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104th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

 2d Session                                                     104-625
_______________________________________________________________________


 
 DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS BILL, 
                                  1997

                                _______
                                

 June 18, 1996.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

_______________________________________________________________________


    Mr. Regula, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

             SUPPLEMENTAL, DISSENTING, AND ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 3662]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Department of the Interior and Related 
Agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1997. The 
bill provides regular annual appropriations for the Department 
of the Interior (except the Bureau of Reclamation) and for 
other related agencies, including the Forest Service, the 
Department of Energy, the Indian Health Service, the 
Smithsonian Institution, and the National Foundation on the 
Arts and the Humanities.

                                CONTENTS

_______________________________________________________________________


                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
Department of the Interior:
        Bureau of Land Management..........................     2
                                                                      8
        U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.....................    16
                                                                     16
        National Park Service..............................    29
                                                                     24
        U.S. Geological Survey.............................    37
                                                                     35
        Minerals Management Service........................    40
                                                                     37
        Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and 
            Enforcement....................................    43
                                                                     39
        Bureau of Indian Affairs...........................    46
                                                                     41
        Departmental Offices...............................    56
                                                                     49
        General Provisions.................................    67
                                                                     55
Related Agencies:
        Forest Service, USDA...............................    75
                                                                     56
Department of Energy:
        Clean Coal Technology..............................      
                                                                     73
        Fossil Energy Research and Development.............    91
                                                                     74
        Alternative Fuels Production.......................    92
                                                                     78
        Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves.............    93
                                                                     79
        Energy Conservation................................    94
                                                                     79
        Economic Regulation................................    95
                                                                     86
        Strategic Petroleum Reserve........................    96
                                                                     87
        Energy Information Administration..................    98
                                                                     88
Indian Health Service, DHHS................................   102
                                                                     88
Indian Education, DEd......................................   110
                                                                     92
Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation................   111
                                                                     93
Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and 
    Arts Development.......................................   112
                                                                     94
Smithsonian Institution....................................   113
                                                                     94
National Gallery of Art....................................   118
                                                                     97
John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.............   121
                                                                     98
Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars...........   123
                                                                     99
National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities.........   124
                                                                     99
Commission of Fine Arts....................................   130
                                                                    102
Advisory Council on Historic Preservation..................   132
                                                                    103
National Capital Planning Commission.......................   133
                                                                    103
Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial Commission..............   134
                                                                    103
United States Holocaust Memorial Council...................   135
                                                                    104
Title III--General Provisions..............................   136
                                                                    105

                   Comparison With Budget Resolution

    Section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget and 
Impoundment Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, requires that the report accompanying a bill providing 
new budget authority contain a statement detailing how the 
authority compares with the reports submitted under section 602 
of the Act for the most recently agreed to concurrent 
resolution on the budget for the fiscal year. This information 
follows:

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                     Sec. 602(b)               This bill--      
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                              Discretionary  Mandatory  Discretionary  Mandatory
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Budget authority............................................       12,118          59        12,118          58 
Outlays.....................................................       12,920          62        12,914          62 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The bill provides no new spending authority as described in 
section 401(c)(2) of the Congressional Budget and Impoundment 
Control Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as amended.

                          Summary of the Bill

    The Committee has conducted extensive hearings on the 
programs and projects provided for in the Interior and Related 
Agencies Appropriations bill for 1997. The hearings are 
contained in 9 published volumes totaling nearly 9,000 pages.
    During the course of the hearings, testimony was taken at 
19 hearings on 14 days from nearly 450 witnesses, not only from 
agencies which come under the jurisdiction of the Interior 
Subcommittee, but also from Members of Congress, State and 
local government officials, and private citizens.
    The bill which is recommended for 1997 has been developed 
after careful consideration of all the facts and details 
available to the Committee.

                                  BUDGET AUTHORITY RECOMMENDED IN BILL BY TITLE                                 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                Committee bill  
                      Activity                         Budget estimates,    Committee bill,      compared with  
                                                       fiscal year 1997    fiscal year 1997    budget estimates 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Title I, Department of the Interior: New Budget                                                                 
 (obligational) authority...........................      $6,598,587,000      $5,985,022,000       -$613,565,000
Title II, related agencies: New Budget                                                                          
 (obligational) authority...........................       6,326,056,000       6,073,089,000        -252,967,000
                                                     -----------------------------------------------------------
      Grand total, New Budget (obligational)                                                                    
       authority....................................      12,924,643,000      12,058,111,000        -866,532,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

  Total Appropriations for the Department of the Interior and Related 
                                Agencies

    In addition to the amounts in the accompanying bill, which 
are reflected in the table above, permanent legislation 
authorizes the continuation of certain government activities 
without consideration by the Congress during the annual 
appropriations process.
    Details of these activities are listed in tables at the end 
of this report. In fiscal year 1996, these activities are 
estimated to total $3,053,416,000. The estimate for fiscal year 
1997 is $2,706,477,000.
    The following table reflects the total budget 
(obligational) authority contained both in this bill and in 
permanent appropriations for fiscal years 1996 and 1997.

         DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR AND RELATED AGENCIES TOTAL BUDGET AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEARS 1996-97        
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                 Item                      Fiscal year 1996         Fiscal year 1997              Change        
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Interior and related agencies                                                                                   
 appropriations bill.................          $12,539,892,000          $12,058,111,000            -$481,781,000
Permanent appropriations, Federal                                                                               
 funds...............................            2,086,913,000            1,964,433,000             -122,480,000
Permanent appropriations, trust funds            1,079,592,000            1,087,142,000               +7,550,000
                                      --------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total budget authority.........           15,706,397,000           15,109,686,000             -596,711,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 Revenue Generated by Agencies in Bill

    The following tabulation indicates total new obligational 
authority to date for fiscal years 1995 and 1996, and the 
amount recommended in the bill for fiscal year 1997. It 
compares receipts generated by activities in this bill on an 
actual basis for fiscal year 1995 and on an estimated basis for 
fiscal years 1996 and 1997.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                             Fiscal year--                      
                        Item                         -----------------------------------------------------------
                                                             1995                1996                1997       
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
New obligational authority..........................     $13,669,502,000     $12,539,892,000     $12,058,111,000
Receipts:                                                                                                       
    Department of the Interior......................       5,128,071,000       5,494,603,000       6,831,270,000
    Forest Service..................................         758,328,000         815,476,000         810,430,000
    Naval petroleum reserves........................         412,144,000         462,955,000         407,202,000
                                                     -----------------------------------------------------------
        Total receipts..............................       6,298,543,000       6,773,034,000       8,048,902,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   Application of General Reductions

    The level at which sequestration reductions shall be taken 
pursuant to the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control 
Act of 1985, if such reductions are required in fiscal year 
1997, is defined by the Committee as follows:
    As provided for by section 256(l)(2) of Public Law 99-177, 
as amended, and for the purpose of a Presidential Order issued 
pursuant to section 254 of said Act, the term ``program, 
project, and activity'' for items under the jurisdiction of the 
Appropriations Subcommittees on the Department of the Interior 
and Related Agencies of the House of Representatives and the 
Senate is defined as (1) any item specifically identified in 
tables or written material set forth in the Interior and 
Related Agencies Appropriations Act, or accompanying committee 
reports or the conference report and accompanying joint 
explanatory statement of the managers of the committee of 
conference; (2) any Government-owned or Government-operated 
facility; and (3) management units, such as national parks, 
national forests, fish hatcheries, wildlife refuges, research 
units, regional, state and other administrative units and the 
like, for which funds are provided in fiscal year 1997.
    The Committee emphasizes that any item for which a specific 
dollar amount is mentioned in any accompanying report, 
including all increases over the budget estimate approved by 
the Committee, shall be subject to a percentage reduction no 
greater or less than the percentage reduction applied to all 
domestic discretionary accounts.

                    Land and Water Conservation Fund

    Following is a comparison of the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund by agency. More specific information can be 
found in each agency's land acquisition account.

                    LAND AND WATER CONSERVATION FUND                    
                        [In thousands of dollars]                       
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                    Enacted     Estimated               
                                  fiscal year  fiscal year   Recommended
                                      1996         1997                 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Assistance to States:                                                   
    Matching grants.............            0            0             0
    Administrative expenses.....        1,500        1,500         1,000
                                 ---------------------------------------
      Subtotal, assistance to                                           
       States...................        1,500        1,500         1,000
                                 =======================================
Federal programs:                                                       
    Bureau of Land Management...       12,800       12,800        10,000
    Fish and Wildlife Service...       36,900       36,900        30,000
    National Park Service.......       47,600       34,800        29,000
    Forest Service..............       39,400       41,200        30,000
                                 ---------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Federal programs      136,700      125,700        99,000
                                 =======================================
          Total L&WCF...........;      138,200      127,200       100,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee has included $100,000,000 to cover the land 
acquisition needs of the Bureau of Land Management, Fish and 
Wildlife Service, National Park Service, and the U.S. Forest 
Service.
    Bill language is included in the General Provisions, 
Department of the Interior, which allows the Secretary of the 
Interior to transfer the Interior funds between the Interior 
agencies. All transfers and final project approval is subject 
to the Committee's reprogramming guidelines which were 
published in the Committee report accompanying the fiscal year 
1995 appropriations, House Report 103-551, with the 
understanding that only the highest priority projects involving 
willing sellers will be considered. The Committee continues to 
support strongly land exchanges.

                            Indian Programs

    Spending for Indian Services by the Federal Government in 
total is included in the following table:

                                       FEDERAL FUNDING OF INDIAN PROGRAMS                                       
                                            [In thousands of dollars]                                           
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                          Fiscal year 1995,        Fiscal year 1996,        Fiscal year 1997,   
           Budget authority                     actual                  estimate             budget estimate    
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Agriculture............                   94,619                  134,590                  132,774
Department of Commerce...............                    6,984                    2,683                    4,499
Department of Defense................                    8,000                    8,000                        0
Department of Justice................                    9,811                   10,261                    9,462
Department of Education..............                  436,723                  454,000                  464,100
Department of HHS....................                2,357,154                2,396,819                2,611,754
Department of HUD....................                  533,846                  479,752                  523,868
Department of Veterans Affairs.......                      218                      205                      434
Department of the Interior...........                1,924,836                1,797,002                2,030,075
Department of Labor..................                   63,151                   63,867                   65,840
Department of Transportation.........                  198,955                  201,522                  201,847
Environmental Protection Agency......                   51,896                   84,539                   98,759
Smithsonian Institution..............                   37,200                   37,200                   22,800
Army Corps of Engineers..............                   17,446                   10,569                   18,300
Other Independent Agencies...........                   36,101                   25,845                   30,500
                                      --------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total..........................                5,776,940                5,702,354                6,215,012
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                     Improving Management Practices

    Last year the Committee provided suggestions on improving 
and streamlining operations in land management agencies and 
encouraged those agencies to work with each other to 
consolidate activities and achieve economies. The Committee 
reiterates that direction this year and expects to see more 
progress in that regard in fiscal year 1997.
    Over the past year the General Accounting Office has been 
reviewing the accounting records at several of the large 
agencies in the Interior bill. GAO has identified a large 
amount of unobligated funds which remain after the expiration 
of the fiscal year and also a number of uncosted balances which 
remain in contracts for years after obligation. GAO has 
discovered that many agencies have difficulty in responding 
readily with explanations for these balances. The Committee 
recognizes that there are legitimate reasons in many cases for 
these balances; however, all such balances should be reviewed 
regularly and excess funds should be used to offset major 
requirements, either through the reprogramming process or in 
future budget requests. It is unacceptable to have large 
unexplained balances which, in some cases, amount to more than 
half of the requested new budget authority for a given account. 
The GAO will continue to monitor these balances for the 
Committee. Each agency should cooperate fully with the GAO in 
this effort toward the common goal of sound financial 
management.

           Progress on Recreational Fee Demonstration Program

    Last year the Committee provided the four major federal 
land management agencies the authority to establish a 
demonstration program to test the collection, retention, and 
reinvestment of new admission and user fees. Each agency was 
allowed to establish 50 sites so that 80 percent of the 
increase in the fees could be used at the site of collection. 
This enhances service to the American public and helps reduce 
the backlog of needed maintenance. The American public has 
indicated that they are willing to pay reasonable fees if they 
are given substantial service in return. The Committee is 
encouraged by some of the actions taken by some agencies, 
especially the Forest Service, to begin this program in an 
expeditious and efficient fashion. The Committee is concerned 
that the National Park Service has taken so little action to 
date on this important opportunity to increase public service, 
benefit many sites, and establish an experience and 
informational background base from which better fee collection 
legislation can be implemented in the near future. The 
Committee has learned that the National Park Service has failed 
to join in interagency coordination and has even refused to 
participate in joint news and educational releases on this 
effort. The Committee will take the Park Service performance in 
this program into account when making future allocations of 
funds. The Committee strongly urges these agencies to use this 
demonstration program to enhance their own financial and public 
service situation. The Committee strongly urges the National 
Park Service, Fish and Wildlife Service, Bureau of Land 
Management and the Forest Service to implement rapidly this 
program and report back to the Committee by December 31, 1996 
on the implementation and early lessons of the demonstration 
program. These agencies should submit individual as well as a 
joint, integrated report to the Committee. The Committee also 
urges the four agencies to work closely together to provide a 
solid and shared base of understanding on this important 
effort. The Committee has recommended extending the fee 
demonstration period by one year because the late signing of 
the appropriations act made establishment of projects before 
the summer visitation season difficult.

                     Making Good Government Choices

    This Committee has taken testimony this year from the 
Administration, environmental groups, Native Americans, 
cultural organizations, industry and the American public. The 
consensus opinion is that we should be taking care of our 
National Parks, public lands and cultural institutions. This 
means providing increases in operations and reducing the 
backlog of critical maintenance. In other words, we have been 
asked to take good care of what we currently have in the public 
trust.
    This Committee has provided increases for the National 
Parks, Wildlife Refuges and Forests. We have provided special 
increases for the Everglades Restoration, earthquake program, 
the new southern California Natural Communities Conservation 
Planning and Appalachian Clean Streams initiatives, and assured 
that $9,000,000 will be available for Sterling Forest land 
acquisiton. We have added funds for the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs' Tribal Priority Allocations, Indian health and 
education. Increases are provided for a forest health 
initiative which includes pest suppression, wildfire management 
and timber stand improvements.
    Priority was given to funding increases in both operations 
and relieving critical maintenance backlogs for our Nation's 
major cultural institutions such as the Smithsonian 
Institution, the National Gallery of Art, the John F. Kennedy 
Center for the Performing Arts and the Holocaust Museum.
    In order to fund these priorities, reductions were taken to 
Washington and Regional office bureaucracies with a goal toward 
eliminating duplication and layers of management. Further 
reductions were made to the Department of Energy, eliminating 
wasteful and inappropriate government-subsidized programs and 
channeling all these savings to the high priority programs 
mentioned above.
    By continuing to reduce unnecessary spending and focusing 
our increases on the core programs contained in this bill, the 
Committee was able to save the taxpayers of this country $500 
million and fulfill the commitment to the American public to 
take care of our National treasures.

                     Reducing Levels of Management

    The Committee's recommendations for fiscal year 1997, in 
most cases, assume that fixed cost increases will be absorbed 
by agencies. The Committee expects each agency to reduce levels 
of review and management in order to cover the costs associated 
with pay raises and inflation. In particular, the Committee 
directs each agency to ensure that administrative practices 
that consume a large amount of staff time are eliminated or 
greatly reduced and the resulting savings are reflected in the 
reduction of staff and in budget reductions. For example, chain 
of review, concurrence and ``sign-offs'' for correspondence and 
for programmatic documents should be limited to no more than 
four reviewers except in rare cases involving a major policy 
issue, a complex legal situation or an agency-wide directive. 
For routine correspondence there should not be more than one 
level of review. The Committee expects that, as levels of 
review are reduced and employees are empowered to do their 
jobs, many positions will be eliminated. These positions should 
not be converted into additional program staff but should truly 
result in a reduction of FTEs.

                     Inflationary Impact Statement

    Clause 2(l)(4), of rule XI of the House of Representatives, 
requires that each Committee report on a bill or resolution 
contain a statement as to whether enactment of such bill or 
resolution may have an inflationary impact on price and costs 
in the operation of the national economy. Many of the funds 
provided in this bill permit increased production, will 
increase supply and, thus, reduce the inflationary demand that 
results when a material is in short supply. These programs also 
generate revenue for the Federal Government which is estimated 
at $8 billion for fiscal year 1997. Therefore, the expenditures 
proposed in this bill will contribute to the economic 
stability, rather than inflation.

                  TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                       Bureau of Land Management

    The Bureau of Land Management is responsible for the 
multiple use management, protection, and development of a full 
range of natural resources, including minerals, timber, 
rangeland, fish and wildlife habitat, and wilderness on about 
270 million acres of the Nation's public lands and for 
management of 300 million additional acres of federally owned 
subsurface mineral rights. The Bureau is the second largest 
supplier of public outdoor recreation in the Western United 
States, with an estimated 65 million visits totaling 570 
million visitor hours of recreation use on the public lands 
under the Bureau's management.
    Under the multiple-use and ecosystem management concept the 
Bureau administers the grazing of approximately 4.3 million 
head of livestock on some 164 million acres of public land 
ranges, and manages over 43,000 wild horses and burros, some 
270 million acres of wildlife habitat, and over 150,000 miles 
of fisheries habitat. Grazing receipts are estimated to be 
about $15.5 million in fiscal year 1997, compared to an 
estimated $15.6 million in fiscal year 1996 and actual receipts 
of $16.8 million in fiscal year 1995. The Bureau also 
administers about 4 million acres of commercial forest lands 
through the ``Management of lands and resources'' and ``Oregon 
and California grant lands'' appropriations. Timber receipts 
(including salvage) are estimated to be $96.9 million in fiscal 
year 1997 compared to estimated receipts of $96.2 million in 
fiscal year 1996 and actual receipts of $74.4 million in fiscal 
year 1995. The Bureau has an active program of soil and 
watershed management on 175 million acres in the lower 48 
States and 92 million acres in Alaska. Practices such as 
revegetation, protective fencing, and water developments are 
designed to conserve, enhance, and develop public land, soil, 
and watershed resources. The Bureau is also responsible for 
fire protection on the public lands and on all Department of 
the Interior managed lands in Alaska, and for the suppression 
of wildfires on the public lands in Alaska and the western 
States.

                   management of lands and resources

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................    $567,453,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     575,892,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     566,514,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        -939,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -9,378,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $566,514,000 
for management of lands and resources, a decrease of $9,378,000 
below the budget estimate, and $939,000 below the 1996 enacted 
level.
    The amount recommended by the Committee as compared to the 
1996 enacted level by activity is shown on the following table:


    Land resources.--The Committee recommends $120,435,000 for 
land resources, including increases from the 1996 enacted level 
of $1,591,000 for soil, water and air management, $2,269,000 
for range management, $30,000 for forestry management, 
$1,578,000 for riparian management, $1,059,000 for cultural 
resources, and $1,080,000 for wild horse and burro management. 
The Committee supports the Bureau's involvement in the PM-10 
Clean Air study in the San Joaquin Valley. The Committee 
encourages the Bureau to use up to $500,000 of funds within 
range management for the Rangelands Ecosystem Group component 
of the Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program (EMAP) 
in cooperation with other agencies. The Committee notes that 
the Secretary will soon be implementing new standards and 
guidelines for rangeland health developed by the Resource 
Advisory Councils. However to assess fully the condition of 
western rangelands, the Bureau must use new data collection 
tools, such as remote sensing, to prioritize its field work.
    Wildlife and fisheries.--The Committee recommends 
$28,234,000 for wildlife and fisheries, including increases of 
$1,601,000 for wildlife management and $1,533,000 for fisheries 
management above the 1996 enacted level.
    Recreation management.--The Committee recommends 
$45,864,000 for recreation management, including increases of 
$1,072,000 for wilderness management, and $1,633,000 for 
recreation resources management above the 1996 enacted level.
    The Committee believes that as a result of the 69 BLM 
wilderness areas totaling 3.6 million acres created under P.L. 
103-433, the Department should increase its BLM desert ranger 
force in the California desert. The concentration of visitor 
use has resulted in a number of adverse impacts including more 
conflicts among users, greater pressure on resources, and a 
greater need for intensive management and visitor assistance. 
For these reasons, the Committee believes that the best 
approach for resolving this problem is to provide an additional 
$200,000 in order to fund five additional rangers.-
    The Committee directs that $100,000 be used at the visitor 
facility at Harper Lake for the installation of interpretive 
signs, hiking trails, and boardwalks to help make this area an 
environmental showplace to enhance tourism, and help create an 
outdoor facility for use by local young people.
    Energy and minerals.--The Committee recommends $69,503,000 
for energy and minerals, which is an increase of $342,000 above 
the 1996 enacted level.
    The Committee is greatly concerned about the soda ash 
royalty rate increase recently imposed by the Department of the 
Interior. It has come to the Committee's attention that the 
Department may not have provided adequate support and analysis 
for this increase. Therefore, the Committee directs the 
Department to conduct a study in consultation with the 
Department of Commerce, the United States Trade Representative, 
and the Office of Management and Budget, that at a minimum 
addresses (1) what is the best way to set royalty rates when 
``comparable'' rates are the product of monopoly power, (2) 
what are the benefits associated with increased revenues to the 
Treasury, as opposed to the costs to the domestic soda ash 
industry and U.S. trade objectives, and (3) why is the royalty 
rate for soda ash significantly higher than the rates charged 
for other minerals. The Department should submit this report to 
the Committee no later than 120 days after enactment of this 
Act. If adequate analysis of this issue is not forthcoming, the 
Congress may give serious consideration to repealing this 
royalty rate increase.
    The Committee supports the discussions currently taking 
place between the Bureau and the States over the transfer of 
Federal oil and gas inspection and enforcement activities to 
the States. The Committee believes that it is in everyone's 
interest to pursue a policy that can lead to reduced costs as 
well as simplification and consolidation of regulatory 
programs. The Bureau is directed to report to the Committee on 
the status of these negotiations within 90 days of enactment of 
this Act.
    Realty and ownership management.--The Committee recommends 
$69,556,000 for realty and ownership management, which is 
$189,000 above the fiscal year 1996 enacted level.
    Resource protection and maintenance.--The Committee 
recommends $58,084,000 for resource protection and maintenance, 
which includes increases of $2,654,000 for facilities 
maintenance, $53,000 for resource protection, and $76,000 for 
hazardous materials management above the fiscal year 1996 
enacted level.
    The Committee recommends a reduction of $8,500,000 for 
resource management planning which eliminates this subactivity. 
It is the Committee's expectation that the necessary costs of 
planning will be borne by the programs (which already cover the 
majority of planning costs), and that funding in this manner 
will encourage additional streamlining of the planning process. 
Savings will also be achieved by eliminating the layer of 
planning staff who have been funded in this subactivity. 
Funding has been reallocated to program areas to ensure that 
additional resources are dedicated to on-the-ground field work.
    Automated land and mineral records system.--The Committee 
recommends $42,207,000 for automated land and mineral records 
system (ALMRS), which is $8,793,000 below the fiscal year 1996 
enacted level. Any additional funding for this activity is 
contingent upon a successful initial test in New Mexico, and a 
third party review of the results of this test.
    Mining law administration.--The Committee recommends 
$32,300,000 for mining law administration, which is the same as 
the request. This activity is supported by offsetting fees 
equal to the amount made available in the bill.
    In Title III--General Provisions, the Committee has 
continued a limitation on accepting and processing applications 
for patents and on the patenting of Federal land to claimants 
until mining law reform legislation is enacted. This language 
is identical to that carried in 1996.
    Workforce and organizational support.--The Committee 
recommends $116,131,000 for workforce and organizational 
support, $574,000 above the 1996 enacted level.
    Bill language.--The Committee has included bill language 
that permits the collection and use of small fees by the Bureau 
to cover part of the costs of processing applications and for 
providing certain services on the public lands. The intent of 
this language is to use these fees to help address the backlog 
of operation and maintenance needs on our public lands. This 
language does not apply to the collection or distribution of 
receipts from rents, royalties or bonuses from energy and 
mineral leasing, timber sales, or grazing fees. It also does 
not affect collections that are already appropriated to the 
Bureau, such as adoption fees for wild horses and burros, 
right-of-way application fees, and fees for providing copies of 
public land records. The Committee directs the Bureau to 
provide, as part of its annual budget submission, a list of 
fees established under this authority, the fee rate charged, 
and the distribution of these fees to program operations.

