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104th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

 1st Session                                                    104-402
_______________________________________________________________________


 
 MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND RELATED 
AGENCIES, FOR THE FISCAL YEAR ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 1996, AND FOR OTHER 
                                PURPOSES

                                _______


               December 12, 1995.--Ordered to be printed

_______________________________________________________________________


 Mr. Regula, from the committee of conference, submitted the following

                           CONFERENCE REPORT

                        [To accompany H.R. 1977]

      The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of 
the two Houses on the amendments of the Senate to the bill 
(H.R. 1977) making appropriations for the Department of the 
Interior and related agencies, for the fiscal year ending 
September 30, 1996, and for other purposes, having met, after 
full and free conference, have agreed to recommend and do 
recommend to their respective Houses as follows:
      That the Senate recede from its amendments numbered 4, 
21, 24, 40, 54, 57, 67, 77, 83, 85, 94, 99, 100, 105, 107, 111, 
117, 118, 123, 136, 138, 147, 148, 155, 163, 166, and 169.
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendments of the Senate numbered 10, 11, 13, 15, 16, 17, 18, 
19, 20, 28, 32, 34, 36, 45, 46, 48, 50, 51, 52, 56, 59, 61, 62, 
66, 71, 72, 73, 74, 75, 76, 78, 80, 81, 82, 87, 88, 93, 96, 97, 
102, 103, 106, 109, 113, 121, 124, 126, 127, 128, 129, 130, 
131, 133, 134, 137, 139, 140, 141, 142, 143, 144, 145, 149, 
150, 157, 159, 160, 161, and 162, and agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 1:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 1, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment insert the following: , and assessment of mineral 
potential of public lands pursuant to P.L. 96-487 (16 U.S.C. 
3150(a)), $568,062,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 2:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 2, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      Restore the matter stricken by said amendment, amended as 
follows: After the first comma in said amendment insert: of 
which $2,000,000 shall be available for assessment of the 
mineral potential of public lands in Alaska pursuant to section 
1010 of P.L. 96-487 (16 U.S.C. 3150), and; and the Senate agree 
to the same.
      Amendment numbered 3:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 3, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$568,062,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 5:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 5, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$3,115,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 6:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 6, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$101,500,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 7:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 7, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$12,800,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 8:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 8, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$93,379,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 9:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 9, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment insert the following: $497,943,000, to remain 
available for obligation until September 30, 1997, and the 
Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 12:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 12, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$37,655,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 14:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 14, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$36,900,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 22:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 22, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed by said amendment insert: 
: Provided further, That the Director of the Fish and Wildlife 
Service may charge reasonable fees for expenses to the Federal 
Government for providing training by the National Education and 
Training Center: Provided further, That all training fees 
collected shall be available to the Director, until expended, 
without further appropriation, to be used for the costs of 
training and education provided by the National Education and 
Training Center; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 23:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 23, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      Retain the matter proposed by said amendment amended as 
follows: Following ``Public Law 88-567,'' insert: if for any 
reason the Secretary disapproves for use in 1996 or does not 
finally approve for use in 1996 any pesticide or chemical which 
was approved for use in 1995 or had been requested for use in 
1996 by the submission of a pesticide use proposal as of 
September 19, 1995, ; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 25:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 25, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$1,083,151,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 26:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 26, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      Restore the matter stricken by said amendment, amended to 
read as follows: , and of which not more than $500,000 shall be 
available for development of the National Park Service's 
management plan for the Mojave National Preserve: Provided, 
That these funds shall be strictly limited to the development 
activities for the Preserve's management plan; and the Senate 
agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 27:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 27, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$37,649,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 29:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 29, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$36,212,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 30:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 30, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$143,225,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 31:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 31, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum stricken and inserted by said 
amendment insert the following: $4,500,000 of the funds 
provided herein ; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 33:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 33, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$49,100,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 35:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 35, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: : 
Provided, That any funds made available for the purpose of 
acquisition of the Elwha and Glines dams shall be used solely 
for acquisition, and shall not be expended until the full 
purchase amount has been appropriated by the Congress; and the 
Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 37:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 37, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed by said amendment insert: 
None of the funds in this Act may be spent by the National Park 
Service for activities taken in direct response to the United 
Nations Biodiversity Convention.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 38:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 38, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed by said amendment insert:
      The National Park Service may enter into cooperative 
agreements that involve the transfer of National Park Service 
appropriated funds to state, local and tribal governments, 
other public entities, educational institutions, and private 
nonprofit organizations for the public purpose of carrying out 
National Park Service programs.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 39:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 39, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed by said amendment insert:
      The National Park Service shall, within existing funds, 
conduct a Feasibility Study for a northern access route into 
Denali National Park and Preserve in Alaska, to be completed 
within one year of the enactment of this Act and submitted to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations and to the 
Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources and the House 
Committee on Resources. The Feasibility Study shall ensure that 
resource impacts from any plan to create such access route are 
evaluated with accurate information and according to a process 
that takes into consideration park values, visitor needs, a 
full range of alternatives, the viewpoints of all interested 
parties, including the tourism industry and the State of 
Alaska, and potential needs for compliance with the National 
Environmental Policy Act. The Study shall also address the time 
required for development of alternatives and identify all 
associated costs.
      This Feasibility Study shall be conducted solely by the 
National Park Service planning personnel permanently assigned 
to National Park Service offices located in the State of Alaska 
in consultation with the State of Alaska Department of 
Transportation.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 41:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 41, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment insert the following: and to conduct inquiries into 
the economic conditions affecting mining and materials 
processing industries (30 U.S.C. 3, 21a, and 1603; 50 U.S.C. 
98g(1)) and related purposes as authorized by law and to 
publish and disseminate data; $730,503,000; and the Senate 
agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 42:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 42, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      Restore the matter stricken by said amendment amended to 
read as follows: , and of which $137,000,000 for resource 
research and the operations of Cooperative Research Units shall 
remain available until September 30, 1997, and of which 
$16,000,000 shall remain available until expended for 
conducting inquiries into the economic conditions affecting 
mining and materials processing industries; and the Senate 
agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 43:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 43, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      Restore the matter stricken by said amendment amended to 
read as follows: : Provided further, That funds available 
herein for resource research may be used for the purchase of 
not to exceed 61 passenger motor vehicles, of which 55 are for 
replacement only: Provided further, That none of the funds 
available under this head for resource research shall be used 
to conduct new surveys on private property, including new 
aerial surveys for the designation of habitat under the 
Endangered Species Act, except when it is made known to the 
Federal official having authority to obligate or expend such 
funds that the survey or research has been requested and 
authorized in writing by the property owner or the owner's 
authorized representative: Provided further, That none of the 
funds provided herein for resource research may be used to 
administer a volunteer program when it is made known to the 
Federal official having authority to obligate or expend such 
funds that the volunteers are not properly trained or that 
information gathered by the volunteers is not carefully 
verified: Provided further, That no later than April 1, 1996, 
the Director of the United States Geological Survey shall issue 
agency guidelines for resource research that ensure that 
scientific and technical peer review is utilized as fully as 
possible in selection of projects for funding and ensure the 
validity and reliability of research and data collection on 
Federal lands: Provided further, That no funds available for 
resource research may be used for any activity that was not 
authorized prior to the establishment of the National 
Biological Survey: Provided further, That once every five years 
the National Academy of Sciences shall review and report on the 
resource research activities of the Survey: Provided further, 
That if specific authorizing legislation is enacted during or 
before the start of fiscal year 1996, the resource research 
component of the Survey should comply with the provisions of 
that legislation: Provided further, That unobligated and 
unexpended balances in the National Biological Survey, 
Research, inventories and surveys account at the end of fiscal 
year 1995, shall be merged with and made a part of the United 
States Geological Survey, Surveys, investigations, and research 
account and shall remain available for obligation until 
September 30, 1996: Provided further, That the authority 
granted to the United States Bureau of Mines to conduct mineral 
surveys and to determine mineral values by section 603 of 
Public Law 94-579 is hereby transferred to, and vested in, the 
Director of the United States Geological Survey; and the Senate 
agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 44:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 44, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$182,994,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 47:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 47, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment insert the following:
      For expenses necessary for, and incidental to, the 
closure of the United States Bureau of Mines, $64,000,000, to 
remain available until expended, of which not to exceed 
$5,000,000 may be used for the completion and/or transfer of 
certain ongoing projects within the United States Bureau of 
Mines, such projects to be identified by the Secretary of the 
Interior within 90 days of enactment of this Act: Provided, 
That there hereby are transferred to, and vested in, the 
Secretary of Energy: (1) the functions pertaining to the 
promotion of health and safety in mines and the mineral 
industry through research vested by law in the Secretary of the 
Interior or the United States Bureau of Mines and performed in 
fiscal year 1995 by the United States Bureau of Mines at its 
Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania, and at its Spokane 
Research Center in Washington; (2) the functions pertaining to 
the conduct of inquiries, technological investigations and 
research concerning the extraction, processing, use and 
disposal of mineral substances vested by law in the Secretary 
of the Interior or the United States Bureau of Mines and 
performed in fiscal year 1995 by the United States Bureau of 
Mines under the minerals and materials science programs at its 
Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania, and at its Albany 
Research Center in Oregon; and (3) the functions pertaining to 
mineral reclamation industries and the development of methods 
for the disposal, control, prevention, and reclamation of 
mineral waste products vested by law in the Secretary of the 
Interior or the United States Bureau of Mines and performed in 
fiscal year 1995 by the United States Bureau of Mines at its 
Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania: Provided further, 
That, if any of the same functions were performed in fiscal 
year 1995 at locations other than those listed above, such 
functions shall not be transferred to the Secretary of Energy 
from those other locations; Provided further, That the Director 
of the Office of Management and Budget, in consultation with 
the Secretary of Energy and the Secretary of the Interior, is 
authorized to make such determinations as may be necessary with 
regard to the transfer of functions which relate to or are used 
by the Department of the Interior, or component thereof 
affected by this transfer of functions, and to make such 
dispositions of personnel, facilities, assets, liabilities, 
contracts, property, records, and unexpended balances of 
appropriations, authorizations, allocations, and other funds 
held, used, arising from, available to or to be made available 
in connection with, the functions transferred herein as are 
deemed necessary to accomplish the purposes of this transfer: 
Provided further, That all reductions in personnel complements 
resulting from the provisions of this Act shall, as to the 
functions transferred to the Secretary of Energy, be done by 
the Secretary of the Interior as though these transfers had not 
taken place but had been required of the Department of the 
Interior by all other provisions of this Act before the 
transfers of function become effective: Provided further, That 
the transfers of function to the Secretary of Energy shall 
become effective on the date specified by the Director of the 
Office of Management and Budget, but in no event later than 90 
days after enactment into law of this Act: Provided further, 
That the reference to ``function'' includes, but is not limited 
to, any duty, obligation, power, authority, responsibility, 
right, privilege, and activity, or the plural thereof, as the 
case may be; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 49:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 49, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$173,887,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 53:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 53, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment insert the following: $1,384,434,000; and the Senate 
agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 55:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 55, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment insert the following: $100,255,000 shall be for 
welfare assistance grants and not to exceed $104,626,000; and 
the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 58:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 58, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$68,209,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 60:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 60, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$71,854,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 63:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 63, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      Retain the matter proposed by said amendment amended as 
follows: Before ``: Provided further'' in said amendment, 
insert: , to become effective on July 1, 1997; and the Senate 
agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 64:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 64, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$100,833,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 65:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 65, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$80,645,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 68:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 68, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      Retain the matter proposed by said amendment amended as 
follows: In lieu of the sum named in said amendment insert: 
$500,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 69:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 69, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      Retain the matter proposed by said amendment, amended as 
follows:
      In lieu of the first sum named in said amendment insert: 
$4,500,000.
      In lieu of the second sum named in said amendment insert: 
$35,914,000.
      In lieu of the third sum named in said amendment insert: 
$500,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment Numbered 70:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 70, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment insert the following: $65,188,000, of which (1) 
$61,661,000 shall be available until expended for technical 
assistance, including maintenance assistance, disaster 
assistance, insular management controls, and brown tree snake 
control and research; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment Numbered 79:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 79, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      Retain the matter proposed by said amendment amended as 
follows:
      In lieu of ``October 1, 1995'' named in said amendment 
insert: March 1, 1996; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment Numbered 84:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 84, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      Restore the matter stricken by said amendment, amended to 
read as follows: Sec. 108. Prior to the transfer of Presidio 
properties to the Presidio Trust, when authorized, the 
Secretary may not obligate in any calendar month more than \1/
2\ of the fiscal year 1996 appropriation for operation of the 
Presidio: Provided, That this section shall expire on December 
31, 1995.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment Numbered, 86:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 86, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed by said amendment, insert:
      Sec. 115. (a) Of the funds appropriated by this Act or 
any subsequent Act providing for appropriations in fiscal years 
1996 and 1997, not more than 50 percent of any self-governance 
funds that would otherwise be allocated to each Indian tribe in 
the State of Washington shall actually be paid to or on account 
of such Indian tribe from and after the time at which such 
tribe shall--
            (1) take unilateral action that adversely impacts 
        the existing rights to and/or customary uses of, 
        nontribal member owners of fee simple land within the 
        exterior boundary of the tribe's reservation to water, 
        electricity, or any other similar utility or necessity 
        for the nontribal members' residential use of such 
        land; or
            (2) restrict or threaten to restrict said owners 
        use of or access to publicly maintained rights of way 
        necessary or desirable in carrying the utilities or 
        necessities described above.
      (b) Such penalty shall not attach to the initiation of 
any legal actions with respect to such rights or the 
enforcement of any final judgments, appeals from which have 
been exhausted, with respect thereto.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 89:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 89, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed by said amendment insert:
      Sec. 118. Section 4(b) of Public Law 94-241 (90 Stat. 
263) as added by section 10 of Public Law 99-396 is amended by 
deleting ``until Congress otherwise provides by law.'' and 
inserting in lieu thereof: ``except that, for fiscal years 1996 
through 2002, payments to the Commonwealth of the Northern 
Mariana Islands pursuant to the multi-year funding agreements 
contemplated under the Covenant shall be $11,000,000 annually, 
subject to an equal local match and all other requirements set 
forth in the Agreement of the Special Representatives on Future 
Federal Financial Assistance of the Northern Mariana Islands, 
executed on December 17, 1992 between the special 
representative of the President of the United States and 
special representatives of the Governor of the Northern Mariana 
Islands with any additional amounts otherwise made available 
under this section in any fiscal year and not required to meet 
the schedule of payments in this subsection to be provided as 
set forth in subsection (c) until Congress otherwise provides 
by law.
      ``(c) The additional amounts referred to in subsection 
(b) shall be made available to the Secretary for obligation as 
follows:
            ``(1) for fiscal years 1996 through 2001, 
        $4,580,000 annually for capital infrastructure projects 
        as Impact Aid for Guam under section 104(c)(6) of 
        Public Law 99-239;
            ``(2) for fiscal year 1996, $7,700,000 shall be 
        provided for capital infrastructure projects in 
        American Samoa; $4,420,000 for resettlement of Rongelap 
        Atoll; and
            ``(3) for fiscal years 1997 and thereafter, all 
        such amounts shall be available solely for capital 
        infrastructure projects in Guam, the Virgin Islands, 
        American Samoa, the Commonwealth of the Northern 
        Mariana Islands, the Republic of Palau, the Federated 
        States of Micronesia and the Republic of the Marshall 
        Islands: Provided, That, in fiscal year 1997, 
        $3,000,000 of such amounts shall be made available to 
        the College of the Northern Marianas and beginning in 
        fiscal year 1997, and in each year thereafter, not to 
        exceed $3,000,000 may be allocated, as provided in 
        appropriations Acts, to the Secretary of the Interior 
        for use by Federal agencies or the Commonwealth of the 
        Northern Mariana Islands to address immigration, labor, 
        and law enforcement issues in the Northern Mariana 
        Islands. The specific projects to be funded in American 
        Samoa shall be set forth in a five-year plan for 
        infrastructure assistance developed by the Secretary of 
        the Interior in consultation with the American Samoa 
        Government and updated annually and submitted to the 
        Congress concurrent with the budget justifications for 
        the Department of the Interior. In developing budget 
        recommendations for capital infrastructure funding, the 
        Secretary shall indicate the highest priority projects, 
        consider the extent to which particular projects are 
        part of an overall master plan, whether such project 
        has been reviewed by the Corps of Engineers and any 
        recommendations made as a result of such review, the 
        extent to which a set-aside for maintenance would 
        enhance the life of the project, the degree to which a 
        local cost-share requirement would be consistent with 
        local economic and fiscal capabilities, and may propose 
        an incremental set-aside, not to exceed $2,000,000 per 
        year, to remain available without fiscal year 
        limitation, as an emergency fund in the event of 
        natural or other disasters to supplement other 
        assistance in the repair, replacement, or hardening of 
        essential facilities: Provided further, That the 
        cumulative amount set aside for such emergency fund may 
        not exceed $10,000,000 at any time.
            ``(d) Within the amounts allocated for 
        infrastructure pursuant to this section, and subject to 
        the specific allocations made in subsection (c), 
        additional contributions may be made, as set forth in 
        appropriations Acts, to assist in the resettlement of 
        Rongelap Atoll: Provided, That the total of all 
        contributions from any Federal source after enactment 
        of this Act may not exceed $32,000,000 and shall be 
        contingent upon an agreement, satisfactory to the 
        President, that such contributions are a full and final 
        settlement of all obligations of the United States to 
        assist in the resettlement of Rongelap Atoll and that 
        such funds will be expended solely on resettlement 
        activities and will be properly audited and accounted 
        for. In order to provide such contributions in a timely 
        manner, each Federal agency providing assistance or 
        services, or conducting activities, in the Republic of 
        the Marshall Islands, is authorized to make funds 
        available through the Secretary of the Interior, to 
        assist in the resettlement of Rongelap. Nothing in this 
        subsection shall be construed to limit the provision of 
        ex gratia assistance pursuant to section 105(c)(2) of 
        the Compact of Free Association Act of 1985 (Public Law 
        99-239, 99 Stat. 1770, 1792), including for individuals 
        choosing not to resettle at Rongelap, except that no 
        such assistance for such individuals may be provided 
        until the Secretary notifies the Congress that the full 
        amount of all funds necessary for resettlement at 
        Rongelap has been provided.''.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 90:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 90, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$178,000,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 91:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 91, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment insert the following: $136,794,000, to remain 
available until expended, as authorized by law; and the Senate 
agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 92:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 92, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$1,256,253,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 95:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 95, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$163,500,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 98:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 98, and agree to the same with 
an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$41,200,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 101:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 101, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      Retain the matter proposed by said amendment amended as 
follows: Following ``Forest Service,'' in said amendment 
insert: other than the relocation of the Regional Office for 
Region 5 of the Forest Service from San Francisco to excess 
military property at Mare Island, Vallejo, California; and the 
Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 104:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 104, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed by said amendment insert:  
Any funds available to the Forest Service may be used for 
retrofitting Mare Island facilities to accommodate the 
relocation: Provided, That funds for the move must come from 
funds otherwise available to Region 5: Provided further, That 
any funds to be provided for such purposes shall only be 
available upon approval of the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 108:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 108, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed by said amendment insert: 
      For fiscal years 1996 and 1997, the Secretary shall 
continue the current Tongass Land Management Plan (TLMP) and 
may accommodate commercial tourism (if an agreement is signed 
between the Forest Service and the Alaska Visitors' 
Association), except that during this period, the Secretary 
shall maintain at least the number of acres of suitable 
available and suitable scheduled timber lands, and Allowable 
Sale Quantity, as identified in the Preferred Alternative 
(Alternative P) in the Tongass Land and Resources Management 
Plan and Final Environmental Impact Statement (dated October 
1992) as selected in the Record of Decision Review Draft #3-2/
93. Nothing in this section, including the ASQ identified in 
Alternative P, shall be construed to limit the Secretary's 
consideration of new information or to prejudice future 
revision, amendment or modification of TLMP based upon sound, 
verifiable scientific data.
      If the Forest Service determines in a Supplemental 
Evaluation to an Environmental Impact Statement that no 
additional analysis under the National Environmental Policy Act 
or section 810 of the Alaska National Interest Lands 
Conservation Act is necessary for any timber sale or offering 
which has been prepared for acceptance by, or award to, a 
purchaser after December 31, 1988, that has been subsequently 
determined by the Forest Service to be available for sale or 
offering to one or more other purchasers, the change of 
purchasers for whatever reason shall not be considered a 
significant new circumstance, and the Forest Service may offer 
or award such timber sale or offering to a different purchaser 
or offeree notwithstanding any other provision of law. A 
determination by the Forest Service pursuant to this paragraph 
shall not be subject to judicial review.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 110:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 110, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum stricken and inserted by said 
amendment insert: and for promoting health and safety in mines 
and the mineral industry through research (30 U.S.C. 3, 861(b), 
and 951(a)), for conducting inquiries, technological 
investigations and research concerning the extraction, 
processing, use, and disposal of mineral substances without 
objectionable social and environmental costs (30 U.S.C. 3, 
1602, and 1603), and for the development of methods for the 
disposal, control, prevention, and reclamation of waste 
products in the mining, minerals, metal, and mineral 
reclamation industries (30 U.S.C. 3 and 21a), $417,169,000; and 
the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 112:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 112, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$148,786,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 114:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 114, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$553,293,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 115:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 115, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$140,696,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 116:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 116, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$114,196,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 119:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 119, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$72,266,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 120:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 120, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$1,747,842,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 122:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 122, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$238,958,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 125:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 125, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$308,188,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 132:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 132, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$6,442,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 135:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 135, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the sum proposed by said amendment insert: 
$5,840,000; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 146:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 146, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed by said amendment insert:


