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104th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

 1st Session                                                    104-196
_______________________________________________________________________


 
DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE, JUSTICE, AND STATE, THE JUDICIARY, AND RELATED 
             AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, FISCAL YEAR 1996

                                _______


 July 19, 1995.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

_______________________________________________________________________


    Mr. Rogers, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 2076]
                        INDEX TO BILL AND REPORT

_______________________________________________________________________


                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
Title I--Department of Justice.............................     2
                                                                      9
Title II--Department of Commerce and Related Agencies......    32
                                                                     47
        Office of the United States Trade Representative...    32
                                                                     48
        International Trade Commission.....................    32
                                                                     48
        Department of Commerce.............................    33
                                                                     49
Title III--The Judiciary...................................    47
                                                                     79
Title IV--Department of State and Related Agencies.........    54
                                                                     85
        Department of State................................    54
                                                                     85
        Arms Control and Disarmament Agency................    65
                                                                    104
        United States Information Agency...................    65
                                                                    105
Title V--Related Agencies..................................    70
                                                                    111
        Department of Transportation: Maritime 
            Administration.................................    70
                                                                    111
        Commission for the Preservation of America's 
            Heritage Abroad................................    73
                                                                    113
        Commission on Civil Rights.........................    73
                                                                    113
        Commission on Immigration Reform...................    73
                                                                    114
        Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe...    74
                                                                    114
        Competitiveness Policy Council...........................
                                                                    114
        Equal Employment Opportunity Commission............    74
                                                                    115
        Federal Communications Commission..................    75
                                                                    115
        Federal Maritime Commission........................    76
                                                                    116
        Federal Trade Commission...........................    76
                                                                    117
        Japan-United States Friendship Commission..........    77
                                                                    117
        Legal Services Corporation.........................    78
                                                                    118
        Marine Mammal Commission...........................    92
                                                                    121
        Martin Luther King, Jr. Federal Holiday Commission.    92
                                                                    122
        Ounce of Prevention Council..............................
                                                                    122
        Securities and Exchange Commission.................    92
                                                                    123
        Small Business Administration......................    94
                                                                    123
        State Justice Institute..................................
                                                                    128
Title VI--General Provisions...............................    96
                                                                    128
Assistance to State and Local Governments........................
                                                                      6
Appropriations Not Authorized By Law.............................
                                                                    149
Changes in the Application of Existing Law.......................
                                                                    129
Comparison with Budget Resolution................................
                                                                      5
Comparative Statement of New Budget (obligational) 
    Authority....................................................
                                                                    158
Compliance with Rule XIII--Clause 3..............................
                                                                    151
Five-Year Projection of Outlays..................................
                                                                      6
Inflationary Impact Statement....................................
                                                                      5
Programs, Projects and Activities................................
                                                                      6
Reprogrammings, Reorganizations, and Relocations.................
                                                                      7
Summary of Estimates and Recommendations.........................
                                                                      2
Transfer of Funds................................................
                                                                    154
                Summary of Estimates and Recommendations

    The budget estimates for the departments and agencies 
included in the accompanying bill are contained in the Budget 
of the United States for 1996 submitted on February 6, 1995 (H. 
Doc. 104-4), budget amendments submitted on February 22, 1995 
(H. Doc. 104-39), May 2, 1995 (H. Doc. 104-63), June 29, 1995 
(H. Doc. 104-88), and July 17, 1995 (H. Doc. 104-100), and in a 
letter of transmittal from the State Justice Institute (dated 
February 1, 1995). This organization has the authority to 
transmit its budget directly to Congress.
    The Committee recommends a total of $23,098,491,000 in 
general purpose discretionary budget authority for the 
departments and agencies funded in the Departments of Commerce, 
Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Bill for fiscal year 1996, and $3,981,987,000 in 
discretionary budget authority from the Violent Crime Reduction 
Trust Fund for the Department of Justice and the Judiciary. The 
Committee also recommends $505,651,000 for mandatory programs 
funded within this bill.
    For general purpose discretionary programs, the Committee 
recommendation is $3,411,682,000 below the President's budget 
request and $722,214,000 below the amounts enacted to date for 
the current fiscal year. For Crime Trust Fund programs, the 
Committee recommendation is $28,213,000 below the President's 
budget request and $1,636,987,000 above the amounts provided in 
the current fiscal year.
    The Committee recommendation is within the Committee's 
section 602(b) allocation for the departments and agencies 
funded within the accompanying bill. The section 602(b) 
allocations are $23,100,000,000 in budget authority and 
$24,422,000,000 in outlays for general purpose discretionary 
programs, and $4,022,000,000 in budget authority and 
$2,066,000,000 in outlays for the Violent Crime Reduction Trust 
Fund.
    The Committee was faced with extremely difficult decisions 
in determining the funding levels for the various programs 
funded in this bill. The section 602(b) allocation for general 
purpose discretionary funding is more than $700,000,000 in 
budget authority and $1,100,000,000 in outlays below the fiscal 
year 1995 appropriation to date, while the President requested 
an increase of $2,689,468,000 in budget authority and 
$946,622,000 in outlays above the fiscal year 1995 
appropriation. The Committee has made the difficult but 
necessary choices to recommend a bill that is within the 
Committee's section 602(b) allocation. In this regard, the 
Committee bill has prioritized by providing and even increasing 
funding to the highest priority programs, including law 
enforcement, and reducing and in a number of cases terminating 
low priority programs.
    The following table provides a comparison of the new budget 
authority recommended in the accompanying bill with the amounts 
appropriated to date for fiscal year 1995, and with the budget 
request for fiscal year 1996:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                           1996 recommendation  
                                                                                              compared with     
                                                     1995         1996         1996    -------------------------
                                                   enacted      request    recommended      1995         1996   
                                                                                          enacted      request  
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary..................................       23,821       26,510       23,098         -723       -3,412
Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund.............        2,345        4,010        3,982       +1,637          -28
Mandatory......................................          493          506          506          +13  ...........
                                                ----------------------------------------------------------------
      Total....................................       26,659       31,026       27,586         +927       -3,440
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         Highlights of the Bill

    Major initiatives and highlights of the bill contained in 
the Committee recommendations follow:
                         Department of Justice

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                           1996 recommendation  
                                                                                              compared with     
                                                     1995         1996         1996    -------------------------
                                                   enacted      request    recommended      1995         1996   
                                                                                          enacted      request  
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I--Department of Justice:                                                                                 
    Discretionary..............................        9,788       11,210       10,418         +629         -792
    Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund.........        2,345        3,964        3,940       +1,595          -24
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --$2.0 billion for a new State and Local Law Enforcement 
Block Grant, that will reach over 39,000 State and local law 
enforcement agencies. Funding can be used for a variety of 
programs, including more police officers, crime prevention 
programs, drug courts and equipment and technology.
    --$500 million for a new State prisons grant program, which 
provides incentives to States to ensure that violent criminals 
serve their time.
    --Over $2.3 billion, an increase of $762 million, to seal 
our borders, remove illegal aliens from the country and 
reimburse States for the incarceration costs of criminal 
aliens. This includes a $378 million increase for the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) including 1,000 
more border patrol agents on the front lines of the border and 
a total of over 3,000 more INS employees. The border crossing 
fee proposed in the budget is rejected.
    --A $301 million increase for Federal law enforcement, 
including funding required to maintain the 750 new FBI and DEA 
agents added in 1995, and 1,100 new staff required to activate 
10 new and expanded prisons scheduled to open in 1996.
    --$227 million to enhance law enforcement response 
capabilities to major terrorism incidents in response to the 
July 17, 1995 antiterrorism budget amendment.

              Department of Commerce and Related Agencies

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                           1996 recommendation  
                                                                                              compared with     
                                                     1995         1996         1996    -------------------------
                                                   enacted      request    recommended      1995         1996   
                                                                                          enacted      request  
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title II--Department of Commerce and Related                                                                    
 Agencies:                                                                                                      
    Discretionary..............................        4,167        4,731        3,452         -715       -1,279
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --$3.45 billion for the Department of Commerce, a reduction 
of $1.3 billion below the request and $715 million below the 
fiscal year 1995 appropriation level, bringing the Department 
back to its basics, including trade promotion and basic 
research, while eliminating or reducing low priority programs.
    --Provides a new structure under Title II of the bill that 
groups together the core functions that must be considered as 
decisions are made determining the future of Commerce 
Department programs: trade and infrastructure development; 
economic and information infrastructure; and science and 
technology.

                             The Judiciary

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                           1996 recommendation  
                                                                                              compared with     
                                                     1995         1996         1996    -------------------------
                                                   enacted      request    recommended      1995         1996   
                                                                                          enacted      request  
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title III--The Judiciary:                                                                                       
    Discretionary..............................        2,651        3,041        2,740          +89         -301
    Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund.........  ...........           31           42          +42          +11
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --Over $2.7 billion for the discretionary programs of the 
Federal Judiciary, a 4.3 percent increase above the fiscal year 
1995 appropriation level. This increase is consistent with the 
increases provided for Federal law enforcement agencies funded 
in this bill.

               Department of State, USIA and Arms Control

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                           1996 recommendation  
                                                                                              compared with     
                                                     1995         1996         1996    -------------------------
                                                   enacted      request    recommended      1995         1996   
                                                                                          enacted      request  
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title IV--Department of State and Related                                                                       
 Agencies:                                                                                                      
    Discretionary..............................        5,530        5,454        5,034         -496         -420
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --$5.0 billion for all programs funded by Department of 
State, United States Information Agency and the Arms Control 
and Disarmament Agency appropriations, a reduction of $496 
million below fiscal year 1995 levels and $420 million below 
the request, conforming international spending to budget 
realities. All funding levels are at or below the House-passed 
authorization bill, H.R. 1561.

                            Related Agencies

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                           1996 recommendation  
                                                                                              compared with     
                                                     1995         1996         1996    -------------------------
                                                   enacted      request    recommended      1995         1996   
                                                                                          enacted      request  
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title V--Related Agencies:                                                                                      
    Discretionary..............................        1,898        2,207        1,455         -443         -752
    Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund.........  ...........           15  ...........  ...........          -15
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    --$590 million for the Small Business Administration, a 
reduction of $40 million from the request and $333 million 
below the fiscal year 1995 level, preserving the core functions 
of assisting small businesses at less cost to the taxpayer.
    --$278 million for the Legal Services Corporation, a 
reduction of $122,000,000, or 32%, below the fiscal 1995 level. 
The recommendation provides only for the basic program of 
individual legal assistance for the poor, while for the first 
time assuring that the use of Federal funds is not abused, by 
requiring such things as a competitive bidding process for 
grantees, timekeeping requirements and an independent auditing 
structure.

                     Inflationary Impact Statement

    Clause 2(l)(4) of rule XI of the House of Representatives 
requires that each committee report accompanying a bill or 
resolution contain a statement as to whether enactment of the 
bill or resolution would have an inflationary impact on prices 
and costs in the operation of the national economy. In 
accordance with this requirement, it is the opinion of the 
Committee that enactment of this bill would not have an 
inflationary impact on prices and costs in the operation of the 
national economy.
    The total amount recommended in the bill is $27,586,129,000 
in new budget authority for the departments, agencies and 
commissions considered by the Committee. Considering the 
diversity of the programs funded in this bill, the Committee 
has concluded that there is no inflationary impact on prices 
and costs in the operation of the national economy.

                   Comparison With Budget Resolution

    Section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget and 
Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, requires that the report accompanying a bill providing 
new budget authority contain a statement detailing how the 
authority compares with the reports submitted under section 
602(b) of the Act for the most recently agreed to concurrent 
resolution on the budget for the fiscal year. This information 
follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                  Section    Recommended
                                                   602(b)      in this  
                                                 allocation      bill   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Budget authority:                                                       
    Mandatory.................................          532          505
    Discretionary.............................       23,100       23,098
    Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund........        4,022        3,982
                                               -------------------------
      Total budget authority..................       27,654       27,585
                                               =========================
Outlays:                                                                
    Mandatory.................................          525          501
    Discretionary.............................       24,422       24,496
    Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund........        2,066        2,005
                                               -------------------------
      Total outlays...........................       27,013      27,002 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Note.--The amount included in this bill as shown above does not include 
  estimates of the effect of H.R. 1944. The Emergency Supplemental      
  Appropriations and Rescissions Bill for FY 1995. The estimates were   
  not included since H.R. 1944 had not received final Congressional     
  approval at the time this report was filed. If H.R. 1944 is approved, 
  the amount scored to this bill will change and the new amount will be 
  within the 602(b) subdivision.                                        

    The bill provides no new spending authority as described in 
section 401(c)(2) of the Congressional Budget and Impoundment 
Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as amended.

                    Five-Year Projection of Outlays

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344) as amended, the following tables contain 
five-year projections of the outlays associated with the budget 
authority provided in the accompanying bill:

                        Fiscal Year 1996 Outlays
                        [In millions of dollars]

Budget authority........................................         $27,585
Outlays:
    1996................................................          19,396
    1997................................................           4,717
    1998................................................           2,664
    1999................................................             688
    2000 and future years...............................             116
               Assistance To State And Local Governments

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(D) of the 
Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344), as amended, the new budget authority and 
outlays provided by the accompanying bill for financial 
assistance to State and local governments are as follows:

                                                                Millions
FY 1996 new budget authority............................          $1,150
FY 1996 outlays resulting therefrom.....................             209
                   Programs, Projects, and Activities

    During fiscal year 1996, for purposes of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 
99-177), as amended, the following information provides the 
definition of the term ``program, project, and activity'' for 
departments and agencies under the jurisdiction of Commerce, 
Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies 
Subcommittees of the House and Senate. The term ``program, 
project, and activity'' shall include the most specific level 
of budget items identified in the Departments of Commerce, 
Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act of 1996, as passed the House and the House 
report accompanying said Act.
    In implementing any Presidential order, departments and 
agencies shall apply the percentage reduction required for 
fiscal year 1996 pursuant to the provisions of Public Law 99-
177 to each program, project, activity and subactivity 
specified in the budget justification documents submitted to 
the Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate in 
support of the fiscal year 1996 budget estimates, as amended, 
for such departments and agencies, as modified by Congressional 
action. In addition, the departments and agencies, in 
implementing the Presidential order, shall apply the percentage 
reduction required for fiscal year 1996 to each grantee of such 
department or agency as applicable. In addition, the 
departments and agencies in implementing the Presidential 
order, shall not: (1) eliminate any program, project or 
activity; (2) reorder priorities or funds; or (3) initiate any 
program, project or activity that was not funded in the fiscal 
year 1996 Appropriations Act. However, for purposes of program 
execution, departments and agencies may propose reprogramming 
between programs, projects and activities pursuant to the 
provisions of the Committee's reprogramming procedures after 
they implement the reductions required under the Balanced 
Budget Act.

            Reprogrammings, Reorganizations, and Relocations

    The House and Senate reports accompanying the 
appropriations bills for the Departments of Commerce, Justice, 
and State, the Judiciary, and the Related Agencies for several 
years have contained sections concerning the reprogramming of 
funds between programs or activities. This matter is addressed 
in section 605 of the General Provisions contained in the 
accompanying bill.
    The Committee expects each department and agency to follow 
closely the reprogramming procedures listed below which are 
similar to provisions that applied in statute during fiscal 
year 1995:
    The Committee desires and expects that the Chairman of the 
Subcommittee on the Departments of Commerce, Justice, and 
State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies will be notified by 
letter a minimum of 15 days prior to--
          (1) Reprogramming of funds, whether permanent or 
        temporary, in excess of $500,000 or 10 percent, 
        whichever is less, between programs or activities. This 
        provision is also applicable in cases where several 
        activities are involved with each receiving less than 
        $500,000. In addition, the Committee desires to be 
        notified of reprogramming actions which are less than 
        these amounts if such actions would have the effect of 
        committing the agency to significant funding 
        requirements in future years.
          (2) Increasing funds or personnel by any means for 
        any project or activity for which funds have been 
        denied or restricted.
          (3) Creation of new programs, offices, agencies or 
        commissions or substantial augmentation of existing 
        programs, offices, agencies or commissions.
          (4) Relocation of offices or employees.
          (5) Reorganization of offices, programs, or 
        activities.
    In addition, the Committee desires and expects any 
department or agency funded in the accompanying bill which is 
planning to conduct a reduction-in-force to notify the 
Committee by letter 30 days in advance of the date of the 
proposed personnel action.
    The Committee also expects that any items which are subject 
to interpretation will be reported.
    The Committee is concerned that in some instances, the 
department or agencies funded within this Appropriations Act 
are not adhering to the Committee's reprogramming policy and 
procedures which are set forth in this report and in section 
605 of the accompanying bill. The Committee expects each 
department and agency funded in the bill to follow these 
notification policies precisely and not reallocate resources or 
reorganize activities prior to submitting the required 
notifications to the Committee. The Committee has provided each 
of the departments, the Judiciary, the Small Business 
Administration, and the United States Information Agency with 
transfer authority, which is the same as the transfer authority 
provided in the fiscal year 1995 Appropriations Act. The 
Committee believes such authority, together with the 
traditional reprogramming policy, gives each department, the 
Judiciary, the Small Business Administration, and the United 
States Information Agency the needed discretion to respond to 
unanticipated circumstances and requirements which may arise 
throughout the fiscal year.

           Relationship With Budget and Comptroller's Offices

    Through the years, the Appropriations Committee has 
channeled most of its inquiries and requests for information 
and assistance through the budget offices or comptroller 
organizations of the various departments, agencies, commissions 
and the Judiciary. The Committee has often pointed out the 
natural affinity and relationship between these organizations 
and the Appropriations Committee which makes such a 
relationship imperative. The Committee reiterates its position 
that while it always reserves the right to call upon all 
organizations in the departments, agencies, commissions and the 
Judiciary for information and assistance, the primary liaison 
between the Committee and these entities must be through the 
budget offices and comptroller organizations.
    The Committee appreciates all of the assistance received 
from each of the departments, agencies, commissions and the 
Judiciary during this past year. The workload generated in the 
budget process is large and growing, and therefore, a positive, 
responsive relationship between the Committee and the budget 
and/or comptroller offices is absolutely essential to the 
appropriations process of the United States Government.

              Staffing and Operations Outside of the U.S.

    The Committee is concerned that there does not appear to be 
any systematic control over the size and growth of Federal 
department and agency presence outside of the U.S., raising the 
likelihood that resources are being misallocated. Total 
staffing abroad continues to grow, even as the staffing of 
traditional foreign affairs agencies has remained level or 
declined in recent years. The State Department is responsible 
for much of the central administrative costs of the presence of 
all agencies outside of the U.S. This leads to the situation 
where agencies other than the State Department can expand their 
international presence without having to consider the true 
cost.
    Furthermore, as each agency deploys its own resources, the 
net result can be a staffing pattern and an agency presence in 
a particular country that does not match the overall U.S. 
interest in that country.
    The lack of a system for determining overall allocation of 
resources and for allocating true cost among agencies for 
operations outside of the U.S. is especially troubling because 
of the cost implications--it costs two to three times as much 
to maintain an employee outside of the U.S. as it does within 
the U.S. It is clear that rationalizing and systematizing 
staffing and operations in foreign countries has the potential 
for large budgetary savings.
    The Committee has addressed these issues throughout the 
report, particularly under the Department of State. But at the 
outset, the Committee wishes to make it clear that any 
expansion of staffing or presence overseas is to be brought to 
the attention of the Committee at the outset of the planning 
process, well in advance of the proposed use of any funds 
appropriated in this Act, or any prior or subsequent 
appropriations Acts, preferably through the annual budget 
submission, and as a last resort through the reprogramming 
process. The Committee is intent upon finding the proper way to 
assure control of the deployment of personnel and resources 
outside of the U.S.

                     TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

    The Committee recommends $14,474,522,000 in new budget 
(obligational) authority in the accompanying bill for the 
Department of Justice for fiscal year 1996. This amount is 
$2,231,454,000 more than the appropriation for the current 
year, and is $816,517,000 below the budget request for fiscal 
year 1996. Of the total amount provided, $10,534,035,000 is 
derived from general purpose funds, which represents an 
increase of $635,967,000 over the current year. The remaining 
$3,940,487,000 is derived from the Violent Crime Reduction 
Trust Fund, which is an increase of $1,595,487,000 in spending 
from this Trust Fund over the current year.
                         General Administration

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends a total of $74,282,000 for General 
Administration for fiscal year 1996, reflecting the requested 
appropriation of $49,450,000 to a new account for the 
Administrative Review and Appeals function and $365,000 to the 
Criminal Division for the Executive Office of Asset Forfeiture. 
The total amount provided after these changes is $4,454,000 
more than the current year appropriation.
    This account funds the development of policy objectives and 
the overall management of the Department of Justice. The 
Committee recommendation includes funding at the current year 
level for these activities but eliminates funding of $1,546,000 
for the Office of the Associate Attorney General as proposed in 
the House-passed Budget Resolution.
    The Committee recommendation also includes a $5,000,000 
base transfer from the Immigration and Naturalization Service 
(INS) to this account for additional Departmental management 
and financial oversight of INS. The Committee believes that 
``hands-on'' assistance to the INS in the management of day to 
day activities and the implementation of significant hiring and 
expansion initiatives is most critical. Therefore, the 
Committee supports the base transfer of $5,000,000 to General 
Administration instead of to the Office of the Inspector 
General, as proposed in the budget request.
    Counterterrorism Initiative.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $1,000,000 to support six additional positions, 
including three attorneys, for the Office of Intelligence 
Policy and Review (OIPR). This office is responsible for 
coordination, development, and implementation of Departmental 
policy on intelligence and national security matters. The 
additional resources will support greater oversight, direction 
and monitoring of Department of Justice counterterrorism and 
counterintelligence activities. The Committee understands that 
one of the most important and sensitive positions within the 
Department of Justice is held by the Counsel for Intelligence 
Policy within OIPR and expects that any individual holding this 
position have substantial experience in the areas of national 
security and intelligence.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous fiscal years, making up to $3,317,000 
of this appropriation available until expended for the 
Facilities Program 2000.

                         Counterterrorism Fund

    The Committee recommends $26,898,000 for the 
Counterterrorism Fund which was established in the 1995 
Supplemental Appropriation for Oklahoma City. This Fund is 
under the control and direction of the Attorney General, to: 
(1) cover the extraordinary and contingency costs that have 
occurred and are expected to occur as a result of the Oklahoma 
City bombing and (2) to cover costs related to any potential or 
actual future domestic or international terrorist act.
    Of the amount provided, $1,500,000 is for payments to State 
and local law enforcement agencies for their assistance in 
emergency situations. In addition, $2,500,000 is provided for 
payment of rewards in accordance with section 106 of this Act.
    Because there may be necessary expenses that arise in such 
events that are not known at the present time, the Committee 
recommendation allows the Attorney General to make the 
determination on a case-by-case basis of the necessary expenses 
which may be covered by funds appropriated to this account. The 
Attorney General may also use these funds to engage in 
planning, and the executions of plans, related to upcoming 
significant events which offer the potential of being targeted.
    The Attorney General is required to notify the Committees 
on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
Senate in accordance with section 605 of this Act, prior to the 
obligation of any funds from this account.

                   Administrative Review and Appeals

    The Committee recommends the establishment of a new 
appropriation account for Administrative Review and Appeals and 
funding of $87,516,000 for fiscal year 1996, of which 
$47,780,000 is provided from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust 
Fund. These activities were previously carried out under the 
General Administration, Salaries and Expenses account. These 
activities include: (1) the Executive Office for Immigration 
Review (EOIR), which includes the Board of Immigration Appeals, 
Immigration Judges, and Administrative Law Judges who decide 
through administrative hearings whether to admit or exclude 
aliens seeking to enter the country, and whether to deport or 
adjust the status of aliens whose status has been challenged; 
and (2) the Office of the Pardon Attorney which receives, 
investigates and considers petitions for all forms of Executive 
clemency.
    Immigration Reform Initiative.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $86,102,000 for the Executive Office 
for Immigration Review (EOIR), which represents an increase of 
$36,652,000 over the current year appropriation. This increase 
fully supports the request for 45 additional judges and 106 
attorneys and support positions for the immigration reform 
initiative. Of the total amount provided for EOIR, $33,433,000 
is for positions and expenses related to Expeditious 
Deportation for Denied Asylum and $14,347,000 is for Expanded 
Special Deportation Proceedings under the Violent Crime 
Reduction Trust Fund.

                      Office Of Inspector General

    The Committee recommends $30,484,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General for fiscal year 1996. This amount is 
$6,260,000 below the request, and equals the current year 
appropriation.
    The Committee recommendation assumes that the Inspector 
General will continue to receive full reimbursement for 
services provided to the U.S. Trustees and the Environmental 
Protection Agency. However, the Committee did not include the 
requested base transfer of $5,000,000 from the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service (INS) to conduct audits of INS 
activities. Instead, this base transfer is provided to the 
General Administration account for additional management and 
financial oversight of INS. The Committee expects that to the 
extent audits are planned for non-appropriated accounts for the 
INS, subject to the reprogramming requirements of section 605 
of this Act, the Inspector General may be reimbursed from these 
accounts. Approval of any reprogrammings will be based on a 
showing that these audits will be more strategic in assisting 
INS in the improvement of its overall operations.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous fiscal years, which makes: (1) up to 
$10,000 of this appropriation available for emergencies of a 
confidential nature; and (2) funds available for the 
acquisition of motor vehicles.

                         U.S. Parole Commission

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends $5,446,000 for the Parole 
Commission for fiscal year 1996. This amount is $2,004,000 less 
than the current year appropriation, and is $1,335,000 below 
the request.
    This Commission is an independent body within the 
Department of Justice which makes decisions regarding requests 
for parole and supervision of Federal prisoners. As a result of 
legislation that established sentencing guidelines, the Parole 
Commission is scheduled to terminate by November 1, 1997. 
Therefore, the Committee's recommendation assumes that the 
Commission's staff will be reduced by one-third from the 
current staffing level.
    Phase Down of the Parole Commission.--The Committee 
understands that, after the sunset of the Parole Commission, 
there will still be casework that will require review. The 
Committee requests that the Parole Commission and the Judiciary 
conduct a joint study to assess the feasibility of transferring 
all remaining workload of the Commission to the Federal 
Judiciary by September 30, 1996 and report the findings of this 
study to the Committee by March 1, 1996.

                            Legal Activities

                        General Legal Activities

    The Committee recommends a total of $409,520,000 for 
General Legal Activities for fiscal year 1996, of which 
$7,591,000 is provided from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust 
Fund. The total amount recommended is $11,914,000 less than the 
current year appropriation, and $35,131,000 less than the 
request.
    This appropriation supports the Attorney General through 
the establishment of litigation policy, conduct of litigation, 
and various other legal responsibilities, through the Office of 
the Solicitor General, the Tax Division, the Criminal Division, 
the Civil Division, the Environmental and Natural Resources 
Division, the Office of Legal Counsel, the Civil Rights 
Division, INTERPOL--U.S. National Central Bureau, and the 
Office of Special Counsel for Immigration Related Unfair 
Employment Practices.
    The Committee recommendation assumes funding at the 1995 
level and includes a base transfer of $365,000 from the General 
Administration appropriation for the Executive Office for 
Assets Forfeiture to the Criminal Division. The recommendation 
includes increases of $5,000,000 for the Civil Rights Division 
for consolidation of activities currently performed by the 
Community Relations Service with regard to Conflict Prevention 
and Resolution and $2,991,000 from the Violent Crime Reduction 
Trust Fund to sustain the full cost of Civil Division attorneys 
for the immigration reform initiative.
    Counterterrorism Initiative.--The Committee recommends 
$2,207,000 for the Criminal Division to support 15 positions, 
including 10 attorneys, for expert assistance in the 
prosecution of the Oklahoma City bombing case and other alleged 
international and domestic terrorist investigations.
    Transfer of Tax and Environment Attorneys.--The Committee 
recommendation includes an initiative to transfer the costs 
associated with 200 attorneys who conduct tax and environment 
litigation to the U.S. Attorneys Offices. The Committee 
understands that both the Tax Division and Environment and 
Natural Resources Division, as well as the U.S. Attorneys 
Offices, conduct litigation of this nature. The Committee 
further understands that memoranda of understanding are 
necessary to avoid overlap or jurisdictional issues with regard 
to these activities being performed by these offices and that 
extensive travel resources are required for Division attorneys 
to travel to U.S. Attorneys Offices to conduct this litigation. 
The Committee believes that it is more efficient and cost 
effective to conduct litigation activities of this nature at 
the U.S. Attorneys Offices. Thus, the Committee recommendation 
includes a decrease of $22,477,000 for the General Legal 
Activities and a corresponding increase for the U.S. Attorneys 
appropriation. The Committee expects that there will not be a 
decrease in litigation related to these activities as a result 
of this initiative, and that tax and environmental policy 
guidance will still be developed by the Tax and Environment and 
Natural Resources Divisions.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous fiscal years, which: (1) allows up to 
$20,000 for expenses of collecting evidence; (2) makes up to 
$10,000,000 for litigation support contracts available until 
expended; (3) makes up to $22,618,000 for office automation 
systems available until expended; (4) makes up to $1,000 
available to the U.S. National Central Bureau--INTERPOL for 
reception and representation expenses; and (5) allows 
acceptance of gifts for hosting the 1996 INTERPOL regional 
conference. In addition, new language is included to authorize 
General Legal Activities to carry out functions previously 
performed by the Community Relations Service.

               The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act

    The Committee recommends a reimbursement of $4,028,000 for 
fiscal year 1996 from the Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust 
Fund to cover Justice Department expenses associated with 
litigating cases under the National Childhood Vaccine Injury 
Act of 1986. This represents an increase of $1,528,000 over the 
current year appropriation to handle increased workload.

                 Civil Liberties Public Education Fund

    The Committee recommendation does not provide the 
additional $5,000,000 requested for educational activities 
pursuant to section 106(b) of the Civil Liberties Act of 1988. 
The current year appropriation provided $5,000,000 for expenses 
of a nine member Board of Directors to reprint the findings of 
the President's Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment 
of Civilians and to sponsor exhibits, publications and oral 
histories about the internment experiences of Japanese-
Americans. To date, only eight of the nine members have been 
named and all still require Senate confirmation. As a result, 
the entire $5,000,000 available in the current year is likely 
to carryover into 1996 and will be available for expenditure.

               Salaries And Expenses, Antitrust Division

    The Committee recommendation assumes a total of $85,143,000 
in budget (obligational) authority for the Antitrust Division 
for fiscal year 1996, freezing the appropriation at the amount 
provided in the current year. Of this amount, $48,262,000 will 
be derived from anticipated fee collections in fiscal year 
1996, and $16,000,000 will be derived from unobligated fiscal 
year 1995 fee collections, resulting in a net direct 
appropriation of $20,881,000.
    This Division acts on antitrust cases before the Supreme 
Court, represents the interests of the United States in cases 
brought under Federal antitrust laws, reviews decisions of 
regulatory commissions, and prepares and files amicus briefs.
    The recommendation includes bill language for the Antitrust 
Division, similar to that included in previous fiscal years, 
which: (1) allows $48,262,000 in fees to be credited to this 
account; (2) reduces appropriated funds as fees are collected; 
and (3) makes fees in excess of $48,262,000 available until 
expended in fiscal year 1997. Language proposed in the budget 
is also included which adds the phrase ``from the General 
Fund'' to make it clear that the source of appropriated funding 
for the Division is the General Fund of the U.S. Treasury.

             Salaries And Expenses, United States Attorneys

    The Committee recommends a total of $911,556,000 for the 
U.S. Attorneys for fiscal year 1996, of which $14,731,000 is 
provided from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund. The total 
amount provided is an increase of $60,732,000 above the current 
year appropriation and $27,638,000 below the request.
    This appropriation supports the Executive Office for U.S. 
Attorneys and the 94 U.S. Attorneys Offices which serve as the 
principal litigators for the U.S. Government for criminal, 
civil and debt collection matters.
    The Committee recommendation assumes requested adjustments 
to base and does not require the U.S. Attorneys to absorb the 
cost of the 1996 pay raise as proposed in the budget. The 
Committee understands that the absorption of this cost would 
have required a reduction of 45 attorneys and 44 support 
personnel.
    The recommendation does not include the continuation of the 
Violent Crime Task Force Initiative provided in 1995. The 
Committee believes that the U.S. Attorneys demonstrated an 
inability to manage the timely dissemination of these funds. 
The Committee strongly supports the continuation of violent 
crime task forces but believes that these resources are better 
provided through grants administered by the Bureau of Justice 
Assistance in the Office of Justice Programs. Significant 
funding increases for these types of activities for fiscal year 
1996 are provided under the Office of Justice Programs, State 
and Local Law Enforcement Assistance from the Violent Crime 
Reduction Trust Fund.
    Immigration and Violent Crime Initiatives.--The 
recommendation provides a total of $14,731,000 and 115 FTE from 
the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund, including an increase 
of 40 attorneys and 20 support personnel for activities related 
to both violent crime prosecution and the immigration reform 
initiative. Also included is $500,000 to implement a Federal 
victims' counselors program under the Violence Against Women 
Act.
    Counterterrorism Initiative.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $16,288,000 for the U.S. Attorneys to support the 
Command Center established in Oklahoma City to handle the 
investigation and prosecution of those involved in the Oklahoma 
bombing and any other incident that may be related to this 
incident, and to enhance security at U.S. Attorneys Offices 
that occupy leased space. The Committee understands that 
continued operation of the Command Center will result in 
additional costs related to the travel of detailed attorneys 
and support staff, supplies, space, equipment rentals, and 
litigation expenses and has provided $6,288,000 to cover these 
costs.
    In addition, $10,000,000 is provided for X-ray and scanning 
equipment and contract security officers at 109 U.S. Attorneys 
Offices currently occupying leased space. Bill language is 
included that allows $4,000,000 of these resources to remain 
available until expended for purchase of the security 
equipment.
    Transfer of Tax and Environment Attorneys from General 
Legal Activities.--The Committee recommendation includes an 
initiative to transfer the costs associated with 200 attorneys 
who conduct tax and environment litigation from the Tax 
Division and the Environment and Natural Resources Division to 
the U.S. Attorneys Offices. The Committee believes that 
litigation of this nature should be primarily conducted in the 
U.S. Attorneys Offices for both cost efficiency and 
effectiveness and expects that the U.S. Attorneys will ensure 
that litigation in these areas continues at least at current 
levels. The Committee recommendation includes an increase of 
$25,000,000 for these attorney positions and expects that 
consideration be given first to employees of the Tax and 
Environment and Natural Resources Divisions due to their 
expertise in this type of casework. The Committee expects that 
tax and environmental policy guidance will still be developed 
by the Tax and Environment and Natural Resources Divisions.
    Teamsters Election.--The Committee supports the ongoing 
efforts of the Department of Justice to rid the International 
Brotherhood of Teamsters of mob dominance. While the Committee 
agrees that it is in the best interest of the nation to have a 
mob-free union, it is most beneficial to the union itself. The 
Committee also agrees that the Department of Justice should not 
bear the full cost of the supervision of the upcoming elections 
which the Committee understands will amount to approximately 
$21,000,000. In the Conference Report accompanying the 
Department of Justice and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 
1995 (H. Rept. 103-708), the conferees agreed that for fiscal 
years 1996 and 1997, the cost for the supervision of this 
election should be shared by the Justice Department, the 
Department of Labor and the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters. As such, the Committee provides that up to 
$6,000,000 of the amounts available to the Department of 
Justice for fiscal year 1996 may be allocated for this purpose, 
subject to either the reprogramming authorities provided in 
Section 605 of this Act or the transfer authorities in Section 
107 of this Act. It is further expected that the Department of 
Justice will provide to the Committee, by March 1, 1996, a 
proposed financing plan that has been developed with the 
Department of Labor and the International Brotherhood of 
Teamsters for the remaining expenses of the supervision of this 
election in fiscal years 1996 and 1997, which includes a 
projection of expenses that will be incurred by the 
International Brotherhood of Teamsters.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous fiscal years, which: (1) makes up to 
$2,500,000 for debt collection purposes available until 
September 30, 1997; (2) makes up to $10,000,000 for automated 
litigation support contracts available until expended; and (3) 
makes available up to $8,000 to be used for official reception 
and representation expenses.

                   United States Trustee System Fund

    The Committee recommendation provides a total of 
$101,596,000 in budget (obligational) authority for the U.S. 
Trustees for fiscal year 1996. Of this amount, $44,191,000 will 
be derived from anticipated offsetting fee collections, 
resulting in a net direct appropriation of $57,405,000 from the 
U.S. Trustee System Fund. The Committee recommendation for 
fiscal year 1996 is $1,587,000 below the amount provided for 
the current fiscal year, and is $7,649,000 below the request.
    The U.S. Trustee System provides administrative support to 
expeditiously move bankruptcy cases through the bankruptcy 
process and ensures accountability of private trustees 
appointed to administer bankruptcy estates and with regard to 
debtors. Public Law 99-554, the Bankruptcy Judges, U.S. 
Trustees, and Family Farmer Bankruptcy Act of 1986, established 
a U.S. Trustee System Fund in the U.S. Treasury, and provided 
for the collection of fees into the Fund to finance program 
operations.
    Decline in Bankruptcy filings.--The recommendation assumes 
an overall decline in bankruptcy filings in 1996, as assumed in 
the budget, but reduces the amount of funding to correspond to 
this decline, which was not reflected in the budget request. 
The Committee understands that due to this decline, Chapter 11 
filing fees which partially finance this program are 
anticipated to drop significantly. However, because cases with 
assets to administer often take two to three years, the pending 
caseload still in progress will require ongoing attention. The 
Committee recommendation includes an extension of the quarterly 
fee payments made under Chapter 11 to include the period after 
a reorganization plan has been confirmed by the Bankruptcy 
Court until the case has been dismissed (i.e., the post-
confirmation period). Presently, quarterly fees are collected 
only until the plan of reorganization in the case is confirmed 
by the court. The additional fees will be deposited as 
offsetting collections to the United States Trustee System Fund 
and will provide the resources necessary to ensure adequate 
post-confirmation oversight and supervision of Chapter 11 
cases.
    The recommendation also includes bill language which: (1) 
allows deposits to the U.S. Trustee System Fund to be used to 
pay refunds due depositors; (2) allows $44,191,000 in 
offsetting fee collections to be retained and used for 
necessary expenses in this appropriation; (3) reduces 
appropriated funds as such fees are collected; and (4) makes 
offsetting fee collections in excess of $44,191,000 available 
until expended in fiscal year 1997.

                  Foreign Claims Settlement Commission

    The Committee recommends $830,000 for the Foreign Claims 
Settlement Commission for fiscal year 1996. This amount freezes 
the appropriation at current levels, which is $75,000 below the 
budget request. The Commission settles claims of American 
citizens arising out of nationalization, expropriation, or 
other takings of their properties and interests by foreign 
governments.

         Salaries And Expenses, United States Marshals Service

    The Committee recommends $443,973,000 for the United States 
Marshals Service for fiscal year 1996, of which $25,000,000 
will be provided from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund. 
This amount represents an increase of $47,191,000 above the 
current year appropriation, and $19,414,000 below the amount 
requested.
    The primary mission of the 94 U.S. Marshals Offices is the 
protection of the Federal Judiciary, protection of witnesses, 
execution of warrants and court orders, and the custody and 
transportation of unsentenced prisoners.
    Security at New and Expanded Courthouses.--The Committee 
recommendation provides for requested adjustments to base, 
including the cost of the 1996 pay raise. In addition, the 
recommendation provides for the following program changes from 
the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund to ensure the security 
of 31 new and expanded Federal courthouses scheduled to open in 
1996:
          +$18,209,000 and +137 Deputy U.S. Marshals and +30 
        support personnel to fully staff and operate Marshals 
        Service activities in new courthouses scheduled to open 
        in fiscal year 1996 (an additional $20,051,000 is 
        included in the Federal Prison System, Buildings and 
        Facilities account for 144 additional prisoner holding 
        cells); and
          +$6,791,000 for courthouse security and 
        communications equipment;
    Counterterrorism Initiative.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $10,000,000 for security personnel staff and equipment 
for the trial and prosecution of persons involved in the 
Oklahoma bombing and to correct security deficiencies at 
existing Federal courthouses.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous appropriations acts, which allows up 
to $6,000 to be used for official reception and representation 
expenses, and allows for the acquisition of motor vehicles for 
police-type use without regard to the general purchase price 
limitation.
    U.S. Marshals Service Reorganization Plan.--The Committee 
has recently received a reorganization plan from the Department 
of Justice for the U.S. Marshals Service. The Committee has a 
number of questions concerning the details of the plan, 
particularly regarding any proposed changes to the way in which 
U.S. Marshals are appointed. Therefore, the Committee expects 
that no action be taken by the Department of Justice to approve 
the plan, or by the Marshals Service to implement the plan, 
until the Committee has thoroughly reviewed and formally 
approved the proposal.

                   Support Of United States Prisoners

    The Committee recommendation includes a direct 
appropriation of $250,331,000 for the Support of United States 
Prisoners account for fiscal year 1996 which, when combined 
with $40,000,000 in prior year unobligated balances, results in 
total funding availability of $290,331,000. This represents 
$5,000,000 below the request and $6,422,000 below the current 
year appropriation. Under this program, the U.S. Marshals 
contract with State and local jails and private facilities to 
house unsentenced Federal prisoners for short periods of time 
usually before and during trial and while awaiting transfer to 
Federal institutions after conviction.
    The recommendation provides the full amount required for 
the current rate of expenditures from this account and does not 
provide for a projected increase in jail days or for an 
increase in rates in fiscal year 1996.
    Review of current reimbursement practices for jail space.--
The Committee is recommending a significant increase in 
resources from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund to 
provide grants to States to build, expand, and operate space in 
correctional facilities. The Committee believes, in light of 
the significant level of resources being provided under this 
program, that the Department of Justice should reexamine its 
current practice and rates of reimbursement for bedspace it 
``rents'' from State and local agencies for the short term 
housing of Federal prisoners. The Committee directs the 
Department to review the current reimbursement structure with 
the goal of ensuring space availability and reducing the cost 
to the Federal government and report the findings of this 
review to the Committee no later than March 1, 1996.

                     Fees And Expenses Of Witnesses
    The Committee recommends $85,000,000 for Fees and Expenses 
of Witnesses for fiscal year 1996. This amount is the full 
budget estimate for this program, which is considered mandatory 
for budget scorekeeping purposes. This appropriation provides 
for fees and expenses of witnesses who appear on behalf of the 
Government in cases in which the United States is a party, 
including fact and expert witnesses, mental competency 
examinations, and witness/informant protection.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous appropriations acts, which allows: 
(1) up to $4,750,000 for protected witness safesites; (2) up to 
$1,000,000 for the purchase and maintenance of armored vehicles 
for prisoner transportation; and (3) up to $4,000,000 available 
for the purchase, installation and maintenance of a secure 
automated information system.

                      Community Relations Service

    The Committee recommends consolidation of activities and 
funding of the Community Relations Service (CRS) under the 
Civil Rights Division and the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service.
    The Community Relations Service was established by Title X 
of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 to provide assistance to 
communities in resolving disagreements arising from 
discriminatory practices. The agency is also responsible for 
administering the program of assistance for Cuban and Haitian 
entrants. The transitional care of Mariel Cubans paroled from 
detention was funded from this account in previous years, but 
was transferred to the Federal Prison System, Salaries and 
Expenses appropriation in fiscal year 1995.
    Transfer of functions to the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service.--The recommendation provides $10,057,000 as requested, 
to resettle Cuban and Haitians entering the United States. The 
Committee understands that the CRS resettlement program 
utilizes grants to national voluntary agencies to resettle 
Cubans and Haitians paroled by the INS from INS Service 
Processing Centers and the safe haven at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba. 
The Committee recommends that this funding be provided from the 
Immigration Examinations Fee account. Funding of $11,000,000 
was provided for these activities from the Immigration Exams 
Fee account in fiscal year 1995 through a reimbursement 
agreement with CRS. The Committee understands that expenses of 
this nature are within the scope of the Immigration Exams Fee 
account.
    Transfer of functions to the Civil Rights Division.--The 
Committee recommendation provides $5,000,000 for racial 
conflict prevention and resolution activities, but moves these 
activities under the direction of the Civil Rights Division. 
The Committee understands that the CRS has been effective in 
providing technical assistance and training to State and local 
communities and provides the resources to carry out these 
activities at the request of local parties.

                         Assets Forfeiture Fund

    The Committee recommends $35,000,000 for the Assets 
Forfeiture Fund for fiscal year 1996, which is $20,000,000 
below both the amount requested and the current year 
appropriation. This account provides funds to supplement 
existing resources to cover additional investigative expenses 
of the FBI, DEA, INS and U.S. Marshals, such as awards for 
information, purchase of evidence, equipping of conveyances and 
investigative expenses leading to seizure. Funds for these 
activities are provided from receipts deposited in the Assets 
Forfeiture Fund resulting from the forfeiture of assets. 
Expenses related to the management and disposal of assets are 
also provided from the Assets Forfeiture Fund, by a permanent 
indefinite appropriation.
    The Committee notes that any funds remaining in the Assets 
Forfeiture Fund, after payment of expenses for the disposal of 
assets and the appropriation mentioned above, are available to 
the Attorney General for a variety of law enforcement needs, 
including items for which the appropriation has been reduced.
    Timeliness of the Disposal of Forfeited Assets.--The 
Committee understands that the U.S. Marshals Service has 
initiated various actions to address problems with the timely 
disposal of forfeited property, such as contract management 
reviews at certain districts, revision of procurement policies 
and additional training to the seized asset management staff. 
The Committee also understands that the consolidation of asset 
management and disposition functions of the Departments of 
Justice and Treasury could address duplication and provide cost 
savings to the management and disposal process. The Committee 
expects the Department to review the feasibility of 
consolidating contracts with vendors that provide these 
services for both the U.S. Marshals and the Department of 
Treasury agencies. The Committee also expects the U.S. Marshals 
to continue to implement new practices that improve the 
timeliness of disposal of assets.

                    Radiation Exposure Compensation

                        Administrative Expenses

    The Committee recommends $2,655,000, the full amount 
requested and the same level as the current year appropriation, 
for the expenses of the Civil Division necessary to handle 
claims and litigation arising from the Radiation Exposure 
Compensation Act. This program was established to permit the 
payment of claims to individuals exposed to radiation as a 
result of atmospheric nuclear tests and uranium mining in 
accordance with the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act of 
1990.

          Payment to the Radiation Exposure Compensation Fund

    The Committee recommendation includes an advance 
appropriation of $16,264,000 for fiscal year 1997 to make 
payments to approved claimants under the Radiation Exposure 
Compensation Act of 1990. The Committee understands that the 
request of $16,264,000 for 1996 is no longer required due to a 
projected balance in the Radiation Exposure Compensation Trust 
Fund that will be available for projected payments in 1996.