                        wildland fire management

Appropriated enacted, 1996..............................    $235,924,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     247,924,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     247,924,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     +12,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $247,924,000 
for wildland fire management, which is an increase of 
$12,000,000 above the fiscal year 1996 enacted level.
    The appropriation includes $140,157,000 for preparedness 
and fire use and $107,767,000 for suppression activities. The 
fire use and management activity is funded at 84% of the 1997 
``most efficient level.'' Funding for the operations activity 
is set at about 78% of the ten-year average actual costs for 
this activity. Should additional funding be required, the 
Department should first use the $52,200,000 contingency fund 
appropriated in 1993. Beyond that, the Secretary's authority 
under section 102 of this Act should be invoked. The Committee 
has included language in section 102 which requires a 
supplemental be submitted as promptly as possible.
    The Committee wishes to express its support for the 
principles and recommendations contained in the 1995 Federal 
Wildland Management Policy and Review Report. In particular, we 
encourage the Department to conduct efficient and cost 
effective preparedness, fire use, and suppression operations. 
The report provides a blueprint for the improved interagency 
planning and cooperation necessary to protect life and property 
from wildfires, manage wildland fuels to reduce the risk of 
catastrophic wildfire, and reestablish the natural role of 
wildland fire. The Department of the Interior bureaus and the 
Forest Service should adopt common approaches to funding and 
managing preparedness resources, fuels treatments, and the use 
of prescribed fire in order to accomplish the report 
recommendations. All phases of wildland fire management must be 
conducted without compromising either firefighter or public 
safety.
    The funds available in this appropriation should be used to 
support the implementation of specific Policy Review Report 
recommendations such as expanding the use of joint or shared 
resources to accelerate fuels treatments, the use of prescribed 
fire across administrative boundaries, and taking appropriate 
responses to naturally occurring fires. Budget requests based 
on Most-Efficient-Level planning should be designed to reduce 
the total program cost and resource damage over time. 
Investments in suppression resources, reducing hazardous fuels, 
and using fire to achieve land management objectives should be 
optimized in contrast to the uncontrolled costs of only 
reacting to immediate crises. Prevention and fuels treatment 
programs should be targeted to high priority areas to reduce 
the incidence and cost of large catastrophic wildfires. 
Preparedness and suppression costs can be restrained by 
ensuring that the suppression response is commensurate with 
values to be protected and consistent with resource objectives.

                    Central Hazardous Materials Fund

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $10,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      20,500,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      12,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      +2,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -8,500,000

    The Central hazardous materials fund is established to 
include funding for remedial investigations/feasibility studies 
and cleanup of hazardous waste sites for which the Department 
of the Interior is liable pursuant to the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act and 
includes sums recovered from or paid by a party as 
reimbursement for remedial action or response activities.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $12,000,000 
for the Central hazardous materials fund, which is an increase 
of $2,000,000 above the fiscal year 1996 enacted level. The 
Committee expects the Department to fund the highest priority, 
ongoing, or emergency projects within this funding level.

                              construction

Appropriation enacted, 1996 (excludes emergency)........      $3,115,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       3,103,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       3,103,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................         -12,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,103,000 for 
construction, which is a decrease of $12,000 from the fiscal 
year 1996 enacted level and equal to the budget request.

                       payments in lieu of taxes

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................    $113,500,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     101,500,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     113,500,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     +12,000,000

    Payments in Lieu of Taxes (PILT) provides for payments to 
local units of government containing certain federally owned 
lands. These payments are designed to supplement other Federal 
land receipt sharing payments local governments may be 
receiving. Payments received may be used by the recipients for 
any governmental purpose.
    The Committee recommends $113,500,000 for PILT, the same as 
the fiscal year 1996 enacted level and an increase of 
$12,000,000 above the budget request.

                            land acquisition

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $12,800,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      12,800,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      10,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      -2,800,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -2,800,000

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for land acquisition, 
which is a decrease of $2,800,000 below the fiscal year 1996 
enacted level. This includes $7,500,000 for new acquisitions 
and $2,500,000 for acquisition management.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of the Interior to 
identify all BLM lands within the State of New Mexico which are 
potentially suitable for disposal through sale or exchange and 
to complete site specific resources evaluations, clearances and 
appraisals for these parcels. The Secretary is further directed 
to enter into negotiations with the State of New Mexico, BLM 
lease holders, and other private landowners for the purpose of 
exchange or sale of these lands. The Secretary shall set up a 
timetable and cost estimates for these procedures and keep the 
Committee apprised of any progress.

                   oregon and california grant lands

Appropriation enacted, 1996 (excludes emergency)........     $97,452,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     108,379,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      98,365,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        +913,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -10,014,000

    The amount recommended by the Committee as compared to the 
1996 enacted level by activity is shown on the following table:




    The Committee recommends $98,365,000 for the Oregon and 
California grant lands, including decreases of $3,073,000 for 
facilities maintenance, and increases of $3,986,000 for 
resources management, from the fiscal year 1996 enacted level. 
These funds are provided for construction and acquisition, 
operation and maintenance, and management activities on the 
revested lands in the 18 Oregon and California land grant 
counties of western Oregon range improvements.
    The Committee urges BLM to make every effort to comply with 
the statutory requirements of the Oregon and California Grant 
Lands Act to provide economic benefits to the counties adjacent 
to O&C; forestlands. The Committee has provided $79,948,000 for 
the western Oregon resources management subactivity, an 
increase of $3,986,000 from the fiscal year 1996 enacted level. 
This funding level is sufficient for the Bureau to meet its 
timber sales target of 211 MMBF in fiscal year 1997.

                           range improvements

                 (indefinite appropriation of receipts)

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $9,113,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       9,113,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       9,113,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation of not 
less than $9,113,000 to be derived from public lands receipts 
and Bankhead-Jones Farm Tenant Act lands grazing receipts. 
Receipts are used for construction, purchase, and maintenance 
of range improvements, such as seeding, fence construction, 
weed control, water development, fish and wildlife habitat 
improvement, and planning and design of these projects.

               service charges, deposits, and forfeitures

                              (Indefinite)

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $8,993,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       8,993,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       8,993,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation of 
$8,993,000, the budget estimate, for service charges, deposits, 
and forfeitures. This account uses the revenues collected under 
specified sections of the Federal Land Policy and Management 
Act of 1976 and other Acts to pay for reasonable administrative 
and other costs in connection with rights-of-way applications 
from the private sector, miscellaneous cost-recoverable realty 
cases, timber contract expenses, repair of damaged lands, the 
adopt-a-horse program, and the provision of copies of official 
public land documents.

                       miscellaneous trust funds

                              (indefinite)

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $7,605,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       7,605,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       7,605,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends an indefinite appropriation of 
$7,605,000, the budget estimate, for miscellaneous trust funds. 
The Federal Land Policy and Management Act of 1976 provides for 
the receipt and expenditure of moneys received as donations or 
gifts (section 307). Funds in this trust fund are derived from 
the administrative and survey costs paid by applicants for 
conveyance of omitted lands (lands fraudulently or erroneously 
omitted from original cadastral surveys), from advances for 
other types of surveys requested by individuals, and from 
contributions made by users of Federal rangelands. Amounts 
received from the sale of Alaska town lots are also available 
for expenses of sale and maintenance of townsites. Revenue from 
unsurveyed lands, and surveys of omitted lands, administrative 
costs of conveyance, and gifts and donations must be 
appropriated before it can be used.

                United States Fish and Wildlife Service

    The mission of the Fish and Wildlife Service is to 
conserve, protect and enhance fish and wildlife and their 
habitats for the continuing benefit of people. The Service has 
responsibility for migratory birds, threatened and endangered 
species, certain marine mammals, and land under Service 
control.
    The Service manages 92 million acres, encompassing a 508 
unit National Wildlife Refuge System, and waterfowl production 
areas in 186 counties. The Service also operates 72 National 
Fish Hatcheries and nine Fish Health Centers. A network of law 
enforcement agents and port inspectors enforce Federal laws for 
the protection of fish and wildlife.

                          resource management

Appropriation enacted, 1996 (excludes emergency)........    $501,010,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     540,372,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     520,519,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     +19,509,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -19,853,000

    The Committee recommends $520,519,000 for Resource 
Management, a decrease of $19,853,000 below the budget request 
and an increase of $19,509,000 above the fiscal year 1996 
level.
    The comparisons of the recommendation and the 1996 enacted 
level by activity are shown in the following table:



    The Committee expects the Service to seek approval from the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, following the 
established reprogramming guidelines, before making any base 
funding reallocations.
    Endangered Species.--The Committee recommends $66,300,000 
for the endangered species program, an increase of $6,000,000 
above the fiscal year 1996 level, including increases of 
$1,000,000 for candidate conservation, $1,000,000 for listing, 
$2,000,000 for consultation, and $2,000,000 for recovery.
    The Committee understands that, within the increase 
provided for the candidate conservation program, $750,000 will 
be used for implementation of the Virgin River Integrated 
Resource Management Recovery program and actions to restore 
Virgin River spinedace habitat in Utah. The funds are to be 
matched from other State and local sources.
    The Committee expects the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to 
use a portion of the funding made available by this Act for 
administration of the Endangered Species Act listing program to 
review the scientific basis for maintaining specific existing 
listings, to be selected in the discretion of the Service, in 
order to ensure that they are reflective of the best available 
scientific and other relevant information.
    The Committee encourages the Service to provide the same 
level of assistance in fiscal year 1997 as was provided in 
fiscal year 1996 for the Pacific Northwest Forest Plan; for the 
Upper Colorado River Basin endangered fish recovery program; 
and to The Peregrine Fund to continue activities related to the 
California condor and the peregrine falcon.
    The Committee urges the Fish and Wildlife Service to 
provide at least the same level of assistance for the Natural 
Communities Conservation Planning (NCCP) program in southern 
California as in 1996. These funds are to be equally matched by 
private resources.
    In pursuing the Mexican wolf reintroduction program, the 
Committee urges the Service to make every effort to ensure that 
the risk to livestock and the danger of hybridization with 
other breeds in the wild are addressed fully prior to the 
introduction of wolves in the Blue Range Wolf Recovery Area 
along the New Mexico/Arizona border.
    The Committee expects the Service to address the concerns 
of private landowners with respect to California condor 
recovery efforts and the release of experimental populations. 
The Service should consider all options, including serious 
consideration of designating condors in California as a non-
essential experimental population.
    The Committee commends the outstanding work of the Puerto 
Rico Parrot Office and urges the Service to continue to fund 
the parrot restoration activities at this important station.
    The Committee is concerned that some of the money provided 
for the ``Jobs in the Woods'' program has not been used for its 
intended purpose. The Committee urges FWS to take appropriate 
actions to use project dollars to hire dislocated timber and 
forest workers from forest dependent communities and to provide 
job training in support of those workers.
    Bill language has been included in General Provisions, 
Department of the Interior which prohibits the use of funds to 
continue or enforce the designation of critical habitat for the 
marbled murrelet on private property in California. Excluded 
from this moratorium is the 3,000 acre grove of old growth 
redwoods known as Headwaters Grove.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about the 
designation of critical habitat for the marbled murrelet. The 
Committee understands that the Service has made the critical 
habitat designation for the marbled murrelet and that a portion 
of that habitat is on private lands. In enforcing the 
provisions of the Endangered Species Act with respect to the 
marbled murrelet, the Committee expects the Service to make 
every effort to ensure that the impact on private landowners is 
minimized and that the local economy is not adversely impacted 
by the loss of jobs. The Service should work with the private 
landowners and local community officials to identify potential 
adverse impacts and the actions needed to avoid or ameliorate 
those adverse impacts. The Service should work with willing, 
concerned parties to develop a habitat conservation plan which 
limits regulatory intrusion on private property and clearly 
delineates permissible activities.
    Habitat Conservation.--The Committee recommends $54,528,000 
for habitat conservation, an increase of $720,000 above the 
budget request and $716,000 above the fiscal year 1996 level.
    The increase to the budget request is for two projects 
under the project planning account. They are $120,000 for a 
study of water use in the Upper Carson River area of Nevada, 
which will be matched with funding from the Carson Water 
Subconservancy District, and $600,000 for the Chicago Wetlands 
Office, Chicago wilderness project.
    The Committee understands that $200,000 will be provided to 
the organization ``Long Live the Kings'' and the Hood Canal 
Salmon Enhancement Group, through the Service's coastal 
program, for wild salmon enhancement demonstration activities 
on the Hamma Hamma River and other rivers in Hood Canal, 
Washington. Within these funds, the Service should provide for 
a watershed coordinator for the Hood Canal watershed in 
Washington State. The coordinator should work to establish 
cooperative partnerships with Federal, State, and local 
agencies, gain voluntary watershed protections on privately 
held streamside lands, and seek to build community support for 
salmon efforts.
    Fish & Wildlife Service watershed restoration activities 
should proceed in a manner which takes into consideration the 
condition of an entire watershed, rather than approaching 
restoration through a piece meal effort. Furthermore, to the 
extent possible, the agency should work with private landowners 
and encourage their volunteer efforts in meeting objectives 
related to watershed restoration and the longterm protection of 
salmon habitat. Recent GIS mapping data indicate that almost 
two-thirds of all salmon habitat is on private lands, and 
therefore nonregulatory approaches to soliciting private 
landowner support should be encouraged.
    The Committee expects the Service, in carrying out the 
objectives of the Washington State Ecosystems Project, to 
include as a priority, projects which aid in the restoration 
and rehabilitation of salmon habitat.
    Environmental Contaminants.--The Committee recommends 
$8,821,000 for the contaminants program, which is equal to the 
budget request and to the fiscal year 1996 level.
    Refuges and Wildlife.--The Committee recommends 
$229,075,000 for refuges and wildlife, an increase of 
$8,986,000 above the fiscal year 1996 level, including an 
increase of $9,000,000 in refuge operations and maintenance to 
address the backlogs in those areas and a decrease of $14,000 
in law enforcement as proposed in the budget request.
    Within the funds provided, the Committee understands that 
an additional $533,000 will be used for Everglades restoration.
    The Committee expects the Service to refrain from any 
activity which would facilitate the use of bear viscera or 
products derived from bear viscera, and from any activity 
involving the use of steel jaw leghold traps unless essential 
for law enforcement operations in the public interest.
    The Committee expects the Service to work in close 
consultation with the Laguna Cartagena Interagency Committee on 
all aspects of the Refuge's restoration and should report 
annually to the Committee on the progress of the remediation 
process. Every effort should be made to remove the floating 
peat mats at the refuge within five years of installation of 
the water control device which should be completed by May 1997.
    Fisheries.--The Committee recommends $65,559,000 for 
fisheries programs, an increase of $808,000 above the fiscal 
year 1996 level, including a decrease of $192,000 for hatchery 
operations and maintenance as proposed in the budget request 
and an increase of $1,000,000 for fish and wildlife management. 
The Committee encourages the Service to use a portion of the 
fisheries increase for whirling disease research.
    The Committee agrees with the Administration's original 
proposal to transfer 11 fish hatcheries to the States. Based on 
a review by the Fish and Wildlife Service which established 
criteria to determine the lowest priority hatcheries, these 
facilities were identified because their production primarily 
supports resident State programs. The Committee agrees to 
extend, for one year only, funding which will allow for the 
transfer of these hatcheries to the States, assuming a gradual 
decrease of Federal funding over a three-year period. This 
gives the affected States additional time to prepare for the 
transfer. The Service should seriously consider closing these 
facilities if the States are unwilling to initiate the 
transfers in fiscal year 1997. In fiscal year 1996 the 
Committee provided a modest amount of funding to cover 
maintenance requirements for those States that agreed to 
initiate the transfers in that year. To date, two States have 
agreed to do so. This additional maintenance funding incentive 
is not included in fiscal year 1997.
    General Administration.--The Committee recommends 
$96,236,000 for general administration, an increase of 
$2,999,000 above the fiscal year 1996 level, including a 
decrease of $1,000 for international affairs as proposed in the 
budget request, and increases of $1,000,000 each for the 
National Education and Training Center, for Service-wide 
administrative support, and for the National Fish and Wildlife 
Foundation which, like 1996, is funded within this account 
rather than in the land acquisition account as proposed in the 
budget request.
    The Committee notes the work of the National Fish and 
Wildlife Foundation and endorses the concept of the voluntary 
partnerships it facilitates. A total of $5,000,000 is provided 
for the Foundation which is an increase of $1,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 1996 level.
    The Committee expects the National Education and Training 
Center to collect tuition to offset partially administrative 
operating expenses.
    General.--Language is included under Administrative 
Provisions, Department of the Interior, which requires that the 
establishment of new refuges with funds made available in this 
bill be approved by the Committee through the reprogramming 
process.
    The Committee expects the Service to direct sufficient 
resources to address the decline of nongame migratory birds in 
the United States and to identify priority areas for nongame 
migratory birds.

                              construction

Appropriation enacted, 1996 (excludes emergency)........     $37,655,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      37,587,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      38,298,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        +643,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................        +711,000

    The Committee recommends $38,298,000 for construction, an 
increase of $711,000 above the budget request and $643,000 
above the fiscal year 1996 level. The Committee's 
recommendation includes $33,393,000 for line item construction, 
$4,633,000 for construction management, and $272,000 for 
emergency projects.
    The Committee agrees to the following distribution of line 
item construction funds:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee   
       Site, State, Description          Budget request   recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Creston Hatchery, MT, Jessup Mill Pond                                  
 Dam..................................         $850,000         $850,000
Patuxent Refuge, MD, Cash Lake Dam....          485,000          485,000
Witchita Mountains Refuge, OK, Grama                                    
 Lake & Commanche Dams................          700,000          700,000
Crab Orchard Refuge, IL, Little Wolf                                    
 Creek Bridge.........................          550,000          550,000
Squaw Creek Refuge, MO, Davis Creek                                     
 Bridge...............................          550,000          550,000
White River Refuge, AR, Big Island                                      
 Chute Bridge.........................          300,000          300,000
Region 4, FL/LA/NC, Bridge Replacement                                  
 (5 bridges)..........................          800,000          800,000
Alamosa/Monte Vista Refuge, CO,                                         
 Chicago Ditch Dam....................        1,450,000        1,450,000
Wichita Mountains Refuge, OK, Road                                      
 Rehabilitation.......................        2,048,000        2,048,000
Innoko Refuge, AK, Aircraft Hangar....          630,000          630,000
Craig Brook Hatchery, ME, Water Supply/                                 
 Station Rehabilitation...............        4,810,000        4,810,000
Sacramento Refuge, CA, Water Delivery                                   
 System...............................          500,000          500,000
Ennis Hatchery, MT, Spring Water Cover          300,000          300,000
Southwest Fish Technology Center, NM,                                   
 Construct Mora Hatchery..............        2,705,000        2,705,000
Southwest Fish Technology Center, NM,                                   
 Rehabilitate Dexter Hatchery.........          961,000          961,000
Ouray Hatchery, UT, Ponds/Water Reuse.        1,725,000        1,725,000
Stillwater Refuge, NV, Water Rights...        2,000,000         ,500,000
Stillwater Refuge, NV, Water Gauging                                    
 Station..............................          300,000          300,000
National Education and Training                                         
 Center, WV, Complete Construction....       10,028,000       10,028,000
Bear River Bird Refuge, UT, Willow                                      
 Creek Dikes and Canals...............  ...............          611,000
Mason Neck Refuge, VA, Woodbridge                                       
 Research Facility Reuse Plan.........  ...............          100,000
Southeast Louisiana Refuges, LA,                                        
 Health and Safety (Various)..........  ...............          500,000
Dam and Bridge Safety Inspections (non-                                 
 specific)............................          990,000          990,000
                                       ---------------------------------
      Total, Line item construction...       32,682,000       33,393,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee has not included funds for completing water 
supply studies at the Quivera refuge in Kansas. The Committee 
understands that the Service has yet to obligate its 1996 funds 
for this important project and that no further funds are needed 
until fiscal year 1998. The Committee intends to provide 
additional funds next year to ensure this project remains on 
schedule.

                natural resource damage assessment fund

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $4,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       4,000,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       4,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The purpose of the Natural Resource Damage Assessment Fund 
is to provide the basis for claims against responsible parties 
for the restoration of injured natural resources. Assessments 
ultimately will lead to the restoration of injured resources, 
natural resource damages, and reimbursement for reasonable 
assessment costs from responsible parties through negotiated 
settlements or other legal actions.
    The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for the Natural 
Resource Damage Assessment Fund, which is equal to the budget 
request and the fiscal year 1996 level.

                            land acquisition

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $36,900,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      36,900,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      30,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      -6,900,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -6,900,000

    The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for land acquisition, 
a decrease of $6,900,000 below the Administration's request. 
The total includes: $19,500,000 for acquisitions, $1,000,000 
for inholdings, $1,000,000 for hardships, $7,500,000 for 
management, and $1,000,000 for Exchanges.

            cooperative endangered species conservation fund

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $8,085,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      16,085,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      13,085,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      +5,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -3,000,000

    The Committee recommends $13,085,000 for the Cooperative 
Endangered Species Conservation Fund, a decrease of $3,000,000 
below the budget request and an increase of $5,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 1996 level. The $5,000,000 increase above the 
1996 enacted level is for a new activity to purchase lands for 
habitat conservation planning. The Committee does not object to 
the use of up to $1,000,000 of this increase for non-land 
acquisition grants, if the Service, in consultation with the 
States, determines it is appropriate to do so.
    The Committee urges the Service to work with the Natural 
Communities Conservation Planning program in Southern 
California to support implementation of those community plans.

                     national wildlife refuge fund

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $10,779,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      10,779,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      10,779,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends $10,779,000 for the National 
Wildlife Refuge Fund, which is equal to the budget request and 
to the fiscal year 1996 level.
    Through this program the Service makes payments to counties 
in which Service lands are located based on their fair market 
value. Payments to counties will be $14,983,000 in fiscal year 
1997 with $10,779,000 derived from this appropriation and 
$4,204,000 from net refuge receipts estimated to be collected 
in fiscal year 1996.