                           public development


      Funds made available under this heading in prior years 
shall be available for operating and administrative expenses 
and for the orderly closure of the Corporation, as well as 
operating and administrative expenses for the functions 
transferred to the General Services Administration.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 151:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 151, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      Restore the matter stricken by said amendment, amended as 
follows:
      In lieu of subsection (g) insert the following:
      (g) Section 3(b) of the Pennsylvania Avenue Development 
Corporation Act of 1972 (40 U.S.C. 872(b)) is amended as 
follows:
      ``(b) The Corporation shall be dissolved on or before 
April 1, 1996. Upon dissolution, assets, obligations, 
indebtedness, and all unobligated and unexpended balances of 
the Corporation shall be transferred in accordance with the 
Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations 
Act, 1996.''.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 152:
      That the House recede for its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 152, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment insert the following:
      Sec. 314. (a) Except as provided in subsection (b), no 
part of any appropriation contained in this Act or any other 
Act shall be obligated or expended for the operation or 
implementation of the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem 
Management Project (hereinafter ``Project'').
      (b)(1) From the funds appropriated to the Forest Service 
and Bureau of Land Management: a sum of $4,000,000 is made 
available for the Executive Steering Committee of the Project 
to publish, and submit to the Committees on Agriculture, 
Nutrition, and Forestry, Appropriations, and Energy and Natural 
Resources of the Senate and Committees on Agriculture, 
Appropriations, and Resources of the House of Representatives, 
by April 30, 1996, an assessment on the National Forest System 
lands and lands administered by the Bureau of Land Management 
(hereinafter ``Federal lands'') within the area encompassed by 
the Project. The assessment shall be accompanied by draft 
Environmental Impact Statements that are not decisional and not 
subject to judicial review, contain a range of alternatives, 
without the identification of a preferred alternative or 
management recommendation, and provide a methodology for 
conducting any cumulative effects analysis required by section 
102(2)(C) of the National Environmental Policy Act (42 U.S.C. 
4332(2)) in the preparation of such amendment to a resource 
management plan pursuant to subsection (c)(2). The Executive 
Steering Committee shall release the required draft 
Environmental Impact Statements for a ninety day public comment 
period. A summary of the public comments received must 
accompany these documents upon its submission to Congress.
      (2) The assessment required by paragraph (1) shall 
contain the scientific information collected and analysis 
undertaken by the Project on landscape dynamics and forest and 
rangeland health conditions and the implications of such 
dynamics and conditions for forest and rangeland management, 
specifically the management of forest and rangeland vegetation 
structure, composition, density and related social and economic 
effects.
      (3) The assessment and draft Environmental Impact 
Statements required by paragraph (1) shall not: contain any 
material other than that required in paragraphs (1) and (2); be 
the subject of consultation or conferencing pursuant to section 
7 of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 (16 U.S.C. 1536); or be 
accompanied by any record of decision or documentation pursuant 
to section 102(2) of the National Environmental Policy Act, 
except as specified in paragraph (1).
      (c)(1) From the funds appropriated to the Forest Service 
and the Bureau of Land Management, each Forest Supervisor of 
the Forest Service and District Manager of the Bureau of Land 
Management with responsibility for a national forest or unit of 
land administered by the Bureau of Land Management (hereinafter 
``forest'') within the area encompassed by the Project shall--
            (A) review the resource management plan 
        (hereinafter ``plan'') for such forest, the scientific 
        information and analysis in the report prepared 
        pursuant to subsection (b) which are applicable to such 
        plan, and any policy which is applicable to such plan 
        upon the date of enactment of this section (whether or 
        not such policy has been added to such plan by 
        amendment), including any which is, or is intended to 
        be, of limited duration, and which the Project 
        addresses; and
            (B) based on such review, develop a modification of 
        such policy, or an alternative policy which serves the 
        basic purpose of such policy, to meet the specific 
        conditions of such forest.
      (2) For each plan reviewed pursuant to paragraph (1), the 
Forest Supervisor or District Manager concerned shall prepare 
and adopt an amendment which: contains the modified or 
alternative policy developed pursuant to paragraph (1)(B); is 
directed solely to and affects only such plan; and addresses 
the specific conditions of the forest to which the plan applies 
and the relationship of the modified or alternative policy to 
such conditions. The Forest Supervisor or District Manager 
concerned shall consult at a minimum, with the Governor of the 
State, and the Commissioners of the county or counties, and 
affected tribal governments in which the forest to which the 
plan applies is situated during the review of the plan required 
by paragraph (1) and the preparation of an amendment to the 
plan required by this paragraph.
      (3) To the maximum extent practicable, each amendment 
prepared pursuant to paragraph (2) shall establish site-
specific standards in lieu of imposing general standards 
applicable to multiple sites. Any amendment which would result 
in any major change in land use allocations within the plan or 
would reduce the likelihood of achievement of the goals and 
objectives of the plan (prior to any previous amendment 
incorporating in the plan any policy referred to in paragraph 
(1)(A)) shall be deemed a significant change, pursuant to 
section 6(f)(4) of the Forest and Rangeland Renewable Resources 
Planning Act of 1974 (16 U.S.C. 1604(f)(4)) or section 202 of 
the Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 (43 U.S.C. 
1712), requiring a significant plan amendment or equivalent.
      (4) Each amendment prepared pursuant to paragraph (2) 
shall comply with any applicable requirements of section 102(2) 
of the National Environmental Policy Act, except that any 
cumulative effects analysis conducted in accordance with the 
methodology provided pursuant to subsection (b)(1) shall be 
deemed to meet any requirement of such Act for such analysis 
and the scoping conducted by the Project prior to the date of 
enactment of this section shall substitute for any scoping 
otherwise required by such Act for such amendment, unless at 
the sole discretion of the Forest Supervisor or District 
Manager additional scoping is deemed necessary.
      (5) The review of each plan required by paragraph (1) 
shall be conducted, and the preparation and decision to approve 
an amendment to each plan pursuant to paragraph (2) shall be 
made, by the Forest Supervisor or District Manager, as the case 
may be, solely on: the basis of the review conducted pursuant 
to paragraph (1)(A), any consultation or conferencing pursuant 
to section 7 of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 required by 
paragraph (6), any documentation required by section 102(2) of 
the National Environmental Policy Act, and any applicable 
guidance or other policy issued prior to the date of enactment 
of this Act.
      (6)(A) Any policy adopted in an amendment prepared 
pursuant to paragraph (2) which is a modification of 
alternative to a policy referred to in paragraph (1)(A) and 
upon which consultation or conferencing has occurred pursuant 
to section 7 of the Endangered Species Act of 1973, shall not 
again be subject to the consultation or conferencing provisions 
of such section 7.
      (B) If required by such section 7, and not subject to 
subparagraph (A), the Forest Supervisor or District Manager 
concerned shall consult or conference separately on each 
amendment prepared pursuant to paragraph (2).
      (C) No further consultation, other than the consultation 
specified in subparagraph (B), shall be undertaken on the 
amendments prepared pursuant to paragraph (2), on any project 
or activity which is consistent with an applicable amendment, 
on any policy referred to in paragraph (1)(A), or on any 
portion of any plan related to such policy or the species to 
which such policy applies.
      (7) Each amendment prepared pursuant to paragraph (2) 
shall be adopted on or before October 31, 1996: Provided, That 
any amendment deemed a significant plan amendment, or 
equivalent, pursuant to paragraph (3) shall be adopted on or 
before March 31, 1997.
      (8) No policy referred to in paragraph (1)(A), or any 
provision of a plan or other planning document incorporating 
such policy, shall be effective in any forest subject to the 
Project on or after March 31, 1997, or after an amendment to 
the plan which applies to such forest is adopted pursuant to 
the provisions of this subsection, whichever occurs first.
      (9) On the signing of a record decision or equivalent 
document making an amendment for the Clearwater National Forest 
pursuant to paragraph (2), the requirement for revision 
referred to in the Stipulation of Dismissal dated September 13, 
1993, applicable to the Clearwater National Forest is deemed to 
be satisfied, and the interim management direction provisions 
contained in the Stipulation of Dismissal shall be of no 
further effect with respect to the Clearwater National Forest.
      (d) The documents prepared under the authority of this 
section shall not be applied or used to regulate non-Federal 
lands.
      And the Senate agreed to the same.
      Amendment numbered 153:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 153, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment insert the following:

SEC. 315. RECREATIONAL FEE DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM.

      (a) The Secretary of the Interior (acting through the 
Bureau of Land Management, the National Park Service and the 
United States Fish and Wildlife Service) and the Secretary of 
Agriculture (acting through the Forest Service) shall each 
implement a fee program to demonstrate the feasibility of user-
generated cost recovery for the operation and maintenance of 
recreation areas or sites and habitat enhancement projects on 
Federal lands.
      (b) In carrying out the pilot program established 
pursuant to this section, the appropriate Secretary shall 
select from areas under the jurisdiction of each of the four 
agencies referred to in subsection (a) no fewer than 10, but as 
many as 50, areas, sites or projects for fee demonstration. For 
each such demonstration, the Secretary, notwithstanding any 
other provision of law--
            (1) shall charge and collect fees for admission to 
        the area or for the use of outdoor recreation sites, 
        facilities, visitor centers, equipment, and services by 
        individuals and groups, or any combination thereof;
            (2) shall establish fees under this section based 
        upon a variety of cost recovery and fair market 
        valuation methods to provide a broad basis for 
        feasibility testing;
            (3) may contract, including provisions for 
        reasonable commissions, with any public or private 
        entity to provide visitor services, including 
        reservations and information, and may accept services 
        of volunteers to collect fees charged pursuant to 
        paragraph (1);
            (4) may encourage private investment and 
        partnerships to enhance the delivery of quality 
        customer services and resource enhancement, and provide 
        appropriate recognition to such partners or investors; 
        and
            (5) may assess a fine of not more than $100 for any 
        violation of the authority to collect fees for 
        admission to the area or for the use of outdoor 
        recreation sites, facilities, visitor centers, 
        equipment, and services.
      (c)(1) Amounts collected at each fee demonstration area, 
site or project shall be distributed as follows:
            (A) Of the amount in excess of 104% of the amount 
        collected in fiscal year 1995, and thereafter annually 
        adjusted upward by 4%, eighty percent to a special 
        account in the Treasury for use without further 
        appropriation, by the agency which administers the 
        site, to remain available for expenditures in 
        accordance with paragraph (2)(A).
            (B) Of the amount in excess of 104% of the amount 
        collected in fiscal year 1995, and thereafter annually 
        adjusted upward by 4%, twenty percent to a special 
        account in the Treasury for use without further 
        appropriation, by the agency which administers the 
        site, to remain available for expenditure in accordance 
        with paragraph (2)(B).
            (C) For agencies other than the Fish and Wildlife 
        Service, up to 15% of current year collections of each 
        agency, but not greater than fee collection costs for 
        that fiscal year, to remain available for expenditure 
        without further appropriation in accordance with 
        paragraph (2)(C).
            (D) For agencies other than the Fish and Wildlife 
        Service, the balance to the special account established 
        pursuant to sub-paragraph (A) of section 4(i)(1) of the 
        Land and Water Conservation Fund Act, as amended.
            (E) For the Fish and Wildlife Service, the balance 
        shall be distributed in accordance with section 201(c) 
        of the Emergency Wetlands Resources Act.
      (2)(A) Expenditures from site specific special funds 
shall be for further activities of the area, site or project 
from which funds are collected, and shall be accounted for 
separately.
            (B) Expenditures from agency specific special funds 
        shall be for use on an agency-wide basis and shall be 
        accounted for separately.
            (C) Expenditures from the fee collection support 
        fund shall be used to cover fee collection costs in 
        accordance with section 4(i)(1)(B) of the Land and 
        Water Conservation Fund Act, as amended: Provided, That 
        funds unexpended and unobligated at the end of the 
        fiscal year shall not be deposited into the special 
        account established pursuant to section 4(i)(1)(A) of 
        said Act and shall remain available for expenditure 
        without further appropriation.
      (3) In order to increase the quality of the visitor 
experience at public recreational areas and enhance the 
protection of resources, amounts available for expenditure 
under this section may only be used for the area, site or 
project concerned, for backlogged repair and maintenance 
projects (including projects relating to health and safety) and 
for interpretation, signage, habitat or facility enhancement, 
resource preservation, annual operation (including fee 
collection), maintenance, and law enforcement relating to 
public use. The agencywide accounts may be used for the same 
purposes set forth in the preceding sentence, but for areas, 
sites or projects selected at the discretion of the respective 
agency head.
      (d)(1) Amounts collected under this section shall not be 
taken into account for the purposes of the Act of May 23, 1908 
and the Act of March 1, 1911 (16 U.S.C. 500), the Act of March 
4, 1913 (16 U.S.C. 501), the Act of July 22, 1937 (7 U.S.C. 
1012), the Act of August 8, 1937 and the Act of May 24, 1939 
(43 U.S.C. 1181f et seq.), the Act of June 14, 1926 (43 U.S.C. 
869-4), chapter 69 of title 31, United States Code, section 401 
of the Act of June 15, 1935 (16 U.S.C. 715s), the Land and 
Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965 (16 U.S.C. 460l), and any 
other provision of law relating to revenue allocation.
      (2) Fees charged pursuant to this section shall be in 
lieu of fees charged under any other provision of law.
      (e) The Secretary of the Interior and the Secretary of 
Agriculture shall carry out this section without promulgating 
regulations.
      (f) The authority to collect fees under this section 
shall commence on October 1, 1995, and end on September 30, 
1998. Funds in accounts established shall remain available 
through September 30, 2001.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 154:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 154, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      Restore the matter stricken by said amendment, amended to 
read as follows:
      Sec. 316. Section 2001(a)(2) of Public Law 104-19 is 
amended as follows: Strike ``September 30, 1997'' and insert in 
lieu thereof ``December 31, 1996''.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 156:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 156, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      Restore the matter stricken by said amendment, amended to 
read as follows:

SEC. 319. GREAT BASIN NATIONAL PARK.

      Section 3 of the Great Basin National Park Act of 1986 
(16 U.S.C. 410mm-1) is amended--
            (1) in the first sentence of subsection (e) by 
        striking ``shall'' and inserting ``may''; and
            (2) in subsection (f)--
                    (A) by striking ``At the request'' and 
                inserting the following:
            ``(1) Exchanges.--At the request'';
                    (B) by striking ``grazing permits'' and 
                inserting ``grazing permits and grazing 
                leases''; and
                    (C) by adding after ``Federal lands.'' the 
                following:
            ``(2) Acquisition by donation.--
                    ``(A) In general.--The Secretary may 
                acquire by donation valid existing permits and 
                grazing leases authorizing grazing on land in 
                the park.
                    ``(B) Termination.--The Secretary shall 
                terminate a grazing permit or grazing lease 
                acquired under subparagraph (A) so as to end 
                grazing previously authorized by the permit or 
                lease.''.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 158:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 158, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment insert the following:
      Sec. 322. (a) None of the funds appropriated or otherwise 
made available pursuant to this Act shall be obligated or 
expended to accept or process applications for a patent for any 
mining or mill site claim located under the general mining 
laws.
      (b) The provisions of subsection (a) shall not apply if 
the Secretary of the Interior determines that, for the claim 
concerned: (1) a patent application was filed with the 
Secretary on or before September 30, 1994, and (2) all 
requirements established under sections 2325 and 2326 of the 
Revised Statutes (30 U.S.C. 29 and 30) for vein or lode claims 
and sections 2329, 2330, 2331, and 2333 of the Revised Statutes 
(30 U.S.C. 35, 36, and 37) for placer claims, and section 2337 
of the Revised Statutes (30 U.S.C. 42) for mill site claims, as 
the case may be, were fully complied with by the applicant by 
that date.
      (c) Processing Schedule.--For those applications for 
patents pursuant to subsection (b) which were filed with the 
Secretary of the Interior, prior to September 30, 1994, the 
Secretary of the Interior shall--
            (1) Within three months of the enactment of this 
        Act, file with the House and Senate Committees on 
        Appropriations and the Committee on Resources of the 
        House of Representatives and the Committee on Energy 
        and Natural Resources of the United States Senate a 
        plan which details how the Department of the Interior 
        will make a final determination as to whether or not an 
        applicant is entitled to a patent under the general 
        mining laws on at least 90 percent of such applications 
        within five years of the enactment of this Act and file 
        reports annually thereafter with the same committees 
        detailing actions taken by the Department of the 
        Interior to carry out such plan; and
            (2) Take such actions as may be necessary to carry 
        out such plan.
      (d) Mineral Examinations.--In order to process patent 
applications in a timely and responsible manner, upon the 
request of a patent applicant, the Secretary of the Interior 
shall allow the applicant to fund a qualified third-party 
contractor to be selected by the Bureau of Land Management to 
conduct a mineral examination of the mining claims or mill 
sites contained in a patent application as set forth in 
subsection (b). The Bureau of Land Management shall have the 
sole responsibility to choose and pay the third-party 
contractor in accordance with the standard procedures employed 
by the Bureau of Land Management in the retention of third-
party contractors.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 164:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 164, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the section number named in said amendment, 
insert: 328; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 165:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 165, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the section number named in said amendment, 
insert: 329; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 167:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 167, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the section number named in said amendment, 
insert: 330; and the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 168:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 168, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed by said amendment insert:
      Sec. 331. (a) Purposes of National Endowment for the 
Arts.--Section 2 of the National Foundation on the Arts and the 
Humanities Act of 1965, as amended (20 U.S.C. 951), sets out 
findings and purposes for which the National Endowment for the 
Arts was established, among which are--
            (1) ``The arts and humanities belong to all the 
        people of the United States'';
            (2) ``The arts and humanities reflect the high 
        place accorded by the American people. . .to the 
        fostering of mutual respect for the diverse beliefs and 
        values of all persons and groups'';
            (3) ``Public funding of the arts and humanities is 
        subject to the conditions that traditionally govern the 
        use of public money [and] such funding should 
        contribute to public support and confidence in the use 
        of taxpayer funds''; and
            (4) ``Public funds provided by the Federal 
        Government must ultimately serve public purposes the 
        Congress defines''.
      (b) Additional Congressional Findings.--Congress further 
finds and declares that the use of scarce funds, which have 
been taken from all taxpayers of the United States, to promote, 
disseminate, sponsor, or produce any material or performance 
that--
            (1) denigrates the religious objects or religious 
        beliefs of the adherents of a particular religion, or
            (2) depicts or describes, in a patently offensive 
        way, sexual or excretory activities or organs

is contrary to the express purposes of the National Foundation 
on the Arts and the Humanities Act of 1965, as amended.
      (c) Prohibition on Funding That Is Not Consistent With 
the Purposes of the Act.--Notwithstanding any other provision 
of law, none of the scarce funds which have been taken from all 
taxpayers of the United States and made available under this 
Act to the National Endowment for the Arts may be used to 
promote, disseminate, sponsor, or produce any material or 
performance that--
            (1) denigrates the religious objects or religious 
        beliefs of the adherents of a particular religion, or
            (2) depicts or describes, in a patently offensive 
        way, sexual or excretory activities or organs,

and this prohibition shall be strictly applied without regard 
to the content or viewpoint of the material or performance.
      (d) Section Not To Affect Other Works.--Nothing in this 
section shall be construed to affect in any way the freedom of 
any artist or performer to create any material or performance 
using funds which have not been made available under this Act 
to the National Endowment for the Arts.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 170:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 170, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed by said amendment insert:
      Sec. 332. For purposes related to the closure of the 
Bureau of Mines, funds made available to the United States 
Geological Survey, the United States Bureau of Mines, and the 
Bureau of Land Management shall be available for transfer, with 
the approval of the Secretary of the Interior, among the 
following accounts: United States Geological Survey, Surveys, 
investigations, and research; Bureau of Mines, Mines and 
minerals; and Bureau of Land Management, Management of lands 
and resources. The Secretary of Energy shall reimburse the 
Secretary of the Interior, in an amount to be determined by the 
Director of the Office of Management and Budget, for the 
expenses of the transferred functions between October 1, 1995 
and the effective date of the transfers of function. Such 
transfers shall be subject to the reprogramming guidelines of 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 171:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 171, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed by said amendment insert 
the following:
      Sec. 333. No funds appropriated under this or any other 
Act shall be used to review or modify sourcing areas previously 
approved under section 490(c)(3) of the Forest Resources 
Conservation and Shortage Relief Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-
382) or to enforce or implement Federal regulations 36 CFR part 
223 promulgated on September 8, 1995. The regulations and 
interim rules in effect prior to September 8, 1995 (36 CFR 
223.48, 36 CFR 223.87, 36 CFR 223 Subpart D, 36 CFR 223 Subpart 
F, and 36 CFR 261.6) shall remain in effect. The Secretary of 
Agriculture or the Secretary of the Interior shall not adopt 
any policies concerning Public Law 101-382 or existing 
regulations that would restrain domestic transportation or 
processing of timber from private lands or impose additional 
accountability requirements on any timber. The Secretary of 
Commerce shall extend until September 30, 1996, the order 
issued under section 491(b)(2)(A) of Public Law 101-382 and 
shall issue an order under section 491(b)(2)(B) of such law 
that will be effective October 1, 1996.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 172:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 172, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed by said amendment insert 
the following:
      Sec. 334. The National Park Service, in accordance with 
the Memorandum of Agreement between the United States National 
Park Service and the City of Vancouver dated November 4, 1994, 
shall permit general aviation on its portion of Pearson Field 
in Vancouver, Washington until the year 2022, during which time 
a plan and method for transitioning from general aviation 
aircraft to historic aircraft shall be completed; such 
transition to be accomplished by that date. This action shall 
not be construed to limit the authority of the Federal Aviation 
Administration over air traffic control or aviation activities 
at Pearson Field or limit operations and airspace of Portland 
International Airport.
      And the Senate agree to the same.
      Amendment numbered 173:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate numbered 173, and agree to the same 
with an amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter proposed by said amendment insert:
      Sec. 335. The United States Forest Service approval of 
Alternative site 2 (ALT 2), issued on December 6, 1993, is 
hereby authorized and approved and shall be deemed to be 
consistent with, and permissible under, the terms of Public Law 
100-696 (the Arizona-Idaho Conservation Act of 1988).
      And the Senate agree to the same.