                      Interagency Law Enforcement

                 Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement

    The Committee recommends $374,943,000 for Interagency Crime 
and Drug Enforcement for fiscal year 1996. This amount is 
$3,530,000 below the request, and is the same level of funding 
provided in the current year appropriation.
    The Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement program, through 
its 13 regional Task Forces, utilizes the combined resources 
and expertise of its 11 member Federal agencies, in cooperation 
with State and local investigators and prosecutors, to target 
and destroy major narcotics trafficking and money laundering 
organizations.
    The Committee recommends bill language, similar to that 
included in previous appropriations acts, which: (1) allows for 
intergovernmental agreements; (2) makes $50,000,000 available 
until expended; (3) allows funds to be used under existing 
authorities available to participating organizations; and (4) 
allows the Attorney General to reallocate unobligated balances 
among participating organizations.
    The recommendation provides funds to the following 
agencies:

                        REIMBURSEMENTS BY AGENCY                        
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                    FTE       Thousands 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
DEA...........................................          987      $99,020
FBI...........................................        1,073      108,883
INS...........................................          107       10,563
Marshals......................................           13        1,172
Customs.......................................          318       28,133
BATF..........................................           96       10,270
IRS...........................................          423       37,147
Coast Guard...................................            9          868
US Attorneys..................................          895       75,287
Criminal Division.............................            6          755
Tax Division..................................           12        1,293
Administrative Office.........................           13        1,552
                                               -------------------------
      Total...................................        3,952     $374,943
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    Federal Bureau of Investigation

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends a total operating level of 
$2,381,021,000 for the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) 
for fiscal year 1996, which includes $48,940,000 of resources 
available in 1996 from the supplemental appropriation provided 
in 1995 for expenses related to the Oklahoma City bombing, and 
$80,600,000 from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund. This 
operating level is $149,226,000 above the appropriation for the 
current year and $104,090,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee assumes the availability of 22,395 direct-funded FTE 
for the FBI for fiscal year 1996, an increase of 997 FTE above 
fiscal year 1995 levels.
    Counterterrorism Initiative.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $170,200,000 to enhance the FBI's investigative 
capabilities in responding to major terrorism incidents and 
activities. Of this amount, $98,400,000 is for construction and 
is included under a separate heading and $50,000,000 is 
provided for digital telephony. The remaining $21,800,000 is 
provided for the following:
          +$9,900,000 to enable the FBI to modernize its 
        forensic laboratory equipment;
          +$2,600,000 for 75 forensic examiners, technicians, 
        and support personnel;
          +$2,900,000 to provide Emergency Response Teams with 
        proper equipment and tools for the collection and 
        processing of crime scene evidence;
          +$1,400,000 for personnel to staff the FBI Command 
        Center for better coordination of law enforcement 
        agencies in emergency situations;
          +$1,500,000 to upgrade the hostage/barricade 
        database; and
          +$3,500,000 to establish a gang/terrorist database 
        for NCIC 2000.
    Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund resources.--The 
Committee recommendation provides for proposed adjustments to 
base, including the cost of the 1996 pay raise. Included in 
this amount is $27,737,000 from the Violent Crime Reduction 
Trust Fund for 630 FTE to fully sustain the restoration of 
positions that was provided in the 1995 appropriation. In 
addition, resources from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund 
will support $45,363,000 of current FBI expenses for State and 
local training and other State and local assistance programs. 
The Committee recommendation also includes program increases 
from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund which include:
          +$5,500,000 for the FBI's combined DNA Index System;
          +$2,000,000 for computerized automation and 
        technology improvements at the FBI training academy.
    Digital Telephony.--Funding of $50,000,000 is provided for 
research efforts and engineering services to develop new 
techniques and equipment to perform court-approved wiretaps and 
interceptions of communications. The Committee understands that 
the use of wiretaps and other electronic surveillance is 
critical to counterterrorism, criminal and counterintelligence 
investigations. However, funding provided in this bill is only 
available for obligation after completion of counterterrorism 
authorization legislation, which will address wiretapping 
authorities for the FBI.
    Available resources due to hiring lapses.--The Committee is 
aware that the FBI has approximately $48,000,000 in base 
resources available as a result of lapses in backfilling a 
large number of agents that have retired. The Committee 
understands that this lapse in hiring is the result of a large 
number of new recruitments and training constraints resulting 
from additional positions provided in 1995 and the additional 
requirements now resulting from these unanticipated 
retirements. The Committee believes that the FBI should use 
these available resources in 1995 to offset equipment needs for 
new hires in 1996.
    Crime on Federal Public Lands.--The Committee is concerned 
about reports it has received about increasing crime on Federal 
public lands. The Committee urges the Department of Justice law 
enforcement agencies to coordinate with the appropriate land 
management agencies on efforts to reduce these violations. The 
Committee instructs the Department of Justice, Office of 
Investigative Agencies Policy to review, in consultation with 
the Department of the Interior and the Department of 
Agriculture, the best methods to address the increasing crime 
on Federal public lands and report the findings of this review 
to the Committee by March 1, 1996.
    Violent Crime Strategic Plan.--The Committee wants to 
ensure that resources provided to the Department of Justice are 
coordinated in the most effective way to address the nation's 
most important crime problem--violent crime. The Committee 
understands, from its hearing on March 9, 1995, with the 
Department of Justice law enforcement agencies, that there are 
a number of efforts and task forces ongoing within the 
Department of Justice to address this problem. The Committee is 
concerned that the Department lacks an overall strategic plan 
that outlines the goals, actions, and expected results of these 
and future efforts to combat violent crime. The Committee 
therefore directs the Office of Investigative Agencies Policy 
to develop a five-year strategic plan that is focused on 
reducing violent crime in this country and provide this plan to 
the Committee by March 1, 1996.
    National Drug Intelligence Center.--The Committee is 
pleased to note that the National Drug Intelligence Center is 
now fully operational. The Committee believes that this Center 
can be a vital new resource for law enforcement personnel and 
can contribute greatly to the apprehension of major drug 
traffickers that threaten the safety and security of our 
citizens. The Committee recognizes that the success of this 
operation will depend on the ability to integrate NDIC assets 
into the operational and technical planning of the Department 
of Justice's war on drugs. Recognizing that new and somewhat 
different operational arrangements may be required, the 
Committee directs the Office of Investigative Agency Policies 
to ensure that proper coordination continues to take place.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous appropriations acts, which allows: 
(1) for purchase of passenger vehicles without regard to 
general purchase price limitations, and the acquisition and 
operation of aircraft; (2) up to $70,000 for unforeseen 
emergencies; (3) up to $50,000,000 for ADP, telecommunications 
and technical equipment, and up to $1,000,000 for undercover 
operations to remain available until September 30, 1997; (4) up 
to $14,000,000 for research and development to remain available 
until expended; (5) up to $10,000,000 to reimburse State and 
local police for assistance related to violent crime, terrorism 
and drug investigations; (6) $1,500,000 for an IAFIS program 
office; and (7) up to $45,000 for official reception and 
representation expenses. New language is also included as a 
general provision that allows surcharges currently collected 
for fingerprint checks to be used to offset the costs of NCIC 
2000 development in addition to automation of fingerprint 
identification services. In addition, bill language which 
specified the amount for the Fingerprint Identification System 
is no longer included. However, the Committee expects that of 
the resources provided, $84,400,000 will be used for expenses 
related to automation of fingerprint identification services. 
Any change to this amount requires notification to the 
Committee pursuant to reprogramming requirements outlined in 
section 605.

                              Construction

    The Committee recommends $98,400,000 for construction for 
the FBI, which is $859,000 less than the requested amount. 
However, the Committee does not recommend the architectural 
design and site planning for three new facilities as proposed 
by the Administration. Instead, the recommendation channels 
resources to the most critical projects; namely, upgrades to 
the existing FBI Command Center and a new Forensic Laboratory.
    The Committee understands that renovations, equipment and 
telecommunications upgrades to the Command Center are vitally 
needed to provide the capability of addressing multiple sites 
and incidents concurrently, and to support the centralized 
coordination of law enforcement for major incidents such as the 
Oklahoma City bombing. The Committee has provided $10,000,000 
to complete these upgrades.
    The Committee has also provided $88,400,000 for 
architectural design, site planning, and the first phase of 
construction of a new FBI Laboratory Facility. The Committee 
understands that the existing FBI Laboratory facility, located 
in the FBI Headquarters Building, is inadequate for current 
needs and that there are continuing safety concerns related to 
having such a facility in a multi-story office building in a 
densely-populated area. This facility was constructed nearly 25 
years ago and is critical to examining crime evidence and 
solving criminal and terrorist cases. In addition, State and 
local law enforcement entities depend on FBI Laboratory 
services which are not available through local or regional 
facilities. The Committee understands that a new facility would 
permit the use of new technologies and would allow the 
collocation of forensic science research and development 
activities, which are currently housed at the FBI Training 
Academy, with the operational components of the FBI laboratory, 
and that federally-owned property at Ft. Belvoir, Virginia has 
been made available for this facility.
    The Committee expects the FBI to provide a construction 
plan and timeline for completion of this facility to the 
Committee by November 15, 1995.

                    Drug Enforcement Administration

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends total budget authority of 
$793,488,000 for the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for 
fiscal year 1996, of which $47,241,000 is derived from the 
Diversion Control Fund, and $12,000,000 is derived from the 
Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund. This amount is $16,680,000 
below the budget request and $36,975,000 above the funding 
level for the current year. The Committee assumes the 
availability of 6,409 FTE for fiscal year 1996, which will 
allow the DEA to increase staffing by 199 FTE above fiscal year 
1995 levels.
    The Committee recommendation provides for requested 
adjustments to base, including the cost of the 1996 pay raise. 
Of this amount, $12,000,000 is provided from the Violent Crime 
Reduction Trust Fund to ensure that the increase of 311 agents 
and 125 support personnel provided in 1995 will be fully funded 
in 1996.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous appropriations acts, which allows: 
(1) up to $70,000 for unforeseen emergencies; (2) for expenses 
for drug education and training; (3) purchase of passenger 
vehicles without regard to general purchase price limitations, 
and acquisition and operation of aircraft; (4) up to $1,800,000 
for research to remain available until expended; (5) up to 
$4,000,000 for evidence and information, up to $4,000,000 for 
ADP and telecommunications, and up to $2,000,000 for technical 
and laboratory equipment to remain available until September 
30, 1997; and (6) up to $50,000 for official reception and 
representation expenses. In addition, new technical language is 
included that allows DEA to transfer $15,000,000 of the DEA 
appropriation used for the Diversion Control Program to the 
Diversion Control Fee account to simplify the accounting and 
costs for that program. The Committee understands that 
currently the $15,000,000 is provided via reimbursement 
agreement and that this change will not affect the amount of 
funding provided to the Diversion Control Program.

                 Immigration and Naturalization Service

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends total new budget (obligational) 
authority of $2,557,470,000 for the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service for fiscal year 1996 which includes 
$11,000,000 for construction provided under a separate account. 
This is a net increase of $486,480,000 over the current fiscal 
year. Of the total amount recommended, $303,542,000 is derived 
from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund and $821,447,000 
will be derived from offsetting fee collections.
    The Committee recommendation provides for the full request 
for adjustments to base, and also restores the $7,210,000 and 
100 FTE reduction proposed in the budget associated with the 
absorption of the 1996 pay raise.
    Enforcing Our Immigration Laws.--Recognizing the need for 
stronger enforcement against illegal immigration, the Committee 
recommendation includes $344,932,000 in program increases to 
support an immigration initiative focused on controlling the 
border, removing illegal aliens, especially criminals, and 
reducing job opportunities for illegal aliens. The increases 
provide for over 3,000 new INS personnel--over 1,400 more 
personnel on the front lines of the border, including 1,000 new 
and redeployed border patrol agents and 400 new inspectors, and 
over 1,500 more investigations and detention and deportation 
personnel to locate, apprehend and remove illegal aliens from 
the United States. In addition, 2,800 more detention beds will 
be available to detain illegal aliens, and $157,464,000 of base 
resources are provided to continue the border systems 
modernization effort started last year which will provide for a 
fingerprint-based identification system and automated lookout, 
files and case-tracking systems.
    Border Control.--A total increase of 1,246 positions, 539 
FTE and $128,985,000, of which $16,785,000 is from the Violent 
Crime Reduction Trust Fund, is recommended to enhance border 
control, including:
          +$71,400,000 for 700 new border patrol agents, 140 
        support personnel and the relocation of 300 border 
        patrol agents from interior stations to the front lines 
        of the border;
          +$12,600,000 for camera surveillance systems, 
        fingerprinting equipment, sensors and an additional 
        helicopter for the border patrol;
          +$20,000,000 for 400 new land border inspectors for 
        the Southern border;
          +$20,285,000 for automated border lookout systems 
        including piloting of an exit control system;
          +$4,700,000 to conduct a pilot interior repatriation 
        effort in the San Diego area, targeting over 5,000 of 
        the most serious violators, including the worst 
        recidivists, to the interior of Mexico;
    Detention and Removal of Deportable Aliens.--An increase of 
1,244 positions, 622 FTE and $125,447,000, of which $24,547,000 
is from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund, is recommended 
to apprehend, locate, detain and deport illegal aliens, 
including:
          +$41,700,000 and 384 Detention personnel to increase 
        detention capacity by over 2,800 beds, including 1,836 
        detention beds in State and local detention facilities, 
        and 976 beds in INS Detention centers;
          +$40,447,000, 171 investigations personnel, 232 
        detention and deportation personnel, and 154 INS 
        attorneys and legal and management support, to support 
        the Institutional Hearing Programs (IHP) in California, 
        Texas, Florida, New York, and Illinois, and expand the 
        IHP to Arizona and New Jersey. This program is a 
        coordinated effort among INS, the Executive Office for 
        Immigration Review, and Federal and State correctional 
        facilities, to identify, hold hearings and secure final 
        orders of deportation for criminal aliens while they 
        are still serving their criminal sentence;
          +$25,800,000 and 235 Deportation personnel for 
        removal of abscondees, criminal aliens and illegal 
        aliens who have been denied asylum, or administratively 
        deported, or apprehended from worksites;
          +$5,200,000 and 68 deportation personnel to support 
        an initiative to add warrants for arrest into the 
        National Crime Information Center (NCIC) for aliens who 
        are repeat offenders of reentry after deportation; and
          +$12,300,000 for health and safety renovations to INS 
        Service Processing Centers and for the purchase of new 
        vehicles for the transportation of detainees.
    Worksite Enforcement and Verification.--An increase of 604 
positions, 303 FTE, and $79,500,000 is recommended to enforce 
sanctions against employers who hire illegal aliens and to 
support a means to systematically verify employment eligibility 
of all new hires, including:
          +$43,000,000 and 454 investigations personnel to 
        backfill 300 border patrol agents who will be relocated 
        from interior offices and who are primarily performing 
        employer sanctions enforcement activities, and to 
        expand targeted sanctions programs in industries that 
        have a high incidence of employing illegal workers;
          +$31,100,000 and 69 records personnel to improve the 
        accuracy of INS records, develop pilots with the Social 
        Security Administration and the Department of Labor for 
        verification systems, and expand the current INS 
        Telephone Verification System program to almost 1,000 
        employers; and
          +$5,400,000 and 81 legal, management, and fraudulent 
        document laboratory personnel to support worksite 
        enforcement casework.
Offsetting fee collections

    The Committee recommends a total of $821,447,000 in 
offsetting fee collections, an increase of $188,132,000 over 
the current year, to support activities related to the legal 
admission of persons into the United States. These activities 
are supported entirely by fees paid by persons who are either 
traveling internationally or are applying for immigration 
benefits. The following increases are recommended:
    Inspections User Fees.--An anticipated increase of 
$26,132,000 in revenues from persons paying fees on 
international flights or sea travel will support the following 
inspections activities:
          +$7,121,000 for adjustments to base activities 
        including 84 FTE for inspectors added in 1995; and
          +$19,011,000 to upgrade automated lookout systems at 
        airports, including upgrades to the Interagency Border 
        Inspection System (IBIS) to include the electronic data 
        exchange of visa information between INS and the 
        Department of State overseas posts; the development of 
        electronic arrival and departure records; and a pilot 
        system of exit controls in conjunction with the 
        Department of State.
    The Committee also supports the removal of the exemption 
for cruise lines from the payment of inspections user fees, 
included in legislation recently introduced in the House (H.R. 
1915). The Committee understands that the removal of this 
exemption will provide $21,000,000 in revenue that could be 
used to further enhance the inspection of persons entering the 
United States.
    Immigration Examinations Fees.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $450,217,000 of spending from 
offsetting collections from persons applying for immigration 
benefits. This represents an increase of $159,120,000 over the 
level approved for 1995 and includes the following:
          +$13,475,000 for adjustments to base, including pay 
        raises and inflation;
          +$135,588,000 and 1,351 FTE to support 
        naturalization, adjustment of status processing, mail 
        and data entry, refugee processing in Moscow and Cuba, 
        and improvements to the ASK IMMIGRATION telephone 
        system; and
          +$10,057,000 to support the costs of resettlement 
        activities of the Cuban and Haitian entrant program 
        that will be transferred from the Community Relations 
        Service.
    Land Border Inspections Fees.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $5,965,000 in spending from the Land Border Inspection 
Fund. Fees are generated under this account for the 
implementation of pilot programs such as Dedicated Commuter 
Lanes along the Northern border and in California. Language was 
requested in the budget that would remove the prohibition for 
collection of fees for these projects along the Southern 
border. Currently, only fees can be collected in California. 
The Committee understands that a repeal of this language would 
allow for the implementation of a border crossing fee through 
administrative regulations. The Committee does not support the 
concept of a border crossing fee.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous appropriations acts, which allows: 
(1) up to $50,000 to meet unforeseen emergencies and up to 
$5,000 to be used for official reception and representation 
expenses; (2) for the purchase of motor vehicles for police-
type use and for uniforms, without regard to general purchase 
price limitations; (3) for the acquisition and operation of 
aircraft and for immigration-related research; (4) up to 
$400,000 for research to be available until expended; (5) up to 
$25,000 to be paid to individual employees for overtime; and 
(6) up to $10,000,000 for basic officer training. In addition, 
new language is added to allow for the transfer of up to 
$30,000,000 to the Department of Labor and the Social Security 
Administration for the establishment of verification systems.
    Border Patrol.--The Committee recommendation fully funds 
the salaries and related expenses (including vehicles, personal 
equipment, training and additional space) associated with the 
hiring of 700 new Border Patrol Agents. In addition, the 
Committee recommendation includes resources to transfer 300 
Border Patrol Agents from interior offices back to the front 
lines of the border, thereby providing 1,000 additional agents 
on the front lines of the border.
    The Committee understands that interior border patrol 
stations were opened during the Bracero period to maintain a 
Border Patrol presence in agricultural areas to regulate and 
oversee the Bracero program. These stations have remained, 
largely due to shortages of investigative resources to carry 
out employer sanctions activities. The Committee recommends 
that these stations remain open but that they be staffed with 
investigative positions to improve coordination of the employer 
sanctions program. In addition, the border patrol agents in 
these stations are more experienced and are critically needed 
along the border especially in light of the large number of new 
border patrol agents being hired. The Committee recognizes that 
some border patrol agents may opt to convert to the 
investigator positions; however, the Committee has provided 
$12,000,000 for the relocation and transfer of border patrol 
agents moved to the more immediate border areas. This transfer 
would accomplish two significant goals--a coordinated employer 
sanctions approach and additional experienced personnel on the 
front lines of the border.
    The Committee also recognizes the management challenges 
facing the INS in order to accomplish the hiring of over 3,000 
new personnel included in this recommendation. In a hearing 
before the Committee on February 22, 1995, the Attorney General 
revealed to the Committee that the INS was having difficulty 
maintaining a hiring and training schedule for the 700 new 
agents provided in 1995 as well as backfilling behind agents 
who had retired or resigned. As a result, 149 of the 700 agents 
provided last year will not be hired until 1996. The Committee 
notes that the number of border patrol agents on-board at the 
end of fiscal year 1994 was 4,219. Legislation recently 
introduced in the House (H.R. 1915) recommends an increase of 
at least 1,000 agents over this level. With the hiring that 
will occur based on the Committee's appropriation in 1995 and 
its recommendation for 1996, the number of border patrol agents 
expected to be on-board at the end of fiscal year 1996, is 
5,678--or 1,459 more than were on-board as of September 30, 
1994.
    The Committee would also urge the Department to seek, on 
behalf of INS, the allowable waivers from the Office of 
Personnel Management that would allow INS to reemploy retired 
(with no loss of retirement pay) Border patrol agents: (1) 
either as instructors where feasible so as to not draw 
currently employed, experienced Border patrol agents off the 
line into training academy duties; or (2) to use reemployed 
retirees on the border to free up current, experienced Border 
Patrol agents to act as temporary training officers.
    The Committee expects that INS will deploy these agents to 
the Southwest border to support the greatest areas of illegal 
traffic. The Committee also expects that INS consult with the 
Appropriations Committees of both the House and the Senate 
before a final allocation of these agents is decided.
    California Checkpoints.--The Committee has included a 
provision prohibiting the INS from operating Border Patrol 
traffic checkpoints located in San Clemente and Temecula, 
California. Further, the Committee directs the INS to 
immediately redeploy all resources and personnel from those 
checkpoints to San Diego Border Patrol stations for activities 
along the California-Mexico border. The Committee expects the 
INS to submit, no later than September 15, 1995, a report on 
the plan to implement this directive. The Committee also 
expects the INS to submit a reprogramming pursuant to section 
605 of this Act.
    Immigration Inspectors at Land Border Ports of Entry.--The 
Committee understands that the success of increased border 
enforcement adds significant pressure at the ports of entry. 
The Administration requested new inspectors to address this 
activity but suggested that a new border crossing fee be 
implemented to finance these inspectors. The Committee rejects 
the proposed border crossing fee and has provided 400 new 
inspectors from direct appropriations. The Committee has been 
informed that the ratio of supervisors to inspectors in the 
Inspections program is so significantly high that only a small 
percentage of these inspectors may actually be performing 
front-line activities. The Committee also notes that 
Headquarters staffing for the Inspections program has doubled 
since 1992, largely due to staffing associated with the User 
Fee program. The Committee directs the INS to review its 
supervisory ratio and Headquarters staffing in the Inspections 
program and report to the Committee by January 1, 1996, a plan 
to reduce this ratio and the number of staff at headquarters 
and move INS inspectors to ``front-line'' activities. The 
Committee also expects that the entire 400 new inspectors 
provided in this recommendation be used as ``front-line'' 
employees to staff lanes for the facilitation of traffic across 
the border. The INS should consult with the Appropriations 
Committees of both the House and Senate as to the activities 
and locations of these inspectors before these resources are 
deployed.
    Pilot Program to Collect Records of Departing Passengers.--
The Committee has provided resources to both the INS and the 
Department of State for automated systems upgrades to support 
the identification and tracking of persons entering the United 
States. Consistent with Section 113 of H.R. 1915, as introduced 
in the House, the Committee expects the INS, in conjunction 
with the State Department, to establish a pilot program in 
three of the five airports with the heaviest volume of incoming 
traffic from foreign territories, in which INS officers collect 
a record of departure for every alien departing the United 
States, match the records of departure with the record of the 
alien's arrival, and provide relevant information back to State 
Department Consular Offices. The Committee expects INS to 
consult with the Committee on the development of this proposal 
and to submit a plan for implementation of this pilot program 
to the Committee by no later than January 15, 1996.
    Unified Port Management Pilot Project.--The Committee notes 
that the recommendation for 1996 for the U.S. Customs Service 
may include a unified port management pilot project in which 
the U.S. Customs Service will designate a single director of 
all port activities at two pilot ports, one on the Southern 
border and one on the Northern border. This project is intended 
to improve coordination among Federal inspection agencies as 
well as with State and local agencies. The Committee expects 
INS to provide input in the selection of the port director and 
to participate in these pilot projects and their evaluation.
    Inspections Staffing at Miami International Airport.--The 
Committee is concerned that Miami International Airport (MIA) 
is experiencing severe delays in the processing of arriving 
international passengers by INS officials. Due to the 
understaffing of these INS inspectors at this airport, delays 
of up to two hours in length are occurring during peak arrival 
times, thus causing arriving passengers to miss connecting 
flights to other domestic and international destinations. The 
Committee understands that this situation will be further 
exacerbated this summer by the opening of a new international 
terminal requiring extended hours of operation of the Federal 
Inspection Facilities and the normal increase in summer flight 
schedules. This understaffing may also create a limitation of 
capacity of MIA which is in direct violation of bilateral air 
agreements. Therefore, the Committee directs INS to provide the 
already authorized levels of INS inspectors to the MIA to avoid 
future serious delays to arriving passengers.
    Operation Alliance.--The Committee's recommendation 
includes the full level of resources provided in the current 
year that is dedicated to Operation Alliance. This operation is 
a multi-agency entity whose primary mission is to facilitate 
and improve the coordination of the drug-related law 
enforcement organizations operating in the Southwest Border 
area of the United States. The Committee understands that a 
significant amount of the cocaine in the United States comes 
through Mexico and specifically through El Paso, Texas. The 
Committee supports the continued program levels for Operation 
Alliance.
    INS Management Reforms.--The Committee's recommendation 
includes a $5,000,000 base transfer from the INS to the 
Department of Justice, General Administration account for 
additional oversight of INS financial and management 
activities. The budget request proposed that this base transfer 
be provided to the Office of the Inspector General for auditing 
INS programs. The Committee believes that INS is in greater 
need of practical, hands-on management assistance and therefore 
has included these resources to the General Administration. It 
is expected that the Department will provide greater financial 
and management assistance to the INS in the form of personnel 
details and special oversight of hiring and contracting to 
implement the immigration reform initiative.
    Administrative Centers.--The Committee understands that INS 
has developed an administrative centers concept for its 
administrative offices in Burlington, Vermont, Laguna Niguel, 
California, Dallas, Texas and Minneapolis, Minnesota. The 
Committee understands that this concept will assist INS in the 
management of its administrative functions and provide 
uniformity, eliminate duplication and improve customer service 
in such areas as personnel, accounting, procurement, debt 
collection, and files and forms management. The Committee 
expects INS to continue its implementation of its 
Administrative Center concept and expects its full 
implementation by the end of fiscal year 1997.

                              construction

    The Committee recommends $11,000,000 for construction of 
facilities for the Immigration and Naturalization Service. The 
current year appropriation includes $50,000,000 in construction 
resources for border infrastructure requirements. Of the amount 
recommended, $6,000,000 will provide for improvements that are 
vitally needed to correct extensive health and safety code 
deficiencies to existing border patrol facilities in South 
Texas and Arizona, and $5,000,000 will augment resources 
provided in 1994 for the construction of a joint U.S. Marshals/
INS detention center in the Northeast region of New York, as 
requested in the budget under Salaries and Expenses.

                         Federal Prison System

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends $2,588,078,000 for the Salaries 
and Expenses of the Federal Prison System for fiscal year 1996, 
including $13,500,000 from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust 
Fund for Inmate Drug Treatment programs. This amount is 
$55,681,000 less than the budget request, and is an increase of 
$236,444,000 over total amounts available in the current year.
    Due to the critical importance of providing adequate space 
for the incarceration of sentenced and unsentenced Federal 
prisoners, and the need to activate newly constructed prison 
facilities, the Committee gave special consideration to the 
operating funds of the Federal Prison System. The Committee 
recommendation provides for requested adjustments to base, 
including $140,394,000 to annualize 3,084 additional positions 
provided in 1995 for new prison activations.
    Activation of New Prisons.--The Committee understands that 
due to delays in scheduled activations for 1996, as well as 
$40,000,000 in funds that will carryover from fiscal year 1995 
as a result of slippages in activations from facilities that 
were scheduled to open in 1995, the appropriation required for 
the Federal Prison System can be reduced by $55,681,000 without 
affecting requested program levels. The Committee further 
understands that as a result of these slippages, the detention 
center in Brooklyn, New York and the low security facility in 
Yazoo City, Mississippi will not open in 1996 as originally 
planned. As a result, the Committee recommendation includes 
$56,942,000 to activate the following 10 new and expanded 
facilities:
          --Beaumont, Texas--1,536 bed low security and 512 bed 
        minimum security facility;
          --Taft, California--1,536 bed low security and 512 
        bed minimum security facility;
          --Forrest City, Arkansas--1,536 bed low security 
        facility;
          --Expansions at the following 5 institutions: 
        Tallahassee, Florida; Milan, Michigan; Lompac, 
        California; Fort Worth, Texas; and Lexington, Kentucky;
    In addition, the recommendation provides for the following 
program increases:
          +$15,464,000 to support a projected increase in the 
        inmate population;
          +$22,416,000 to support a projected increase in the 
        population in Community Corrections Centers;
          +$4,945,000 to support a projected increase in the 
        use of State and local facilities to house inmates;
          +$10,765,000 to support inmate care programs, 
        including $3,190,000 for kidney dialysis services and 
        $7,575,000 for infectious disease control, which will 
        address tuberculosis, sexually transmitted diseases, 
        hepatitis, and HIV/AIDS;
          +$1,702,000 for drug treatment programs for inmates; 
        and
          +$684,000 for Institution Security and 
        Administration.
    Privatization of Federal Prisons.--Of the facilities 
scheduled to open in 1996, the Administration proposed the 
privatization of the operations of the facilities in Taft, 
California and Forrest City, Arkansas. In addition, the 
Administration proposed the privatization of the majority of 
future pretrial detention, minimum and low security Federal 
prisons.
    The Committee understands that the Federal Bureau of 
Prisons has relatively limited experience regarding the cost 
and performance of private prisons and believes the budget 
proposal to privatize all future pre-trial and the majority of 
low and minimum security prisons goes too far, too fast. 
Therefore, the Committee expects the Bureau of Prisons to 
privatize only the facilities proposed for activation in Taft, 
California, in fiscal year 1996.
    In addition, in an effort to determine the future level of 
privatization of pre-trial, minimum and low security prisons, 
the Committee directs the Bureau of Prisons to undertake a 
comprehensive study of both the Eloy, Arizona contract prison 
and the Taft, California prisons, to include comparison of 
costs and quality of correctional programs to that of 
comparable Federally-operated prison facilities. These cost/
benefit studies should be provided to the Committee no later 
than September 30, 1996. In addition, the Committee expects 
that the Bureau of Prisons reexamine its proposal for 
privatization of the Yazoo City, Mississippi and Forrest City, 
Arkansas to consider any future plans with regard to expansions 
of these complexes to include medium and/or maximum security 
facilities.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding to support 
353 positions and 54 FTE above the level requested in the 
budget to reflect the net impact of the delay in scheduled 
activations and the privatization of only one prison project.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous appropriations acts, which allows: 
(1) for the purchase of motor vehicles for police-type use and 
the purchase of uniforms without regard to the general purchase 
price limitation; (2) for the provision of technical advice to 
foreign governments; (3) for transfer of funds to the Health 
Resources and Services Administration; (4) for the Director to 
enter into contracts to furnish health care; (5) up to $6,000 
for reception and representation expenses; (6) up to 
$50,000,000 for activation of prisons to remain available until 
September 30, 1997; (7) up to $20,000,000 for contract 
confinement expenses for the care and security of Cuban and 
Haitian entrants. In addition, one-time language is deleted, as 
proposed in the budget, for the transfer of balances from the 
Community Relations Service for the care of Mariel Cubans.

                   National Institute Of Corrections

    The Committee does not recommend the $10,158,000 requested 
for the National Institute of Corrections (NIC). Instead, the 
recommendation assumes consolidation of the National Institute 
of Corrections (NIC) program within the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) 
Salaries and Expenses appropriation. The Committee has not 
provided additional resources to the Salaries and Expenses 
appropriation for these activities and expects these functions 
to be absorbed within current resources provided. However, the 
Committee assumes elimination of the NIC grants program and a 
reduction of five positions associated with NIC grants 
administration and NIC administrative responsibilities.
    The Committee recognizes that there are some functions that 
are performed by NIC that may be of use and supports the 
continuation during 1996 of the following functions under the 
Bureau of Prisons Contract Confinement and Community 
Corrections program: (1) direct training of jails, prisons and 
community corrections personnel; (2) corrections security 
audits; (3) corrections staffing analyses; (4) collection and 
dissemination of corrections information; (5) emergency site 
visits to State and local corrections systems; (6) duties of 
the Correctional Job Training and Placement Office; and (7) 
Task Force activities on prison construction. Because these 
activities are primarily performed on behalf of State and local 
entities, the Committee expects BOP, when practical and to the 
maximum extent possible, to pursue reimbursement from State and 
local entities for these services in order to provide a 
significant portion of funding for these activities through 
reimbursements, and present a plan to Committee by March 1, 
1996, that provides a reimbursement structure that will fully 
support these activities.
    D.C. Corrections Department Study.--The Committee provided 
resources in the 1995 Appropriations Act for the NIC to perform 
an in-depth study of the District of Columbia Department of 
Corrections. The Committee expects that this report will be 
completed and provided to the Committee by September 30, 1995.

                        Buildings And Facilities

    The Committee recommends a total of $323,728,000 for fiscal 
year 1996 for the construction, modernization, maintenance and 
repair of prison and detention facilities housing Federal 
prisoners. This amount is $47,427,000 above the amount 
appropriated for the current fiscal year, and is the full 
amount requested.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous appropriations acts, which allows: 
(1) for planning, acquisition of sites, and construction of 
facilities; (2) for leasing a facility in Oklahoma City; (3) 
for acquisition, remodeling, and equipping facilities by 
contract or force account; (4) up to $14,074,000 to construct 
inmate work areas; (5) for use of prisoner labor; (6) up to 10 
percent of this appropriation to be transferred to the Salaries 
and Expenses account; and (7) for up to $22,351,000 for 
renovation and construction of Marshals Service prisoner 
holding facilities. In addition, language is deleted for 
limitation on funds for projects under the Cooperative 
Agreement Program because no funds are provided for this 
program.
    The recommendation provides the full request for base 
adjustments and the following program changes:
          +$64,500,000 for construction of a medium security 
        facility at the Beaumont, Texas prison complex;
          +$96,550,000 for architectural and engineering 
        services and the construction of a medium security 
        facility and camp in Lee County, Virginia;
          +$12,350,000 for site and planning of a Mid-Atlantic 
        Region correctional facility
          +$14,253,000 for site acquisition for contract 
        detention space in Hawaii;
          +$20,051,000 for construction of 144 additional 
        holding cells for use by the U.S. Marshals Service; and
          +$4,526,000 for health and safety renovations and 
        repairs to existing facilities.
    The Committee encourages the use of local labor and 
services, where appropriate and cost-effective, for the 
construction of these facilities.

                Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated

                (Limitation On Administrative Expenses)

    The Committee recommends a limitation on administrative 
expenses of $3,559,000 for the Federal Prison Industries, 
Incorporated for fiscal year 1996, which is the full amount 
requested, and $96,000 above the current year limitation.
    Bureau of Prison's support for the 1996 Paralympic Games.--
The Committee supports efforts to use inmate training 
activities in the planning and production of products for the 
1996 Paralympic Games.

                       Office of Justice Programs

    The Committee recommends a total of $3,762,828,000 in new 
budget (obligational) authority for fiscal year 1996, including 
$3,435,743,000 from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund, for 
the various law enforcement assistance, juvenile justice, 
research and statistics programs of the Office of Justice 
Programs (OJP). This amount represents an increase of 
$1,343,428,000 over the current year appropriation and 
$232,825,000 below the budget request. Included in these 
amounts are funds to expand programs providing assistance to 
the States, such as a Local Law Enforcement Block Grant 
program, State Prison Grant program, State Criminal Alien 
Assistance Program, Violence Against Women Grant program, Byrne 
Grant program, Weed and Seed program, Juvenile Justice and 
Delinquency Prevention, and Victims of Child Abuse programs.

Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund Programs

    The Committee recommendation includes $3,435,743,000 from 
the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund for programs that 
provide State and local assistance. This amount represents an 
increase of $1,374,743,000 over the current year appropriation 
from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund and $33,457,000 
below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding for a Local 
Law Enforcement Block Grant program pursuant to H.R. 728 which 
passed the House on February 14, 1995 as an amendment to the 
Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994. This 
program is funded in place of the Community Oriented Policing 
Services program in order to give over 39,000 State and local 
law enforcement agencies the discretion to fund additional 
police, equipment, technology and/or prevention programs such 
as drug courts.
    The Committee recommendation also includes funding for 
State Prison Grants pursuant to H.R. 667 which passed the House 
on February 10, 1995 as an amendment to the Violent Crime 
Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994. Of the amount provided 
for this program, $200,000,000 is available to States to 
supplement other funds provided for the incarceration of 
criminal aliens.
    The following State and local assistance programs are 
provided from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund and are 
explained in more detail under Justice Assistance and State and 
Local Law Enforcement Assistance:

     OFFICE OF JUSTICE PROGRAMS--VIOLENT CRIME REDUCTION TRUST FUND     
                        [In Thousands of dollars]                       
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                             1995         1996 request    Recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Justice Assistance:                                                     
    Drug Courts......      $29,000         $150,000      ...............
    Violence Against                                                    
     Women...........       26,000          174,900          $74,500    
    Ounce of                                                            
     Prevention                                                         
     Council \1\.....        1,500      ...............  ...............
    Crime Prev. Block                                                   
     Grants..........  ...............       30,000      ...............
    Model Intensive                                                     
     Grant Program...  ...............       48,216      ...............
    Substance Abuse                                                     
     Treat/Prisons...  ...............       27,000           27,000    
Other Crime Control                                                     
 Programs:                                                              
    Asst. for Delinq.                                                   
     & At-Risk Youth.  ...............        1,604      ...............
    Family Unity                                                        
     Demo. Projects..  ...............        1,922      ...............
    Missing                                                             
     Alzheimer's.....  ...............          900              900    
                      --------------------------------------------------
      Total Justice                                                     
       Assistance....      $56,500         $434,542         $102,400    
                      ==================================================
State and Local                                                         
 Assistance:                                                            
    Byrne Formula                                                       
     Grants..........     $450,000         $260,000         $475,000    
    Local Block Grant/                                                  
     COPS............    1,300,000        1,902,964        2,000,000    
    Brady Bill/                                                         
     Upgrade Criminal                                                   
     Records.........      100,000           25,000           25,000    
    State Prison                                                        
     Grants..........       24,500          500,000          500,000    
    State Criminal                                                      
     Alien Incarc.                                                      
     Grants..........      130,000          300,000          300,000    
    Youth Offender                                                      
     Incarceration...  ...............        9,643           19,643    
    Rural Law                                                           
     Enforcement.....  ...............       10,252      ...............
Other Crime Control                                                     
 Programs:                                                              
    Turberculosis in                                                    
     Prisons.........  ...............          200              200    
    Comm.-Based                                                         
     Grants/                                                            
     Prosecutors.....  ...............        5,000      ...............
    Law Enforcement                                                     
     Family Support..  ...............        1,205      ...............
    DNA                                                                 
     Identification                                                     
     State Grants....  ...............          482            1,000    
    Improved Training                                                   
     & Tech.                                                            
     Automation                                                         
     Grants..........  ...............        4,822           10,000    
    Ease State Court                                                    
     Burdens.........  ...............       11,090      ...............
    Gang                                                                
     Investigation                                                      
     Info. Collection  ...............        1,000            1,000    
    Motor Vehicle                                                       
     Theft Prevention  ...............        1,500            1,500    
    Senior Citizens/                                                    
     Marketing Scams.  ...............          500      ...............
    Presidential                                                        
     Summit on Crime.  ...............        1,000      ...............
                      --------------------------------------------------
      Total State and                                                   
       local                                                            
       assistance....   $2,004,500       $3,034,658       $3,333,343    
                      ==================================================
      Total Violent                                                     
       Crime                                                            
       Reduction                                                        
       Trust Fund....   $2,061,000       $3,469,200       $3,435,743    
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Requested as an Independent Agency in 1996.                         

                           Justice Assistance

    The Committee recommends $200,377,000 for Justice 
Assistance for fiscal year 1996, of which $102,400,000 will be 
derived from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund. The 
Justice Assistance activity provides assistance to States in 
the form of research, evaluation, statistics, information 
sharing, emergency assistance, missing children assistance and 
the management and administration of all grants provided 
through the Office of Justice Programs. In addition, funding 
from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund is recommended for 
grants associated with the Violence Against Women Act, 
Substance Abuse Treatment in State Prisons, and for the Missing 
Alzheimer's Patients Program. An explanation of each program 
follows:
    National Institute of Justice.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $28,000,000 for the National Institute 
of Justice (NIJ) for fiscal year 1996, which is $1,000,000 
above the amount provided for the current year appropriation. 
The NIJ is the Nation's primary source of research and 
development on crime and the criminal justice system. The NIJ 
also performs crucial evaluations of new programs and projects 
and distributes their findings to the States.
    National Study on Correctional Health Care.--The Committee 
understands that the need for correctional health care 
services, along with associated costs is growing at an alarming 
rate. More than 11 million persons are released from jails, 
prisons, and juvenile correctional facilities annually. Many of 
these persons have contracted drug-resistant tuberculosis, HIV/
AIDS, or have a history of substance abuse or mental illness. 
Without proper treatment, these individuals pose a direct and 
immediate health threat to the larger community. Within the 
overall amounts recommended for NIJ, the Committee encourages 
NIJ to undertake a national study on the health care assessment 
of services currently available in jails, prisons, and juvenile 
facilities, including the identification of problem areas, 
particularly as they relate to health care linkages which exist 
between correctional institutions and community health 
resources.
    Defense Technology.--The Committee is supportive of efforts 
by the Justice Department, in conjunction with the Department 
of Defense, to convert non-lethal defense technology to law 
enforcement use. Within the amount recommended, $3,000,000 is 
provided to continue the law enforcement technology information 
network in conjunction with the Regional Information Sharing 
System, that will provide States with information on new 
equipment and technologies, as well as assist law enforcement 
agencies in locating high cost/low use equipment for use on a 
temporary or emergency basis. In addition, of the amount 
recommended, $2,800,000 is provided to expand the technology 
commercialization initiative started in 1995.
    Bureau of Justice Statistics.--The Committee recommendation 
provides $21,379,000 for the Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) 
for fiscal year 1996, which is the same amount provided in the 
current year appropriation. BJS is responsible for the 
collection, analysis and publication of statistical information 
on crime, criminal offenders, victims of crime, and the 
operations of the Nation's justice systems.
    The Committee understands that the Violent Crime Control 
and Law Enforcement Act of 1994 instructed the Department of 
Justice to develop and disseminate model juvenile handgun 
legislation. The Committee directs the Department to report to 
the Committees on Appropriations of both the House and the 
Senate by August 15, 1995, on the status and scope of this 
legislation and expected completion date.
    Emergency Assistance.--The Committee recommendation 
provides no new budget authority for the Emergency Assistance 
program, as requested by the Department. This program offers 
Federal assistance to States in response to situations of an 
emergency nature.
    Missing Children.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$5,971,000 for the Missing Children program for fiscal year 
1996, which is the same amount provided in the current year 
appropriation. This program provides funds to combat crimes 
against children, particularly kidnapping and sexual 
exploitation.
    Regional Information Sharing System.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $14,500,000 for fiscal year 1996 for 
the Regional Information Sharing System (RISS), which is the 
same amount provided for the current year appropriation. The 
RISS program provides funds to maintain six regionally-based 
information sharing centers throughout the United States to 
assist States in addressing major, multi-jurisdictional crimes.
    National White Collar Crime Information Center.--The 
Committee recommends a total of $3,850,000 for the National 
White Collar Crime Information Center (NWCCC) for fiscal year 
1996. This program provides assistance to State and local law 
enforcement and regulatory agencies in addressing multi-
jurisdictional white collar crimes. Of the amount provided, 
$2,100,000 is for the ongoing operations of the NWCCC, and 
$1,750,000 is for the establishment of a State and local law 
enforcement support capability for computer crimes.
    Management and Administration.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $24,277,000 for the management and 
administration of the Office of Justice Programs. In addition, 
reimbursable funding will be provided from the Juvenile Justice 
account and the Violent Crime Reduction programs for the 
administration of grants under these activities.

    violent crime reduction trust fund programs, justice assistance

    The Committee recommendation includes $102,400,000 for two 
programs authorized under the Violent Crime Control and Law 
Enforcement Act of 1994. These programs are as follows:
    Violence Against Women Act.--The Committee recommends 
$74,500,000 for grants under the Violence Against Women Act. 
This amount represents an increase of $48,500,000 over the 
current year appropriation and $100,400,000 below the budget 
request. Grants provided under this recommendation are for the 
following programs:

Law Enforcement and Prosecution Grants to Combat Violent 
    Crimes Against Women................................     $32,750,000
Grants to Encourage Arrest Policies.....................      28,000,000
Rural Domestic Violence & Child Abuse Enforcement.......       7,000,000
Victims of Child Abuse Programs:
    Court-Appointed Special Advocate Program............       6,000,000
    Training for Judicial Personnel & Practitioners.....         750,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................      74,500,000

    The Committee notes that Law Enforcement and Prosecution 
Grants may be used to assist States, Indian Tribal governments 
and units of local government by providing personnel, training, 
technical assistance, data collection and equipment, and victim 
services programs for more widespread apprehension, 
prosecution, and adjudication of persons committing violent 
crimes against women. In addition, grants are provided to 
encourage States, Indian Tribal governments, or units of local 
governments to implement mandatory arrest of domestic violence 
offenders, improve tracking and coordination of police 
enforcement and prosecution of offenders and strengthen legal 
advocacy service programs for victims. Grants for Rural 
Domestic Violence and Child Abuse Enforcement Assistance target 
similar initiatives to rural States.
    The Committee also provides funding from the Violent Crime 
Reduction Trust Fund for the continuation of two programs that 
were previously funded under Juvenile Justice for Victims of 
Child Abuse--the Court Appointed Special Advocates Program and 
Child Abuse Training Programs for Judicial Personnel and 
Practitioners.
    Substance Abuse Treatment of State Prisoners.--The 
Committee recommends $27,000,000 for grants for use by States 
and units of local government for development and 
implementation of residential substance abuse treatment 
programs within State correctional facilities, and certain 
local correctional and detention facilities. The amount 
provided reflects the full amount authorized for this program 
under the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund for 1996.
    Safe Return Program.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$900,000 to continue and expand the national program to locate 
missing Alzheimer's patients.

               State And Local Law Enforcement Assistance

    The Committee recommends a total of $3,383,343,000 for 
fiscal year 1996, of which $3,333,343,000 is provided from the 
Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund. This amount represents an 
increase of $1,303,387,000 over fiscal year 1995 appropriations 
for State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance programs. These 
funds provide assistance to State and local governments in 
their drug control and other law enforcement efforts as 
follows:
    Edward Byrne Grants to States.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $525,000,000 for the Edward Byrne 
Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance Program, of 
which $50,000,000 is for discretionary grants and $475,000,000 
is provided under the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund for 
formula grants. This amount represents an increase of 
$25,000,000 over the current year appropriation.
    Discretionary Grants.--The Committee recommendation 
provides $50,000,000 for discretionary grants under Chapter A 
of the Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Assistance Program 
to be administered by the Bureau of Justice Assistance (BJA) to 
public or private agencies and nonprofit organizations, for 
educational and training programs, technical assistance, 
improvement of State criminal justice systems, and 
demonstration projects of a multi-jurisdictional nature. Within 
the amount provided for these discretionary grants, the 
Committee expects BJA to provide:
   $13,500,000 for the Weed and Seed program;
   $4,000,000 for State and local law enforcement 
        activities related to the 1996 Olympic Games;
   $3,000,000 for the National Crime Prevention Council 
        to continue and expand the National Citizens Crime 
        Prevention Campaign (McGruff);
   $1,750,000 to continue and expand the Drug Abuse 
        Resistance Education (DARE) program;
   $2,000,000 for continued funding for the Washington 
        Metropolitan Area Drug Enforcement Task Force;
   $1,000,000 for the National Judicial College to 
        provide drug legal education and training to State and 
        local trail judges;
   $4,350,000 for a grant to the Boys and Girls Clubs 
        of America to expand their very successful community-
        based crime prevention programs; and
   $1,000,000 to the SEARCH Group, Inc. to continue and 
        expand the National Technical Assistance Program, which 
        provides support to State and local criminal justice 
        agencies to improve their use of computers and 
        information technology.
    The Committee also encourages the Attorney General to 
provide grants to public or private agencies and private 
nonprofit organizations for advanced education and training of 
criminal justice personnel and to provide educational 
assistance to students who possess a sincere interest in public 
service law enforcement. The Committee expects BJA to submit a 
report to the Committee on its intentions for this proposal by 
November 15, 1995.

   Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund Programs, State and Local Law 
                         Enforcement Assistance

    Local Law Enforcement Block Grant.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $2,000,000,000 for a Local Law 
Enforcement Block Grant program pursuant to H.R. 728 which 
passed the House of Representatives on February 14, 1995. The 
funding is provided in place of the budget request for the 
Community Oriented Policing Services Programs and will support 
the following activities at the discretion of State and local 
agencies:
          (1) Hiring, training, and employing on a continuing 
        basis new, additional law enforcement officers and 
        necessary support personnel;
          (2) Paying overtime to presently employed law 
        enforcement officers and necessary support personnel;
          (3) Procuring equipment, technology, and other 
        material directly related to basic law enforcement 
        functions;
          (4) Enhancing security measures in and around schools 
        and any other facility or location which is considered 
        by the unit of local government to have a special risk 
        for incidents of crime;
          (5) Establishing crime prevention programs that may, 
        though not exclusively, involve law enforcement 
        officials and that are intended to discourage, disrupt, 
        or interfere with the commission of criminal activity, 
        including neighborhood watch and citizen patrol 
        programs, sexual assault and domestic violence 
        programs, and programs intended to prevent juvenile 
        crime;
          (6) Establishing or supporting drug courts;
          (7) Establishing early intervention and prevention 
        programs for juveniles to reduce or eliminate crime;
          (8) Enhancing the adjudication process of cases 
        involving violent juvenile offenders;
          (9) Enhancing formula grants under the Edward Byrne 
        Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance 
        programs;
          (10) Establishing cooperative task forces between 
        adjoining units of local government to work together to 
        prevent and combat criminal activity, particularly 
        criminal activity that is exacerbated by drug or gang-
        related involvement; and
          (11) Establishing multi-jurisdictional task forces, 
        particularly in rural areas, composed of law 
        enforcement officials representing units of local 
        government, that work with Federal law enforcement 
        officials to prevent and control crime.
    The Committee recommendation supports one of the most 
significant changes to the Violent Crime Control and Law 
Enforcement Act of 1994 that was adopted by the House of 
Representatives in its passage of H.R. 728. This change 
provides assistance to State and local governments confronting 
crime, without prescribing the specific programs that 
localities must implement in order to receive funding. The 
resources provided will allow localities to respond to their 
unique crime problems with their own solutions. The Committee 
recommendation, therefore, does not specifically provide for 
the Community Oriented Policing Services program. The Committee 
understands that community policing is an important tool for 
combatting crime. However, the Committee understands that the 
Local Law Enforcement Block Grant Program allows a local 
government to make the decision regarding funding for more 
police officers. In addition, the Block Grant program is 
available to support other prevention programs, such as drug 
courts, if the locality deems it to be critical to combatting 
crime in their community. The Committee believes that its 
recommendation provides the most cost effective method of 
providing assistance to States and localities, during a time of 
declining resource availability.
    National Instant Criminal Background Check System.--The 
recommendation provides $25,000,000 to fund the second year of 
State programs designed to implement the National Instant 
Criminal Background Check System (NICS). The Brady Handgun 
Violence Prevention Act requires the establishment of the NICS 
by November, 1998. Funding for States to upgrade criminal 
records, to interface between these records and other databases 
holding information on other categories of individuals who are 
prohibited from purchasing firearms under Federal or State 
statute, and implementation of the NICS, is authorized under 
the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund. In 1995, $100,000,000 
was provided from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund for 
this initiative, which was the full authorization level for 
1995. The Committee recommendation supports the full 
authorization level for 1996.
    State Prison Grants.--The recommendation provides 
$500,000,000 for State Prison Grants pursuant to H.R. 667 which 
passed the House of Representatives on February 10, 1995. The 
Committee recommendation provides an increase of $475,500,000 
above the current year appropriation. In 1995, $24,500,000 was 
provided for boot camps for violent offenders.
    The $500,000,000 recommended by the Committee is available 
under the provisions of H.R. 667, The Violent Criminal 
Incarceration Act of 1995. The Committee recommendation 
supports the changes adopted by the House to the State Prison 
Grant program included in the Violent Crime Control and Law 
Enforcement Act of 1994, which strengthen the incentives for 
States to implement ``truth in sentencing'' policies and 
address States' costs due to the incarceration of criminal 
aliens. Of the $500,000,000 provided, up to $200,000,000 can be 
used for reimbursement to States for alien incarceration.
    After the reimbursement for alien incarceration, 
$300,000,000 is available for grants to States and to eligible 
States organized as a regional compact to build, expand, and 
operate correctional facilities for the housing of serious 
violent offenders. Funds can also be used to build, expand, and 
operate temporary or permanent correctional facilities, 
including facilities on military bases and boot camp 
facilities, for the confinement of convicted nonviolent 
offenders and criminal aliens for the purpose of freeing 
suitable existing prison space for persons convicted of a 
serious violent felony. Such grants may also be used to build, 
expand, and operate secure youth correctional facilities. All 
grants are subject to the distribution and requirements 
outlined in H.R. 667.
    The Committee also recognizes that substantial savings for 
taxpayers, in both dollar terms and in the time necessary to 
make newly-constructed facilities operational, can be achieved 
by encouraging States to utilize the private sector. In 
reviewing and approving grants under this program, the Attorney 
General should take steps to assure applicants have considered 
privatization of both construction and operations, where most 
appropriate.
    State Criminal Alien Assistance Program.--The 
recommendation provides $300,000,000 for the State Criminal 
Alien Assistance Program for the reimbursement to States for 
the costs of incarceration of criminal aliens. This amount is 
in addition to $200,000,000 provided for this purpose under the 
State Prison Grants program as described above. Thus, the 
Committee recommends a total of $500,000,000 for reimbursement 
to states of alien incarceration. The total amount represents 
an increase of $370,000,000 over the current year appropriation 
and $200,000,000 above the budget request.
    Youthful Offender Incarceration Grants.--The recommendation 
provides a total of $19,643,000 for grants to States, for use 
by States and units of local government, for the purpose of 
developing alternative methods of punishment for young 
offenders to traditional forms of incarceration and probation, 
such as boot camps. The alternative methods of punishment 
should ensure certain punishment for young offenders and 
promote reduced recidivism, crime prevention, and assistance to 
victims, particularly for young offenders who can be punished 
more effectively in an environment other than a traditional 
correctional facility.
    The Committee is aware of a juvenile offender residential 
facility in Mobile, Alabama that has proven successful in its 
three years of operation as a deterrent in curtailing serious 
crimes committed by juveniles. The Committee understands that 
the facility is designed to free up space in the area's maximum 
security facility for the incarceration of serious juvenile 
offenders. Within the amounts recommended by the Committee for 
Youthful Offender Incarceration Grants or the State Prison 
Grants program, the Committee expects the Office of Justice 
Programs to examine the proposal to expand this Juvenile 
Residential Facility, to provide grants if warranted, and to 
submit a report to the Committee on its intentions.
    Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention.--The recommendation 
provides $1,500,000 for grants to combat motor vehicle theft 
through creation of a cooperative partnership between car 
owners and State and local law enforcement to reduce car theft 
committed by professional auto thieves and to facilitate their 
recovery. The amount recommended is an increase of $1,000,000 
above amounts provided in the current appropriation and is the 
full amount authorized in the Violent Crime Reduction Trust 
Fund for 1996.
    Treatment of Tuberculosis in Correctional Institutions.--
The recommendation provides $200,000 for treatment of 
tuberculosis in State and Federal Correctional institutions, 
which is the full amount requested.
    DNA Identification State Grants.--The recommendation 
includes $1,000,000 for DNA Identification State Grants, which 
is the full amount authorized for this program under the 
Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund and $518,000 above the 
budget request.
    Funding is recommended for grants to States and units of 
local government to develop or improve forensic DNA testing 
capabilities in State and local forensic laboratories and to 
foster cooperation and mutual assistance among forensic DNA 
laboratories within States and between States that are seeking 
to match and exchange DNA identification records for law 
enforcement purposes using the FBI's Combined DNA Index System 
(CODIS).
    Improved Training and Technical Automation Grants.--The 
recommendation provides $10,000,000 for Improved Training and 
Technical Automation Grants, which is the full amount 
authorized for this program under the Violent Crime Reduction 
Trust Fund and $5,178,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee understands that one of the most critical 
needs of State and local law enforcement is improved 
information systems for the identification and tracking of 
criminals. The recommendation will provide grants to States, 
Indian Tribal and local criminal justice agencies and nonprofit 
organizations to improve their efficiency through improved 
technology and automation. Grants can be made to (1) increase 
the use of mobile digital terminals; (2) improve communications 
systems, such as computer-aided dispatch and incident reporting 
systems; (3) establish or improve ballistics identification 
programs; (4) increase the application of automated fingerprint 
identification systems and their communications on an 
interstate and intrastate basis; and (5) improve the 
computerized collection of criminal records.
    The Committee is aware of a number of automation projects 
which will enhance State and local enforcement. Within the 
overall amounts recommended herein for Information and 
Technology Grants and under the Edward Byrne discretionary 
grant program, the Committee expects the Office of Justice 
Programs to examine each of the following proposals, to provide 
grants if warranted, and to submit a report to the Committee on 
its intentions for each proposal:
           San Francisco Criminal Justice Technology 
        Network Initiative which is an innovative program 
        designed to use state-of-the-art technology to tie 
        together the city's police, fire, paramedic staff, 
        sheriff and court services;
           Center of Advanced Support in Technology for 
        Law Enforcement (CASTLE) for implementation of a 
        national communications capability for local, state, 
        and Federal law enforcement using multi-tiered 
        interactive computer technologies;
           North Carolina Criminal Justice Information 
        Network for the implementation of a Statewide 
        Automation Fingerprint Identification System; and
           Expansions of criminal information in the 
        Regional Information Sharing Systems.
    The Committee believes that grants should be used to the 
greatest extent possible to promote information sharing among 
Federal, State, and local criminal justice agencies and the 
development and implementation of compatible systems. The 
Committee expects that, when considering applications for 
grants made under this program, the Attorney General shall, to 
the extent possible, ensure State, Indian Tribal, and local 
criminal justice agency proposals include technology that is 
compatible with or can interface with other national law 
enforcement and criminal justice information systems being 
developed, in particular, National Crime Information Center 
2000, the National Instant Background Check System, National 
Incident-Based Reporting System, and DRUGFIRE.
    Gang Investigation Coordination and Information 
Collection.--The recommendation provides $1,000,000 for 
improved information collection on gang investigations. This 
amount is the full amount authorized under the Violent Crime 
Reduction Trust Fund for this program and the full amount 
requested. The Committee expects that the resources provided 
will support the development of a national strategy to 
coordinate gang-related investigations by Federal law 
enforcement agencies and enhance data collection activities of 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation with regard to incidents of 
gang violence for inclusion in the annual uniform crime report.

                         WEED AND SEED PROGRAM

    The Committee recommendation provides a total of 
$23,500,000 for the Weed and Seed program. The current year 
appropriation provided $23,500,000 for Weed and Seed, of which 
$13,500,000 was provided from direct appropriations and 
$10,000,000 was provided from Byrne Discretionary Grants. The 
budget requested $23,500,000 for the Weed and Seed program, of 
which $5,000,000 was requested from direct appropriations, 
$13,500,000 was requested from Byrne Discretionary Grants, and 
$5,000,000 was requested from the Community Oriented Policing 
Services program.
    The Committee recommendation provides funding of 
$13,500,000 as requested from the Byrne discretionary grant 
program and provides funding of $10,000,000 from discretionary 
grants under the Juvenile Justice programs. The Committee 
believes that, because the Weed and Seed program areas 
represent 36 high-crime neighborhoods, the use of Juvenile 
Justice discretionary grants will target at-risk youth in the 
most crime-ridden communities.
    Within the overall amount provided for the Weed and Seed 
Program the Committee expects that $270,000 be provided to the 
Gospel Mission of Washington, D.C., for the purposes of 
renovating the former Fulton Hotel and converting it into a 
drug treatment center for women.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous fiscal years, making funds available 
for grants or agreements with State agencies or to reimburse 
Federal agencies in order to execute the Weed and Seed 
strategy, and also allows for the use of other Department of 
Justice funds to support the Weed and Seed Program.
                       Juvenile Justice Programs

    The Committee recommendation provides a total of 
$148,500,000 for Juvenile Justice Programs for fiscal year 
1996, the full amount requested by the Administration.
    Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.--The Committee 
recommends a total of $144,000,000 for fiscal year 1996 for 
grants and administrative expenses for Juvenile Justice and 
Delinquency Prevention (JJDP) Programs, the same amount 
provided in the current fiscal year and the full amount 
requested. The JJDP program provides funds to States and 
localities for projects in the areas of education, research, 
prevention and rehabilitation as follows:
          1. $5,000,000 for the Office of Juvenile Justice 
        Programs (OJJP) (Part A).
          2. $70,000,000 for Formula Grants for assistance to 
        State and local programs (Part B).
          3. $25,000,000 for Discretionary Grants for National 
        Programs and Special Emphasis Programs (Part C). Within 
        the amount provided for Part C discretionary grants, 
        the Committee expects the OJJP to provide:
                  --$10,000,000 for the Weed and Seed program; 
                and
                  --$2,300,000 for a grant to continue and 
                expand the National Council of Juvenile and 
                Family Courts which provides continuing legal 
                education in family and juvenile law.
           4. $10,000,000, the full amount requested, to expand 
        the Youth Gangs (Part D) program which provides grants 
        to public and private nonprofit organizations to 
        prevent and reduce the participation of at-risk youth 
        in the activities of gangs that commit crimes.
          5. $10,000,000, the full amount requested, for 
        Discretionary Grants for State Challenge Activities 
        (Part E). This program authorizes the OJJP 
        Administrator to award grants which could increase the 
        amount of a state's formula grant by up to 10 percent, 
        if that State agrees to undertake some or all of the 
        ten challenge activities included in this program. 
        These challenge activities are designed to improve 
        various aspects of a State's juvenile justice and 
        delinquency prevention programs.
          6. $4,000,000, the full amount requested, for the 
        Juvenile Mentoring Program (Part G). This program seeks 
        to reduce juvenile delinquency, improve academic 
        performance, and reduce the drop-out rate among at-risk 
        youth through the use of mentors. The program brings 
        together young people in high crime areas with law 
        enforcement officers and other responsible adults who 
        are willing to serve as long-term mentors.
          7. $20,000,000 for Incentive Grants for Local 
        Delinquency Prevention Programs (Title V), which is the 
        same amount provided in the current fiscal year and the 
        full amount requested. These grants are transmitted 
        through the State Advisory Groups to units of general 
        local government for delinquency prevention programs 
        and other activities for at-risk youth.
    Within the amounts appropriated for discretionary grants 
under title II and title V of the JJDP Act, the Committee 
expects OJJP to examine each of the following proposals, to 
provide grants if warranted, and to submit a report to the 
Committee on its intentions for each proposal:
          --A grant to the Santa Fe Boys and Girls Club which 
        is the primary provider of after school and summer 
        activities for low-income youth and community-based 
        crime prevention programs;
          --A grant to the Mable Dodge Lujan Foundation in 
        Taos, New Mexico, that works with community educators, 
        police, public housing authorities, and local citizens 
        to provide anti-crime programs for juveniles;
          --A grant to the Kids Peace National Center for Kids 
        for its Intensive Treatment Family Program, which is an 
        innovative community-based approach designed to provide 
        individualized treatment and foster care to seriously 
        emotionally disturbed children and adolescents referred 
        by the juvenile justice system; and
          --A grant to Parents Anonymous, Inc. to enhance the 
        capability of the organization's national office to 
        support the delinquency prevention and self-help 
        programs of its local chapters.
     Victims of Child Abuse Act.--The Committee recommends a 
total of $4,500,000 for the various programs authorized under 
the Victims of Child Abuse Act (VOCA). In addition, funding of 
$6,750,000 is provided for Victims of Child Abuse programs 
under the Violence Against Women Program funded by the Violent 
Crime Reduction Trust Fund. The total amounts recommended for 
Victims of Child Abuse Act, equal the amounts provided in the 
current fiscal year and the full amount requested in the 
budget. The following programs are included in the 
recommendation:
          --$4,500,000 to Improve Investigations and 
        Prosecutions (Subtitle A) as follows:
                  --$500,000 to continue Regional Children's 
                Advocacy Centers, as authorized by section 213 
                of VOCA.
                  --$2,000,000 to continue local Children's 
                Advocacy Centers, as authorized by section 214 
                of VOCA.
                  --$1,500,000 for a continuation grant to the 
                National Center for Prosecution of Child Abuse 
                for specialized technical assistance and 
                training programs to improve the prosecution of 
                child abuse cases, as authorized by section 
                214a of VOCA.
                  --$500,000 for a continuation grant to the 
                National Network of Child Advocacy Centers for 
                technical assistance and training, as 
                authorized by section 214a of VOCA.

                    Public Safety Officers Benefits

    The Committee recommendation includes the requested 
language for death benefits under the Public Safety Officers 
Benefits program for fiscal year 1996, which will fully fund 
anticipated payments. This program provides a lump sum death 
benefit payment to eligible survivors of Federal, State and 
local public safety officers whose death was the direct and 
proximate result of a traumatic injury sustained in the line of 
duty.
    The recommendation also includes $2,134,000, the full 
amount requested, for lump sum payments to public safety 
officers who are permanently disabled in the line of duty.

                General Provisions--Department of Justice

    The Committee has included the following general provisions 
for the Department of Justice in this bill:
    Section 101 provides language, included in previous 
appropriations acts, which makes up to $45,000 of the funds 
appropriated to the Department of Justice available for 
reception and representation expenses.
    Section 102 provides language, included in previous 
appropriations acts, which continues certain authorities for 
the Justice Department in fiscal year 1996 that were contained 
in the Department of Justice Authorization Act, fiscal year 
1980.
    Section 103 provides language, included in appropriations 
acts prior to 1994, which prohibits the use of funds to perform 
abortions in the Federal Prison System.
    Section 104 provides language, included in previous 
appropriations acts, which prohibits the use of the funds 
provided in this bill to require any person to perform, or 
facilitate the performance of, an abortion.
    Section 105 provides language, included in previous 
appropriations acts, which states that nothing in the previous 
section removes the obligation of the Director of the Bureau of 
Prisons to provide escort services to female inmates who seek 
to obtain abortions outside a Federal facility.
    Section 106 provides language, similar to that included in 
previous appropriations acts, and recently amended in H.R. 
1944, which allows the Department of Justice to spend up to 
$10,000,000 for rewards for information regarding acts of 
terrorism against a United States person or property at levels 
not to exceed $2,000,000 per reward.
    Section 107 provides language, included in previous 
appropriations acts, which allows the Department of Justice, 
subject to the Committee's reprogramming procedures, to 
transfer up to 5 percent between any appropriation, except 
Justice Assistance, but limits to 10 percent the amount that 
can be transferred into any one appropriation.
    Section 108 provides language, included in the 1995 
Appropriations Act, requested by the Administration, which 
allows the Federal Prison System's Commissary Fund to invest 
amounts not needed for operations in obligations of the United 
States.
    Section 109 provides language included in prior 
appropriations acts that allows balances remaining in the 
Assets Forfeiture Fund after September 30, 1995 to be available 
to the Attorney General for any authorized purpose of the 
Department of Justice.
    Section 110 provides language included in the 1995 
Appropriations Act, which prohibits the transfer of Justice 
Department funds to other Departments, except as authorized by 
this Act.
    Section 111 adds new language, as proposed by the 
Administration, to extend the quarterly fee payments for 
debtors under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code to include the 
period from when a reorganization plan is confirmed by the 
Bankruptcy Court until the case is converted or dismissed.
    Section 112 adds language, contained in prior 
appropriations acts, that continues the undercover operations 
authorities for the FBI and DEA for one year. No new 
authorities are provided.
    Section 113 adds new language that allows the user fee 
surcharge currently collected by the FBI to defray automation 
costs related to the development of the NCIC 2000 and Uniform 
Crime Report systems. The current language allows this 
surcharge to be used to defray automation costs of the 
fingerprint identification system.

         TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND RELATED AGENCIES

    The Committee recommends a total of $3,451,646,000 for the 
United States Trade Representative, the International Trade 
Commission and the Department of Commerce for fiscal year 1996. 
This amount is $1,279,064,000 below the total request and is 
$715,521,000 below the total amount appropriated for the these 
programs for fiscal year 1995.
    The Committee has provided a structure under this Title 
that reflects the fundamental functions that will need to be 
considered as the overall administrative structure of these 
programs is debated. This reflects the Committee's effort to 
identify and prioritize these programs and lay the groundwork 
for decisions to be made.

                  TRADE AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee has included under this section of Title II, 
the U.S. Office of the Trade Representative, the International 
Trade Commission, and the Department of Commerce agencies 
responsible for trade promotion and enforcement and economic 
infrastructure development.

                            RELATED AGENCIES

            Office of the United States Trade Representative

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $20,949,000 
for the Office of the United States Trade Representative (USTR) 
for fiscal year 1996. This amount is equal to the budget 
request and the amount appropriated for fiscal year 1995.
    The Committee has not reduced the resources of the USTR, 
despite the conclusion of the two major trade negotiations, the 
North American Free Trade Agreement, and the Uruguay Round of 
the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade, because of the 
USTR's position that these resources should now be applied to 
enforcement of these and other trade agreements. The success of 
this enforcement policy should be reflected in a decline in the 
trade deficit, of which there is not yet any significant 
evidence.
    The Office of the United States Trade Representative is 
responsible for developing and coordinating U.S. international 
trade, commodity, and direct investment policy, and leading or 
directing negotiations with other countries on such matters.

                     International Trade Commission

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $42,500,000 
for the International Trade Commission for fiscal year 1996. 
This amount is equal to the appropriation for the current 
fiscal year and is $4,677,000 below the budget request. The 
amount provided requires requested increases to be absorbed 
within the base.
    The International Trade Commission is an independent, 
quasi-judicial agency responsible for conducting trade-related 
investigations; providing the Congress and the President with 
independent, expert technical advice to assist in the 
development and implementation of U.S. international trade 
policy; responding to the Congress and the President on various 
matters affecting international trade; maintaining the 
Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System of 
internationally accepted product nomenclature; providing 
technical assistance to eligible small businesses seeking 
remedies and benefits under the trade laws; and performing 
other specific statutory responsibilities ranging from research 
and analysis to quasi-judicial functions on trade-related 
matters.

                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

                   International Trade Administration

                     Operations And Administration

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $264,885,000 
for the programs of the Commerce Department's International 
Trade Administration (ITA). The amount provided is a decrease 
of $14,673,000 below the request and a decrease of $1,208,000 
below the amounts provided for fiscal year 1995. The 
recommendation reflects decreases below the base for various 
components of ITA, but maintains core trade policy and 
enforcement functions and strengthens trade promotion 
activities. The amount provided reflects the high priority the 
Committee places on trade promotion and related activities. The 
following table reflects the distribution of the Committee 
recommendation by subactivity:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                           FY                        FY                 
                      1995enacted  FY 1996base  1996request  FY 1996mark
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Trade Development...      $67,574      $47,427      $53,863      $53,684
Int'l Economic                                                          
 Policy.............       27,808       21,613       25,673       19,452
Import                                                                  
 Administration.....       30,368       30,832       30,540       28,749
US&FCS..............;      158,298      158,470      169,482      165,000
Estimated carryover.     (17,955)            0            0      (2,000)
                     ---------------------------------------------------
      Total, ITA....     $266,093     $258,342     $279,558     $264,885
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The recommendation includes the full base funding for both 
the domestic and international offices of the U.S. and Foreign 
Commercial Service, plus increases of $6,530,000 over the base 
to allow for the completion of the redesign of the domestic 
field structure, the expansion of US&FCS; into big emerging 
markets overseas, and the improvement of the automated 
commercial information services systems. The Committee expects 
that no additional positions will be created at headquarters as 
a result of this increase. Any additional positions for the 
US&FCS; are to be directed to the field office structure, 
domestic and international offices.
    The Committee supports increased coordination between the 
various agencies involved in export promotion. In that regard, 
the Committee encourages the Export Assistance Centers 
(operated jointly by the Commercial Service and the Small 
Business Administration) to work closely with Business 
Information Centers (funded under SBA), when located in the 
same state, to establish a regional export strategy for the 
area's small businesses.
    Concerns have been raised that changes made, or which may 
be made, by the Import Administration to the agreements 
suspending the antidumping investigations on uranium from 
Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, the Russian Federation, and Uzbekistan, 
may adversely affect U.S. electric utilities which purchased 
uranium from those countries prior to the changes. 
Specifically, parties have expressed concern about the impact 
of amendments that may provide that all uranium from one or 
more of the countries that is enriched in a third country prior 
to importation in the United States will be considered uranium 
mined in the CIS countries and, thus, be subject to the 
quantitative restrictions of the agreements. Because utilities 
may have entered into contracts for such material prior to the 
amendment, they believe the terms of the amendment should not 
apply to such contracts (i.e., the contracts should be 
``grandfathered'').
    The Committee understands that different views exist on the 
issues of grandfathering and third country enrichment of 
uranium prior to importation in to the United States. The 
Committee directs the Import Administration to fully review 
those views and to report to the Committee no later than 
September 15, 1995, on the actions it proposes to take in order 
to equitably address the views of all parties concerned.
    The Committee does not support recommendations that have 
been made to separate or eliminate any function performed by 
the ITA, particularly the proposals to eliminate the domestic 
Commercial Service office or to transfer foreign Commercial 
Service offices to the Department of State.
    The recommendation also includes $10,000,000, under trade 
development, for continuation of two export promotion programs 
related to the textile and apparel industries. ITA has a unique 
statutory responsibility for trade enforcement and promotion 
for the textile industry. Of this amount, $7,000,000 is 
intended for the National Textile Center and $3,000,000 is for 
the Textile/Clothing Technology Center (TC2).
    The Committee intends that the Office of Textiles and 
Apparel be maintained at no less than 90 percent of its base 
level in fiscal year 1996.

                         Export Administration

                     Operations And Administration
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $38,644,000 
for the Bureau of Export Administration. The amount provided is 
a decrease of $9,797,000 below the amount requested, and equal 
to the amount appropriated for fiscal year 1995.
    The Committee expects that adjustments to base will be 
funded through the proposed decreases related to the Export 
Administration's buyout program and additional downsizing 
resulting from the liberalization of export controls and 
reduced licensing volume. In addition, the Committee is aware 
that BXA may have carryover balances of $3,800,000 that could 
be used to fund its most critical program requirements. The 
Committee reminds BXA that expenditures of carryover balances 
are subject to the reprogramming procedures contained in 
section 605 of the accompanying bill.
    The Committee has not provided the requested funding 
related to the Chemical Weapons Convention Treaty because of 
ongoing delays in its ratification. Should there be additional 
progress in the international efforts to ratify the treaty, the 
Committee is willing to entertain a reprogramming of funds for 
this purpose.
    The Committee continues to support the upgrade and 
improvement of the BXA on-line licensing system as a way to 
eliminate bureaucratic delay and duplication in the licensing 
process. The Committee does not support recommendations to 
transfer the functions of this office to the Department of 
State or the Department of Defense.

                  Economic Development Administration

    The accompanying bill provides a total of $348,500,000 for 
the programs and administrative expenses of the Economic 
Development Administration (EDA) for fiscal year 1996, a total 
of $91,427,000 below fiscal year 1995 and $90,466,000 below the 
request. The Committee recommendation represents a 21 percent 
reduction below the current level.
    The Committee recommendation assumes passage of legislation 
reforming EDA programs, restructuring the Agency, and 
tightening eligibility requirements to better focus funds on 
the most distressed areas. It is the Committee's expectation 
that these reforms and the restructuring will target these 
programs toward the problems EDA was created to address--
providing long term economic solutions for communities 
suffering from severe economic distresss.

                Economic Development Assistance Programs

    A total of $328,500,000 is recommended for fiscal year 1996 
for Economic Development Assistance Programs. This amount is a 
decrease of $79,283,000 below the budget request and the amount 
provided for the current fiscal year. This amount reflects a 20 
percent decrease in funding for EDA programs. The Committee 
understands that the authorizing committee plans to consider 
legislation which will dramatically revise the way EDA 
currently does business, and ensure that assistance is 
targetted to the most economically distressed areas of the 
country. The Committee supports enactment of reforms for EDA 
programs and the continuation of a basic program to provide 
infrastructure investments, revolving loan funds and technical 
assistance to economically distressed areas, particularly rural 
areas. The Committee believes such a program provides the 
``seed capital'' to distressed areas to allow local communities 
to increase their ability to create new economic opportunities 
and jobs in accordance with local priorities.
    No funds are provided for the proposed Competitive 
Communities proposal. The Committee directs EDA to discontinue 
the use of single purpose grant loans in fiscal year 1996.
    Language is included in the bill which allows the Secretary 
of Commerce to provide financial assistance to projects located 
on military bases closed or scheduled for closure even prior to 
the grantee having taken title for the property in question. 
The language has been carried in the bill for two years.
    The following table reflects the proposed distribution of 
the funds provided:

                ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS                
                        [In thousands of dollars]                       
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         FY 1995     FY 1996    FY 1996 
                                                     request     House  
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Public works grants (Title I)......     $195,000     $140,926   $169,185
Planning assistance................       26,598       26,357     24,403
Technical assistance (including                                         
 university centers)...............       10,926        6,000      9,912
Defense economic conversion........      120,000       80,000     97,000
Research and evaluation............          500        1,500        500
Trade adjustment assistance........       10,000    .........      8,500
Competitive Communities............  .............    134,000  .........
Economic adjustment grants (Title                                       
 IX)...............................       45,000       19,000     19,000
                                    ------------------------------------
      Total........................     $408,024     $407,783   $328,500
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends $20,000,000 for the salaries and 
expenses of the Economic Development Administration. The amount 
provided is $11,183,000 below the request, and $12,144,000 
below the amount made available for the current fiscal year. 
The Committee expects that this decreased level of funding will 
be sufficient to administer the programs of the EDA under 
changes to be addressed by the authorizing committees.
    The Committee has included language in the bill which 
provides the authority to use this appropriation to monitor 
projects approved under Title I of the Public Works Employment 
Act of 1976, Title II of the Trade Act of 1974, and the 
Community Emergency Drought Relief Act of 1977.
                  Minority Business Development Agency

                     Minority Business Development

    The Committee recommends $32,000,000 for the Minority 
Business Development Agency (MBDA) for fiscal year 1996. This 
amount is $15,921,000 below the budget request and is 
$11,789,000 less than the amount available for fiscal year 
1995.
    The Committee's recommendation reflects a 25 percent 
reduction in funding for this agency. Many of MBDA's programs 
and activities are duplicative of, or similar to, work done by 
the Small Business Administration. The Committee expects the 
Commerce Department and the SBA to work together to develop a 
plan for eliminating this duplication of activities, and to 
submit this plan, along with a timeline for implementation, to 
the Committee by November 1, 1995.
    The Committee encourages MBDA to actively shift its focus 
beyond the development of Federal procurement opportunities, 
toward creating minority-owned businesses that can successfully 
compete in the economic mainstream, especially in growth areas 
such as emerging technologies and international trade. The 
Committee also encourages MBDA to continue to provide funding 
for programs that develop innovative approaches to providing 
minority entrepreneurs greater access to Federal laboratories 
as a means of furthering minority business participation in the 
area of technology commercialization, such as the Minority 
Apprenticeship Program in Technology Management.

            United States Travel and Tourism Administration

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee has included $2,000,000 in the bill for the 
United States Travel and Tourism Administration. This amount is 
$14,328,000 below the amount provided for fiscal year 1995, and 
$14,303,000 below the budget request. The amount provided will 
allow USTTA to continue through the White House Conference on 
Travel and Tourism, scheduled for October 1995. Bill language 
makes these funds available until December 31, 1995.
    The Committee has maintained bill language carried in prior 
fiscal years which prohibits funding made available under this 
heading to be used for carrying out section 203(a) of the 
International Travel Act of 1961, as amended.
    The United States Travel and Tourism Administration was 
established to coordinate the Federal role in international 
tourism through trade development, trade policy, and 
statistical research programs. In this time of budgetary 
constraints, the Committee has had to make the difficult 
decision to terminate funding for non-essential programs. The 
Committee feels that any critical trade development programs 
for the travel industry can be absorbed by the International 
Trade Administration, which is responsible for all other 
industries' trade development and promotion activities, within 
funds provided, and statistical research programs for the 
travel industry can be absorbed by the Bureau of Economic 
Analysis.

                ECONOMIC AND INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE

    The Committee has included under this section of the bill 
the Department of Commerce agencies responsible for the 
nation's basic economic and technical information 
infrastructure, as well as the administrative functions which 
oversee the development of telecommunications and information 
policy.

                   Economic and Statistical Analysis

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The bill provides $40,000,000 for the economic and 
statistical analysis programs of the Department of Commerce, 
including the Bureau of Economic Analysis, for fiscal year 
1996. This amount is $17,220,000 less than the budget request 
and is $6,896,000 less than the amount appropriated for the 
current fiscal year.
    The amount provided is a reduction of almost 20 percent 
below the base funding for this account. The Committee expects 
this reduction to be applied first to policy and administrative 
activities included under this appropriation, and notes that 
recently announced decisions to eliminate certain periodic 
economic reports will result in budgetary savings. The 
Committee intends that none of the funds provided under this 
appropriation, or under the Bureau of the Census appropriation 
accounts, be used to carry out the Integrated Environmental-
Economic Accounting or ``Green GDP'' initiative.
    The Economic and Statistics Administration (ESA) is 
responsible for the collection, tabulation and publication of a 
wide variety of economic, demographic and social statistics and 
provides support to the Secretary of Commerce and other 
Government officials in interpreting the state of the economy 
and developing economic policy. The Bureau of Economic Analysis 
and the Under Secretary for Economic Affairs are funded in this 
account.

         Economics And Statistics Administration Revolving Fund

    The Committee has included in the bill language necessary 
for the continuation of a self-supporting revolving fund for 
data products of the Economics and Statistics Administration, 
as requested.
    The Economics and Statistics Administration operates a 
revolving fund for the payment of expenses incurred in the 
electronic dissemination of data, including the acquisition and 
public sale of domestic, federally-funded and foreign business, 
trade and economic information. The revolving fund was 
initially established in fiscal year 1995 with a one-time 
appropriation of $1,677,000 to capitalize the fund.

                          Bureau of the Census

    The Committee recommends a total of $271,000,000 for the 
Bureau of the Census for fiscal year 1996. This amount is a 
reduction of $67,262,000 from the budget estimates, and a 
decrease of $7,083,000 below the amounts provided for the 
current fiscal year.

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The bill provides $136,000,000 for the Salaries and 
Expenses of the Bureau of the Census for fiscal year 1996. This 
amount is $8,812,000 less than the budget request, and freezes 
funding for this account at the level provided in fiscal year 
1995.
    This appropriation provides for the current statistical 
programs of the Bureau of the Census, which include the 
measurement of the Nation's economy and the demographic 
characteristics of the population. These programs are intended 
to provide a broad base of economic, demographic, and social 
information used for decision making by governments, private 
organizations, and individuals. The Committee expects the 
Bureau to be fully reimbursed for any survey requested by any 
other Federal agency or private organization.

                     Periodic Censuses And Programs

    The Committee recommends $135,000,000 for periodic censuses 
and related programs for fiscal year 1996. This amount is a 
reduction of $58,450,000 from the budget request and a decrease 
of $7,083,000 below the amount provided for fiscal year 1995.
    This appropriation account provides for decennial and 
quinquennial censuses, and other programs which are cyclical in 
nature. Additionally, individual surveys are conducted for 
other Federal agencies on a reimbursable basis.
    The Committee intends the amount provided be distributed as 
follows:

Economic censuses.......................................     $25,000,000
Census of governments...................................       2,000,000
Census of agriculture...................................      10,000,000
Intercensal demographic estimates.......................       5,000,000
Year 2000 Decennial census..............................      42,000,000
Continuous measurement..................................       4,000,000
Sample redesign.........................................       2,000,000
CASIC...................................................       4,000,000
Geographic support......................................      36,700,000
Data processing systems.................................      10,000,000
    Recovery of prior year obligations..................     (3,100,000)
    Estimated Carryover.................................     (2,600,000)
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................    $135,000,000

    The amount provided for this account reflects the 
Committee's ongoing concerns with the Census Bureau's inability 
to face budgetary realities. While the Committee recognizes the 
need for valid and reliable information, the Bureau must 
prioritize the Nation's statistical requirements. Considering 
the recent action by Congress to achieve a balanced budget by 
the year 2002 and to further reduce the size of the Federal 
government, the Committee's warnings take on even greater 
significance. The status quo is unacceptable. The Census 
Bureau, like other Federal agencies, will have to do more with 
less funding and fewer positions. Consequently, it is 
absolutely essential that the Bureau reprioritize programs to 
reflect the most critical statistical program needs.
    Therefore, the Committee expects the Bureau to develop and 
submit to the Committee by November 1, 1995, a proposal on the 
reprioritization and possible elimination of programs funded 
under this account. This proposal should include a package of 
recommended statutory changes necessary to implement this 
proposal. The Committee expects the Bureau to develop this 
proposal in consultation with the appropriate authorizing 
committees as well as the Committee on Appropriations.
    Census 2000.--The Committee continues to be concerned about 
progress related to the next decennial census. For years, the 
Committee has warned the Census Bureau that the cost of Census 
2000 had to be kept in check, and that only through early 
planning and decision-making could costs be controlled.
    The Committee recognizes that fiscal year 1996 is a 
critical year in planning for the decennial census. The 
Committee understands that numerous decisions will be made and 
preparatory actions taken which will have a significant bearing 
on the overall cost of the census, including implementation of 
a final census design, development and testing of content 
requirements, and planning for precensus and postcensus 
operations. In light of the severe budget constraints and the 
impact these activities will have on future appropriations, the 
Committee expects the Census Bureau to consult with the 
Committee prior to any final decisions being made regarding the 
decennial census' final design, methodology, or content. 
Further, the Committee expects the Bureau to consult with the 
Committee, and submit a reprogramming in accordance with 
Section 605 of the accompanying bill, before implementing plans 
for precensus and postcensus operations.
    Other Periodic Censuses and Programs.--While the decennial 
census is the largest and most costly activity of the Census 
Bureau, the Committee believes the Bureau must re-evaluate and 
reprioritize all of its programs. The Committee expects that 
the Bureau's aforementioned review will include all programs of 
the Bureau.

       National Telecommunications and Information Administration

    The Committee recommends a total of $78,709,000 for the 
National Telecommunications and Information Administration 
(NTIA) for fiscal year 1996. This amount is $54,596,000 less 
than the budget request, and is $22,696,000 less than the 
amount appropriated for the current fiscal year.

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends $19,709,000 for the Salaries and 
Expenses appropriation of the National Telecommunications and 
Information Administration. This amount is a reduction of 
$3,223,000 from the budget request, and a decrease of 
$1,252,000 below the amount appropriated for fiscal year 1995. 
The amount provided reflects a ten percent reduction below the 
base for this account.

       Public Broadcasting Facilities, Planning And Construction

    The Committee recommends $19,000,000 for planning and 
construction grants for public television, radio, and non-
broadcast facilities. The Committee recommendation is a 
decrease of $9,983,000 below the amount appropriated for this 
program in fiscal year 1995, and an increase of $11,041,000 
above the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation, which is 35 percent below the 
current appropriation for this account, reflects the severe 
overall budget constraints facing the Committee.
    While the Committee expects non-Federal funds to be used to 
the maximum extent possible in the maintenance of this 
infrastructure, the Committee notes that many areas, 
particularly rural or disadvantaged locales, lack the necessary 
resources to provide for maintenance and upgrades of the 
facilities. Therefore, the Committee has provided funding above 
the request for this program to ensure that adequate resources 
are available to maintain that infrastructure, especially in 
such areas.
    The Committee has included language in the bill which 
permits not to exceed $2,200,000 to be available for program 
administration as authorized by law, as well as language 
carried in the appropriations bill for many years which permits 
prior year unobligated balances to be available for grants for 
projects for which applications have been submitted and 
approved during any fiscal year.
    The Committee has not included requested bill language 
earmarking $1,500,000 of the funds provided under this account 
for the Pan-Pacific Educational and Cultural Experiments by 
Satellite (PEACESAT) program. The Committee believes that this 
program should compete under the Information Infrastructure 
Grant program with other innovative distance learning and 
information initiatives.

                   Information Infrastructure Grants

    The Committee recommends $40,000,000 for the Information 
Infrastructure Grant program under NTIA for demonstrations of 
new telecommunications technology applications. This amount is 
$59,912,000 below the budget request, and a decrease of 
$8,962,000 below the current amount available for fiscal year 
1995.
    The Committee has also included bill language making 
$4,000,000 of the funds provided under this heading available 
for program administration and related program support 
activities, instead of $8,395,000 as requested. The bill also 
includes recommended bill language which will allow up to five 
percent of this appropriation to be available for 
telecommunications research activities.
    The Committee believes the NII program is critical to the 
development of the national information superhighway which will 
be of particular value to underserved and rural areas. This 
emerging telecommunications infrastructure will allow more 
remote areas to gain access to enhanced education, health care, 
and social services, as well as provide enhanced economic 
opportunities. Therefore, as was suggested in last year's 
report, the Committee directs NTIA to give particular 
consideration to applications which would lead to increased 
telecommunications access in areas where such service is not 
readily available.
    The Committee has been made aware of a worthwhile proposal 
which should be eligible for funding under the applicable 
guidelines for the Information Infrastructure Grant program. 
The organizing committee for the Xth Paralympic Games has a 
proposal for the development of voice recognition and digitized 
voice feedback software that can be incorporated into a touch 
screen information system for use by the athletes, officials, 
and spectators to retrieve accurate and timely information on 
venue sites, service locations, competition times and 
transportation schedules. The Committee encourages NTIA to 
consider this proposal and provide a grant if warranted.

            endowment for children's educational television

    The Committee recommends no funding for the Endowment for 
Children's Television for fiscal year 1996. The current year 
funding level for this account is $2,499,000; $2,502,000 was 
requested for fiscal year 1996.
    These grants are duplicative of programs funded under other 
agencies and through the private sector and have no 
relationship to other NTIA mission activities.

                      Patent and Trademark Office
                         Salaries And Expenses

    The bill provides $100,000,000 for the Salaries and 
Expenses appropriation of the Patent and Trademark Office 
(PTO). The amount provided is to be appropriated from amounts 
paid into the Patent Fee Surcharge Fund. This amount is a 
decrease of $10,868,000 below the budget request, and is 
$17,676,000 above the amount provided from the Fund for fiscal 
year 1995. The amount included in this bill is in addition to 
anticipated offsetting fee collections of $532,146,000 
available directly to the Patent and Trademark Office, 
resulting in a total operating level of $632,014,000 for fiscal 
year 1996 compared to $541,714,000 for the current fiscal year.
    As has been the practice in previous years, the Committee 
has not provided the total amount requested from the Patent Fee 
Surcharge Fund for fiscal year 1996. The Committee is scored 
against its overall funding allocation for appropriating fees 
from this Special Fund and must give this account the same 
consideration as other funding requests when determining 
appropriate funding levels. The Committee recommendation will 
result in a total of $70,649,000 in cumulative unappropriated 
balances available in the Patent Fee Surcharge Fund. The 
Committee notes that this situation was created under the 
Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990, under which the 
increase in patent fees was diverted to offset the Federal 
deficit, and therefore encourages the resolution of the 
situation through the budget reconciliation process.
    The Patent and Trademark Office is charged with 
administering the patent and trademark laws of the United 
States. PTO examines patent applications, grants patent 
protection for qualified inventions, and disseminates 
technological information disclosed in patents. PTO also 
examines trademark applications and provides Federal 
registration to owners of qualified trademarks.

                         SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

    The Committee has included under this section of Title II 
the Department of Commerce agencies involved in technology 
research and development, scientific assessment and prediction 
of environmental phenomena, and the administrative and policy 
functions providing oversight for these activities.

             National Institute of Standards and Technology

    The Committee recommends a total of $404,100,000 for the 
three appropriations accounts under the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology (NIST) for fiscal year 1996. This 
amount is a reduction of $618,950,000 from the budget request, 
and is a decrease of $359,698,000 below the amounts 
appropriated for fiscal year 1995. A description of each 
account and the Committee recommendation follows:

             Scientific And Technical Research And Services

    The Committee has provided $263,000,000 for the Scientific 
and Technical Research and Services (core programs) 
appropriation of the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology. This amount is a reduction of $47,679,000 from the 
budget request and a decrease of $1,486,000 below the fiscal 
year 1995 appropriation. The amounts provided for this account 
reflect the Committee's commitment to funding basic research 
programs that benefit the nation's industries.
    The following is a breakdown of the amounts provided under 
this account by activity. This distribution should be used as 
the basis for any proposed reprogrammings of funds:

Electronics and Electrical Engineering..................     $37,000,000
Manufacturing Engineering...............................      19,200,000
Chemical Science and Technology.........................      27,100,000
Physics.................................................      27,400,000
Material Sciences and Engineering.......................      53,400,000
Building and Fire Research..............................      13,200,000
Computer Systems........................................      30,700,000
Applied Mathematics and Scientific Computing............      10,000,000
Technical Assistance....................................      18,000,000
Research Support........................................      27,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, NIST core research.........................    $263,000,000

    The Committee recommendation is within the amounts proposed 
in the pending reauthorization bill for the NIST internal 
research programs.
    The Committee understands that NIST is currently 
considering the assignment of personnel to nine overseas posts. 
Each of these posts currently have Commerce Department 
representation through the Commercial Service. The Committee 
does not approve the placement of additional NIST personnel 
overseas. Concerns about the rapid growth of overseas personnel 
from agencies other than the Department of State are addressed 
elsewhere in this report.
    Quality Program.--Within the amount designated for 
``Research Support'', the Committee has provided $2,900,000 for 
the base NIST Quality Program, which includes the Malcolm 
Baldridge National Quality Award. The Committee fully endorses 
the continuation of the basic Baldridge award program.

                     Industrial Technology Services

    The Committee recommends $81,100,000 for the Industrial 
Technology Services appropriation of the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology. This amount is $353,573,000 below the 
current appropriation available for fiscal year 1995, and is 
$561,358,000 below the budget request.
    Advanced Technology Program.--The Committee has provided no 
new funds for the Advanced Technology Program (ATP) because of 
the likelihood that no authorization will be provided for the 
program. The Committee understands that as of May 31, 1995, 
approximately $187,000,000 of ATP funds remained unobligated. 
The Committee has included bill language directing that no 
additional grants be awarded, and that any remaining balances 
be used to fund the continuation costs of ATP grants awarded in 
fiscal year 1994 and prior years. Administrative costs 
necessary for the management of continuation grants may be 
absorbed under the NIST internal account.
    Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program.--The Committee 
has included $81,100,000 for the Manufacturing Extension 
Partnership (MEP) Program. This amount will allow for the 
continuation of eligible existing centers, rollover costs for 
22 of the 37 Centers originally funded under the Technology 
Reinvestment Program under the Defense Department, and for one 
additional competition for new centers to be conducted in 
fiscal year 1996.

                  Construction Of Research Facilities

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $60,000,000 
for construction of NIST facilities. This amount is a decrease 
of $4,639,000 below the amount appropriated for the current 
fiscal year, and is $9,913,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee recognizes the importance of continuing the long term 
plan to address the technical obsolescence of NIST facilities, 
but expects NIST to reassess its building requirements in light 
of reduced program and staffing levels and overall budget 
constraints.
    This program supports all NIST activities by providing the 
facilities necessary to carry out the NIST mission. The 
Institute has proposed a multiyear effort to construct advanced 
technology laboratories and to renovate NIST's current 
buildings and laboratory facilities in compliance with more 
stringent science and engineering program requirements. The 
amount provided for fiscal year 1996 will permit continuation 
of both the design work for new facilities and enhanced 
maintenance of NIST's existing facilities.

            National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration

    The Committee recommends a total of $1,752,410,000 in new 
budget (obligational) authority for the eight appropriation 
items of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration 
(NOAA), transfers totaling $55,500,000 and fees totaling 
$3,000,000. This amount is a decrease of $354,099,000 below the 
budget request for these items and a decrease of $196,614,000 
below the amounts appropriated under these accounts for fiscal 
year 1995.