                         rewards and operations

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................        $600,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................         600,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       1,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        +400,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................        +400,000


    The Committee recommends $1,000,000 for Rewards and 
Operations for African elephant conservation, which is $400,000 
above both the budget request and the fiscal year 1996 level.
    The African Elephant Conservation Act of 1988 established a 
fund for assisting nations and organizations involved with 
conservation of African elephants. With this funding, the 
Service will provide grants to African nations with elephants 
and to qualified organizations and individuals with proposals 
to protect and manage critical populations of African 
elephants.
    The African elephant's 60% population decline in the 1980s, 
from 1.3 million to less than 600,000 animals, has been 
stabilized by a successful international effort led by the 
United States to stop the ivory trade and provide antipoaching 
assistance through this fund. The modest support provided 
through this appropriation is critical for assisting rangers to 
fight poaching and for maintaining current population levels of 
the species. The Committee expects these funds to be matched by 
non-Federal funding to leverage private contributions to the 
maximum extent possible.

               north american wetlands conservation fund

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $6,750,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      11,750,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       7,750,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      +1,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -4,000,000


    The Committee recommends $7,750,000 for the North American 
Wetlands Conservation Fund, a decrease of $4,000,000 below the 
budget request and $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 1996 level. 
Of the amount recommended by the Committee $7,280,000 is for 
habitat management and $470,000 is for administration.

                 Rhinoceros and tiger conservation fund

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................        $200,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................         200,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................         400,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        +200,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................        +200,000

    The Committee recommends $400,000 for the Rhinoceros and 
Tiger Conservation Fund, which is $200,000 above both the 
budget request and the fiscal year 1996 level. The Rhinoceros 
and Tiger Conservation Act authorized the establishment of this 
fund to encourage conservation programs that enhance compliance 
with CITES and U.S. or foreign laws prohibiting the taking or 
trade of rhinoceros, tigers, or their habitat.
    Rhino and tiger populations have declined by more than 90% 
since 1970, and experts now predict the extinction of several 
species in the wild before the turn of the century unless there 
is greatly increased international assistance for antipoaching 
and conservation programs. The Committee expects this fund to 
be managed so as to emphasize assistance to countries which 
have a proven conservation record and which have the greatest 
chance of producing immediate results. The Committee further 
expects these funds to be matched by non-Federal funding to 
leverage private contributions to the maximum extent possible.

              wildlife conservation and appreciation fund

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................        $800,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................         800,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................         800,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................


    The Committee recommends $800,000 for the Wildlife 
Conservation and Appreciation Fund, which is equal to the 
budget request and to the fiscal year 1996 level.
    The Partnerships for Wildlife Act authorizes the 
establishment of the Wildlife Conservation and Appreciation 
Fund account to provide grants to State fish and wildlife 
agencies for wildlife and conservation appreciation projects. 
The Act aims to conserve the entire array of diverse fish and 
wildlife species in the United States and to provide 
opportunities for the public to use and enjoy these fish and 
wildlife species through non-consumptive activities.

                         National Park Service

    The world has witnessed a staggering level and pace of 
change since the first national park was created at Yellowstone 
over 100 years ago. But the parks endure and continue to grow 
in importance, especially for the contrast they provide to that 
change. Noting this rapid change, Frederick Law Olmsted long 
ago observed that were there no place like national parks, 
there would be nothing against which to measure change. Today 
the complexity and speed of this change is mirrored in the 
National Park System which is now comprised of 369 areas, 
encompassing more than 80 million acres, in 49 States and the 
District of Columbia. The areas range in size and character 
from the immense roadless wilderness of Gates of the Arctic 
National Park in Alaska to the small Federal Hall National 
Memorial in lower Manhattan. Visitation is expected to exceed 
270 million in 1996.

                 operation of the national park system

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................  $1,082,481,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................   1,173,304,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................   1,135,139,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     +52,658,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -38,165,000

    The amount recommended by the Committee for fiscal year 
1997 compared with the 1996 enacted level by activity is shown 
in the following table:



    The Committee recommends an increase of $52,658,000 over 
the fiscal year 1996 enacted level for the Operations of the 
National Park System. The Committee has included an additional 
$33.5 million, specifically for the parks, which provides a 3% 
across the board increase to every unit in the National Park 
System, funding for all uncontrollable expenses, and $8.5 
million for special park needs identified in the 1997 budget. 
It should be noted that the National Park Service was the only 
major Interior bureau that received fixed costs, reflecting the 
importance of the National Park Service to the American public.
    In addition, the Committee, recognizing the national 
importance of the South Florida Restoration Project, included 
an additional $12.8 million to continue the critical science 
work associated with restoring the Everglades. The Committee 
further encourages the department to submit a reprogramming 
request should additional dollars be required.
    Unless otherwise noted in the report, all other programs 
should be funded at the fiscal year 1996 level and the 
Committee expects that funds will not be realigned to initiate 
new programs or program expansions which have not been agreed 
to by the Committee. The Committee strongly encourages the Park 
Service to consider the direction contained in the fiscal year 
1996 report which is restated in the front of this report 
regarding reducing levels of management and review and seeking 
opportunities to collocate facilities, functions, programs, or 
field locations with other federal land management agencies.
    The Committee recognizes that visitation to the parks 
continues to increase as does the backlog of serious 
maintenance needs. The Park Service has repeatedly testified to 
Congress and commented in the media that the critical backlog 
needs are in excess of several hundreds of millions of dollars 
and that a partial solution to this condition is passage of fee 
legislation. The Committee reminds the Service that in an 
effort to be responsive to this need, a provision was included 
in the fiscal year 1996 bill which provided the authority to 
establish a pilot fee program at 50 units in the system 
designed solely to improve the condition of the parks by 
allowing 80% of the recreational fees collected to remain in 
the parks that collect the fees. The Committee is concerned 
that the National Park Service has taken little action to 
implement this new funding source and strongly encourages the 
Service to aggressively take advantage of this new authority 
provided last year by the Congress.
    The fiscal year 1997 budget request included additional 
funds to provide professional training for Park employees. The 
Committee understands this need and regrets that additional 
funds could not be made available. However, the Committee would 
consider a formal reprogramming request up to $2 million which 
redirects funds from travel, savings from buyout and downsizing 
initiatives, and further reductions from headquarters 
management and administrative overhead to fund some of these 
training initiatives.
    The Service should note that there is a provision in Title 
III of the bill which states that none of the funds 
appropriated in this bill may be used to implement the 
Americorps program. Specifically, the Committee has denied the 
$1,750,000 request for funding Americorps projects at National 
Park Service sites. Given the size of the federal deficit and 
the recent mandate from the American people to downsize the 
government, the Committee believes that all activities not 
central to visitor services and backlog of maintenance of the 
National Parks should be discontinued at this time.
    The General Provisions, Department of the Interior section 
contains a provision relating to the Presidio. The language 
states that any funds appropriated in this bill for the 
Presidio which are not obligated as of the date on which the 
Presidio Trust is established by an Act of Congress shall be 
transferred immediately to and available only for the Presidio 
Trust.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about reports of 
fee inequities charged to users of the Blue Ridge Parkway and 
encourages the Superintendent to resolve any bias in this area. 
The Committee expects fees charged to be distributed fairly and 
equitably among all users of the Parkway.
    The Committee encourages the National Park Service to 
continue providing assistance to the Museum of the Cherokee 
Indian in Cherokee, North Carolina and the Cherokee Heritage 
Center in Tahlequah, Oklahoma as they revise their exhibits 
interpreting the history of the Cherokee people and the story 
of the Trail of Tears.
    The Committee is concerned about reports of the number of 
days Highway 441, the Newfound Gap road in the Great Smoky 
Mountains National Park remains closed. This road is the vital 
transportation link between North Carolina and Tennessee, and 
the two most heavily visited areas within the Park (Cherokee 
Indian Reservation and Gatlinburg, Tennessee). Closure of the 
road causes financial hardship on the business community in 
Cherokee and the surrounding community. The Committee 
encourages the National Park Service to commit the necessary 
resources to ensure Highway 441 is not closed unnecessarily.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of the Interior to 
review and recommend changes to the National Park Service's 
policy for ordering the closure of private businesses during a 
government shutdown, specifically those operating along 
National Parkways. The Committee expects the Secretary to 
report back within 60 days on any changes to the policy that 
would reduce the impact on the business community.
    The Committee understands the historical significance and 
supports the preservation of Plum Orchard Mansion, in 
Cumberland Island, Georgia. The Committee supports the Park 
Service's plan to enter into an agreement with a private non-
profit entity to preserve and maintain the Mansion and 
encourages the Park Service to do so in a timely manner. The 
Committee is concerned with the length of time that is included 
in the draft Memorandum of Agreement that a private non-profit 
entity may hold the Mansion and urges the Service to reconsider 
the 50 years with a 25-year option provision.
    The Committee is concerned with the Park Service's yearly 
estimates of a 15% increase in the feral horse population on 
Cumberland Island. The Park Service places the horse population 
at 230 in 1996. In the 1984 General Management Plan for the 
Island, it was estimated that there were 250 horses which means 
that horse population has actually decreased in 12 years. 
Because the Service's overall funding is limited, the Committee 
directs the Service not to implement its plan of controlling 
the 230 feral horses and recommends that this funding be used 
for other initiatives such as protecting the threatened and 
endangered Loggerhead sea turtle nests on the Island.
    While recognizing the special and unique role solitude 
offers to the overall experience of visiting Grand Canyon 
National Park, the Committee is concerned about the potential 
economic impact that could result from the National Park 
Service's joint rulemaking with the Federal Aviation 
Administration to overhaul current regulations governing 
flights in the vicinity of the Grand Canyon National Park. Air 
tourism is essential to the economic vitality of southern 
Nevada and northern Arizona. The Committee expects that the 
economic impact on air tour operators and the tourism 
industries will be addressed fairly and adequately during the 
rulemaking process and recommends a 90 days public comment 
period be held prior to the final rule being implemented.
    The Committee has provided funding for the National Council 
on the Traditional Arts at the 1996 level of $175,000.
    The Committee has provided no funding for crowd counting 
activities associated with gatherings held on federal property 
in Washington, D.C. If event organizers wish to have an 
estimate on the number of people participating in their event, 
then those organizers should hire a private sector firm to 
conduct the count.
    The Committee expects the Park Police stationed in Rock 
Creek Park to devote a majority of their resources to combating 
violent crimes.
    The Committee expects the Service to provide $133,000 
annually to the Garfield NHS which represents the one-third 
Federal share required to operate the historic site and protect 
the Government assets.
    In view of the important public recreational need provided 
by the Belle Haven Marina to residents of the entire Washington 
Metropolitan Area, it is the Committee's desire that the 
National Park Service enter into an appropriate agreement with 
State and/or local government officials to insure the 
rehabilitation and continued operation of that marina. The 
Committee further instructs the National Park Service to 
continue the operation of the marina, until such time as a 
suitable agreement with local government is concluded for the 
future operations of the marina and to provide $200,000 toward 
the partnership effort of rehabiliating the marina.
    While the Committee was unable to earmark funds for the 
Little River Canyon Field School, the Committee notes that 
significant long-term savings, projected at $4 million over 20 
years, can be achieved through an innovative cooperative 
agreement between the National Park Service and the Little 
Canyon Field School to share facilities and personnel. The 
Committee encourages the National Park Service to actively seek 
such an arrangement.
    The Committee has provided $100,000 to implement the 
original cooperative agreement to operate the German-American 
Cultural Center including full time staff support and support 
services.
    The Committee has given permanent authority to the Service 
to enter into cooperative agreements with non-federal partners. 
This provision was included in the fiscal year 1996 bill.
    The Committee directs the Park Service to establish dog 
runs at Meridian Hill and Military Field in Rock Creek Park as 
expeditiously as possible.
    Resources stewardship.--The Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $188,482,000, an increase of $17,123,000 from 
the current fiscal year. Funds are included for a 3% across the 
board increase for all units and an additional $12.8 million 
increase for research to advance the South Florida Restoration 
project and a portion of the $8,500,000 special parks 
initiative. The Committee would also consider a reprogramming 
of funds should additional funds for research be required. All 
other programs should be continued at the current 1996 levels. 
No new program initiatives are funded.
    Visitor Services.--The Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $260,843,000 an increase of $9,288,000 from 
the current fiscal year. Funds are included for a 3% across the 
board increase for all units and a portion of the $8,500,000 
special parks initiative. All other programs should be 
continued at the current 1996 levels. No new program 
initiatives are funded with the exception of the $600,000 which 
is included for the Presidential Inaugural activities.
    Maintenance.--The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$369,565,000 an increase of $20,285,000 from the current fiscal 
year. This includes funds for a 3% across the board increase 
for all units and a portion of the $8,500,000 special parks 
initiative. No new program initiatives are funded with the 
exception of the $400,000 provided for the Presidential 
Inaugural activities. The Committee is deeply concerned about 
the backlog of maintenance needs. Any reprogramming request to 
add funds to this account will be seriously considered. The 
Committee has denied the Administration's request, as part of 
their Rego II initiative regarding the divestiture of local 
Parkways. These units of the National Park System are to remain 
in the system and funding is provided for their maintenance. 
Funding emphasis should be placed on addressing critical 
backlog maintenance needs.
    Park support.--The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$223,590,000 an increase of $2,915,000 from the current fiscal 
year. This includes funds for a 3% across the board increase 
for all units and a portion of the $8,500,000 special parks 
initiative. The Committee continues to support the $600,000 
earmark for the NPS Challenge Cost-Share program for the 
National Trails System. These funds continue to leverage 
projects 2-1 by non-federal partners. No new program 
initiatives are funded.
    Bill language is included in administrative provisions that 
limits the administrative accounts in the National Park Service 
for the following offices: not more than $1.7 million for the 
Office of the Director, not more than $2 million for the Office 
of Public Affairs and not more than $951,000 for the Office of 
Congressional Affairs. These limitations apply to the program 
totals, but reductions should be taken from headquarters 
functions.
    External administrative costs.--The Committee provides 
$92,659,000, an increase of $3,047,000 from the current fiscal 
year. This increase is for uncontrollable costs.

                  national recreation and preservation

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $37,649,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      40,218,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      36,476,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      -1,173,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -3,742,000


    The National Recreation and Preservation appropriation 
within the National Park Service provides for the outdoor 
recreation planning, preservation of cultural and national 
heritage resources, technical assistance to Federal, State and 
local agencies, administration of Historic Preservation Fund 
grants and statutory and contractual aid.
    The amount recommended by the Committee for fiscal year 
1997 compared with the 1996 enacted level by activity is shown 
in the following table:




    Statutory or contractual aid.--The Committee recommends 
$4,901,000, a reduction of $1,000,000 below the current fiscal 
year for the Native Hawaiian culture and arts program. All 
increases and decreases recommended in the budget request are 
included in the Committee's recommendation.
    Natural Programs.--The Committee continues to support 
strongly the activities of the River and Trails Conservation 
Assistance Program and regrets that it is unable to provide the 
additional $500,000 requested for fiscal year 1997. The 
Committee does provide $200,000 of the $1 million request for 
the Chesapeake Bay Initiative. These funds are specifically for 
the NPS Chesapeake Bay Program Office in Maryland to be used to 
continue work with federal, state, local and private entities 
throughout the watershed and the Southern Maryland Heritage 
Partnership to implement their heritage protection watershed 
plans. The Committee has not included $1.373 million for the 
new Heritage Partnership Program. The Committee strongly 
supports passage of a separate Heritage Partnership Bill and 
should this occur prior to the House/Senate Conference, the 
Committee will seriously consider additional funds. The 
Committee notes that in fiscal year 1996 two programs related 
to the Recreation and Preservation account were eliminated 
including the Urban Parks and State land and water conservation 
fund programs. As a temporary measure, the Park Service should 
utilize staff available from these former grants programs for 
the Heritage Program until such time as the Congress addresses 
the permanent legislation. The Committee recognizes the 
$110,000 reduction reflects reductions to central office 
personnel as part of the overall restructuring initiative.
    The Committee recognizes the effort and leadership provided 
by the Rivers, Trails and Conservation Assistance Program in 
conducting urban initiatives in the midwest region and expects 
continued involvement to serve as a national model for 
enhancing highly degraded urban waterways and ensuring the 
availability of quality natural resources for all people. The 
Committee expects the Service to continue these important 
assistance programs in the midwest region.
    Cultural Programs.--The Committee accepts the $50,000 
reduction which reflects efforts to downsize the central 
offices and applies those funds to the National Center for 
Preservation Technology. The reduction to central offices is 
associated with the National Register Programs. All other 
programs are funded at the current fiscal year levels. The 
Committee notes that base funds are included for review and 
monitoring of ongoing urban parks programs. The Committee has 
agreed to this need for this fiscal year, however the Service 
should not anticipate these funds continuing in future years.
    International Park Affairs.--The Committee does not support 
the additional funds requested for this program, funding should 
remain at the current fiscal year level. The Committee accepts 
the reduction of $41,000 attributable to the downsizing 
initiatives.

                       historic preservation fund

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $36,212,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      38,290,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      36,212,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -2,078,000

    The Historic Preservation Fund supports the State historic 
preservation offices to perform a variety of functions, 
including: State management and administration of existing 
grant obligations, review and advice on Federal projects and 
actions, determinations, and nominations to the National 
Register, Tax Act certifications and technical preservation 
services. The States also review properties within States to 
develop data for planning use.
    The amount recommended by the Committee as compared to the 
1996 enacted level by activity is shown on the following table:




    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $36,212,000, 
which is the same as the current fiscal year. The Committee 
continues the Grants-in-aid program to the states, the Grants-
in-aid to Indian Tribes and Grants-in-aid to Historically Black 
Colleges and Universities at the current fiscal year levels. 
The National Trust continues to be funded at $3.5 million and 
will become completely self-supporting in fiscal year 1999. The 
Trust continues to perform an important function. The Committee 
felt the Trust, which raises over $30 million in private funds 
annually, is better prepared to seek alternative sources of 
funds to replace federal funds than the other grant programs.

                              construction

Appropriation enacted, 1996 (excludes emergency)........    $143,225,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     143,225,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     119,745,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     -23,480,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -23,480,000

    The recommendation is $119,745,000. This is $23,480,000 
below both the Administration's request and the enacted level. 
The recommendation includes the following areas and activities:

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Committee   
 Park unit, State, and description ---   Budget request   recommendation
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Acadia NP, MA (restore roads).........       $1,700,000                0
Amistad NRA, TX (water & sewer).......        1,100,000                0
Blackstone River Valley NHC, MA                                         
 (interpretative/signs/exhibits)......  ...............         $460,000
Blue Ridge Parkway, NC (Headquarters).  ...............        4,400,000
Blue Ridge Parkway, VA (Fisher Peak)..        4,000,000                0
Carlsbad Caverns NP, NM (replace                                        
 elevators)...........................  ...............        1,400,000
Chamizal NM, TX (rehab)...............  ...............          200,000
Cuyahoga NRA, OH (site and structure                                    
 rehab)...............................  ...............        3,000,000
Delaware Gap NRA, PA (Dingman's                                         
 Trails)..............................  ...............        1,200,000
Everglades NP, FL (water delivery)....        5,000,000        2,800,000
Florissant Fossil Beds NM, CO                                           
 (shelters)...........................  ...............           37,000
Fort McHenry NM, MD (rehab)...........        2,500,000                0
Fort Necessity, PA (design)...........  ...............          400,000
Gateway NRA, NM, NY (Jacob Riis)......        4,300,000                0
General Grant, NY (restoration).......        1,200,000        1,200,000
Glen Echo Park, DC (utilities)........        2,100,000        2,100,000
Grand Canyon NP, AZ (transportation                                     
 system)..............................        4,900,000        2,000,000
Hot Springs NP, AR (lead paint                                          
 removal).............................  ...............          500,000
Independence NHP, PA (utilities)......       13,300,000       13,300,000
Indiana Dunes NL, IN (demolition).....  ...............          500,000
Jefferson Memorial, DC (preservation).        4,500,000        1,300,000
Kings Canyon NP, CA (waste water                                        
 treatment)...........................        2,900,000        2,900,000
Lackawanna Valley, PA (technical asst)  ...............          650,000
Lake Mead NRA, NV (water & sewer).....        5,000,000        5,000,000
Little River Canyon NP, AL (health &                                    
 safety)..............................  ...............          550,000
Minute Man NHP, MA (road).............        2,000,000                0
President's Park, DC (electrical                                        
 system)..............................        5,000,000        1,000,000
President's Park, DC (replace HVAC)...        5,000,000        5,000,000
Rock Creek, Meridian Park, DC (rehab).  ...............          100,000
Roosevelt/Vanderbilt NHS, NY (rehab)..  ...............        1,700,000
Saint-Gaudens NHS, NH (maintenance                                      
 facility)............................          900,000                0
Saratoga NM, NY (complete rehab)......  ...............        1,000,000
Saugus Iron Works NHS, MA (rehab).....  ...............          200,000
Sequoia NP, CA (replace facilities)...        5,200,000        3,000,000
Sequoia NP, CA (utilities)............        3,000,000        3,000,000
Southwestern Pennsylvania Commission,                                   
 PA (various projects)................  ...............        2,000,000
Stones River NB, TN (Redoubt Brannan).  ...............          190,000
Stones River NB, TN (trail                                              
 construction)........................  ...............          300,000
Thomas Stone NHS, MD (rehab)..........  ...............          250,000
Ulysses S. Grant NHS, MO (rehab)......                0          670,000
Washington Monument, DC (replace                                        
 elevator)............................        1,900,000        1,900,000
Wind Cave NP, SD (replace elevators)..        1,300,000        1,300,000
Zion NP, UT...........................        5,100,000                0
                                       ---------------------------------
      Line Item Total.................       82,200,000       65,507,000
                                                                        