                                   Ralph Regula,
                                   Joseph M. McDade,
                                   Jim Kolbe,
                                   Joe Skeen,
                                   Barbara F. Vucanovich,
                                   Charles H. Taylor,
                                   George R. Nethercutt, Jr.,
                                   Jim Bunn,
                                   Bob Livingston,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Slade Gorton,
                                   Ted Stevens,
                                   Pete V. Domenici,
                                   Mark O. Hatfield,
                                   Conrad Burns,
                                   Robert F. Bennett,
                                   Connie Mack,
                                   J. Bennett Johnston,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.

       JOINT EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE COMMITTEE OF CONFERENCE

      The managers on the part of the House and the Senate at 
the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on 
the amendments of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 1977), making 
appropriations for the Department of the Interior and related 
agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1996, and for 
other purposes, submit the following joint statement to the 
House and the Senate in explanation of the effect of the action 
agreed upon by the managers and recommended in the accompanying 
conference report.
      The conference agreement on H.R. 1977 incorporates some 
of the provisions of both the House and the Senate versions of 
the bill. Report language and allocations set forth in either 
House Report 104-173 or Senate Report 104-125 which are not 
changed by the conference are approved by the committee of 
conference. The statement of the managers, while repeating some 
report language for emphasis, does not negate the language 
referenced above unless expressly provided herein.
      The managers have included funding in each of the land 
acquisition accounts that is not earmarked by individual 
projects. The managers direct the Department of the Interior 
and the Forest Service to develop a proposed distribution of 
project funding for review and approval by the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations. In developing the proposed 
distributions, the agencies are encouraged to give 
consideration to a broader array of projects than was proposed 
in the FY 1996 budget, including but not limited to, projects 
for which capability statements have been prepared.

                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                       Bureau of Land Management

                   Management of Lands and Resources

      Amendment No. 1: Appropriates $568,062,000 for management 
of lands and resources instead of $570,017,000 as proposed by 
the House and $563,936,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
amendment also adds language to transfer responsibility for 
mineral assessments in Alaska from the Bureau of Mines.
      The net decrease below the House consists of decreases of 
$1,500,000 for wild horse and burro management, $500,000 for 
threatened and endangered species, $1,000,000 for recreation 
wilderness management, $448,000 for recreation resources 
management, $50,000 for coal management, $50,000 for other 
mineral resources, $554,000 for land and realty management, 
$4,000,000 for ALMRS, $500,000 for administrative support, and 
$834,000 for bureau-wide fixed costs; and increases of 
$4,981,000 for Alaska conveyance, $500,000 for information 
systems operations and $2,000,000 for mineral assessments in 
Alaska formerly funded under the Bureau of Mines.
      Amendment No. 2: Restores House provision stricken by the 
Senate which provides $599,999 for the management of the East 
Mojave National Scenic Area. The Senate had no similar 
provision. The amendment also adds language earmarking 
$2,000,000 for mineral assessments in Alaska.
      Amendment No. 3: Restates the final appropriation amount 
for management of lands and resources as $568,062,000 instead 
of $570,017,000 as proposed by the House and $563,936,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.

                        wildland fire management

      Amendment No. 4: Appropriates $235,924,000 for wildland 
fire management as proposed by the House instead of 
$240,159,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                        construction and access

      Amendment No. 5: Appropriates $3,115,000 for construction 
and access instead of $2,515,000 as proposed by the House and 
$2,615,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The managers agree to the following distribution of 
funds:

Sourdough Campground, AK......................................  $584,000
Byington Campground, ID.......................................   290,000
West Aravaipa Ranger Station, AZ..............................   200,000
Railroad Flat Campground, CA..................................   218,000
Penitentie Canyon, CO.........................................   220,000
James Kipp Campground, MT.....................................   345,000
Datil Well Rec Site reconstruction, NM........................    41,000
Encampment River Rec Area, WY.................................    60,000
Indian Creek Accessibility Rehab, NV..........................    57,000
El Camino Real Int'l Heritage Ctr., NM-A&E....................;   500,000
Flagstaff Hill, OR............................................   600,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Total................................................... 3,115,000

      The managers urge BLM and the non-Federal partners to 
consider during the A&E; phase of the El Camino Real 
International Heritage Center project the fact that future 
construction funds are likely to be severely constrained.

                       payments in lieu of taxes

      Amendment No. 6: Appropriates $101,500,000 for payments 
in lieu of taxes instead of $111,409,000 as proposed by the 
House and $100,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                            land acquisition

      Amendment No. 7: Appropriates $12,800,000 for land 
acquisition instead of $8,500,000 as proposed by the House and 
$10,550,000 as proposed by the Senate. The $12,800,000 includes 
$3,250,000 for acquisition management, $1,000,000 for emergency 
and inholding purchases, and $8,550,000 for land purchases.
      Funds provided under this account for land purchases are 
subject to the guidelines identified at the front of this 
statement.

                   oregon and california grant lands

      Amendment No. 8: Appropriates $93,379,000 for Oregon and 
California grant lands instead of $91,387,000 as proposed by 
the House and $95,364,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The net increase above the House consists of a reduction 
of $900,000 for resources management, and increases of 
$1,115,000 for facilities maintenance, and $1,777,000 for Jobs-
in-the-Woods.
      The managers are concerned about the many programs in the 
President's Forest Plan designed to provide assistance to 
timber dependent communities in the Pacific Northwest. The 
managers are disturbed by the inability of the agencies 
involved to provide a detailed accounting of funds appropriated 
in previous fiscal years in the President's Forest Plan for the 
unemployed timber worker programs.
      The managers expect the Secretary of the Interior and the 
Secretary of Agriculture to prepare a detailed accounting and 
report of the funds appropriated in fiscal year 1995 for the 
President's Forest plan. The report shall include a careful 
accounting of appropriated funding, including: funds 
appropriated for timber production; administrative expenses, 
including the number of Federal employees employed to 
administer the various aspects of the President's plan; funds 
appropriated for the various jobs programs under the 
President's plan, including but not limited to the Jobs in the 
Woods program; the number of individuals employed by these 
programs; and the average length of employment in the various 
jobs. The managers expect the Secretaries to submit the report 
to the Committees no later than March 31, 1996.

                United States Fish and Wildlife Service

                          resource management

      Amendment No. 9: Appropriates $497,943,000 for resource 
management instead of $497,150,000 as proposed by the House and 
$501,478,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The net increase above the House consists of increases of 
$3,800,000 for cooperative conservation agreements, $750,000 
for listing, $2,237,000 for habitat conservation, $1,502,000 
for migratory bird management, $600,000 for hatchery operations 
and maintenance, $800,000 for fish and wildlife management, 
$478,000 for the National Education and Training Center, and 
$885,000 for vehicle and aircraft purchase; and reductions of 
$500,000 for recovery, $230,000 for environmental contaminants, 
$6,542,000 for refuge operations and maintenance, and 
$2,987,000 for servicewide administrative support.
      The conference agreement includes $3,800,000 for 
cooperative conservation agreements with private landowners to 
institute effective management measures that make listing 
unnecessary. The managers intend that these funds also be used 
to implement the 4(d) rule which is intended to ease endangered 
species land use restrictions on small landowners. The managers 
agree that none of the funding for cooperative conservation 
agreements or listing be used in any way to conduct activities 
which would directly support listing of species or designating 
critical habitat.
      The managers have included $750,000 under the listing 
program to be used only for delisting and downlisting of 
threatened and endangered species in order to ease land use 
restrictions on private and public lands.
      The conference agreement includes a reduction of $200,000 
from the gray wolf reintroduction program. The managers expect 
the Service to continue the cooperative agreement with the 
Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service to provide 
assistance to ranchers experiencing livestock losses to wolves.
      The managers agree with the Senate position regarding the 
continued operation of Federal fish hatcheries. However, the 
funding provided for hatcheries in total is below last year's 
level, so reductions will be necessary. The managers encourage 
those non-Federal parties that have expressed an interest in 
participating in hatchery transfers to continue to pursue this 
option, and the Service should provide the transitional 
assistance for such efforts as was contemplated in the budget. 
Within the funds restored for hatchery operations and 
maintenance, $500,000 is provided only for maintenance of those 
hatcheries transferred during fiscal year 1996.
      The managers reiterate, however, the need for the working 
group proposed by the Senate to identify, by March 1, 1996, 
savings from the fisheries program that equal or surpass the 
savings associated with the hatchery transfers or closures 
proposed in the budget. Outyear funding for fisheries and other 
programs cannot be assured at a time of declining budgets, and 
future transfer proposals might not involve transitional 
assistance. The managers expect that there will be 
significantly fewer Federal fish hatcheries by the end of 
fiscal year 1997.
      The National Fish and Wildlife Foundation is funded at a 
level of $4,000,000. The House recommended that no funds be 
provided for this purpose in the future. The Senate took no 
position regarding outyear funding for the Foundation.
      The managers direct the Department to reinstate its 1992 
policy, modified to reflect public comments received, regarding 
permit terms and conditions for hunting and fishing guides in 
Alaska providing permit terms of 5 years with one renewal 
period of 5 years, transferability under prescribed conditions, 
and a right of survivorship. At such time as the new policy is 
implemented, existing permits should be reissued consistent 
with this policy. The managers note that the existing policy 
limiting terms to one year makes it impossible to obtain 
financing for guiding operations while the limit on 
transferability and survivorship prevent long-time family 
businesses from continuing upon the death or illness of the 
permit holder.
      The managers recognize the Fish and Wildlife Service's 
fisheries mitigation responsibilities pursuant to existing law 
and expect the working group to take into account such 
responsibilities.
      Amendment No. 10: Extends availability of $11,557,000 for 
Lower Snake River compensation plan facilities until expended 
as proposed by the Senate, instead of limiting the availability 
to September 30, 1997 as proposed by the House.
      Amendment No. 11: Includes language proposed by the 
Senate which prohibits listing additional species as threatened 
or endangered and prohibits designating critical habitat during 
fiscal year 1996 or until a reauthorization is enacted. The 
House had no similar provision.

                              construction

      Amendment No. 12: Appropriates $37,655,000 for 
construction instead of $26,355,000 as proposed by the House 
and $38,775,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The managers agree to the following distribution of 
funds:

Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge, UT, flood repair............$1,000,000
Bosque del Apache NWR, NM, repair............................. 1,820,000
Hawaii captive propagation facility, HI....................... 1,000,000
Mississippi refuges, bridge repair and equipment.............. 1,120,000
National Education Training Center, WV, construction..........24,000,000
Quivira NWR, KS, water management.............................   760,000
Russian River, AK, rehab......................................   400,000
Southeast Louisiana refuges, rehab............................ 1,000,000
Wichita Mountains NWR, OK, Grama Lake and Comanche Dams, 
    repair....................................................   700,000
Dam safety, servicewide inspections...........................   460,000
Bridge safety, servicewide inspections........................   395,000
Emergency projects--servicewide............................... 1,000,000
Construction management--servicewide.......................... 4,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

            Total.............................................37,655,000

      The managers expect the Department to include the 
remaining funding necessary to complete the construction of the 
National Education and Training Center in the fiscal year 1997 
budget.

                   natural resource damage assessment

      Amendment No. 13: Appropriates $4,000,000 for the natural 
resource damage assessment fund as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $6,019,000 as proposed by the House.
      The reductions below the House consist of $1,597,000 for 
damage assessments and $422,000 for program management.

                            land acquisition

      Amendment No. 14: Appropriates $36,900,000 for land 
acquisition instead of $14,100,000 as proposed by the House and 
$32,031,000 as proposed by the Senate. The $36,900,000 includes 
$8,000,000 for acquisition management, $1,000,000 for emergency 
and hardship purchases, $1,000,000 for inholding purchases, 
$1,000,000 for land exchanges, and $25,900,000 for refuge land 
purchases.
      Funds provided under this account for land purchases are 
subject to the guidelines identified at the front of this 
statement.

               north american wetlands conservation fund

      Amendment No. 15: Appropriates $6,750,000 for the North 
American Wetlands Conservation Fund as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $4,500,000 as proposed by the House.
      The increase above the House includes $2,230,000 for 
habitat management and $20,000 for administration.
      The House recommended that no funds be provided for this 
purpose in the future. The Senate took no position regarding 
outyear funding for this program.

              wildlife conservation and appreciation fund

      Amendment No. 16: Appropriates $800,000 for the Wildlife 
Conservation and Appreciation Fund as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $998,000 as proposed by the House.
      Amendment No. 17: Deletes matching requirements proposed 
by the House and stricken by the Senate. The matching 
requirements of the Partnerships for Wildlife Act will continue 
to apply, and do not need to be stated in the appropriations 
act.

                       administrative provisions

      Amendment No. 18: Provides authority to purchase 113 
motor vehicles as proposed by the Senate instead of 54 
passenger vehicles as proposed by the House.
      Amendment No. 19: Deletes House prohibition on purchasing 
police vehicles. The Senate had no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 20: Includes Senate provision that the Fish 
and Wildlife Service may accept donated aircraft. The House had 
no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 21: Includes House provision prohibiting 
the Fish and Wildlife Service from delaying the issuance of a 
wetlands permit for the City of Lake Jackson, TX. The Senate 
had no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 22: Modifies Senate provision on the 
distribution of refuge entrance fees by substituting language 
which allows the Fish and Wildlife Service to charge reasonable 
fees for expenses associated with the conduct of training 
programs at the National Education and Training Center. Any 
fees collected for this purpose will be used to cover costs 
associated with the operation of this facility. The House had 
no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 23: Modifies Senate provision regarding use 
of pesticides on farmland within wildlife refuges in the 
Klamath Basin. The amendment is based, in part, upon the 
Service's representation that it has already approved or 
anticipates approval of certain materials that are needed for 
farming during this fiscal year and that it will consider other 
materials for 1996 and subsequent years. If these approvals do 
not occur or are withdrawn, the Senate language will prevail 
and growers will be subject to the same restrictions as growers 
on private lands. Allowing the pesticide use proposal process 
to remain in effect for the next fiscal year will enable 
growers and the Federal government to work constructively 
toward an agreeable process.

                    Natural Resources Science Agency

                   Research, Inventories and Surveys

      Amendment No. 24: Deletes Senate language providing 
$145,965,000 for a natural resources science agency and 
providing guidance on the operation of that agency. This agency 
would have replaced the National Biological Service. The House 
had no similar provision. The managers have agreed to eliminate 
the National Biological Service and to fund natural resources 
research as part of the U.S. Geological Survey as proposed by 
the House. This item is discussed in more detail under 
amendment Nos. 42 and 43.

                         National Park Service

                 Operation of the National Park System

      Amendment No. 25: Appropriates $1,083,151,000 for 
operation of the National park system instead of $1,088,249,000 
as proposed by the House and $1,092,265,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The reduction from the Senate level reflects the 
transfer of the equipment replacement account back to the 
construction account.
      In keeping with the demands placed on other Interior 
bureaus, the managers have not funded uncontrollable costs and 
expect these costs to be absorbed through reductions to levels 
of review and management. Efficiencies should also be sought by 
exploring opportunities that exist and have been outlined in 
GAO reports to co-locate and combine functions, systems, 
programs, activities or field locations with other Federal land 
management agencies.
      The managers are concerned about the costs associated 
with the current reorganization effort and strongly urge the 
NPS to limit expenditures for task forces, work groups and 
employee details and special assistants. The managers request 
that a report be submitted by February 1, 1996, detailing a 
budget history of past costs and future estimated costs 
associated with the reorganization.
      The managers expect a report within 45 days of enactment 
of this Act identifying NPS' preliminary allocations for fiscal 
year 1996. This report will serve as the baseline for any 
reprogrammings in fiscal year 1996.
      In considering these allocations, the managers expect 
that none of the programmatic increases requested in the budget 
are to be considered except those necessary to meet specific 
park operating needs. This includes new and expanded programs. 
Any new initiative such as those related to training, 
reorganization or national service should be addressed through 
the reprogramming process.
      The managers expect that the National Park Service will 
use these operating funds for core park programs.
      The managers expect that the principle goal of the 
reorganization plan, which is to relocate staff from central 
and regional offices to the parks, will greatly alleviate the 
pressures placed on parks by increased visitation.
      The managers understand that in September 1995, a 
delegation from the World Heritage Committee of the United 
Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization held 
hearings in Montana regarding Yellowstone National Park and 
surrounding areas. The managers understand that the World 
Heritage Committee has neither the authority nor the ability to 
require the Federal or State governments to change, modify or 
amend management directions or to create, manage or maintain 
buffer zones to protect resources. In the event the World 
Heritage Committee, or any other organization, recommends non-
binding steps to protect resources in the Yellowstone area, the 
managers expect the National Park Service, as well as any other 
affected Federal agency, to follow the regular planning 
process, including full public involvement, before implementing 
any management changes.
      The managers have agreed to the House position regarding 
the termination of the Pennsylvania Avenue Development 
Corporation and the transfer of certain specific activities to 
other agencies including the National Park Service. This item 
is discussed in greater detail in amendment number 151 in Title 
III.
      Amendment No. 26: Revises House language stricken by the 
Senate to provide for the use of up to $500,000 for the 
development of a management plan for the Mojave National 
Preserve.
      The National Park Service is directed to develop a long-
term management plan for the Mojave National Preserve that 
incorporates traditional uses and recognizes budgetary 
constraints. The managers have permitted up to $500,000 to be 
used for this specific purpose. Such funds must be derived from 
the Office of the Director of the National Park Service and 
funds may not be reprogrammed from any other source within the 
National Park Service or the Department of the Interior to 
replenish the Office of the Director account.
      The management plan shall set forth a vision for public 
use of and access to the Mojave National Preserve that gives 
proper balance to:
            1. Pre-existing uses of the area:
            2. The full range of compatible recreational uses 
        of the Mojave;
            3. Modes of transport, including vehicle, bicycle, 
        foot, helicopter, fixed-wing aircraft, and other 
        appropriate means;
            4. Legal access for private lands and interests 
        which remain within the boundary of the Preserve;
            5. Public education on the history of human use of 
        the desert, on the native biota of the desert, and on 
        the appropriate balance between these sometimes 
        competing elements;
            6. The adoption of necessary management policies 
        for the Mojave which assure long-term sustainability of 
        the species, habitats, and ecosystems of the desert, 
        including the humans; and
            7. Consideration of ways to assure a continuous 
        Heritage Trail corridor through the Preserve in order 
        to provide public access over the historic route.
      It is the intent of the managers during this interim 
period, while the Park Service prepares this plan, that the 
Bureau of Land Management manage the day-to-day operations of 
the Preserve; $599,999 has been provided for this specific 
purpose. The Department may not transfer any of these operating 
funds to the National Park Service or any other entity within 
the Department of the Interior during fiscal year 1996.
      At the request of the Bureau of Land Management, the 
managers do not object to the temporary detail of a small 
number of seasonal employees from nearby Park Service units.