                  Operations, Research, And Facilities

                     (including transfers of funds)

    The bill includes $1,690,452,000 in new budget 
(obligational) authority for the fisheries, marine, weather, 
environmental, satellite, and other programs funded in this 
appropriation. This amount is a reduction of $330,683,000 from 
the budget request and is a decrease of $138,840,000 below the 
amount appropriated for fiscal year 1995.
    In addition to the new budget authority provided, the 
Committee recommends a transfer of $55,500,000 from balances in 
the account entitled, ``Promote and Develop Fishery Products 
and Research Pertaining to American Fisheries.'' This amount is 
equal to the budget request and will leave approximately 
$9,265,000 remaining in the fund for Saltonstall-Kennedy 
grants. The total amount provided also includes a transfer of 
$3,900,000 from the Damage Assessment Revolving Fund.
    Language is included in the bill which allows NOAA to 
collect additional fees to recover some of the costs of 
administering the aeronautical charting program. The language 
allows these fees to be credited to this appropriation as 
offsetting collections, and will result in a final General Fund 
appropriation of $1,687,452,000. The bill also includes 
language allowing NOAA to retain gifts and contributions made 
under the Marine Sanctuary Program. Any amounts collected under 
this proposal are in addition to amounts provided in the bill 
for marine sanctuaries.
    Language is included in the bill establishing a maximum 
level of $2,000,000 per State under the Coastal Zone Management 
administrative grant program. This is similar to language 
included in previous years appropriations acts.
    The Committee recommendation reflects prior year 
deobligations and carryover funding totaling $30,000,000. The 
Committee is increasingly concerned by NOAA's inability to 
accurately project its funding requirements for any given 
fiscal year. In response to a request from the Committee 
earlier this year for estimated carryover balances, NOAA 
responded that only $1,500,000 would carryover from fiscal year 
1995 into fiscal year 1996. Yet NOAA historically carries over 
an average of $74,000,000 from one fiscal year to the next. The 
Committee expects NOAA to take immediate steps to address its 
serious accounting and financial management problems without 
the creation of any additional layers of management.
    The Committee is increasingly concerned by the failure of 
NOAA to respond to its requests for cooperation in certain 
matters, and to follow up on information requests made by the 
Committee. The Committee is also concerned with the cavalier 
approach NOAA takes to directions given in the Committee 
report, particularly direction related to items not included in 
the budget request. The Committee expects NOAA to follow the 
direction given in this section of the report as well as the 
sections addressing the Committee's reprogramming requirements.
    The Committee recommendation includes increases above 
fiscal year 1995 levels, and in some cases above the fiscal 
year 1996 request, for certain high priority funding 
requirements, and eliminates or reduces funding for many lower 
priority items included in the request. The Committee is 
concerned that many of the line items included in the request 
are continuations of add-ons provided in previous years for 
which the original intended purpose has been accomplished. NOAA 
has instead incorporated these items into its base funding 
without adequate justification for the activity or the dollar 
amount associated with it, or any explanation of the need to 
continue to fund these items. In many cases NOAA has ignored 
Congressional direction and diverted funds intended to be 
provided to specific institutions or grantees in order to 
offset shortfalls in the NOAA base. The Committee reminds NOAA 
that the base reductions included in this mark are intentional. 
NOAA must take action to downsize and streamline its various 
functions and offices. The Committee directs NOAA to end the 
practice of subsidizing its base costs through the practice of 
withholding funds from activities designated in the bill or 
report.
    Further, the Committee expects the Commerce Department and 
NOAA to develop a revised budget structure that displays the 
amounts requested under a true program office and activity 
structure. This budget structure should identify and segregate 
amounts requested for headquarters and field office components 
of various activities as well as indicate the amounts intended 
for external grants or contracts. The Committee expects the 
Commerce Department and NOAA to develop this budget structure 
in consultation with the Committee on Appropriations and the 
appropriate authorizing committees, and to use this revised 
budget structure in the submission of its fiscal year 1997 
budget request.
    The following table compares the Committee recommendation 
to the 1995 enacted appropriation and the fiscal year 1996 
budget request for the activities, sub-activities, and projects 
funded in this appropriation:

NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION--FISCAL YEAR 1996 BUDGET
                         [Dollars in thousands]                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                           FY 1996                      
                         FY 1995         President's      FY 1996 House 
                      appropriation        request            mark      
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                        
  NATIONAL OCEAN                                                        
                                                                        
Mapping, Charting,                                                      
 and Geodesy:                                                           
    Mapping and                                                         
     Charting.....          $32,149           $33,586           $37,500 
    Geodesy.......           20,667            19,927            20,927 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Total,                                                            
       Mapping,                                                         
       Charting,                                                        
       and Geodesy           52,917            53,513            58,427 
                   =====================================================
Observation and                                                         
 Assessment:                                                            
    Observation                                                         
     and                                                                
     Prediction...           13,058            13,599            11,000 
        Chesapeake                                                      
         Bay                                                            
         observati                                                      
         on buoys.              400                 0               400 
        Ocean                                                           
         services.            4,418             4,451             3,000 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal           17,876            18,050            14,400 
                   =====================================================
    Estuarine and                                                       
     Coastal                                                            
     Assessment...            2,674             3,130             2,674 
        Ocean                                                           
         assessmen                                                      
         t program           24,528            21,925            14,600 
        Damage                                                          
         assessmen                                                      
         t........            1,200             4,500             1,200 
        Transfer                                                        
         from                                                           
         Damage                                                         
         Assessmen                                                      
         t Fund...            6,770             6,550             6,550 
        Oil                                                             
         Pollution                                                      
         Act of                                                         
         1990.....            1,300             1,395             1,000 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal           36,472            37,500            26,024 
                   =====================================================
    Coastal Ocean                                                       
     Science                                                            
     Coastal Ocean                                                      
     program......           12,243            18,541                 0 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Total,                                                            
       Observation                                                      
       and                                                              
       Assessment.           66,591            74,091            40,424 
                   =====================================================
Ocean and Coastal                                                       
 Management:                                                            
    Coastal                                                             
     Management                                                         
        CZM grants           45,500            46,657            36,000 
        Acquisitio                                                      
         n of                                                           
         estuarine                                                      
         sanctuari                                                      
         es.......            3,350             4,214                 0 
        Charleston                                                      
         , SC,                                                          
         spec.                                                          
         area mgt.                                                      
         plan.....            1,000                 0                 0 
        Nonpoint                                                        
         pollution            5,000             8,000                 0 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal           54,850            58,851            36,000 
                   =====================================================
    Ocean                                                               
     Management                                                         
        Marine                                                          
         sanctuary                                                      
         program..           11,961            12,371             9,000 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Total,                                                        
           Ocean                                                        
           and                                                          
           Coastal                                                      
           Managem                                                      
           ent....           66,811            71,222            45,000 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Total,                                                        
           NOS....          186,218           198,826           143,851 
                   =====================================================
                                                                        
  NATIONAL MARINE                                                       
 FISHERIES SERVICE                                                      
                                                                        
Information                                                             
 Collection and                                                         
 Analyses:                                                              
    Resource                                                            
     Information..           65,973            86,467            72,835 
        Conservati                                                      
         on                                                             
         engineeri                                                      
         ng by                                                          
         catch....              800               800                 0 
        Antarctic                                                       
         research.            1,200             1,200             1,000 
        Fishery                                                         
         resource                                                       
         data                                                           
         error                                                          
         reduction              960               960                 0 
        Marine                                                          
         mammal                                                         
         research.            2,314             2,314             1,650 
        Protected                                                       
         species                                                        
         research.            3,630             3,630             1,800 
        Chesapeake                                                      
         Bay                                                            
         Studies..            1,890             1,890             1,000 
        Right                                                           
         whale                                                          
         research.              214               214                 0 
        Gear                                                            
         entanglem                                                      
         ent                                                            
         studies..              651               651                 0 
        MARFIN....            3,780             3,780             3,000 
        SEAMAP....            1,340             1,340               700 
        Aquacultur                                                      
         e........            2,500             2,500                 0 
        Alaskan                                                         
         groundfis                                                      
         h surveys              661               661               661 
        Bearing                                                         
         Sea                                                            
         pollock                                                        
         research.              945               945               945 
        West Coast                                                      
         groundfis                                                      
         h........              780               780               780 
        New                                                             
         England                                                        
         stock                                                          
         depletion            1,116             1,116             1,000 
        Hawaii                                                          
         stock                                                          
         managemen                                                      
         t plan...              500                 0                 0 
        Yukon                                                           
         River                                                          
         chinook                                                        
         salmon...              700               700               500 
        Winter Run                                                      
         chinook                                                        
         salmon...              250               250                 0 
        Atlantic                                                        
         salmon                                                         
         research.              710               710               500 
        Gulf of                                                         
         Maine                                                          
         groundfis                                                      
         h survey.              567               567               450 
        Dolphin                                                         
         safe                                                           
         technolog                                                      
         ies......              500               500                 0 
        Habitat                                                         
         research/                                                      
         evaluatio                                                      
         n........              470               470               450 
        Pacific                                                         
         salmon                                                         
         treaty                                                         
         program..            5,587             5,587             5,000 
        Fish                                                            
         cooperati                                                      
         ve inst.                                                       
         enhanceme                                                      
         nt.......              410               410                 0 
        Hawaiian                                                        
         monk                                                           
         seals....              520               520                 0 
        Stellar                                                         
         sea lion                                                       
         recovery                                                       
         plan.....            1,440             1,440               720 
        Hawaiian                                                        
         sea                                                            
         turtles..              240               240                 0 
        Atlantic                                                        
         bluefin                                                        
         tuna                                                           
         research.              300                 0                 0 
        Halibut/                                                        
         Sablefish            1,200             1,200             1,200 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal          102,148           121,842            94,191 
                   =====================================================
    Fishery                                                             
     Industry                                                           
     Information                                                        
        Fish                                                            
         statistic                                                      
         s........           11,937            14,187            13,000 
        Alaska                                                          
         groundfis                                                      
         h                                                              
         monitorin                                                      
         g........            5,200             5,200             5,200 
        PACFIN/                                                         
         catch                                                          
         effort                                                         
         data.....            2,300             2,300             2,300 
        Rec.                                                            
         fishery                                                        
         harvest                                                        
         monitorin                                                      
         g........            2,900             2,900             2,900 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal           22,337            24,587            23,400 
                   =====================================================
    Information                                                         
     Analyses and                                                       
     Dissemination           20,913            22,606            18,373 
        Computer                                                        
         hardware                                                       
         and                                                            
         software.            5,000             5,000             4,000 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal           25,913            27,606            22,373 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Total,                                                        
           Informa                                                      
           tion                                                         
           Collect                                                      
           ion and                                                      
           Analyse                                                      
           s......          150,398           174,035           139,964 
                   =====================================================
Conservation and                                                        
 Management                                                             
 Operations:                                                            
    Fisheries                                                           
     Management                                                         
     Programs.....           15,856            16,763            16,000 
        Columbia                                                        
         River                                                          
         hatcherie                                                      
         s........           10,300            10,263             9,000 
        Columbia                                                        
         River                                                          
         end.                                                           
         species                                                        
         studies..              288               287               140 
        Regional                                                        
         councils.            8,556             8,524             9,000 
        Fisheries                                                       
         Managemen                                                      
         t (ITQs).                0            10,000                 0 
        Internatio                                                      
         nal                                                            
         fisheries                                                      
         commissio                                                      
         ns.......            1,250               395               395 
        Management                                                      
         of                                                             
         George's                                                       
         Bank.....              480               478               478 
        Beluga                                                          
         whale                                                          
         committee              200                 0               200 
        Pacific                                                         
         tuna                                                           
         managemen                                                      
         t........            2,000             1,992                 0 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal          38 ,930            48,702            35,213 
                   =====================================================
    Protected                                                           
     Species                                                            
     Management...            5,234             6,712             5,000 
        ESA                                                             
         listing                                                        
         and                                                            
         status                                                         
         review...              930               928                 0 
        Driftnet                                                        
         Act                                                            
         implement                                                      
         ation....            3,000             2,993             2,500 
        Marine                                                          
         Mammal                                                         
         Protectio                                                      
         n Act....            8,000            10,230             6,000 
        Endangered                                                      
         Species                                                        
         Act                                                            
         recovery                                                       
         plan.....            7,000            14,783             3,000 
        Fishery                                                         
         observer                                                       
         training.              300                 0               300 
        East Coast                                                      
         observers              700               697               350 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal           25,164            36,343            17,150 
                   =====================================================
    Habitat                                                             
     Conservation.            7,979            10,665             8,000 
    Enforcement                                                         
     and                                                                
     Surveillance.           15,460            18,445            15,500 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Total,                                                            
       Conservatio                                                      
       n and                                                            
       Management                                                       
       Operations.           87,533           114,155            75,863 
                   =====================================================
State and Industry                                                      
 Assistance                                                             
 Programs:                                                              
    Interjurisdict                                                      
     ional                                                              
     fisheries                                                          
     grants.......            3,156             3,156             2,000 
    Anadromous                                                          
     grants.......            2,108             2,108             1,500 
    Anadromous                                                          
     fishery                                                            
     project......              250               250                 0 
    North Atlantic                                                      
     fishery                                                            
     project......            2,800                 0                 0 
    Interstate                                                          
     fish                                                               
     commissions..            4,000             4,000             2,000 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....           12,314             9,514             5,500 
                   =====================================================
    Fisheries                                                           
     Development                                                        
     Program                                                            
        Fisheries                                                       
         trade                                                          
         promotion                                                      
         activitie                                                      
         s........            1,500             1,631                 0 
        Product                                                         
         quality                                                        
         and                                                            
         safety/                                                        
         seafood                                                        
         inspectio                                                      
         n........           14,155            14,500            10,000 
        Export                                                          
         strategie                                                      
         s/Mahi                                                         
         Mahi.....              750                 0                 0 
        Fisheries                                                       
         Biotechno                                                      
         logy.....            2,000             1,993                 0 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal           18,405            18,124            10,000 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Total,                                                        
           State                                                        
           and                                                          
           Industr                                                      
           y                                                            
           Assista                                                      
           nce                                                          
           Program                                                      
           s......           30,719            27,638            15,500 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Total,                                                        
           NMFS...          268,650           315,828           231,327 
                   =====================================================
                                                                        
    OCEANIC AND                                                         
    ATMOSPHERIC                                                         
     RESEARCH                                                           
                                                                        
Climate and Air                                                         
 Quality Research:                                                      
    Interannual                                                         
     and Seasonal                                                       
     Climate                                                            
     Research                                                           
     (including                                                         
     Climate and                                                        
     Global                                                             
     Change)......           78,770            97,788            60,346 
    Long-Term                                                           
     Climate and                                                        
     Air Quality                                                        
     Research.....           27,272            39,144            33,772 
        High                                                            
         Performan                                                      
         ce                                                             
         Computing            6,500            15,558             6,500 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal           33,772            54,702            94,118 
                   =====================================================
    GLOBE.........            7,000             7,038                 0 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Total,                                                            
       Climate and                                                      
       Air Quality          119,542           159,518            94,118 
                   =====================================================
Atmospheric                                                             
 Programs:                                                              
    Weather                                                             
     Research.....           33,613            34,720            33,613 
        Wind                                                            
         profiler.            4,350             4,350             4,350 
        Federal/                                                        
         state                                                          
         weather                                                        
         mod.                                                           
         grants...            3,100                 0                 0 
        Southeaste                                                      
         rn storm                                                       
         research.              400                 0                 0 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal           41,463            39,070            37,963 
                   =====================================================
    Solar-                                                              
     Terrestrial                                                        
     services and                                                       
     research.....            5,483             7,839             5,483 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Total,                                                            
       Atmospheric                                                      
       Program....           46,946            46,909            43,446 
                   =====================================================
Ocean and Great                                                         
 Lakes Programs:                                                        
    Marine                                                              
     Prediction                                                         
     Research.....            9,506            10,226             9,506 
        GLERL.....            4,558             4,558                 0 
        Great                                                           
         lakes                                                          
         nearshore                                                      
         research.              200               200                 0 
        VENTS.....            2,496                 0                 0 
        SE US/                                                          
         Caribbean                                                      
         FOCI                                                           
         program..              450                 0                 0 
        GLERL/                                                          
         Zebra                                                          
         mussel...              911                 0                 0 
        Lake                                                            
         Champlain                                                      
         study....              150                 0                 0 
        Pacific                                                         
         Island                                                         
         technical                                                      
         assistanc                                                      
         e........              190                 0                 0 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal           18,461            14,984             9,506 
                   =====================================================
    Sea Grant                                                           
        Sea grant                                                       
         college                                                        
         program..           53,198            49,400            53,300 
        National                                                        
         coastal                                                        
         R&D;                                                            
         institute            1,000                 0                 0 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal           54,198            49,400            53,300 
                   =====================================================
    Undersea                                                            
     Research                                                           
     Program                                                            
        NOAA                                                            
         Undersea                                                       
         Research                                                       
         Program..           17,932                 0                 0 
        Regional                                                        
         marine                                                         
         research                                                       
         centers..            1,500                 0                 0 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal           19,432                 0                 0 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Total,                                                        
           Ocean                                                        
           and                                                          
           Great                                                        
           Lakes                                                        
           Program                                                      
           s......           92,091            64,384            62,806 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Total,                                                        
           OAR....          258,579           270,821           200,370 
                   =====================================================
                                                                        
 NATIONAL WEATHER                                                       
      SERVICE                                                           
                                                                        
Operations and                                                          
 Research:                                                              
    Local Warnings                                                      
     and Forecasts/                                                     
     MARDI........          438,414           417,356           405,300 
        Data buoy                                                       
         maint.                                                         
         for                                                            
         Hawaii...              542               542                 0 
        Agricultur                                                      
         al and                                                         
         fruit                                                          
         frost                                                          
         program..            2,316                 0                 0 
        Fire                                                            
         weather                                                        
         services.              449                 0                 0 
        Susquehann                                                      
         a River                                                        
         Basin                                                          
         Flood Sys            1,250               669               669 
        Aviation                                                        
         forecasts           35,596            35,596            35,596 
        Regional                                                        
         climate                                                        
         centers..            3,200                 0                 0 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal          481,767           454,163           441,565 
                   =====================================================
    Central                                                             
     Forecast                                                           
     Guidance.....           29,015            30,457            28,193 
    Atmospheric                                                         
     and                                                                
     Hydrological                                                       
     Research.....            2,487             2,669             2,000 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Total,                                                            
       Operations                                                       
       and                                                              
       Research...          513,269           487,289           471,758 
                   =====================================================
Systems                                                                 
 Acquisition:                                                           
    Public Warning                                                      
     and Forecast                                                       
     Systems                                                            
        NEXRAD....           82,982            55,249            53,335 
        ASOS......           17,515            16,952            16,952 
        AWIPS/                                                          
         NOAAPort.           34,947            52,097            50,000 
        Computer                                                        
         Facility                                                       
         Upgrades.            9,985            12,745            12,000 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Total,                                                        
           Systems                                                      
           Acquisi                                                      
           tion...          145,429           137,043           132,287 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Total,                                                        
           NWS....          658,698           624,332           604,045 
                   =====================================================
                                                                        
     NATIONAL                                                           
   ENVIRONMENTAL                                                        
 SATELLITE, DATA,                                                       
  AND INFORMATION                                                       
      SERVICE                                                           
                                                                        
Satellite                                                               
 Observing                                                              
 Systems:                                                               
    Polar                                                               
     spacecraft                                                         
     and launching          146,228           198,824           184,765 
    Polar                                                               
     convergence/                                                       
     IPO..........           16,000            54,000            39,500 
    Landsat.......                0            12,000                 0 
    Geostationary                                                       
     spacecraft                                                         
     and launching          132,242           179,101           162,273 
    Ocean remote                                                        
     sensing......            6,000             1,600                 0 
    Environmental                                                       
     observing                                                          
     services.....           51,271            55,912            49,000 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Total,                                                            
       Satellite                                                        
       Observing                                                        
       Systems....          351,741           501,437           435,538 
                   =====================================================
Environmental Data                                                      
 Management                                                             
 Systems..........           24,365            28,564            24,365 
    Data and                                                            
     Information                                                        
     Services.....           11,300            15,100            11,300 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Total, EDMS.           35,665            43,664            35,665 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Total,                                                            
       NESDIS.....          387,406           545,101           471,203 
                   =====================================================
                                                                        
  PROGRAM SUPPORT                                                       
                                                                        
Administration and                                                      
 Services:                                                              
    Executive                                                           
     direction and                                                      
     administratio                                                      
     n............           25,490            25,882            20,000 
    Systems                                                             
     Program                                                            
     Office (SPO).            1,798             2,607             1,500 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....           27,288            28,489            21,500 
                   =====================================================
    Central                                                             
     Administrativ                                                      
     e Support....           37,853            54,749            30,000 
    Retired Pay                                                         
     Commissioned                                                       
     Officers.....            7,706             7,889             7,706 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Total,                                                            
       Administrat                                                      
       ion and                                                          
       Services...           72,847            91,127            59,206 
                   =====================================================
    Marine                                                              
     Services.....           62,011            62,202            60,000 
    Aircraft                                                            
     Services.....            9,153            10,248             9,500 
        Critical                                                        
         safety                                                         
         and                                                            
         instrumen                                                      
         tation...            4,000                 0                 0 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Total,                                                        
           Aircraf                                                      
           t                                                            
           Service                                                      
           s......           13,153            10,248             9,500 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Total,                                                        
           PS.....          148,011           163,577           128,706 
                   =====================================================
Direct Obligations        1,907,582         2,118,485         1,779,502 
    GSA Amendment.         [-2,054]   ................  ................
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Total,                                                            
       direct                                                           
       obligations        1,907,582         2,118,485         1,779,502 
                   =====================================================
Reimbursable                                                            
 obligations......          316,216           309,715           309,715 
                   =====================================================
Anticipated                                                             
 offsetting                                                             
 collections......                0             4,000             3,000 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....          316,216           313,715           312,715 
                   =====================================================
      Total                                                             
       obligations        2,223,918         2,432,200         2,092,217 
                   =====================================================
Financing:                                                              
    Deobligations/                                                      
     Carryover....          (16,000)          (18,000)          (30,000)
    Unobligated                                                         
     balances                                                           
     transferred                                                        
     (DARE).......           (2,650)           (2,650)           (2,650)
        Anticipate                                                      
         d                                                              
         offsettin                                                      
         g                                                              
         collectio                                                      
         ns.......           (6,000)           (4,000)           (3,000)
        Federal                                                         
         funds....         (280,607)         (272,207)         (272,207)
        Non-                                                            
         federal                                                        
         funds....          (35,609)          (37,508)          (37,508)
                   -----------------------------------------------------
          Budget                                                        
           authori                                                      
           ty.....        1,885,562         2,097,835         1,746,852 
Financing from:                                                         
    Promote and                                                         
     develop                                                            
     American                                                           
     fisheries....          (55,500)          (55,500)          (55,500)
    Damage                                                              
     assessment &                                                       
     restoration                                                        
     revolving fun           (4,120)           (3,900)           (3,900)
    Transfer from                                                       
     BPA..........                0           (10,300)                0 
    Mandatory Fish                                                      
     Fees (ITQs)..                0           (10,000)                0 
                   -----------------------------------------------------
      Appropriatio                                                      
       n, ORF.....        1,823,292         2,018,135         1,687,452 
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The following paragraphs provide highlights of the amounts 
distributed in the preceeding table:

                         National Ocean Service

    The Committee has included a total of $143,851,000 for 
activities of the National Ocean Service (NOS) for fiscal year 
1996, instead of $186,358,000 provided for fiscal year 1995 and 
$198,826,000 as requested.
    Mapping and Charting.--The Committee has included 
$37,500,000 for the NOAA mapping and charting program. This 
increase above the request is intended to increase the 
percentage of critical areas that could be surveyed in fiscal 
year 1996 and hasten the implementation of NOAA's new digital 
charting system. The Committee intends that NOAA increase its 
reliance on contracting with the private sector to conduct 
mapping and charting activities. An increased reliance on the 
private sector will enable NOAA to decrease its FTE 
requirements and the need for additional vessels in its own 
fleet for these purposes. The Committee intends that the entire 
increase provided will be used to contract with the private 
sector and does not approve additional FTE for this activity.
    Geodesy.--The Committee has included $20,927,000 for NOAA's 
geodesy programs. Included in this amount is $1,000,000 in 
fiscal year 1996 funds for the Land Information System, 
multipurpose cadastre program. The Committee directs NOAA to 
identify an additional $3,120,000 in fiscal year 1995 
appropriations and prior year carryover balances to complete 
the original proposals for base mapping projects for Orleans 
and Jefferson Parishes. This amount to be provided from prior 
year carryover funds represents the amount the National 
Geodetic Survey has retained from amounts designated in the 
report in previous years for this project. The total amount of 
$4,120,000 will complete the planned Land Information Systems 
for these two parishes. The Committee expects these funds to be 
awarded as soon as possible, but no later than 30 days after 
enactment of the accompanying bill.
    The Committee encourages NOAA to review the merits of a 
pilot project under the National Geodetic Survey to implement 
the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD 88) in 
California and in western North Carolina. NAVD88 would be used 
to provide accurate and safely identified civil engineering 
information by measuring vertical data. The Committee 
understands that NAVD88 is the appropriate replacement for the 
current vertical measurement system. This pilot project could 
demonstrate NAVD88's potential for integrating available 
technologies at the local level.
    Marine Sanctuary Program.--The Committee has included 
$9,000,000 for the National Marine Sanctuary Program. The 
Committee expects that the total overhead charged to the 
National Marine Sanctuaries Program in fiscal year 1996 will 
not be in excess of the program's demands on those resources.
    The Committee is also aware of concerns related to the 
proposal to designate a new marine sanctuary site in Puget 
Sound, Washington. The Committee expects that no action will be 
taken to designate this site unless and until the communities 
impacted by the designation vote in the affirmative to do so.
    Coastal Zone Management (CZM).--The Committee has included 
$36,000,000 for CZM 306 and 306(a) grants. Funding for CZM 
program administration is to be covered under amounts made 
available through the Coastal Zone Management Fund. In 
addition, the Committee has provided $4,300,000 for the 
National Estuarine Research Reserve program under the separate 
appropriation from the Coastal Zone Management Fund.
    Chesapeake Bay Observation Buoys.--The Committee has 
included $400,000 to complete the acquisition of observation 
buoys for the Chesapeake Bay Observation System. This funding 
is based on a commitment for the State of Maryland to assume 
responsibility for funding the operation of these buoys in 
future years.

                   National Marine Fisheries Service
    The Committee has provided $231,327,000 for the programs of 
the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) for fiscal year 
1996 instead of $315,828,000 as requested. The Committee has 
redirected and reprioritized funds provided to NMFS to reflect 
the Committee's commitment to building sustainable fisheries. 
The Committee understands that the reductions below current 
year spending for NMFS will require significant reductions in 
headquarters and field activities and encourages NMFS to 
develop an immediate program-driven plan for addressing these 
reductions.
    Endangered Species Act.--The Committee is aware that the 
Endangered Species Act has not been reauthorized since 1992. 
The Committee, therefore, finds it inappropriate to fund the 
application of this law to new prelisting or listing activities 
associated with threatened or endangered species. These 
activities include designations of critical habitat, review of 
petitions to list species and/or revise critical habitat, or 
any other activities the agency conducts as part of its 
prelisting and listing actions. The Committee has included 
funding for species currently listed under the law in order to 
avoid disruption of ongoing programs for these species as well 
as impacts on the activities of private parties.
    The Committee recognizes that the Department of Commerce 
may be subject to court orders finding violations of the 
Endangered Species Act by failing to take a listing or 
prelisting action with respect to a specific species. The 
current listing moratorium contained in Public Law 104-6 
provides a limited exception for these situations. The 
Committee expects that the Department would comply with an 
order issued by a Federal court with respect to a specific 
species prior to April 10, 1995, the date of enactment of 
Public Law 104-6, to the extent that funds are available for 
reprogramming. However, the deletion of funding due to lack of 
authorization does apply to implementation of any settlement of 
a lawsuit agreed to by the Department.
    Sea Turtle/Shrimp Fishery Emergency Response Plan.--As 
addressed in House Report 104-124, the conference report on 
H.R. 1158, the Committee directs NMFS to immediately convene a 
team of experts to scientifically peer review and examine all 
the information available on its March 14, 1995, Sea Turtle, 
Shrimp Fishery Emergency Response Plan (ERP) and the NMFS and 
NOAA Sea Turtle Conservation Restrictions Applicable to Shrimp 
Trawling Activities announced in the May 3, 1995 Federal 
Register. The Committee directs that individuals with 
appropriate scientific expertise nominated by the shrimp 
fishing industry and the conservation community be part of the 
peer process and team. The Committee also directs NMFS to 
immediately seek detailed recommendations and analysis from 
affected shrimp fishing industry members and the conservation 
community on its March 14, 1995 restrictions, including a 
detailed assessment of the economic impact on the affected 
shrimp fishing industry. The Assistant Administrator for NMFS 
shall convene immediate meetings with representatives of such 
groups to review and develop such recommendations.
    The Committee directs NMFS to work with the shrimp fishing 
industry to revise its March 14, 1995 ERP and its May 3, 1995 
restriction to include the results of the scientific peer 
review and the alternatives for lessening the economic impact 
on the shrimp fishing industry. These alternatives may include 
exemptions to using turtle excluder devices (TEDs) in smaller 
try nets. NMFS is directed to publish for public comment and 
input only the revised plans for the March 14, 1995 ERP and the 
May 3, 1995 restrictions by August 30, 1995. The Committee 
directs NMFS and the Department of Commerce not to implement 
any shrimp fishery closures that may result from the March 14, 
1995 ERP prior to December 31, 1995.
    The Committee directs NOAA to report to the Committee on 
its progress in implementing these actions prior to the 
conference with the Senate on the accompanying bill, but no 
later than September 15, 1995. The Committee notes that similar 
direction was provided to NOAA regarding these issues in the 
conference report to accompany H.R. 1158. Prior to passage of 
the conference report on H.R. 1158, the Under Secretary of 
Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere informed the Committee that 
NOAA would comply with the direction should H.R. 1158 become 
law. Despite the Administration's veto of the original bill, 
the Committee intends that NOAA comply with the direction in 
that report and the additional direction provided here.
    Sea Turtle Protection.--In addition, the Committee also 
expects NMFS to improve its activities in the area of 
protecting, recovering and improving beach monitoring of the 
Kemps Ridley and other sea turtles. Within the amount provided 
for conservation and management activities, the Committee 
directs NMFS to provide additional resources toward the 
following activities:
          (1) protecting and enhancing the nesting beaches and 
        nesting success of the Kemps Ridley at Rancho Nuevo, 
        Mexico;
          (2) improving the beach monitoring of the Sea Turtle 
        Stranding and Salvage Network (STSSN) by establishing a 
        systemic stranding monitoring program with the 
        cooperation and participation of the shrimp fishing 
        industry; and
          (3) conducting independent research, through academic 
        institutions and with the participation of the shrimp 
        fishing industry, into alternative methods, other than 
        the use of turtle excluder devices, for reducing the 
        incidental capture of sea turtles in shrimp trawls.
    Red Snapper Stock Management.--The Committee also expects 
NOAA, with the participation of all segments of the commercial 
and recreational fishing industry, to conduct an independent 
survey and analysis of the red snapper stock and red snapper 
management plan. The Committee directs NOAA to conduct this 
survey and analysis to better define the condition of the stock 
and to assess the need for management and the economic impact 
on the industry due to actions taken under the management plan.
    Columbia River Hatcheries.--With regard to the Columbia 
River hatcheries, the Committee is aware that the states of 
Oregon and Washington have required their state agencies to 
begin marking all hatchery salmon. NMFS should make an effort 
to work with these states to help facilitate this work at 
federally funded facilities.
    Fish Screen Criteria.--The Committee expects NMFS to work 
with the Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Servcie and the appropriate resources agencies of the State of 
California to review and, where necessary, revise criteria for 
sweeping and approach velocities for new fish screens in the 
Sacramento and San Joaquin Rivers. Existing criteria appear to 
be unsuitable for some riverine conditions; these tests will 
assist in the development of suitable screening criteria for 
species for which no screening criteria currently exist. The 
Committee expects this review to result in lower design and 
construction costs of fish screens in riverine environments.
    RECFIN.--The Committee has provided $2,900,000 for the 
RECFIN program. The Committee expects that the programs for the 
West Coast, Atlantic States, and Gulf States shall each receive 
one-third of these funds. Funding for any supplemental region-
specific projects is to be derived from the overall ``Fish 
Statistics'' line item.
    Interstate Fish Commissions.--The recommendation includes 
$2,000,000 for interstate fish commissions. The Committee 
directs that $600,000 be provided to the three interstate 
commissions, with the remaining $1,400,000 provided for 
implementation of the Atlantic Coastal Fisheries Cooperative 
Management Act.

                    Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$200,370,000 for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, instead of 
$270,811,000 as requested.
    The Committee recommendation includes the following amounts 
for basic laboratory research and support under Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Research: $8,000,000 for the base Interannual and 
Seasonal Climate research program (exclusive of climate and 
global change funding); $27,272,000 for Long-term Climate and 
Air Quality research; $33,613,000 for Weather research; 
$5,483,000 for solar-terrestrial research and services; and 
$9,506,000 for the base Marine Prediction research program. 
These amounts will maintain these basic research programs at 
the fiscal year 1995 level.
    The Committee has provided no funding for the undersea 
research program, as proposed in the budget request.
    The Committee expects NOAA to follow the direction given in 
this section of the report as well as the sections addressing 
the Committee's reprogramming requirements.
    The Committee recommendation includes $53,300,000 for the 
Sea Grant program. The Committee expects NOAA to continue to 
fund oyster disease research and zebra mussel research under 
Sea Grant at not less than the levels provided in fiscal year 
1995.
    The Committee has provided $60,346,000 for inter-annual and 
seasonal climate research. This amount includes funding for the 
climate and global change program. The Committee has merged 
these activities to ensure that climate change research is 
focused on near-to mid-term climatic events such as the El Nino 
phenomenon. The Committee believes this research provides the 
most immediate return on the investment, particularly in its 
value to the U.S. agricultural community. The Committee intends 
that none of the funds provided under this program or elsewhere 
under NOAA be used for the Global Learning and Observations to 
Benefit the Environment (GLOBE) program.
    The Committee's recommendation of $5,483,000 for solar-
terrestrial services and research assumes that NOAA will 
develop a proposal for assessing fees from the users of the 
services provided by this laboratory.
                        National Weather Service

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$604,045,000 for the National Weather Service (NWS) for fiscal 
year 1996, a decrease of $20,287,000 below the request and a 
decrease of $54,653,000 below the amount provided for the 
current year. The Committee expects reductions in staffing 
required by this reduction to be applied proportionately to 
headquarters and administrative activities.
    Operations and Research.--The Committee recommendation 
reflects the integration of the amounts provided for basic 
local warnings and forecasts with the funds for the Weather 
Service modernization and restructuring initiative at a funding 
level of $405,300,000. The amount provided assumes full funding 
of the NOAA weather radio network enhancement as requested.
    The amounts provided for NWS operations reflect proposed 
legislative changes to the current statutory certification 
requirements for weather office closures that are included in 
H.R. 1815, the NOAA authorization bill. The severe budgetary 
constraints faced by the Committee require that these funding 
reductions be made. However, the Committee acknowledges that 
there are still uncertainties regarding the adequacy of 
coverage in certain areas under the current NWS modernization 
plan. The Committee encourages NOAA to continue to rely on an 
independent review of the coverage concerns prior to the 
closure of any NWS office. The Committee reminds NOAA that all 
office closures, including the closure of weather service 
offices under the modernization plan, are subject to the 
Committee's standard reprogramming procedures included in 
section 605 of the bill. NOAA is expected to submit an 
independent analysis of the adequacy of coverage with the 
required reprogramming notification.
    The Committee expects the National Weather Service to 
provide sufficient funding under the local warnings and 
forecasts activity to cover the phase-out of Fruit Frost 
weather service program. The Committee expects NOAA to continue 
the program through the upcoming fall and winter freeze season, 
but to require the full privatization of this program by April 
1996.
    The amounts provided reflect no increase for the NOAA 
radiosonde network replacement. The Committee recognizes the 
need to modernize this network, but funding constraints 
prohibit the expansion of this program in fiscal year 1996. The 
Committee will reconsider the request in the next fiscal year 
as systems acquisition costs for next-generation radars 
(NEXRAD) and the automated surface observing system (ASOS) 
continue to decline.
    The amount provided includes the full request for aviation 
forecasts. The Committee has not provided funding for the NWS 
to continue the augmentation/backup of ASOS units at NWS 
airport locations that will have commissioned ASOS units in 
service in fiscal year 1996. The Committee's mark assumes that 
the Federal Aviation Administration will assume these 
responsibilities in fiscal year 1996.
    The Committee is aware of a recent report regarding 
technical problems in commissioning ASOS sites. The Committee 
understands that there are off-the-shelf solutions to these 
problems, but that implementation has been slow. The Committee 
directs NOAA to provide a report no later than October 1, 1995, 
on the intended solutions to the technical and installation 
problems associated with this program and the timeline for 
implementation for those solutions.
    Systems Acquisition.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$132,287,000 for National Weather Service systems acquisition. 
The amount includes a reduction of $1,914,000 from the request 
for NEXRAD planned product improvements.
    The recommendation includes $50,000,000 for the Advanced 
Weather Interactive Processing System (AWIPS). The Committee 
continues to be concerned by delays and design problems with 
this system.

  National Environmental and Satellite, Data, and Information Service

    The Committee recommendation includes $471,203,000 for the 
National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service 
(NESDIS) for fiscal year 1996. This amount is an increase of 
$83,797,000 above the amount provided for the current fiscal 
year and a decrease of $73,898,000 below the amount requested. 
The Committee recommendation assumes funding for no more than 
870 permanent positions.
    The Committee has included $224,265,000 for the NOAA Polar 
satellite program, of which $39,500,000 is for the interagency 
program office. The Committee commends NOAA and the Department 
of Defense (DOD) for their efforts thus far in consolidating 
their respective Polar satellite programs. The Committee's mark 
for convergence assumes that NOAA and DOD share equally in the 
costs of all common activities in fiscal year 1996 and 
recommends that this approach be used in subsequent years as 
well.
    The Committee has included $162,273,000 for NOAA's 
Geostationary (GOES) spacecraft and launching. This amount 
reflects reductions assumed in the NOAA authorization bill.
    The Committee has not provided funding requested by NOAA 
for LANDSAT 7 operations and does not support NOAA's 
involvement in the LANDSAT 7 program. The recommendation also 
includes no funding for the Ocean Remote Sensing program, a new 
program begun in fiscal year 1995. The Committee believes that 
NOAA's highest priority under NESDIS should be the acquisition 
and operation of the basic weather satellite and data and 
information services.
    The Committee does support NOAA's efforts to rescue and 
provide wider access to legacy environmental data, and to 
develop a single point of entry for end-users of access data 
from the national data centers. The Committee recommends that 
NOAA continue the development of the NESDIS virtual data center 
initiated in fiscal year 1995.

                            Program Support

    The Committee recommendation includes $128,706,000 for NOAA 
program support instead of $163,577,000 as requested.
    The recommendation includes $20,000,000, a reduction of 
more than 20 percent below the request, for NOAA executive 
direction and administration. This amount assumes a staffing 
level of no more than 350 positions for this activity. This 
action is consistent with reductions taken in executive 
direction functions elsewhere in the Department of Commerce. 
The Committee expects NOAA to examine its headquarters office 
structure and eliminate those offices which are unnecessary or 
redundant.
    The Committee has also recommended $30,000,000 for NOAA 
central administrative support. The Committee expects NOAA to 
maintain adequate support for the Regional Administrative 
Support Centers which service all field elements of the 
Department.
    The recommendation includes $9,500,000 for operation of 
NOAA aircraft services. The Committee expects NOAA to reassess 
the necessity to support aircraft not meeting minimum usage 
standards and consider alternatives to NOAA ownership and 
operation of its aircraft.
    The recommendation also includes $60,000,000 for marine 
services. The Committee notes that an additional $20,000,000 is 
available under the appropriations account for Fleet 
Modernization.
                      Coastal Zone Management Fund

    The Committee has included language in the bill which makes 
available $7,800,000 in the Coastal Zone Management (CZM) Fund 
for administration of the CZM program, for State Development 
Grants in accordance with the authorization set forth in 
Section 308(b)(2)(A) and 308(b)(2)(B)(v) of the Coastal Zone 
Management Act, and for the National Estuarine Research Reserve 
program set forth in Section 315(e) of the Coastal Zone 
Management Act. The amount provided is equal to the budget 
request and the current funding level, which both provided 
these funds for only CZM program management and other purposes 
authorized by section 308 of the CZMA.
    The Committee intends that $3,000,000 shall be available 
from the Fund for program administration and program grants, 
and that $500,000 shall be available for State development 
grants. The remaining $4,300,000 is to be available for the 
National Estuarine Research Reserve program.

                              Construction

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $42,731,000 
for the Construction account under the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration. This amount is $9,568,000 below the 
budget request, and a decrease of $54,523,000 below the amount 
appropriated for fiscal year 1995.
    The recommendation includes $10,000,000 for the cleanup of 
the Pribilof Islands in Alaska, as requested. This amount 
results from the need to clean up various sites that NOAA and 
its predecessor agencies have used on the Islands. The amount 
provided is to: remediate contaminated soil; to close and 
remediate landfills, diesel seep sites, debris sites, solid and 
liquid wastes, and public safety hazards; and to fund planning 
and compliance costs of cleanup, landfills, and public safety 
on the Pribilof Islands.
    The following table reflects the Committee's 
recommendations for this account:

NOAA facilities maintenance.............................      $2,201,000
Sandy Hook lease........................................       1,500,000
Environmental compliance................................       2,000,000
Boulder lab--above standard costs.......................       2,000,000
NEXRAD construction/maintenance.........................      19,430,000
Nat'l Ctrs for Environmental Prediction.................       1,000,000
Columbia River facilities...............................       4,600,000
Pribilof Island Cleanup.................................      10,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, NOAA Construction..........................     $42,731,000

    The amounts provided for Columbia River hatcheries are to 
be used for water diversion screens to assist in the recovery 
of declining salmon stocks.
    The Committee notes that funding reductions in the NOAA 
Operations, Research, and Facilities account, and the 
corresponding reductions in positions resulting from these 
funding levels, will require NOAA to develop a strategy for 
scaling back its current laboratory/science center structure. 
While a recent assessment conducted by the NOAA Chief Scientist 
concluded that there was no duplication in NOAA labs, the 
Committee believes that opportunities for consolidating 
underutilized facilities and achieving additional efficiencies 
do exist. Recently, the Commerce Department announced that a 
National Marine Fisheries Service laboratory in Gloucester, 
Massachusetts, would be turned over to the State for operation. 
The Committee endorses this proposal, and expects NOAA to look 
for additional opportunities to transfer underutilized 
laboratory space to the States and/or the private sector. The 
Committee directs NOAA to develop a laboratory consolidation 
plan in consultation with the appropriate House and Senate 
authorizing committees, and submit this plan to the Committee 
no later than March 1, 1996 along with a proposed 
implementation schedule. This plan should take into account the 
following factors:
        --the age and physical condition of the facility, and 
        the costs associated with keeping the facility 
        functioning,
        --the relationship of research performed at the 
        facility to core NOAA missions and legislative 
        mandates, and
        --the geographic proximity of other Federal, state or 
        private sector facilities that carry out similar 
        research functions.
    The Committee expects development of this facility 
consolidation plan to be a consultative process that addresses 
program requirements while acknowledging overall budgetary 
constraints and the need to streamline and downsize government 
functions.

            Fleet Modernization, Shipbuilding And Conversion

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $20,000,000 
for Fleet Modernization, Shipbuilding, and Conversion. This 
amount is a decrease of $3,347,000 below the budget request, 
and a decrease of $2,936,000 below the amount appropriated for 
this account for fiscal year 1995.
    This account provides for expenses necessary to maintain 
and improve the NOAA fleet of oceanographic, survey and 
fisheries research vessels, and for converting and/or leasing 
vessels as needed for maintaining effective support of NOAA 
programs.
    The Committee understands that NOAA's revised fleet 
modernization proposal will soon be submitted to the 
appropriate authorizing committees. The Committee has included 
this amount under this account as a placeholder; however, 
funding provided under this appropriation account will be 
subject to approval of the fleet modernization plan by the 
Congress. Should the proposal for fleet modernization not be 
approved, the Committee intends that these funds will be used 
to cover the costs of contracting with the private sector for 
the necessary shiptime for critical NOAA research and 
operations.

            Fishing Vessel And Gear Damage Compensation Fund

    The Committee recommends $1,032,000 for the Fishing Vessel 
and Gear Damage Compensation Fund. This amount is a decrease of 
$250,000 below the budget request, and a decrease of $241,000 
below the amount available for fiscal year 1995. It is 
estimated that there will be $250,000 carried over in this 
account, thus providing the full amount required for fiscal 
year 1996.
    The Fishing Vessel and Gear Damage Fund provides 
compensation to U.S. fishermen whose vessels have been lost, 
damaged, or destroyed by foreign or domestic vessels. The Fund 
indemnifies domestic fishermen against commercially uninsurable 
losses of fishing gear caused by foreign or domestic vessels 
and a portion of the associated economic loss. Monies paid into 
the Fund include: (1) surcharges not to exceed 20 percent of 
the fee imposed for any foreign fishing vessel permit issued 
under the Magnuson Fishery Conservation and Management Act; (2) 
administrative fees paid by claimants; (3) revenues from 
deposits or investments of Fund balances not immediately 
required; and (4) funds not to exceed $5,000,000 borrowed from 
the Treasury in the event the Fund balance is insufficient to 
pay claims.

                      Fishermen's Contingency Fund

    The Committee recommends $999,000 for the Fishermen's 
Contingency Fund, which is $1,000 below the budget request and 
equal to the amount appropriated for fiscal year 1995.
    The Fishermen's Contingency Fund provides compensation to 
U.S. fishermen for damage or loss of fishing gear and any 
resulting loss because of natural or man-made obstructions 
related to oil and gas exploration, development, and production 
on the Outer Continental Shelf. The Secretary of Commerce is 
authorized to establish an area account within the fund for any 
area within the Outer Continental Shelf. A holder of a lease, 
permit, easement, or right-of-way in such area is required to 
pay a fee into the appropriate area account in the fund. Each 
area account, if depleted, will be replenished by assessment. 
The authorization stipulates that amounts available in each 
area account can be disbursed only to the extent provided by 
appropriations acts. Since receipts collected may not be 
sufficient for this appropriation, the Committee has included 
language which provides that the sums necessary to eliminate 
the insufficiency may be derived from the General Fund of the 
Treasury.

                     Foreign Fishing Observer Fund

    The Committee recommends $196,000 for the Foreign Fishing 
Observer Fund for fiscal year 1996. This amount is a decrease 
of $200,000 below the budget request, and a reduction of 
$204,000 from the amount appropriated for fiscal year 1995. It 
is estimated that $200,000 will carry over under this account 
into fiscal year 1996, thus providing the full amount requested 
for the year.
    Fees paid into the Fund are collected from owners and 
operators of certain foreign fishing vessels that fish within 
the United States Fishery Conservation Zone and are intended to 
be used by the Secretary of Commerce to finance the cost of 
placing United States observers aboard such fishing vessels. 
The observers collect scientific information on the foreign 
catch and monitor compliance by foreign fishing crews in 
accordance with the provisions of the Fishery Conservation and 
Management Act of 1976. The Act permits foreign governments to 
contract directly for observer services from contractors 
approved by the Secretary of Commerce. The appropriation 
provides the authority necessary to pay the salaries of United 
States observers and program support personnel, other 
administrative costs, and the cost of data management and 
analysis.

                 Fishing Vessel Obligations Guarantees
    The Committee has included no funding for fishing vessel 
obligations guarantees. Considering the overcapitalization of 
the fishing industry in most parts of the country, the 
Committee believes this loan guarantee program is no longer 
necessary. The budget request for this account was $250,000, an 
amount equal to the amount provided for fiscal year 1995.

                       Technology Administration

       Office Of The Under Secretary/Office Of Technology Policy

                         Salaries And Expenses

     The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for the Technology 
Administration's Office of the Under Secretary/Office of 
Technology Policy. This amount is a reduction of $8,906,000 
from the budget request and is $4,992,000 below the amount 
appropriated for the current fiscal year prior to the pending 
rescission.
    The primary mission of the organizations funded under this 
account is to coordinate the Administration's civilian 
technology initiative. Considering the program reductions and 
eliminations made in the Commerce technology programs, the 
Committee believes that the proposed funding level is 
appropriate. The amount provided will ensure the elimination of 
current redundancies in the bureaucracy overseeing NIST 
technology programs.
     The Committee included language in the report accompanying 
the fiscal year 1995 appropriation for the Commerce Department 
encouraging the Under Secretary for Technology to continue to 
integrate the resources of the National Technology Transfer 
Center (NTTC) in all Technology Administration activities, 
including plans for the electronic management of the agency's 
functions and implementation of the Manufacturing Extension 
Partnership Program.
     The Committee is disappointed that the Technology 
Administration has not pursued a more substantive relationship 
with the NTTC in areas of mutual interest. In these times of 
limited budgetary resources, avoiding duplication and 
increasing collaboration among existing Federal initiatives is 
of paramount importance. The Committee therefore expects the 
Technology Administration to complete an analysis of potential 
cooperative initiatives between TA and the NTTC to be submitted 
to the Committee, along with an implementation strategy for 
each, by November 1, 1995.
    The Committee recognizes that university and Federal 
laboratories have a traditional obligation to publicly 
advertise inventions and technologies currently available for 
exclusive licensing and cooperative research and development 
agreements (CRADAs). There has long been confusion over the 
best avenue to present that information to U.S. companies and 
individuals. The Committee believes that electronic access is 
the best possible way to alert potential licensees, especially 
small companies, of the opportunities that exist. The Gateway 
service of the NTTC has been established and widely used by 
American industry to electronically access available 
technologies. The Committee therefore expects the Department to 
stipulate that use of the NTTC's electronic Gateway service by 
university and Federal laboratories to advertise technology 
commercialization opportunities is considered adequate public 
notice of availability.

                 National Technical Information Service

                          NTIS Revolving Fund

    The Committee has included no appropriated funds for the 
National Technical Information Service (NTIS) Revolving Fund. 
This is a decrease of $8,000,000 below the current available 
appropriation. No appropriation was requested under this 
account for fiscal year 1996.

                         General Administration

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends $29,100,000 for the Commerce 
Department's Salaries and Expenses appropriation for fiscal 
year 1996. This amount is a decrease of $6,726,000 below the 
budget request, and is a decrease of $7,371,000 below the 
amount appropriated for the current fiscal year. The amount 
provided is based on a ten percent reduction below the base for 
departmental staff services and a 25 percent reduction below 
the base for executive direction of the Commerce Department.
    This appropriation provides for the Office of the Secretary 
and for staff offices of the Department which assist in the 
formulation of policy, management, and administration.
    The Committee continues to support the U.S.-Israel Science 
and Technology Commission, which brings together the private 
sectors of these two high technology nations to facilitate 
breakthroughs in the areas of biotechnology, energy, 
agriculture, and defense conversion. The Committee expects the 
Commerce Department to provide its commitment of $2,500,000 for 
this program in fiscal year 1996 from within available 
resources, subject to the standard transfer and reprogramming 
procedures set forth under sections 205 and 605 of the 
accompanying bill.

    The Committee recommends $21,849,000 for the Commerce 
Department's Office of Inspector General for fiscal year 1996. 
This amount is an increase of $4,962,000 above current 
appropriations level, but is a reduction of $400,000 below the 
budget request. The amount provided reflects approval of base 
transfers totaling $3,576,000 from other Commerce Department 
agencies related to audits performed under the Chief Financial 
Officers Act.
    The Committee is supportive of the work being carried out 
by the Department's Inspector General, and looks forward to 
working more closely with the IG to follow up on matters of 
mutual concern. The program increase provided will allow the IG 
to perform audits of all the Department's revolving funds, 
trust funds and substantial commercial activities, a critical 
activity considering proposals to privatize these functions.

               General Provisions Department of Commerce

    The Committee has included the following General Provisions 
for the Department of Commerce that were included in the fiscal 
year 1995 Appropriations Act (Public Law 103-317).
    Section 201 makes Commerce Department funds in the bill 
available for advanced payments only upon certification of 
officials designated by the Secretary that such payments are 
considered to be in the public interest.
    Section 202 makes appropriations for the Department in the 
bill for Salaries and Expenses available for the hire of 
passenger motor vehicles, and for services, uniforms and 
allowances as authorized by law.
    Section 203 prohibits any of the funds in the bill to be 
used to support hurricane reconnaissance aircraft and 
activities that are under the control of the United States Air 
Force or the United States Air Force Reserve.
    Section 204 prohibits the use of Commerce Department funds 
in this or any previous Act from being used for the purpose of 
reimbursing the Unemployment Trust Fund or any other account of 
the Treasury to pay unemployment compensation for temporary 
Census workers for services performed after April 20, 1990.
    Section 205 provides the authority to transfer funds 
between Department of Commerce appropriation accounts. The 
language provides that no account may be decreased by more than 
5 percent or increased by more than 10 percent. The language 
also makes the transfers subject to the Committee's standard 
reprogramming procedures.