Emergency, unscheduled, housing.......       14,600,000       14,973,000
Planning..............................       18,760,000       17,000,000
Equipment Replacement.................       19,940,000       14,365,000
General Management Plan...............        6,600,000        6,600,000
Special Resource Studies..............          825,000        1,000,000
Strategic Planning Office.............          300,000          300,000
                                       ---------------------------------
      Grand Total, Construction.......      143,225,000      119,745,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee has provided funding for all of the agencies 
highest priority-one projects with the exception of a 
maintenance facility at Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site, 
which the Committee understands can be delayed for one year. 
Most of these projects involve health and safety issues which 
the Committee strongly supports.
    The Committee is aware of the White House directive to the 
National Park Service to redesign Pennsylvania Avenue in front 
of the White House. No funds have been requested by the 
Administration and none are provided in this bill for this 
purpose. The Secret Service has informed the Committee that the 
action taken in conjunction with the Park Service this past 
fiscal year to address security inadequacies has been 
accomplished. The Committee notes that the Park Service has not 
been reimbursed the $500,000 it contributed out of other 
construction accounts for this purpose, despite the fact that 
the White House staff assured them that the funds would be 
restored. Since the immediate threat to the President's safety 
has been remedied by last year's actions, the Committee directs 
the Park Service not to spend any additional dollars, from any 
account, for this redesign project unless they follow the 
normal budget process, including reprogramming procedures. 
Further, the NPS is directed not to seek or use any private 
funds for the redesign of Pennsylvania Avenue until the 
Committee has made an affirmative commitment to redesign the 
Avenue. The NPS should report on the safety and feasibility of 
reopening Pennsylvania Avenue to vehicular traffic. Bill 
language prohibiting the unauthorized use of federal funds for 
this purpose without prior Committee approval is contained in 
the General Provisions, U.S. Department of the Interior section 
of this bill.
    The Committee has provided $1.2 million for the Delaware 
Water Gap National Recreation Area, Dingmans Falls trails 
rehabilitation which will include accessibility for the 
handicapped, wayside exhibits and new restroom facilities. A 
total of $1.4 million is provided for an elevator replacement 
at Carlsbad Caverns. Funding in the amount of $4.4 million is 
provided for the next phase of construction of an 
administration building on the Blue Ridge Parkway in North 
Carolina.
    A total of $2 million is provided for continuing ongoing 
activities associated with the Southwestern Pennsylvania 
Heritage Preservation Commission. The Committee has approved 
$400,000 for final design work on an Education Center at Fort 
Necessity Battlefield. The State will provide the construction 
funds. The Committee is aware of several health and safety 
projects at the Little River Canyon National Preserve and has 
provided the $550,000 necessary to make these improvements.
    $3 million is available to the Cuyahoga National Recreation 
Area for site and structure rehabilitation.
    The Committee has provided $2 million to continue the 
purchase of buses for the new transportation system at Grand 
Canyon National Park. In addition, the Committee expects that 
at least $1 million out of the emergency housing line item be 
expended at Grand Canyon to replace trailers and seriously 
deteriorated housing.
    The construction budget for fiscal year 1997 included $5.1 
million to continue to implement a visitor transportation 
center at Zion National Park. The Park Service has informed the 
Committee that the funds appropriated in fiscal year 1996 for a 
parking area have not been obligated because the land is not 
currently in federal ownership. The Committee continues to 
support strongly this initiative and will appropriate funds for 
the next phase once the parking area conflict has been 
resolved.
    Funds are provided to update the General Management Plan 
for the Homestead National Monument in Nebraska.
    The Committee has provided $200,000 to conduct a special 
resources study of the Robert Russa Morton High School in 
Prince Edward County, Virginia. This does not commit the 
Committee to provide additional funds in the future.
    The Committee has included $100,000 for facility 
rehabilitation and security enhancements at Meridian Hill Park, 
which is part of Rock Creek Park.
    The Committee has been supporting critical stabilization 
work at Stones River National Battlefield, specifically the 
Redoubt Brannan and Fortress Rosecrans. The Committee has 
provided $190,000 to complete this important work. In addition, 
$300,000 is provided to continue construction on the historic 
river trail near Murfreesboro, Tennessee.
    A total of $37,000 is made available to the Florissant 
Fossil Beds National Monument to provide shelters to protect 
two petrified stumps which have shown signs of serious 
deterioration. The Committee commends the local Friends 
organization which has raised over $23,000 for this purpose.
    The Thomas Stone National Historic site in Maryland has 
received the support of the Committee for several years to 
renovate the inside of the historic structure. The Committee 
has provided an additional $250,000 to be matched by State and 
private funds to complete this restoration. Again, the 
Committee applauds the non-federal entities who continue to act 
in partnership with the Federal government to accomplish this 
important preservation project.
    The Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor is a 
successful and historically important cooperative project. The 
Committee supports an additional onetime appropriation of 
$460,000 to complete exhibits, signage and interpretive 
materials.
    The Committee has provided $200,000 for repair and 
rehabilitation of the Dock and Bulkheads at the Saugus Iron 
Works National Historic Site.
    A total of $200,000 is provided to the Chamizal National 
Memorial to complete the final phase of the landscape 
improvement plan.
    The Committee includes $500,000 for the Indiana Dunes 
National Lakeshore to remove abandoned buildings.
    The Committee has included $500,000 to remove lead paint at 
the Hot Springs bathhouses and $670,000 for repairs to the 
Ulysses S. Grant NHS in Missouri.
    The Committee has provided $1,000,000 to complete the 
ongoing rehabilitation at the Saratoga NM in New York and 
$1,700,000 for improvements to the heating, alarm and HVAC 
equipment at the Roosevelt-Vanderbilt NHS.
    The Committee has agreed to the $460,000 included in the 
budget to complete the Elwha Dam Environmental Impact 
Statement. The Committee has not agreed to the additional $5 
million requested to replace outdated radio equipment with 
narrow band radios. The Committee understands that this needs 
to be accomplished over the next several years and encourages 
the Service to begin replacing this equipment as necessary out 
of existing funds.
    The Committee is aware of a potential access problem at the 
Sandy Hook Unit of the Gateway National Recreation Area. The 
Park Service should review this problem and if funding is 
needed to provide adequate protection for the causeway within 
the ``critical zone'' of the Sandy Hook Unit and to ensure 
visitor access, such funding should be requested.

                      everglades restoration fund

    The Committee has not included the $100 million requested 
by the Administration for a special Everglades Restoration 
Fund. The Congress provided $200 million last year solely for 
land acquisition projects. These funds were contained in P.L. 
104-127, Section 390 of the Farm bill. The Department should 
utilize these funds prior to seeking additional appropriations. 
The Committee did not include the new Everglades Restoration 
Fund Receipts account because it requires passage of 
authorizing legislation. The Committee remains committed to the 
South Florida Restoration Project and has provided an 
additional $12.8 million for research projects in the Park 
Service operational budget.

                    Land and Water Conservation Fund

                   (Rescission of Contract Authority)

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................    -$30,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     -30,000,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     -30,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends rescission of $30,000,000 in 
annual contract authority provided by 16 U.S.C. 460l-10a. This 
authority has not been used in years and there are no plans to 
use it in fiscal year 1997.

                 land acquisition and state assistance

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $49,100,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      36,300,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      30,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     -19,100,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -6,300,000

    The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for land acquisition, 
a decrease of $6,300,000 below the Administration's budget. The 
amount includes: $16,800,000 for acquisitions, $3,000,000 for 
emergencies and hardships, $7,200,000 for acquisition 
management, $2,000,000 for inholdings and $1,000,000 for 
administering the close-out of the State grant program.
    Although the Committee has chosen not to earmark land 
acquisition projects at this time, it is the Committee's 
understanding that the Sterling Forest acquisition project has 
a first year cost of $9 million. It is the Committee's intent 
to fund this project subject to authorization. The Committee 
considers this and the Everglades Restoration effort to be two 
of the highest priority projects in this bill.
    The Committee believes that the Elwha River in Washington 
State may represent a unique opportunity for salmon restoration 
in a fiscally responsible and effective manner. Unlike other 
rivers in the Pacific Northwest, almost all of the Elwha, from 
Mt. Olympus to the Strait of Juan de Fuca, is in Olympic 
National Park. The Committee considers the acquisition of the 
Elwha dams to be a high priority, and fully expects the 
Administration to make monies available for acquisition through 
funds available for National Park Service land acquisition 
activities. This activity should not be considered a precedent 
for other dam acquisition or removal proposals in the Pacific 
Northwest or elsewhere.
    The Committee has included bill language in the General 
Provisions section which gives the Secretary authority to 
transfer the limited acquisition funds between Interior 
agencies.

                    United States Geological Survey

    The United States Geological Survey was established by an 
act of Congress on March 3, 1879 to provide a permanent Federal 
agency to conduct the systematic and scientific 
``classification of the public lands, and examination of the 
geological structure, mineral resources, and products of the 
National domain''. The USGS is the Federal Government's largest 
earth-science research agency, the Nation's largest civilian 
mapmaking agency, and the primary source of data on the 
Nation's surface and ground water resources. Its activities 
include conducting detailed assessments of the energy and 
mineral potential of the Nation's land and offshore areas; 
investigating and issuing of warnings of earthquakes, volcanic 
eruptions, landslides, and other geologic and hydrologic 
hazards; research on the geologic structure of the Nation; 
studies of the geologic features, structure, processes, and 
history of other planets of our solar system; topographic 
surveys of the Nation and preparation of topographic and 
thematic maps and related cartographic products; development 
and production of digital cartographic data bases and products; 
collection on a routine basis of data on the quantity, quality, 
and use of surface and ground water; research in hydraulics and 
hydrology; the coordination of all Federal water data 
acquisition; the scientific understanding and technologies 
needed to support the sound management and conservation of our 
Nation's biological resources; and the application of remotely 
sensed data to the development of new cartographic, geologic, 
and hydrologic research techniques for natural resources 
planning and management.

                 surveys, investigations, and research

Appropriation enacted, 1996 (excludes emergency)........    $730,163,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     746,380,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     730,163,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -16,217,000

    The amount recommended by the Committee as compared to the 
1007 enacted level by activity is shown in the following table:


    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $730,163,000 
for surveys, investigations, and research, which is $16,217,000 
below the budget request and the same as the 1996 enacted 
level.
    The Committee recommends the following changes from the 
1996 level. Decreases of $2,160,000 for information 
dissemination services, $1,189,000 for volcano hazards, and 
$1,080,000 for data collection and analysis, and increases of 
$2,000,000 for university research in the national earthquake 
hazards reduction program and $2,429,000 for the Federal/State 
cooperative water resources research. The Committee has also 
included $4,553,000 for the water resources research 
institutes.
    The Committee places a high-priority on providing an 
adequate funding level for the national earthquake hazards 
reduction program to ensure a strong commitment between Federal 
and university-based earthquake research.
    The Committee has recommended continued funding for the 
water resources research institutes to continue efforts to 
address important State and regional water resources issues and 
problems.
    The Committee believes that the Survey should maintain and 
expand its relationship with States through the cooperative 
Federal/State water resources research program which provides 
water quality and quantity information needed by Federal, 
State, and local communities in managing their water resources.
    The Committee expects the Survey to continue to increase 
contracting of map and digital data production, with the goal 
of no less that 50 percent contracting by the end of fiscal 
year 1997 and no less than 60 percent contracting by the end of 
fiscal year 1999. The Survey should not be competing with the 
private sector for map production contracts. When services of 
equal quality and cost are available from the private sector, 
the Survey should use the private sector.
    The Committee also expects the Survey to provide 20 percent 
of funds available for the national cooperative geologic 
mapping program to the States and these funds should be matched 
on at least a one-for-one basis by the States and used for 
geologic mapping by the States.
    The Committee provided specific direction on the operation 
of the biological research functions of the Survey's budget in 
last years report, and expects that direction to be honored.
    The Biological Research Division is funded at the 1996 
enacted level. Hence, there should be no further closures or 
reductions in resources to field stations without advance 
approval by the Appropriations Committees in accordance with 
reprogramming procedures. Within the funds provided for the 
Biological Research Division the Tunison field station should 
be funded at the 1995 enacted level of $488,000.
    The USGS should continue to work with regional initiatives 
such as the Transboundary Resource Inventory project (TRIP) and 
seek input from state and local governments, universities, 
private businesses, non-governmental organizations and other 
data users regarding the use of aerial photography of the 
border region to develop a base map and binational information 
system.
    As they continue to grow, communities along the U.S.-Mexico 
border must drawn upon aquifers to meet their demands, but 
there is an unfortunate lack of information on their dimensions 
and sustainability. A groundwater geology survey team has been 
proposed by the Transboundary Resource Inventory Project to 
include USGS, the border State Geologists, federal, state and 
local water authorities, the International Boundary and Water 
Commission, the Border Environmental Cooperation Commission and 
the North American Development Bank. Through the appropriate 
bilateral channels, this group can work jointly with the 
Mexican authorities to prepare a work plan, including the order 
of priorities budgets and timelines, for a comprehensive 
survey, characterization and map of each transboundary aquifer 
along the extension of the U.S.-Mexico border.
    The Committee did not provide any funding related to 
residual costs associated with the former Bureau of Mines. The 
Committee directs that such funds be provided by Departmental 
Management and not allocated from operational accounts within 
the Geological Survey or any other bureau.

                      Minerals Management Service

    The Minerals Management Service is responsible for 
collecting, distributing, accounting and auditing revenues from 
mineral leases on Federal and Indian lands. In fiscal year 
1997, MMS expects to collect and distribute about $5.1 billion 
from over 107,000 Federal and Indian leases. In addition, about 
$172 million in unpaid and underpaid royalties are expected to 
be collected through the MMS audit and negotiated settlement 
programs.
    The MMS also manages the offshore energy and mineral 
resources on the Nation's Outer Continental Shelf. To date, the 
OCS program has been focused primarily on oil and gas leasing. 
Over the past few years, MMS has begun exploring the possible 
development of other marine mineral resources, especially sand 
and gravel.
    With the passage of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, MMS 
assumed increased responsibility for oil spill research, 
including the promotion of increased oil spill response 
capabilities, and for oil spill financial responsibility 
certifications of offshore platforms and pipelines.

                royalty and offshore minerals management

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................    $182,555,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     182,994,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     186,555,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      +4,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      +3,561,000

    The amount recommended by the Committee as compared to the 
1996 enacted level by activity is shown on the following table:




    The Committee recommends $186,555,000 for royalty and 
offshore minerals management, an increase of $3,561,000 above 
the budget request and $4,000,000 above the fiscal year 1996 
level. The amount recommended by the Committee includes an 
increase of $4,000,000 for the audit compliance program and 
decreases of $300,000 in the OCS lands program for the office 
of management support, $42,000 in the royalty management 
program for the program services office, and $97,000 as a 
general reduction to headquarters administration.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about the 
proportion of Service funding which is devoted to 
administration. The general administration account in 
combination with the offshore management support office and the 
program services office comprises 21 percent of the royalty and 
offshore minerals management appropriation in fiscal year 1996. 
The Committee encourages the Service to examine closely 
opportunities for further streamlining these functions in 
future budget requests.
    The Committee has had a long-standing concern with respect 
to the MMS royalty audit program and the adequacy of the 
funding and staffing for that program. In fiscal year 1990 the 
MMS initiated a three-year initiative to place the royalty 
audit program on a more timely cycle. At the Committee's 
direction, and as a part of that initiative, the MMS developed 
an annual audit plan for fiscal year 1990 and each succeeding 
year outlining the audits to be conducted in each of those 
fiscal years. The Committee expects the MMS to continue to 
develop an annual audit plan, and to report quarterly on actual 
audit activity, including completed audits by category compared 
with the audit plan, the status of staffing and hiring for the 
audit program, and any key areas of concern.
    The Committee understands that the Interior, Energy and 
Commerce Departments have been investigating possible 
underpayment of royalties for minerals produced from Federal 
lands, and expects the Service to take aggressive action to 
secure full recoupment of any and all amounts owed. The 
Committee should be kept informed of all actions taken toward 
that end.
    The Committee expects the Service to consider conducting 
additional pilot projects for taking oil and/or gas in-kind. 
The Service should coordinate with the legislative committees 
of jurisdiction in doing so.
    Bill Language.--Bill language has been included under 
General Provisions, Department of the Interior to prohibit the 
use of funds for Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) leasing 
activities in several areas. In those areas where the Committee 
has recommended restrictions on preleasing activities, those 
restrictions apply to the formal steps identified by the 
Department of the Interior as part of the actual lease sale 
process. These formal steps include such activities as the 
publication of sale-specific environmental impact statements, 
the conduct of public hearings directly associated with the EIS 
process, issuance of notices of sale, and receipt of bids.
    The leasing restrictions included for fiscal year 1997 are 
the same as those in fiscal year 1996. The Administration has 
supported continuing these provisions for another year. The 
areas covered by the Committee's recommendation include those 
identified by President Bush in his June 26, 1990 statement--
namely, Northern, Central and Southern California, the North 
Atlantic, Washington-Oregon, and Florida south of 26 degrees 
north latitude--as well as the Mid and South Atlantic, the 
Eastern Gulf of Mexico north of 26 degrees, and the North 
Aleutian Basin in Alaska.

                           Oil Spill Research

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $6,440,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       6,440,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       6,440,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends $6,440,000, to be derived from the 
Oil Spill Liability Trust Fund, to conduct oil spill research 
and financial responsibility and inspection activities 
associated with the Oil Pollution Act of 1990, Public Law 101-
380. The Committee recommendation is equal to the budget 
request and to the fiscal year 1996 level.

          Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement

    The Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 
(OSM), through its regulation and technology account, regulates 
surface coal mining operations to ensure that the environment 
is protected during those operations and that the land is 
adequately reclaimed once mining is completed. The OSM 
accomplishes this mission by providing grants to those States 
that maintain their own regulatory and reclamation programs and 
by conducting oversight of State programs. Further, the OSM 
administers the regulatory programs in the States that do not 
have their own programs and on Federal and tribal lands.
    Through its abandoned mine reclamation fund account, the 
OSM provides environmental restoration at abandoned coal mines 
using tonnage-based fees collected from current coal production 
operations. In their unreclaimed condition these abandoned 
sites may endanger public health and safety or prevent the 
beneficial use of land and water resources.

                       regulation and technology

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $95,470,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      94,272,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      94,272,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      -1,198,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $94,272,000 
for regulation and technology, the budget request, and 
$1,198,000 below the 1996 funding level. The comparisons of the 
recommendation and the 1996 enacted level by activity is shown 
in the following table:




    The Committee is encouraged by the success with which the 
OSM has dramatically downsized. Although performance has 
suffered somewhat, the overall accomplishments indicate that 
this year should be a year for level funding in which past 
reductions can be accommodated and in which future 
restructuring can be considered. The Committee is encouraged by 
the new business lines budget structure which will be proposed 
before the submission of a fiscal year 1998 budget request.

                    abandoned mine reclamation fund

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................    $173,887,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     179,385,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     175,887,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      +2,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -3,498,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $175,887,000 
for the Abandoned Mine Reclamation Fund, a decrease of 
$3,498,000 below the budget request and an increase of 
$2,000,000 above the 1996 funding level. The comparisons of the 
recommendation and the 1996 enacted level by activity is shown 
in the following table:




    The Committee has included $4,000,000 to initiate the 
Appalachian Clean Streams Initiative to address acid mine 
drainage problems which have destroyed over 7,000 miles of 
streams. The Administration requested $4,300,000 for this 
purpose. The Committee is encouraged by the efforts of bringing 
various governmental and non-governmental organizations 
together to tackle this problem in a full partnership. Other 
federal agencies, especially the federal land management 
agencies, are encouraged to participate in this program where 
projects should be completed on the lands they manage.
    Bill Language.--The Committee has recommended continuing 
bill language, carried in previous years, maintaining the 
Federal emergency reclamation program and limiting expenditures 
in any one State to 25 percent of the total appropriated for 
Federal and State-run emergency programs. The total recommended 
for fiscal year 1996 is $18 million. Bill language also is 
included to permit States to use prior year carryover funds 
from the emergency program without being subject to the 25 
percent statutory limitation per State. The Committee also has 
recommended bill language which would fund minimum program 
State grants at $1,500,000 per State and bill language which 
provides $4,000,000 to be used for projects in the Appalachian 
Clean Streams Initiative.

                        Bureau of Indian Affairs

                      operation of indian programs

Appropriation enacted, 1996 (excludes emergency)........  $1,384,434,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................   1,579,423,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................   1,381,623,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      -2,811,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................    -197,800,000

    The Bureau of Indian Affairs was created in 1824, its 
mission is founded on a government-to-government relationship 
and trust responsibility that results from treaties with Native 
groups. The Bureau delivers services to over one million Native 
Americans through 12 area offices and 83 agency offices. In 
addition, the Bureau provides education programs to Native 
Americans through the operation of 117 day schools, 56 boarding 
schools, and 14 dormitories. Lastly the Bureau administers more 
than 46 million acres of tribally owned land.
    The Committee recommends a total of $1,381,623,000 for 
fiscal year 1997 for Operation of Indian Programs, which is 
$197,800,000 below the budget request, and $2,811,000 below the 
1996 enacted level.
    The amounts recommended by the Committee as compared to the 
1996 enacted level by activity is shown in the following table:


    Tribal priority allocations.--The Committee recommends 
$664,152,000 for tribal priority allocations, which is 
$10,000,000 above the 1996 enacted level. Because of the high-
priority the Committee places on the tribal priority allocation 
portion of the Bureau's budget the Committee has included a 
general increase of $10,000,000 over the 1996 enacted level. 
The Bureau is directed to study and report to this Committee by 
February 1, 1997 on additional programs for inclusion in tribal 
priority allocations, including education programs. Within the 
funds provided for water resources, $399,000 is for the 
Seminole and Miccosukee tribes water studies in support of the 
Everglades initiative.
    Other recurring programs.--The Committee recommends 
$498,058,000 for other recurring programs, which is $4,561,000 
over the 1996 enacted level.
    The Committee recommends $445,858,000 for education 
programs within other recurring programs. This funding level 
includes $339,709,000 for forward-funded school operations. 
Other school operations are funded at $78,738,000, and 
continuing education is funded at $27,411,000 same as the 1996 
enacted level.
    Within resources management, the Committee recommends 
$100,000 to be made available to the Lake Roosevelt Water 
Quality Control Council, a partner in the Lake Roosevelt Forum. 
These funds will be used for continued work on measuring heavy 
metal and dioxin contamination of the water, sediments, and 
fishery resources of Lake Roosevelt.
    Within the funds provided for resources management, 
$600,000 is to be made available to the Bering Sea Fisherman's 
Association, and $69,000 is available to the Alaska Sea Otter 
Commission.
    Given the limited resources available to the Committee in 
fiscal year 1997 and for the foreseeable future, the Committee 
is concerned about maintaining an adequate educational system 
for the students currently in the Bureau's school system. An 
increasing demand on already scarce resources could result in 
diminishing the educational services available to the 
approximately 50,000 children that are now served by Bureau 
schools. Accordingly, the Committee has continued the fiscal 
year 1996 bill language which limits the number of schools to 
be funded to those in the Bureau of Indian Affairs school 
system as of September 1, 1995. Bill language is also continued 
which prohibits using Bureau funds for any additional grades 
beyond the grade structure in place at each school as of 
October 1, 1995. The intent is to preclude expansions such as 
when a school which currently enrolls students in the primary 
grades (K through grade 6) expands its grade structure by 
adding a junior high (grades 7 and 8) or high school (grades 9 
through 12).
    The Committee remains concerned that BIA operated schools 
should be able to adopt their own salary schedules in the same 
manner as contract and grant schools, particularly since school 
operations funds are distributed equally to all schools. Bill 
language is included which would allow BIA operated schools to 
adjust the salaries of all education positions, including 
teachers and counselors as well as non-teaching staff. The 
authority applies only to staff appointed after June 30, 1997. 
This grandfathering provision will protect current BIA 
employees who remain at the same position at the same school 
from salary adjustments below their base level.
    The Committee recognizes that the recommended funding 
levels will place constraints on Bureau funded schools. 
However, the funds available in this bill apply to the 1997-98 
school year, therefore, the Bureau and schools have over a year 
to develop a plan for making the most efficient use of 
appropriated funds.
    Within resource management, funding for the Native American 
Fish and Wildlife Society (NAFWS) is continued at the 1996 
enacted level. The funding level will ensure that NAFWS will be 
able to support development and protection of tribal fish and 
wildlife resources.
    Non-recurring programs.--The Committee recommends 
$62,499,000 for non-recurring programs, which is $3,722,000 
below the 1996 enacted level. Decreases include $1,500,000 for 
community and reservation economic development and $250,000 for 
technical assistance as proposed by the Administration, and 
$1,972,000 for water rights negotiations/litigation.
    Within the $3,000,000 provided for the ``jobs in the 
woods'' initiative, $400,000 should continue to be used by the 
Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission for the Wildstock 
Restoration Initiative.
    Central office operations.--The Committee recommends 
$44,818,000 for central office operations. The Committee 
recommendation includes a transfer of $3,500,000 to the 
construction account, a transfer into central office operations 
of $1,207,000 for personnel services and $1,935,000 for 
education personnel management, and a general decrease of 
$5,052,000. A total of $218,000 from central office financial 
management and $75,000 from ADP central program management is 
transferred to the Office of Special Trustee for administrative 
accounting and budget support and certain information resource 
management functions. No funds are transferred to the Office of 
Special Trustee for information resource management systems and 
other contractual costs to support mainframe computers, 
licenses, and other similar costs. The Bureau shall continue to 
pay for and provide these types of IRM support to the Office of 
Special Trustee in 1997. To the extent the Office of Special 
Trustee is unable to establish mechanisms to secure required 
administrative support, funding transferred should be used to 
reimburse the Bureau for continued provision of services.
    The Committee recommended that additional resources be 
allocated to tribal priority allocations and education 
programs, however, significant budgetary constraints and the 
need to move towards a balanced budget remain. Consistent with 
the direction for reorganization and consolidation, the 
Committee believes that additional savings are available within 
central office operations and provides a general reduction of 
$5,052,000.
    Area office operations.--The Committee recommends 
$36,693,000 for area office operations. This funding level 
includes a transfer of $3,650,000 for personnel services and a 
general decrease of $3,671,000. A total of $166,000 from area 
office personnel services is transferred to the Office of 
Special Trustee for personnel and EEO services. No funds are 
transferred to the Office of Special Trustee that support 
activities of the Bureau's information management centers 
(IMC's). The IMC's shall continue to support the Office of 
Special Trustee in 1997. To the extent the Office of Special 
Trustee is unable to establish mechanisms to secure required 
administrative support, funding transferred should be used to 
reimburse the Bureau for continued provision of services.
    As is the case with central office and consistent with the 
direction for reorganization and consolidation, the Committee 
believes that additional savings are available within area 
office operations and provides a general reduction of 
$3,671,000.
    The Committee has denied the Bureau's request to move 
funding for the Navajo area office operations into tribal 
priority allocation. However, the Committee will have no 
objection to a reprogramming proposal once the Committee has 
been provided with assurance that the Navajo area office is 
being closed and an explanation of how those functions and 
activities deemed to be inherently Federal and trust 
responsibilities related to the Navajo Nation will be handled.
    Special programs and pooled overhead.--The Committee 
recommends $70,403,000 for special programs and pooled 
overhead. This funding level includes decreases of $962,000 for 
the Indian arts and crafts board, $150,000 for the intertribal 
agriculture council as proposed by the Administration, 
$1,000,000 for employee displacement costs as proposed by the 
Administration, $866,000 for the Indian Child Welfare Act as 
proposed by the Administration, and a transfer of $8,619,000 
for personnel services to central and area office operations.
    A total of $1,329,000 from General Administration-Pooled 
Overhead is transferred to the Office of Special Trustee for 
FFS ($78,000), PAY/PERS ($62,000), postage ($347,000), FTS 2000 
($110,000), Departmental Billings ($23,000), Unemployment 
Compensation ($209,000), and GSA Rentals ($500,000). Amounts 
included for Postage, FTS 2000, and GSA Rentals include amounts 
related to operations of the Albuquerque Headquarters of the 
Office of Trust Funds Management and postage costs relating to 
issuance of IIM checks and quarterly trust account statements. 
No funds are transferred to the Office of Special Trustee for 
Postage, FTS 2000, and GSA Rentals of field operations (Area 
and Agency) of the Office of Special Trustee. The Bureau of 
Indian Affairs shall continue to support these costs in 1997. 
To the extent the Office of Special Trustee is unable to 
establish mechanisms to secure required administrative support, 
funding transferred should be used to reimburse the Bureau of 
Indian Affairs for continued provision of services.
    The Bureau requested an account consolidation for personnel 
services in fiscal year 1995. The Committee is not aware of any 
progress made by the Bureau in the consolidation or reduction 
of personnel services. For fiscal year 1997, the Bureau has 
requested that the consolidated account be reversed and funds 
be appropriated in central and area offices. The Committee 
accepts this proposal. However, the Committee also expects that 
the Bureau will achieve savings in personnel because of the 
reduction in Bureau staff and increased automation in the 
personnel area. The Committee is reducing personnel funding by 
20 percent in the appropriate areas with the expectation that 
the Bureau will achieve savings in 1997.
    The Committee notes that the Bureau of Indian Affairs has 
undergone significant downsizing during the past two years due 
both to the Vice-President's National Performance Review 
efforts and to reductions in personnel and funding. Little of 
this downsizing has been consistent with the BIA reorganization 
plan issued in 1994 by the joint Federal-Tribal Reorganization 
Taskforce. Given the substantial hearing records developed on 
BIA reorganization by the authorizing Committees, the Committee 
directs the Bureau to proceed with reorganization and 
consolidation of central, area, and agency offices in a manner 
that is consistent with the procedures set forth by the 
Taskforce. In particular, the Bureau may find opportunities for 
consolidation and/or closure where significant progress has 
been made by Indian tribes to compact or contract Bureau 
operations. It is the intent of this Committee that such 
consolidation and/or closure should be conducted in a manner 
consistent with the Taskforce's recommendations, including 
direct and active negotiation with the affected Indian tribal 
governments. Any savings in resources made by these efforts 
should be made available for transfer to tribes subject to 
Committee approval. The Committee further directs the Bureau to 
report on its reorganization within 120 days of enactment of 
this Act.
    Language is included under Administrative Provisions, 
Department of the Interior, which limits the Secretary of the 
Interior from taking land into trust unless there is an 
agreement between Indian tribes, States, and local communities 
requiring tribes to pay State and local taxes on purchases by 
non-Indians in retail establishments on said lands.

                              construction

Appropriation enacted, 1996 (excludes emergency)........    $100,833,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     122,824,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      85,831,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     -15,002,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -36,993,000

    The amounts recommended by the Committee as compared to the 
1996 enacted level by activity is shown in the following table:




    Education.--The Committee recommends $28,039,000 for 
education construction. This funding level includes $4,000,000 
to complete construction of the Chief Leschi school complex, 
$3,000,000 for employee housing, and $21,039,000 for FI&R.; The 
Committee recommendation assumes that this is the only project 
funded in fiscal year 1997.
    The Committee notes that the Bureau of Indian Affairs has 
been well informed about the need to replace the existing 
portable classroom buildings at the Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe 
School in Hayward, Wisconsin because of ongoing health and 
safety hazards in the existing structures, including vermin 
proliferation and the resultant problems associated with 
infestation. The Committee is aware that consideration is being 
given to a temporary fix to address the most serious aspects of 
this problem. The Committee further understands that the long-
term solution is in the planning process and expects that the 
BIA and the Department will not change the long-term priorities 
for the school due to a short-term, temporary fix.
    The Committee has continued the fiscal year 1995 bill 
language related to implementing the process to award grants 
for construction of new schools or facilities improvement and 
repair projects in excess of $100,000. The language ensures 
that the Department can continue to implement the grant process 
while the permanent implementation process is under development 
in fiscal year 1997. The Committee expects the Department and 
the Bureau of Indian Affairs to continue to work cooperatively 
with the tribes in the development of a final implementation 
process. Given that the language is clear concerning 
negotiating the schedule of payments, the Committee has not 
continued the language limiting payments to two per year.
    Public safety and justice.--The committee recommends 
$4,400,000 for public safety and justice. No new law 
enforcement projects are proposed for funding in fiscal year 
1997. The Committee has included $4,000,000 for the Bureau's 
fire program and $400,000 for FI&R;, same as the request.
    General Administration.--The Committee recommends 
$7,146,000 for general administration including decreases of 
$2,000 for telecommunications improvement and repair, 
$1,401,000 for FI&R;, and increases of $3,500,000 for 
construction management from the 1996 enacted level.
    Resources management.--The Committee recommends $46,246,000 
for resources management. Included in this amount is 
$25,500,000 for the Navajo Indian Irrigation Project which is 
the same as the 1996 enacted level.
    The Committee is aware of the Pueblo of Laguna's efforts to 
complete its New Mexico-Paguate dam restoration project. The 
Committee urges the Bureau to examine safety concerns at this 
dam. If conditions warrant, funding for this project should be 
given priority consideration.

 indian land and water claim settlements and miscellaneous payments to 
                                indians

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $80,645,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      69,241,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      65,241,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     -15,404,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -4,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $65,241,000 
for Indian land and water claim settlements and miscellaneous 
payments to Indians.
    The Committee recommends a decrease of $4,000,000 for the 
Pyramid Lake Water Rights Settlement. All other settlements are 
funded at the budget estimate.
    The Committee understands that legislation authorizing the 
Torres-Martinez land settlement has been introduced and, 
because of bipartisan support, likely to be enacted into law 
before the end of the 104th Congress. Once authorized, the 
Committee will look favorably on funding the settlement. 
Assuming it is authorized, the Committee expects the Department 
of the Interior to include funding for the Torres-Martinez 
settlement as part of its fiscal year 1998 budget request.

               technical assistance of Indian enterprises

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................        $500,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................................
Recommended, 1997.......................................................
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        -500,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends no appropriation for Technical 
Assistance of Indian Enterprises, the same as the budget 
estimate.

                 indian guaranteed loan program account

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $5,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       5,002,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       5,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................          -2,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,000,000 for 
the Indian Guaranteed Loan Program, same as the 1996 enacted 
level.

                          Departmental Offices

                            Insular Affairs

                       assistance to territories

Appropriation enacted, 1996 (excludes emergency)........     $65,188,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      65,188,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      65,088,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        -100,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................        -100,000

    The Office of Insular Affairs (OIA) was established on 
August 4, 1995 through Secretarial Order No. 3191 which also 
abolished the former Office of Territorial and International 
Affairs. The OIA has important responsibilities to help the 
United States government fulfill its responsibilities to the 
four U.S. territories (Guam, American Samoa, U.S. Virgin 
Islands and the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands 
(CNMI)) and the three freely associated states: the Federated 
States of Micronesia (FSM), the Republic of the Marshall 
Islands and the Republic of Palau. The permanent and trust fund 
payments to the territories and the compact nations provide 
substantial financial resources to these governments. With the 
signing of the fiscal year 1996 Interior and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act a large re-allocation of CNMI covenant 
grants was achieved. This reallocation: helps the Government of 
Guam with the impact of Micronesian immigrants on social and 
education programs; meets significant capital improvement needs 
in American Samoa; helps rehabilitate and resettle Rongelap 
Atoll; and helps with a variety of other problems in the 
Northern Marianas.
    The amounts recommended by the Committee for fiscal year 
1997, compared to the 1996 enacted level by activity, are shown 
in the following table:




    Territorial Assistance.--The Committee recommends funding 
of $14,322,000, which is $100,000 below the requested level. 
The Committee is encouraged by the successful implementation of 
a headquarters downsizing and reorganization that has occurred 
as a result of abolishing the former Office of Territorial and 
International Affairs. Given the large reductions taken last 
year, the Committee recommends a relatively stable 
appropriation for 1997. The Committee expects the OIA to work 
closely with the insular governments to ensure that technical 
assistance funding is used efficiently and high priority needs 
are identified and met. The Committee remains concerned about 
the menace of the brown tree snake and supports continued 
research into this problem so that it is not spread further in 
the Pacific.
    CNMI/Covenant grants.--The Committee recommends the 
mandatory grants as requested, $27,720,000. This includes the 
requests of: $11,000,000 for CNMI construction, $4,580,000 for 
impact aid to Guam, $6,140,000 for American Samoa construction, 
$3,000,000 for CNMI College construction, and $3,000,000 for 
the CNMI immigration, labor and law enforcement initiative. The 
Committee expects the grant to the College to be used to help 
fund the College's capital improvement plan. The Committee is 
concerned about the lack of financial commitment by other 
Federal agencies to the immigration, labor and law enforcement 
initiative and the Committee will closely watch this with 
respect to future funding decisions on the initiative.
    American Samoa.--The Committee recommends $23,046,000, the 
same as the request and the 1996 funding level, for operations 
grants. Last year the Committee expressed its concerns over the 
slow progress of the American Samoa Government in addressing 
its financial situation. The Committee has not received 
evidence that meaningful financial controls and reforms are 
being implemented, including the imposition of reasonable user 
fees, reduction in size of government, and implementation of 
other improvements incorporated in the Financial Recovery Plan 
prepared by the Joint Working Group. The Committee hopes such 
evidence is forthcoming and will take this into account in 
determining future allocations of construction and operations 
funding. Note that $6,140,000 has been included from covenant 
grants for American Samoa construction as recommended by the 
OIA. The Committee is anxious to see a final five-year capital 
improvement plan and expects future updates concurrent with 
submission of the Department's budget justifications.
    Guam.--The Committee included language in the fiscal year 
1996 appropriations act that commits $4,580,000 annually in 
construction grants for a six-year period to assist Guam in 
addressing the impacts resulting from implementation of the 
Compact of Free Association Act. The Committee expects the 
Department to augment this funding by working with the 
Government of Guam to identify other Federal programs or 
control efforts to address this problem. The Committee 
anticipates the combination of direct financial assistance and 
other Federal efforts will fully resolve this impact issue.
    Virgin Islands.--The Committee recommends no special 
funding for the Virgin Islands. Technical assistance needs for 
the Virgin Islands should be covered within the allocation for 
technical assistance. The Committee expects to receive a copy 
of the Secretary's report on Hurricane Marilyn recovery and 
would like that report to include a specific description of the 
uses of the fiscal year 1996 emergency supplemental 
appropriation.

                 trust territory of the pacific islands

    The Committee does not recommend any funding. The 
implementation of the Compact of Free Association with the 
Republic of Palau, the final entity of the Trust Territory, 
precludes the need for any additional budget authority in this 
appropriation.

                      compact of free association

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $24,938,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      23,538,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      23,638,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      -1,300,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................        +100,000

    The Committee recommends an increase of $100,000 for the 
Compact of Free Association. The amounts recommended by the 
Committee for fiscal year 1997, compared with the 1996 enacted 
level by activity, follow:



    Federal services assistance.--The Committee recommends 
$6,964,000, the same as the 1996 enacted level.
    Program grant assistance.--The Committee recommends 
$13,500,000 for program grant assistance, the same as the 
request.
    Enewetak support.--The Committee recommends $1,191,000 for 
the Enewetak agricultural and food support program, an increase 
of $100,000 from the 1996 level. This funding includes a 
temporary increase due to increased costs. This should be 
considered to be temporary support until the Enewetak community 
is able to establish self-supporting food programs. The 
Committee understands that the OIA is conducting a review of 
this program, including a comparison of existing conditions at 
Enewetak Atoll and other atolls in the Marshall Islands. The 
Committee expects the results to be discussed and incorporated 
in the next budget justification.
    Rongelap Atoll.--The Committee recommends $1,983,000, the 
same as the budget estimate. Despite budgetary constraints, the 
Committee recognizes the responsibility of the Federal 
government to provide a reasonable contribution to the 
resettlement of Rongelap Atoll. The Committee urges the 
Department to develop a program that ensures an expeditious 
resettlement. Caution should be used in any approach using 
trust funds that impose a considerable additional cost to the 
United States Treasury.
    Federal States of Micronesia.--The Committee urges the 
Department to conduct a rigorous audit of funds sent to the 
Federated States of Micronesia, and especially, the use of 
funds in Chuuk, and report back to the Committee by December 
31, 1996; the report should evaluate if there has been any 
misuse of U.S. funds that might constitute a violation of the 
Compact.

                        Departmental Management

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $56,912,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      59,196,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      53,691,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      -3,221,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -5,505,000

    The amounts recommended by the Committee for Departmental 
Management, compared with the 1996 enacted level by activity 
follow:



    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $53,691,000, a 
decrease of $3,221,000 below the fiscal year 1996 level. The 
Committee has attempted to reduce headquarters overhead and 
channel limited increases in this bill to some of the 
Department's highest priority agencies and programs such as the 
National Parks, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the Bureau 
of Indian Affairs' Tribal Priority Allocations and to some of 
the other bureaus in the bill like the Indian Health Service. 
The Committee is confident that the Administration would agree 
that these programs, so important to the American public, 
should be funded at higher levels and that reducing levels of 
non program management in headquarters offices is appropriate 
to accomplish this goal.
    The Committee directs that the following reductions below 
the 1996 level be made to the offices under Departmental 
Direction: -$700,000 Congressional and intergovernmental 
affairs, -$400,000 Communications, -$100,000 Assistant 
Secretary Water and Science, -$100,000 Assistant Secretary Land 
and Minerals Management, -$100,000 Assistant Secretary Indian 
Affairs, and -$375,000 Assistant Secretary Policy, Management 
and Budget.
    The following reductions are to be made to the offices 
under management and coordination: -$300,000 policy analysis, 
-$200,000 information resources management, and -$946,000 from 
central services.
    The Committee notes that the Department did not follow the 
Committee's directions regarding a $884,000 reduction for 
headquarters administration in the departmental direction 
activity. Instead the Department chose to disregard the 
specific instruction of the managers of the conference and made 
reductions to the Management and Coordination activity. The 
Committee has identified specific offices for reductions in 
fiscal year 1997 to avoid any misinterpretation of Committee 
intent.

                        Office of the Solicitor

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $34,427,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      35,208,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      35,208,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        +781,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $35,208,000, 
an increase of $781,000 over the current fiscal year. This 
increase represents uncontrollable expenses, including 
mandatory pay increases. The Committee understands that the 
office provides essential legal services to the Department's 
bureaus and has experienced a steady growth in workload in 
recent years. While this increase is not programmatic, it will 
help protect the office against inflationary and pay increases.
    The Committee seriously considered reinstituting the 
Solicitor's Honors Program but due to budgetary restraints, 
felt that any program increases should be channeled to the 
National Parks, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the BIA's 
Tribal Priority Allocation and the Indian Health Service. 
Should the Senate receive a more generous allocation, the 
Committee will seriously consider the addition of this very 
worthwhile program.

                      Office of Inspector General

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $23,939,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      24,439,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      24,439,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        +500,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends $24,439,000, an increase of 
$500,000 over the current fiscal year. The Committee has also 
included bill language in the General Provisions, U.S. 
Department of the Interior section which would permit the 
Office of the Inspector General to participate, as do other 
federal agencies, in the asset forfeiture program and to 
receive and use an equitable share of forfeited assets 
resulting from an investigation in which they have actively 
participated. The Committee hopes this will be helpful in 
defraying uncontrollable expenses and for minor equipment 
purchases.

                   National Indian Gaming Commission

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $1,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       1,000,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       1,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,000,000, 
the budget request, for the National Indian Gaming Commission.

           Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $16,338,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      36,338,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      19,126,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      +2,788,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -17,212,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $19,126,000 
for the Office of the Special Trustee for American Indians, 
which is $2,788,000 above the fiscal year 1996 enacted level.
    The Committee has transferred $1,788,000 from the Operation 
of Indian Program account to the Office of Special Trustee 
account to cover certain administrative and overhead costs of 
the Office of Special Trustee, currently provided by the Bureau 
of Indian Affairs. To the extent the Office of Special Trustee 
is unable to establish mechanisms to secure required 
administrative support, funding provided to the Special Trustee 
should be used to reimburse the Bureau of Indian Affairs for 
continued provision of services.
    The Committee has provided $1,000,000 to conduct a 
requirements analysis and user needs assessment which is 
necessary to complete the Special Trustee's comprehensive 
strategic plan. The Special Trustee should ensure that this 
analysis is conducted in the most economical manner. To the 
extent that the cost of the analysis is less than the resources 
provided, any remaining funds can be allocated to other high-
priority needs. Upon completion of the strategic plan, if the 
Administration believes there is a compelling need for 
additional resources, the Committee would consider a request 
for a supplemental appropriation.
    Within funds provided for executive direction, the Special 
Trustee should prioritize funding between staffing, the Special 
Trustee's Advisory Board, and the Inter-Tribal Monitoring 
Association (ITMA). The Committee expects ITMA to provide the 
Special Trustee with any information that is provided to the 
Committee or any of the authorizing committees.
    Bill language has been included under the Office of Special 
Trustee that would discontinue funding of trust fund losses, 
including claims, judgments, and settlements, through either 
the Bureau of Indian Affairs or the Office of Special Trustee 
appropriations.

             general provisions, department of the interior

    The Committee recommends continuing several provisions 
carried in previous bills as follows. Sections 101 and 102 
provide for emergency transfer authority with the approval of 
the Secretary. Section 103 provides for warehouse and garage 
operations and for reimbursement for those services. Section 
104 provides for vehicle and other services. Section 105 
provides for uniform allowances. Section 106 provides for 
twelve month contracts with the General Services Administration 
for services and rentals.
    Section 107 provides the Secretary with transfer authority 
between and among the land acquisition accounts in the Bureau 
of Land Management, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the 
National Park Service, and makes the use of land acquisition 
funds subject to the reprogramming guidelines of the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations.
    Section 108 provides for the transfer of funds to the 
Presidio Trust upon its establishment.
    Section 109 prohibits the use of funds for developing, 
promulgating and implementing a rule concerning rights-of-way 
under section 2477 of the Revised Statutes. Section 110 is 
intended to allow time for Congress to adopt legislation 
clarifying the terms and scope of grants for highway rights-of-
way across federal land pursuant to section 2477 of the Revised 
Statues. Historically, the Department took the position that 
the validity of these grants was governed by state property law 
because there was no general federal law of property and no 
delegation of authority by Congress to interpret the terms of 
the statute by regulation. The Department established an 
administrative process for the non-adjudicatory acknowledgment 
of valid grants. Then as now, the courts were available to 
resolve disputed claims. The present contention that FLPMA, or 
other land management statutes enacted after the vesting of 
these property rights, now permits the Department to look back 
and re-interpret the basic terms of the grant is doubtful as a 
matter of law and questionable as a matter of public policy. 
The implications are enormous; if such a contention were valid, 
virtually every transfer of interest or title in federal lands 
back to the founding of the Republic could be compromised. The 
Committee believes that the public interest will be better 
served if these grants to States and their political 
subdivisions are not put in jeopardy by the Department pending 
Congressional clarification of these issues. Section 109 does 
not limit the ability of the Department to acknowledge or deny 
the validity of claims under RS 2477 or limit the right of 
grantees to litigate their claims in any court.
    Sections 110 through 113 prohibit the expenditure of funds 
for Outer Continental Shelf leasing activities in certain areas 
as proposed in the budget. These provisions are addressed under 
the Minerals Management Service in this report.
    Section 114 establishes a franchise pilot program within 
the Department of the Interior. The Committee expects the fund 
to be used principally to provide administrative-support 
services on a competitive basis to agencies other than the 
Department and that it will result in an overall savings in 
administrative-support costs for the Government.
    Section 115 prohibits expenditures for redesign of 
Pennsylvania Avenue without the advance approval of the 
Appropriations Committees.
    Section 116 limits the use of funds for continuing or 
enforcing the designation of critical habitat for the marble 
murrelet on private property in the State of California, except 
the old growth redwoods in the ``Headwaters Grove''.
    Section 117 limits the use of funds by the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs with respect to the transfer of property into trust 
unless there is an agreement in place between the tribe and the 
State and local government on the collection and payment of 
sales and excise taxes by any retail establishments located on 
the property.
    Although the Committee has not recommended continuing a 
legislative provision, carried in previous years, requiring 
that employee details conform to Office of Personnel Management 
regulations, the Department is to report monthly to the 
Committee on employee details.