                  National Recreation and Preservation

      Amendment No. 27: Appropriates $37,649,000 for National 
recreation and preservation instead of $35,725,000 as proposed 
by the House and $38,094,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The reduction of $445,000 in Statutory and Contractual 
Aid from the Senate amount reflects the elimination of $23,000 
for the Maine Acadian Cultural Preservation Commission and a 
reduction of $442,000 for the Native Hawaiian Culture and Arts 
program.
      Amendment No. 28: Earmarks $236,000 for the William O. 
Douglas Outdoor Education Center as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $248,000 as proposed by the House.
      As discussed under amendment No. 155, no funds are 
provided for the Mississippi River Corridor Heritage 
Commission. Within funds provided, the National Park Service 
shall publish the final report and enter into no other 
activities related to this corridor. The funds included in the 
Senate bill for the Commission have been transferred to the 
rivers and trails program.

                         historic preservation

      Amendment No. 29: Appropriates $36,212,000 for the 
Historic Preservation Fund instead of $37,934,000 as proposed 
by the House and $38,312,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The managers have provided $32,712,000 for State grants 
and $3,500,000 for the National Trust for Historic 
Preservation.
      The managers agree to a three year period of transition 
for the National Trust for Historic Preservation to replace 
Federal funds with private funding.

                              construction

      Amendment No. 30: Appropriates $143,225,000 for 
construction instead of $114,868,000 as proposed by the House 
and $116,480,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The managers agree to the following distribution of 
funds:

Andersonville National Historic Site, GA (prisoner of 
    war museum).........................................      $2,800,000
Assateague National Seashore, MD (erosion control)......         300,000
Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor MA/RI 
    (interpretive project)..............................         300,000
Blue Ridge Parkway, Hemphill Knob, NC (administration 
    building)...........................................       1,030,000
Cane River Creole National Historic Park, LA 
    (preservation and stabilization)....................       4,000,000
Chickasaw National Recreation Area, OK (campground 
    rehabilitation).....................................       1,624,000
Chamizal National Monument, TX (rehabilitation).........         300,000
Crater Lake National Park, OR (dormitories construction)      10,000,000
Cuyahoga National Recreation Area, OH (site and 
    structure rehabilitation)...........................       2,500,000
Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area, PA (trails 
    rehabilitation).....................................       1,050,000
Everglades National Park, FL (water delivery system 
    modification).......................................       4,500,000
Fort Necessity National Battlefield, PA (rehabilitation)         265,000
Fort Smith National Historic Site, AR (rehabilitation)..         500,000
Gateway National Recreation Area, NY (Jacob Riis Park 
    rehabilitation).....................................       1,595,000
General Grant National Memorial, NY (rehabilitation)....       1,000,000
Gettysburg National Military Park, PA (water and sewer 
    lines)..............................................       2,550,000
Glacier National Park, MT (rehabilitate chalets)........         328,000
Grand Canyon National Park, AZ: Transportation..........       1,000,000
Gulf Islands National Seashore, MS (erosion control)....         600,000
Harpers Ferry National Historical Park, WV (utilities 
    and phone lines)....................................         455,000
Hot Springs NP, AR (stabilization/Lead Point)...........         500,000
James A. Garfield National Historic Site, OH 
    (rehabilitation/development)........................       3,600,000
Jean Lafitte National Park and Preserve, LA (complete 
    repairs)............................................       2,100,000
Klondike Gold Rush National Historical Park, AK (restore 
    Skagway historic district...........................         850,000
Lackawanna Valley, PA (technical assistance)............         400,000
Lake Chelan National Recreation Area, WA (planning and 
    design for repair of Company Creek Road)............         280,000
Little River Canyon National Park, AL (health and 
    safety).............................................         460,000
Mount Rainier National Park, WA (replace employee 
    dormitory)..........................................       6,050,000
Natchez Trace Parkway, MS...............................       3,000,000
National Capital Parks--Central, DC (Lincoln/Jefferson 
    memorials rehabilitation)...........................       4,000,000
New River Gorge National River, WV (trails, visitor 
    access and hazardous materials).....................         625,000
President's Park, DC: Replace White House electrical 
    system..............................................       1,100,000
Sagamore Hill National Historic Site, NY (water and 
    sewer lines)........................................         800,000
Salem Maritime National Historic Site, MA (vessel 
    exhibit)............................................       2,200,000
Saratoga National Historical Park, NY (monument 
    rehabilitation).....................................       2,000,000
Sequoia National Park, CA (replace Giant Sequoia 
    facilities).........................................       3,700,000
Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission (various projects).       2,000,000
Stones River National Battlefield, TN (stabilization)...         200,000
Thomas Stone Historic Site, MD (rehabilitation).........         250,000
Western Trails Center, IA...............................       3,000,000
Wrangell-St. Elias National Park and Preserve, AK 
    (Kennicott Mine site safety and rehabilitation).....       1,500,000
Yosemite National Park, CA (El Portal maintenance 
    facilities).........................................       9,650,000
Zion National Park, UT (transportation system 
    facilities).........................................       5,200,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Subtotal, line item construction....................      90,162,000
Emergency, unscheduled, housing.........................      13,973,000
Planning................................................      17,000,000
Equipment replacement...................................      14,365,000
General management plans................................       6,600,000
Special resource studies................................         825,000
Strategic planning office...............................         300,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
    Total...............................................     143,225,000

      The bill provides $1,000,000 for transportation related 
activities at Grand Canyon National Park. These funds are to be 
made available for transportation projects that the 
Superintendent of the Grand Canyon Park has identified as high 
priority. Therefore, it is the intent of the managers that 
these moneys be used for any transportation related 
expenditure, including the design of new transportation 
facilities and the purchase of new buses.
      The managers encourage the National Park Service to 
proceed expeditiously with the necessary work at Cane River 
Creole NHP, LA.
      Amendment No. 31: Earmarks $4,500,000 for the Everglades 
as proposed by the Senate instead of $6,000,000 as proposed by 
the House.
      Amendment No. 32: Retains the Senate provision indicating 
Historic Preservation funds may be available until expended to 
stabilize buildings associated with the Kennicott, Alaska 
copper mine. The House had no similar provision.

                            land acquisition

      Amendment No. 33: Appropriates $49,100,000 for land 
acquisition instead of $14,300,000 as proposed by the House and 
$45,187,000 as proposed by the Senate. The $49,100,000 includes 
$7,200,000 for acquisition management, $3,000,000 for emergency 
and hardship purchases, $3,000,000 for inholding purchases, 
$1,500,000 for State grant administration, and $34,400,000 for 
other land purchases.
      Amendment No. 34: Deletes the earmark inserted by the 
House and stricken by the Senate for Federal assistance to the 
State of Florida. Authority exists for the Department to use 
land acquisition funds for a grant to the State of Florida if 
approved pursuant to the procedures identified for land 
acquisition in fiscal year 1996.
      Amendment No. 35: Modifies language proposed by the 
Senate which requires that funds which may be made available 
for the acquisition of the Elwha and Glines dams shall be used 
solely for acquisition, and shall not be expended until the 
full purchase amount has been appropriated by the Congress. The 
House had no similar provision. Consistent with the direction 
for the land acquisition accounts, no specific earmark is 
provided for this project. Under the procedures identified for 
land acquisition, however, funds could be made available for 
the Elwha and Glines dams.
      The Elwha Act, P.L. 102-495, authorizes the purchase of 
the Elwha and Glines dams by the Secretary of the Interior at a 
total purchase price of $29,500,000. Recognizing the serious 
funding constraints under which the Committees are operating, 
bill language has been included which authorizes funding to be 
provided over a period of years, as necessary, in order to 
acquire the dams. The bill language specifies that the 
appropriated funds may only be used for acquisition. 
Appropriated funds cannot be expended until the total purchase 
price of $29,500,000 is appropriated.
      Under the Elwha Act, the Secretary is authorized to study 
the benefits of the removal of both dams, and to assess the 
costs of such a removal to restore fish runs in the Elwha 
River. The managers continue to be disturbed greatly by the 
early projections from the Administration of costs that range 
from $80-$300 million for dam removal. Due to the lack of 
available funds, the managers strongly discourage the 
Administration and those parties supporting dam removal from 
continuing to support such a policy. Instead, the managers 
encourage interested parties to pursue other, less costly 
alternatives to achieve fish restoration. The managers urge 
parties interested in the Elwha Act to work to find, within the 
next year, a more fiscally responsible and achievable solution 
to fishery restoration in lieu of dam removal. If no conclusion 
can be reached on this issue, the appropriations committee, 
working with the authorizing committees, will be forced to work 
to find a legislative solution to the problem.
      The managers have included $1,500,000 for administration 
of the state grant program. These funds are provided only to 
close down ongoing projects. No funds are provided for new 
grants and the managers intend that no funds will be provided 
in the future.

                       Administrative Provisions

      Amendment No. 36: Retains Senate language regarding an 
agreement for the redevelopment of the southern end of Ellis 
Island and providing for Congressional review. Identical 
language has been included in previous interior appropriations 
bills.
      Amendment No 37: Modifies language proposed by the Senate 
to clarify that funds may not be used by the National Park 
Service for activities taken in direct response to the United 
Nations Biodiversity Convention. The House had no similar 
provision.
      Amendment No. 38: Modifies Senate language to authorize 
the National Park Service (NPS) to enter into cooperative 
agreements not only for the American Battlefield Program as 
proposed by the Senate but also to carry out its other 
statutory programs. Current authority is not adequate to allow 
the NPS to pursue a range of partnership opportunities which 
would benefit our National parks and programs. This language 
will enable NPS to enter into such agreements with States, 
local governments and other public and private entities, to 
accomplish, but not be limited to, such projects as scientific 
research with universities, joint maintenance operations with 
adjoining state parks, heritage partnerships, long-range trail 
development with a variety of entities, and other similar 
programs. The House had no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 39: Modifies Senate language regarding a 
feasibility study for a northern access route into Denali 
National Park and Preserve in Alaska. The modification is to 
require that the study also be submitted to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations.
      Amendment No. 40: Deletes Senate language regarding the 
Stampede Creed Mine at Denali National Park in Alaska. The 
House had no similar provision.
      If requested by the University of Alaska at Fairbanks, 
the National Park Service shall enter into negotiations 
regarding a memorandum of understanding for continued use of 
the Stampede Creek mine property. The Park Service should 
report to the relevant Congressional committees by May 1, 1996 
on an assessment of damages resulting from the April 30, 1987 
explosion. The repair or replacement should be to the same 
condition as existed on April 30, 1987. If the University of 
Alaska at Fairbanks seeks to replace the facilities, the Park 
Service should consider working with the Army to assist in any 
compensation to which the University of Alaska at Fairbanks may 
be eligible since the Army assisted the National Park Service 
with the explosives work conducted at Stampede Creek on April 
30, 1987.

                    United States Geological Survey

                 Surveys, Investigations, and Research

      Amendment No. 41: Appropriates $730,503,000 for surveys, 
investigations and research instead of $686,944,000 as proposed 
by the House and $577,503,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
amendment also provides authority for minerals information 
activities formerly conducted in the Bureau of Mines.
      Changes to the amount proposed by the House include 
increases of $24,112,000 for natural resources research, 
$16,000,000 for minerals information activities transferred 
from the Bureau of Mines and $4,000,000 for university 
earthquake research grants, and decreases in Federal water 
resources investigations of $176,000 for data collection and 
analysis and $100,000 for hydrology of critical aquifers and a 
decrease of $277,000 in the National mapping program for 
cartographic and geographic research.
      The managers have provided $4,000,000 for university 
research in the earthquakes program. If there is a compelling 
need for additional funds in this program in fiscal year 1996 
and an acceptable funding offset can be justified, the USGS 
should notify the Committees following the existing 
reprogramming guidelines. The Committees will consider any such 
request on its merits.
      The managers understand that the USGS is constrained from 
releasing certain information under interagency agreement No. 
AGP00473.94 with the Bureau of Indian Affairs absent the 
approval of the BIA. This issue is discussed in more detail in 
the BIA section of this statement.
      The managers have agreed to fund a competitive program 
for the water resources research institutes with at least a 2 
to 1 funding match from non-Federal sources. The managers 
expect that this approach likely will lead to the closure of 
some of the institutes. The managers recommend that in fiscal 
year 1996 a modest base grant of $20,000 per participating 
institute be provided with the balance of the funding for the 
program to be competitively awarded based on National program 
priorities established by the USGS. The need for continuing a 
small base grant beyond fiscal year 1996 should be carefully 
examined by the USGS in the context of its fiscal year 1997 
budget priorities. The managers do not object to competitions 
being regionally-based if that approach is determined by the 
USGS to be the most productive, from the standpoint of meeting 
the most compelling information needs, and the most cost 
effective. If a regional approach is selected, the managers 
suggest that the USGS regions be consolidated so that there are 
no more than 4 or 5 large regional areas. The competition 
should not be structured to ensure that every participating 
institute in a region gets a competitive award. The USGS should 
report to the Committees in the fiscal year 1997 budget 
submission on how the competition is to be structured and 
should report in subsequent budget submissions on the 
distribution of competitively awarded grants by institute.
      Amendment No. 42: Earmarks $137,000,000 for natural 
resources research and cooperative research units instead of 
$112,888,000 as proposed by the House. The Senate recommended 
funding this research under a separate account and at a level 
of $145,965,000 as discussed in amendment No. 24. The amendment 
also earmarks $16,000,000 for minerals information activities 
transferred from the Bureau of Mines, mines and minerals 
account (see amendment No. 47).
      The managers agree that natural resources research in the 
Department of the Interior should be organized in a manner that 
ensures that it is independent from regulatory control and 
scientifically excellent. The managers intend the merger of 
these research activities into the USGS to be permanent. The 
USGS is directed to plan and manage the restructuring and 
downsizing of the former National Biological Service. 
Retrenchments required to remain within the reduced level of 
appropriations for the former NBS are to occur predominately in 
administrative, managerial and other headquarters support 
functions of that organization so as to maintain, to the 
maximum extent possible, scientific and technical capabilities.
      The managers expect the agency to work closely with the 
land management agencies to identify priority science needs of 
concern to the Department's land managers on the ground. The 
managers are concerned that natural resource research be linked 
closely to management issues. In addition, attention should be 
provided to information related to wildlife resources entrusted 
to the stewardship of the Department; fisheries, including 
restoration of depleted stocks; fish propagation and riverine 
studies; aquatic resources; nonindigenous nuisances that affect 
aquatic ecosystems; impacts and epidemiology of disease on fish 
and wildlife populations; chemical drug registration for 
aquatic species; and effective transfer of information to 
natural resources managers.
      During fiscal year 1996, funds appropriated for the 
functions of the former NBS shall remain a separate entity, 
titled ``natural resources research'', within the USGS. Upon 
completion of the necessary downsizing, and no later than nine 
months after enactment of this legislation, the managers direct 
the USGS to provide the Committees with a final plan for the 
permanent consolidation and integration of natural resources 
research functions into the USGS. As of October 1, 1996, 
employees of the former NBS shall be subject to the same 
administrative guidelines and practices followed by the USGS 
including peer review of research and investigations, 
maintenance of objectivity and impartiality, and ethics 
requirements regarding financial disclosure and divestiture. 
The managers expect that the USGS budget request for fiscal 
year 1997 will require amendment subsequent to its submission 
to reflect appropriately this consolidation. To reiterate, this 
merger is intended to be permanent and should be implemented 
fully by October 1, 1996.
      During fiscal year 1996 the Department and the USGS are 
prohibited from reprogramming funds from other USGS programs 
and activities for any program or activity within the 
Department for natural resources research activities.
      The managers also have agreed to provide $16,000,000 for 
minerals information activities, transferred from the Bureau of 
Mines. The funding represents a reduction from the fiscal year 
1995 level and may require significant downsizing and 
restructuring of the program. The USGS should oversee the 
refocusing of the program. Until such downsizing is completed, 
the program should remain a separate and distinct budget and 
organizational entity within the USGS. To the extent job 
vacancies occur in the transferred program in fiscal year 1996, 
they should be filled with Bureau of Mines employees subject to 
termination or reduction-in-force. The managers understand that 
the existing USGS mineral resources survey activity is 
undergoing a restructuring and downsizing and expect that 
effort and the required downsizing of the minerals information 
program to proceed independently. When both downsizing efforts 
are completed, a single, refocused minerals program should be 
created which combines the minerals information activities 
transferred from the Bureau of Mines with other USGS mineral 
resources work.
      Amendment No. 43: Modifies language inserted by the House 
and stricken by the Senate providing guidance on the conduct of 
natural resources research. The change to the House position 
expands the prohibition on the use of funds for new surveys on 
private property to include new aerial surveys for the 
designation of habitat under the Endangered Species Act unless 
authorized in writing by the property owner. With respect to 
natural resources research activities, the managers agree that 
funds may not be used for new surveys on private property 
without the written consent of the land owner, that volunteers 
are to be properly trained and that volunteer-collected data 
are to be verified carefully. The amendment also transfers 
authority from the Bureau of Mines to the Director of the USGS 
to conduct mineral surveys, consistent with the funding for 
that purpose earmarked under amendment No. 42.

                      Minerals Management Service

                royalty and offshore minerals management

      Amendment No. 44: Appropriates $182,994,000 for royalty 
and offshore minerals management instead of $186,556,000 as 
proposed by the House and $182,169,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Changes to the amount proposed by the House include 
decreases in information management of $151,000 for the 
absorption of fixed cost increases and $3,000,000 which is 
offset by the authority to use additional receipts as provided 
in amendment Nos. 45 and 46; and decreases in general 
administration of $306,000 for administrative operations and 
$105,000 for general support services.
      The managers agree that the independent review of the 
royalty management program which was recommended by the House 
should not be conducted until the disposition of the hardrock 
minerals program is legislatively resolved. Accordingly, no 
funds are earmarked for this effort in fiscal year 1996.
      Amendment No. 45: Provides for the use of $15,400,000 in 
increased receipts for the technical information management 
system as proposed by the Senate instead of $12,400,000 as 
proposed by the House.
      Amendment No. 46: Permits the use of additional receipts 
for Outer Continental Shelf program activities in addition to 
the technical information management system as proposed by the 
Senate. The House had no similar provision.

                            Bureau of Mines

                           mines and minerals

      Amendment No. 47: Appropriates $64,000,000 for mines and 
minerals instead of $87,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$128,007,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conference 
agreement provides for the transfer of health and safety 
research to the Department of Energy (see amendment No. 110). 
The $64,000,000 provided for mines and minerals is to be used 
for the orderly closure of the Bureau of Mines.
      The managers expect that the health and safety functions 
in Pittsburgh, PA and Spokane, WA will be continued under the 
Department of Energy as will the materials partnerships program 
in Albany, OR. The U.S. Geological Survey will assume 
responsibility for the minerals information program in Denver, 
CO and Washington, DC. The Bureau of Land Management will 
assume responsibility for mineral assessments in Alaska. The 
managers do not object to a limited number of administrative 
support personnel being maintained in these locations. All 
other functions of the Bureau of Mines will be terminated and 
all other Bureau locations will be closed. The funds provided 
under this head should be sufficient to provide termination 
costs and to provide for environmental cleanup costs and for 
the required oversight and closeout of contracts. The managers 
understand that some contracts will require oversight through a 
logical completion point to ensure that the Federal investment 
is not lost. One example is the construction associated with 
the Casa Grande in situ copper leaching program. The managers 
expect that there will be few such cases and expect the 
Secretary to notify the Committees of the rationale for 
continuing specific contracts, not transferred to DOE, BLM or 
USGS, beyond the closure of the Bureau. The managers expect the 
Secretary to proceed apace with the termination of the Bureau 
using the funds provided herein.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement

                       regulation and technology

      Amendment No. 48: Appropriates $95,970,000 for regulation 
and technology as proposed by the Senate instead of $93,251,000 
as proposed by the House.

                    abandoned mine reclamation fund

      Amendment No. 49: Appropriates $173,887,000 for the 
abandoned mine reclamation fund instead of $176,327,000 as 
proposed by the House and $170,441,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The net decrease below the House consists of reductions 
of $500,000 for donations, $2,000,000 for reclamation program 
operations, and $93,000 for administrative support; and 
increases of $13,000 for executive direction and $140,000 for 
general services.
      Amendment No. 50: Deletes House earmark of $5,000,000 for 
the Appalachian Clean Streams Initiative. The Senate had no 
similar provision.
      Amendment No. 51: Deletes House provision that allowed 
the use of donations for the Appalachian Clean Streams 
Initiative. The Senate had no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 52: Includes Senate provision which allows 
States to use part of their reclamation grants as a funding 
match to treat and abate acid mine drainage, consistent with 
the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act (SMCRA). The 
House had no similar provision.