                        TITLE III--THE JUDICIARY

    The funds recommended by the Committee in Title III of the 
accompanying bill are for the operation and maintenance of the 
United States Courts and include the salaries of judges, 
magistrates, supporting personnel and other expenses of the 
Federal Judiciary.
    The budget request submitted by the Judiciary for fiscal 
year 1996 totals $3,335,994,000. Of this amount, $263,891,000 
is associated with the salaries and retirement expenses of 
Supreme Court Justices, Article III Judges and Bankruptcy 
Judges, and is considered mandatory for scorekeeping purposes. 
The remainder of the request, $3,072,103,000, which is 
considered discretionary for scorekeeping purposes, represents 
an increase of $421,117,000 or 16 percent over the enacted 
amounts for fiscal year 1995. Of this amount, $30,700,000 is 
requested from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund.
    The Committee recommendation provides the full request of 
$263,891,000 for mandatory salary and retirement expenses of 
the Justices and judges. The Committee recommendation also 
provides $2,781,507,000 for the discretionary programs of the 
Judiciary, including $41,500,000 from the Violent Crime 
Reduction Trust Fund. This amount is $290,596,000 below the 
request, but is $140,709,000 or 4.8 percent above the amount 
provided for the current year.
    Optimal Utilization of Judicial Resources.--The Congress is 
concerned about the ability to sustain the current 
appropriations level for the Judicial Branch in the context of 
the need to balance the budget and reduce the deficit. The 
Committee understands that some courts face disproportionately 
high caseloads, while others may be underutilized. The 
Committee also understands that there are a number of court 
facilities which have no resident judges or staff, and which 
are used on a visiting basis for less that 45 days per year.
    The Committee wants to ensure that the Judiciary maintains 
its current high standards for the delivery of justice in our 
courts and the public's confidence in the court system. 
Particularly in this time of budgetary constraints, this must 
be done in the most cost-effective way possible.
    In order to provide the Congress the means to better 
evaluate the operations of the courts, the Committee expects 
the Judicial Conference to initiate an in-depth review of ways 
to make the courts more efficient and less costly. The review 
shall be performed by an independent, nonpartisan, professional 
organization outside the Judiciary, but with the complete 
cooperation and support of the Judiciary. A report on the 
findings of this review, along with the comments of the 
Judicial Conference, should be submitted to the House 
Committees on Appropriations and the Judiciary by no later than 
August 15, 1996. An interim report on the findings of this 
review should be submitted by March 1, 1996. While the report 
may address possible improvements in any aspect of the 
Judiciary and its functions, the Committee expects the report 
to emphasize the following:
        --The extent to which the need for additional 
        judgeships in a given District or Circuit can be 
        addressed by the reallocation of vacant judgeships from 
        Districts or Circuits with lower caseloads.
        --The extent to which the use of contract services 
        might be substituted for non-judge employees in the 
        courts and what, if any, savings could be realized.
        --The extent to which savings and efficiencies can be 
        realized through enhanced use of automation and other 
        high technology initiatives.
        --The extent to which underutilized court facilities 
        could be closed, or the sharing of courtroom space 
        expanded, without appreciably affecting the delivery of 
        justice, and the potential for savings in space costs 
        that could be realized.
    Underutilized Courthouse Facilities.--The Committee has 
previously expressed to representatives of the Judiciary its 
concerns regarding underutilized courthouse facilities. The 
Committee understands that there are approximately 90 court 
facilities across the country for which there is no resident 
judge, and that the Judicial Conference is currently examining 
this issue to determine whether some of these facilities could 
be closed. The Committee encourages the Judiciary to report on 
its findings as soon as possible, but no later than August 15, 
1995, and to include recommendations for facilities that could 
be closed or turned over to other Federal agencies. The 
Committee expects the Judiciary to work with the Department of 
Justice, in particular, to determine whether underutilized 
courthouse space may be appropriate for various Justice 
agencies.
                   Supreme Court of the United States

    The Committee recommends a total of $29,147,000 for the 
Supreme Court of the United States for fiscal year 1996. The 
total amount is provided in two separate appropriation accounts 
as follows:

                          Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends $25,834,000 for fiscal year 1996 
for the Salaries and Expenses of the Justices, their supporting 
personnel, and the costs of operating the Supreme Court, 
excluding the care of the building and grounds. The Committee 
recommendation is $1,594,000 more than the current year 
appropriation, and is equal to the budget request for this 
account.

                    Care Of The Building And Grounds

    The Committee recommends $3,313,000 for fiscal year 1996 
for personnel and other services relating to the Supreme Court 
building and grounds, which is supervised by the Architect of 
the Capitol. The recommendation is $313,000 more than the 
current year appropriation, but is $690,000 less than the 
request.
    The Committee recommendation includes reductions to the 
base of $180,000, and allows $305,000 for the highest priority 
security-related program increases requested for this account.

         United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends $14,070,000 for fiscal year 1996 
for the Salaries and Expenses of the United States Court of 
Appeals for the Federal Circuit. The Committee recommendation 
is $632,000 more than the current year appropriation, but is 
$1,425,000 less than the request.
    The Committee recommendation reflects approval of $498,000 
of the amount requested for adjustments to base for the Court 
of Appeals for the Federal Circuit. The Committee 
recommendation does not include any of the requested funds for 
19 additional positions for the court.

               United States Court of International Trade

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends $10,859,000 for fiscal year 1996 
for the Salaries and Expenses of the United States Court of 
International Trade. The Committee recommendation reflects 
approval of the total amount requested for this account, which 
is a decrease of $826,000 below the fiscal year 1995 
appropriation level. The decrease under this account is related 
to GSA space rental reductions and the abolishment of six 
positions.

    Courts of Appeals, District Courts, and Other Judicial Services

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The recommendation includes a total of $2,452,524,000 for 
this account for fiscal year 1996, including $41,500,000 from 
the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund. The Committee 
recommendation is a reduction of $224,141,000 from the budget 
request, but is $112,397,000 above the amount appropriated for 
fiscal year 1995. In addition, the Committee understands that 
the Judiciary will carry over an estimated $71,366,000 
resulting from unanticipated fee revenue in fiscal year 1995. 
This will allow a total fiscal year 1996 operating level of 
$2,523,890,000 for this account.
    This account provides for the salaries of judges, 
magistrates, and all other officers and employees of the 
Federal Judiciary not otherwise provided for, and for all 
necessary expenses, including rental charges for space and 
facilities.
    The Committee recommendation reflects reductions totaling 
$56,718,000 of the requested increase of $231,081,000 for 
adjustments to base for this account. The Committee intends 
that $13,400,000 of this reduction be applied to space and 
facilities; $12,100,000 be applied to Article III judges and 
supporting personnel; with the remainder to be applied to other 
activities.
    This recommendation includes only of the $74,757,000 in 
requested program increases for this account for fiscal year 
1996. The Committee recognizes the need for additional 
resources in the area of probation and pretrial services, and 
would be willing to consider a reprogramming of base funds 
toward the requested increases in these areas should additional 
funds be identified.
    Given the overall funding constraints for this bill for 
fiscal year 1996, the Committee believes that the amount 
provided for this account is appropriate. The Committee has 
requested that the Judiciary initiate a review of ways to make 
the courts more efficient and less costly, and expects that 
review to identify specific actions the Judiciary can take to 
function within the overall reductions in funding required in 
order to achieve a balanced budget by the year 2002.
    Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund.--The Committee has 
provided $41,500,000 for the Judiciary from the Violent Crime 
Reduction Trust Fund for fiscal year 1996 instead of 
$30,700,000 as requested. No funds were provided from the Trust 
Fund for the Judiciary in fiscal year 1995. The Committee 
intends that amounts provided be used to offset base 
expenditures related to carrying out provisions of the Violent 
Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act of 1994, and to fund 
requested program increases related to certain provisions of 
that Act such as activities related to the Violence Against 
Women program, and mandatory drug testing to be conducted by 
probation officers. The Committee expects the Judiciary to 
transmit a notification detailing the proposed distribution of 
the amounts provided under the Violent Crime Reduction Trust 
Fund.

               The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act

    The Committee recommends a reimbursement of $2,318,000 for 
fiscal year 1996 from the Special Fund to cover expenses of the 
Claims Court associated with processing cases under the 
National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986. This amount is a 
decrease of $2,000 below the budget request and an increase of 
$68,000 above the amount appropriated for the current fiscal 
year.

                           Defender Services

    The Committee recommends $260,000,000 for fiscal year 1996 
for the operation of the Federal Public Defender and Community 
Defender organizations and for compensation and reimbursement 
of expenses of attorneys appointed pursuant to the Criminal 
Justice Act, as amended. This represents an increase of 
$10,000,000 from the fiscal year 1995 appropriated amount and a 
reduction of $35,761,000 from the request.
    The Committee recommendation includes a provision in the 
bill, prohibiting funds for Death Penalty Resource Centers, 
otherwise known as Post-Conviction Defender Organizations. The 
Committee believes that Death Penalty Resource Centers have 
become a vehicle for delaying the judicial process in Federal 
habeas petitions. The Committee also expects that, under habeas 
corpus reform currently being considered by the Congress, there 
will be a decline in overall death penalty litigation. The 
Committee recommendation provides $10,000,000 over the current 
year appropriation to allow private panel attorneys to assume 
the caseload currently represented by the Centers.
    The Committee appreciates the Judiciary's concerns that the 
cost of panel attorney representation in Federal habeas cases 
be kept to an appropriate level. Therefore, the Committee 
expects the Judiciary to conduct a pilot project, in one or 
more Circuits with the heaviest Federal habeas caseload, to 
establish a system to contract with the private attorneys on a 
flat fee basis, similar to systems used by the State courts in 
both Los Angeles County and San Diego, California. The 
Committee expects the Judiciary to provide a comparative review 
of this demonstration with other Circuits not included in the 
pilot project, and report back to the Committee by June 1, 1996 
on the results of this review.

                    Fees Of Jurors And Commissioners

    The Committee recommends $59,028,000 for fiscal year 1996 
for the fees and allowances of grand and petit jurors and for 
the compensation of land commissioners and jury commissioners. 
This represents a reduction of $318,000 from the fiscal year 
1995 amount and a reduction of $12,980,000 from the budget 
request.
    The Committee recommendation reflects estimates of 
carryover balances of $7,980,000. In addition, reduced juror 
activity should result in program decreases of approximately 
$5,000,000. Thus, the amount provided will allow for the 
anticipated operational needs of this program.

                             Court Security

    The Committee recommends $109,724,000 for Court Security 
for fiscal year 1996, an increase of $12,724,000 over the 
amount provided for fiscal year 1995, but a reduction of 
$6,709,000 from the budget request. This amount, along with 
funds provided for this account in the fiscal year 1995 
supplemental related to the Oklahoma City bombing will fund an 
additional 474 court security officers and related equipment in 
fiscal year 1996.
    This account provides for the necessary expenses of 
security and protective services for the United States Courts 
in courtrooms and adjacent areas.

           Administrative Office of the United States Courts

                         Salaries And Expenses
    The Committee recommends $47,500,000 for the Salaries and 
Expenses of the Administrative Office of the United States 
Courts for fiscal year 1996, an amount equal to the fiscal year 
1995 enacted level, but a reduction of $5,945,000 from the 
budget request. The Committee recommendation freezes funding 
for the Administrative Office at the current appropriations 
level.
    This account is responsible for the administration of the 
United States Courts, including the probation and bankruptcy 
systems.
    Phase Down of the U.S. Parole Commission.--The Committee 
expects the Administrative Office to work with the U.S. Parole 
Commission to conduct a joint study to assess the feasibility 
of transferring all remaining workload of the Parole Commission 
to the Judiciary by September 30, 1996. The Committee expects a 
report on the findings of this study by March 1, 1996.

                        Federal Judicial Center

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends $18,828,000 for the Salaries and 
Expenses of the Federal Judicial Center for fiscal year 1996, 
an amount equal to the fiscal year 1995 enacted level, but a 
reduction of $1,943,000 from the budget request.
    The amount provided for the Federal Judicial Center does 
not include requested adjustments to base. The Committee 
recommends that these adjustments be absorbed within current 
levels, and directs FJC to reduce the travel costs of providing 
training for judges and judicial personnel through the 
increased use of video-conferencing and related technologies.

                       Judicial Retirement Funds

                    Payment To Judiciary Trust Funds

    The Committee recommends $32,900,000 for the payment to the 
Judicial Officers' Retirement Fund, the Judicial Survivors' 
Annuities Fund, and the Claims Court Judges' Retirement Fund 
for fiscal year 1996. This amount is equal to the budget 
request, and is $4,425,000 more than the current year 
appropriation for this account, which is considered mandatory 
for budget scorekeeping purposes.
    These funds will cover the estimated annuity payments to be 
made to retired bankruptcy judges and magistrate judges, Claims 
Court judges and spouses and dependent children of deceased 
judicial officers.

                  United States Sentencing Commission

                         Salaries and Expenses

    The Committee recommends $8,500,000 for the salaries and 
expenses of the United States Sentencing Commission for fiscal 
year 1996, a reduction of $300,000 below the amount provided 
for the current fiscal year and a reduction of $1,000,000 below 
the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation reflects absorption of 
requested adjustments to base and disapproval of requested 
program increases. The Committee believes that the Commission 
can absorb the base adjustments through reductions in 
administrative activities.
    The purpose of the Commission is to establish, review and 
revise sentencing guidelines, policies and practices for the 
Federal criminal justice system. The Commission is also 
required to monitor the operation of the guidelines and to 
identify and report necessary changes to the Congress.

                   General Provisions--The Judiciary

    The Committee has included the following general provisions 
in the bill for the Judiciary.
    Section 301 provides language, included in previous 
appropriations Acts, to permit funds in the bill for salaries 
and expenses for the Judiciary to be available for employment 
of experts and consultant services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 
3109.
    Section 302 provides language included in previous 
appropriations Acts which authorizes appropriations for the 
special court of appeals established under the Regional Rail 
Reorganization Act of 1973, Public Law 93-236.
    Section 303 provides language, included in previous 
appropriations Acts, which permits up to five percent of any 
appropriation made available for fiscal year 1996 to be 
transferred between Judiciary appropriation accounts with the 
proviso that no appropriation shall be decreased by more than 5 
percent or increased by more than 10 percent by any such 
transfer. In addition, the language provides that any such 
transfer shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under 
section 605 of the accompanying bill and shall not be available 
for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the 
procedures set forth in that section.
    Section 304 provides language permitting not to exceed a 
total of $10,000 for expenses of official reception and 
representation expenses incurred by the Judicial Conference of 
the United States.
           TITLE IV--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCIES

    In total, the amounts recommended in this Title for the 
Department of State, the United States Information Agency 
(USIA) and the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency (ACDA) are 
below the authorized levels set forth in the fiscal year 1996-
1997 authorization bill, H.R. 1561, the American Overseas 
Interests Act of 1995, as it passed the House on June 8, 1995, 
by $73,226,000. Every program contained in this Title is either 
at or below the individual authorization provided in that bill.
    H.R. 1561 provides for the consolidation of USIA and ACDA 
with the State Department by March 1, 1997. The Committee has 
placed funding for USIA and ACDA within this Title to put in 
one place the accounts within the jurisdiction of the 
Subcommittee that would be merged into the State Department 
during fiscal year 1997 under that bill. In recognition of the 
proposed consolidation, and as a first step, the Committee 
provides for the immediate consolidation of the Inspector 
General Offices of the Department of State and USIA.

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

    The Committee recommends a total of $4,036,446,000 for 
fiscal year 1996 for the Department of State. This amount is 
$165,866,000 less than the budget request for fiscal year 1996, 
and is $154,071,000 less than the amounts appropriated for 
fiscal year 1995 for the Department.
    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$2,688,975,000 for the appropriation accounts under 
Administration of Foreign Affairs; $1,298,000,000 for the 
appropriation accounts under International Organizations and 
Conferences; $39,471,000 for International Commissions; and 
$10,000,000 for the Asia Foundation. The Committee's 
recommended priorities for the Department of State are 
delineated in the following paragraphs.

                   Administration of Foreign Affairs

                    Diplomatic And Consular Programs

    The Committee recommends $1,727,298,000 for the Diplomatic 
and Consular Programs account, including $9,720,000 for 
security enhancements requested as part of the Administration's 
July 17, 1995 anti-terrorism budget amendment. The Committee 
recommendation represents a reduction of $31,560,000 from the 
budget request for the functions funded in this account and a 
reduction of $10,000,000 from the current year appropriation in 
the regular program, and an increase of $9,720,000 for anti-
terrorism enhancements. Together with the $32,320,000 of 
program decreases already built into the budget request, the 
recommendation will require a reduction of $63,880,000 below 
the amount required to maintain the fiscal year 1995 operations 
level in fiscal year 1996, and will require substantial 
personnel reductions, post closings, and other streamlining and 
savings initiatives.
    This appropriation account provides for the formulation and 
execution of United States foreign policy, including the 
conduct of diplomatic and consular relations with foreign 
countries, diplomatic relations with international 
organizations and related activities. This account primarily 
funds the overseas programs and operations of the Department of 
State.
    The Committee has included requested language in the bill 
which will provide not to exceed $700,000 in registration fees 
collected pursuant to section 45 of the State Department Basic 
Authorities Act for activities of the Office of Defense Trade 
Controls. The Committee has also included a language provision 
under this heading which provides $1,223,000 in fees collected 
from other Executive Branch agencies for lease or use of 
facilities at the International Center Complex, as authorized 
by law, but did not include requested language appropriating 
$448,000 to be derived from the reserves. Finally, the 
Committee language provides not to exceed $15,000 from 
reimbursements, surcharges, and fees for use of Blair House 
facilities in accordance with the State Department Basic 
Authorities Act.
     The bill includes a provision which permits up to 20 
percent of the amounts made available in the Diplomatic and 
Consular Programs account and Salaries and Expenses account to 
be transferred between such appropriations accounts in order to 
provide administrative flexibility to the Department.
    The bill retains and updates a provision included in the 
fiscal year 1995 appropriations bill that sets forth the 
funding for the Diplomatic Telecommunications Service, 
$24,856,000 for existing base services and not to exceed 
$17,144,000 for program enhancements, and requires that the 
enhancement funding be released no sooner than 15 days after 
submission of a report on ongoing pilot projects is submitted.
    Finally, the bill includes language requiring that starting 
in fiscal year 1997, a system be in place that allocates to 
each department and agency the full cost of its presence 
outside the United States.
    As requested, the bill deletes the following provisions 
that were included in the fiscal year 1995 Act: (1) $4,000,000 
for grants to conduct research and promote international 
cooperation on scientific and communications issues; (2) 
$600,000 to carry out the activities of the Commission on 
Protecting and Reducing Government Secrecy; (3) $300,000 to 
carry out the activities of the Office of Cambodian Genocide 
investigations; (4) a prohibition on the use of funds to carry 
out the provisions of section 101(b)(2)(F) of Public Law 103-
236, and (5) permanent provisions permitting collection of 
expedited passport fees and increased visa fees resulting from 
processing of fingerprints, to be deposited into this account 
as an offsetting collection. The latter four provisions were 
one-time items that do not require action in the fiscal year 
1996 bill.
    Enhanced Security.--In separate bill language, the 
Committee has provided $9,720,000 for enhanced security 
overseas. This amount was requested as part of the anti-
terrorism budget amendment submitted on July 17, 1995. This 
amount will provide for full armored vehicles in critical 
terrorist threat posts, security equipment, funding for the 
local guard program, and reinstitution of a crisis training 
program with a focus on counter terrorism.
    Spending Reductions.--The budget request for this account 
included $32,320,000 in program decreases, which, together with 
$13,319,000 in program decreases included in the Salaries and 
Expenses account, would have required budget savings measures, 
including a reduction of 336 positions, and 15 overseas post 
closings, and the elimination of at least one bureau.
    After the fiscal year 1996 budget was formulated, the Vice 
President issued a press release announcing the second phase of 
the National Performance Review for foreign affairs agencies 
intended to result in savings of at least $5 billion over five 
years. The Secretary of State has continued to outline budget 
savings plans through his Strategic Management Initiative, 
announced on May 8, 1995. While there is confusion as to 
whether the initiatives announced by the Vice President were 
meant to help meet the savings already planned in the fiscal 
year 1996 budget request or to result in additional savings, 
all of these budget saving initiatives and more will be 
required, since the Committee has recommended an additional 
reduction of $31,560,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee believes that rationalizing staffing 
patterns, eliminating duplication of functions overseas, and 
addressing the way operating costs overseas are allocated among 
the State Department and the agencies it supports, are crucial 
to achieving these savings.
    There is one major area of duplication that ranks first in 
terms of steps that must be taken to achieve the additional 
spending reduction recommended by the Committee. In overseas 
posts in which both the State Department and the United States 
and Foreign Commercial Service (US&FCS;) are present, the State 
Department and the Commerce Department both report on the host 
country economic and commercial situation. Therefore, the 
Committee directs that at those posts, duplication be ended by 
eliminating the State Department economics officer position and 
giving that responsibility to the US&FCS.; There is no reason 
why the US&FCS; staff cannot submit their reports to both the 
Commerce and State Departments.
    In addition, there is a significant overlap of functions 
between the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency and the 
Department's Bureau of Political-Military Affairs. This was 
identified in the Vice President's Reinventing Government 
announcement. The Committee believes that reductions need to be 
made in the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs to eliminate 
duplication, and expects a report by March 1, 1996, on steps 
being taken both in the Bureau and at ACDA to reduce personnel 
performing duplicative functions.
    Overseas Staffing.--At its April 8, 1995 hearing, the 
Subcommittee confirmed that the State Department lacked an 
overall system to link overseas staffing with policy 
priorities, as the General Accounting Office (GAO) had stated 
in its September 1994 report on this subject. However, the 
Committee is aware of the efforts that are underway to put 
together such a system. One promising development is the 
Overseas Staffing Board, proposed by the Secretary, to 
establish six model staffing profiles for all overseas posts 
and to place posts into one of the six categories according to 
overall U.S. interests. The Committee urges prompt completion 
of this ranking and appropriate use of the models to manage and 
track overseas staffing. The Committee expects implementation 
to begin during fiscal year 1996 to reduce overseas staffing in 
those posts that have more positions than their staffing 
profiles permit. This system should be fully implemented no 
later than the beginning of fiscal year 1997.
    In addition, the Committee is encouraged by work already 
underway by the Department's Inspector General and the Office 
of Management Policy and Planning to use the Mission and Bureau 
Program Plans to relate overseas positions to specific policy 
priorities. The IG recently completed a pilot effort to match 
the number of employees at overseas posts with the priorities 
set forth in each post's Mission Program Plan. The Committee 
believes that this effort should be extended to all posts 
during the next Mission Program Plan development. In addition, 
a method must be developed to include a qualitative evaluation 
of how essential each employee is in carrying out the 
priorities with which he or she is charged. The Department 
should submit the results of this staffing profile process 
together with the fiscal year 1997 budget request.
    Overseas Staffing of All Agencies Supported by State.--The 
issue of staffing overseas is not only or even predominately a 
State Department issue. In 1994, some 35 agencies in addition 
to State employed personnel overseas. According to 
Administration testimony, over the past ten years, the number 
of United States direct hires overseas has been flat for the 
State Department, and now accounts for only one-third or less 
of Americans working overseas. Most of the growth has been in 
nonforeign affairs agencies, including the Departments of 
Justice, Treasury and Transportation. Again, the GAO took the 
lead in pointing this out in its December 1994 report. 
Therefore, the Committee recommends that the staffing profile 
process be expanded, as the Secretary intends, to include 
inter-agency consideration of overseas staffing of all 
agencies.
    Authority of Chief of Mission.--As all agencies operating 
overseas work together to meet rapidly evolving challenges, the 
Committee believes that the authority of the Chief of Mission 
is essential to combining both authority and accountability in 
one senior Executive Branch individual in every diplomatic 
mission overseas. This authority was codified in National 
Security Decision Directive 38 issued by President Reagan and 
reaffirmed by his successors. The Committee understands that 
NSDD-38 is supportive of the authority conferred upon Chiefs of 
Mission by the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (P.L. 96-465), and 
that the Chief of Mission must have the final word on size, 
composition and mandate of all executive agency operations and 
personnel in the country of his or her assignment.
    But the Committee believes another step needs to be taken, 
in addition to the Department rationalizing its own overseas 
staffing system, and the Chief of Mission having the authority 
over agency presence in a particular country. There also must 
be a mechanism by which all agencies work together to decide 
how best to deploy resources overseas, and which agencies need 
to be represented and at what staffing level. The Committee 
understands that an Interagency Council is being established 
along these lines, and expects a periodic report on its 
progress.
    Improving Shared Administrative Support Services.--The 
Committee understands that the Department of State is currently 
undertaking an important effort to completely revise the 
Foreign Affairs Administrative Support (FAAS) System. FAAS was 
designed to ensure reimbursement by other agencies for the 
Department's incremental expenses incurred in providing 
administrative support to non-State agencies overseas. The 
Committee has long been concerned that State shoulders an 
inordinate level of the cost of having non-State employees 
located overseas and encourages the Department to continue to 
seek a more equitable distribution of expenses. Virtually every 
agency which operates under FAAS, including the Department of 
State, finds it unsatisfactory and wants it changed.
    The Department has said it is planning to establish, during 
fiscal year 1996, pilot Cooperative Administrative Support Unit 
programs at up to ten posts overseas. Each pilot post will have 
a local board, composed of representatives of each agency. A 
major objective will be to fully recover all direct and 
indirect costs of providing services overseas. The Committee 
fully supports these efforts and requests that the Department 
report within 120 days of enactment of this legislation on the 
status of these projects.
    It is absolutely imperative that a new system like this be 
devised and accepted. Because of the constraints on the budget, 
it is no longer possible for the State Department to provide 
seventy percent of the support costs for other agencies, and 
still maintain its own mission overseas.
    It is the Committee's intention that this will be the last 
year the State Department subsidizes the budgets of other 
agencies through the old administrative support mechanism. 
Starting in fiscal year 1997, all other agencies with 
operations overseas in U.S. diplomatic missions and consulates 
should have to pay their full share. The Committee also expects 
the Office of Management and Budget to require each agency to 
reflect the total cost of its overseas presence in its budget 
request to Congress beginning with fiscal year 1997. For that 
reason, language is included in the bill stating that in fiscal 
year 1997, a system shall be in place that allocates to each 
department and agency the full cost of its presence outside of 
the United States.
    Post Closings.--The Committee believes that the Secretary's 
announcement of his intention to close 21 posts overseas is a 
welcome sign of willingness to prioritize in times of budget 
restraint. The Committee believes there is much more that could 
be done in terms of combining, regionalizing, reducing presence 
in low priority areas, and other measures to downsize.
    Technology Partnership.--The Committee recognizes and 
commends the efforts of the Department of State under the first 
investment trade negotiations between the Government of Japan 
and the United States regarding the Technology Village 
Partnership (TVP) project. The goal of TVP is to enable U.S. 
companies to gain access to the up-front design-in-process of 
Japanese manufacturers, Japan's distribution infrastructure, 
joint ventures, and many other marketing opportunities, through 
the forces of a free and open marketplace. The Committee 
requests that the State Department make recommendations on 
options to assist in the completion of the design and 
engineering functions of the project in conjunction with 
industry and Government of Japan contributions. The Committee 
requests that the State Department expedite this review and 
report to the Committee.
    Continuations.--Within the recommendation, the Committee 
has provided sufficient funding to continue the National Law 
Center for Inter-American Free Trade and the International 
Center for the Study of Canadian-American Trade at their 
current levels of funding.
    Visa Fees.--The Committee notes that the Department expects 
to collect approximately $75,000,000 in fiscal year 1996 in 
machine readable visa fees. These fees are to be used to 
continue to upgrade consular visa and passport systems as part 
of the Border Security Initiative. It is expected that a 
portion of these resources will be used in conjunction with the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service to develop an exit 
strategy, using machine readable visa technology, in order for 
the first time to gain control over not only who is entering 
the country, but who is overstaying their visas. Visa overstays 
represent the source of as much as half of the illegal 
immigration in this country.
    Lebanon.--The Committee understands that the State 
Department is in the process of determining whether to renew or 
alter its policy on travel to Lebanon. Currently, there is a 
passport restriction on U.S. citizen travel to Lebanon, citing 
safety concerns. This restriction acts as a barrier to American 
commerce and trade opportunities. The Committee expects that 
the Department will confer with the Committee throughout its 
review of this policy.

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends $365,146,000 for the Salaries and 
Expenses account of the Department of State, including 
$1,870,000 for security enhancements requested as part of the 
Administration's July 17, 1995 anti-terrorism budget amendment. 
The amount recommended represents a reduction of $9,204,000 
from the budget request and a reduction of $20,696,000 from the 
current year appropriation in the regular program, and an 
increase of $1,870,000 for anti-terrorism enhancements.
    This appropriation provides for the management, 
administrative, and support functions of the Department of 
State, including the Office of the Secretary.
    The Committee notes that the budget request assumed 
$13,319,000 in program reductions, which, together with the 
reductions assumed in the request for Diplomatic & Consular 
Programs, would result in a reduction of 336 positions. The 
Committee has increased those reductions by $9,204,000, so that 
significantly more reductions will be required. The Vice 
President's announcement concerning the second phase of the 
National Performance Review indicated that duplicative public 
affairs, congressional relations, politico-military affairs and 
policy planning staff would be eliminated. The Committee 
concurs, particularly in the areas of public affairs and 
politico-military affairs. These and other reductions will be 
necessary to meet the funding level recommended by the 
Committee. Notification of the reductions in both personnel 
accounts should be submitted to the Committee in accordance 
with section 605 of the accompanying bill.
    Enhanced Security.--In separate bill language, the 
Committee has provided $1,870,000 for enhanced domestic 
security. This amount was requested as part of the anti-
terrorism budget amendment submitted on July 17, 1995. This 
amount will provide for security enhancements at the Main State 
Department building and annexes, and for data base links with 
law enforcement information systems.
                        Capital Investment Fund

    The Committee recommends $16,400,000 for the Capital 
Investment Fund, compared to a request of $32,800,000. There 
was no funding for this account in fiscal year 1995.
    The Committee believes there is ample justification to fund 
this new account, in order to provide resources for needed 
investments in information systems. The Department's 
information systems are inadequate to meet critical mission 
requirements; about 80 percent of the Department's Automated 
Data Processing equipment is classified as obsolete; 75 percent 
of the Department's telephone systems are outdated; and half of 
the Department's posts have inadequate numbers of personal 
computers. Nonetheless, because of funding restraints, the 
Committee recommends one-half of the budget request.
    The Department's overall Information Resources Management 
modernization plan has been the subject of much criticism. Only 
recently did the Secretary appoint a Chief Information Officer, 
who was charged by the Secretary to report on specific options 
and cost estimates by July 15, 1995. In order to gain support 
for resources, the Chief Information Officer will need to 
demonstrate that the deficiencies pointed to repeatedly by a 
number of studies and reports have been overcome. The Committee 
expects the Department to report on the status of its overall 
information plan and implementation prior to the fiscal year 
1997 budget hearings.

                      Office Of Inspector General

    The Committee recommends merging the Office of Inspector 
General of the United States Information Agency with the Office 
of Inspector General of the State Department. There are several 
reasons. First, the Committee is willing to start the proposed 
consolidation of the foreign affairs agencies ahead of 
schedule, and believes the Office of the Inspector General is a 
good place to start, since it would be beneficial to have an 
overall Inspector General to watch over the development of the 
consolidation process. The State Inspector General already has 
jurisdiction over the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency.
    Second, this consolidation of the two Inspector General 
Offices was specifically recommended by the Vice President in 
his announcement of the second phase of the National 
Performance Review for foreign affairs agencies, so this action 
would follow through on that recommendation as well.
    And, third, the Committee believes there are substantial 
savings to be achieved through the consolidation.
    For the combined Office of the Inspector General for the 
Department of State and the United States Information Agency, 
the Committee recommends $27,669,000. This is $1,174,000 less 
than the amount requested for the two Offices, and $481,000 
less than the amount appropriated for the two Offices in fiscal 
year 1995. The recommendation provides the full amount 
authorized for the two Offices in the House-passed 
reauthorization bill, H.R. 1561, the American Overseas 
Interests Act, less $100,000, the assumed savings from having 
one Inspector General.

                       Representation Allowances

    The Committee recommends $4,780,000 for representation 
allowances authorized by section 905 of the Foreign Service Act 
of 1980. This amount is $200,000 less than the budget request 
and is the same as the amount provided for fiscal year 1995.
    These funds are used to reimburse Foreign Service Officers 
for expenditures incurred in their official capacities abroad 
in establishing and maintaining relations with officials of 
foreign governments and appropriate members of local 
communities.

              Protection Of Foreign Missions And Officials

    The accompanying bill includes a total of $8,579,000 for 
the appropriation entitled, ``Protection of Foreign Missions 
and Officials''. This amount is the same as the budget request, 
and $1,000,000 less than the appropriation provided for fiscal 
year 1995.
    The fiscal year 1995 appropriation included funding for two 
special events totaling $1,000,000; the recommendation for 
fiscal year 1996 represents the base level that was funded in 
fiscal year 1995.
    This account reimburses local governments and communities 
for the extraordinary costs incurred in providing protection 
for international organizations, foreign missions and 
officials, and foreign dignitaries under certain circumstances. 
The Committee believes that local jurisdictions which incur 
such costs must submit a certified billing for such costs in 
accordance with program regulations. The Committee also 
believes that in those circumstances where a local jurisdiction 
will realize a financial benefit from a visit from a foreign 
dignitary through increased tax revenues, that such 
circumstances should be taken into account by the Department in 
assessing the need for reimbursement under this program. The 
Committee expects the Department to treat such submissions 
diligently and provide reimbursement to local jurisdictions on 
a timely basis if claims are fully justified.
    Of the total amount recommended, $1,489,000 is available 
for protection of foreign diplomats and their families 
throughout the United States. The Foreign Missions Act of 1982 
authorizes the provision of such services when necessary either 
at the request of a foreign mission or on the initiative of the 
Secretary of State. In these situations, where State and local 
authorities cannot provide the security required, the Act 
permits the Department of State to employ the services of 
private security firms.
    Of the total amount recommended, $7,090,000 is allocated to 
reimburse New York City for the protection of foreign missions 
and officials credited to the United Nations and other 
international organizations. These funds provide for the costs 
of guard posts and security escort and motorcade services to 
foreign missions and personnel assigned to the United Nations.

            Acquisition And Maintenance Of Buildings Abroad
    The Committee recommends a total appropriation of 
$391,760,000 for Acquisition and Maintenance of Buildings 
Abroad for fiscal year 1996. The total amount provided in this 
appropriation account for fiscal year 1996 is a reduction of 
$30,000,000 from the budget request, and provides the same 
level as in fiscal year 1995, assuming enactment of a 
$30,000,000 rescission. The Committee recommendation includes a 
provision carried in the bill in previous years which prohibits 
funds from being used for acquisition of furniture and 
furnishings and generators for other departments and agencies.
    This account provides the funding that allows the 
Department to manage U.S. Government real property worth in 
excess of $10,000,000,000 and to lease close to 14,000 
residential, office, and functional properties, not only for 
the Department of State, but for all U.S. employees overseas.
    The budget request includes no funding for new capital 
projects, reflecting a shift in emphasis from capital 
construction to enhanced management of existing facilities.
    This program has only recently been removed from the watch 
list of most vulnerable federal programs, in part because of 
the Committee's support for sufficient resources for this 
account. There has been a rolling five-year plan dedicated to 
restoring the safety, efficiency and security of aging overseas 
building inventory, with a backlog of needed repairs estimated 
at over $413 million. The Committee directs the Department to 
submit an updated five-year plan and to identify the current 
backlog of needed repairs as soon as possible, so that the 
Committee can keep track of the Department's progress in 
addressing these needs.
    With respect to future capital needs, the Committee 
believes that, due to fiscal restraints, less costly means will 
need to be developed to finance them. Consequently, the 
Committee would like the Department to report back on the 
efficacy of lease-purchase agreements as a financing mechanism 
for meeting new facility requirements, and to suggest whether a 
pilot project involving one or two facilities would be 
worthwhile undertaking. As part of this effort, the Department 
should evaluate needs for new facilities in posts with outmoded 
facilities, including Jamaica.

           Emergencies In The Diplomatic And Consular Service

    The Committee recommends $6,000,000 to enable the Secretary 
of State to meet unforeseen emergencies arising in the 
Diplomatic and Consular Service. This amount is the same as the 
budget request, but is $500,000 less than the amount 
appropriated for fiscal year 1995.
    The Committee has included a provision in the bill which 
permits up to $1,000,000 to be transferred from this account to 
the Repatriation Loans Program account, as requested in the 
budget. This provision will ensure an adequate level of 
resources for loans to American citizens through the 
Repatriation Loans Program account should that account require 
additional funds in fiscal year 1996 due to an unanticipated 
increase in the number of loans needed.
    The appropriation provides resources for the Department of 
State to meet emergency requirements in the conduct of foreign 
affairs. The Committee recommendation provides funds for: (1) 
travel and subsistence expenses for relocation of American, 
United States Government employees and their families from 
troubled areas to the United States and/or safe-haven posts; 
(2) allowances granted to State Department employees and their 
dependents evacuated to the United States for the convenience 
of the Government; and (3) payment of rewards for information 
concerning terrorist and narcoterrorist activities.

                   Repatriation Loans Program Account

    The Committee has included $593,000 for the subsidy cost of 
repatriation loans, and $183,000 for administrative costs of 
the program as authorized by 22 U.S.C. 2671. The Committee 
recommendation represents the full budget request for the 
subsidy amount and administrative costs and is the same amount 
for these items as was appropriated for fiscal year 1995.
    This account provides emergency loans to assist destitute 
Americans abroad who have no other source of funds to return to 
the United States.

              Payment To The American Institute In Taiwan

    The accompanying bill includes $15,165,000 for the 
appropriation entitled, ``Payment to the American Institute in 
Taiwan''. This amount is $300,000 below both the budget request 
and the amount provided in fiscal year 1995. It represents the 
level of the House-passed authorization, and returns the 
account to its appropriation level in fiscal year 1994.
    The Taiwan Relations Act requires that programs concerning 
Taiwan be carried out by the American Institute in Taiwan and 
authorizes funds to be appropriated to the Secretary of State 
to carry out the provisions of the Act. The Institute 
administers programs in the areas of economic and commercial 
services, cultural affairs, travel services, and logistics. The 
Department of State contracts with the American Institute in 
Taiwan to carry out these activities.

     Payment To The Foreign Service Retirement And Disability Fund

    The Committee recommends $125,402,000 for the appropriation 
entitled, ``Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and 
Disability Fund''. This amount is the full budget request and 
is $3,919,000 less than the amount appropriated for fiscal year 
1995. The decrease reflects a change in actuarial assumptions 
and an increase in the 30-year amortization payment.
    This appropriation, which is considered mandatory for 
budget scorekeeping purposes, is authorized by the Foreign 
Service Act of 1980 which provides for an appropriation to the 
Fund in 30 equal annual installments of the amount required for 
the unfunded liability created by new benefits, new groups of 
beneficiaries or increased salaries on which benefits are 
computed.

              International Organizations and Conferences

              Contributions To International Organizations
    The bill includes a total of $870,000,000 for payment of 
the obligations of United States membership in international 
organizations as authorized by conventions, treaties, or 
specific Acts of Congress. This is $2,661,000 below the fiscal 
year 1995 appropriation, $53,057,000 below the budget request, 
and $3,000,000 below the House-passed authorization level.
    The Committee recommends language, carried in the fiscal 
year 1995 Appropriations Act, which provides that payment of 
arrearages shall be directed towards special activities that 
are mutually agreed upon by the United States and the 
respective international organization. The recommendation does 
not provide any funds for arrearages, and so it is unlikely 
that this provision will be utilized. The Committee expects 
that the Department will submit a reprogramming to the House 
and Senate Appropriations Committees under the provisions of 
section 605 of the bill before payment of arrearages is made to 
any of the international organizations.
    The Committee also recommends bill language carried in 
previous Appropriations Acts which prohibits any of the funds 
made available in this account for a United States contribution 
to an international organization for the United States' share 
of interest costs for loans incurred on or after October 1, 
1984, through external borrowings.
    The Committee also recommends a provision that 20 percent 
of the amount for the United States assessed contributions to 
the regular budget of the United Nations will be withheld from 
obligation and expenditure until a certification is made 
pursuant to section 401(b) of Public Law 103-236. This 
certification relates to the establishment of an independent 
Office of Inspector General at the United Nations. This 
provision was carried in the fiscal year 1995 appropriations 
bill and has been updated to apply to fiscal year 1996. H.R. 
1561, the House-passed authorization bill, contains a 
provision, Section 2524, that continues the certification 
requirement of Public Law 103-236, but since it has not yet 
been enacted, the Committee has made reference to the 
comparable provision in the enacted Public Law.
    The Committee recommendation provides for payments of 
United States assessed contributions to the fifty international 
organizations requested under this account at the fiscal year 
1995 level, with the exceptions that are listed below. Most, if 
not all, international organizations have been operating on a 
principle referred to as ``zero-based budgeting'' for a number 
of years. However, this principle, as interpreted, has allowed 
the assessments for these organizations to increase 
significantly, because the budgets are adjusted upward annually 
or biennially for inflation and mandatory increases. For 
domestic programs and budget comparisons, under new House 
Rules, inflationary increases are no longer built into budget 
comparisons, and the same principle should apply to 
international programs. Consequently, the Committee has applied 
``zero-based budgeting'' to mean the fiscal year 1995 level for 
these international organizations, and that is the basis for 
recommending most organizations be funded at the fiscal year 
1995 level.
    The exceptions to level funding are as follows:
           four organizations are provided the higher 
        fiscal year 1996 request level, because of the 
        importance of their work in current international 
        events: International Atomic Energy Agency, the World 
        Trade Organization, North Atlantic Treaty Organization, 
        and the related North Atlantic Assembly;
           two organizations are provided their fiscal 
        year 1996 request level, because the requested level is 
        lower than in fiscal year 1995: the Food and 
        Agriculture Organization and the World Intellectual 
        Property Organization;
           two organizations are not funded:
                  --United Nations Industrial Development 
                Organization because consistently, from the 
                Commission on Global Governance, to the 
                communique issued at the recent G-7 meeting in 
                Halifax, to the Department of State's own 
                comments in the Subcommittee's hearing on this 
                topic, it is named as an organization that 
                should either be shut down or completely 
                reformed and other nations like Canada have 
                withdrawn; and
                  --the International Copper Study Group, for 
                which funding is requested for the first time 
                under this account, at a time when it does not 
                seem advisable to start funding more 
                international organizations.
    In addition, the United Nations is funded at a level of 
$272,202,000, which is $14,298,000 higher than the fiscal year 
1995 appropriation, but $16,601,000 below the fiscal year 1995 
assessed payment to the U.N., because of the availability of 
$30,899,000 from a one-time exchange rate gain. If the 
Department of State wishes to increase the amount available for 
the U.N. to the fiscal year 1995 program level, it can easily 
do so, by prioritizing among the other 49 international 
organizations, and either reducing or terminating payments to, 
and withdrawing from, lower priority organizations. The 
Committee would be receptive to a reprogramming of funds based 
on prioritizing the importance of these 50 international 
organizations.
    Finally, $5,074,000 is provided as initial funding for the 
Chemical Weapons Convention, should it come into effect during 
fiscal year 1996. This, together with $6,500,000 available in 
carryover for this purpose under the Arms Control and 
Disarmament Agency (ACDA), would provide a total of $11,574,000 
of funding available for this purpose, close to the $12,000,000 
assumed in the House-passed authorization bill, H.R. 1561. The 
budget requested $17,000,000 for this purpose under the ACDA 
account. If the CWC goes into effect early in fiscal year 1996, 
and additional funds are required for the U.S. assessment, they 
will be considered as part of the fiscal year 1997 
appropriations.
    At a time when, because of budget constraints, funding for 
domestic programs is being significantly reduced, international 
programs must be subjected to the same scrutiny.
    Prioritization.--At a time of declining budgets, it is 
absolutely essential for the Administration to prioritize the 
importance of these organizations and to act accordingly. There 
are a multitude of small organizations that, in the 
Subcommittee's hearing on this topic, the Department indicated 
are duplicative, after the establishment of the World Trade 
Organization as a forum for trade matters. At the Subcommittee 
hearing, the Assistant Secretary for International Organization 
Affairs indicated that the Department was in the process of 
doing such a prioritization and would provide it for the 
hearing record, but it has yet to be provided. The Committee 
directs the Department to submit the result of its analysis to 
the Subcommittee at the earliest possible time, but no later 
than August 31, 1995, as well as an analysis of the impact of 
the World Trade Organization on the need to continue existing 
international trade organizations, and the Department's plans 
to withdraw from low priority organizations.
    Reform.--One of the most critical priorities, particularly 
in this time of budget constraints, must be reform. The need 
for reform at the U.N. is long overdue and widely acknowledged. 
Some steps are being taken by the Under Secretary General for 
Management with respect to the litany of management areas in 
need of reform: a bloated bureaucracy; a personnel system that 
fails both to recognize performance and to eliminate deadwood; 
featherbedding, where jobs are created or maintained regardless 
of need; the lack of a comprehensive code of conduct; excessive 
printing and publications; and wasteful and unnecessary 
worldwide conferences.
    But deeper structural reform is also required. The 
communique issued at the recent G-7 meeting in Halifax, like 
the recommendations of the Commission on Global Governance, 
focused on the United Nations Conference on Trade and 
Development, the Regional Economic Commissions, and the 
Economic and Social Council as prime examples of structures in 
need of reexamination. A top to bottom reform of the entire 
U.N. structure is required to eliminate obsolete or unneeded 
operations.
    Management and structural reform are equally needed 
throughout all U.N. related agencies and other international 
organizations.
    The United States needs to be the leader in this effort. 
There should be a comprehensive blueprint for reform that 
defines the U.S. position in the U.N. and throughout the 
system. The Committee expects the Department of State to 
prepare and submit such a plan by March 1, 1996.
    Conferences.--The U.S. representative to the U.N. and 
others have stated that there should be no more world-wide 
conferences scheduled. The Committee agrees, and believes that 
the U.S. should not agree to participate in or finance any 
further world-wide conferences.
    U.N. Inspector General.--At the insistence of the Congress, 
an Inspector-General-type operation has been installed at the 
United Nations, known as the Office of Internal Oversight 
Services. Overall, the new Office has not yet made itself an 
agent of change. The Under Secretary General of the Office has 
stated that it is not within the scope of the office to 
evaluate the overall effectiveness of programs or to criticize 
the actions of Member States. Furthermore, protections for 
employees who bring situations to the attention of the Office 
do not appear to be sufficient. The U.S. mission should be at 
the forefront of assuring that U.S. citizens who speak out do 
not suffer reprisals. In conjunction with the certification 
requirements contained in the bill, the Committee intends to 
follow the progress of this Office closely.
    In addition, the Committee requests that the Department of 
State do a formal evaluation of the existence and adequacy of 
Inspector General offices at all the major international 
organizations and report back to the Committee by March 1, 
1996.

        Contributions For International Peacekeeping Activities

    The Committee recommends a total of $425,000,000, for 
United States payments for Contributions for International 
Peacekeeping Activities for fiscal year 1996. This is 
$108,304,000 below the amount provided in fiscal year 1995 and 
$20,000,000 below the amount requested for fiscal year 1996. 
The reduction is due to a new mandate that was voted for the 
peacekeeping mission in Rwanda (UNAMIR) in early June, which 
reduces the number of troops in half. The budget originally 
requested $47,250,000, and the reduction will result in 
$27,250,000 remaining available to meet the U.S. assessment for 
the smaller mission in Rwanda.
    In fiscal year 1996, the U.S. assessment rate for its share 
of the cost of peacekeeping missions will decline from 30.4 
percent to 25 percent, because of Congressional action 
requiring this to happen.
    Language is included, stating that none of the funds in 
this bill can be expended for new or expanded peacekeeping 
missions unless 15 days in advance of the vote at the U.N.: (1) 
the Committee is notified of the estimated cost and length of 
the mission, the vital national interest that will be served, 
and the planned exit strategy; and (2) a reprogramming request 
is submitted, indicating the source of funds that will be used 
to pay for the new or expanded mission.
    The notification requirement in the recommended language is 
similar to existing notification requirements enacted in the 
Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 
1995, and proposed in other pending legislation. The Committee 
has included this requirement in appropriations language to 
assure that it is one of the Committees that receives 
notification. The requirement to submit a reprogramming, 
identifying the source of funds for a new or expanded mission 
is added because the State Department has continued to commit 
the United States to paying huge sums in assessments without 
having any notion of where the funds will be found to pay for 
those commitments. The Administration's own peacekeeping policy 
directive, Presidential Decision Directive 25, makes 
availability of funds a factor in deciding whether to vote for 
a peacekeeping operation, and yet the Administration still 
routinely votes for peacekeeping missions without even 
formulating a proposal identifying how the U.S. assessment will 
be paid for.
    As recent events with respect to the Rapid Reaction Force 
in Bosnia indicate, the Administration continues to take the 
position that it can vote for new or expanded missions without 
identifying where the funds will be found to pay for new 
commitments like this and with minimal consultation in advance 
with Congress. The Administration needs to formulate a proposal 
as to where the funds will come from to pay for a new or 
expanded mission prior to committing the U.S. to pay 
assessments and to consult with the Committee about the mission 
and the proposal to pay for it prior to voting for the mission. 
Failure to consult in advance in any meaningful way is exactly 
how the Administration got the U.S. into a position of owing an 
estimated $672 million in peacekeeping assessments by the end 
of fiscal year 1995 without having formulated any realistic or 
acceptable proposal to identify the funds to pay those 
assessments.
    Language is included, as in the previous year, requiring 
that funds are available for peacekeeping expenses only upon a 
certification that American manufacturers and suppliers are 
provided procurement opportunities equal to those being given 
to foreign manufacturers and suppliers. The Committee was 
surprised to learn that the Economics and Business Affairs 
Bureau, which is the part of the Department responsible for 
advocating U.S. business opportunities internationally, has not 
taken any role with respect to the international organizations, 
and has not participated in the certification process. 
Promoting business opportunities at the international 
organizations should be accorded much higher priority, given 
the amount of U.S. funds that are provided to these 
organizations.
    The Committee is concerned about problems that have arisen 
out of the sharing of intelligence with the United Nations. 
These problems are being addressed in a number of authorization 
bills that are moving in both the House and the Senate, and the 
Committee believes that this situation must be addressed and 
rectified to prevent the reoccurrence of these problems in the 
future.
    Bosnia-Herzegovina.--The Committee remains deeply concerned 
about the continuing crisis in Bosnia-Herzegovina. The recent 
fall of the ``safe haven'' of Srebrenica and the creation of 
thousands of refugees as a result of continued Serb aggression 
must not go unnoticed. The Committee urges the Department of 
State to seek the immediate prosecution of war criminals in the 
conflict and consult with our European Allies regarding the 
crisis of refugees created by the policy of ethnic cleansing 
and forced expulsion of civilian populations from their homes.