                       TITLE II--RELATED AGENCIES

                       DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

                             Forest Service

    The U.S. Forest Service manages over 191 million acres of 
public lands for multiple use nationwide, including lands in 44 
states, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. The Forest Service 
administers a wide variety of programs, including forest and 
rangeland research, state and private forestry assistance, 
wildfire suppression and presuppression, cooperative forest 
health programs, and human resource programs. The National 
Forest System (NFS) includes 156 national forests, 20 national 
grasslands, 4 national monuments, 9 land utilization projects, 
and the nation's first national tallgrass prairie established 
in 1996. The NFS is managed for multiple use, including timber 
production, recreation, grazing, fish and wildlife habitat 
management, and soil and water conservation. The NFS includes 
about 47% of the nation's softwood inventory and supplies about 
10% of the nation's softwood timber. More than 9,000 farmers 
and ranchers pay for permits to graze cattle, horses, sheep and 
goats on 74 million acres of grassland, open forests, and other 
forage-producing acres of the National Forest System. 
Recreational use of national forest land amounted to 
approximately 295.5 million visitor days in 1993. The NFS 
includes over 125,000 miles of trails and 23,000 developed 
facilities, including 4,389 campgrounds, 58 major visitor 
centers, and about one-half of the nation's ski-lift capacity. 
Recreation facilities on NFS lands had a combined capacity of 
2.1 million people-at-one-time in 1995. There are 51 
Congressionally designated areas, including 19 national 
recreation areas, and 7 national scenic areas. Wilderness areas 
cover 35 million acres, nearly two-thirds of the wilderness in 
the contiguous 48 states. The Forest Service also has major 
habitat management responsibilities for more than 3,000 species 
of wildlife and fish, and 10,000 plant species and provides 
important habitat and open space for over 284 threatened or 
endangered species. Half of the big game and coldwater fish 
habitat in the nation is located on National Forest System 
lands and waters. In addition, in the 16 western States, where 
the water supply is sometimes critically short, about 55 
percent of the total annual yield of water is from National 
Forest System lands.
    The Committee is extremely concerned about the problem of 
forest and rangeland health. There is a great need for a 
comprehensive approach, including: (1) insect and disease 
suppression and science, (2) fire management through prescribed 
burning and biomass management, and (3) forest and rangeland 
improvements through thinning, salvage, and native and noxious 
vegetation manipulation. The Committee recommends enhancing the 
nation's forest health program and has provided increased 
funding above that enacted last year, including: (1) $18.5 
million for the forest health management accounts in State and 
Private Foresty; (2) $26 million for the prescribed burning 
program in the wildfire presuppression account; and (3) $10 
million for NFS timber management. Increases of $2 million are 
also recommended for timber roads and road maintenance and $1 
million is added for forest health research.

                     forest and rangeland research

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................    $178,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     179,786,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     179,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      +1,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................        -786,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $179,000,000 
for forest and rangeland research, a decrease of $786,000 below 
the budget request and an increase of $1,000,000 above the 1996 
funding level.
    The Committee has recently agreed to the reorganization of 
the headquarters office for forest and rangeland research but 
expects that the field organization will remain unchanged at 
the Station level. The Committee is especially concerned about 
forest and rangeland health research, and has included a 
$1,000,000 increase to enhance the insect, disease and noxious 
plant programs. The Committee is concerned at the loss of 
entomologists and pathologists from the Service. These 
specialized scientific skills are generally unavailable 
elsewhere, so the Committee feels that it is imperative that 
the research branch maintain expertise in these fields so that 
forest and rangeland health problems can be dealt with in 
efficient, economic, and scientific manners.
    The Committee is encouraged by research with adaptive 
management techniques. Within the increase provided, $200,000 
is to provide research support for adaptive management 
activities which implement and evaluate controlled 
silvicultural treatment in designated fire-generated, 
overstocked, small-diameter, stagnated forest ``CROP'' stands 
or other stands designated by the Secretary as having ``CROP'' 
characteristics on the Colville National Forest. The Forest 
Service should prepare and submit to Congress, not later than 
September 30, 1997, a research plan and supporting 
environmental documents that provide for implementing this 
program. This plan is referenced in the NFS account and should 
be a coordinated effort.
    The Committee has included funding to continue the 
International Institute of Tropical Forestry and the Institute 
of Pacific Islands Forestry in the research program, due to the 
elimination of the international forestry activity. Within the 
funding provided, $300,000 is for the landscape management 
project at the University of Washington and $200,000 is to 
support the research activities of the Olympic Natural 
Resources Center. Within the funds provided, $500,000 is 
included for the Evanston Research Office, Lincoln Park 
restoration project. The Committee urges the Forest Service to 
maintain the 1996 funding levels for the Urban Forestry 
Research Stations at Syracuse, NY and UC Davis, CA. Research 
support to the Pacific Northwest forest plan should be at or 
above the 1996 level, including adaptive management areas and 
monitoring. The Committee recognizes the valuable work of the 
International Arid Lands Consortium and encourages the U.S. 
Forest Service to provide funds to the Arid Lands program from 
the research account.
    The Committee recognizes the benefits of cooperative 
forestry research arrangements in leveraging the effectiveness 
of Forest Service research funding. In the face of reduced 
funding and staffing, the Committee urges the agency to 
maintain and employ cooperative agreements whenever possible in 
order to obtain the greatest benefit in research investment. 
Additionally, the Committee encourages the Forest Service to 
develop a more detailed system of tracking the research areas 
in which appropriated research dollars are being utilized.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of timely forest 
inventory data as a basis for natural resources policy 
decisions. The information obtained from the Forest Inventory 
and Analysis program directed at forest health conditions on 
both public and private lands has been extremely important in 
recent years to land managers and policymakers. The Committee 
urges the Forest Service to continue its efforts to maintain a 
ten-year minimum inventory cycle in all parts of the country 
outside of the South, where a five-year cycle is desired.

                       state and private forestry

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................    $136,884,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     164,000,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     148,884,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     +12,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -15,116,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $148,884,000 
for state and private forestry, a decrease of $15,116,000 below 
the budget request and $12,000,000 above the 1996 funding 
level. Through cooperative programs with State and local 
governments, forest industry and private landowners, the Forest 
Service helps to protect and manage 805 million acres of forest 
and associated watershed land. Technical and financial 
assistance is offered to improve fire, insect and disease 
control; improve harvesting, processing and monitoring of 
forest products; and stimulate reforestation and timber stand 
improvement. The Committee is especially concerned about the 
forest health management activities. The Forest Service 
provides special expertise and disease suppression for all 
Federal and tribal lands, as well as cooperative assistance 
with the States for State and private lands. The stewardship 
program affects over 3.5 million acres of private forests and 
assists over 200,000 woodland owners. The urban forestry 
program assists over 13,000 urban areas.
    The comparisons of the recommendation and the 1996 enacted 
level by activity is shown in the following table:




    Forest health management.--The Committee recommends 
$68,501,000 for forest health management, which is $11,501,000 
above the request, and $18,529,000 above the 1996 funding 
level. 
This overall increase of 37% reflects the high priority the 
Committee has placed on these activities. Previously, the 
critical forest pest suppression activities were conducted 
using emergency appropriations. It is now the House policy to 
prohibit emergency spending authority in general appropriations 
bills. However, much of this insect and disease suppression 
activity is predictable, and because it is so critically 
important to the health of the nation's forests and economy, 
these funding needs should be covered with general 
appropriations to the extent that funding is available.
    The Federal lands forest health management account provides 
the forest health science and suppression service for all 
Federal lands (BLM, NPS, FWS, and DOD) and tribal lands, and 
funds science and survey work for the states. The President's 
budget provided only 23% of the 5 year average funding needed 
for insect and disease suppression on Federal lands and 60% of 
the 5 year average for cooperative lands. This recommendation 
fully funds suppression needs and provides vital expertise for 
all the nation's forest lands. The Committee has included an 
increase above the 1996 level of $8,000,000 for the federal 
lands forest health program, $8,529,000 for the cooperative 
lands forest health management program, and $2,000,000 for 
cooperative lands fire management. The Committee suggests that 
the forest health efforts should take a comprehensive view and 
include substantial efforts to manage and control noxious, 
exotic, and alien weeds on NFS lands.
    Massive wildfires and extensive forest health problems 
caused by overstocked stands and pests such as the Southern 
Pine Beetle and Gypsy Moth have resulted in large volumes of 
dead and dying timber on both public and private lands. The 
Committee encourages the Forest Service to utilize the full 
breadth of silvicultural prescriptions available to land 
managers, including the use of salvage harvesting, prescriptive 
fire and integrated pest management, where appropriate, to 
improve the health and productivity of the National Forest 
System.
    Cooperative forestry.--The Committee recommends $80,383,000 
for Cooperative forestry, which is $26,617,000 below the 
request, and $6,529,000 below the 1996 funding level. Due to 
funding constraints imposed by the budget resolution, the 
Committee has eliminated the forest legacy program and 
restricted the funding level for the stewardship incentives 
program and the forest stewardship programs at the fiscal year 
1996 levels. The Committee recommends a $1,000,000 increase 
above the request for the Pacific Northwest assistance 
programs, and a $2,000,000 decrease below the request for the 
economic action programs. The Committee expects that the old-
growth diversification program will be funded at the 1996 
level. Within the Economic Action Program, the Committee has 
provided $5,000,000 to continue the Rural Development Through 
Forestry program of which $3,000,000 is included for the 
Northeast and Midwest. The Committee has included $500,000 for 
Lake Tahoe Basin erosion control. The urban forestry program 
also includes funding for the urban resources partnerships 
program. The Chesapeake Bay program and the National 
Agroforestry Center should be funded at the 1996 level; 
Northeastern area forest specialists should consult with and 
aid the Sterling Forest effort. The Committee supports the 
Northeastern Pennsylvania community forestry program and 
provides $500,000 from the forest stewardship account and 
$1,000,000 from the Urban forestry account for these 
activities; from these joint funds a sum not to exceed $500,000 
shall be made available for a demonstration arboretum in 
northeastern Pennsylvania. Due to the limited funds in the 
Stewardship Incentive Program, the Committee expects the Forest 
Service to adopt an appropriate policy which would not allow 
cost-share monies to be used for tree planting before or after 
a timber harvest that generates enough revenue for 
reforestation of the same acreage. The Committee feels that it 
is the responsibility of the landowner who makes a profit from 
the harvest of trees to immediately reforest that same land and 
that this is not the responsibility of the Federal government.

                         International Forestry

    The Committee has not provided specific funding for 
international forestry activities, similar to fiscal year 1996. 
The Committee recommends that the Forest Service may, with 
appropriate reprogramming approval of the Committee, spend up 
to $2,000,000 from benefiting functions to cover vital 
international activities of benefit to those programs.

                         National Forest System

Appropriation enacted, 1996 (excludes emergency)........  $1,257,057,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................   1,291,553,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................   1,259,057,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      +2,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -32,496,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,259,057,000 
for the National Forest System, a decrease of $32,496,000 below 
the budget request and $2,000,000 above the 1996 funding level. 
The comparisons of the recommendation and the 1996 enacted 
level by activity is shown in the following table:


    Land Management Planning.--The Committee recommends 
$77,088,000 for land management planning, which is $67,912,000 
below the request for the former ecosystem management activity, 
and $53,000,000 below the 1996 funding level. The Committee has 
returned the inventory and monitoring funds back to the 
multiple use activity from which they were taken in fiscal year 
1994. This results in a 41% decrease in the newly named land 
management planning activity, but it results in apparent 
increases to the recreation, wildlife, rangeland, timber, and 
soil, water and air activities. These apparent increases are 
really just a redistribution of funds and not real increases, 
although more has been allocated to the timber and range 
activities than the recreation activity. This leaves the core 
land management planning activities and watershed assessments, 
thereby providing a more manageable manner for the Committee to 
control and limit the costs of forest planning. Within the 
recommended amount, no less than $19,400,000 is for watershed 
assessments for the President's Pacific Northwest plan. The 
Committee expects its actions will not affect ongoing ecosystem 
planning under the President's Pacific Northwest Forest plan, 
and the agency is urged to fulfill the timber and other 
multiple-use program goals of the Pacific Northwest Forest 
plan. The Committee expects the Forest Service to carry out 
watershed analysis and watershed restoration activities in a 
manner that carefully considers the overall circumstances of 
the entire watershed. The agency should also work with 
concerned interests with lands adjacent to Forest Service 
lands. Watershed analysis should conclude by listing watershed 
restoration and protection priorities. Such prescriptions 
should target degraded habitat, the restoration of which will 
positively affect the condition of a river or stream, and areas 
of high quality habitat that should be protected. The 
prescriptions that stem from watershed analysis should then be 
followed by watershed restoration efforts. As was the case last 
year, the Committee remains concerned about the proliferation 
of ecoregion assessments and urges the Forest Service to weigh 
carefully the economic benefits to the Service of continuing 
such planning efforts before starting new assessments.
    Recreation.--The Committee recommends $219,151,000 for 
recreation use, which is $8,151,000 above the request, and 
$8,000,000 above the 1996 funding level. The apparent increase 
is due to the Committee restoring some of the funds removed in 
fiscal year 1994 for the ecosystem management activity. The 
Committee recognizes increasing public demand for recreation 
services. The Committee is encouraged by the potential for the 
recreation fee demonstration program in the Forest Service to 
improve services and reduce the backlog of maintenance at up to 
50 pilot sites. The Committee recommends that $750,000 be used 
to manage properly the national scenic and historic trails 
fully under the jurisdiction of the Forest Service, including 
the Pacific Crest, Continental Divide, and Florida National 
Scenic Trails and the Nez Perce National Historic Trail. At 
least $250,000 should be used to manage other National Scenic 
and Historic Trails. In addition, the Committee recommends that 
$10,400,000 be allocated to the challenge cost share program 
and that the Forest Service aggressively pursue this fine 
partnership effort with the private sector which returns so 
much private investment and good will to further land 
management needs.
    The Committee is concerned about the methodology used by 
the Forest Service for counting visitor days. It is desirable 
for the Forest Service to standardize methods and provide this 
visitation information to the Committee and the American public 
in a reliable manner.
    Wildlife and fish management.--The Committee recommends 
$96,561,000 for the wildlife and fish habitat management 
program, which is $5,561,000 above the request, and $11,000,000 
above the 1996 funding level. The apparent increase is due to 
the Committee restoring some of the funds removed in fiscal 
year 1994 for the ecosystem management activity. The Committee 
commends the Forest Service for its efforts in developing an 
effective and aggressive challenge cost share program, and 
designates that $15,000,000 be allocated to challenge cost 
share partnership efforts. These efforts bring in non-federal 
money to accomplish on-the-ground tasks for the general benefit 
of the public and the long-term benefit of the land. These 
efforts should be considered a key part of the program on 
national forests, grasslands and other units.
    Rangeland management.--The Committee recommends $44,012,000 
for rangeland management, which is $13,012,000 above the 
request, and $17,000,000 above the 1996 funding level. The 
apparent increase is due to the Committee restoring some of the 
funds removed in fiscal year 1994 for the ecosystem management 
activity. The Committee recognizes that the range program has 
suffered more than others with the migration of funds to the 
former ecosystem management activity and this has now been 
rectified. The Committee also commends the Sharing Common 
Ground program and designates $500,000 to this program. At the 
same time, the Committee is concerned at the lack of progress 
in addressing noxious, alien and invasive weeds on national 
forest system lands, and accordingly designated that no less 
than $4,000,000 from the vegetation management activity be used 
for treatment and management of this problem.
    Forestland management.--The Committee recommends 
$260,409,000 for forestland management, which is $18,409,000 
above the request, and $20,000,000 above the 1996 funding 
level. The Committee has restored funds removed in fiscal year 
1994 for the ecosystem management activity. The Committee 
remains concerned about forest health and timber supply. The 
increased funds for the subactivity should be used to rebuild a 
timber supply pipeline and maximize timber stand improvement 
and commercial thinning. The $10,000,000 increase to vegetation 
management should be used to fund commercial and pre-commercial 
thinning and forest stand improvement activities that can then 
be followed by prescribed burns, where appropriate, to ensure 
healthier forests. These activities also create jobs and 
support rural industries.
    The Committee is encouraged by use of adaptive management 
techniques. Within the increase provided, $300,000 is for 
implementing and evaluating controlled silvicultural treatment 
in designated fire-generated, overstocked, small-diameter, 
stagnated forest ``CROP'' stands or other stands designated by 
the Secretary as having ``CROP'' characteristics on the 
Colville National Forest. The Forest Service should prepare and 
submit to Congress, not later than September 30, 1997, a 
research plan, prepared by the forest and rangeland research 
branch, and supporting environmental documents that provide for 
implementing this program. This report is referenced in the 
forest and rangeland research account and should be a 
coordinated effort. The Committee recommends that the Service 
begin one or more initial demonstration projects based on a 
preliminary draft of the research plan as soon as practicable 
in an area of approximately 10,000 acres.
    Timber sales.--To facilitate the fiscal year 1997 timber 
sale program and to ensure the most efficient expenditure of 
federal appropriations, the Committee has funded the program to 
produce a total sale offer of 4.29 bbf, consisting of 2.86 bbf 
of ``green'' sales, with an additional 1.43 bbf of salvage 
sales. The Committee expects the Forest Service to allocate 
funding in a manner which will optimize forest plan outputs, 
taking full advantage of green and salvage sale preparation 
capacity agency-wide. Funding should be allocated to those 
forests which have the highest likelihood of attaining current 
forest plan goals, objectives, and targets. The Committee 
remains extremely concerned with accomplishment of the Forest 
Service timber sale program and has provided significant 
resources to allow the agency to move forward aggressively with 
the national timber program for both green and salvage sales. 
To ensure that Congress is adequately informed and notified of 
progress and delays in implementing the fiscal year 1997 
program, the Committee requests the agency continue its 
regular, quarterly reporting of timber sale preparation, offer, 
sale and harvest accomplishment--including a region by region 
status report. The Committee expects the reports to include 
detailed information on the status of the timber sales pipeline 
and an identification of the volumes offered, sold, and 
harvested categorized as net merchantable sawtimber. Timber 
program accomplishments should report timber actually sold and 
transferred to purchasers, and on the volume offered. The 
reports are to be as comprehensive as possible and provide 
information on both green and salvage sales. Any additional 
salvage opportunities that may arise during fiscal year 1997 
should not impact green sale targets. The Committee notes that 
House Report 103-551 specifically allows Forest Service 
managers to use scaling when selling salvage sales or 
thinnings. The Committee expects the Forest Service to use 
fully the flexibility authorized in House Report 103-551 for 
rapidly deteriorating timber.
    The Committee is also concerned about the Forest Service's 
inability to meet the timber harvest goals that were laid out 
as part of the President's Forest Plan for the Pacific 
Northwest even though sufficient funding has been provided to 
reach those goals. The Forest Service should take every action 
possible to reach the harvest levels promised by the President 
for the regions in the Option 9 plan.
    The Committee is aware of the widespread forest health 
problems in the national forests across the country. In this 
regard, the committee understands that the agency can use the 
timber sale program as a cost-efficient tool to thin and 
restructure forest stands. Funds within the timber sales 
management account should be used for this purpose, and the 
agency is encouraged to make every effort to include preventive 
forest health treatments as part of timber salvage efforts. The 
Committee encourages the Forest Service to complete inventories 
of NFS old-growth forests and to exercise care to avoid 
inadvertently including unidentified old-growth timber in new 
timber sales.
    Soil, water and air management.--The Committee recommends 
$49,014,000 for soil, water and air management, which is 
$1,014,000 above the request, and $7,000,000 above the 1996 
funding level. The apparent increase is due to the Committee 
restoring some of the funds removed in fiscal year 1994 for the 
ecosystem management activity. The Committee urges the use of 
non-Federal partnerships wherever possible, and in this light 
designates $500,000 for a challenge cost share program to be 
administered similar to other NFS efforts.
    Minerals and geology management.--The Committee recommends 
$35,017,000 for minerals and geology management, which is 
$17,000 above the request, and the same as the 1996 funding 
level.
    Land ownership management.--The Committee recommends 
$57,053,000 for land ownership management, which is $53,000 
above the request, and the same as the the 1996 funding level.
    Infrastructure management.--The Committee recommends 
$106,027,000 for infrastructure management, which is $973,000 
below the request, and $2,000,000 above the 1996 funding level. 
The $2,000,000 increase is for timber road maintenance to 
assist the forest health timber stand improvement and thinning 
program. The Committee urges the use of non-Federal 
partnerships wherever possible, and in this light encourages 
the engineering staff to start a challenge cost share program 
to be administered similar to other NFS efforts.
    Law enforcement operations.--The Committee recommends 
$59,637,000 for law enforcement, the same as the 1996 funding 
level. The Committee remains concerned about Forest Service law 
enforcement, including the problem of timber theft. The 
Committee remains very interested in the new independent law 
enforcement office and will carefully watch its ability to 
carry out its program in association with other NFS needs and 
legal mandates. The Committee urges the Forest Service to 
provide national attention to the timber theft issue and 
aggressively pursue a full program of protection and 
enforcement. The Committee expects the Forest Service to 
complete the study required by Senate Report 104-125 on law 
enforcement and submit the report to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations no later than March 1, 1997. The 
Committee is concerned about the increasing use of Forest 
Service law enforcement resources in activities more 
appropriately handled by other law enforcement agencies. The 
Committee is aware of law enforcement personnel engaged in 
border patrol and illegal immigration enforcement activities in 
California, on the Cleveland National Forest, and Arizona, on 
the Coronado National Forest. With the limited resources 
available for law enforcement, the Committee recommends the 
Forest Service turn these responsibilities over to the U.S. 
Border Patrol and Immigration and Naturalization Service, the 
agencies with jurisdiction over these matters. Law enforcement 
personnel should focus on crimes that relate more directly to 
the natural resources and facilities within the National Forest 
System, collaborating with other law enforcement agencies as 
the need arises. Cooperative agreements with States and local 
agencies for law enforcement activities should be utilized to 
the greatest extent possible.
    General administration.--The Committee recommends 
$255,088,000 for general administration, which is $9,465,000 
below the request, and $10,000,000 below the 1996 funding 
level. Any personnel reductions made in fiscal year 1997 should 
have a negligible impact on the Forest Service's ability to 
meet the volume targets in the timber sale program. The 
Committee urges the Forest Service to utilize its contracting 
authority to meet the goals outlined. The Committee remains 
concerned about the large investment in new computer equipment 
and information management. The Forest Service should 
collaborate as much as possible with fellow federal land 
management agencies funded in this bill when implementing 
computer systems, geographic information systems and software, 
and geographic and analytical data and procedures. The 
Committee does not have the resources to support duplicative 
systems covering the same geographic areas that may be 
implemented by different agencies. Due to intermingled lands, 
close collaboration with the Bureau of Land Management and the 
National Park System is especially warranted.
    General.--The Committee is concerned about accountability 
for the Congressionally designated use of funds. Whereas the 
Committee has supported substantial simplification of Forest 
Service budget structures recently, there is an unacceptable 
tendency for the Forest Service to reprogram funds without 
advance Congressional notice and approval. As discussed by the 
Committee last year, the Forest Service is to maintain all 
specific Congressional designations, in any amount, and to 
submit a reprogramming request if any such designation is 
proposed for a change. There also is a lack of accountability 
for certain large programs. Because of this the Committee has 
included bill language requiring the Forest Service to submit 
reprogramming requests. Because of the lack of clarity on the 
past use of funds, the Committee has returned the inventory and 
monitoring funds within the former NFS ecosystem planning, 
inventory and monitoring activity to those activities from 
which the funds were moved in fiscal year 1994. The Committee 
is renaming the activity the land management planning activity. 
This puts funds back into multiple use programs where there is 
greater accountability for programs. This also will help the 
Committee more closely monitor and limit land management 
planning costs which have consumed all too much of the scarce 
management resources available to the Service.
    The Committee remains concerned about restructuring and 
reorganizations and, as last year, considers such proposals to 
be subject to the Committee's review pursuant to the 
reprogramming guidelines. The Committee expects the Forest 
Service to maintain the North Central and Northeastern research 
station headquarters in St. Paul, MN and Radnor, PA. The 
Committee remains concerned about the methodology used for 
allocating funds among regions, especially the treatment of 
recreation funds for region 2 and other high-use regions. The 
Committee expects the Forest Service to be prepared to submit a 
detailed explanation of its assumptions and methodology on 
regional allocations in connection with its fiscal year 1998 
budget submission.
    The Committee urges the Forest Service to maintain at least 
the 1996 funding level for the Pacific Northwest Forest plan 
and urges the Service to see that the ``Jobs in the Woods'' 
program is used to hire dislocated timber and forest workers 
from forest dependent communities and to provide job training 
in support of those workers.
    The Committee is concerned about the destruction of habitat 
for the endangered Indiana bat and other bats on the Shawnee NF 
and urges the Service to protect bat habitat on the Shawnee. 
The Committee expects the Shawnee NF not to engage in any 
below-cost timber sales. The Committee has provided $1,600,000 
for operations at the Midewin National Tallgrass Prairie (NTP) 
and expects the Service to recognize the Midewin NTP as an 
important and independent unit of the forest system. 
Administrative services should be provided by the Milwaukee 
regional office, which is far closer than the Shawnee NF 
office.
    The Committee remains concerned that the Southern 
Appalachian Assessment not be used to supersede management 
direction outlines within existing forest plans. The Committee 
expects that areas identified in the Southern Appalachian 
Assessment as potential roadless areas and currently classified 
as suitable for timber harvest under existing forest plans 
continue to support timber harvest objectives, proportionate to 
the area so designated.
    Administrative provisions.--Bill language is included which 
prevents reprogramming without the advance approval of the 
House and Senate Committees on appropriations in compliance 
with the reprogramming procedures contained in House Report 
103-551. The Committee expects the Forest Service to obey this 
law and to seek approval for desired changes to Congressionally 
designated allocations to accounts, activities, and projects. 
The Committee is concerned that the Forest Service is not 
realizing all of the funds possible through right-of-way 
agreements and and encourages the Service to implement a market 
value approach to right-of-way processing to the extent 
feasible under existing law. The Committee has continued 
language limiting clearcutting in the Wayne NF, OH and the 
Shawnee NF, IL and continued language regarding ``Jobs in the 
Woods'' grants in the state of Washington.
    The Committee has retained language requiring advance 
submission of proposals to change boundaries, close offices, 
change the appropriations structure, or use transfer authority. 
The Committee considers that this bill language prevents any 
preparation or planning for a move, or the move itself, of the 
Atlanta regional office to a new location without the advance 
notice and approval of the Committees. The Committee remains 
concerned that the Forest Service is being required to move the 
Regional Office in Atlanta, Georgia from its present location 
to a new Federal Center in downtown Atlanta at greatly 
increased costs. Accessibility for both the public and 
employees will be made more difficult. The Committee does not 
want the Forest Service to move into more costly space with no 
apparent increase in effectiveness or efficiency.
    The Committee has included funding of $1,000,000 for the 
National Forest Foundation which is to be used for matching 
funds to further the multiple use and public service mission of 
the Forest Service.