                        Bureau of Indian Affairs

                      operation of indian programs

      Amendment No. 53: Appropriates $1,384,434,000 for the 
Operation of Indian Programs instead of $1,509,628,000 as 
proposed by the House and $1,261,234,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Changes to the amount proposed by the House from Tribal 
Priority Allocations include decreases of $1,500,000 for 
contract support, $4,000,000 for small and needy tribes, and a 
general reduction of $92,136,000.
      Changes from Other Recurring Programs include: increases 
of $1,109,000 for ISEP formula funds, $1,000,000 for student 
transportation, and $73,000 for Lake Roosevelt; and decreases 
of $1,109,000 for ISEP adjustments, $1,000,000 for early 
childhood development, and $1,186,000 for community 
development--facilities O&M; and a transfer of $3,047,000 from 
trust services to the Office of Special Trustee for American 
Indians.
      Changes from Nonrecurring Programs include: increases of 
$400,000 for Self Determination grants, $1,500,000 for 
community economic development grants, $250,000 for technical 
assistance, and $1,500,000 for water rights negotiations; and 
decreases of $442,000 for attorney fees and $125,000 for 
resources management for absorption of pay costs.
      Changes from Central Office Operations include: a 
decrease of $126,000 for the substance abuse coordination 
office, a decrease of $2,000,000 for education program 
management, a $12,477,000 transfer from trust services to the 
Office of Special Trustee for American Indians, a transfer of 
$447,000 from general administration to the Office of Special 
Trustee for American Indians, and a general reduction of 
$14,400,000.
      Changes from Area Office Operations include a transfer of 
$2,367,000 from trust services to the Office of Special Trustee 
for American Indians and a general reduction of $14,447,000.
      Changes from Special Programs and Pooled Overhead 
include: increases of $1,337,000 for special higher education 
scholarships, $962,000 for the Indian Arts and Crafts Board, 
$1,780,000 for intra-governmental billings, and $57,000 for 
direct rentals; and decreases of $866,000 for the Indian Child 
Welfare Act, $1,500,000 for employee displacement costs, 
$141,000 for personnel consolidation, $664,000 for GSA rentals, 
$1,666,000 for human resources development, and a $23,000 
general reduction.
      Amendment No. 54: Deletes Senate earmark of $962,000 for 
the Indian Arts and Crafts Board. The House had no similar 
provision. The managers agree that within Special Programs/
Pooled Overhead, $962,000 is earmarked for the Indian Arts and 
Crafts Board. In light of declining budgets, future funding for 
this program should be provided through non-Federal sources.
      Amendment No. 55: Earmarks $104,626,000 for contract 
support costs as proposed by the Senate instead of $106,126,000 
as proposed by the House and adds language earmarking 
$100,255,000 for welfare assistance.
      Amendment No. 56: Earmarks up to $5,000,000 for the 
Indian Self-Determination fund as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $5,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      Amendment No. 57: Earmarks $330,711,000 for school 
operations costs as proposed by the House instead of 
$330,991,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Amendment No. 58: Earmarks $68,209,000 for higher 
education scholarships, adult vocational training, and 
assistance to public schools instead of $67,138,000 as proposed 
by the House and $69,477,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Amendment No. 59: Retains a statutory reference to the 
Johnson O'Malley Act as proposed by the Senate. The House had 
no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 60: Earmarks $71,854,000 for housing 
improvement, road maintenance, attorney fees, litigation 
support, self-governance grants, the Indian Self-Determination 
Fund, and the Navajo-Hopi settlement program instead of 
$74,814,000 as proposed by the House and $62,328,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Amendment No. 61: Deletes a reference to trust fund 
management as proposed by the Senate. Responsibility for trust 
fund management has been transferred to the Office of Special 
Trustee for American Indians.
      Amendment No. 62: Deletes reference to the statute of 
limitations language, as proposed by the Senate. This language 
is included in the Office of Special Trustee for American 
Indians (amendment No. 80).
      Amendment No. 63: Retains Senate language on the use of 
up to $8,000,000 in unobligated balances for employee 
severance, relocation, and related expenses and inserts new 
language regarding the effective date when schools can adjust 
salary schedules. The House had no similar provision.
      The managers agree that:
      1. Under Other Recurring Programs $409,000 is earmarked 
for Alaska legal services and salmon studies.
      2. Not more than $297,000 shall be available for a grant 
to the Close Up Foundation.
      3. Amounts specifically earmarked within the bill for 
Tribal Priority Allocations are subject to the general 
reduction identified for Tribal Priority Allocations. The 
managers expect the Bureau to allocate the general reduction in 
a manner that will not jeopardize funding provided from the 
Highway Trust Fund for road maintenance. In addition, the 
general reduction should not be applied to the $750,000 
allocated for the Financial Management Improvement Team and for 
small and needy tribes. BIA should ensure that compacting and 
non-compacting tribes are treated consistently, except for 
compacting tribes who meet the criteria for small and needy 
tribes.
      4. BIA should provide consistent treatment in allocating 
funds for small and needy tribes and new tribes. Allocations 
should be based on recommendations of the Joint Reorganization 
Task Force.
      5. No funds are provided for the school statistics 
initiative. If the BIA wishes to pursue this initiative, the 
Committees will consider a reprogramming request.
      6. Several steps must be completed before schools can 
adjust salary schedules. For this reason, bill language is 
included that will provide this authority beginning with the 
1997-98 school year. The managers expect that within 30 days 
after enactment of this Act BIA should provide the Committees 
with a plan and time schedule advising how BIA will adjust 
salary schedules by the 1997-98 school year. The managers 
expect BIA to ensure that all necessary steps are taken to 
facilitate changes in salary rates for any schools desiring to 
use non-DOD pay rates.
      7. $16,338,000 from the Operation of Indian Programs 
should be transferred to the Office of Special Trustee for 
American Indians (see Amendment No. 80).
      The managers have agreed to a reduction of $2,000,000 for 
education program management in the Central Office Operations 
program. No reduction has been included for area and agency 
technical support in Other Recurring Programs. The managers 
expect the Bureau to review education program management at all 
levels to ensure that resources are properly allocated within 
the funding provided. If the Bureau wishes to reallocate the 
funds for these accounts, a reprogramming request should be 
submitted to the Committees.
      The managers expect the Bureau of Indian Affairs to 
direct the U.S. Geological Survey to provide for the public 
release of all interpretations of data and reports (draft and 
final) completed under interagency agreement number AGP00473.94 
and all related amendments immediately upon completion of the 
water studies. Within 15 days of enactment of this Act the BIA 
shall report to the Committees its decision as to whether or 
not it will direct the USGS to provide for the public release 
of the information. If the BIA does not allow for the public 
release of the information, the BIA should immediately cancel 
the interagency agreement with the USGS.
      The managers have not agreed to the Senate amendment 
regarding a prohibition of the use of funds for travel and 
training expenses for the BIA. However, the BIA is expected to 
follow the guidance detailed in the discussion of Amendment No. 
163.

                              construction

      Amendment No. 64: Appropriates $100,833,000 for 
construction instead of $98,033,000 as proposed by the House 
and $107,333,000 as proposed by the Senate. Changes to the 
amount proposed by the House include increases of $4,500,000 
for the Chief Leschi School, and $2,500,000 for the fire 
protection program, and decreases of $3,700,000 for the Navajo 
irrigation project and $500,000 for engineering and 
supervision.
      The managers agree that the Chief Leschi School complex 
project will be phased in over a two-year period.
      The managers agree that funding provided for construction 
projects should include the entire cost of a given project, 
which eliminates the need for a separate appropriation for 
contract support.

 indian land and water claim settlements and miscellaneous payments to 
                                indians

      Amendment No. 65: Appropriates $80,645,000 for Indian 
land and water claim settlements and miscellaneous payments to 
Indians instead of $75,145,000 as proposed by the House and 
$82,745,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Amendment No. 66: Earmarks $78,600,000 for land and water 
claim settlements as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$73,100,000 as proposed by the House. Changes to the amount 
proposed by the House include an increase of $5,500,000 for the 
Ute Indian settlement.
      Amendment No. 67: Earmarks $1,000,000 for trust fund 
deficiencies as proposed by the House instead of $3,100,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.

               technical assistance of indian enterprises

      Amendment No. 68: Appropriates $500,000 for technical 
assistance instead of $900,000 as proposed by the Senate and no 
funds as proposed by the House.

                 indian guaranteed loan program account

      Amendment No. 69: Appropriates $5,000,000 for guaranteed 
loans instead of $7,700,000 as proposed by the Senate and no 
funds as proposed by the House.
      The managers agree that $4,500,000 is for the cost of 
guaranteed loans and $500,000 is for administrative expenses.

                 Territorial and International affairs

                       assistance to territories

      Amendment No. 70: Appropriates $65,188,000 for Assistance 
to Territories instead of $52,405,000 as proposed by the House 
and $68,188,000 as proposed by the Senate. The changes to the 
amount proposed by the House include an increase of $13,827,000 
for territorial assistance and a decrease of $1,044,000 for 
American Samoa operations grants. The amount provided for 
territorial assistance includes increases over the House of 
$5,650,000 for technical assistance, $2,400,000 for maintenance 
assistance, $1,500,000 for management controls, and $750,000 
for disaster assistance.
      Amendment No. 71: Earmarks $3,527,000 for the Office of 
Insular Affairs as proposed by the Senate instead of no funds 
as proposed by the House. The managers agree that the Office of 
Territorial and International Affairs is abolished along with 
the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Territorial and 
International Affairs. The funding provided is for staff to 
carry out the Secretary's mandated responsibilities and is to 
be located under the Assistant Secretary for Policy, Management 
and Budget. This action is consistent with the reorganization 
already approved by the Appropriations Committees.
      Amendment No. 72: Retains Senate language directing the 
use of funds for technical assistance, maintenance assistance 
and disaster assistance.

                      compact of free association

      Amendment No. 73: Deletes House proposed language and 
funding for impact aid to Guam as proposed by the Senate.
      The managers agree that Guam should be compensated for 
the impact caused by immigration from the freely associated 
states as authorized under the Compact of Free Association. 
Funding for compact impact shall be provided by a re-allocation 
of existing mandatory grant funds as discussed under amendment 
No. 89.

                          Departmental Offices

                        departmental management

                         salaries and expenses

      Amendment Nos. 74 and 75: The managers agree to the 
Senate language which changes the account name from Office of 
the Secretary to Departmental Management.
      Amendment No. 76: Appropriates $57,796,000 for 
departmental management as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$53,919,000 as proposed by the House. A redistribution has been 
made which includes reductions of $296,000 to the Secretary's 
immediate office and $51,000 to Congressional Affairs. These 
funds have been transferred to Central Services.
      The managers agree that these accounts have been 
restrained over recent years and that coordination of the 
Department's programs, particularly during the ongoing 
downsizing and restructuring process, is critical to ensure the 
overall effectiveness of the Department's programs. However, 
the managers feel that it is important to restrain these 
offices at the 1995 level considering that most of the 
Department's programs have sustained reductions, or face 
elimination, and all are being directed to absorb their 
uncontrollable expenses. The managers also recognize the need 
to have flexibility in the Departmental Offices to manage 
within reduced funding levels and with the displacements and 
uncertainties caused by reductions-in-force. Therefore, the 
managers agree that the Department may reprogram funds without 
limitation among the program elements within the four 
activities. However, any reprogramming among the four 
activities must follow the normal reprogramming guidelines.
      The managers strongly support language included in the 
House Report which encourages each agency to reduce levels of 
review and management in order to cover the costs associated 
with pay raises and inflation. The Department should carefully 
review and eliminate excessive or duplicated positions 
associated with Congressional and Public Affairs offices.
      Amendment No. 77: Deletes Senate language which prohibits 
the use of official reception funds prior to the filing of the 
Charter for the Western Water Policy Review Commission. The 
House had no similar provision.

                        construction management

      Amendment No. 78: Appropriates $500,000 as proposed by 
the Senate instead of no funding as proposed by the House.
      The managers agree to retain the core policy function 
from the Office of Construction Management in Office of Policy, 
Management and Budget. The balance of the programs are 
transferred to BIA construction.

                   national indian gaming commission

      Amendment No. 79: Modifies language inserted by the 
Senate requiring a report detailing information on Indian 
tribes or tribal organizations with gaming operations. The 
modification changes the date the report is due to March 1, 
1996. The House had no similar provision.

             office of special trustee for american indians

                         federal trust programs

      Amendment No. 80: Appropriates $16,338,000 for Federal 
trust programs in the Office of Special Trustee for American 
Indians and establishes this new account as proposed by the 
Senate. The House had no similar provision.
      The managers agree to the following transfers from the 
Operations of Indian Programs account within the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs as proposed by the Senate: $3,047,000 from Other 
Recurring Programs for financial trust services; $2,367,000 
from Area Office Operations for financial trust services; and 
$10,924,000 from Central Office Operations, including 
$10,447,000 for the Office of Trust Funds Management.
      The managers concur with the need for establishing the 
office as articulated in the Senate report. The managers 
believe that the Special Trustee will be effective in 
implementing reforms in the Bureau of Indian Affairs only to 
the extent that the Trustee has authority over the human and 
financial resources supporting trust programs. Lacking such 
authority, the Trustee cannot be held accountable and the 
likely result will be simply one more office pointing out the 
shortcomings of the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
      Furthermore, under the current financial constraints 
facing the Committees and the various downsizing activities 
taking place in the Department, it is essential that the 
Committees have a clear understanding of the organizational 
structure supporting trust programs and an assurance that the 
significant general reductions proposed to be taken against the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs do not impair the Secretary's ability 
to manage trust assets. The managers are aware that there may 
be additional activities that could be transferred to the 
Office and encourage the Special Trustee, the Department, the 
Bureau of Indian Affairs, the tribes, and the Office of 
Management and Budget to work closely with the appropriations 
and authorizing committees to identify the activities and 
related resources to be transferred.
      Any increase in funding or staffing for the Office of 
Special Trustee should be considered within the context of the 
fiscal year 1997 budget request and with consideration for 
funding constraints and the downsizing occurring throughout the 
Department, particularly within the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
      The managers have recommended funding in a simplified 
budget structure to allow the Special Trustee some flexibility 
in establishing the office and the budget structure. Prior to 
submission of the fiscal year 1997 budget request, the managers 
expect the Special Trustee to work with the Committees to 
establish an appropriate budget structure for the Office.
      The managers expect the Special Trustee to provide by 
December 1, 1996 a detailed operating plan for financial trust 
services for fiscal year 1996. The plan should detail what 
specific activities relating to the reconciliation effort will 
be undertaken, both directly by the Office of Special Trustee 
and by its contractors. The plan should detail what products 
will be provided to the tribes and the Congress and when such 
products will be submitted. The plan should include staffing 
for financial trust services, including the number of vacant 
positions and when the positions are expected to be filled.
      Within the funds provided, support should be provided to 
the Intertribal Monitoring Association (ITMA). The managers 
expect ITMA to provide the Special Trustee with any information 
that is provided to the Appropriations or authorizing 
committees. If the Office of the Special Trustee plans to 
continue funding ITMA in fiscal year 1997, the managers expect 
the Special Trustee to identify the funds to be available for 
ITMA in the fiscal year 1997 budget request.
      To the extent possible, the managers expect that 
administrative support services will continue to be provided by 
the Bureau of Indian Affairs during fiscal year 1996. To the 
extent that resources exist within the Office of Special 
Trustee for budgeting or other administrative services, these 
activities should be provided by the Office of Special Trustee, 
rather than through the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The managers 
have not included any funds for overhead costs, such as GSA 
rent, postage, FTS-2000, PAY/PERS, or workers' compensation. 
These costs should be paid from the Operation of Indian 
Programs account during fiscal year 1996. The fiscal year 1997 
budget should include appropriate overhead amounts in the 
Office of the Special Trustee.

                       administrative provisions

      Amendment No. 81: Retains language inserted by the Senate 
changing the name of ``Office of the Secretary'' to 
``Department Management''.

             General Provisions, Department of the Interior

      Amendment No. 82: Deletes an unnecessary comma as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Amendment No. 83: Retains the House language stricken by 
the Senate granting the Secretary of the Interior authority to 
transfer land acquisition funds between the Bureau of Land 
Management, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National 
Park Service.
      Amendment No. 84: Modifies language proposed by the House 
and stricken by the Senate regarding the expenditure of funds 
for the Presidio. The managers are aware of legislation which 
may be enacted regarding the future management of the Presidio 
in California and have provided a funding limitation in order 
for the Congress to consider legislation this fall. In light of 
declining budgets, the managers recognize the need for an 
alternative approach for the Presidio that does not require 
additional appropriations from the Interior bill. Because the 
authorizing legislation may be enacted early in fiscal year 
1996, the managers have included language which restricts how 
much funding can be obligated on a monthly basis for the first 
quarter of the fiscal year. However, if legislation is not 
enacted, the managers also recognize the need for the National 
Park Service to be able to fulfill its management and resource 
protection responsibilities at the Presidio. Thus, the 
obligation limitation would be lifted on December 31, 1995.
      Because of concerns about sufficient resources remaining 
available to address the requirements of any authorization 
regarding the Presidio Trust, the managers expect the National 
Park Service to notify the relevant House and Senate 
appropriations and authorizing committees before awarding any 
major contracts after December 31, 1995, and prior to the 
establishment of the Presidio Trust once it is authorized.
      Amendment No. 85: Restores language proposed by the House 
and stricken by the Senate repealing provisions of the Oil 
Pollution Act of 1990 with respect to Outer Continental Shelf 
leases offshore North Carolina. The repeal of this statute is 
not intended to excuse the United States from the liabilities, 
if any, it has incurred to date nor to otherwise affect pending 
litigation.
      Amendment No. 86: Modifies language proposed by the 
Senate limiting the allocation of self-governance funds to 
Indian tribes in the State of Washington if a tribe adversely 
impacts rights of nontribal owners of land within the tribe's 
reservation. The House had no similar provision. The 
modification eliminates the requirement that a mutual agreement 
be reached within 90 days of enactment.
      Amendment No. 87: Retains language proposed by the Senate 
which requires the Department of the Interior to issue a 
specific schedule for the completion of the Lake Cushman Land 
Exchange Act within 30 days of enactment and to complete the 
exchange by September 30, 1996. The House had no similar 
provision.
      Amendment No. 88: Retains Senate language authorizing the 
National Park Service to expend funds for maintenance and 
repair of the Company Creek Road in Lake Chelan National 
Recreation Area and providing that, unless specifically 
authorized, no funds may be used for improving private 
property. The House had no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 89: Revises language proposed by the Senate 
to reallocate mandatory grant payments of $27,720,000 to the 
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI).
      The managers agree that for fiscal years 1996 through 
2002 the CNMI shall receive $11,000,000 annually. This is 
consistent with total funding, matching requirements, and terms 
negotiated and set forth in the agreement executed on December 
17, 1992, between the special representative of the President 
of the United States and the special representatives of the 
Governor of the Northern Mariana Islands.
      The managers agree that Guam shall receive impact aid of 
$4,580,000 in fiscal year 1996. This funding level shall 
continue through fiscal year 2001, as authorized by the Compact 
of Free Association. The managers agree that these grant funds 
must be used for infrastructure needs, as determined by the 
Government of Guam.
      The managers agree that $7,700,000 shall be allocated for 
capital improvement grants to American Samoa in fiscal year 
1996 and that higher levels of funding may be required in 
future years to fund the highest priority projects identified 
in a master plan. The managers have agreed to language 
directing the Secretary to develop such a master plan in 
conjunction with the Government of American Samoa. The plan is 
to be reviewed by the Army Corps of Engineers before it is 
submitted to the Congress and is to be updated annually as part 
of the budget justification.
      The managers understand that renovation of hospital 
facilities in American Samoa has been identified as one of the 
more critical and high priority needs. The Secretary of the 
Interior and the American Samoa Governments are reminded that 
Congress required the creation of a hospital authority as a 
condition to Federal funding of health care facilities. The 
managers expect the existing hospital authority in American 
Samoa to be supported by the American Samoa Government so that 
it continues the purpose of improving the quality and 
management of health care.
      The managers agree that $4,420,000 shall be allocated in 
fiscal year 1996 for resettlement of Rongelap Atoll. Language 
has been included that total additional contributions, 
including funding provided in this bill, may not exceed 
$32,000,000 and are contingent on an agreement that such 
contributions are a full and final settlement of all 
obligations of the United States to assist in the resettlement 
of Rongelap.
      The managers have deleted language provisions proposed by 
the Senate which would legislate on several matters including 
minimum wage, immigration, and local employment in the Northern 
Mariana Islands.
      The managers agree that the Secretary of the Interior 
should continue to submit an annual ``State of the Islands'' 
report. This report has been submitted for the past four years 
in accordance with Committee directives and is a valuable 
source of information for the Congress.