              International Conferences And Contingencies

    The Committee recommends $3,000,000 to finance the U.S. 
participation in multilateral intergovernmental conferences and 
contributions to new or provisional international 
organizations, $3,000,000 less than the budget request and the 
amount appropriated for fiscal year 1995.
    The Committee believes the Department needs to do a more 
rigorous job of prioritizing which of the approximately 700 
scheduled conferences it chooses to attend, and of limiting the 
number of representatives.
    This account finances only the expenses of official 
delegations to conferences and does not cover employees funded 
by other Departments who are not part of an official 
delegation. As a result, there is no control over the amount of 
funds spent on international conferences. A State Department 
Inspector General Report of September, 1994, recommended that 
the Department consult with the Office of Management and Budget 
(OMB) to seek to expand the authority of the Office of 
International Conferences to monitor overall costs to the U.S. 
Government as well as the size and composition of conference 
delegations. The Committee recommends that the Department 
implement that recommendation and report to the Committee the 
results of that consultation.

                       International Commissions

 International Boundary And Water Commission, United States And Mexico

    The bill includes a total of $19,002,000 for the 
International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and 
Mexico (IBWC). This amount is $5,254,000 less than the total 
budget request for fiscal year 1996 and $500,000 less than the 
amounts provided for fiscal year 1995. The total amount 
provided includes $12,358,000 for Salaries and Expenses and 
$6,644,000 for Construction.

                         salaries and expenses

    The Committee recommendation for the Salaries and Expenses 
account is $12,358,000, $1,500,000 less than the budget 
request, and $500,000 below the fiscal year 1995 appropriation. 
However, $800,000 will be available from an appropriation of 
$1,000,000 in the fiscal year 1996 Energy and Water 
Appropriations bill out of the Western Area Power 
Administration. Therefore, the total funds available for IBWC 
salaries and expenses will be $300,000 higher than the amount 
for salaries and expenses available in fiscal year 1995.
    The recommendation includes funding for the items requested 
in the budget, except for $1,500,000 requested to purchase 
spare parts and equipment for the expected start-up of the San 
Diego/Tijuana International Wastewater Treatment Plant in 
fiscal year 1997. This amount was arrived at by what may be 
termed, at best, very rough estimating techniques, and the 
Committee will consider a request for spare parts only if it is 
based on a plan that sets forth the actual need for spare parts 
inventory.

                              construction

    The Committee recommendation for the Construction 
appropriation freezes funding at the fiscal year 1995 level 
which is $3,754,000 below the request. The recommendation 
provides all items requested in the budget, with the following 
exception.
    The budget request included $6,500,000 as part of a multi-
year effort to accumulate $16,000,000 that will be loaned to 
Mexico in fiscal year 1997 or 1998 to pay its share of the 
construction costs of the San Diego/Tijuana International 
Wastewater Treatment Plant. The loan will then be repaid to the 
U.S. over a period of 10 years. A total of $6,097,000 has 
already been appropriated and is being held as carryover for 
this purpose.
    The Committee recommends $2,746,000 for this purpose, a 
reduction of $3,754,000 below the request for the following 
reasons: (1) the full amount of funding is not required this 
year; (2) after credit reform, it should be possible to request 
funding for a loan program in a way that gets scored as a loan 
rather than as direct spending, at considerable savings in 
cost, and the Department and OMB are requested to look into 
this with respect to the remaining balance to be requested in 
future years; and (3) there may be up to $6,000,000 in total 
project costs that can be saved, obviating the need for this 
additional appropriation. In the Clean Water Act 
reauthorization that recently passed the House, the City of San 
Diego is apparently being provided a waiver that will remove 
the necessity to provide secondary treatment to its municipal 
sewage. If the same waiver were to be provided to the 
International Wastewater Treatment Plant, it would save 
$6,000,000 in construction costs. The Department is requested 
to look into this situation and report as to whether the 
situations are comparable.
    The Committee understands that carryover funds are 
available to reimburse San Diego for the costs of wastewater 
treatment.
    The Committee understands that the IBWC is leasing property 
for its offices and will soon be required to make decisions 
about facilities necessary to carry out its functions. The IBWC 
is expected to report to the Committee on its plans and is 
expected to utilize the services of the General Services 
Administration.
    The Committee would like to see IBWC fulfill its existing 
agreements to reimburse local governments for operation, 
maintenance, and other related costs associated with treatment 
of wastewater originating in Mexico. The Committee recognizes 
that concerns have been raised by local governments about costs 
eligible for reimbursement as they relate to wastewater 
treatment. Therefore, IBWC is directed to submit to this 
Committee, within 60 days after enactment of this legislation, 
a report detailing the historical context in which Memorandums 
of Agreement for wastewater treatment have been entered, 
concerns raised by local governments that would affect 
reimbursement to the locality, and recommendations for 
resolution of the aforementioned concerns.

              American Sections International Commissions

    The Committee recommends a total of $5,800,000 to fund the 
U.S. share of expenses of the International Boundary 
Commission, the International Joint Commission, United States 
and Canada, and the Border Environment Cooperation Commission 
for fiscal year 1996. This amount is $490,000 less than the 
request but is the same amount as was appropriated for fiscal 
year 1995.
    The Committee recommendation provides $640,000 for the 
International Boundary Commission. This is $100,000 below both 
the budget request and the fiscal year 1995 level. An agreement 
has been reached to fund only one joint Commissioner for both 
the International Boundary Commission and the International 
Joint Commission, whose salary will be paid out of the 
International Joint Commission, resulting in a $100,000 savings 
in the amount needed for the International Boundary Commission.
    The Committee recommendation provides $3,360,000, for the 
International Joint Commission, $190,000 below both the request 
and the fiscal year 1995 level. The Committee believes that 
$90,000 in savings can be obtained from additional 
consolidation efforts between the IBC and the IJC, as was 
indicated at the Subcommittee's hearing on this topic. In 
addition, an additional $100,000 in savings can be obtained by 
reducing expenditures for consulting out of the professional 
services and Reference Referral Fund activities.
    The Committee recommendation also includes $1,800,000 for 
the second year of funding for the Border Environment 
Cooperation Commission (BECC), authorized under the legislation 
approving the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). This 
is $190,000 above the amount appropriated in fiscal year 1995, 
and $200,000 below the request. The reduction is based on the 
fact that BECC's initial operations appear to have begun slower 
than was initially anticipated. As of May 31, 1995, two-thirds 
of the way through the fiscal year, BECC had spent only a small 
portion (22%) of the funds available to it from the U.S. and 
Mexico.
    This new Commission has been established to develop 
cooperative efforts to resolve environmental problems along the 
United States/Mexico border. The Commission's purpose is to 
work with affected States, local communities and 
nongovernmental organizations that propose environmental 
infrastructure projects by assessing technical and financial 
feasibility, evaluating environmental benefits, arranging 
public and private financing, and coordinating the development 
and implementation of these projects.
                  International Fisheries Commissions

    The accompanying bill provides a total of $14,669,000 to 
fund the U.S. share of the expenses of the International 
Fisheries Commissions, participation in the International 
Council for the Exploration of the Sea, participation in the 
North Pacific Marine Sciences Organization, travel expenses of 
the United States commissioners and their advisors, and 
salaries of non-government employees of the Pacific Salmon 
Commission for days actually worked as commissioners and panel 
members and alternates.
    The total amount recommended is the same as the budget 
request and the amount appropriated for fiscal year 1995.
    The Committee recommendation includes $8,323,000 for the 
Great Lakes Fishery Commission, the full 1996 budget request. 
Approximately $7,000,000 of this amount is passed through to 
the Fish and Wildlife Service in the Department of Interior for 
sea lamprey eradication. The Committee does not believe it is 
the function of the State Department to undertake or oversee 
fishery programs, nor does it believe that this program fits 
within the purpose of this account, which is to pay for the 
administrative costs of international commissions. 
Consequently, the Committee directs the State Department and 
the Office of Management and Budget to request funding for the 
sea lamprey eradication program in the fiscal year 1997 budget 
of the Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior.

                                 Other

                     Payment To The Asia Foundation

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $10,000,000 
for payment to the Asia Foundation for fiscal year 1996. This 
is the amount of the budget request, and a reduction of 
$5,000,000 below the fiscal year 1995 level. The $15,000,000 
provided in fiscal year 1995 was appropriated from two bills: 
$10,000,000 from the fiscal year 1995 Commerce, Justice, State 
and Judiciary Appropriations Act, and $5,000,000 from the 
fiscal year 1995 Defense Appropriations Act.
    Given the constraints of its funding allocation for fiscal 
year 1996, the Committee was faced with many difficult 
decisions including the necessity of terminating funding for 
non-essential programs. The Committee's decision to recommend 
continued funding for the Asia Foundation, albeit at a reduced 
level, is due to the fact that it is a grant-making, as opposed 
to a grant-taking, non-governmental organization. Its grants 
are primarily for the purpose of democratization in Asia, one 
of the areas of the world where democratization needs to be 
supported. Nonetheless, because of the continued budget 
constraints of the years ahead, the Committee recommends that 
the Foundation move forward as quickly as possible with efforts 
to secure full support from the non-Federal sector.
    The Committee notes that, despite a reduced overall budget 
request, the amount requested for administration increased over 
fiscal year 1995. Administrative costs funded from this 
appropriation should be reduced at least proportionate to the 
reduction in overall appropriation, so as to maximize the 
resources available for grants.

                General Provisions--Department of State

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the Department of State that were included in the fiscal 
year 1995 Appropriations Act, renumbered to reflect the 
relocation of the Department of State appropriations in Title 
IV of this Act instead of Title V, as in previous years:
    Section 401 of the bill, as requested, permits funds 
appropriated in this Act for the Department of State to be 
available for allowances and differentials as authorized by 
subchapter 59 of 5 U.S.C.; for services as authorized by 5 
U.S.C. 3109; and hire of passenger transportation pursuant to 5 
U.S.C. 1343(b).
    Section 402 of the bill permits up to five percent of any 
appropriation made available in the bill for the Department of 
State and the United States Information Agency to be 
transferred between their respective appropriations. The 
language also provides that no appropriation shall be decreased 
by more than 5 percent or increased by more than 10 percent by 
any such transfer. In addition, the language provides that any 
transfer pursuant to this subsection shall be treated as a 
reprogramming of funds under section 605 of the accompanying 
bill and shall not be available for obligation or expenditure 
except in compliance with the procedures set forth in that 
section.
    Section 403 provides that funds appropriated or otherwise 
made available under this Act or any other Act may be expended 
for compensation of the United States Commissioner of the 
International Boundary Commission, United States and Canada, 
only for actual hours worked by such Commissioner.

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                  Arms Control and Disarmament Agency

                Arms Control And Disarmament Activities

    The Committee recommends $40,000,000 for the basic 
operating expenses of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency 
(ACDA) for fiscal year 1996, which is $36,300,000 below the 
request, and $14,378,000 below the amount provided in fiscal 
year 1995.
    The fiscal year 1996 request contained two items that are 
not included in the recommendation: $17,000,000 for the 
estimated U.S. assessment of the Chemical Weapons Convention, 
which the Committee addresses under the Department of State, 
Contributions to International Organizations account; and 
$13,961,000, a new request for the operation of the COBRA DANE 
radar facility in Alaska, which the Committee does not approve 
and believes should be addressed under the National Security 
appropriations bill, where it is currently funded.
    Leaving aside these two items, the Committee's 
recommendation of $40,000,000 is $5,339,000 below the fiscal 
year 1996 request for basic operating expenses of ACDA and 
$4,378,000 below the fiscal year 1995 appropriation, prior to 
enactment of the pending rescission bill.
    The reduction results from assumed savings as follows: (1) 
a reduction in operating costs in Geneva due to termination of 
a building lease; (2) the recent announcement of 12 additional 
areas of administrative consolidation among State, ACDA, the 
Agency for International Development and the United States 
Information Agency; (3) elimination of positions that are 
duplicative between the Bureau of Political-Military Affairs at 
State and ACDA, as called for in the Vice President's Second 
Phase of Reinventing Government announcement, relating to 
foreign affairs agencies; (4) not filling existing vacancies; 
and (5) reductions in a relatively large public affairs office.
    The Committee notes that it has continued ACDA in its 
present form for fiscal year 1996, but that, under the terms of 
the House-passed authorization bill, it will be consolidated 
with the State Department in fiscal year 1997.
    The Committee further notes that there is an expected 
carryover of $6,500,000 for Chemical Weapons Convention 
activities. If the Convention does not enter into force, these 
funds can be used to continue to pay the U.S. costs associated 
with the Preparatory Commission. If the Convention does enter 
into force, these funds can be used as part of the first-year 
assessment.
    The Arms Control and Disarmament Agency advises and assists 
the President, the National Security Council, the Secretary of 
State and other senior Government officials on arms control 
matters.

                    United States Information Agency
    The Committee recommends a total of $1,082,646,000 for the 
United States Information Agency (USIA) to carry out the 
information, educational and cultural exchange activities of 
the Agency and international broadcasting operations. The 
Committee recommendation also provides for a grant to the 
National Endowment for Democracy for fiscal year 1996. The 
Committee recommendation also provides for the requested 
appropriation of interest and earnings on the Eisenhower 
Exchange Fellowship Program Trust Fund, the Israeli-Arab 
Scholarship Endowment Fund, and the American Studies 
Collections Endowment Fund. This total amount for USIA is 
$217,681,000 less than the budget request for these items, and 
$331,471,000 less than the fiscal year 1995 appropriation. The 
details of the Committee's recommendations for the nine 
appropriations of the Agency are contained in the following 
paragraphs. These recommendations generally provide funding at 
the authorization levels included in H.R. 1561, as passed by 
the House, and in no case exceed those authorization levels.

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends $445,645,000 for the Salaries and 
Expenses appropriation of the United States Information Agency 
(USIA). This amount is $50,357,000 less than the budget 
request, and $30,000,000 below the amount appropriated in 
fiscal year 1995.
    The Committee recommendation includes the following 
limitations on the use of funds which have been carried in the 
bill in previous years: (1) $700,000 for temporary employees; 
(2) $25,000 for entertainment, including official receptions, 
as authorized by law; (3) $1,400,000 for representation abroad 
as authorized by law; (4) $7,615,000, to remain available until 
expended, in fees credited to this appropriation which are 
received in connection with English teaching, library, motion 
pictures, and publication programs as authorized by law; and 
(7) $1,700,000 to remain available until expended to carry out 
projects involving security construction and related 
improvements for agency facilities not physically located 
together with State Department facilities abroad.
    The recommended funding level will require major reductions 
and consolidations in the operations of USIA, estimated at 600 
positions or more, and at least 20 post closings, compared to 
three originally proposed in the budget request. USIA will have 
to look at all of its major operations, such as the printing 
plant in the Philippines, to examine what other activities can 
be eliminated. It will have to immediately downsize in those 
posts where staffing is not in accord with USIA's Resource 
Allocation Grouping model, like India. The Committee believes 
that the areas that should be looked to for further reductions 
include staffing and programs related to western Europe and 
Canada, since these are parts of the world that have the freest 
access to information and are most likely to be exposed to the 
American point of view through other means.

                            Technology Fund

    The Committee recommends $5,050,000 for a new account, the 
Technology Fund, compared to the budget request of $10,100,000, 
and no funding in fiscal year 1995. The purpose of this new 
account is to establish a technology investment fund to 
modernize USIA's non-broadcasting computer and 
telecommunications infrastructure. The intention is to replace 
an investment strategy that followed adopted technology plans 
but relied heavily on available year-end funds. This new fund 
will allow better planning and assure the availability of 
appropriated funds to carry out the plans.

                      Office Of Inspector General

    The bill does not provide separate funding for USIA's 
Office of Inspector General, but rather merges this Office into 
the Office of Inspector General at the Department of State. 
Funding of $4,200,000 for the functions of USIA's Office of 
Inspector General is assumed under the State Inspector General 
appropriation. This is the level of the authorization provided 
in H.R. 1561, as passed by the House, less $100,000 in savings 
assumed to result from having one Inspector General.

               Educational And Cultural Exchange Programs

    The bill includes a total of $192,090,000 for the 
Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs of the United States 
Information Agency. This amount is $60,586,000 less than the 
budget request. It is $88,189,000 less than was appropriated 
for these programs for fiscal year 1995. The fiscal year 1995 
total includes, for comparability purposes, $42,000,000 
appropriated under the Foreign Operations Appropriations bill 
for exchange programs in the Newly Independent States (NIS) of 
the former Soviet Union, funding for which is requested under 
this account in fiscal year 1996. Bill language does not 
include reference to particular programs.
    The recommended total corresponds to the total of the 
authorization levels passed by the House as part of H.R. 1561, 
the American Overseas Interests Act of 1995. The House-passed 
authorization levels included in that bill were: $112,484,000 
for the Fulbright program, $900,000 for South Pacific 
Exchanges, $800,000 for East Timorese Scholarships, $141,000 
for Cambodian Scholarships, $500,000 for Tibetan Exchanges and 
$77,266,000 for other programs.
    Within the total, given the major reduction in resources, 
the Committee recommends that exchange resources for Europe and 
Canada be weighted more heavily toward Eastern Europe and the 
countries of the former Soviet Union, rather than Western 
Europe and Canada. With respect to the NIS exchanges, the 
Committee expects that funding will be distributed equitably 
among high-school, college, graduate, and post-graduate 
programs.
    To the maximum extent possible, the Committee urges that 
the following exchange programs be supported: the International 
Visitors Program, the Pepper Scholarships, including the 
Executive Education Program for Central European Business and 
Professional Leaders, the Muskie Fellowships, the Mike 
Mansfield Fellowship Program and the Humphrey Fellowships.
    First-year support was provided in fiscal year 1995 for the 
Xth Paralympiad, which will take place in 1996. In addition to 
the athletic competition, there are also planned international 
exchange events involving disability issues, including an 
international forum on disability, an adaptive technology 
exposition, and follow-through dissemination of materials and 
information. The Committee urges that support be increased for 
this program to the maximum extent possible within the 
resources provided, since this is the year that the program 
will take place.
    With respect to the administration of the Fulbright 
program, the Committee requests a report by March 1, 1996 on 
whether savings would result from opening up the administration 
of the program to competition, rather than making awards on a 
sole-source basis.
    Within the total amount of funding provided, funding for 
exchange support activities is included.
    The Committee expects that a proposal for the distribution 
of the available resources among exchange programs will be 
submitted through the normal reprogramming process prior to 
final decisions being made.

                 Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program

           Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program Trust Fund

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of interest and 
earnings in the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program Trust 
Fund, authorized by the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Act of 
1990 (Public Law 101-454). The bill does not include $2,500,000 
that was provided as a one-time contribution to the endowment 
in the fiscal year 1995 bill.
    The Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Act of 1990 authorized a 
permanent endowment for the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship 
Program to increase educational opportunities for young leaders 
in preparation for and enhancement of their professional 
careers and to advance peace through international 
understanding. The Act established the Eisenhower Exchange 
Fellowship Program Trust Fund in the United States Treasury for 
these purposes. A total of $7,500,000 has been provided to 
establish a permanent endowment for the program, from which is 
appropriated interest and earnings in the fund to Eisenhower 
Exchange Fellowships, Incorporated.

                    Israeli-Arab Scholarship Program

    The Committee recommends language in the accompanying bill 
which will appropriate interest and earnings of the Israeli-
Arab Scholarship Endowment Fund totaling $397,000. This is the 
full budget request and the same as was provided in fiscal year 
1995. A permanent endowment of $4,978,500 for the Fund was 
established in fiscal year 1992 with funds made available to 
the United States Information Agency under section 556(b) of 
the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related Programs 
Appropriations Act, 1990, as amended. The income from the 
endowment is to be used for a program of scholarships for 
Israeli-Arabs to attend institutions of higher education in the 
United States.

              American Studies Collections Endowment Fund

    The Committee recommends appropriations language, as 
requested, for this new account, providing interest and 
earnings from a $2,000,000 endowment fund, created through 
appropriations of $1,000,000 in both fiscal year 1994 and 1995. 
The purpose of the Fund is to create and support American 
studies collections at university libraries abroad and to work 
with foreign universities to that end. The program is 
authorized in section 235 of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995.

                 International Broadcasting Operations

    The Committee recommends $341,000,000 to carry out United 
States International Broadcasting Operations for fiscal year 
1996. This amount is $54,340,000 less than the budget request 
for this account and $161,882,000 less than the comparable 
amounts provided in fiscal year 1995. The Committee 
recommendation includes funding for all international 
broadcasting under this account, as requested in the budget. In 
fiscal year 1995, funding was provided separately for 
Broadcasting to Cuba and Radio Free Asia.
    The Committee recommendation includes funds for 
broadcasting operations, associated technical activities and 
administration in accordance with the provisions of H.R. 1561, 
the American Overseas Interests Act of 1995, as passed by the 
House. The one difference with the level of authorizations 
relates to Radio Free Asia. The post-rescission level of 
$5,000,000 appropriated in fiscal year 1995 remains unobligated 
and unspent. As a result, the Committee recommends a new 
appropriation of $5,000,000, to remain available until 
expended, resulting in a total of $10,000,000 to be available 
should the new Broadcasting Board of Governors be appointed and 
confirmed, and a decision to proceed with Radio Free Asia be 
made.
    The Committee has provided all funding for international 
broadcasting under one heading, because fiscal year 1996 is the 
first year of operation of the new administrative structure for 
international broadcasting, authorized by the United States 
International Broadcasting Act of 1994. Under this new set-up, 
there will be one board, the Broadcasting Board of Governors 
(BBG), in charge of all broadcasting activities, and one 
bureau, the International Broadcasting Bureau, to carry out all 
non-military international broadcasting activities, with the 
exception of RFE/RL, which will operate separately under the 
supervision of the BBG. The unified appropriation corresponds 
to the unified administrative structure. This action brings to 
a conclusion a multi-year reorganization effort that has 
resulted in the downsizing of international broadcasting, the 
collaboration of the different broadcasting services to end 
duplication and to centralize support services, the move of 
RFE/RL from Munich to Prague, and savings on the order of $400 
million over the period from fiscal year 1994 to fiscal year 
1997.
    The bill language provides: (1) that $5,000,000 of the 
funds shall remain available until expended; (2) that not to 
exceed $90,000 may be used for official receptions and 
representation in the U.S. and abroad; (3) that $250,000 in 
authorized fees can remain available until expended; and (4) 
authority to use funds for broadcasting to Cuba for facilities 
as well as operations, as has been provided in the past.
    The reductions for international broadcasting are large and 
far-reaching. For RFE/RL, funding cannot exceed $75,000,000 in 
fiscal year 1996, as provided in the 1994 Act, compared with a 
comparable funding level of $193,183,000 in fiscal year 1995. 
For Voice of America (VOA), the recommendation could mean a 
reduction of at least 400 personnel, and the possible cessation 
of broadcasting in as many as 20 languages. These reductions 
come on top of the major reorganization/downsizing that 
occurred because of the 1994 Act, which has resulted in 
staffing reductions of 900 at RFE/RL and 350 at VOA.
    In the fiscal year 1995 appropriations bill, $5,000,000 was 
provided for continuation and enhancement of VOA's China Focus 
Program and other international broadcasting operations to 
Asia. The Committee intends that no less than $5,000,000 be 
available for this purpose from the amounts made available 
under this heading, and that these amounts can be spent either 
to enhance VOA's Asian broadcasting, or for a pilot project for 
freedom broadcasting to Asia, whichever is more likely to reach 
the widest audience within the shortest period of time.
    The Committee expects that it will be notified of the final 
distribution of funding among the activities under this account 
pursuant to the normal reprogramming procedures.

                           Radio Construction

     The bill includes $70,164,000 in new budget authority for 
the Radio Construction account for fiscal year 1996. This 
amount is $15,755,000 less than the budget request, and is 
$15,150,000 less than the level provided in fiscal year 1995 
prior to the pending rescission. The amount recommended will 
provide for maintenance, improvements, replacements and 
repairs; satellite and terrestrial program feeds; engineering 
support activities and broadcast facility leases and land 
rentals.
    The recommendation reflects a reduction in the amount 
provided for the construction of the Tinian transmitter to the 
level required for the initial year construction costs, with 
the balance of the reduction to be derived from Maintenance, 
Improvements, Replacements and Repairs activities.
    The Committee is aware of the high cost of the lease for 
the Wertachtel transmitters, and directs USIA to examine the 
possibility of alternative, less-costly transmitter options, 
together with any costs associated with ending the lease, and 
to provide its recommendation to the Committee on whether to 
continue this lease.

                            Radio Free Asia

     Funding for Radio Free Asia is considered under the 
International Broadcasting Operations account, as requested in 
the fiscal year 1996 budget.

                          Broadcasting To Cuba

     Funding for Broadcasting to Cuba is considered under the 
International Broadcasting Operations account, as requested in 
the fiscal year 1996 budget

                            East-West Center

     The Committee does not recommend funding for maintaining 
and operating the East-West Center. The budget contained a 
request of $20,000,000, and in fiscal year 1995, $24,500,000 
was provided.
     Because of extreme budget constraints, the Committee 
cannot recommend continued funding for this sole-source 
appropriation to a non-governmental organization affiliated 
with a university.
    The Center started receiving a direct subsidy from the 
Federal government in fiscal year 1961. Over the past nine 
years, the Federal government has provided $204,430,000 for its 
operations.
    The largest item in the Center's budget is Program 
Direction and Administration, which in fiscal year 1995 
accounted for 27 percent of the appropriation. The Center 
employs 323 full-time staff. The second largest item is for 
Education and Training, which in fiscal year 1995 accounted for 
21 percent of the appropriation. About half of that is for 
student scholarships which cover in full or in part student 
stipends, insurance premiums, housing, travel, book allowances, 
and University of Hawaii tuition. The third largest item is for 
Centerwide Programs, which in fiscal year 1995 accounted for 12 
percent of the appropriation. This activity includes 
publications, briefings, conferences, seminars and other 
outreach activities, as well as a Hawaii community relations 
program. The Center also carries on activities in the areas of 
environment, population, international economics and politics, 
resources programs--energy and minerals, cultural studies, 
communications and journalism, and Pacific Islands development.
    According to the budget justification, the work of the 
Center is based on four fundamental premises--the intertwining 
of issues confronting the region, the importance of 
understanding the cultural context, the utility of cooperative 
research involving Asians, Pacific Islanders and Americans, and 
the need and opportunity for the United States to learn from 
Asia and the Pacific Islands.
    In fiscal year 1994, the Center received $3,291,000 in 
other Federal grants and received $7,853,000 in private 
funding, so it should be possible to continue the core 
functions of the Center without this funding.

                           North/South Center

     The Committee does not recommend funding for continued 
support of the operations of the North/South Center. The budget 
contained a request of $1,000,000, as final-year phase-out 
funding, and in fiscal year 1995, $4,000,000 was provided.
    Because of extreme budget constraints, the Committee cannot 
recommend continued funding for this sole-source appropriation 
to a non-governmental organization affiliated with a 
university.
    The Center started receiving a direct subsidy from the 
Federal government in 1991. Since that time the Federal 
government has provided $35,400,000 for its operations. Prior 
to 1991, the Center operated on private funding and competed 
for, and received, project-specific Federal grants.
    The discontinuation of Federal funds does not necessarily 
mean the dissolution of the Center. The North/South Center can 
solicit private donations and compete for Federal grants 
available to support its programs and research as it did prior 
to 1991.

                    National Endowment For Democracy

     The Committee recommends $28,000,000 for the National 
Endowment for Democracy for fiscal year 1996, a reduction of 
$6,000,000 from the budget request and the level provided in 
fiscal year 1995.
     The National Endowment for Democracy is a private, non-
profit corporation established to strengthen the development of 
democratic institutions and processes internationally, 
including activities which promote individual rights and 
freedom through private-sector initiatives, training, and other 
activities. To carry out these objectives, the Endowment 
develops and funds programs in five substantive areas: (1) 
pluralism; (2) democratic governments and political processes; 
(3) education, culture, and communications; (4) research; and 
(5) international cooperation. The Endowment does not carry out 
programs directly, but provides funding for projects which are 
determined to be in the national interest of the United States 
and which are administered by private organizations and groups.

                        TITLE V--RELATED AGENCIES

                      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

                        Maritime Administration

    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$116,600,000 in new budget authority, plus an additional 
$162,610,000 for liquidation of contract authority, for the 
Maritime Administration for fiscal year 1996, as described 
below:

                    Operating-Differential Subsidies

            (Appropriation to Liquidate Contract Authority)

     The Committee recommends $162,610,000 for payment of 
obligations incurred for operating-differential subsidies of 
American flag vessels. This amount is the full request, and 
represents a decrease of $51,746,000 below the amount made 
available for the program in fiscal year 1995. This amount does 
not score against the Committee's 602(b) allocation for budget 
authority or outlays.

                       Maritime Security Program

     The Committee recommends no funding for the proposed new 
Maritime Security Program, which is not yet authorized. The 
Committee is aware of the support for this program, and will 
reconsider funding for the program should the proposed 
authorization become law. The budget request included 
$175,000,000 for this new program.

                        Operations And Training

     The Committee recommends an appropriation of $64,600,000 
to fund programs under the Operations and Training account for 
the Maritime Administration (MARAD). This amount is a reduction 
of $17,050,000 from the budget request and is a decrease of 
$11,487,000 below the amount appropriated for the current 
fiscal year.
     The Committee recommendation includes $31,000,000 for the 
operation and maintenance of the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, 
$2,300,000 for direct and student incentive payments at the 
State maritime schools, and $1,400,000 for additional training. 
The remaining $29,900,000 is provided for the MARAD operating 
program and general administration. No funds are provided in 
fiscal year 1996 for the MARAD research and development 
program. The Committee believes that the total amount provided 
under this account is appropriate given the overall funding 
constraints for this bill.
     The Committee recommends language included in previous 
years' appropriations acts providing that funds derived from 
the sale or disposal of National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF) 
may be used for training and other costs at the U.S. Merchant 
Marine Academy and the State maritime academies.

                          Ready Reserve Force

     The accompanying bill includes no funds for the Ready 
Reserve Force (RRF) for fiscal year 1996. As proposed in the 
budget request, the funding for this account is being 
transferred to the Department of Defense.

                    Maritime Guaranteed Loan Program

    The Committee has included a total of $52,000,000 in the 
bill for the Maritime Guaranteed Loan (Title XI) Program. This 
amount is equal to the budget request, and is an increase of 
$25,000,000 above the amount provided to MARAD for fiscal year 
1995. An additional $25,000,000 was provided for this program 
in fiscal year 1995 under the Department of Defense 
appropriation act. The bill also includes a total program 
limitation of $1,000,000,000. This amount assumes enactment of 
proposed fee legislation to be addressed in the pending 
authorization bill.
     The amount provided includes $48,000,000 in subsidies for 
the guaranteed loan program, which will provide a total program 
level of approximately $1,000,000,000, and $4,000,000 for 
administrative expenses related to this program. The amount 
provided for administrative expenses may be transferred to and 
merged with appropriations for MARAD operations and training to 
cover the common overhead expenses associated with maritime 
guaranteed loans.

                       Administrative Provisions

     The bill includes several administrative provisions 
involving Government property controlled by MARAD, the 
accounting for certain funds received by MARAD, and a 
prohibition on obligations from the MARAD construction fund. 
These provisions have been carried in appropriations acts for 
the Maritime Administration for several years.
      Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad

                         Salaries And Expenses

     The Committee recommends $206,000 for the expenses of the 
Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad. 
This amount reflects the same level of funding for the 
Commission as provided in fiscal year 1995, and is $6,000 below 
the budget request. The recommendation will allow the 
Commission to fund its administrative expenses through 
appropriated funds while relying on privately donated funds for 
the actual purchase and restoration of property.
     The purpose of the Commission is to encourage the 
preservation of cemeteries, monuments, and historic buildings 
associated with the foreign heritage of the American people.

                       Commission on Civil Rights

                          Salaries And Expenses

     The Committee recommends an appropriation of $8,500,000 
for the Salaries and Expenses of the Commission on Civil 
Rights. The amount recommended is $2,900,000 less than the 
budget request and $500,000 less than the current year 
appropriation.
     The Committee recommends bill language which provides (1) 
$50,000 to employ consultants; (2) a prohibition against 
reimbursing commissioners for more than 75 billable days with 
the exception of the chairman who is permitted 125 billable 
days; and (3) a limitation of four full-time positions under 
schedule C of the Excepted Service exclusive of one special 
assistant for each commissioner.
    While the Commission has stated that their independence and 
objectivity in conducting fact-finding projects and research 
could be compromised by augmenting their resources with 
interagency details and cooperative agreements, the Committee 
believes that this is an appropriate use of resources and 
recognizes that other independent commissions, such as the 
Commission on Immigration Reform, utilize these types of 
agreements to address their workload. The Committee recommends 
that the Commission explore with the authorizing committee any 
changes necessary to existing authorizations to allow for these 
types of agreements. In light of budget constraints, this is a 
more than appropriate way to handle the workload requirements 
of the Commission, rather than requesting more resources. In 
addition, the Committee suggests that the Commission reexamine 
the proposals for research it plans in 1996 to ensure that 
other independent Commissions are not conducting similar 
research. The Committee notes that the Commission intends to 
conduct a study on the role of the Federal government in 
fostering naturalization and that the Commission on Immigration 
Reform will also be reviewing naturalization-related issues.
    The Committee is displeased with the manner in which the 
recent report entitled Funding Federal Civil Rights Enforcement 
was issued by the Commission. The Committee understands that 
the report was published prematurely and does not represent a 
majority or consensus of the Commission. In its hearing before 
the Committee on April 4, 1995, the Chairperson stressed that 
the Commission is an independent bipartisan Commission. In 
light of the fact that three Commissioners were apparently 
denied a proper opportunity to vote on this report, the 
Commission's actions appear to speak louder than its words.

                    Commission on Immigration Reform

                         Salaries And Expenses

     The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,877,000 
for fiscal year 1996 for the Commission on Immigration Reform, 
which is an increase of $483,000 above the total amount 
available to the Commission for fiscal year 1995 and is 
$500,000 below the budget request.
     The Commission's mandate is to review and evaluate the 
impact of U.S. immigration policy and to transmit to the 
Congress a report of its findings and recommendations for 
additional changes that should be made with respect to 
immigration into the United States. The Commission must report 
to the Congress on September 30, 1997.
     The recommendation provides for funds to support salaries 
of the nine Commissioners and the Commission staff; travel to 
hearings and meetings; office expenses; and services to support 
Commission meetings, hearings and research activities.

            Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe

                          Salaries And Expenses

     The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,090,000 
for the Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe 
(CSCE), a freeze at the fiscal year 1995 level, and $32,000 
below the request.
     The Commission was established in 1976 to monitor 
compliance with the final act of the Conference on Security and 
Cooperation in Europe with particular regard to provisions 
dealing with humanitarian affairs.
    The Committee requests the CSCE to prepare an analysis of 
the strengths and weaknesses of the structure of the 
Organization on Security and Cooperation in Europe and 
ascertain the feasibility of that structure in other geographic 
regions, including the Asia/Pacific region.

                     Competitiveness Policy Council

                         Salaries And Expenses

     The Committee recommends that no funds be provided for the 
Competitiveness Policy Council. The Council requested $503,000 
for fiscal year 1996 and was funded at $1,000,000 for fiscal 
year 1995. The Committee understands that carryover balances 
exceeding $800,000 will be available in fiscal year 1996, and 
intends that these funds be used for the orderly termination of 
the Council.
    The Competitiveness Policy Council was created for the 
purpose of advising the Federal Government on issues of global 
economic competitiveness.
    The Committee believes the Council is duplicative of other 
private sector organizations, such as the Council on 
Competitiveness, which focus on the same issues as this Council 
without the use of Federal funds. There is no room for 
duplicative programs in this time of severe budget constraints 
and government downsizing.

                 Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

                          Salaries And Expenses

     The Committee recommends $233,000,000 for the Salaries and 
Expenses of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission for 
fiscal year 1996. This amount is $35,000,000 less than the 
request, and is the same amount provided in the current year 
appropriation.
     The bill also includes language included in previous 
appropriations acts allowing: (1) non-monetary awards to 
private citizens; (2) up to $26,500,000 for payments to State 
and local agencies; and (3) up to $2,500 for official reception 
and representation expenses.
    The Committee supports the recent changes adopted by the 
EEOC to use mediation-based alternatives to resolving disputes 
in some cases and to prioritize and categorize charges based on 
new charge handling procedures. The Committee believes that 
these efforts should have a considerable effect on the workload 
of the EEOC and recognizes that the increases proposed for the 
EEOC were requested prior to the implementation of these new 
procedures. In addition, the Committee understands that these 
policies, in addition to changes being reviewed with regard to 
EEOC's relationship with State and local Fair Employment 
Practices Agencies, will substantially improve the agency's 
private sector charge processing systems. The Committee expects 
the EEOC to continue its examination of alternatives to case 
processing in order to decrease its backlog of cases and reduce 
the rate of incoming casework.
                   Federal Communications Commission

                         Salaries And Expenses

     The Committee recommends total budget authority of 
$185,232,000 for the Salaries and Expenses of the Federal 
Communications Commission (FCC) for fiscal year 1996, of which 
$116,400,000 is to be derived from offsetting fee collections. 
This will result in a direct appropriation of $68,832,000, a 
decrease of $38,368,000 below the request. The amount provided 
is equal to the current year appropriation.
     The FCC is an independent agency charged with regulating 
interstate and foreign communications by means of radio, 
television, wire, cable and satellite.
     The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous appropriations acts, which allows: 
(1) up to $600,000 for land and structures; (2) up to $500,000 
for care of grounds and buildings; (3) up to $4,000 for 
official reception and representation expenses; (4) up to 
$300,000 for research and policy studies to remain available 
until September 30, 1997; (5) authority to purchase uniforms 
and acquire vehicles; (6) special counsel fees; (7) for the 
collection of $116,400,000 in section 9 fees; (8) for the sum 
appropriated to be reduced as section 9 fees are collected; (9) 
fees collected in excess of $116,400,000 to be available in 
fiscal year 1997.
     The Committee has not provided requested increases related 
to the cost of relocating the FCC headquarters into 
consolidated new space. The fiscal year 1996 request for these 
costs is $25,100,000, and the FCC anticipates that an 
additional $15,448,000 will be required in fiscal year 1997. 
The Committee's funding allocation will not allow for such 
significant increases for this agency in the current fiscal 
climate. The Committee is also concerned about the extremely 
high cost estimates associated with this proposed relocation, 
particularly the costs associated with systems furniture. 
Should the proposed move take place in accordance with the 
current schedule, the FCC would be required to submit a 
reprogramming of funds under Section 605 of the bill to cover 
the costs of the move.
     The Committee notes that the FCC has conducted a review of 
its activities and functions in an attempt to identify 
opportunities to streamline its operation. The Committee 
expects the Commission to take the necessary steps to carry out 
these recommendations and to report back to the Congress on any 
suggested changes in law that might be necessary to further 
streamline the operations of the agency.
    In a hearing before the Committee on March 22, 1995, the 
Committee encouraged the National Telecommunications and 
Information Administration (NTIA), FCC and Federal law 
enforcement agencies to establish a coordinated plan to 
identify cost issues and spectrum requirements for public 
safety communications. The Committee expects that this effort 
is ongoing and that the FCC will submit a thorough report of 
these requirements to the Committee by no later than March 1, 
1996.

                      Federal Maritime Commission

                         Salaries And Expenses

     The Committee recommends an appropriation of $15,000,000 
for the Salaries and Expenses of the Federal Maritime 
Commission (FMC). The recommended amount is $3,947,000 below 
the budget request, and does not include the fees that were 
proposed by the FMC. The amount is $3,569,000 below the fiscal 
year 1995 appropriation.
    The Committee assumes the phase out of the FMC to begin 
during fiscal year 1996. The Committee has not gone further 
pending future action by the authorizing committee setting 
forth the deregulation of the maritime commerce industry. The 
Committee expects that the FMC will begin closing all field 
offices immediately, and that all field offices will be closed 
no later than March 31, 1996.
    The FMC regulates the waterborne domestic and foreign 
offshore commerce of the United States.

                        Federal Trade Commission

                         Salaries And Expenses

     The Committee recommends total budget (obligational) 
authority of $98,928,000 for the Salaries and Expenses of the 
Federal Trade Commission (FTC) for fiscal year 1996. Of this 
amount, $16,000,000 is to be derived from prior year 
unobligated fee collections, and $48,262,000 is to be derived 
from current year offsetting fee collections from pre-merger 
filing fees under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Act resulting in a net 
direct appropriation of $34,666,000. The recommended budget 
authority freezes the FTC at the current appropriation, and is 
$8,945,000 below the request.
     The mission of the Federal Trade Commission is to enforce 
a variety of Federal antitrust and consumer protection laws. 
Under these laws, the Commission seeks to ensure that the 
nation's markets are competitive, function vigorously and 
efficiently, and are free from undue governmental and private 
restrictions. The Commission also seeks to improve the 
operation of the marketplace by eliminating deceptive and 
unfair practices.
     The Committee recommends bill language, similar to that 
included in previous appropriations acts, which: (1) allows for 
purchase of uniforms and hire of motor vehicles; (2) allows up 
to $2,000 for official reception and representation expenses; 
(3) allows for the collection of fees; (4) allows for the sum 
appropriated to be reduced as fees are collected; (5) allows 
fees in excess of the amount designated in the bill to be 
available in fiscal year 1997, and (6) prohibits the use of 
funds to implement section 151 of the Federal Deposit Insurance 
Corporation Improvements Act of 1991. The Committee has added 
new bill language making funds appropriated from the Treasury 
for the FTC available until expended. This language change is 
necessary to avoid setting up a separate accounting system to 
track appropriated funds versus fee revenue.
    The Committee has been made aware of concerns about the 
FTC's involvement in areas more appropriately addressed by 
States and localities. As the Commission continues its ongoing 
review of antitrust and consumer protection policy and 
regulations, the Committee expects the FTC to identify those 
areas which are more appropriately enforced by the Commission 
and those which States and localities are better situated to 
enforce. The Committee encourages the FTC to conduct this 
review in consultation with the State attorneys general.

               Japan-United States Friendship Commission

                          Salaries And Expenses

     The Committee recommends $1,247,000 for the expenses of 
the Japan-United States Friendship Commission for fiscal year 
1996. This amount reflects the same level of funding provided 
in fiscal year 1995. The bill also provides for an amount of 
Japanese currency not to exceed the equivalent of $1,420,000. 
In accordance with Public Law 94-118, the interest earned on 
the principal in the trust fund is subject to the annual 
appropriations process.
     The Committee intends that the funds provided be used for 
the promotion of scholarly, cultural, and business/economic 
relations between the United States and Japan.

                       Legal Services Corporation

                Payment to the Legal Services Corporation

    The Committee recommendation provides a total of 
$278,000,000 for the Legal Services Corporation, the same level 
as recommended in the House-passed Budget Resolution. This 
amount is a decrease of $162,000,000 below the request, and 
$122,000,000 below the fiscal year 1995 enacted level.
    The Committee recommendation is distributed as follows:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Fiscal year 1995    Recommendation 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Basic field programs..............       $345,898,000       $265,000,000
Supplemental programs:                                                  
    Native American...............          8,867,000                  0
    Migrant.......................         12,759,000                  0
    National support..............          8,109,000                  0
    State support.................          9,373,000                  0
    Supplemental field............          1,274,000                  0
    Regional training centers.....            711,000                  0
    Computer legal research.......            582,000                  0
    Clearinghouse.................            985,000                  0
    Law schools...................            726,000                  0
Administration and oversight:                                           
    Management and administration.         10,716,000          5,000,000
    Inspector general.............          1,000,000          8,000,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee understands that the Corporation has been 
involved in a reimbursable agreement with the Court of Veterans 
Appeals to work with a consortium of veterans service 
organizations to recruit pro bono attorneys to represent 
veterans otherwise unable to obtain legal counsel in the 
appeals before the Court. The Committee supports this 
reimbursable agreement, and expects this agreement to continue 
in fiscal year 1996.
    The Committee wants to ensure that a mechanism exists to 
provide poor individuals with access to the civil justice 
system. The Committee recommendation provides for the 
continuance of funding for direct legal services but at the 
same time eliminates areas of continuing controversy 
surrounding some of the activities of the Corporation and its 
grantees.
    The Committee remains concerned that the Corporation has 
been unauthorized for a number of years. Consequently, each 
year, the Committee has been compelled to take action in the 
appropriations process to ensure Federal funds are spent 
consistent with the program's mission of providing poor 
individuals access to the civil court system. The Committee 
believes a comprehensive review of the entire civil legal 
assistance system is long overdue, and hopes that such a review 
is conducted in the context of the authorization process, 
obviating the need for continued action in the appropriations 
process.
    In the interim, the Committee believes it has a 
responsibility to ensure that such funding is spent in 
accordance with the program's mission. Therefore, in keeping 
with past practices, the Committee has included numerous 
administrative provisions on the allowable use of the funds 
provided, in many cases significantly strengthening current 
provisions, and in all cases applying the provisions to Federal 
and non-Federal funds used by a grantee. These provisions 
govern funds for the Corporation, pending final authorization 
action.

         administrative provisions--legal services corporation

    The Committee has included language in Section 507, 
providing that, upon enactment of authorization for the 
Corporation, such authorization will supersede all 
contradictory provisions in this act.
    In Section 501, the Committee recommendation provides for 
funding for basic field programs to be distributed by 
geographic area, with such areas to be determined by the 
Corporation. Funding among the geographic areas will be 
distributed by a formula based on the number of poor people 
residing in each area.
    The Committee recommendation includes numerous requirements 
which must be met by the Corporation and its grantees. These 
requirements fall into the following categories: (1) program 
quality and effectiveness; (2) program priorities; and (3) 
accountability.
    Program Quality and Effectiveness.--The Committee includes 
several provisions designed to ensure that the highest quality 
of legal services is provided with funding under this Act. In 
Section 503 the Committee recommendation requires that all 
funds provided to the Corporation for the direct delivery of 
legal services will be awarded through a competitive selection 
system. Further, in Section 502 the Committee allows state and 
local governments, as well as substate and regional councils of 
government, an opportunity to compete to become service 
providers. The Committee believes that the competitive award of 
grantees, open to a wide array of potential service providers, 
will guarantee that the highest quality, most efficient 
programs are funded with limited federal dollars.
    Further, in Section 504(9) the Committee includes 
requirements that all grantees receiving federal funds must 
establish and follow locally-decided priorities to meet the 
unique legal needs of their communities and has directed the 
Corporation to establish guidelines to assist local programs in 
establishing these priorities. The Committee notes that in a 
time of increasing budgetary constraints, it is important that 
all programs prioritize to ensure that they are able to meet 
the most pressing needs of the greatest number of their 
potential clients.
    In Section 504(8), the Committee recommendation requires 
federally funded programs to name their clients and keep a 
record of the facts of the case on file. The Committee believes 
this is an important tool to ensure that programs are meeting 
the priorities and goals of their programs in the most 
efficient and effective manner.
    Program Priorities.--The Committee recommendation includes 
numerous terms and conditions which a potential grantee must 
meet in order to receive Federal funding. The Committee notes 
that Federal grants and contracts are voluntary agreements. It 
is both the right and the responsibility of the Congress to 
decide what programs and activities will be supported by 
Federal funds. Therefore, the Committee has included numerous 
terms and conditions which target scarce resources to programs 
whose mission is to provide basic legal assistance to the poor.
    The Committee understands that advocacy on behalf of poor 
individuals for social and political change is an important 
function in a democratic society. However, the Committee does 
not believe such advocacy is an appropriate use of Federal 
funds. The Committee notes that there are hundreds of private 
organizations which can and do fulfill this advocacy role. The 
Committee notes that any funding devoted to advocacy is funding 
taken away from basic legal assistance.
    The Committee recommendation requires that a grantee 
receiving Federal funding must agree not to engage or 
participate in: (1) redistricting activities or litigation 
(Section 504(1)); (2) actions in an attempt to lobby or 
influence any legislative or rulemaking activities, or 
interfere in oversight of the Corporation or its grantees 
(Section 504(2)-(6)); (3) class action litigation against a 
Federal, state, or local government (Section 504(7)); (4) 
political demonstrations, strikes, or union organizing 
activities (Section 504(12)); (5) abortion-related activities 
or litigation (Section 504(15)); (6) activities or litigation 
to influence welfare reform initiatives (Section 504)16)); (7) 
representation of illegal aliens (Section 504(11)); or (8) 
representation of Federal, state, or local prisoners in civil 
litigation (Section 504(16)).
    In addition, Section 504(18) of the Committee 
recommendation prohibits funding to grantees who represent a 
public housing tenant facing an eviction proceeding brought by 
a public housing authority if that tenant has been formally 
charged by a prosecuting entity with the illegal sale or 
distribution of drugs. The Committee notes that the 
Corporation's Board of Directors adopted a similar resolution, 
governing Federal funds, recently. The Committee commends the 
Corporation's initiative and believes that it is inappropriate 
for Federal funding to support, either directly or indirectly, 
activities which impede the ability of public housing 
authorities to protect their residents from the continuing 
scourge of drug activity.
    The Committee recommendation also requires that a grantee 
receiving Federal funding must refrain from: (1) accepting fee-
generating cases (Section 504(13)); (2) collecting attorneys 
fees (Section 504(14)); or (3) soliciting clients (Section 
504(19)). The Committee believes that Federally-funded legal 
aid programs should serve as a catalyst, not a replacement, for 
private bar activity. The Committee believes that cases which 
provide an opportunity for the collection of attorneys fees can 
be serviced by the private bar. Further, the Committee notes 
that Corporation grantees are supported by public resources in 
order to provide free legal aid to their clients. Therefore, 
the Committee believes it is inappropriate for attorneys fees 
to be collected for free legal aid. Finally, the Committee 
finds it unacceptable for any Federally-funded legal aid 
program to solicit clients at a time when the Corporation and 
the legal aid community continue to testify that they must turn 
eligible clients away due to lack of resources.
    The Committee notes that previous appropriations acts have 
imposed many similar restrictions on a grantee's Federal funds, 
as these are often highly political and controversial 
activities which do not serve the core function of providing 
basic legal representation to poor individuals. The Committee 
recommendation significantly strengthens current restrictions 
and expands them to encompass all funding received by a grantee 
by restricting a Federal grant from being made to an entity 
that engages in these restricted activities. The Committee 
believes that it is inappropriate for Federal resources to be 
used to support directly or indirectly these activities. Such 
activities only further drain much needed resources from the 
program's core mission--to provide basic legal aid to poor 
individuals. Further, the Committee must note that there are 
hundreds of private advocacy and special interest organizations 
which have the expertise, the resources, and the interest in 
pursuing these types of issues.
    Accountability.--The Committee recommendation also includes 
several provisions to strengthen financial management and 
accountability over legal aid programs. Section 504(10) 
requires that all grantees institute timekeeping. Further, all 
legal aid programs funded will be subject to financial and 
compliance audits. Bill language requires that these audits 
will be conducted by an independent, private accounting firm, 
in accordance with audit guidelines established by Office of 
Management and Budget Circular A-133. Further, section 504(20) 
requires all programs receiving Federal funds to comply with 
Federal statutes and regulations governing waste, fraud, and 
abuse of Federal funds. The Committee believes that these 
actions will provide invaluable tools to evaluate and ensure 
program effectiveness and accountability.
    The Committee recommendation also includes in section 505 a 
prohibition against the use of Federal funds to be used to pay 
membership dues or fees to advocacy or professional membership 
organizations. The Committee believes such use of Federal tax 
dollars is inappropriate and does nothing to serve the needs of 
indigent clients.
    Finally, section 506 of the Committee recommendation 
prohibits an organization from using its Federal funds to sue 
the Corporation. Again, the Committee notes that Federal 
funding is provided to represent individual poor people in 
seeking redress through the civil court system. Any use of 
scarce federal dollars to the contrary does not further this 
goal.
                        Marine Mammal Commission

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for the Marine Mammal 
Commission in fiscal year 1996. This is $425,000 below the 
request, and $384,000 below the current appropriation.
    The Committee believes that the amount provided is 
sufficient for the Marine Mammal Commission to carry out its 
core mission. The Committee further believes that the funding 
level provided will require the Marine Mammal Commission to 
achieve its goals more efficiently, by more carefully 
scrutinizing its expenditures in such areas as personnel, 
travel, and contractual services.
    The Marine Mammal Commission's statutory responsibilities 
include the review of programs impacting endangered and 
threatened marine species, the compilation and evaluation of 
data needed to make reliable marine stock determinations, the 
development of sound State management strategies, and the 
improvement of methods and procedures for collecting and 
analyzing marine data.