                        Wildland fire management

Appropriation enacted, 1996 (excludes emergency)........    $385,485,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     385,485,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     411,485,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     +26,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     +26,000,000

    The Committee recommends $411,485,000, an increase of 
$26,000,000, for Forest Service fire protection and 
suppression. This includes $321,315,000 for preparedness and 
fire use, an increase of $24,015,000 above the request and an 
increase of $26,000,000 above the 1996 enacted level. This 
increase is for forest health activities and to increase the 
presuppression funding to about 94% of the most efficient 
level. This increase should decrease the funding needed for 
wildfire suppression activities during emergencies by 
increasing preparedness, and especially, by increasing 
prescribed burns and biomass treatments. The funding also 
includes $90,170,000 for wildfire suppression activities. The 
Committee is especially concerned about the wildfire 
preparedness in region 5 and encourages the Forest Service to 
fund fully presuppression and suppression efforts in this 
region.
    The Committee supports the principles and recommendations 
contained in the 1995 Federal Wildland Management Policy and 
Review Report. The Committee has added substantial resources to 
aid wildfire preparedness. The report provides a blueprint for 
the improved interagency planning and cooperation necessary to 
protect life and property from wildfires, manage wildland fuels 
to reduce the risk of catastrophic wildfire, and reestablish 
the natural role of wildland fire in sustaining natural 
ecosystems. The Forest Service should work with the Department 
of the Interior bureaus to adopt common approaches to funding 
and managing preparedness resources, fuels treatments and the 
use of prescribed fire. Funds should be used to support the 
implementation of the policy review, such as expanding the use 
of joint or shared resources to accelerate fuels treatments, 
the use of prescribed fire across administrative boundaries, 
and taking appropriate responses (including monitoring or 
confinement) to naturally occurring fires. Prevention and fuels 
treatment programs should be targeted to high priority areas to 
reduce the incidence and cost of large catastrophic wildfires. 
Preparedness and suppression costs can be restrained by 
ensuring that the suppression response is commensurate with 
values to be protected and consistent with resource objectives.
    The recommended level includes $9,300,000 for forest health 
and natural fuels treatments for region 5 and the national 
forests in Nevada. The Committee recognizes that timber stand 
and forest health activities, like prescribed burning, forest 
thinning, brush clearing and pruning are important tools for 
reducing the overaccumulation of natural fuels, a principle 
cause of catastrophic wildfire.
    The Committee is concerned about the expansion of the 
urban/forest interface and its effects on wildfire suppression 
efforts. Fire suppression efforts which emphasize protection of 
life and property will be increasingly stressed as this 
interface broadens, further burdening appropriations. The 
Committee believes that the costs of these efforts should not 
be wholly borne by appropriated funds, and that the landowners 
and their insurance carriers should participate cooperatively. 
With regard to this issue the Committee is further concerned 
about the increased opportunity for starting fires in this 
interface. The Committee would like the Forest Service to 
provide a report by December 1, 1996, detailing the efforts, 
either those in place, or planned, for educating homeowners in 
this interface in fire prevention and fire suppression 
responsibilities.

                    reconstruction and construction

Appropriation enacted, 1996 (excludes emergency)........    $163,600,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     169,662,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     164,100,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        +500,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -5,562,000

    The Committee recommends $164,100,000, a decrease of 
$5,562,000 from the budget estimate, for the construction and 
reconstruction of roads and trails, and the reconstruction and 
construction of facilities. The amounts recommended by the 
Committee for fiscal year 1997, compared to the budget 
estimates by activity, are shown in the following table:




    Facilities construction and reconstruction.--The Committee 
recommends $47,029,000 for facilities construction, a reduction 
of $1,500,000 from 1996 and $5,633,000 below the request. The 
Committee urges the use of non-federal partnerships wherever 
possible, and in this light designates $500,000 for a challenge 
cost share program for service-wide facilities construction, to 
be administered similar to NFS challenge cost share efforts. 
The overall facilities construction funding includes:

Fire, administrative, and other (FAO)...................      $9,000,000
Recreation..............................................      36,000,000
Research................................................       2,029,000

    Fire, Administrative, Other (FAO).--The Committee has 
provided facilities funds according to the following table:-

------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Committee
    Region             NF               Project       Request    recomm 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
1.............  Custer..........  Ashland RD office.     $475      $475 
2.............  Arap/Roos.......  Boulder WC........      485       485 
3.............  Kaibab..........  Chalender RS......      476       476 
4.............  Payette.........  McCall RD office..      200       200 
5.............  Lake Tahoe......  LTBMU SO phase II.      470       470 
8.............  Oconee..........  Oconee RD office..      393       393 
8.............  Pisgah..........  Pisgah office            19        19 
                                   expan.                               
9.............  Wayne...........  Wayne SO w ODOT...        0     2,200 
9  ...........  Midewin.........  Midewin Prairie           0       250 
                                   admin.                               
                                                     -------------------
                                        Subtotal....    2,518     4,968 
PA............  Grey Towers.....  Grey Towers               5     1,000 
                                   reconst.                             
All...........  All.............  Planning and          1,706     1,000 
                                   design.                              
WO............  All.............  Program supervison      280       240 
All...........  All.............  Misc construc.....    1,491     1,792 
                                                     -------------------
All...........  All.............  Total FAO.........    6,000     9,000 
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Recreation Facilities construction.--The committee has 
provided funds for recreation construction according to the 
following regional table:

                                                                        
                         [Dollars in thousands]                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                   Region                        Request     Recommended
------------------------------------------------------------------------
1...........................................        $2,171        $2,000
2...........................................         5,427         4,700
3...........................................         6,078         4,700
4...........................................         4,558         3,600
5...........................................         3,907         3,800
6...........................................         5,047         4,100
8...........................................         6,512         5,900
9...........................................         3,907         4,100
10..........................................         5,861         2,000
                                             ---------------------------
      Sub-total.............................        43,468        34,900
      Administration........................         1,194         1,100
                                             ---------------------------
      Total.................................        44,662        36,000
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Within the amounts above, the Committee has provided for 
the following earmarks:
    Region 3 includes $851,000 for the Sitting Bull Falls 
complex on the Lincoln NF and $232,000 for the Sabino Canyon 
VIC exhibits; Region 5 includes $508,000 to complete the 
Applewhite Picnic area phase II; Region 8 includes $400,000 for 
Badin Lake project on the Uwharrie NF and $560,000 for the 
Davidson River sanitation rehabilitation on the NF's of NC, and 
$300,000 to complete site utilities rehabilitation at the 
Cradle of Forestry Discovery Center; Region 9 includes $251,000 
for Willow Bay phase 3, $100,000 for Hearts Content campground 
rehabilitation, and $150,000 for Rimrock recreation area on the 
Allegheny NF, and $1.5 million for Midewin National Tallgrass 
Prairie facilities.
    Research facilities construction and reconstruction.--The 
Committee recommends $2,029,000 for forest and rangeland 
research facilities construction and reconstruction. This is 
$471,000 below the 1996 level and $29,000 above the request.
    Road construction.--The Committee recommends $97,062,000 
for road construction, an increase of $2,000,000 above the 1996 
enacted level. This includes $59,000,000 for timber roads, 
$26,000,000 for recreation roads, and $12,062,000 for general 
purpose roads. The Committee recommendation includes a 
$2,000,000 increase above the 1996 enacted level for timber 
roads that are needed for forest health related timber stand 
improvement and thinning activities.
    Timber purchaser road credits.--The Committee continues the 
policy of last year of designating up to $50,000,000 for timber 
purchaser road credits.
    Trails.--The committee recommends $20,009,000 for trails 
construction and reconstruction, the same as fiscal year 1996, 
and $5,991,000 below the request. The Committee recommends that 
the Forest Service utilize $500,000 in trail construction funds 
for challenge cost share efforts with non-Federal partners in a 
manner similar to the recreation and wildlife programs. The 
Committee also suggests that the Forest Service highlight the 
national scenic and historic trail system on the National 
Forest System lands.

                            land acquisition

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $39,400,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      41,200,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      30,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      -9,400,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -11,200,000

    The Committee recommends $30,000,000 for land acquisition, 
a decrease of $9,400,000 below fiscal year 1996 and $11,200,000 
below the request. The amount recommended includes $18,875,000 
for acquisitions, $1,725,000 for cash equalization, $1,500,000 
for emergencies, $7,400,000 for management and $500,000 for 
wilderness.

        acquisition of lands for national forests, special acts

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $1,069,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       1,069,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       1,069,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends $1,069,000 for acquisition of 
lands for national forests, special acts, which is the same as 
the 1996 funding level and the request. These funds are used 
pursuant to several special acts which authorize appropriations 
from the receipts of specified National Forests for the 
purchase of lands to minimize erosion and flood damage to 
critical watersheds needing soil stabilization and vegetative 
cover.

            acquisition of lands to complete land exchanges

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................        $210,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................         210,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................         210,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $210,000, the 
budget estimate, for acquisition of lands to complete land 
exchanges under the Act of December 4, 1967 (16 U.S.C. 484a). 
Under the Act, deposits made by public school districts or 
public school authorities to provide for cash equalization of 
certain land exchanges can be appropriated to acquire similar 
lands suitable for National Forest System purposes in the same 
State as the National Forest lands conveyed in the exchanges.

                         range betterment fund

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $3,976,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       3,995,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       3,995,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................         +19,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,995,000, 
the budget estimate, to be derived from grazing receipts from 
the National Forests (Public Law 94-579, as amended) and to be 
used for range rehabilitation, protection, and improvements 
including seeding, reseeding, fence construction, weed control, 
water development, and fish and wildlife habitat enhancement in 
16 western States.

    gifts, donations and bequests for forest and rangeland research

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................         $92,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................          92,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................          92,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $92,000, the 
budget estimate. The appropriation will make available to the 
Forest Service deposits in the form of gifts, donations, and 
bequests for forest and rangeland research. Authority for the 
program is contained in Public Law 95-307 (16 U.S.C. 1643, 
section 4(b)). Amounts appropriated and not needed for current 
operations may be invested in public debt securities. Both the 
principal and earnings from the receipts are available to the 
Forest Service.

                          DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

                         Clean Coal Technology

    The Committee has recommended no new budget authority for 
clean coal technology programs. An additional $137,879,000 in 
funding for ongoing clean coal projects will be available for 
obligation in fiscal year 1997. That amount consists of 
$287,879,000 made available in advance appropriations from 
prior appropriations acts less $150,000,000 of the total funds 
available for obligation in fiscal year 1997 as a result of a 
rescission in fiscal year 1995. The Committee does not object 
to the use of up to $16,000,000 in available funds for 
administration of the clean coal program in fiscal year 1997.

                 fossil energy research and development

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................    $417,018,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     348,508,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     358,754,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     -58,264,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     +10,246,000

    The Committee recommends $358,754,000 for fossil energy 
research and development, an increase of $10,246,000 above the 
budget request and a decrease of $58,264,000 below the 1996 
level.
    The amount recommended by the Committee for fiscal year 
1997 compared to the 1996 enacted level by activity is shown in 
the following table:


    The Committee recommendation reduces fossil energy research 
and development funding about 14 percent below the fiscal year 
1996 level. The Committee commends the agency for complying 
with the Committee's direction of last year to continue to 
reduce fossil energy research and development programs. 
Unfortunately, the budget request short funded several 
important programs and the Committee has attempted to realign 
the request to ensure that the multi-million dollar Federal 
investment, to date, in promising research and new technology, 
which promotes the economic viability of domestically-developed 
energy technology and provides energy-related jobs and economic 
benefits to all the States across this nation, is not lost.
    The Committee expects the agency to continue to terminate 
projects which become infeasible rather than continuing to 
support such projects through to completion because of some 
predetermined schedule. The Committee also encourages the 
agency to review carefully each of its research programs with 
the goal of increasing private cost sharing and of reducing the 
scope and timing of projects to the greatest extent 
practicable.
    Coal.--The Committee recommends $104,879,000 for coal 
research, an increase of $2,250,000 above the budget request 
and a decrease of $16,386,000 below the fiscal year 1996 level. 
Changes to the budget request are shown in the following table:

Advanced Clean Fuels Research:
    Direct Liquefaction/innovative process concepts.....      ($800,000)
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Advanced Clean/Efficient Power Systems:
    Advanced Pulverized Coal-Fired Powerplant/low 
      emission boilers..................................       5,000,000
    Advanced Research and Environmental Technology/super 
      clean systems.....................................       (400,000)
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, Advanced Clean Efficient Power Systems..       4,600,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Advanced Research and Technology Development:
    University Coal Research............................     (1,000,000)
    International Program Studies.......................       (150,000)
    International Energy Agency Coal Research...........       (200,000)
    Historically Black Colleges and Universities, 
      Education and Training............................       (200,000)
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, Advanced Research and Technology 
      Development.......................................     (1,550,000)
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, Coal Research..............................       2,250,000

    The agency should consider incorporating the HBCU program 
into the university coal research program.
    Oil Technology.--The Committee recommends $42,437,000 for 
oil technology research, a decrease of $10,100,000 below the 
budget request and $13,277,000 below the fiscal year 1996 
level. Changes to the budget request are shown in the following 
table.

Exploration and Production Supporting Research:
    Reservoir Characterization..........................     (2,000,000)
    Technology Transfer.................................       (500,000)
    Exploration and Drilling............................     (1,500,000)
    Industry/Laboratory Partnerships....................     (4,000,000)
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, Exploration and Production Supporting 
      Research..........................................     (8,000,000)
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Recovery Field Demonstrations:
    Production from Marginal Wells......................       (500,000)
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Exploration and Production Environmental Research:
    Research on Produced Water..........................     (1,000,000)
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Processing Research and Downstream Operations:
    Environmental Compliance............................       (300,000)
    Upgrading Technology Development....................       (300,000)
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, Processing Research and Downstream 
      Operations........................................       (600,000)
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, Oil Technology.............................    (10,100,000)

    The Committee is encouraged by the Department's efforts 
toward privatizing its oil technology operations and programs 
in order to reduce long-term reliance on Federal 
appropriations, and recommends that it remain a top priority.
    Natural Gas.--The Committee recommends $126,108,000 for 
natural gas and fuel cell research, an increase of $22,400,000 
above the budget request and $13,922,000 above the fiscal year 
1996 level. Changes to the budget request are shown in the 
following table:

Exploration and Production/Coal Mine Methane 
    Demonstration.......................................    ($1,000,000)
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Advanced Turbine Systems................................      19,000,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Utilization:
    Ion Transport Membranes.............................       1,000,000
    Methyl Chloride Production..........................         900,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, Utilization.............................       1,900,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Environmental Research and Regulatory Analysis:
    Technology Development..............................     (2,000,000)
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Fuel Cells:
    Molten Carbonate Systems............................       3,500,000
    Advanced Concepts/tubular solid oxide fuel cell.....       1,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, Fuel Cells..............................       4,500,000
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, Natural Gas................................      22,400,000

    Cooperative Research and Development.--The Committee 
recommends $4,000,000 for cooperative research and development, 
which is equal to the budget request and $2,295,000 below the 
fiscal year 1996 level.
    Fuels Program.--The Committee recommends $2,188,000 for the 
fuels conversion program, which is equal to the budget request 
and $499,000 below the fiscal year 1996 level.
    Environmental Restoration, Program Direction and Capital 
Projects.--The Committee recommends $13,027,000 for 
environmental restoration, a decrease of $2,000,000 below the 
budget request and $1,892,000 below the fiscal year 1996 level. 
The Committee recommends $13,901,000 for headquarters program 
direction ($1,000,000 below the budget request), and 
$45,214,000 for energy technology center program direction, 
which is equal to the budget request and $10,062,000 below the 
fiscal year 1996 level. The Committee recommends no funding for 
equipment not related to construction and $2,000,000 for 
general plant projects; collectively these accounts are 
$1,304,000 below the budget request and $2,005,000 below the 
fiscal year 1996 level. Changes to the budget request for these 
accounts are shown in the following table:

Environmental Restoration, Program Direction and Capital 
    Projects:
    Environmental Restoration...........................    ($2,000,000)
    Headquarters Program Direction:
        Salaries and benefits...........................       (500,000)
        Travel..........................................       (100,000)
        Contract services...............................       (400,000)
    Energy Technology Center Program Direction:
        Contract services, Morgantown and Pittsburgh....       6,000,000
        Contract services, Bartlesville.................     (6,000,000)
    Equipment Not Related to Construction...............     (1,000,000)
    General Plant Projects..............................       (304,000)
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, Program Direction and Environmental 
      Restoration.......................................     (4,304,000)

    General.--No funding has been provided for capital 
equipment. Any such needs may be funded within project 
operating costs, subject to the Committee's established 
reprogramming guidelines.
    The Committee expects that reductions at Argonne National 
Laboratory in fiscal year 1997 will be no greater than the 
reductions to the other National Laboratories.
    The Department should make every effort to use fully the 
expertise of the Federal Energy Technology Center by 
encouraging its use by other Departmental elements, other 
governmental entities, and the private sector on a reimbursable 
basis.
    The Committee expects all biotechnology and materials 
activities to be implemented through the field and not by 
Headquarters.
    The Committee notes that the Department has established a 
working capital fund for administrative expenses formerly paid 
within the Departmental Administration budget. The Committee 
has agreed that the fossil energy program should pay its fair 
share of these costs.

                      alternative fuels production

              (including transfer and rescission of funds)

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     -$2,400,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      -4,000,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      -4,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      -1,600,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends the deposit of investment income 
earned as of October 1, 1996 on principal amounts in a trust 
fund established as part of the sale of the Great Plains 
Gasification Plant in Beulah, ND, into this account and 
immediate transfer of the funds to the General Fund of the 
Treasury. The amount available as of October 1, 1996, is 
estimated to be $1,500,000. In addition, $2,500,000 in 
unobligated balances are rescinded.

                 naval petroleum and oil shale reserves

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................    $148,786,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     149,500,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     143,786,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      -5,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -5,714,000

    Naval Petroleum and Oil Shale reserves include petroleum 
reserves Nos. 1 and 2 located at Elks Hills, California, 
petroleum reserve No. 3 northeast of Casper, Wyoming, Naval Oil 
Shale Reserves Nos. 1 and 3 in Colorado, and Naval Oil Shale 
No. 2 in Utah. The Government's share of oil, natural gas, and 
liquid product production available for sale from the Naval 
Petroleum Reserves is expected to average 57,600 oil equivalent 
barrels per day in fiscal year 1997. Total receipts in fiscal 
years 1996 and 1997 are estimated to be about $463 million and 
$407 million respectively.
    The amount recommended by the Committee for fiscal year 
1997 compared with the 1996 enacted level by activity is shown 
in the following table:




    The Committee recommends $143,786,000 for the Naval 
Petroleum and Oil Shale Reserves, a decrease of $5,714,000 
below the budget request and $5,000,000 below the fiscal year 
1996 level. The decrease includes reductions of $5,000,000 for 
operations at NPRs 1 and 2 and $714,000 for headquarters 
program direction.
    The amount recommended by the Committee, in combination 
with uncosted balances available in the operational contract 
for Elk Hills, should be sufficient for operations in fiscal 
year 1997. The Committee expects the Department to continue to 
improve and streamline the operations at Elk Hills and to 
achieve cost savings by using good business practices.
    Bill Language.--Since sufficient funds and outlay authority 
are not being recommended in the SPR petroleum account to 
purchase oil, the Committee recommends waiving the statutory 
requirement for selling NPR-1 oil at prices equivalent to 
Strategic Petroleum Reserve purchase prices.