                       TITLE II--RELATED AGENCIES

                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

                             Forest Service

                            forest research

      Amendment No. 90: Appropriates $178,000,000 for forest 
research instead of $182,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$177,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      For forestry research, the managers reaffirm support for 
the consolidation of budget line items, to provide the agency 
additional flexibility with restructuring, and to allow 
efficiencies and cost savings as required to meet the funding 
reductions. The managers agree that no forest and range 
experiment station, research program, or research project 
should be held harmless from decreases that would impose 
disproportionate reductions to other research activities. The 
agency should maintain its focus on core research activities--
including forestry research--that support initiatives relating 
both to public and private forest lands, and cooperative 
research efforts involving the universities as well as the 
private sector, directed at forest management, resource 
utilization and productivity. The managers urge the Forest 
Service to avoid location closures where research is not 
conducted elsewhere, and to consolidate programs that are 
spread over multiple locations. The managers are particularly 
concerned that silvicultural and hardwood utilization research 
continue given the large number of public and private forests 
which rely on this research.
      In addition, the managers note the growing importance of 
data and other information collected through the Forest 
Inventory Analysis (FIA) program and the resulting statewide 
forest inventories. The analysis and collection of information 
directed at forest health conditions on public and private 
forest lands has become especially important in recent years.
      The managers have included $300,000 for landscape 
management research at the University of Washington, $479,000 
for Cook County Ecosystem project, and $200,000 for research at 
the Olympic Natural Resources Center in Forks, WA.

                       state and private forestry

      Amendment No. 91: Appropriates $136,794,000 for State and 
private forestry as proposed by the Senate but deletes Senate 
earmarks for cooperative lands fire management and the 
stewardship incentives program. The House provided $129,551,000 
for State and private forestry.
      The net increase above the House includes increases of 
$4,500,000 for the stewardship incentives program, $3,000,000 
for the forest legacy program, and $5,500,000 for economic 
action programs; and reductions of $2,000,000 from forest 
health management, $621,000 from cooperative lands fire 
management, $1,636,000 for forest stewardship and $1,500,000 
for urban and community forestry.
      The managers agree to the following distribution of funds 
within economic action programs:

Forest products conservation and recovery.....................$1,000,000
Economic recovery............................................. 5,000,000
Rural development............................................. 4,800,000
Wood in transportation........................................ 1,200,000
Columbia River Gorge, economic grants to countries............ 2,500,000

      The managers agree that $2,880,000 within rural 
development be allocated to the Northeast and Midwest, and that 
no funds are provided for economic diversification studies.

                         international forestry

      The managers agree that up to $4,000,000 of Forest 
Service funds may be utilized for purposes previously funded 
through the International Forestry appropriation. Domestic 
activities requiring international contacts will continue to be 
funded, as in the past, by the appropriate domestic benefiting 
program. The managers reiterate their expectations that the 
Service curtail foreign travel expenditures in light of budget 
constraints.
      Operations formerly funded by International Forestry or 
other appropriations, other than research activities, of the 
International Institute of Tropical Forestry, Puerto Rico and 
the Institute of Pacific Islands Forestry, Hawaii may continue 
to be funded as appropriate. As with other programs, it may be 
necessary to reduce funding for these institutes due to budget 
constraints. Research activities will be funded from the Forest 
Research appropriation.
      The managers also expect the Forest Service to examine 
the best means to provide leadership in international forestry 
activities and meet essential representation and liaison 
responsibilities with foreign governments and international 
organizations, and agree that the Forest Service should not 
maintain a separate deputy chief for international forestry.

                         national forest system

      Amendment No. 92: Appropriates $1,256,253,000 for the 
national forest system instead of $1,266,688,000 as proposed by 
the House and $1,247,543,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The net decrease below the House consists of reductions 
of $5,750,000 for recreation management, $1,750,000 for 
wilderness management, $435,000 for heritage resources, 
$1,750,000 for wildlife habitat management $1,000,000 for 
inland fish habitat management, $1,750,000 for threatened and 
endangered species habitat management; and increases of 
$1,000,000 for road maintenance, and $1,000,000 for facility 
maintenance.
      The managers expect the land agencies to begin to rebuild 
and restore the public timber programs on national forests and 
BLM lands. With the modest increase in funding provided, the 
Forest Service is expected to produce 2.6 billion board feet of 
green sales. With enactment of the new salvage initiative (P.L. 
104-19) in response to the emergency forest health situation, 
the agencies are expected to proceed aggressively to expedite 
the implementation of existing programmed salvage volumes, with 
the expectation that the Forest Service will produce an 
additional increment of 1.5 BBF over the expected sale program 
for fiscal year 1996. The managers expect a total fiscal year 
1996 Forest Service sale accomplishment level of 5.6 BBF, and 
note that this is nearly half the level authorized for sale 
just five years ago. The Forest Service is to report timber 
sale accomplishments on the basis of net sawtimber sold and 
awarded to purchasers, and on the volume offered. Those regions 
of the country which sell products other than sawtimber should 
continue to report accomplishments in the same manner as used 
in the forest plans. The reports are to provide information on 
both green and salvage sales.
      The managers encourage the Forest Service to use up to 
$350,000 to commission a third party field review of the 
environmental impacts and the economic efficiency of the 
emergency forest salvage program mandated by section 2001 of 
P.L. 104-19. The managers believe that funding such a review 
can be appropriately undertaken through the timber salvage sale 
fund.
      The managers note the difference between the House and 
Senate reports pertaining to tree measurement and timber 
scaling. The managers also note that House Report 103-551 
specifically allows Forest Service managers to use scaling when 
selling salvage sales of thinnings. The managers expect the 
Forest Service to use fully the flexibility authorized in House 
Report 103-551 for rapidly deteriorating timber, and to use 
sample weight scaling for the sale of low value thinnings. 
Further, the managers direct the Forest Service to undertake a 
study to identify: (1) which measurement method is more cost 
efficient; (2) to assess what percent of timber theft cases 
involve scaling irregularities and whether tree measurement 
discourages timber theft; (3) which measurement method is more 
efficient when environmental modifications are needed after a 
sale has been awarded; and (4) assess the agency's ability to 
perform cruising required under tree measurement. The study 
will measure Forest Service performance based on Forest Service 
Handbook cruise standards, including identifying how often 
uncertified employees are involved in cruise efforts. The 
Forest Service shall contact with an established independent 
contractor skilled in both cruising and scaling and report back 
to the Committees no later than March 1, 1996.
      The conference agreement includes $400,000 for the 
development of a plan for preserving and managing the former 
Joliet Arsenal property as a National tallgrass prairie. The 
managers are aware of legislation to establish the Midewin 
National Tallgrass Prairie and urge the Forest Service to take 
such steps as are necessary, including a reprogramming, to 
begin implementing the legislation when enacted. The managers 
also urge the Forest Service to seek full funding for the 
Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie as part of its fiscal year 
1997 budget request.
      The managers are concerned about the many programs in the 
President's Forest Plan designed to provide assistance to 
timber dependent communities in the Pacific Northwest. The 
managers are disturbed by the inability of the agencies 
involved to provide a detailed accounting of funds appropriated 
in previous fiscal years for the unemployed timber worker 
programs in the President's Forest Plan.
      The managers expect the Secretary of the Interior and the 
Secretary of Agriculture to prepare a detailed accounting and 
report of the funds appropriated in fiscal year 1995 for the 
President's Forest plan. The report shall include a careful 
accounting of appropriated funding, including: funds 
appropriated for timber production; administrative expenses, 
including the number of Federal employees employed to 
administer the various aspects of the President's plan; funds 
appropriated for the various jobs programs allowed for under 
the President's plan, including but not limited to the Jobs in 
the Woods program; the number of individuals employed by these 
programs; and the average length of each job. The managers 
expected the Secretaries to submit the report to the Committees 
no later than March 31, 1996.
      The managers are concerned that the Forest Service 
reallocates funding pursuant to reprogramming requests before 
they are transmitted to Congress. The managers direct the 
Forest Service to adhere to the reprogramming guidelines, and 
not reallocate funds until the Appropriations Committees have 
had an opportunity to review these proposals.
      The managers believe that additional opportunities exist 
for contracting Forest Service activities, and encourage 
expanding the use of contractors wherever possible.
      The managers are aware that suggestions have been made to 
withdraw administratively additional lands in Montana in order 
to prevent timber and oil and gas development. It is the 
understanding of the managers that wilderness designation for 
Federal lands can only be accomplished legislatively. However, 
the Forest Service does have the ability to designate the 
management of its lands through the forest planning process. 
The managers expect the Forest Service to comply with existing 
statutory and regulatory requirements in the management of 
National forest system lands. Where appropriate, proposed 
changes in land management practices should be implemented 
involving public participation and scientific analysis in the 
land management planning process, including plan amendments as 
necessary.

                        wildland fire management

      Amendment No. 93: Changes the account title to Wildland 
Fire Management as proposed by the Senate; instead of Fire 
Protection and Emergency Suppression as proposed by the House.
      Amendment No. 94: Appropriates $385,485,000 for wildland 
fire management as proposed by the House instead of 
$381,485,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                              construction

      Amendment No. 95: Appropriates $163,500,000 for 
construction, instead of $120,000,000 as proposed by the House 
and $186,888,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The increase above the House includes $23,500,000 for 
facilities, $5,000,000 for road construction, and $15,000,000 
for trail construction. Within the total for facilities, the 
conference agreement includes $36,000,000 for recreation, 
$10,000,000 for FA&O;, and $2,500,000 for research.
      The managers agree to the following earmarks within 
recreation construction:

Allegheny NF, rehabilitation..................................  $150,000
Bead Lake, WA, boating access.................................    60,000
Bead Lake, WA, roads..........................................   176,000
Columbia River Gorge Discovery Center, OR, completion......... 2,500,000
Cradle of Forestry, NC, utilities.............................   500,000
Daniel Boone NF, KY, rehabilitation...........................   660,000
Gum Springs Recreation Area, LA, rehabilitation phase II......   400,000
Johnston Ridge Observatory, WA................................   500,000
Johnston Ridge Observatory, WA, roads.........................   550,000
Lewis and Clark Interpretive Center, MT, completion........... 2,700,000
Multnomah Falls, OR, sewer system.............................   190,000
Northern Great Lakes Visitor Center, WI....................... 1,965,000
Seneca Rocks, WV visitor center, completion................... 1,400,000
Timberline Lodge, OR, water system improvements and new 
    reservoir.................................................   750,000
Winding Stair Mountain National Recreation and Wilderness 
    Area, OK, improvements....................................   682,000

      The managers agree that for the Northern Great Lakes 
Visitor Center, WI, funding is provided with the understanding 
that the project cost is to be matched 50% by the State of 
Wisconsin.
      The conference agreement includes $95,000,000 for roads 
to be allocated as follows: $57,000,000 for timber roads, 
$26,000,000 for recreation roads, and $12,000,000 for general 
purpose roads.
      The managers remain interested in Forest Service plans 
for restoring Grey Towers, and are concerned about the cost of 
the project. The managers expect the Forest Service to continue 
the implementation of the master plan for Grey Towers and to 
explore additional partnerships that can help cost-share 
required restoration work. The Forest Service should work with 
the Committees to provide a better understanding of the needs 
of Grey Towers and explore ways to reduce the cost to the 
Federal government.
      The managers concur in the reprogramming request 
currently pending for Johnston Ridge Observatory and Timberline 
Lodge sewer system.
      Amendment No. 96: Earmarks $2,500,000 and unobligated 
project balances for a grant to the ``Non-Profit Citizens for 
the Columbia Gorge Discovery Center,'' and authorizes the 
conveyances of certain land, as proposed by the Senate. The 
House included no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 97: Includes Senate provision which 
authorizes funds appropriated in 1991 for a new research 
facility at the University of Missouri, Columbia, to be 
available as a grant for construction of the facility, and 
provides that the Forest Service shall receive free space in 
the building. The House had no similar provision.

                            land acquisition

      Amendment No. 98: Appropriates $41,200,000 instead of 
$14,600,000 as proposed by the House and $41,167,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The $41,200,000 includes $7,500,000 for 
acquisition management, $2,000,000 for emergency and in holding 
purchases, $1,000,000 for wilderness protection, $1,725,000 for 
cash equalization of land exchanges, and $28,975,000 for land 
purchase.
      Amendment No. 99: Strikes Senate earmark for Mt. Jumbo.
      Amendment No. 100: Strikes Senate earmark for Kane 
Experimental Forest.
      The managers expect that any movement of acquisition 
funds from one project to another regardless of circumstances 
must follow normal reprogramming guidelines. The managers have 
deleted all references to specific earmarkings included in the 
Senate report.
      The managers continue to encourage strongly the use of 
land exchanges as a way in which to protect important 
recreational or environmentally significant lands, in lieu of 
the Federal Government acquiring lands. The managers believe 
that land exchanges represent a more cost-effective way in 
which to do business and encourage the Forest Service to give 
high priority to those exchanges either nearing completion, or 
where land management decisions are made particularly difficult 
due to checkerboard ownership.
      The managers are concerned about the long history of 
problems associated with the implementation of land acquisition 
provisions in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Act. To 
date, nearly $40 million has been spent on land acquisitions in 
the Gorge, and the Forest Service estimates that nearly $20-$30 
million in remaining land is left to be acquired. The Gorge Act 
authorizes land exchanges in the area, and while several 
exchanges have been completed, a substantial number of acres 
remain to be acquired to fulfill the purposes of the Scenic 
Act. The managers strongly support the use of land exchanges 
versus land acquisitions. The managers understand that the 
Forest Service has the existing statutory authority to conduct 
land exchanges in the Scenic Area, including tripatrite land-
for-timber exchanges.
      The managers encourage the Forest Service to enter into 
land exchanges, including tripartite land exchanges, with 
willing land owners in the Gorge to diminish the need for 
future acquisitions.

               Administrative Provisions, Forest Service

      Amendment No. 101: Retains Senate provision which 
prohibits any reorganization without the consent of the 
appropriations and authorizing committees and adds a provision 
exempting the relocation of the Region 5 regional offices from 
the requirement to obtain the consent of the authorizing and 
appropriations committees. The House had no similar provision.
      The managers are concerned that the Forest Service is 
being required to move the Regional Office in Atlanta, Georgia 
from its present location to a new Federal Center in downtown 
Atlanta at greatly increased costs. At the same time, 
accessibility for both the public and employees will be made 
more difficult. Requiring the Forest Service to absorb 
increased costs for no increase in effectiveness or efficiency 
is not acceptable. The managers agree that any relocation of 
the Atlanta office can occur only pursuant to the bill language 
restrictions which require the advance approval of the 
authorizing and appropriations committees. This will allow the 
committees the opportunity to examine closely the costs and 
benefits of any such proposal, and require the Administration 
to justify fully any additional expenditures.
      Amendment No. 102: Includes Senate provision which adds 
the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources to the list of 
committees which must approve reorganizations pursuant to 
amendment No. 101. The House had no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 103: Includes the Senate provision which 
adds the Committee on Resources to the list of committees which 
must approve reorganizations pursuant to amendment No. 101. The 
House had no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 104: Modifies Senate provision by deleting 
the prohibition on changes to the appropriations structure 
without advance approval of the Appropriations Committees, and 
substituting language allowing the relocation of the Region 5 
regional office to Mare Island in Vallejo, CA, subject to the 
existing reprogramming guidelines. The House had no similar 
provision.
      The conference agreement includes bill language which 
provides authority to finance costs associated with the 
relocation of the Region 5 regional office to excess military 
property at Mare Island Naval Shipyard at Vallejo, CA, from any 
Forest Service account. However, the managers expect a 
reprogramming request which justifies the relocation and 
identifies the source of funds to be used before funds are 
reallocated for this purpose. The allocation of other regions 
are not to be reduced in order to finance the move.
      Amendment No. 105: Retains House language stricken by the 
Senate providing that 80 percent of the funds for the ``Jobs in 
the Woods'' program for National Forest land in the State of 
Washington be granted to the State Department of Fish and 
Wildlife. The Senate had no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 106: Deletes House provision relating to 
songbirds on the Shawnee NF. The Senate had no similar 
provision.
      Amendment No. 107: Deletes Senate provision which 
prohibits revision or implementation of a new Tongass Land 
Management Plan. The House had no similar provision.
      Amendment 108: Deletes Senate provision requiring the 
implementation of the Tongass Land Management Plan (TLMP), 
Alternative P and replaces it with a requirement that the 
Tongass Land Management Plan in effect on December 7, 1995 
remain in effect through fiscal year 1997. During fiscal years 
1996 and 1997, the managers require the Secretary to maintain 
at least the number of acres of suitable available and suitable 
scheduled timber lands, and Allowable Sale Quantity as in 
Alternative P. The Secretary may continue the TLMP revision 
process, including preparation of the final EIS and Record of 
Decision, but is not authorized to implement the Record of 
Decision before October 1, 1997.
      The conference agreement also includes language which 
allows a change in the offerees or purchasers of one or more 
timber sales that have already complied with the National 
Environmental Protection Act (NEPA) and the Alaska National 
Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA). This language intends 
that when the Forest Service determines that additional 
analysis under NEPA and ANILCA is not necessary, the change of 
offerees or purchasers for whatever reason (including 
termination of a long term timber sale contract) shall not be 
considered a ``significant new circumstance'' under NEPA or 
ANILCA and shall not be a reason under other law for the sale 
or sales not to proceed.
      The House had no similar provision.
    Amendment No. 109: Includes Senate provision which 
prohibits applying paint to rocks or rock colorization. The 
House included no similar provision.