           Martin Luther King, Jr. Federal Holiday Commission

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends $250,000 for the Martin Luther 
King, Jr. Federal Holiday Commission, which is $100,000 below 
the request and $50,000 below the current level of funding. The 
Commission's Operations Committee presented a motion which was 
passed by the Full Commission to sunset the Commission at the 
end of fiscal year 1996. The Committee recommendation will 
allow the Commission to proceed with the funding of activities 
through fiscal year 1996.
    The Commission was established in order to encourage and 
promote appropriate ceremonies and activities throughout the 
United States related to the observance of the Federal legal 
holiday honoring Martin Luther King, Jr., and to provide 
assistance to Federal, State and local governments and to 
private organizations concerning the observance of the holiday.
    The Committee intends that the funds provided be used 
toward programming and any shutdown costs for the Commission. 
The Committee understands that a transition team to carry out 
an orderly sunset of the Commission has been appointed, and 
expects to be kept fully informed of the progress of the 
transition team.

                      Ounce of Prevention Council

    The Committee recommends no appropriation for the Ounce of 
Prevention Council in fiscal year 1996. This is $14,700,000 
below the request, and $1,500,000 below the amount provided to 
the Council in fiscal year 1995. Close-out costs are to be 
funded from carry-over balances available to the Council.
    The Ounce of Prevention Council is intended to have two 
purposes--program coordination and grant-making. The program 
coordination function includes such things as the development 
of a crime prevention program catalogue and the creation of 
strategies for program integration and grant simplification. 
The Committee believes the coordination of prevention programs 
can be accomplished without the creation of another level of 
bureaucracy to carry out these types of activities, which 
cannot be justified within the context of streamlining and 
reinventing government. The Office of Justice Programs 
currently funds the coordination of crime prevention efforts at 
the State and local levels through programs such as the 
National Crime Prevention Council.
    The grant-making function includes grants for summer and 
after-school recreation programs, mentoring, programs assisting 
employability, and outreach programs for at-risk families. 
Grants of this nature can be funded under the Local Law 
Enforcement Block Grant Program provided in the Committee 
recommendation for State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance 
and under Juvenile Justice programs under the Department of 
Justice. Furthermore, the Committee notes that the 
authorization for the Ounce of Prevention Council was repealed 
in H.R. 728, as passed by the House on February 14, 1995.

                   Securities and Exchange Commission

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends a direct appropriation of 
$103,445,000 for the Securities and Exchange Commission, an 
increase of $28,589,000 above the appropriation provided in 
fiscal year 1995. The Administration had proposed an 
appropriation of $342,922,000, to be reduced, upon enactment of 
legislation that would provide for the self-financing of the 
SEC from fees, to zero.
    The Committee assumes an overall operating level of 
$297,405,000, the same level as in fiscal year 1995. This 
figure assumes that $184,293,000 will be available as the 
result of maintaining the section 6(b) registration fees at the 
fiscal year 1995 level. That is a decrease of $7,707,000, the 
result of an expected reduced volume of registrations, based on 
current trends. The figure also assumes that $9,667,000 in 
carryover from fiscal year 1995 will be available, a decrease 
from the $20,882,000 in carryover that was available in fiscal 
year 1995. As a result, just to maintain the operating level of 
the SEC at the fiscal year 1995 level, the Committee has had to 
increase the direct appropriation by $28,589,000.
    The Committee recommends bill language, similar to that 
included in previous appropriations acts, which: (1) allows for 
the rental of space; (2) makes up to $3,000 available for 
official reception and representation expenses; (3) makes up to 
$10,000 available for a permanent secretariat for the 
International Organization of Securities Commissions; (4) makes 
up to $100,000 available for expenses of meetings and 
consultations with foreign governmental and regulatory 
officials; and (5) raises section 6(b) fees from one-fiftieth 
of one percent to one twenty-ninth of one percent and credits 
this fee increase to this account.
    At the Subcommittee's hearing with the SEC, the 
Commission's Chairman stated that the SEC would be conducting 
an audit of all fees to assure that they are being accurately 
assessed and collected. The Committee looks forward to 
reviewing the results of that audit.
    The Committee has worked closely with the House Commerce 
and Ways and Means Committees to assure that the SEC has the 
resources to operate in fiscal year 1996 and avoid a costly 
disruption as occurred at the beginning of fiscal year 1995. 
The Committee will continue to work closely with the 
authorizing committees to assure a long-term solution to the 
SEC's financing.

                     Small Business Administration

    The accompanying bill provides a total of $590,369,000 for 
the five appropriations items of the Small Business 
Administration (SBA). This amount is a reduction of 
$333,058,000 from the fiscal year 1995 enacted amounts, and a 
decrease of $40,537,000 below the total budget request for 
fiscal year 1996. The details for the five SBA appropriation 
accounts are contained in the following paragraphs.

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends $221,247,000 for the Salaries and 
Expenses of the Small Business Administration. This is a 
decrease of $21,584,000 below the budget request and 
$30,257,000 below the amount appropriated for the current 
fiscal year. The amount provided is offset by an additional 
$3,300,000 in fees to be collected from the distribution of 
publications produced by SBA, resulting in an overall 
appropriation of $217,947,000 for this account.
    In addition, $97,000,000 is available for this account from 
the portion of the Business Loans Program account for 
administrative expenses, and $78,000,000 is available from the 
portion of the Disaster Loans Program account for 
administrative expenses. These amounts are to be transferred to 
and merged with the Salaries and Expenses account for a total 
of $396,247,000 available for this account, compared to a total 
request of $423,081,000.
    The Committee recommendation includes requested language 
authorizing $3,500 for official reception and representation 
expenses and language authorizing SBA to charge fees to cover 
the cost of publications, and certain loan servicing 
activities. The language also permits revenues received from 
all such activities to be credited to the Salaries and Expenses 
account to be available for carrying out these purposes without 
further appropriations. The Committee has deleted, as requested 
by SBA, language carried in prior appropriations acts 
prohibiting SBA from charging fees for consulting services 
provided by the Small Business Development Centers (SBDCs). The 
Committee notes that the Department of Commerce's Minority 
Business Development Centers currently charge a nominal fee for 
similar consulting services. The experience of these centers 
has been that such fees have not proven to be a barrier to 
customers seeking these services. Therefore, the Committee 
believes that charging a nominal fee for the valuable 
consulting services provided by the SBDCs is justified, and 
will not prohibit small businesses from receiving these needed 
services.
    The Committee recommendation includes a total of 
$93,919,000 for non-credit initiatives, as follows:

Small business development centers......................     $70,000,000
SCORE...................................................       3,250,000
Women's outreach........................................       2,000,000
Women's Council.........................................         200,000
Microloan technical assistance..........................      12,000,000
Enterprise zone one-stop shops..........................       2,767,000
Export assistance centers...............................       3,202,000
Business information centers............................         500,000

    On May 1, 1995, SBA submitted a proposal to the Congress 
under the second round of the Administration's reinventing 
government initiative (REGO-2). Included in the SBA initiative, 
titled ``Stretching Taxpayer Dollar$'', was the proposal to 
close certain SBA field offices. Based on concerns raised by 
many Members of Congress, the Committee recently disapproved 
most of that proposal, allowing SBA to close post-of-duty 
stations and to realign regional offices but not to close any 
district or branch office at this time. The Committee believes 
that the process used by the SBA to select offices for closure 
was flawed and the timing of the proposal was premature. While 
the funding levels provided in the accompanying bill may 
require further office closure by the SBA, the Committee 
believes that the determination of office closures should be a 
consultative process, with involvement by the House and Senate 
authorization and appropriations committees in determining both 
the appropriate criteria for selecting offices for closure and 
the timing of additional closures or downsizing. The Committee 
notes that changes in SBA's programs may take place as the 
authorizing committees continue their review of small business 
assistance programs. Changes in SBA's programs and 
responsibilities should be the primary factor in determining 
the need to maintain individual offices in the field structure 
as well as at SBA headquarters; the Committee expects that any 
further office realignment will not be proposed until the 
Congress has completed action on legislative changes to the 
SBA's mission.
    The Committee has provided no funds in fiscal year 1996 for 
the SBA Office of Advocacy. This office is supposed to be an 
independent voice for small business. The office is headed by a 
Presidentially-appointed position. The Committee is concerned 
that the Office of Advocacy actually works against the best 
interests of our nation's small business entrepreneurs on 
issues such as health care reform--to expect a Presidential 
appointee to take a position against the Administration is 
unrealistic. The Committee believes that the funds saved by 
closing the Office of Advocacy and abolishing advocacy research 
grants can be better used in other programs that more directly 
serve small businesses.
    The Committee understands that many of the programs and 
activities of the Commerce Department's Minority Business 
Development Agency are duplicative of, or similar to, work done 
by the Small Business Administration. The Committee has 
directed the Commerce Department to work with the SBA to 
develop a plan and a timeline for the elimination of this 
overlap through the merger of activities. The Committee expects 
the SBA to work closely with the Department on the development 
and implementation of this plan.
    The Committee supports increased coordination between the 
various agencies involved in export promotion. In that regard, 
the Committee encourages the Export Assistance Centers 
(operated jointly by the Small Business Administration and the 
Commerce Department's U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service) to 
work closely with Business Information Centers (funded under 
SBA), when located in the same state, to establish a regional 
export strategy for the area's small businesses.

                      Office Of Inspector General

    The Committee recommends $8,750,000 for the Office of 
Inspector General of the Small Business Administration. The 
amount is an increase of $250,000 above the amount provided for 
the current fiscal year, but is a decrease of $450,000 below 
the amount requested.
    The Committee has provided additional resources to the 
Office of Inspector General for additional program review 
activity. The Committee believes that additional efforts in 
this area will assist the Committee in its efforts to ensure 
that Federal programs funded in the Small Business 
Administration are cost effective.

                     Business Loans Program Account

    The Committee recommends $248,710,000 for the Business 
Loans Program Account for subsidies for direct and guaranteed 
business loans, including $97,000,000 for administrative 
expenses related to this account. The amount provided for 
administrative expenses may be transferred to and merged with 
the appropriation for SBA salaries and expenses to cover the 
common overhead expenses associated with business loans.
    As required by the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990, the 
Congress is required to appropriate an amount sufficient to 
cover the estimated losses associated with all direct loan 
obligations and loan guarantee commitments made in fiscal year 
1996, as well as the administrative expenses of the loans. The 
subsidy amounts are estimated on a net present value basis, and 
the administrative expenses are estimated on a cash basis.
    The Committee recommendation includes $5,000,000 for the 
credit subsidy cost of the Small Business Administration's 
direct loan program, instead of $12,428,000 as requested and 
$9,596,000 as provided for fiscal year 1995. The Committee 
notes that the fiscal year 1995 President's Budget proposed 
elimination of the entire direct loan program. The Committee 
recommendation is intended to fund only direct loans under the 
Microloan program. The subsidy amount of $5,000,000 will fund 
an overall program level of approximately $25,000,000. The 
amount provided assumes a phase-out of the direct loan portion 
of the Microloan program as Microloan guarantees are increased.
    The Committee recommendation provides $146,710,000 for the 
business loan guaranty program, instead of $52,535,000 as 
requested and $275,655,000 as provided for fiscal year 1995. 
The amount provided assumes that some of the legislative 
changes proposed as part of the REGO-2 proposal for this 
account will be enacted. The Committee's assumptions for the 
subsidy amounts proposed are provided below.
    7(a) Business loan program: The Committee has included 
subsidy appropriations of $104,500,000 for the 7(a) general 
business loan program, instead of zero as proposed by the 
Administration in its REGO-2 proposal and $196,096,000 as 
provided for fiscal year 1995 (exclusive of carryover). The 
Committee recommendation is based on concerns that enactment of 
proposed legislation to implement changes to this program 
resulting in a zero subsidy may not be realistic. The amount 
provided assumes a .95 percent subsidy rate based on changes in 
the fees paid by borrowers and lenders. Should these fee 
changes be enacted, the subsidy rate of .95 percent will result 
in an overall 7(a) loan program amount of $11,000,000,000. The 
Committee strongly encourages enactment of legislation which 
would allow the lower subsidy rate in order to provide a 
sufficient program level of general business loans in fiscal 
year 1996.
    504 Development Company loans: The Committee recommendation 
provides no new budget authority for the section 504 
development company loan program. This amount, however, assumes 
that legislative proposals bring the subsidy rate to zero for 
this program will be enacted into law. The Committee 
recommendation is that this program level be set at not less 
than $2,500,000,000.
    Small Business Investment Corporation (SBIC) debenture and 
participating securities: The Committee recommendation includes 
a total of $40,510,000. This amount provides $16,410,000 in 
subsidies for SBIC debenture guarantees, which is approximately 
the fiscal year 1995 level, (resulting in a program level of 
$111,000,000) and $24,100,000, the full request, for the SBIC 
participating securities loans (resulting in a program level of 
$270,000,000). These program levels require no changes in 
legislation.
    Microloan Guaranty Program: The recommendation includes 
$1,700,000 in subsidy amounts for guaranteed loans under the 
Microloan program. This will result in a program level of 
$14,000,000. The Committee supports the transition of 
Microloans from a direct loan program to a guarantee program.

                     Disaster Loans Program Account

    The Committee recommends $34,432,000 for the Disaster Loans 
Program Account for loan subsidies and an additional 
$78,000,000 for administrative expenses related to this 
account. The amount provided for administrative expenses may be 
transferred to and merged with the appropriation for SBA 
salaries and expenses to cover the common overhead expenses 
associated with disaster loans.
    The amount provided for loan subsidies is $17,721,000 below 
the fiscal year 1995 level and is equal to the budget request 
for fiscal year 1996 and requires the enactment of proposed 
reform legislation for this program. The amount provided for 
administrative expenses is equal to the current funding level 
for this account, and is a decrease of $2,340,000 below the 
budget request.
    As required by the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990, the 
Congress is required to appropriate an amount sufficient to 
cover the subsidy costs associated with all direct loan 
obligations and loan guarantee commitments made in fiscal year 
1996, as well as the administrative expenses of the loan 
programs. The subsidy amounts are measured on a net present 
value basis, and the administrative expenses are estimated on a 
cash basis.
    The Committee recommends no funding for the disaster loan 
emergency contingency fund, the budget requested $100,000,000, 
and $125,000,000 was provided in fiscal year 1995.
    The Committee recommendation deletes language included in 
prior appropriations acts which prohibited recipients of SBA 
disaster loans to relocate outside the community impacted by 
the disaster. This deletion was proposed in the budget request.

                 Surety Bond Guarantees Revolving Fund

    The accompanying bill provides an appropriation of 
$2,530,000 for additional capital for the Surety Bond 
Guarantees Revolving Fund. This amount is equal to the budget 
request, but is a decrease of $2,839,000 below the amount 
provided for fiscal year 1995. The Committee recommendation is 
based on proposed legislation that will increase fees 
associated with this program; this amount would result in a 
program level of $1,800,000,000 for the Surety Bond Program. 
Without these proposed legislative changes, program reductions 
will be required.
    Under the Surety Bond Guarantees program, the Small 
Business Administration guarantees a portion of the losses 
sustained by a surety company as a result of the issuance of a 
bid, payment, and/or performance bond to a small business 
concern.

                        ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISION

    The Committee recommendation includes an administrative 
provision in the bill language providing the authority to 
transfer funds between the Small Business Administration's 
appropriations accounts. The language provides that no account 
may be decreased by more than 5 percent or increased by more 
than 10 percent. The language also makes the transfers subject 
to the Committee's standard reprogramming procedures.

                        State Justice Institute

                         Salaries And Expenses

    The Committee recommends the elimination of the State 
Justice Institute (SJI) in fiscal year 1996, and therefore does 
not provide $14,150,000 including $600,000 from the Violent 
Crime Reduction Trust Fund, as requested in the budget for this 
program. The amount provided in fiscal year 1995 was 
$13,550,000.
    The mission of SJI is to award grants to improve the 
administration of justice in the State courts. Of the 
$14,150,000 requested, $11,113,000 was requested for grants to 
State judiciaries for demonstration, education and research 
projects on cases such as family violence, substance abuse and 
mass tort litigation. The $600,000 requested from the Violent 
Crime Reduction Trust Fund would allow SJI to fund judicial 
training programs.
    The Committee believes that funding to improve the 
efficiency of State court systems should be supported with 
State resources, and is achievable without the expenditure of 
Federal tax dollars. The Committee also believes that SJI 
provides no actual direct services and notes that the current 
Administration targeted SJI for elimination in fiscal year 
1995. Furthermore, the Committee is aware that there are 
carryover balances of at least $5,000,000 available in fiscal 
year 1996 which should be sufficient to provide for the orderly 
closure of SJI.

                      TITLE VI--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the departments and agencies funded in the accompanying 
bill. Sections 601 through 606 have been included in previous 
Appropriations Acts.
    Section 601 prohibits any appropriation contained in the 
Act from being used for publicity or propaganda purposes not 
authorized by the Congress.
    Section 602 prohibits any appropriation contained in the 
Act from remaining available for obligation beyond the current 
fiscal year unless explicitly provided.
    Section 603 provides that the expenditure for any 
appropriation contained in the Act for any consulting services 
through procurement contracts shall be limited to those 
contracts where such expenditures are a matter of public record 
and available for public inspection except where otherwise 
provided under existing law or under existing Executive Order 
issued pursuant to existing law.
    Section 604 provides that if any provision of the Act or 
the application of such provision to any person or 
circumstances shall be held invalid, the remainder of the Act 
and the application of such provisions to persons or 
circumstances other than those to which it is held invalid 
shall not be affected thereby.
    Section 605 provides for the Committee's policy concerning 
the reprogramming of funds. Section 605(a) prohibits the 
reprogramming of funds which: (1) creates new programs; (2) 
eliminates a program, project, or activity; (3) increases funds 
or personnel by any means for any project or activity for which 
funds have been denied or restricted; (4) relocates offices or 
employees; (5) reorganizes offices, programs, or activities; or 
(6) contracts out or privatizes any function or activity 
presently performed by Federal employees unless the 
Appropriations Committees of both Houses of Congress are 
notified 15 days in advance.
    Section 605(b) prohibits a reprogramming of funds in excess 
of $500,000 or 10 percent, whichever is less, that: (1) 
augments existing programs, projects or activities; (2) reduces 
by 10 percent funding for any existing program, project, or 
activity, or numbers of personnel by 10 percent as approved by 
Congress; or (3) results from any general savings due to a 
reduction in personnel which would result in a change in 
existing programs, activities, or projects as approved by 
Congress unless the Appropriations Committees of both Houses of 
Congress are notified 15 days in advance.
    The Committee has included carryover funds under the 
requirements of section 605 to clarify that agencies must 
follow reprogramming procedures with respect to carryover 
funds.
    Section 606 prohibits funds in the Act from being used for 
construction, repair (other than emergency repair), overhaul, 
conversion, or modernization of vessels of the National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration in shipyards located outside the 
United States.
    Section 607 states the sense of the Congress that all 
equipment and products purchased with funds made available in 
the bill should be American-made, and directs the head of each 
Federal agency to provide a notice describing Congressional 
intent to any entity it provides financial assistance to or 
enters into a contract with.
    Section 608 prohibits funds in the bill from being used to 
implement, administer, or enforce any guidelines of the Equal 
Employment Opportunity Commission covering harassment based on 
religion similar to proposed guidelines published by the EEOC 
in October, 1993.

               Changes in the Application of Existing Law

    Pursuant to Clause 3, rule XXI of the House of 
Representatives, the following statement is submitted 
describing the effect of provisions in the accompanying bill 
which directly or indirectly change the application of existing 
law.
    Language is included for a number of accounts which places 
limitations on representation and reception allowances in order 
to reduce the amount of money that could otherwise be spent on 
these activities.
    The bill also provides that a number of appropriations 
shall remain available for obligation beyond the current fiscal 
year. While these provisions are not specifically authorized 
for all of the items, it is deemed desirable to include such 
language for certain programs in order to provide for orderly 
administration and the effective use of funds.
    On page 2, under Department of Justice, General 
Administration, Salaries and Expenses, a limitation of 
$3,317,000 is provided for the Facilities Program 2000 and a 
limitation of $5,000,000 is included for the management and 
oversight of immigration and naturalization activities, and 
both remain available until expended.
    On pages 2 and 3, under Counterterrorism Fund, funding of 
$26,898,000 is provided under the control and direction of the 
Attorney General to reimburse any Department of Justice 
organization for (1) the costs incurred in reestablishing the 
operational capability of an office or facility which has been 
damaged or destroyed as a result of the bombing of the Alfred 
P. Murrah Federal Building in Oklahoma City or any domestic or 
international terrorist incident, (2) the costs of providing 
support to counter, investigate or prosecute domestic or 
international terrorism, including payment of rewards, and (3) 
the costs of conducting a terrorism threat assessment of 
Federal agencies and their facilities. Language is provided 
that makes these funds available only after the Attorney 
General notifies the Committees on Appropriations of the House 
and Senate in accordance with the reprogramming requirements 
included in section 605 of the accompanying bill.
    On page 3, under Office of Inspector General, a limitation 
of $10,000 is provided to meet unforeseen emergencies of a 
confidential nature. Language is also included which makes the 
appropriation available for the acquisition, lease, 
maintenance, and operation of motor vehicles without regard to 
the general purchase price limitation.
    On pages 3 through 5, under Legal Activities, Salaries and 
Expenses, General Legal Activities, language is included to 
allow activities authorized by title X of the Civil Rights Act 
of 1964, that are currently performed by the Community 
Relations Service, to be performed under this account. In 
addition, a limitation of $20,000 is provided for expenses of 
collecting evidence. Language is also included to permit the 
lease of private or government-owned space in the District of 
Columbia. In addition, a limitation of $10,000,000 is provided 
for litigation support contracts to remain available until 
expended and a limitation of $22,618,000, to remain available 
until expended, is provided for office automation systems. 
Further, language is included that provides a limitation of 
$1,000 to the United States National Central Bureau (INTERPOL) 
for official reception and representation expenses and allows 
the acceptance of gifts for the purpose of hosting the INTERPOL 
regional conference in 1996. In addition, language is included 
which permits up to $4,028,000 to be appropriated from the 
Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund for processing cases 
under the National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act of 1986.
    On pages 5 and 6, under Salaries and Expenses, Antitrust 
Division, language is included to allow $48,262,000 to be 
credited to this appropriation from fees collected for 
premerger notification filings under the Hart-Scott-Rodino 
Antitrust Improvements Act. Further language provides that the 
appropriation shall be reduced by such offsetting collections 
that are received during fiscal year 1996 so as to result in a 
final year 1996 appropriation estimated at not more than 
$20,881,000. Further, language is included that any fees 
received in excess of $48,262,000 in fiscal year 1996 shall 
remain available until expended, but shall not be available for 
obligation until fiscal year 1997. In addition, language is 
included which clarifies that the source of appropriated 
funding for the Division is the General Fund of the U.S. 
Treasury.
    On pages 5 through 7, under Salaries and Expenses, United 
States Attorneys, language is included providing a limitation 
of $2,500,000 to be available until September 30, 1997, for the 
purposes of: (1) providing debt collection training; (2) 
providing services relating to locating debtors and their 
property; (3) paying the costs of sales of property not covered 
by sale proceeds; and (4) paying the costs of processing and 
tracking debts owed to the United States Government. Language 
is also included providing a limitation of $8,000 for official 
reception and representation expenses, and up to $10,000,000 
for automated litigation support contracts and $4,000,000 for 
security equipment to be available until expended.
    On pages 7 and 8, under United States Trustee System Fund, 
language is included that makes deposits to the Fund available 
to pay refunds due depositors. In addition, language is 
included which provides that not to exceed $44,191,000 of 
offsetting collections derived from fees collected shall be 
retained and used for necessary expenses in this appropriation. 
In addition, the language provides that the $101,596,000 
appropriated shall be reduced as such offsetting collections 
are received during fiscal year 1996 so as to result in a final 
fiscal year 1996 appropriation estimated at not more than 
$57,405,000. In addition, language is included which provides 
that any of the aforementioned fees collected in excess of 
$44,191,000 in fiscal year 1996 shall remain available until 
expended, but shall not be available for obligation until 
October 1, 1996.
    On pages 8 and 9, under United States Marshals Service, 
language is included which makes funds available to procure, 
maintain and operate vehicles and aircraft, and which permits 
purchase of vehicles without regard to the general purchase 
price limitation. Language is also included which allows up to 
$6,000 to be available for official reception and 
representation expenses.
    On page 9, under Support of United States Prisoners, 
language is included stating that the appropriation is not 
available for expenses otherwise provided for in appropriations 
available to the Attorney General.
    On pages 9 and 10, under Fees and Expenses of Witnesses, 
language is included which makes funds available for expert 
witnesses, private counsel and per diem. Language is also 
provided making not to exceed $4,750,000 available for 
planning, construction, renovation, maintenance, remodeling, 
and repair of buildings, and the purchase of equipment incident 
thereto for protected witness safe sites. Also, language is 
included which makes not to exceed $1,000,000 available for the 
purchase and maintenance of armored vehicles for transportation 
of protected witnesses, and up to $4,000,000 for a secure 
automated network for protected witnesses.
    On pages 10 and 11, under Payment of Radiation Exposure 
Compensation Trust Fund, language is included that provides an 
advance appropriation for fiscal year 1997 of $16,264,000 for 
payment of claims under the Radiation Exposure Compensation 
Act.
    On page 11, under Interagency Law Enforcement, Interagency 
Crime and Drug Enforcement, language is provided which permits 
the appropriation to be used for intergovernmental agreements 
with State and local law enforcement agencies engaged in the 
investigation and prosecution of individuals involved in 
organized crime drug trafficking. Language is also included 
permitting $50,000,000 to remain available until expended. In 
addition, language is provided that allows the appropriation to 
be used under authorities available to the organizations 
reimbursed from this appropriation. Finally, language is 
provided that permits unobligated balances remaining available 
at the end of the fiscal year to revert to the Attorney General 
for reallocation among participating organizations in the 
succeeding fiscal year, subject to the reprogramming procedures 
described in Section 605 of the accompanying bill.
    On pages 11 through 13, under Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, several provisions are recommended, including 
language which permits the purchase of up to 1,815 passenger 
vehicles for police-type use, of which 1,300 will be for 
replacement only, without regard to the general purchase price 
limitation for the current fiscal year, and which permits the 
procurement, maintenance and operation of aircraft. Language is 
also included to allow up to $70,000 for unforeseen emergencies 
to be expended solely under the certificate of the Attorney 
General. In addition, language is provided which permits not to 
exceed $50,000,000 for automated data processing, 
telecommunications, and technical equipment and $1,000,000 for 
undercover operations to be available until September 30, 1997. 
In addition, language is recommended which permits $14,000,000 
for research and development related to investigative 
activities to remain available until expended. Also, language 
is included under this item permitting not to exceed 
$10,000,000 for contractual or reimbursable agreements with 
State and local law enforcement agencies while engaged in 
cooperative activities related to violent crime, terrorism, 
organized crime and drug investigations. Also language is 
included which provides that $1,500,000 shall be available to 
maintain an independent program office dedicated solely to the 
relocation of the Identification Division and the automation of 
fingerprint identification services. Language is also included 
that makes $50,000,000 for digital telephony available for 
obligation only upon enactment of authorization legislation. 
Finally, a limitation is provided of $45,000 for official 
reception and representation expenses.
    On page 13, language is provided, under the heading 
Construction, for the necessary expenses of the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation to remain available until expended, to 
construct or acquire buildings and sites by purchase, or as 
otherwise authorized by law (including equipment for such 
buildings); conversion and extension of federally-owned 
buildings; and the preliminary planning and design of projects.
    On pages 13 and 14, under Drug Enforcement Administration, 
language is included to allow for up to $70,000 for unforeseen 
emergencies. Language is also included to permit expenses for 
conducting drug education and training programs. Language is 
provided to permit the purchase of not to exceed 1,208 
passenger motor vehicles of which 1,178 are for replacement 
only for police-type use without regard to the purchase price 
limitation for the current fiscal year. Language is also 
included to permit acquisition, lease, maintenance and 
operation of aircraft. In addition, a limitation of $1,800,000 
is included for research and $15,000,000 for transfer to the 
Diversion Control Fee Account is to remain available until 
expended. In addition, the following limitations are included: 
$4,000,000 for purchase of evidence and payments for 
information; $4,000,000 for contracting for ADP and 
telecommunications equipment; and $2,000,000 for technical and 
laboratory equipment and will remain available until September 
30, 1997. Finally, a limitation of $50,000 is provided for 
official reception and representation expenses.
    On pages 14 through 16, under Immigration and 
Naturalization Service, several provisions are recommended, 
including language to allow up to $50,000 for unforeseen 
emergencies. Language is also included to permit the purchase 
of up to 813 passenger motor vehicles for police-type use of 
which 177 are for replacement only without regard to the 
general purchase price limitation for the current fiscal year 
and for the hire of passenger motor vehicles, and to permit the 
procurement, maintenance and operation of aircraft. In 
addition, language is included to permit research related to 
immigration enforcement and which makes $400,000 for research 
available until expended. In addition, language is included 
which limits the amount available for administrative expenses 
to pay any employee overtime pay in excess of $25,000. Language 
is also included which makes available not to exceed 
$10,000,000 for costs associated with the training program for 
basic officer training. Language is also included to allow the 
purchase of uniforms without regard to the general purchase 
price limitation for the current fiscal year. Language is 
included that permits up to $5,000 to be available for official 
reception and representation expenses. Language is also 
included to allow the Attorney General to transfer up to 
$30,000,000 to the Department of Labor and the Social Security 
Administration for programs to verify the immigration status of 
persons seeking employment in the United States. Language is 
also included that prohibits funds appropriated in this Act to 
be used to operate the Border Patrol traffic checkpoints 
located in San Clemente, California, at interstate highway 5 
and in Temecula, California, at interstate highway 15.
    On pages 16 through 18, several items are recommended under 
Federal Prison System, Salaries and Expenses, including 
language to permit the purchase of not to exceed 853 law 
enforcement and passenger motor vehicles of which 559 are for 
replacement only, and the hire of law enforcement and passenger 
motor vehicles. Language is also included allowing for the 
provision of technical assistance and advice on corrections-
related issues to foreign governments. In addition, language is 
included to permit the transfer to the Health Resources and 
Services Administration of such amounts as may be necessary for 
medical relief for inmates. Language is also included that 
permits the Director of the Federal Prison System to enter into 
contracts with a fiscal agent/fiscal intermediary claims 
processor to determine the amounts payable to persons who 
furnish health services to inmates. Also, language is provided 
that uniforms may be purchased without regard to the general 
purchase price limitation for the current fiscal year. In 
addition, a limitation of $6,000 is provided for official 
reception and representation expenses. Language is included 
that not to exceed $50,000,000 for the activation of new 
facilities shall remain available until September 30, 1997. In 
addition, language is included which allows for up to 
$20,000,000 for contract confinement expenses for the care and 
security of Cuban and Haitian entrants to remain available 
until expended.
    On pages 18 and 19, several items are recommended under 
Buildings and Facilities, including language making the 
appropriation available for leasing the Oklahoma City Airport 
Trust Facility and for purchase and acquisition of facilities 
and remodeling and equipping of such facilities for penal and 
correctional use, including all necessary expenses incident 
thereto by contract or force account. In addition, language is 
included which makes not to exceed $14,074,000 available to 
construct areas for inmate work programs and permits labor of 
United States prisoners to be used for work performed under 
this appropriation. Further, language is included that permits 
up to 10 percent of the funds appropriated to this account in 
the accompanying bill or any other Act to be transferred to the 
Salaries and Expenses account of the Federal Prison System upon 
notification by the Attorney General to the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees. Finally, language is included, which 
makes up to $22,351,000 available for renovation and 
construction of United States Marshals Service prisoner holding 
facilities.
    On page 19, under Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, 
language is included permitting the Federal Prison Industries, 
Incorporated, to make such expenditures within the limits of 
funds and borrowing authority available and in accord with the 
law and to make such contracts and commitments without regard 
to fiscal year limitations as provided by section 9104 of title 
31, United States Code, as may be necessary in carrying out the 
program set forth in the budget for the current fiscal year. 
Language is also included permitting the purchase of not to 
exceed five passenger motor vehicles, for replacement only, and 
hire of passenger motor vehicles.
    On pages 19 and 20, under Limitation on Administrative 
Expenses, Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated, language is 
included permitting the funds for administrative expenses and 
for services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109 to be computed on 
an accrual basis to be determined in accordance with the 
corporation's current prescribed accounting system. The 
language further provides that such amounts shall be exclusive 
of depreciation, payment of claims, and expenditures which the 
said accounting system requires to be capitalized or charged to 
cost of commodities acquired or produced, including selling and 
shipping expenses and expenses in connection with acquisition, 
construction, operation, maintenance, improvement, protection, 
or disposition of facilities and other property belonging to 
the Corporation or in which it has an interest.
    On pages 20 and 21, under Office of Justice Programs, 
Violent Crime Reduction Programs, Justice Assistance, language 
is included allowing outstanding balances for the Court 
Appointed Special Advocate Program, the Child Abuse Training 
Programs for Judicial Personnel and Practitioners, grants to 
Combat Violence Against Women and the Missing Alzheimer's 
Disease Patient Alert Program, now provided under the Violent 
Crime Reduction Trust Fund, to be merged with this account in 
order to simplify administration of these grants.
    On page 22, under State and Local Law Enforcement 
Assistance, language is included allowing outstanding balances 
of amounts appropriated prior to fiscal year 1995, for 
discretionary grants under the Edward Byrne Memorial State and 
Local Law Enforcement Assistance Program, to be merged with 
this account in order to simplify administration of these 
grants.
    On pages 22, 23 and 24, under Violent Crime Reduction 
Programs, State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance, language 
is provided that makes $2,000,000,000 available for Local Law 
Enforcement Block Grants, pursuant to H.R. 728 as passed by the 
House of Representatives on February 14, 1995. Language is also 
included that makes $500,000,000 available for Truth-in-
Sentencing Grants pursuant to section 101 of H.R. 667 as passed 
by the House of Representatives on February 10, 1995 and limits 
to $200,000,000 the amount available for payments to States for 
the incarceration of criminal aliens from this grant program. 
In addition, language is provided that makes funds available 
under formula grants from the Edward Byrne Memorial Grant 
Program to be available for programs to assist States in the 
litigation processing of death penalty Federal habeas corpus 
petitions. Language is also provided that allows outstanding 
balances from prior years of programs appropriated under this 
account, to be merged with this account in order to simplify 
administration of these grants.
    On pages 24 and 25, under Weed and Seed Program Fund, 
language is included which provides $13,500,000 of the amounts 
for this program to be derived from discretionary grants 
provided under the Edward Byrne Memorial State and Local Law 
Enforcement Assistance Programs and $10,000,000 to be derived 
from discretionary grants provided under part C of title II of 
the Juvenile Justice Delinquency Prevention Act. In addition, 
language is provided which makes the amounts available for 
intergovernmental agreements, including grants, cooperative 
agreements, and contracts, with State and local law enforcement 
agencies engaged in the investigation and prosecution of 
violent crimes and drug offenses in ``Weed and Seed'' 
designated communities and for either reimbursements or 
transfers to appropriation accounts of the Department of 
Justice and other Federal agencies which shall be specified by 
the Attorney General to execute the ``Weed and Seed'' program 
strategy upon notification by the Attorney General to the House 
and Senate Appropriations Committees.
    On pages 26 and 27, under Juvenile Justice Programs, 
language is included that allows outstanding balances from 
amounts appropriated prior to fiscal year 1995 for programs 
under this account, to be merged with this account in order to 
simplify administration of these grants.
    On page 27, under General Provisions--Department of 
Justice, section 101 provides a limitation of $45,000 from 
funds appropriated to the Department of Justice for official 
reception and representation expenses.
    On pages 27 and 28, under section 102, language is provided 
that maintains authorities contained in Public Law 96-132, 
``The Department of Justice Appropriation Authorization Act, 
fiscal year 1980'' until the termination date of this Act or 
until the effective date of a Department of Justice 
Appropriations Authorization Act, whichever is earlier.
    On page 28 under Section 103, language is included which 
prohibits funds appropriated for the Department of Justice to 
pay for an abortion, except when the life of the mother would 
be endangered if the fetus were carried to term, or in the case 
of rape. The language also provides that should this 
prohibition be declared unconstitutional by a court of 
competent jurisdiction, this section shall be null and void.
    On page 28, under section 104, language is included which 
prohibits funds appropriated for the Department of Justice to 
require any person to perform or facilitate in any way the 
performance of any abortion.
    On page 28, under section 105, language is included which 
allows the Director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons to provide 
necessary escort services for female inmates who request 
abortion services outside a Federal prison facility.
    On pages 28 and 29, under section 106, language is included 
which would permit up to $10,000,000 of funds appropriated to 
the Department of Justice to be available for rewards to 
individuals who furnish information regarding acts of terrorism 
against a United States person or property at levels not to 
exceed $2,000,000.
    On page 29, under section 107, language is provided that 
permits up to 5 percent of any appropriation made available for 
the current fiscal year for the Justice Department, including 
those derived from the Violent Crime Reduction Trust Fund, to 
be transferred between such appropriations, but no such 
appropriation shall be increased or decreased by more than 5 
percent by any such transfer. The language also provides that 
this section shall not apply to the appropriation made in the 
bill for the Office of Justice Programs, ``Justice 
Assistance.'' Further, the language provides that any transfer 
made pursuant to this section shall be treated as a 
reprogramming of funds under section 605 of the accompanying 
bill.
    On pages 29 and 30, under section 108, language is included 
which provides permanent authority for the investment of the 
amounts in the Federal Prison System's Commissary Fund, which 
are not needed for operations.
    On page 30, under section 109, language is included which 
allows the excess unobligated balances remaining in the 
Department of Justice Assets Forfeiture Fund on September 30, 
1995 to be available to the Attorney General, without fiscal 
year limitation, for any Federal law enforcement, litigative/
prosecutive, and correctional activities, or any other 
authorized purpose of the Department of Justice, subject to 
notification by the Attorney General to the Appropriations 
Committees of the House and Senate.
    On pages 30 and 31, under section 110, language is included 
which prohibits the transfer of funds appropriated to the 
Department of Justice, other than the transfer of funds 
authorized in this or previous or subsequent appropriations 
Acts for the Department of Justice, and prohibits the control 
of these funds by any means other than an apportionment issued 
by the Office of Management and Budget or an allotment advice 
issued by the Department of Justice.
    On pages 30 and 31, under section 111, language is provided 
that extends the quarterly fee payments for debtors under 
Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code to include the period from 
when a reorganization plan is confirmed by the Bankruptcy Court 
until the case is converted or dismissed. In addition, language 
is included that deposits all of the fees collected under this 
change, as offsetting collections to the appropriation of the 
United States Trustee System Fund.
    On pages 31 and 32, under section 112, language is provided 
that continues certain authorities for undercover operations of 
the Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Drug Enforcement 
Administration, carried in previous appropriations acts, 
through fiscal year 1996.
    On page 31, under section 113, language is provided that 
allows fees currently collected by the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation for the processing of fingerprint identification 
records and name checks for non-criminal justice, non-law 
enforcement employment and licensing purposes and are available 
to defray expenses for the automation of fingerprint 
identification, to also be available to defray expenses for 
criminal justice information services and associated costs.
    On page 32 under the Office of the United States Trade 
Representative, language is included which permits $2,500,000 
of the appropriation to remain available until expended. 
Language is also included providing a limitation of $98,000 for 
official reception and representation expenses.
     On page 33, under the International Trade Commission, 
language is included recommending a ceiling of $2,500 for 
official reception and representation expenses. In addition, 
language is included which makes funding available until 
expended.
    On pages 33 and 34, under International Trade 
Administration, ``Operations and Administration'', language is 
provided which permits the appropriation to be used for trade 
promotion activities abroad without regard to the provisions of 
44 U.S.C. 3702 and 3703 including expenses of grants and 
cooperative agreements for the purpose of promoting exports of 
U.S. firms. The language also permits the appropriation to be 
used for full medical coverage for dependent members of 
immediate families of employees stationed overseas and 
employees temporarily posted overseas, as well as for travel 
and transportation of employees of the United States and 
Foreign Commercial Service between two points abroad without 
regard to 49 U.S.C. 1517.
    Language is included under this heading which permits 
employment of Americans and aliens by contract for services 
abroad, rental of space abroad for periods not exceeding ten 
years, and expenses of alteration, repair or improvement. In 
addition, language is included which permits purchase or 
construction of temporary demountable exhibition structures for 
use abroad, and payment of tort claims in the manner authorized 
in the first paragraph of 28 U.S.C. 2672 when such claims arise 
in foreign countries. In addition, language is included which 
permits not to exceed $327,000 for official representation 
expenses abroad and purchase of passenger motor vehicles for 
official use abroad at not to exceed $30,000 per vehicle. In 
addition, language is included which permits the purchase of 
insurance on official motor vehicles and the renting of tie-
lines and teletype equipment. Also, language is included which 
provides that the provisions of the first sentence of section 
105(f) and all of section 108(c) of the Mutual Educational and 
Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2455(f) and 2458(c)) 
shall apply in carrying out these activities without regard to 
15 U.S.C. 4912, and that for the purpose of this Act, 
contributions under the provisions of the Mutual Educational 
and Cultural Exchange Act shall include payment for assessments 
for services provided as part of these activities.
    On pages 34 and 35, under Export Administration, 
``Operations and Administration'', language is provided which 
permits the appropriation to be used for costs associated with 
the performance of Export Administration field activities both 
domestically and abroad. Language is also included to provide 
for full medical coverage for dependent members of immediate 
families of employees stationed overseas, employment of 
Americans and aliens by contract for services abroad, rental of 
space abroad for periods not exceeding ten years, and expenses 
of alteration, repair, or improvement. Also, language is 
included to permit payment of tort claims in the manner 
authorized in the first paragraph of 28 U.S.C. 2672 when such 
claims arise in foreign countries. In addition, the bill 
provides that not to exceed $15,000 may be used for official 
representation expenses abroad. Language is included to permit 
award of compensation to informers under the Export 
Administration Act of 1979 and as authorized by 22 U.S.C. 
401(b) and purchase of passenger motor vehicles for official 
use and motor vehicles for law enforcement use with special 
requirement vehicles eligible for purchase without regard to 
any price limitation otherwise established by law. Finally, 
language is included which provides that the provisions of the 
first sentence of section 105(f) and all of section 108(c) of 
the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 shall 
apply in carrying out these activities.
    On pages 35 through 37, under Economic Development 
Administration, ``Economic Development Assistance Programs'', 
language is included which allows the Secretary of Commerce to 
provide financial assistance for projects located on military 
installations closed or scheduled for closure without it being 
required that the grantee have title to the property or the 
ability to obtain a lease for the property, when such 
assistance is necessary for the economic development of the 
area. Language is also included to allow the Secretary of 
Commerce to consult with the Secretary of Defense regarding the 
title to land on military installations closed or scheduled for 
closure.
    On page 37, under Minority Business Development Agency, 
language is included to permit the funds to be used for 
fostering, promoting, and developing minority business 
enterprise including expenses of grants, contracts, and other 
agreements with public or private organizations.
    On page 37, under United States Travel and Tourism 
Administration, language is included making funds provided 
available only until December 31, 1995.
    On page 38, under Economic and Statistical Analysis, 
language is included permitting the appropriation to remain 
available until September 30, 1997.
    On page 38, under Economics and Statistics Administration 
Revolving Fund, language is included authorizing the Secretary 
of Commerce to disseminate economic and statistical data 
products and to charge fees necessary to recover the full costs 
incurred in the production of economic and statistical data 
products. The language also allows fees received from data 
dissemination activities to be credited to this account and 
available for carrying out these purposes without further 
appropriation.
    On page 39, under National Telecommunications and 
Information Administration, ``Salaries and Expenses'', language 
is included which will allow NTIA to retain and use funds 
transferred from other Federal agencies for research purposes 
beyond the fiscal year for which the funds were initially 
appropriated.
    On page 39, under the National Telecommunications and 
Information Administration, ``Public Broadcasting Facilities, 
Planning and Construction'', language is included that provides 
that notwithstanding section 391 of the Communications Act of 
1934, as amended, the prior year unobligated balances may be 
made available for grants for projects for which applications 
have been submitted and approved during any fiscal year.
    On page 40 of the bill under ``Information Infrastructure 
Grants'', language is included which provides that 
notwithstanding the requirements of sections 392(a) and 392(c) 
of the Communications Act of 1934, the appropriation may be 
used for the planning and construction of telecommunications 
networks. Language is also included which allows up to five 
percent of the funds appropriated to be available for 
telecommunications research activities.
    On page 41, under Patent and Trademark Office, language is 
included which permits necessary expenses for the defense of 
suits instituted against the Commissioner of Patents and 
Trademarks. Language is also included which provides that the 
amounts made available from the Patent and Trademark Office Fee 
Surcharge Fund shall not exceed amounts deposited and shall 
remain available until expended.
    On pages 41 and 42, under Department of Commerce, National 
Institute of Standards and Technology, ``Scientific and 
Technical Research and Services'', language is recommended 
which would permit not to exceed $8,500,000 to be transferred 
to the ``Working Capital Fund''.
    On page 41 of the bill under ``Industrial Technology 
Services'', language is provided that makes the appropriation 
available for expenses of the Manufacturing Extension 
Partnership Program of the National Institute of Standards and 
Technology. In addition, language is included which permits not 
to exceed $500,000 of the appropriation to be transferred to 
the ``Working Capital Fund''. Finally, language is included 
allowing no funds in this or any other Act to be used to carry 
out additional program competitions under the Advanced 
Technology Program, and providing that any carryover of prior 
year balances in the ATP program be used only for continuation 
grants.
    On pages 42 and 43, under National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration, ``Operations, Research, and Facilities'', the 
bill provides for the expenses of not to exceed 386 active 
commissioned officers, construction of facilities including 
initial equipment, and alteration, modernization, and 
relocation of facilities. Language is also included which 
allows for the collection of additional fees to recover costs 
of administering aeronautical chart programs, and provides that 
the funds appropriated from the General Fund shall be reduced 
as such additional fees are received during fiscal year 1996. 
The language also provides that fees received in excess of 
$3,000,000 in fiscal year 1996 shall not be available for 
obligation until October 1, 1996. Also, language is recommended 
which transfers $55,500,000 from the fund entitled, ``Promote 
and Develop Fishery Products and Research Pertaining to 
American Fisheries''. Language is included allowing NOAA to 
retain gifts and contributions under the Marine Sanctuary 
Program. Finally, language is included providing that grants 
made under sections 306 and 306(a) of the Coastal Zone 
Management Act, as amended, shall not exceed $2,000,000.
    On page 44, under ``Coastal Zone Management Fund'', 
language is included allowing funds made available under this 
heading to be used to carry out purposes set forth in 16 U.S.C. 
1456a(b)(2)(A), 16 U.S.C. 1456a(b)(2)(B)(v), and 16 U.S.C. 
1461(c). This expands the purposes for which these funds can be 
used to include CZM development grants and Estuarine Research 
Reserves.
    On page 45, under General Administration, Salaries and 
Expenses, language is included limiting the amount for official 
entertainment to $3,000.
    On pages 46 through 48, under General Provisions--
Department of Commerce, the following general provisions that 
fall within the rule are recommended:
    Section 201 provides that during the current fiscal year, 
applicable appropriations and funds made available to the 
Department of Commerce by this Act shall be available for the 
activities specified in the Act of October 26, 1949 to the 
extent and in the manner prescribed by said Act, and 
notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3324 may be used for advanced 
payments not otherwise authorized, only upon the certification 
of officials designated by the Secretary that such payments are 
in the public interest.
    Section 203 prohibits any of the funds made available by 
this Act to be used to support the hurricane reconnaissance 
aircraft and activities that are under the control of the 
United States Air Force or the United States Air Force Reserve.
    Section 204 prohibits any of the funds in this, any 
previous Act or hereinafter to be available to reimburse the 
Unemployment Trust Fund or any fund or account of the Treasury 
to pay for any expenses paid before October 1, 1992 as 
authorized by section 8051 of Title 5, United States Code, for 
services performed after April 20, 1990, by individuals 
appointed to temporary positions within the Bureau of the 
Census for purposes relating to the 1990 Decennial Census of 
Population.
    Section 205 provides that up to 5 percent of any 
appropriation made available for the Department of Commerce in 
the Act may be transferred between such appropriations. The 
language also provides that any transfer made under this 
section shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds under 
section 605 of the accompanying bill and shall not be available 
for obligation or expenditure except in compliance with the 
procedures set forth in that section.
    On page 48, under the Judiciary, Supreme Court of the 
United States, ``Salaries and Expenses'', language is included 
permitting not to exceed $10,000 to be used for the purpose of 
transporting Associate Justices. In addition, a limitation of 
$10,000 is recommended for official reception and 
representation expenses, and for miscellaneous expenses 
approved by the Chief Justice.
    On page 48, under Care of the Building and Grounds 
appropriation for the Supreme Court, language is included 
providing that $500,000 remain available until expended.
    On page 48, under U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal 
Circuit, ``Salaries and Expenses'', and under U.S. Court of 
International Trade, ``Salaries and Expenses'', language is 
included which allows funds to be spent for necessary expenses 
of these courts.
    On pages 49 and 50, under Courts of Appeals, District 
Courts, and Other Judicial Services, ``Salaries and Expenses'', 
language is recommended which allows funds to be spent for 
necessary expenses of the courts, and which permits the 
purchase of firearms and ammunition. In addition, language is 
included providing that $14,454,000 for space alteration 
projects remain available until expended. In addition, language 
is included permitting $500,000 to remain available until 
expended for acquisition of books, periodicals and newspapers. 
In addition, language is included permitting not to exceed 
$11,000,000 to remain available until expended for furniture 
and furnishings related to new space and alteration projects. 
In addition, language is included which permits up to 
$2,318,000 to be appropriated from the Vaccine Injury 
Compensation Trust Fund for expenses of the Claims Court 
associated with processing cases under the National Childhood 
Vaccine Injury Act of 1986.
    On page 50, under Violent Crime Reduction Programs, 
language is included making $31,100,000, to remain available 
until expended, for activities of the Federal Judiciary 
authorized by law, to be derived from the Violent Crime 
Reduction Trust Fund as authorized by section 190001(a) of 
Public Law 103-322.
    On pages 50 and 51, under Defender Services, language is 
included permitting the use of funds for compensation of 
expenses of attorneys appointed to assist the court in criminal 
cases where the defendant has waived representation by counsel. 
In addition, language is included permitting the use of funds 
for compensation of travel expenses of guardians ad litem 
acting on behalf of financially eligible minor or incompetent 
offenders in connection with transfers to foreign countries. 
Language is also included permitting the use of funds for 
compensation of attorneys appointed to represent jurors in 
civil actions for the protection of their employment. Finally, 
a limitation is included which allows no funds to be used for 
Death Penalty Resource Centers.
    On pages 51 and 52, under Fees of Jurors and Commissioners, 
language is included which provides that compensation of land 
commissioners shall not exceed that of the highest rate payable 
under 5 U.S.C. 5332.
    On page 52, under Court Security, language is included 
which provides that funds in this account shall be expended by 
the U.S. Marshals Service consistent with standards or 
guidelines agreed to by the Administrative Office of the U.S. 
Courts and the Attorney General.
    On page 52, under Administrative Office of the United 
States Courts, ``Salaries and Expenses'', language is included 
allowing expenses for advertising and rent in the District of 
Columbia and elsewhere. In addition, language is included 
permitting up to $7,500 for official reception and 
representation expenses.
    On pages 52 and 53, under Federal Judicial Center, 
``Salaries and Expenses'', language is included permitting up 
to $1,000 for official reception and representation expenses as 
well as language permitting $1,800,000 to remain available 
through September 30, 1997.
    On page 53, under United States Sentencing Commission, 
language is included permitting up to $1,000 for official 
reception and representation expenses.
    On page 53, under General Provisions--The Judiciary, 
Section 302 permits use of funds in the bill for expenses of 
the Special Court established under the Regional Rail 
Reorganization Act of 1973.
    On page 54, section 303 permits up to 5 percent of any 
appropriation made in the Act for the Judiciary to be 
transferred between such appropriations, but no such 
appropriation shall be increased by more than 10 percent by any 
such transfer. The language also provides that any transfer 
pursuant to this section shall be treated as a reprogramming of 
funds under section 605 of the accompanying bill and shall not 
be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance 
with the procedures set forth in that section.
    On page 54, under section 304, language is recommended that 
provides that notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
Salaries and Expenses appropriation for District Courts, Courts 
of Appeals, and Other Judicial Services shall be available for 
official reception and representation expenses of the Judicial 
Conference of the United States. The language further provides 
that such available funds shall not exceed $10,000 and shall be 
administered by the Director of the Administrative Office of 
the United States Courts in his capacity as Secretary of the 
Judicial Conference.
    On pages 55 through 57, under Department of State, 
Administration of Foreign Affairs, ``Diplomatic and Consular 
Programs'', language is included which permits not to exceed 20 
percent of the amounts made available in this Act in the 
appropriation accounts, ``Diplomatic and Consular Programs'' 
and ``Salaries and Expenses'' to be transferred between such 
accounts in accordance with reprogramming procedures specified 
in section 605 of the Act. Language is also included which 
permits the use of the appropriation for representation 
expenses to certain international organizations in which the 
United States participates pursuant to treaties or specific 
acts of Congress. Language is also included limiting 
availability of funding for the Diplomatic Telecommunications 
Service. Language is also included requiring a cost allocation 
system to be in place in fiscal year 1997.
    On page 57, language is included providing $9,720,000 as an 
additional amount for security enhancements to counter the 
threat of terrorism.
    On page 57, under Department of State, Administration of 
Foreign Affairs, ``Salaries and Expenses'' language is included 
which permits the use of the appropriation for representation 
expenses to certain international organizations in which the 
United States participates pursuant to treaties ratified 
pursuant to the advice and consent of the Senate, or to 
specific acts of Congress.
    On page 58, language is included providing $1,870,000 as an 
additional amount for security enhancements to counter the 
threat of terrorism.
    On page 57, under ``Capital Investment Fund,'' language is 
included removing a reprogramming requirement.
    On pages 57 and 58, under Office of Inspector General (IG), 
language is included merging the IG Offices of the State 
Department and the USIA.
    On pages 58 and 59, under Acquisition and Maintenance of 
Buildings Abroad, language is included which prohibits the 
appropriation from being used for acquisition of furniture and 
furnishings and generators for other departments and agencies.
    On page 59, under Emergencies in the Diplomatic and 
consular Service, language is included which permits up to 
$1,000,000 to be transferred to the Repatriation Loans Program 
account.
    On page 59, under the Repatriation Loans Program account, 
language is included which permits the transfer of $183,000 for 
administrative expenses to the Salaries and Expenses account.
    On pages 60 and 61, under Contributions to International 
Organizations, language is included withholding funds until a 
certification under section 401(b) of Public Law 103-236 for 
fiscal year 1996 is made. In addition, language is included 
which prohibits the use of United States Contributions to 
International Organizations for payment of the United States' 
share of interest costs made known to the United States 
Government for external borrowings by such organizations 
incurred on or after October 1, 1984. Language is included that 
provides that payment of arrearages shall be directed toward 
activities that are mutually agreed upon by the United States 
and the respective international organization.
    On page 61, under Contributions for International 
Peacekeeping Activities, language is included prohibiting use 
of funds for new or expanded missions unless the Committee is 
notified 15 days in advance and a reprogramming is submitted. 
Language is also included making funds available only upon a 
certification by the Secretary of State that American 
manufacturers are being given equal opportunities.
    On page 62, under International Conferences and 
Contingencies, language is recommended which makes funds 
available for personal services without regard to civil service 
and classification laws. Also, language is included which 
limits representation expenses to $200,000.
    On page 63, under International Boundary and Water 
Commission, United States and Mexico, language is included 
limiting representation expenses to $6,000.
    On page 63, under American Sections, International 
Commissions, language is included limiting representation 
expenses to $9,000.
    On page 64, under International Fisheries Commissions, 
language is included that provides that the United States' 
share of the expenses of the International Fisheries Commission 
may be advanced to the respective commissions pursuant to 31 
U.S.C. 3324.
    On pages 64 and 65, under General Provisions--Department of 
State, section 402 provides that up to 5 percent of any 
appropriation made available in the Act for the Department of 
State and USIA may be transferred between such appropriations, 
but no such appropriation shall be increased by more than 10 
percent or decreased by more than 5 percent by any such 
transfer. The language further provides that any transfer 
pursuant to this section shall be treated as a reprogramming of 
funds under section 605 of the accompanying bill and shall not 
be available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance 
with the procedures set forth in that section.
    On page 65, section 403 provides that funds made available 
under this or any other act may be expended for compensation of 
the United States Commissioner of the International Boundary 
Commission, United States and Canada, only for actual hours 
worked by such Commissioner.
    On pages 65 and 66, under Arms Control and Disarmament 
Agency, language is included which provides that not to exceed 
$50,000 is available for official reception and representation 
expenses.
    On pages 66 and 67, under ``Salaries and Expenses'' United 
States Information Agency, language is included which permits 
up to $700,000 to carry out certain activities authorized by 
law, including employment, without regard to civil service and 
classification laws, of persons on a temporary basis.
    Language is included that provides a limitation of 
$1,700,000 to remain available until expended to carry out 
projects involving security construction and related 
improvements for agency facilities not physically located 
together with Department of State facilities abroad.
    On page 68, under the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Trust 
Fund, the Israeli-Arab Scholarship Program and the American 
Studies Collectors Endowment Fund, language is included which 
makes available all interest and earnings accruing to each fund 
on or before September 30, 1996.
    On page 68, under Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program 
Trust Fund, language is included which prohibits any of the 
funds appropriated to pay any salary or other compensation or 
to enter into any contract in excess of the rate authorized by 
5 U.S.C. 5376 or for purposes which are not in accordance with 
OMB Circulars A-110 and A-122, including the restrictions on 
compensation for personal services.
    On pages 69 and 70, under International Broadcasting 
Operations, language is included allowing funds provided for 
broadcasting to Cuba to be used for facilities and equipment.
    On page 70, under Radio Construction, language is included 
for purchase, rent, construction, and improvement of facilities 
for radio transmission and reception and purchase and 
installation of necessary equipment for radio and television 
transmission and reception.
    On pages 70 and 71, under Department of Transportation, the 
Maritime Administration, Operations and Training, language is 
provided that notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
Secretary of Transportation may use proceeds derived from the 
sale or disposal of National Defense Reserve Fleet vessels that 
are currently collected and retained by the Maritime 
Administration, to be used for facility and ship maintenance, 
modernization and repair, acquisition of equipment, and fuel 
costs necessary to maintain training at the United States 
Merchant Marine Academy and State maritime academies. Finally, 
language is included that permits reimbursements to be made to 
this appropriation from receipts to the ``Federal Ship 
Financing Fund'' for administrative expenses in support of that 
program.
    On page 72, under Administrative Provision--Maritime 
Administration, language is provided that notwithstanding any 
other provision of this Act, the Maritime Administration is 
authorized to furnish utilities and services and make necessary 
repairs in connection with any lease, contract, or occupancy 
involving Government property under control of the Maritime 
Administration. In addition, the language provides that 
payments received by the Maritime Administration for utilities, 
services, and repairs so furnished or made shall be credited to 
the appropriation charged with the cost thereof. In addition, 
language is recommended that rental payments under any such 
lease, contract, or occupancy on account of items other than 
such utilities, services or repairs, shall be paid into the 
Treasury as miscellaneous receipts. In addition, language is 
recommended that prohibits obligation from the construction 
funds established by the Merchant Marine Act of 1936, or any 
other obligation, in excess of the appropriations and 
limitations contained in this bill and all receipts which 
otherwise would be deposited to the credit of said fund shall 
be paid to the Treasury as miscellaneous receipts.
    On pages 73 and 74, under Commission on Civil Rights, 
language is included which permits not to exceed $50,000 to be 
used to employ consultants. In addition, language is included 
that prohibits funds appropriated in this paragraph from being 
used to employ in excess of four full-time individuals under 
schedule C of the Excepted Service. Finally, language is 
included that prohibits any of the appropriation from being 
used to reimburse commissioners for more than 75 billable days 
with the exception of the Chairperson who is permitted 125 
billable days.
    On pages 74 and 75, under Equal Employment Opportunity 
Commission, language is included permitting non-monetary awards 
to private citizens. In addition, a limitation of $2,500 is 
included for official reception and representation expenses.
    On pages 75 and 76, under the Federal Communications 
Commission, language is recommended setting a limitation of 
$4,000 for official representation expenses. In addition, 
language is included providing up to $600,000 for land and 
structures, and up to $500,000 for improvement and care of 
grounds and repair to buildings. Also, language is provided 
permitting the purchase of up to sixteen motor vehicles and 
authorizing the use of funds for special counsel fees. Language 
is also included permitting not to exceed $300,000 of the 
appropriation to remain available until September 30, 1997 for 
research and policy studies. Language is included making 
offsetting fee collections in excess of $116,400,000 available 
until expended, but not available until October 1, 1996.
    On page 77, under the Federal Trade Commission, language is 
provided establishing a ceiling of $2,000 for official 
reception expenses. In addition, language is included which 
permits up to $48,262,000 of offsetting collections derived 
from fees collected for pre-merger notification filings under 
the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976 to be 
retained and used for necessary expenses in this appropriation. 
In addition, language is included which provides that the sum 
appropriated for the Federal Trade Commission shall be reduced 
as such offsetting collections are received during fiscal year 
1996 so as to result in a final fiscal year appropriation 
estimated at not more than $34,666,000. Language is included 
that provides that any fees received in excess of $48,262,000 
in fiscal year 1996 shall remain available until expended, but 
shall not be available for obligation until fiscal year 1997. 
In addition, language is provided that prohibits any of the 
funds made available to the Commission in this Act from being 
used for expenses authorized by section 151 of the Federal 
Deposit Insurance Corporation Improvement Act of 1991. Finally, 
language is included making funds appropriated from the General 
Fund of Treasury for the FTC available until expended.
    On page 78, under Japan-U.S. Friendship Commission, 
language is included providing up to $1,420,000 in Japanese 
currency as authorized by Public Law 94-118.
    On page 78, under the Legal Services Corporation, language 
is included which designates $265,000,000 for basic field 
programs, $8,000,000 for the Office of the Inspector General, 
of which $5,750,000 shall be used to contract with independent 
auditing agencies for annual financial and program audits of 
all grantees in accordance with Office of Management and Budget 
Circular A-133, and $5,000,000 for management and 
administration.
    On page 79, under section 501 of Administrative 
Provisions--Legal Services Corporation, language is provided 
for the distribution of funding for the provision of legal 
assistance among geographic areas based on the number of poor 
people per service area.
    On pages 79 through 82, under sections 502 and 503 of 
Administrative Provisions--Legal Services Corporation, 
limitations are included prohibiting funding unless all grants 
and contracts awarded by the Corporation are to be made on a 
competitive basis, and unless certain expanded eligibility 
requirements are followed.
    On pages 82 through 91, under section 504 of Administrative 
Provisions--Legal Services Corporation, limitations are 
included prohibiting the Corporation from awarding grants and 
contracts to an entity which engages in redistricting 
activities, lobbying, rulemaking, class action lawsuits, 
representation of illegal aliens, political advocacy, labor or 
anti-labor activities, boycotts, pickets, strikes, or 
demonstrations, representation of fee-generating cases, 
collection of attorneys fees, abortion litigation, 
representation of local, state, or Federal prisoners, welfare 
reform advocacy, lobbying, or litigation, representation of a 
public housing tenant charged with drug trafficking in an 
eviction proceeding, and solicitation of clients. Limitations 
are also included prohibiting funding unless the Corporation 
requires grantees to name their clients and maintain statements 
of fact when filing a case, establish and follow priorities for 
the delivery of legal assistance to the poor, maintain records 
of time spent on activities, and abide by all Federal laws 
relating to the proper use of Federal funds. Language is also 
included directing the Corporation to establish model priority 
guidelines for the delivery of legal assistance to the poor.
    On pages 91 and 92, under sections 505 and 506 of 
Administrative Provisions--Legal Services Corporation, 
limitations are included prohibiting a grantee of the 
Corporation from using any Federal funds to pay dues or fees to 
membership or advocacy organizations, or file or otherwise 
pursue a lawsuit against the Corporation.
    On page 92, under section 507 of Administrative 
Provisions--Legal Services Corporation, language is provided 
prohibiting any funds appropriated to the Corporation for 
fiscal year 1996 from being used for any purpose prohibited by 
authorization legislation which is enacted into law. Further, 
language is included providing that upon the date of enactment 
of Legal Services Corporation reauthorization legislation, all 
funding provided in this Act shall be subject to the provisions 
of that legislation, and any provisions in this Act 
inconsistent with that legislation shall no longer apply.
    On pages 94 and 95 under the Securities and Exchange 
Commission, language is included allowing the use of funds for 
the rental of space, and establishing a ceiling of $3,000 for 
official reception expenses. Also, language is included setting 
a limit of $10,000 toward funding a permanent secretariat for 
the International Organization of Securities Commissions. In 
addition, language is included which permits up to $100,000 to 
be available for expenses for consultations and meetings hosted 
by the Commission with foreign governmental and other 
regulatory officials to exchange views concerning developments 
relating to securities matters, to include necessary logistic 
and administrative expenses and the expenses of Commission 
staff and invitees. Language is also included increasing the 
rate of fees under section 6(b) of the Securities Act of 1933 
from one-fiftieth of one percent to one twenty-ninth of one 
percent, and providing that such increase shall be deposited to 
this account as an offsetting collection.
    On page 94, under the Small Business Administration, 
``Salaries and Expenses,'' language is included limiting the 
amount for official reception and representation expenses to 
$3,500. In addition, language is included which permits the 
Administrator to charge fees to cover the cost of publications 
developed by the Small Business Administration and certain loan 
servicing activities. Further the language provides that 
notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302, revenues received from all such 
activities shall be credited to this account, to be available 
for carrying out these purposes without further appropriation.
    On page 95, under the Business Loans Program Account, 
language is included allowing funds to be used for the cost of 
modifying loans. In addition, language is included which allows 
$97,000,000 to be transferred to and merged with the 
appropriation for SBA, Salaries and Expenses.
    On pages 95 and 96, under Disaster Loans Program Account, 
language is included to permit funds to be used for the cost of 
modifying loans. In addition, language is included which allows 
$78,000,000 to be transferred to and merged with the 
appropriation for SBA, Salaries and Expenses.
    On page 96, under Administrative Provision--Small Business 
Administration, section 501 provides that up to 5 percent of 
any appropriation made available in the Act for the Small 
Business Administration may be transferred between such 
appropriations, but no such appropriation shall be increased by 
more than 10 percent by any such transfer. The language further 
provides that any transfer pursuant to this section shall be 
treated as a reprogramming of funds under section 605 of the 
accompanying bill and shall not be available for obligation or 
expenditure except in compliance with the procedures set forth 
in that section.
    On pages 97-100, General Provisions, the following sections 
are included which come under the rule:
    Section 603 provides that the expenditure of any 
appropriation under this Act for any consulting service through 
procurement contract, pursuant to 5 U.S.C. 3109 shall be 
limited to those contracts where such expenditures are a matter 
of public record and available for public inspection, except 
where otherwise provided under existing law, or under existing 
Executive Order issued pursuant to existing law.
    Section 604 provides that if any provision of this Act or 
the application of such provision to any person or 
circumstances shall be held invalid, the remainder of the Act 
and the application of each provision to persons or 
circumstances other than those as to which it is held invalid 
shall not be affected thereby.
     Section 605(a) provides that none of the funds provided 
under this Act, under prior appropriations acts, or provided 
from any accounts in the Treasury of the United States derived 
by the collection of fees available to the agencies funded by 
this Act shall be available for obligation or expenditure 
through a reprogramming of funds which: (1) creates new 
programs; (2) eliminates a program, project, or activity; (3) 
increases funds or personnel by any means for any project or 
activity for which funds have been denied or restricted; (4) 
relocates an office or employee; (5) reorganizes offices, 
programs, or activities; or (6) contracts out or privatizes any 
functions or activities presently performed by Federal 
employees; unless the Appropriations Committee of both Houses 
of Congress are notified 15 days in advance of such 
reprogramming of funds.
    Section 605(b) provides that none of the funds provided 
under this Act, under prior appropriations acts, or provided 
from any accounts in the Treasury of the United States derived 
by the collection of fees available to the agency funded by 
this Act shall be available for obligation or expenditure for 
activities, programs, or projects through a reprogramming of 
funds in excess of $500,000 or 10 percent whichever is less 
that: (1) augments existing programs, projects, or activities; 
(2) reduces by 10 percent funding for any existing program, 
project, or activity, or numbers of personnel by 10 percent as 
approved by Congress; or (3) results from any general savings 
due to a reduction in personnel which would result in a change 
in existing programs, activities, or projects as approved by 
Congress, unless the Appropriations Committee of both Houses of 
Congress are notified 15 days in advance of such reprogramming 
of funds.
    Section 606 prohibits any of the funds in this Act from 
being used for the construction, repair, overhaul, conversion, 
or modernization of vessels for the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration in shipyards located outside of the 
United States.
    Section 607(b) includes language requiring that the head of 
each Federal agency provide a notice, describing that it is the 
sense of Congress that all equipment and products purchased 
with funds made available under this Act be American-made, when 
providing financial assistance to, or entering into any 
contract with, any entity using funds made available in this 
Act.
    Section 608 includes language prohibiting funds made 
available in this Act from being used to implement, administer 
or enforce any guidelines of the Equal Employment Opportunity 
Commission covering religious harassment, when it is made known 
to the Federal entity or official to which the funds are made 
available that such guidelines do not differ in any respect 
from the proposed guidelines published by the Commission on 
October 1, 1993.
                 Appropriations, Not Authorized by Law

