     Representatives.

  The VICE PRESIDENT. The majority leader.
  Mr. SCHUMER. Madam President, thank you so much for being part of 
this first big step to putting our country back on the road to 
recovery. We very much appreciate your being here.
  Just a brief word. I am so thankful that our caucus stayed together 
in unity. We had no choice, given the problems facing America and the 
desire to move forward, and we have moved forward. Many bipartisan 
amendments were adopted, so this was a bipartisan activity. In fact, 
the first amendment, which will help the restaurants, was done by 
Senators Sinema and Wicker.
  But we cannot underscore enough how much help America needs during 
this awful crisis, and we cannot miss the point that we still have a 
long way

[[Page S468]]

to go. This was a giant first step, a step in concord, and we are so 
grateful that President Biden put together a plan, with input from so 
many of us--both sides of the aisle--to bring America back, to overcome 
this horrible crisis and then move America forward so that America can 
once again feel the hope and opportunity that has been so, so much part 
of this land but that we seem to have lost over the last 4 years and 
particularly with the pandemic.
  So we will keep working as hard as we can to pass this legislation 
through the House, through the Senate, as we go through the 
reconciliation process and hopefully put it on the President's desk.
  A month ago today, two Senators from Georgia, two Democratic 
Senators, were elected, and just a month from that day, we have taken a 
giant step to begin to fulfill our promise to the American people that 
a Democratic Senate, a Democratic House, and President Biden will have 
their backs and move them forward during this awful crisis.

                          ____________________