                          Department of Energy

                 fossil energy research and development

      Amendment No. 110: Appropriates $417,169,000 for fossil 
energy research and development instead of $379,524,000 as 
proposed by the House and $376,181,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The amendment also provides for the transfer of 
authority for health and safety research in mines and the 
mineral industry from the Bureau of Mines (see amendment No. 
47). Changes to the amount proposed by the House for coal 
research include an increase of $2,000,000 for Kalina cycle 
testing and decreases of $1,500,000 in coal preparation 
research, $1,650,000 for HRI proof of concept testing and 
$1,000,000 for bench scale research in the direct liquefaction 
program, $1,000,000 for in house research in the high 
efficiency integrated gasification combined cycle program, 
$500,000 for filters testing and evaluation in the high 
efficiency pressurized fluidized bed program, and $300,000 for 
international program support and $1,000,000 for university 
coal research in advanced research and technology development. 
Changes to the amount proposed by the House for oil technology 
research include increases of $1,500,000 for a data repository, 
$250,000 for the gypsy field project and $250,000 for the 
northern midcontinent digital petroleum atlas in exploration 
and supporting research, and decreases of $1,000,000 for the 
National laboratory/industry partnership and $1,000,000 for 
extraction in exploration and supporting research, $2,000,000 
for the heavy oil/unconsolidated Gulf Coast project in the 
recovery field demonstrations program, and $1,100,000 as a 
general reduction to the processing research and downstream 
operations program. Changes to the amount proposed by the House 
for natural gas research include decreases of $440,000 for 
conversion of natural gases to liquid fuels, $130,000 for the 
international gas technology information center and $30,000 for 
low quality gas upgrading in the utilization program and 
$1,000,000 for the advanced concepts/tubular solid oxide fuel 
cell program. Other changes to the House recommended level 
include increases of $40,000,000 for health and safety research 
($35 million) and materials partnerships ($5 million) which are 
being transferred from the Bureau of Mines, $6,295,000 for 
cooperative research and development and $5,000,000 for program 
direction at the energy technology centers and a decrease of 
$4,000,000 for environmental restoration.
      The funds provided for cooperative research and 
development include $295,000 for technical and program 
management support and $3,000,000 each for the Western Research 
Institute and the University of North Dakota Energy and 
Environmental Research Center. Within the funds provided for 
WRI and UNDEERC, the managers agree that a percentage 
comparable to the fiscal year 1995 rate may be used for the 
base research program, and the balance is to be used for the 
jointly sponsored research program.
      The managers have included an increase of $5,000,000 for 
program direction, which is $1,000,000 less than recommended in 
the Senate bill. The managers expect the Department to allocate 
these funds commensurate with the program distributions in this 
bill. The various program and support functions of the field 
locations should continue to be funded out of the same line-
items as in fiscal year 1995.
      The managers are aware of proposals regarding the future 
field office structure of the fossil energy program. The 
managers take no position on the specifics of the various 
aspects of the strategic realignment initiative at this time as 
many of the details are not yet available. The managers expect 
the Department to comply fully with the reprogramming 
guidelines before proceeding with implementation of any 
reorganization or relocation. The managers are concerned about 
the basis for estimated savings, personnel impacts, budget 
changes, transition plans, and how any proposed integration 
will address market requirements and utilization.
      In any proposal to privatize the National Institute for 
Petroleum and Energy Research (NIPER), the Department should 
seek competitively a non-Federal entity to acquire NIPER and to 
make such investments and changes as may be necessary to enable 
the private entity to perform high-value research and 
development services and compete with other organizations for 
private and public sector work. In the interim, to the extent 
the program level for oil technology allows, the Department is 
encouraged to maintain as much of the program at NIPER as 
possible.
      With respect to the functions of the Bureau of Mines 
which have been transferred to the Department of Energy, the 
managers expect the Department to continue to identify the 
resources being allocated for these purposes and not to subsume 
these functions into other budget line-items within the fossil 
energy account. The Secretary should maintain the transferred 
functions and personnel at their current locations. In fiscal 
year 1996, any staffing reductions required to accommodate the 
funding level provided for health and safety research should be 
taken from within this activity and should not affect any other 
elements of the fossil energy research and development 
organization. Likewise, any additional or vacant positions 
which are required for the health and safety research function 
should be filled with Bureau of Mines employees who are subject 
to termination or reduction-in-force. The managers strongly 
encourage the Administration, and particularly the Office of 
Management and Budget, to work toward consolidating these 
health and safety functions in the same agency with either the 
Mine Safety and Health Administration or the National Institute 
for Occupational Safety and Health.
      The managers do not object to the use of up to 
$18,000,000 in clean coal technology program funds for 
administration of the clean coal program. The managers are 
concerned that a clean coal project was recently changed 
without addressing congressional concerns that were raised 
before and during the application review period. The managers 
expect the Secretary, to the extent possible, to ensure that 
the sulfur dioxide facility which was approved as part of the 
NOXSO clean coal project is constructed so as to begin 
operation when the elemental sulfur is available from the NOXSO 
process. The managers also expect the Department to report to 
the legislative committees of jurisdiction as well as the 
Appropriations Committees in the House and Senate on the 
rationale for approving the construction of a sulfur dioxide 
plant as part of the NOXSO project. As the remaining projects 
in the clean coal program proceed, the Department should focus 
on technologies that relate directly to the objectives of the 
program.
      Amendment No. 111: Deletes language inserted by the 
Senate requiring that any new project start be substantially 
cost-shared with a private entity. The House had no similar 
provision. The managers expect the Department to make every 
effort to increase the percentage of non-Federal cost-sharing 
in its research and development projects.

                 naval petroleum and oil shale reserves

      Amendment No. 112: Appropriates $148,786,000 for the 
Naval petroleum and oil shale reserves instead of $151,028,000 
as proposed by the House and $136,028,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      Amendment No. 113: Repeals the restriction on conducting 
studies with respect to the sale of the Naval petroleum and oil 
shale reserves as proposed by the Senate. The House had no 
similar provision.

                          energy conservation

      Amendment No. 114: Appropriates $553,293,000 for energy 
conservation instead of $556,371,000 as proposed by the House 
and $576,976,000 as proposed by the Senate. Changes to the 
amount proposed by the House for the buildings program include 
increases of $150,000 for the foam insulation project in the 
building envelope program, $100,000 for lighting and appliance 
collaboratives in commercial buildings in the building 
equipment program and $1,140,000 for energy efficiency 
standards for Federal buildings in the codes and standards 
program, and decreases of $400,000 for residential buildings/
building America, $3,000 for residential energy efficiency/
climate change action plan, and $1,500,000 for partnership 
America/climate change action plan in building systems; 
$150,000 as a general reduction to materials and structures in 
building envelope; $450,000 as a general reduction to lighting 
and $100,000 for appliance technology introduction 
partnerships/climate change action plan in building equipment; 
and $3,060,000 as a general reduction to the codes and 
standards program, consistent with the moratorium on issuing 
new standards (see amendment No. 157).
      Changes to the amount proposed by the House for the 
industry program include an increase of $3,000,000 in 
industrial wastes to maintain the NICE3 program at the fiscal 
year 1995 level and decreases of $300,000 for combustion in the 
municipal solid waste program, $1,000,000 as a general 
reduction to the metals initiative in the materials and metals 
processing program with the expectation that none of the 
reduction is to be applied to the electrochemical dezincing 
project, $200,000 as a general reduction for alternative 
feedstocks and $700,000 as a general reduction for process 
development in the other process efficiency program, and 
$2,000,000 for environmental technology partnerships in 
implementation and deployment.
      Changes to the amount proposed by the House for the 
transportation program include increases of $990,000 for metal 
matrix composites in vehicle systems materials; $200,000 for 
turbine engine technologies, $200,000 for the ceramic turbine 
engine demonstration project, $4,500,000 for automotive piston 
technologies, and $612,000 for combustion and emissions 
research and development in heat engine technologies; and 
$16,228,000 for on-board hydrogen proton exchange membrane fuel 
cells and $2,900,000 for fuel cell research and development in 
electric and hybrid propulsion development. Decreases from the 
House include $1,200,000 for fuel cells/battery materials and 
$500,000 as a general reduction in materials technology; 
$1,000,000 as a general reduction in vehicle systems materials; 
$6,462,000 as a general reduction to light duty engine 
technologies in the heat engine technologies program; and 
$500,000 for battery development, $1,000,000 to terminate the 
phosphoric acid fuel cell bus program and $15,528,000 as a 
general reduction for fuel cell development in the electric and 
hybrid propulsion development program.
      Changes to the amount proposed by the House for the 
technical and financial assistance program include an increase 
of $3,250,000 for the weatherization assistance program and a 
decrease of $295,000 for the inventions and innovations 
program.
      The managers have agreed to the Senate bill language 
restricting the issuance of new or amended standards in the 
codes and standards program (see amendment Nos. 156 and 157).
      The managers agree that:
            1. The Department should aggressively pursue 
        increased cost sharing;
            2. Projects that prove to be uneconomical or fail 
        to produce desired results should be terminated;
            3. The fiscal year 1997 budget should continue the 
        trend of program downsizing with the focus on 
        completing existing commitments;
            4. Ongoing programs should not be grouped under the 
        umbrella of large initiatives and described as new 
        programs in the budget;
            5. There should be no new program starts without 
        compelling justification and identified funding 
        offsets;
            6. The home energy rating system pilot program 
        should be continued with the existing pilot States; 
        within the funds available for HERS, the managers 
        expect the Department to work with Mississippi and 
        other non-pilot program States on the States' home 
        energy rating systems;
            7. There is no objection to continuing the student 
        vehicle competition in the transportation program at 
        the current year funding level;
            8. The Department should work with the States to 
        determine what other programs should be included in a 
        block grant type program along with the consolidated 
        State energy conservation program/institutional 
        conservation program;
            9. There is no objection to continuing the 
        interagency agreement with the Department of Housing 
        and Urban Development for public assisted housing and 
        other low-income initiatives to the extent that HUD 
        reimburses the Department for this work;
            10. The Office of Industrial Technologies may 
        procure capital equipment using operating funds, 
        subject to the existing reprogramming guidelines;
            11. The Department should work with the Office of 
        Management and Budget and the General Services 
        Administration to ensure that agencies fund energy 
        efficiency improvements in Federal buildings;
            12. The Department should increase private sector 
        investment through energy savings performance contracts 
        in the Federal energy management program and should 
        develop mechanisms to be reimbursed for these efforts;
            13. The Department should submit a new five year 
        program plan for the transportation program in light of 
        current funding constraints; and
            14. There are no specific restrictions on the 
        number of contracts to be let for the long term battery 
        development effort or activities within the electric 
        and hybrid vehicle program. Given the level of funding 
        provided, the Department should examine carefully its 
        options in these areas in close coordination with its 
        industry cooperators.
      Amendment No. 115: Earmarks $140,696,000 for State energy 
grant programs instead of $148,946,000 as proposed by the House 
and $168,946,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Amendment No. 116: Earmarks $114,196,000 for the 
weatherization assistance program instead of $110,946,000 as 
proposed by the House and $137,446,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      Amendment No. 117: Earmarks $26,500,000 for the State 
energy conservation program as proposed by the House instead of 
$31,500,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                          Economic Regulation

      Amendment No. 118: Appropriates $6,297,000 for economic 
regulation as proposed by the House instead of $8,038,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The managers agree that the Office of Hearings and 
Appeals should receive reimbursement for work other than 
petroleum overcharge cases and related activities as 
recommended by the House.

                   Energy Information Administration

      Amendment No. 119: Appropriates $72,266,000 for the 
Energy Information Administration instead of $79,766,000 as 
proposed by the House and $64,766,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The managers expect the reduction to be applied largely 
to EIA's forecasting efforts.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

                         INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE

                         Indian Health Services

      Amendment No. 120: Appropriates $1,747,842,000 for Indian 
health services instead of $1,725,792,000 as proposed by the 
House and $1,815,373,000 as proposed by the Senate. Changes to 
the amount proposed by the House include increases of 
$25,000,000 to offset partially the fixed cost increase for 
health care providers, $1,500,000 for collections and billings, 
$750,000 for epidemiology centers, $200,000 for the Indians 
into Psychology programs, and decreases of $2,000,000 for 
Indian health professionals, $3,000,000 for tribal management, 
and a $400,000 transfer from hospitals and clinics to 
facilities and environmental health support. The managers 
direct that the $25,000,000 provided for fixed cost increases 
be distributed on a pro-rata basis across all activities in the 
Indian health services and Indian health facilities accounts.
      Amendment No. 121: Earmarks $350,564,000 for contract 
medical care as proposed by the Senate instead of $351,258,000 
as proposed by the House.
      The managers agree that the Indian Self Determination 
Fund is to be used only for new and expanded contracts and that 
this fund may be used for self-governance compacts only to the 
extent that a compact assumes new or additional 
responsibilities that had been performed by the IHS.
      The managers agree that the fetal alcohol syndrome 
project at the University of Washington should be funded at the 
fiscal year 1995 level.
      The managers are concerned about the adequacy of health 
care services available to the Utah Navajo population, and urge 
IHS to work with the local health care community to ensure that 
the health care needs of the Utah Navajos are being met. IHS 
should carefully consider those needs in designing a 
replacement facility for the Montezuma Creek health center.

                        Indian Health Facilities

      Amendment No. 122: Appropriates $238,958,000 for Indian 
health facilities instead of $236,975,000 as proposed by the 
House and $151,227,000 as proposed by the Senate. Changes to 
the amount proposed by the House include increases of $750,000 
for the Alaska medical center, $1,000,000 for modular dental 
units, $500,000 for injury prevention, $400,000 for a base 
transfer from hospitals and clinics, and a decrease of $667,000 
for the Fort Yuma, AZ project.
      The managers agree to delay any reprogramming of funds 
from the Winnebago and Omaha Tribes' health care facility. 
However, given current budget constraints, if issues relative 
to the siting and design of the facility cannot be resolved, 
the managers will consider reprogramming these funds to other 
high priority IHS projects during fiscal year 1996.
      The Talihina, OK hospital is ranked sixth on the IHS 
health facilities priority list for inpatient facilities. The 
Choctaw Nation has developed a financing plan for a replacement 
facility. The Choctaw Nation proposes various funding sources 
to support its project for a community based hospital. The 
managers direct IHS to work with the Choctaw Nation to identify 
resources necessary to staff, equip, and operate the newly 
constructed facility. The managers will consider these 
operational needs in the context of current budget constraints.
      The managers have not agreed to provisions in the Senate 
bill requiring the IHS to prepare reports on the distribution 
of Indian Health Service professionals and on HIV-AIDS 
prevention needs among Indian tribes. While the managers agree 
that closer examination of these topics may be warranted, the 
resources necessary to conduct adequate studies are not 
available at this time.

                        DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

              Office of Elementary and Secondary Education

                            Indian Education

      Amendment No. 123: Appropriates $52,500,000 as proposed 
by the House instead of $54,660,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The managers agree that no funding is provided for the 
National Advisory Council on Indian Education.

                         OTHER RELATED AGENCIES

              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation

                         Salaries and Expenses

      Amendment No. 124: Appropriates $20,345,000 for the 
Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation as proposed by the 
Senate instead of $21,345,000 as proposed by the House.

                        SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION

                         Salaries and Expenses

      Amendment No. 125: Appropriates $308,188,000 for Salaries 
and Expenses instead of $309,471,000 as proposed by the House 
and $307,988,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The $200,000 increase is provided for the Center for 
folklife programs specifically for the 1996 Festival of 
American Folklife featuring the State of Iowa. This amount is 
provided in addition to the $400,000 base funding. The State of 
Iowa will contribute $250,000 toward this effort.
      Amendment No. 126: Earmarks $30,472,000 as proposed by 
the Senate instead of $32,000,000 proposed by the House for the 
instrumentation program, collections acquisition and various 
other programs.

        Construction and Improvements, National Zoological Park

      Amendment No. 127: Appropriates $3,250,000 for zoo 
construction as proposed by the Senate instead of $3,000,000 as 
proposed by the House. The increase is limited to repairs and 
rehabilitation and is not to be used for new exhibits or 
expansions.

                  Repair and Restoration of Buildings

      Amendment No. 128: Appropriates $33,954,000 for repair 
and restoration of buildings as proposed by the Senate instead 
of $24,954,000 as proposed by the House.

                              Construction

      Amendment No. 129: Appropriates $27,700,000 for 
Construction as proposed by the Senate instead of $12,950,000 
as proposed by the House. The managers agree that $15,000,000 
is included for the National Museum of the American Indian 
Cultural Resource Center, $8,700,000 is included to complete 
the construction and equipping of the Natural History East 
Court Building and $3,000,000 is for minor construction, 
alterations and modifications.
      The managers are providing $1,000,000 to be used to 
complete a proposed master plan and initiate detailed planning 
and design to allow for the development of a proposed financial 
plan for the proposed extension at Dulles Airport for the Air 
and Space Museum. The managers expect that the financial plan 
shall specify, in detail, the phasing of the project and 
commitments by the Commonwealth of Virginia and the Smithsonian 
toward construction and operation of the facility.
      The managers agree that no Federal funds, beyond the 
costs of planning and design, will be available for the 
construction phase of this project.
      The managers have provided $15,000,000 for the continued 
construction of the National Museum of the American Indian 
Cultural Resource Center in Suitland, Maryland. This amount 
will bring the Federal contribution to date for this project to 
$40,900,000. The managers have agreed that no additional 
Federal funds will be appropriated for this project.
      The managers also strongly encourage the Smithsonian to 
develop alternative cost scenarios for the proposed National 
Museum of the American Indian Mall Museum including downsizing 
of the building and decreasing the amount of Federal funding.
      Amendment No. 130: The managers agree to concur with the 
Senate amendment which strikes the House provision permitting a 
single procurement for construction of the American Indian 
Cultural Resources Center. The managers understand that 
authority provided previously for such purposes is sufficient.

                        National Gallery of Art

                         salaries and expenses

      Amendment No. 131: Appropriates $51,844,000 for salaries 
and expenses as proposed by the Senate instead of $51,315,000 
as proposed by the House.

            repair, restoration and renovation of buildings

      Amendment No. 132: Appropriates $6,442,000 for repair, 
restoration and renovation of buildings instead of $5,500,000 
as proposed by the House and $7,385,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

                       operations and maintenance

      Amendment No. 133: Appropriates $10,323,000 for 
operations and maintenance as proposed by the Senate, instead 
of $9,800,000 as proposed by the House.
      Amendment No. 134: Includes Senate provision which amends 
40 U.S.C. 193n to provide the Kennedy Center with the same 
police authority as the Smithsonian Institution and the 
National Gallery of Art. The House had no similar provision.

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

                         salaries and expenses

      Amendment No. 135: Appropriates $5,840,000 for the 
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars instead of 
$5,840,100 as proposed by the House and $6,537,000 as proposed 
by the Senate.
      The managers continue to have serious concerns about the 
total costs associated with the proposed move to the Federal 
Triangle building. Until such time as both the House and Senate 
Appropriations Committees' concerns are satisfactorily 
addressed, no funds may be used for this purpose.

           National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities

                    National Endowment for the Arts

                       grants and administration

      Amendment No. 136: Appropriates $82,259,000 for grants 
and administration as proposed by the House instead of 
$88,765,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Amendment No. 137: Deletes House language making NEA 
funding contingent upon passage of a House reauthorization 
bill. The Senate had no similar provision.
      The managers on the part of the House continue to support 
termination of NEA within two years, and do not support funding 
beyond FY 1997. The managers on the part of the Senate take 
strong exception to the House position, and support continued 
funding for NEA. The managers expect this issue to be resolved 
by the legislative committees in the House and Senate.

                            matching grants

      Amendment No. 138: Appropriates $17,235,000 for matching 
grants as proposed by the House instead of $21,235,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Amendment No. 139: Deletes House language making funding 
for NEA contingent upon passage of a House reauthorization 
bill.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities

                       grants and administration

      Amendment No. 140: Appropriates $94,000,000 for grants 
and administration as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$82,469,000 as proposed by the House.
      The managers on the part of the House continue to support 
a phase out of NEH within three years, and do not support 
funding beyond FY 1998. The managers on the part of the Senate 
take strong exception to the House position, and support 
continued funding for NEH. The managers expect this issue to be 
resolved by the legislative committees in the House and Senate.

                            matching grants

      Amendment No. 141: Appropriates $16,000,000 for matching 
grants as proposed by the Senate instead of $17,025,000 as 
proposed by the House.
      Amendment No. 142: Earmarks $10,000,000 for challenge 
grants as proposed by the Senate instead of $9,180,000 as 
proposed by the House.

               Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

                         salaries and expenses

      Amendment No. 143: Appropriates $2,500,000 for salaries 
and expenses as proposed by the Senate instead of $3,063,000 as 
proposed by the House.
      While the Advisory Council works closely with Federal 
agencies and departments, the National Park Service and State 
historic preservation officers, it does not have responsibility 
for designating historic properties, providing financial 
assistance, overriding other Federal agencies' decisions, or 
controlling actions taken by property owners.
      The managers encourage those Federal agencies and 
departments which benefit from the Advisory Council's expert 
advice to assist in covering these costs. The managers are 
concerned that some Advisory Council activities may duplicate 
those conducted by other preservation agencies. Therefore, the 
managers direct the Advisory Council to evaluate ways to 
recover the costs of assisting Federal agencies and departments 
through reimbursable agreements and to examine its program 
activities to identify ways to eliminate any duplication with 
other agencies. The Advisory Council shall report its findings 
to the Congress by March 31, 1996.

             Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial Commission

                         salaries and expenses

      Amendment No. 144: Appropriates $147,000 as proposed by 
the Senate instead of $48,000 as proposed by the House.

              Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation

                         salaries and expenses

      Amendment No. 145: Appropriates no funds as proposed by 
the Senate instead of $2,000,000 as proposed by the House.

                           public development

      Amendment No. 146: Modifies language proposed by the 
Senate allowing the use of prior year funding for operating and 
administrative expenses. The modification allows the use of 
prior year funding for shutdown costs in addition to operating 
costs. In addition, prior year funds may be used to fund 
activities associated with the functions transferred to the 
General Services Administration. The House had no similar 
provision.
      The managers agree that not more than $3,000,000 in prior 
year funds can be used for operating, administrative expenses, 
and shutdown costs for the Pennsylvania Avenue Development 
Corporation. The managers direct that the orderly shutdown of 
the Corporation be accomplished within six months from the date 
of enactment of this Act. No staff should be maintained beyond 
April 1, 1996. The managers agree that Pennsylvania Avenue 
Development Corporation staff associated with the Federal 
Triangle project should be transferred to the General Services 
Administration, and provision for the transfer has been 
included in the Treasury-Postal Services Appropriations bill.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Council

                       holocaust memorial council

      Amendment No. 147: Appropriates $28,707,000 for the 
Holocaust Memorial Council as proposed by the House instead of 
$26,609,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Amendment No. 148: Restores language proposed by the 
House and stricken by the Senate providing that $1,264,000 for 
the Museum's exhibition program shall remain available until 
expended.