    Pursuant to clause 3 of rule XXI of the House of 
Representatives, the following table lists the appropriations 
in the accompanying bill which are not authorized by law in 
whole or in part. The Committee notes that authorization 
legislation for many of the programs listed below has either 
passed the House or is pending before the House or the 
committee of jurisdiction. In all cases, the Committee has 
endeavored to work closely with the committee of jurisdiction 
in developing the recommendations in this bill.

Department of Justice:
          General Administration
                  Salaries and Expenses
                  Administrative Review and Appeals
                  Office of the Inspector General
          United States Parole Commission
          Legal Activities
                  Salaries and Expenses, General Legal 
                Activities
                  National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act
                  Salaries and Expenses, Antitrust Division
                  Salaries and Expenses, United States 
                Attorneys
                  Salaries and Expenses, Foreign Claims 
                Settlement Commission
                  Fees and Expenses of Witnesses
          Radiation Exposure Compensation, Administrative 
        Expenses
          Interagency Law Enforcement
          Federal Bureau of Investigation
                  Salaries and Expenses
          Drug Enforcement Administration
                  Salaries and Expenses
          Immigration and Naturalization Service
                  Salaries and Expenses
                  Construction
          Federal Prison System
                  Salaries and Expenses
                  Building and Facilities
                  Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated
                  Limitation on Administrative Expenses, 
                Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated
          Office of Justice Programs
                  Justice Assistance
                  Local Law Enforcement Block Grants
                  Truth in Sentencing Grants
                  Weed and Seed Program
Office of the United States Trade Representative
International Trade Commission
Department of Commerce:
          Export Administration
          Economic Development Administration, except Salaries 
        and Expenses and Trade Adjustment Assistance
          Minority Business Development Agency
          National Telecommunications and Information 
        Administration
                  Salaries and Expenses
                  Public Broadcasting Facilities, Planning and 
                Construction
                  Information Infrastructure Grants
          Patent and Trademark Office
          National Institute of Standards and Technology
                  Scientific and Technical Research and 
                Services
                  Industrial Technology Services
                  Construction of Research Facilities
          National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
                  Operations, Research and Facilities
                  Construction
          Technology Administration
Department of State:
          Diplomatic and Consular Services, except registration 
        fees
          Salaries and Expenses
          Capital Investment Fund
          Office of Inspector General
          Representation Allowance
          Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials
          Acquisition and Maintenance of Buildings Abroad
          Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular Service
          Repatriation Loans Program Account
          Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan
          Contributions to International Organizations
          Contributions for International Peacekeeping 
        Activities
          International Conferences and Contingencies
          International Boundary and Water Commission, United 
        States and Mexico
          American Sections, International Commissions, except 
        Border Environment Cooperation Commission
          International Fisheries Commissions
          Payment to the Asia Foundation
Arms Control and Disarmament Agency
United States Information Agency:
          Salaries and Expenses
          Technology Fund
          Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs
          International Broadcasting Operations
          Radio Construction
          National Endowment for Democracy
Department of Transportation, Maritime Administration:
          Operations and Training
          Maritime Guaranteed Loan Program Account
Commission on Civil Rights
Federal Communications Commission, except offsetting fee 
collections
Legal Services Corporation
Securities and Exchange Commission

          Compliance With Rule XIII--Clause 3 (Ramseyer Rule)

    In compliance with clause 3 of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the accompanying bill, as reported, are shown as follows 
(existing law proposed to be omitted is enclosed in bold 
brackets, new matter is printed in italic, existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman):
                      TITLE 28, UNITED STATES CODE

          * * * * * * *

                     PART II--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

          * * * * * * *

                    CHAPTER 31--THE ATTORNEY GENERAL

          * * * * * * *

Sec. 524. Availability of appropriations

    (a) * * *
          * * * * * * *
    (c)(1) * * *
          * * * * * * *
    9(a) * * *
          * * * * * * *
    (E) Subject to the notification procedures contained in 
section 605 of Public Law 103-121, and after satisfying the 
transfer requirement in subparagraph (B) of this paragraph, any 
excess unobligated balance remaining in the Fund on September 
30, 1995 shall be available to the Attorney General, without 
fiscal year limitation, for any Federal law enforcement, 
litigative/prosecutive, and correctional activities, or any 
other authorized purpose of the Department of Justice. Any 
amounts provided pursuant to this subparagraph may be used 
under authorities available to the organization receiving the 
funds.
          * * * * * * *

                   CHAPTER 39--UNITED STATES TRUSTEES

          * * * * * * *

Sec. 589a. United States Trustee System Fund

    (a) * * *
    (b) There shall be deposited in the Fund--
          (1) * * *
          * * * * * * *
          (5) 60 per centum of the fees collected under section 
        1930(a)(6) of this title until a reorganization plan is 
        confirmed;
          * * * * * * *
    (f) For the purpose of recovering the cost of services of 
the United States Trustee System, there shall be deposited as 
offsetting collections to the appropriation ``United States 
Trustee System Fund'', to remain available until expended, the 
following--
          (1) * * * 
          (2) 40 per centum of the fees collected under section 
        1930(a)(6) of this title [.] until a reorganization 
        plan is confirmed;
          (3)100 percent of the fees collected under section 
        1930(a)(6) of this title after a reorganization plan is 
        confirmed.
          * * * * * * *

                           PART V--PROCEDURE

          * * * * * * *

                      CHAPTER 123--FEES AND COSTS

          * * * * * * *
    Sec. 1930 Bankruptcy fees
    (a) Notwithstanding section 1915 of this title, the parties 
commencing a case under title 11 shall pay to the clerk of the 
district court or the clerk of the bankruptcy court, if one has 
been certified pursuant to section 156(b) of this title, the 
following filing fees:
          (1) * * *
          * * * * * * *
          (6) In addition to the filing fee paid to the clerk, 
        a quarterly fee shall be paid to the United States 
        trustee, for deposit in the Treasury, in each case 
        under chapter 11 of title 11 for each quarter 
        (including any fraction thereof) until [a plan is 
        confirmed or] the case is converted or dismissed, 
        whichever occurs first. The fee shall be $250 for each 
        quarter in which disbursements total less than $15,000; 
        $500 for each quarter in which disbursements total 
        $15,000 or more but less than $150,000; $1,250 or each 
        quarter in which disbursements total $150,000 or more 
        but less than $300,000; $3,750 for each quarter in 
        which disbursements total $300,000 or more but less 
        than $3,000,000; $5,000 for each quarter in which 
        disbursements total $3,000,000 or more. The fee shall 
        be payable on the last day of the calendar month 
        following the calendar quarter for which the fee is 
        owed. An individual commencing a voluntary case or a 
        joint case under title 11 may pay such fee in 
        installments. For converting, on request of the debtor, 
        a case under chapter 7, or 13 of title 11, to a case 
        under chapter 11 of title 11, the debtor shall pay to 
        the clerk of the district court or the clerk of the 
        bankruptcy court, if one has been certified pursuant to 
        section 156(b) of this title, a fee or $400.
          * * * * * * *
                              ----------                              

  SECTION 102 OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE, JUSTICE, AND STATE, THE 
 JUDICIARY, AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 1993 (Pub. L. 102-
                                  395)

    Sec. 102. (a) * * *
    (b)(1) During fiscal [years 1993, 1994, and 1995] year 1996 
with respect to any undercover investigative operation of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Drug Enforcement 
Administration which is necessary for the detection and 
prosecution of crimes against the United States or for the 
collection of foreign intelligence or counterintelligence--
      (A) * * *
          * * * * * * *
          (C) sums authorized to be appropriated for the 
        Federal Bureau of Investigation and for the Drug 
        Enforcement Administration for fiscal [years 1993, 
        1994, and 1995] year 1996, and the proceeds from such 
        undercover operation, may be deposited in banks or 
        other financial institutions, without regard to section 
        648 of title 18 of the United States Code and section 
        3302 of title 31 of the United States Code, and
          * * * * * * *
    (5)(A) The Federal Bureau of Investigation or the Drug 
Enforcement Administration, as the case may be, shall conduct a 
detailed financial audit of each undercover investigative 
operation which is closed in fiscal [years 1993, 1994, and 
1995] year 1996--
      (i) * * *
          * * * * * * *
                              ----------                              


DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE, JUSTICE, AND STATE, THE JUDICIARY, AND RELATED 
          AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 1991 (Pub. L. 101-515)

          * * * * * * *

                    TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

          * * * * * * *

                    Federal Bureau of Investigation

                         salaries and expenses

    For expenses necessary for detection, investigation, and 
prosecution of crimes against the United States * * *: 
Provided, That for fiscal year 1991 and hereafter the Director 
of the Federal Bureau of Investigation may establish and 
collect fees to process fingerprint identification records and 
name checks for non-criminal justice, non-law enforcement 
employment and licensing purposes and for certain employees of 
private sector contractors with classified Government 
contracts, and notwithstanding the provisions of 31 U.S.C. 
3302, credit such fees to this appropriation to be used for 
salaries and other expenses incurred in providing these 
services, and that the Director of the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation may establish such fees at a level to include an 
additional amount to establish a fund to remain available until 
expended to defray expenses for the automation of fingerprint 
identification and criminal justice information services and 
associated costs: Provided further, That * * *.
          * * * * * * *

                           Transfer of Funds

    Pursuant to clause 1(b), rule X of the House of 
Representatives, the following information is submitted 
describing the transfer of funds recommended in the 
accompanying bill:
    On page 43, under ``Operations, Research, and Facilities,'' 
the Committee recommends that $55,500,000 be derived by 
transfer from the fund entitled ``Promote and Develop Fishery 
Products and Research Pertaining to American Fisheries.'' This 
fund is a permanent appropriation to which a portion of Customs 
duties on fishery products is appropriated for fisheries 
research, management, and development. The Committee believes 
it appropriate to use a portion of these funds to support 
fisheries research and development programs under the 
``Operations, Research, and Facilities'' account.
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 2(l)(2)(b) of rule XI 
of the House of Representatives, the results of each roll call 
vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, together with 
the names of those voting for and those voting against, are 
printed below:

                          roll call number: 1

    Date: July 19, 1995.
    Measure: Commerce, Justice, State, and Judiciary 
appropriations bill, fiscal year 1996.
    Motion by: Mrs. Lowey.
    Description of Motion: To amend an amendment to provide 
additional funding for grants to combat violence against women.
    Results: Rejected 19 to 29.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Bevill                          Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Coleman                          Mr. Bunn
Mr. Dicks                            Mr. Callahan
Mr. Dixon                            Mr. Dickey
Mr. Durbin                           Mr. Forbes
Mr. Fazio                            Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Foglietta                        Mr. Hobson
Mr. Hefner                           Mr. Istook
Mr. Hoyer                            Mr. Knollenberg
Ms. Kaptur                           Mr. Kolbe
Mrs. Lowey                           Mr. Lightfoot
Mr. Obey                             Mr. Livingston
Mr. Pelosi                           Mr. McDade
Mr. Sabo                             Mr. Miller
Mr. Skaggs                           Mr. Mollohan
Mr. Stokes                           Mr. Myers
Mr. Thornton                         Mr. Nethercutt
Mr. Torres                           Mr. Neumann
Mr. Yates                            Mr. Packard
                                     Mr. Porter
                                     Mr. Regula
                                     Mr. Riggs
                                     Mr. Rogers
                                     Mr. Skeen
                                     Mrs. Vucanovich
                                     Mr. Walsh
                                     Mr. Wicker
                                     Mr. Wolf
                                     Mr. Young
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 2(l)(2)(b) of rule XI 
of the House of Representatives, the results of each roll call 
vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, together with 
the names of those voting for and those voting against, and 
printed below:

                          roll call number: 2

    Date: July 19, 1995.
    Measure: Commerce, Justice, State, and Judiciary 
appropriations bill, fiscal year 1996.
    Motion by: Mr. Mollohan.
    Description of Motion: To provide that if H.R. 728 is not 
enacted by October 1, 1995, then certain funding would be 
available for public safety and community policing grants and 
for crime prevention programs.
    Results: Rejected 19 to 29.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Chapman                          Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Coleman                          Mr. Bunn
Mr. Dicks                            Mr. DeLay
Mr. Dixon                            Mr. Dickey
Mr. Durbin                           Mr. Forbes
Mr. Fazio                            Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Foglietta                        Mr. Hobson
Mr. Hefner                           Mr. Istook
Mr. Hoyer                            Mr. Kingston
Mrs. Lowey                           Mr. Knollenberg
Mr. Mollohan                         Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Murtha                           Mr. Lewis
Mr. Obey                             Mr. Livingston
Mr. Pelosi                           Mr. McDade
Mr. Sabo                             Mr. Miller
Mr. Skaggs                           Mr. Myers
Mr. Stokes                           Mr. Nethercutt
Mr. Torres                           Mr. Neumann
Mr. Yates                            Mr. Packard
                                     Mr. Porter
                                     Mr. Riggs
                                     Mr. Rogers
                                     Mr. Skeen
                                     Mr. Taylor
                                     Mrs. Vucanovich
                                     Mr. Walsh
                                     Mr. Wicker
                                     Mr. Wolf
                                     Mr. Young
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 2(l)(2)(b) of rule XI 
of the House of Representatives, the results of each call vote 
on an amendment or on the motion to report, together with the 
names of those voting for and those voting against, are printed 
below:

                          roll call number: 3

    Date: July 19, 1995.
    Measure: Commerce, Justice, State, and Judiciary 
appropriations bill, fiscal year 1996.
    Motion by: Mr. Mollohan.
    Description of Motion: To increase funding for Byrne law 
enforcement assistance programs and to decrease payments to 
States for incarceration of criminal aliens.
    Results: Rejected 9 to 26.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Chapman                          Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Coleman                          Mr. Bunn
Mr. Mollohan                         Mr. DeLay
Mr. Murtha                           Mr. Forbes
Mr. Obey                             Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Sabo                             Mr. Istook
Mr. Skaggs                           Mr. Kingston
Mr. Thornton                         Mr. Knollenberg
Mr. Yates                            Mr. Kolbe
                                     Mr. Lewis
                                     Mr. Livingston
                                     Mr. McDade
                                     Mr. Miller
                                     Mr. Myers
                                     Mr. Nethercutt
                                     Mr. Neumann
                                     Mr. Porter
                                     Mr. Regula
                                     Mr. Riggs
                                     Mr. Rogers
                                     Mr. Skeen
                                     Mrs. Vucanovich
                                     Mr. Walsh
                                     Mr. Wicker
                                     Mr. Wolf
                                     Mr. Young

      Comparative Statement of New Budget (Obligational Authority)

    The following table provides a detailed summary, for each 
department and agency, comparing the amounts recommended in the 
bill with fiscal year 1995 enacted amounts and budget estimates 
presented for fiscal year 1996:
      
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
                ADDITIONAL VIEWS SUBMITTED BY MR. TAYLOR

    In January 1994, the newly appointed chairman of the 
Federal Communications Commission (FCC) announced that the 
agency's priority would be to promote ``diversity'' in 
broadcasting. Because the policy came on the heels of a two 
year FCC inquiry into NAACP allegations that several radio 
stations had not fully complied with the FCC's equal employment 
opportunity rule, the policy was apparently aimed at stations 
that discriminated against minorities.
    In reality, the FCC has used its new charge to challenge 
and deny radio license applications or renewals for religious 
broadcasters on the ground that they discriminate by requiring 
religious knowledge, training or expertise for employees.
    For example, the FCC targeted KFUO--a station in Clayton, 
Mo. owned and operated by the Lutheran Church--for an 
evidentiary hearing into discrimination charges. Following a 
five day hearing before an administrative law judge, the FCC 
staff concluded that there was no evidence of any intentional 
discrimination by KFUO. However, the FCC recommended to the 
presiding judge that the Church lose its license for the 
station despite the station's exemplary compliance record with 
all other commission rules and regulations. The FCC staff 
contend that the Church violated the Commission's equal 
employment opportunity rule by requiring knowledge of Lutheran 
doctrine and practices for many positions at the station.
    In secular stations, there is a fundamental necessity to 
hire people who have a certain level of knowledge of the format 
and content of the station's programming. For example, an all 
sports station hires people with adequate knowledge of sports. 
Financial and economic news stations require staff with an 
education or experience in such issues. And classic rock 
stations need people who know the difference between Frank 
Sinatra and Led Zeppelin.
    The absurdity in the FCC's ``diversity'' policy is that it 
discriminates against religious broadcast stations for 
attempting to insure some knowledge or expertise by employees 
of the station's content. Last year, Congress voted nearly ten-
to-one to prohibit the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission 
(EEOC) from spending money to enforce regulations defining the 
expression of religious beliefs in the work place as a form of 
harassment. The EEOC rule could have led to a ban on the 
display of religious symbols or any discussion of religion in 
the work place by designating them as religious harassment.
    We are all in agreement that there should be no tolerance 
for discrimination in today's society. In the case of KFUO, 
there is clearly no evidence of discrimination. I hope the 
Commission will reevaluate the intent of its ``diversity'' 
policy as it considers its staff's recommendation regarding 
KFUO's license renewal. We would be happy to work with the FCC 
on this issue to ensure the most reasonable policy is set 
forth.
    However, if the FCC decides it must continue forward with a 
policy that discriminates against religious stations, we will 
find it necessary to add language to this appropriations bill 
similar to that put forth regarding EEOC's policy last year.
 ADDITIONAL VIEWS SUBMITTED BY MR. MOLLOHAN, MR. SKAGGS, AND MR. DIXON

    We would first like to congratulate Chairman Hal Rogers on 
his first bill as Subcommittee Chairman. This year has 
presented him with many unique challenges, and he has carried 
out his duties with great diligence and competence.
    The budget realities the Chairman was faced with as he 
deliberated the funding levels in this bill should not go 
unmentioned. The shortage in this subcommittee's 602(b) 
allocation is directly related to the recently passed 
Republican Budget Resolution which we voted against.
    The subcommittee's 602(b) allocation was simply not 
sufficient to both respond to the increasing demand to provide 
huge increases for Federal law enforcement and crime programs 
and fund other programs under the subcommittee's jurisdiction 
at responsible levels. Choices had to be made. The 
subcommittee's allocation made it impossible to provide a 
284.6% increase for the reimbursement to states for the 
incarceration of illegal aliens and not expect there to be 
consequences for other programs.
    The Budget resolution reorders our National funding 
priorities, and eliminates or cuts many programs which invest 
in our people, in our economy, and in our natural resources. 
And it does so--at least in part--to pay for a tax cut for the 
wealthiest Americans.
    It is the recommendations of the Budget Resolution which 
have limited the allocation of this Subcommittee. The result is 
that we have our Nation's crime-fighting initiatives, our 
competitiveness agenda, and our diplomatic functions competing 
in a less than zero sum game.
    It is easy to see that the Commerce Department has been the 
hardest hit in this exercise. The only question which remains 
to be answered is why.
    The Commerce Department is the only Cabinet level 
Department that works effectively with American business at the 
intersection of trade, technology, economic development, 
economic analysis, and sustainable development. In fact, the 
Department's relevance grows each day as American businesses 
are forced to compete in an increasingly aggressive global 
market place. While some may call the Department's programs 
corporate welfare, they actually serve to put U.S. industry on 
a level playing field with our major competitors, and protect 
our National economic security.
    It is evident that the cuts to the Commerce Department do 
not make fiscal sense. For every dollar invested in the 
Department, seven dollars are returned to the economy. To this 
end, we continue to be perplexed when initiatives to eliminate 
the Department are viewed as cost-saving proposals.
    Although our Chairman acted responsibly in not dismantling 
the Department in this bill, we do have several concerns with 
many of his cuts in important Commerce Department programs.
    Most notably, we are opposed to the huge cuts to the 
civilian technology programs under the National Institutes of 
Standards and Technology. Already, the U.S. ranks 28th--behind 
all of our major competitors--in public funding of non-defense 
R&D; as a percentage of GDP.
    We are concerned that the elimination of the Advanced 
Technology Program will erode the Nation's competitiveness in 
the development and commercialization of high-risk 
technologies. ATP is a wise investment in the advancement of 
high-risk technologies with potentially long-term economic 
benefits--investments that the private sector might otherwise 
forego.
    Additionally, we are extremely concerned with the 
significant cuts to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration, especially in the programs which fall under the 
National Marine Fisheries Service, Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Research, and the National Ocean Service. At the House mark, 
NOAA would be forced to cut employment by 535 FTE and close 
several laboratories; private sector employment also would 
decrease by about 850 FTE. Although the House mark would 
support the National Weather Service modernization, 
insufficient funds would be provided to support research and 
fisheries, protected species management, and other important 
aspects of NOAA's oceanic responsibilities.
    Also under the Department of Commerce, we are concerned 
about the impacts that the 27 percent reduction in funding for 
the Minority Business Development Agency will have on expanding 
opportunities to minority businesses. The MBDA was specifically 
created to enhance minority capitalism. This is a laudable goal 
and one which we assume the majority shares. We believe it is a 
goal that cannot be accomplished without Federal support.
    Minorities continue to be significantly underrepresented in 
the business community. The technical and management assistance 
provided by MBDA is essential to expanding minority access to 
capital and to developing competitive minority owned firms. 
While reduction in duplicative services between MBDA and SBA 
should be reviewed, it is important that the specific mission 
and programs of MBDA not be consumed in a rush to reduce and 
consolidate.
    With regard to the Department of Justice, we do not agree 
with the approach taken by the Committee in the area of crime 
prevention. The Committee's recommendations zero out several 
important targeted crime prevention programs, such as Drug 
Courts, assistance for at-risk youth, and the Community 
Oriented Policing Services (COPS) Program, in favor of a large 
local law enforcement block grant program. Further, this block 
grant is tied to H.R. 728, which passed the House on February 
14, 1995, and has not made much progress in the Senate, leaving 
the fate of the $2.0 billion local law enforcement block grant 
in some question in the event that H.R. 728 or similar 
legislation is not enacted into law.
    Advocates of the local block grant contend that it will 
allow prevention programs as well as the COPS program to be 
funded. While that may be the case, it does not guarantee that 
one new officer will reach the streets of this nation, and it 
pits funding for COPS officers against funding for prevention 
programs.
    We are also concerned about the Committee's decision to 
eliminate the Community Relations Service (CRS), transfer its 
functions to other accounts within the Department of Justice, 
and reduce its funding. CRS provides valuable mediation, 
conflict resolution, and technical assistance services in the 
resolution of volatile racial disputes. Unfortunately, such 
dispute resolution activities remain essential in communities 
across the nation, and the small federal investment in CRS' 
activities is well spent in prevention of more serious 
problems.
    In addition, with regard to the Judiciary, we strongly 
object to the Committee's prohibition on the use of funds for 
Post-Conviction Defender Organizations (PCDO's). In so doing, 
the Committee states its belief that PCDO's delay the judicial 
process in Federal habeas corpus petitions, and the Committee 
has provided $10 million for additional panel attorneys to 
assume the PCDO's caseload, further delaying the process of 
habeas corpus petitions and costing the taxpayers additional 
dollars.
    It is a matter of fact that panel attorneys cost more per 
hour and require more time to perform the work associated with 
habeas corpus petitions than do PCDO attorneys. It is also 
apparent that the $10 million provided by the Committee in 
Fiscal Year 1996 for additional panel attorneys will not cover 
the cost of panel attorney hours required to perform PCDO work. 
This cost is actually closer to $51 million. Therefore, in 
prohibiting the Judiciary from expending funds on PCDO's 
without enough funds for panel attorneys, and without any 
transition period, the Committee is, in effect, further 
delaying the progress of habeas corpus petitions.
    We would also like to express our concerns over the 
Committee's actions in the area of international broadcasting. 
The Committee's recommendations for Fiscal year 1996 reduce 
broadcasting to a point where the operations of both the Voice 
of America (VOA) and Radio Free Europe will be curtailed 
significantly. The Administration has already consolidated and 
downsized international broadcasting and reduced the budget 
request for these functions by almost 20 percent. There is 
broad support in the Congress for continued service of VOA and 
Radio Free Europe.
    We are concerned with the Committee's restrictive language 
for the use of funds for new or expanded peacekeeping missions. 
While it is certainly important that new peacekeeping missions 
be scrutinized as to their national interest, we have concerns 
that such restrictive language in this area will cause serious 
impediments to the President's ability to conduce foreign 
policy.
    Regarding the Legal Services Corporation (LSC), we are not 
in agreement with the committee's recommendation for the Fiscal 
Year 1996 funding level. In addition, the many restrictions 
placed on LSC grantees make the effort to provide access for 
our nation's poor to the judicial system difficult, and at 
times impossible.
    Also, extending restrictions to private and state funds 
hinders LSC's efforts to generate non-federal funding at a time 
when many in the Congress would like to end funding for LSC 
altogether.

                                   Julian C. Dixon.
                                   David E. Skaggs.
                                   Alan B. Mollohan.