                     TITLE III--GENERAL PROVISIONS

      Amendment No. 149: Retains Senate provision making a 
technical correction to Public Law 103-413.
      Amendment No. 150: Includes Senate provision that any 
funds used for the Americorps program are subject to the 
reprogramming guidelines, and can only be used if the 
Americorps program is funded in the VA-HUD and Independent 
Agencies fiscal year 1996 appropriations bill. The House 
prohibited the use of any funds for the Americorps program.
      Since the Northwest Service Academy (NWSA) is funded 
through fiscal year 1996, the managers agree that the agencies 
are not prohibited from granting the NWSA a special use permit, 
from using the NWSA to accomplish projects on agency-managed 
lands or in furtherance of the agencies' missions, or from 
paying the NWSA a reasonable fee-for-service for projects.
      Amendment No. 151: Modifies House language stricken by 
the Senate transferring certain responsibilities from the 
Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation to the General 
Services Administration, National Capital Planning Commission, 
and the National Park Service. The modification transfers all 
unobligated and unexpended balances to the General Services 
Administration. The Senate had no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 152: Modifies House and Senate provisions 
relating to the Interior Columbia River Basin ecoregion 
management project (the Project). The House and Senate 
contained different language on the subject, but both versions 
were clear in their position that the Project has grown too 
large, and too costly to sustain in a time of shrinking 
budgets. In addition, the massive nature of the undertaking, 
and the broad geographic scope of the decisions to be made as 
part of a single project has raised concerns about potential 
vulnerability to litigation and court injunctions with a 
regionwide impact. The language included in the conference 
report reflects a compromise between the two versions.
      Subsection (b) appropriates $4,000,000 for the completion 
of an assessment on the National forest system lands and lands 
administered by the BLM within the area encompassed by the 
Project, and to publish two draft Environmental Impact 
Statements on the Project. The Forest Service and BLM should 
rely heavily on the eastside forest ecosystem health assessment 
in the development of the assessment and DEIS's, in particular, 
volume II and IV provide a significant amount of the direction 
necessary for the development of an ecosystem management plan. 
This document has already been peer reviewed and widely 
distributed to the public. Therefore, the collaborative efforts 
by many scientists can be recognized.
      The two separate DEIS's would cover the project region of 
eastern Washington and Oregon, and the project region of 
Montana and Idaho, and other affected States. The language also 
directs project officials to submit the assessment and two 
DEIS's to the appropriate House and Senate committees for their 
review. The DEIS's are not decisional and not subject to 
judicial review. The managers have included this language based 
upon concern that the publication of DEIS's of this magnitude 
would present the opportunity for an injunction that would shut 
down all multiple use activities in the region.
      The assessment shall contain a range of alternatives 
without the identification of a preferred alternative or 
management recommendation. The assessment will also provide a 
methodology for conducting any cumulative effects analysis 
required by section 102(2) of NEPA, in the preparation of each 
amendment to a resource management plan.
      The assessment shall also include the scientific 
information and analysis conducted by the Project on forest and 
rangeland health conditions, among other considerations, and 
the implications of the management of these conditions. 
Further, the assessment and DEIS's shall not be subject to 
consultation or conferencing under section 7 of the Endangered 
Species Act, nor be accompanied by any record of decision 
required under NEPA.
      Subsection (c) states the objective of the managers that 
the district manager of the Bureau of Land Management or the 
forest supervisor of the Forest Service use the DEIS's as an 
information base for the development of individual plan 
amendments to their respective forest plan. The managers 
believe that the local officials will do the best job in 
preparing plan amendments that will achieve the greatest degree 
of balance between multiple use activities and environmental 
protection.
      Upon the date of enactment, the land managers are 
required to review their resource management plan for their 
forest, together with a review of the assessment and DEIS's, 
and based on that review, develop or modify the policies laid 
out in the DEIS or assessment to meet the specific conditions 
of their forest.
      Based upon this review, subsection (c)(2) directs the 
forest supervisor or district manager to prepare and adopt an 
amendment to meet the conditions of the individual forest. In 
an effort to increase the local participation in the plan 
amendment process, the district manager or forest supervisor is 
directed to consult with the governor, and affected county 
commissioners and tribal governments in the affected area.
      Plan amendments should be site specific, in lieu of 
imposing general standards applicable to multiple sites. If an 
amendment would result in a major change in land use 
allocations within the forest plan, such an amendment shall be 
deemed a significant change, and therefore requiring a 
significant plan amendment or equivalent.
      Subsection (c)(5) strictly limits the basis for 
individual plan amendments in a fashion that the managers 
intend to be exclusive.
      Language has been included to stop duplication of 
environmental requirements. Subsection (c)(6)(A) states that 
any policy adopted in an amendment that modifies, or is an 
alternative policy, to the general policies laid out in the 
DEIS's and assessment document that has already undergone 
consultation or conferencing under section 7 of the ESA, shall 
not again be subject to such provisions. If a policy has not 
undergone consultation or conferencing under section 7 of the 
ESA, or if an amendment addresses other matters, however, then 
that amendment shall be subject to section 7.
      Amendments which modify or are an alternative policy are 
required to be adopted before October 31, 1996. An amendment 
that is deemed significant, shall be adopted on or before March 
31, 1997. The policies of the Project shall no longer be in 
effect on a forest on or after March 31, 1997, or after an 
amendment to the plan that applies to that forest is adopted, 
whichever comes first.
      The managers have included language specific to the 
Clearwater National Forest, as it relates to the provisions of 
this section. The managers have also included language to 
clarify that the documents prepared under this section shall 
not apply to, or be used to regulate non-Federal lands.
      Amendment No. 153: Includes a modified version of 
provisions included by both the House and Senate relating to a 
recreational fee demonstration program. This pilot program 
provides for testing a variety of fee collection methods 
designed to improve our public lands by allowing 80 per cent of 
fees generated to stay with the parks, forests, refuges and 
public lands where the fees are collected. There is a 
tremendous backlog of operational and maintenance needs that 
have gone unmet, while at the same time visits by the American 
public continue to rise. The public is better served and more 
willing to pay reasonable user fees if they are assured that 
the fees are being used to manage and enhance the sites where 
the fees are collected.
      Most of the provisions of the Senate amendment are 
incorporated into the amendment agreed to by the managers, 
which provides for the following:
      (1) The maximum number of demonstration sites per agency 
is extended from 30 to 50.
      (2) The time period for the demonstration is extended 
from one year to three years and these funds remain available 
for three years after the demonstration period ends.
      (3) Agencies may impose a fine of up to $100 for 
violation of the authority to collect fees established by this 
program.
      (4) The more simplified accounting procedures proposed by 
the Senate are adopted, such that fewer Treasury accounts need 
to be established than proposed by the House.
      (5) In those cases where demonstrations had fee 
collections in place before this provision, fees above the 
amounts collected in 1995 (plus 4% annually) are to be used for 
the benefit of the collection site or on an agency-wide basis. 
The other fees collected will be treated like they are at non-
demonstration sites, except funds withheld to cover fee 
collection costs for agencies other than the Fish and Wildlife 
Service will remain available beyond the fiscal year in which 
they are collected.
      (6) For those Fish and Wildlife Service demonstrations 
where fees were collected in fiscal year 1995, the fees 
collected, up to the 1995 level (plus 4% annually), are 
disbursed as they were in 1995.
      (7) The agencies have been provided more latitude in 
selecting demonstration sites, areas or projects. These 
demonstrations may include an entire administrative unit, such 
as a national park or national wildlife refuge where division 
into smaller units would be difficult to administer or where 
fee collections would adversely affect visitor use patterns.
      (8) The Secretaries are directed to select and design the 
demonstration projects in a manner which will provide optimum 
opportunities to evaluate the broad spectrum of resource 
conditions and recreational opportunities on Federal lands, 
including facility, interpretation, and fish and wildlife 
habitat enhancement projects that enhance the visitor 
experience.
      (9) Vendors may charge a reasonable markup or commission 
to cover their costs and provide a profit.
      (10) Each Secretary shall provide the Congress a brief 
report describing the selected sites and free recovery methods 
to be used by March 31, 1996, and a report which evaluates the 
pilot demonstrations, including recommendations for further 
legislation, by March 31, 1999. The reports to Congress are to 
include a discussion of the different sites selected and how 
they represent the geographical and programmatic spectrum of 
recreational sites and habitats managed by the agencies. The 
diversity of fee collection methods and fair market valuation 
methods should also be explained.
      (11) In order to maximize funding for start-up costs, 
agencies are encouraged to use existing authority in developing 
innovative implementation strategies, including cooperative 
efforts between agencies and local governments.
      (12) Although the managers have not included the Senate 
amendment language regarding geographical discrimination on 
fees, the managers agree that entrance, tourism, and 
recreational fees should reflect the circumstances and 
conditions of the various States and regions of the county. In 
setting fees, consideration should be given to fees charged on 
comparable sites in other parts of the region or country. The 
four agencies are encouraged to cooperate fully in providing 
additional data on tourism, recreational use, or rates which 
may be required by Congress in addressing the fee issue.
      (13) The managers request that the General Accounting 
Office conduct a study and report to the Appropriations 
Committees by July 31, 1996 on the methodology and progress 
made by the Secretaries to implement this section.
      Amendment No. 154: Deletes House language relating to 
salvage timber sales in the Pacific Northwest, and substitutes 
language which makes a technical correction to the emergency 
salvage timber program, Sec. 2001(a)(2) of Public law 104-19 
that changes the ending date of the emergency period to 
December 31, 1996. This correction is necessary to conform to 
the expiration date in Sec. 2001(j). The Senate included no 
similar provision.
      Amendment No. 155: Retains House language stricken by the 
Senate prohibiting the use of funds for the Mississippi River 
Corridor Heritage Commission.
      Amendment No. 156: Deletes House language stricken by the 
Senate placing a moratorium on the issuance of new or amended 
standards and reducing the codes and standards program in the 
Department of Energy by $12,799,000 and inserts language 
regarding grazing at Great Basin National Park. The codes and 
standards issue is discussed under the energy conservation 
portion of this statement.
      Amendment No. 157: Deletes language proposed by the House 
and stricken by the Senate and retains Senate alternative 
language providing for a one-year moratorium on new or amended 
standards by the Department of Energy. This issue is discussed 
under the energy conservation portion of this statement.
      Amendment No. 158: Modifies House mining patent 
moratorium that was stricken and replaced by the Senate with 
fair market legislation for mining patents. The conference 
agreement continues the existing, straightforward moratorium on 
the issuance of mining patents that was contained in the fiscal 
year 1995 Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act.
      The agreement further requires the Secretary of the 
Interior within three months of the enactment of this Act to 
file with the House and Senate Appropriations Committees and 
authorizing committees a plan which details how the Department 
will make a final determination on whether or not an applicant 
is entitled to a patent under the general mining laws on at 
least 90 percent of such applications within five years of 
enactment of this Act, and take such actions as necessary to 
carry out such plan. The conference agreement does not intend 
for the final determination to presume final adjudication of 
the contesting of any applications which are deemed not 
entitled to a patent under the general mining laws.
      In order to process patent applications in a timely 
manner, upon the request of a patent applicant, the Secretary 
of the Interior shall allow the applicant to fund a qualified 
third-party contractor to be selected by the Bureau of Land 
Management to conduct a mineral examination of the mining 
claims or mill sites contained in a patent application. The 
Bureau of Land Management shall have the sole responsibility to 
choose and pay the third-party contractor in accordance with 
standard procedures employed by the Bureau of Land Management 
in the retention of third-party contractors.
      Amendment No. 159: Includes the Senate provision which 
prohibits funding for the Office of Forestry and Economic 
Development after December 31, 1995. The House had no similar 
provision.
      Amendment No. 160: Retains language inserted by the 
Senate prohibiting redefinition of the marbled murrelet nesting 
area or modification to the protocol for surveying marbled 
murrelets. The House had no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 161: Retains language inserted by the 
Senate authorizing the Secretary of the Interior to exchange 
land in Washington State with the Boise Cascade Corporation. 
The House had no similar language.
      Amendment No. 162: Includes Senate provision which 
creates a new Timber Sales Pipeline Restoration Fund at the 
Departments of the Interior and Agriculture to partially 
finance the preparation of timber sales from the revenues 
generated from the section 318 timber sales that are released 
under section 2001(k) of Public Law 104-19. The House included 
no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 163: Deletes language proposed by the 
Senate which would prohibit use of funds for travel and 
training expenses for the Bureau of Indian Affairs or the 
Office of Indian Education for education conferences or 
training activities.
      The managers expect the Bureau of Indian Affairs and the 
Office of Indian Education to monitor carefully the funds used 
for travel and training activities. The managers are concerned 
about the cost of travel and training associated with national 
conferences attended by school board members or staff of 
schools funded by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. Because of the 
funding constraints faced by the Bureau, the managers expect 
that priority will be given to funding those activities which 
directly support accreditation of Bureau funded schools and 
covering costs associated with increased enrollment.
      Amendment No. 164: Retains language inserted by the 
Senate prohibiting the award of grants to individuals by the 
National Endowment for the Arts except for literature 
fellowships, National Heritage fellowships and American Jazz 
Masters fellowships. The House had no similar provision.
      Amendment No. 165: Includes Senate provision which delays 
implementation or enforcement of the Administration's rangeland 
reform program until November 21, 1995. The House included no 
similar provision.
      Amendment No. 166: Strikes Senate section 331 pertaining 
to submission of land acquisition projects by priority ranking. 
Priorities should continue to be identified in the budget 
request and justifications.
      Amendment No. 167: Includes Senate provision that makes 
three changes to existing law relating to tree spiking. Costs 
incurred by Federal agencies, businesses and individuals to 
detect, prevent and avoid damage and injury from tree spiking, 
real or threatened, may be included as ``avoidance costs'' in 
meeting the threshold of $10,000 required for prosecution. The 
language doubles the discretionary maximum penalties for prison 
terms to 40 years for incidents resulting in the most severe 
personal injury. Those injured would have recourse to file 
civil suits to recover damages under this law. The House had no 
similar provision.
      Amendment No. 168: Modifies Senate language restricting 
grants that denigrate adherents to a particular religion. The 
modification specifies that this restriction applies to NEA and 
incorporates Senate language from Amendment No. 169 restricting 
NEA grants for sexually explicit material. The House had no 
similar provision.
      Amendment No. 169: Deletes Senate language restricting 
NEA grants for sexually explicit material. This issue is 
addressed in Amendment No. 168.
      Amendment No. 170: Deletes language inserted by the 
Senate extending the scope of the Arts and Artifacts Indemnity 
Act. The House had no similar provision. The amendment also 
inserts language providing that former Bureau of Mines 
activities, which are being transferred to other accounts, are 
paid for from those accounts for all of fiscal year 1996 and 
changes a section number.
      Amendment No. 171: Deletes language inserted by the 
Senate mandating energy savings at Federal facilities and 
inserts in lieu thereof language that keeps in place only the 
regulations and interim rules in effect prior to September 8, 
1995 (36 CFR 223.48, 36 CFR 223.87, 36 CFR 223 Subpart D, 36 
CFR 223 Subpart F, and 36 CFR 261.6) governing the export of 
State and federal timber in the western United States. This 
language has been included so that the Administration, Congress 
and affected parties can have more time to address policy 
issues with respect to Public Law 101-382, the Forest Resources 
Conservation and Shortage Relief Act of 1990. The language 
prohibits the Secretary of Agriculture or the Secretary of the 
Interior from reviewing or making modifications to existing 
sourcing areas. The language prohibits either Secretary from 
enforcing or implementing regulations promulgated on September 
8, 1995 at 36 CFR Part 223. The bill language also directs the 
Secretary of Commerce to continue the 100 percent ban on the 
export of logs that originate from Washington State-owned 
public lands.
      The fiscal year 1996 Agriculture Appropriations Act 
includes language that delayed the implementation of the 
September 8, 1995 regulations for 120 days, and the managers 
have extended the prohibition to enforce or implement these 
regulations for the entire fiscal year. The managers direct the 
Secretary of Agriculture to continue to solicit public comments 
on the regulations issued on September 8, 1995 until February 
29, 1996. Based, in part, upon a careful review of the public 
comments, the Secretary is directed to report to the 
appropriate committees of Congress, including the 
Appropriations Committees, on the following: Any changes in 
those regulations the Secretary proposes to make in response to 
public comments; the appropriations needed to administer and 
enforce the regulations; the expected cost of the regulations, 
and other effects on the private sector, including effects on 
competition for public and private timber and productivity of 
domestic timber processing facilities; and any recommendations 
from the Secretary to amend Public Law 101-382 in response to 
changing circumstances in the timber industry since 1990, when 
the law was enacted.
      Amendment No. 172: Deletes Senate amendment requiring the 
Indian Health Service to prepare a report on the distribution 
of Indian Health Service professionals. The House had no 
similar provision. The conference agreement also inserts 
language providing for the continued general aviation use and 
operation on the National Park Service portion of Pearson 
Airfield in Vancouver, Washington until the year 2022 and for 
the creation and implementation of a transition plan from 
general aviation to historic aircraft. This provision is 
consistent with the Memorandum of Agreement entered into 
between the United States National Park Service and the City of 
Vancouver dated November 4, 1994. The managers are aware that 
legislation to provide a comprehensive partnership agreement 
for management of the Vancouver Historic Reserve is under 
consideration. This provision allows the City of Vancouver to 
develop the Pearson Museum pending completion of the Vancouver 
Historic Reserve legislation. This language shall not be 
construed to limit the authority of the Federal Aviation 
Administration over air traffic control or aviation activities 
at Pearson Airfield, nor to limit operation or airspace in the 
vicinity of the Portland International Airport.
      Amendment No. 173: Deletes Senate language requiring the 
Indian Health Service to prepare a report on HIV-AIDS 
prevention needs, and inserts in lieu thereof a provision which 
allows the construction of a third telescope on Mount Graham, 
in the Coronado National Forest, Arizona, to proceed under the 
terms of the Arizona-Idaho Conservation Act of 1988, P.L. 100-
696.

                   application of general reductions

      The level at which reductions shall be taken pursuant to 
the Deficit Reduction Act of 1985, if such reductions are 
required in fiscal year 1996, is defined by the managers as 
follows:
      As provided for by section 256(1)(2) of Public Law 99-
177, as amended, and for the purposes of a Presidential Order 
issued pursuant to section 254 of said Act, the term ``program, 
project, and activity'' for items under the jurisdiction of the 
Appropriations Subcommittees on the Department of the Interior 
and Related Agencies of the House of Representatives and the 
Senate is defined as (1) any item specifically identified in 
tables or written material set forth in the Interior and 
Related Agencies Appropriations Act, or accompanying committee 
reports or the conference report and accompanying joint 
explanatory statement of the managers of the committee of 
conference; (2) any Government-owned or Government-operated 
facility; and (3) management units, such as national parks, 
national forests, fish hatcheries, wildlife refuges, research 
units, regional, State and other administrative units and the 
like, for which funds are provided in fiscal year 1996.
      The managers emphasize that any item for which a specific 
dollar amount is mentioned in an accompanying report, including 
all changes to the budget estimate approved by the Committees, 
shall be subject to a percentage reduction no greater or less 
than the percentage reduction applied to all domestic 
discretionary accounts.

                   conference total--with comparisons

      The total new budget (obligational) authority for the 
fiscal year 1996 recommended by the Committee of Conference, 
with comparisons to the fiscal year 1995 amount, the 1996 
budget estimates, and the House and Senate bills for 1996 
follow:
New budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 1995... $13,519,230,000
Budget estimates of new (obligational) authority, fiscal 
    year 1996...........................................  13,817,404,000
House bill, fiscal year 1996............................  11,984,603,000
Senate bill, fiscal year 1996...........................  12,053,099,000
Conference agreement, fiscal year 1996..................  12,164,636,000
Conference agreement compared with:
    New budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 
      1995..............................................  -1,354,594,000
    Budget estimates of new (obligational) authority, 
      fiscal year 1996..................................  -1,652,768,000
    House bill, fiscal year 1996........................    +180,033,000
    Senate bill, fiscal year 1996.......................    +111,537,000

                                   Ralph Regula,
                                   Joseph M. McDade,
                                   Jim Kolbe,
                                   Joe Skeen,
                                   Barbara F. Vucanovich,
                                   Charles H. Taylor,
                                   George R. Nethercutt, Jr.,
                                   Jim Bunn,
                                   Bob Livingston,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Slade Gorton,
                                   Ted Stevens,
                                   Pete V. Domenici,
                                   Mark O. Hatfield,
                                   Conrad Burns,
                                   Robert F. Bennett,
                                   Connie Mack,
                                    J. Bennett Johnston,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.