                          energy conservation

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................    $553,189,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     735,363,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     499,680,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     -53,509,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................    -235,683,000

    The amount recommended by the Committee for fiscal year 
1997 compared with the 1996 enacted level by activity is shown 
in the following table:


    The Committee recommends $499,680,000 for energy 
conservation, a decrease of $235,683,000 below the budget 
request and $53,509,000 below the fiscal year 1996 level. Of 
this amount, an indefinite portion is to be derived from the 
excess amount for fiscal year 1996, under the provisions of the 
Budget Reconciliation Act of 1987, Public Law 99-509. This 
amount, which is applied to State and local conservation 
programs and which originates from oil overcharge funds, is 
estimated to be $20,000,000.
    The Committee recommendation reduces energy conservation 
activities by 10 percent below the fiscal year 1996 level. The 
Committee's recommendation will protect the multi-million 
dollar Federal investment, to date, in promising research and 
new technology which promotes the economic viability of 
domestically-developed energy technology and provides energy-
related jobs and economic benefits to all the States across 
this nation. The agency is expected to terminate projects which 
become infeasible rather than continuing to support such 
projects through to completion because of some predetermined 
schedule. The Committee also expects the agency to review 
carefully each of its research programs with the goal of 
increasing private cost sharing and of reducing the scope and 
timing of projects to the greatest extent practicable.
    Buildings.--The Committee recommends $190,538,000 for 
building technology, a decrease of $128,533,000 below the 
budget request and $24,988,000 below the fiscal year 1996 
level. Within the amount recommended by the Committee 
$100,000,000 is for low income weatherization assistance grants 
and $25,000,000 is for State energy program grants. Changes to 
the budget request are shown in the following table:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Budget Activity/Subactivity/project                Amount     
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Building Systems Design:                                                
    Residential Buildings:                                              
        Building America..............................      ($3,000,000)
        Advanced housing technology (terminate                          
         program).....................................         (400,000)
        Industrialized housing........................         (500,000)
        Residential energy efficiency.................       (2,600,000)
    Commercial Buildings:                                               
        Rebuild America...............................       (5,100,000)
        Affordable homes for low income housing (no                     
         new starts)..................................       (3,100,000)
        Commercial/multifamily research and                             
         development..................................       (2,150,000)
    Best Practices:                                                     
        Indoor air quality guidelines/standards.......         (350,000)
        Technology transfer information and outreach..       (1,000,000)
        Advanced architectural design (no new starts).       (1,000,000)
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Building Systems Design...........      (19,200,000)
                                                       =================
Building Equipment and Materials:                                       
    Space Conditioning:                                                 
        Hi-cool heat pump.............................         (500,000)
        Large commercial chiller......................         (300,000)
        Computer model development....................         (400,000)
        Refrigeration technology......................       (1,000,000)
        Refrigerants, materials and lubricants........         (300,000)
    Lighting and Appliances:                                            
        Very high frequency light sources.............         (300,000)
        Electronics...................................         (200,000)
        Fixtures/distribution systems.................         (100,000)
        New concepts in lighting......................         (400,000)
        Lighting collaboratives (no new starts).......         (980,000)
        Emerging technology introduction (terminate                     
         program).....................................       (3,742,000)
        Technology marketing partnerships (terminate                    
         program).....................................       (6,561,000)
        Volume purchases (terminate program)..........       (1,615,000)
    Materials and Structures:                                           
        Urban heat islands (terminate program)........         (700,000)
        Reflectivity/technology partnerships (no new                    
         starts)......................................       (1,300,000)
    Windows and Glazings:                                               
        Electrochromic research.......................       (1,000,000)
        Superwindow collaboratives....................       (2,000,000)
        Advanced glazing..............................       (1,000,000)
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Building Equipment and Materials..      (22,398,000)
                                                       =================
Codes and Standards:                                                    
    Building Standards and Guidelines:                                  
        State codes...................................       (6,000,000)
        Home energy rating systems (terminate program)       (4,235,000)
    Lighting and Appliance Standards:                                   
        Residential...................................       (2,000,000)
        Commercial....................................       (1,500,000)
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Codes and Standards...............      (13,735,000)
                                                       =================
State and Community Grants:                                             
    Weatherization....................................      (55,500,000)
    State Energy Conservation Program.................      (13,400,000)
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, State and Community Grants............      (68,900,000)
                                                       =================
Management and Planning:                                                
    Evaluation and Planning:                                            
        Technology and sector data....................         (200,000)
        Analytical studies and planning support.......         (500,000)
        State and local grant program management......       (2,100,000)
    Program Direction/salaries, benefits, travel......         (250,000)
    Capital Equipment.................................       (1,250,000)
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Management and Planning...............       (4,300,000)
                                                       =================
      Total, Building Technology......................     (128,533,000)
------------------------------------------------------------------------


    The Committee continues to be concerned about the codes and 
standards program. Last year the Committee included a 
moratorium on the issuance of new standards which was primarily 
directed at the appliance standards program. As a result of 
that moratorium the Department of Energy has attempted to 
change the focus of the program by involving all interested 
parties in a discussion of how to reform the standards program. 
The Committee expects the Department to achieve consensus on 
product standards before promulgating new or amended product 
standards in fiscal year 1997. This direction applies to non-
federal building standards, including the model energy code for 
residential construction, as well as appliances standards and 
product determinations, including those products added by the 
Energy Policy Act of 1992. In addition, no action to further 
the development of any individual product standard rulemaking 
should be taken until the Department completes a rulemaking 
which provides a conceptual framework for the standards 
program. The budget has been reduced greatly across-the-board 
for the codes and standards program with the expectation that 
the Department will continue to rethink its approach and 
substantially revamp the program. The Committee will not 
hesitate to reinstate a legislative moratorium on the issuance 
of standards if the Department does not comply with this 
direction.
    Federal Energy Management Program.--The Committee 
recommends $14,800,000 for the Federal energy management 
program, a decrease of $17,100,000 below the budget request and 
$3,723,000 below the fiscal year 1996 level. Changes to the 
budget request are shown in the following table:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Budget Activity/Subactivity/project                Amount     
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Program Activities:                                                     
    Project Financing:                                                  
        Energy saving performance contracts...........      ($5,700,000)
        Technology introduction (no new starts).......       (4,000,000)
    Technical Guidance and Assistance:                                  
        Technology introduction (no new starts).......       (3,000,000)
    Planning, Reporting and Evaluation:                                 
        Regional action project.......................       (3,000,000)
                                                       -----------------
            Subtotal, Program Activities..............      (15,700,000)
    Program Direction.................................       (1,300,000)
    Capital Equipment.................................         (100,000)
                                                       -----------------
        Total, Federal Energy Management Program......      (17,100,000)
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Industry.--The Committee recommends $109,539,000 for 
industry sector programs, a decrease of $49,895,000 below the 
budget request and $6,116,000 below the fiscal year 1996 level. 
Changes to the budget request are shown in the following table:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Budget Activity/Subactivity/project                Amount     
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Industries of the Future (Specific):                                    
    Forest and Paper Products.........................      ($2,140,000)
    Steel.............................................       (1,000,000)
    Aluminum..........................................       (5,587,000)
    Metal Casting.....................................       (2,500,000)
    Glass.............................................       (2,182,000)
    Chemicals.........................................       (3,000,000)
    Petroleum Refining................................       (4,000,000)
    Textiles Partnerships.............................      (12,000,000)
                                                       -----------------
        Subtotal, Industries of the Future (Specific).      (32,409,000)
                                                       =================
Industries of the Future (Crosscutting):                                
    Cogeneration (Advanced Turbine Systems)...........       (2,000,000)
                                                       =================
Technology Access:                                                      
    Industrial Assessment Centers.....................         (750,000)
    Technology Transfer/partnerships..................         (936,000)
    Technology Transfer/outreach programs.............         (500,000)
    Motor Challenge...................................       (2,200,000)
    NICE3.............................................       (6,200,000)
    Climate Wise......................................       (2,400,000)
    Inventions and Innovation (eliminate grant                          
     portion).........................................       (1,700,000)
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Technology Access.....................      (14,686,000)
                                                       =================
Management and Planning:                                                
    Evaluation and Planning...........................         (100,000)
    Program Direction.................................         (700,000)
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Management and Planning...............         (800,000)
                                                       =================
      Total, Industry Sector..........................      (49,895,000)
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Transportation.--The Committee recommends $159,453,000 for 
transportation programs, a decrease of $61,855,000 below the 
budget request and $17,115,000 below the fiscal year 1996 
level. Changes to the budget request are shown in the following 
table:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Budget activity/subactivity/project                Amount     
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Alternative Fueled Vehicles:                                            
    Alternative Fueled Vehicle Research and                             
     Development/systems optimization:                                  
        On-board storage for natural gas vehicles.....        $1,000,000
        Engine optimization for natural gas vehicles..           700,000
    Alternative Fueled Vehicle Research and                             
     Development: Student competitions (terminate                       
     program).........................................         (930,000)
    Alternatively Fueled Vehicle Deployment:                            
        Energy Policy Act, titles III, IV, V                            
         implementation...............................       (1,000,000)
        Energy Policy Act, title VI implementation/                     
         electric vehicle field operations............         (500,000)
        Technical information and outreach............         (500,000)
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Alternative Fueled Vehicles.......       (1,230,000)
                                                       =================
Electric Drive Vehicle Technologies:                                    
    Electric Vehicle R&D;/exploratory technology                         
     research.........................................       (1,000,000)
    Hybrid Vehicle Research and Development...........      (31,000,000)
    Fuel Cell Research and Development................      (11,000,000)
    Capital Equipment.................................         (750,000)
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Electric Drive Vehicle Technologies...      (43,750,000)
                                                       =================
Transportation Materials Technologies:                                  
    Lightweight Vehicle Materials.....................       (8,000,000)
    Heavy Vehicle Materials Technology................         (700,000)
    Capital Equipment.................................       (1,000,000)
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Transportation Materials Technologies.       (9,700,000)
                                                       =================
Combustion Engine Research and Development:                             
    Light Duty Engine Research and Development........       (4,000,000)
    Heavy Duty Engine Research and Development........       (1,000,000)
    Capital Equipment.................................         (375,000)
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Combustion Engine Research and                          
       Development....................................       (5,375,000)
                                                       =================
Implementation and Program Management:                                  
    Evaluation, Planning and Analysis.................         (600,000)
    Program Direction.................................       (1,200,000)
                                                       -----------------
      Subtotal, Implementation and Program Management.       (1,800,000)
                                                       =================
      Total, Transportation...........................      (61,855,000)
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee encourages the agency to work with the 
Southern California Economic Partnership to assist its member 
groups accomplish their objectives with respect to alternative 
fueled vehicles and zero emission vehicles.
    Policy and Management.--The Committee recommends 
$25,350,000 for policy and management, a decrease of $3,000,000 
below the budget request and $1,567,000 below the fiscal year 
1996 level. Changes to the budget request are shown in the 
following table:


------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Budget activity/subactivity/project                Amount     
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Policy and Management:                                                  
    Golden Field Office:                                                
        Salaries and expenses.........................        ($600,000)
        Contract services.............................         (600,000)
                                                       -----------------
          Subtotal, Golden Field Office...............       (1,200,000)
                                                       =================
    International Market Development..................         (300,000)
    Information and Communications Program............       (1,500,000)
                                                       -----------------
      Total, Policy and Management, Energy                              
       Conservation...................................       (3,000,000)
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    General.--No funding has been provided for capital 
equipment. Any such needs may be funded within project 
operating costs, subject to the Committee's established 
reprogramming guidelines.
    The Committee notes that the Department has established a 
working capital fund for administrative expenses formerly paid 
within the Departmental Administration budget. The Committee 
has agreed that the energy conservation program should pay its 
fair share of these costs. The Committee expects that the 
activities of the Energy Information Administration that are 
funded under the Energy Conservation appropriation will be 
funded at the level identified in the budget request.

                          economic regulation

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $6,297,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       2,725,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       2,725,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      -3,572,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The economic regulation account funds the independent 
Office of Hearings and Appeals which is responsible for all of 
the Department's adjudication processes except those that are 
the responsibility of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. 
The amount funded by this Committee is for those activities 
specific to this bill, mainly those related to petroleum 
overcharge cases. All other activities are to be funded on a 
reimbursable basis from the other elements of the Department of 
Energy. Prior to fiscal year 1997, this account also funded the 
Economic Regulatory Administration.
    The Committee recommends $2,725,000 for economic 
regulation, which is equal to the budget request and $3,572,000 
below the fiscal year 1996 level. The decrease is entirely 
attributable to the elimination of funding for the Economic 
Regulatory Administration as agreed in fiscal year 1996. The 
remaining functions of that organization have been incorporated 
into the Department's Office of General Counsel which is funded 
in the Energy and Water Appropriations Act.

                      strategic petroleum reserve

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................    $287,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     221,300,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     220,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     -67,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -1,300,000

    The amount recommended by the Committee for fiscal year 
1997 compared with the 1996 enacted level by activity is shown 
in the following table:




    The Committee recommends $220,000,000 for construction and 
operation of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve, which is to be 
repaid from the SPR Fund which is established to receive the 
proceeds from the sale of SPR oil. The recommendation is a 
decrease of $1,300,000 below the budget request and $67,000,000 
below the fiscal year 1996 level. Decreases recommended from 
the budget request include $711,000 from facilities development 
and operation and $589,000 from management.
    Most surface facilities of the Reserve are reaching the end 
of their useful life and require upgrading and modernization. A 
life extension program was begun in fiscal year 1994 and will 
continue through fiscal year 1999.
    Bill language has been recommended to provide for the sale 
of a portion of the oil from the SPR and for the use of 
$220,000,000 in proceeds from the sale of that oil for 
operational expenses of the SPR. The Committee regrets that a 
further sale of oil is required to pay for operations of the 
SPR in fiscal year 1997. The alternative of funding SPR 
operations through direct appropriations was not feasible 
within the 602(b) allocation.
    The Committee expects that sales of SPR oil in fiscal years 
1996 and 1997 will not result in selling oil at distressed 
prices. The Secretary should award only contracts at fair 
market value.

                         spr petroleum account

    The Committee does not recommend additional appropriations 
for the purchase of petroleum for the Strategic Petroleum 
Reserve.
    The Committee recommends an outlay limitation of $5,000,000 
for this account. The limitation caps outlays from all sources 
in the account, and is required to reduce expenditures 
chargeable to the appropriations bill.
    The Committee recommends retaining bill language, included 
for the past eight fiscal years, that allows continued normal 
operations at Naval Petroleum Reserve Numbered 1 (Elk Hills) 
even though the fill rate of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve is 
less than 75,000 barrels a day.

                   energy information administration

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $72,266,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      66,120,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      66,120,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      -6,146,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Energy Information Administration is a quasi-
independent agency within the Department of Energy established 
to provide timely, objective, and accurate energy related 
information to the Congress, executive branch, State 
governments, industry, and the public. The information and 
analysis prepared by the EIA is widely disseminated and the 
agency is recognized as an unbiased source of energy 
information by government organizations, industry, professional 
statistical organizations and the public.
    The Committee recommends $66,120,000 for the Energy 
Information Administration, which is equal to the budget 
request and $6,146,000 below the fiscal year 1996 level. The 
Committee commends the EIA for a fiscally responsible budget 
request.

            administrative provisions, department of energy

    Bill language has been included to permit programs to 
accept fees and contributions from public and private sources 
to be deposited in a contributed funds account for use in 
executing cooperative projects. This authority is needed to 
permit the Department to comply with Committee direction on the 
Federal Energy Technology Center which is being established 
under the auspices of the Fossil Energy program and for those 
materials partnerships transferred to Fossil Energy from the 
former Bureau of Mines. The Committee has no objection to its 
use in other programs to the extent that it is needed to 
facilitate cooperative efforts.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

                         Indian Health Service

                         indian health services

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................  $1,747,842,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................   1,898,941,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................   1,779,561,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     +31,719,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................    -119,380,000

    The provision of Federal health services to Indians is 
based on a special relationship between Indian tribes and the 
U.S. Government first set forth in the 1830's by the U.S. 
Supreme Court under Chief Justice John Marshall. This 
relationship has been reconfirmed by numerous treaties, 
statutes, constitutional provisions, and international law. 
Principal among these is the Snyder Act of 1921 which provides 
the basic authority for most Indian health services provided by 
the Federal Government to American Indians and Alaska Natives. 
The Indian Health Service (IHS) provides direct health care 
services in 41 hospitals, 66 health centers, 4 school health 
centers, and 44 health stations. Tribes and tribal groups, 
through contracts with the IHS, operate 8 hospitals, 110 health 
centers, 4 school health centers, 62 health stations, and 171 
Alaska village clinics. The IHS, tribes and tribal groups also 
operate 7 regional youth substance abuse treatment centers and 
more than 2,000 units of staff quarters.
    The Committee recommends $1,779,561,000 for Indian Health 
Services, an increase of $31,719,000 above the fiscal year 1996 
enacted level and $119,380,000 below the budget estimate. The 
Committee's recommendation for the Indian Health Service 
assumes that no new initiatives will be funded in fiscal year 
1997. However, the Committee is providing an increase to 
accommodate staffing at four new facilities: Kotzebue, AK; 
Alaska Native Medical Center, AK; Shiprock Hospital, NM; and 
Hays Health Center, MT, and increases for personnel costs.
    It is the Committee's intent that all tribes, including 
those compacting or contracting under Indian self determination 
or Indian self governance, should share equitably as a result 
of any reductions from the budget request.
    The amount recommended by the Committee as compared to the 
1996 enacted level by activity is shown in the following table:




    Hospitals and Health Clinics.--The Committee recommends 
$878,168,000 for hospitals and health clinics which includes 
increases of $16,633,000 for staffing and operations at new 
facilities, and $9,100,000 for personnel related costs above 
the fiscal year 1996 enacted level.
    Dental Health.--The Committee recommends $62,134,000 for 
dental health services, including increases of $1,544,000 for 
staffing and operations at new facilities, and $910,000 for 
personnel related costs above the fiscal year 1996 enacted 
level.
    Mental Health.--The Committee recommends $38,500,000 for 
mental health services, including increases of $549,000 for 
staffing and operations at new facilities, and $390,000 for 
personnel related costs above the fiscal year 1996 enacted 
level.
    Alcohol and Substance Abuse.--The Committee recommends 
$91,796,000 for the alcohol and substance abuse treatment and 
prevention services including an increase of $130,000 for 
personnel related costs above the fiscal year 1996 enacted 
level.
    The Committee recommends that the fetal alcohol syndrome 
project at the University of Washington be funded at the fiscal 
year 1996 level. This project is providing important insight 
into early identification of fetal alcohol syndrome. Early 
identification and intervention by health care professionals 
results in significantly improved lives for those afflicted by 
fetal alcohol syndrome.
    Contract Health Services.--The Committee recommends 
$365,125,000 in contract health services including an increase 
of $26,000 for personnel related costs above the fiscal year 
1996 enacted level.
    The Committee does not object to continuing the California 
contract health demonstration project as long as the tribes in 
California choose to participate and elect to provide funding 
for this program.
    Public Health Nursing.--The Committee recommends 
$25,493,000 for public health nursing, including increases of 
$792,000 for staffing and operations at new facilities, and 
$390,000 for personnel related costs above the fiscal year 1996 
enacted level.
    Health Education.--The Committee recommends $8,590,000 for 
health education including increases above the fiscal year 1996 
enacted level of $104,000 for staffing and operations at new 
facilities, and $65,000 for personnel related costs.
    Community Health Representatives.--The Committee recommends 
$43,958,000 for community health representatives the same as 
the fiscal year 1996 enacted level.
    Alaska Immunization.--The Committee recommends $1,328,000 
for the Alaska immunization program the same as the fiscal year 
1996 enacted level.
    Urban Health.--The Committee recommends $23,360,000 for 
urban health the same as the fiscal year 1996 enacted level.
    Indian Health Professions.--The Committee recommends 
$26,297,000 for Indian health professions including an increase 
of $26,000 for personnel related costs above the fiscal year 
1996 enacted level.
    Tribal Management.--The Committee recommends $2,348,000 for 
Indian health professions the same as the fiscal year 1996 
enacted level.
    Direct Operations.--The Committee recommends $50,260,000 
for direct operations including an increase of $1,000,000 for 
personnel related costs above the fiscal year 1996 enacted 
level.
    Self-Governance.--The Committee recommends $9,104,000 for 
self-governance the same as the fiscal year 1996 enacted level.
    While the Committee strongly supports the self-governance 
program and expects the IHS to expand the program to 
accommodate additional compacts with tribes in fiscal year 
1997, the Committee believes that new self-governance compacts 
should not be negotiated at the expense of program funding for 
other tribes. To the extent that funds cannot be made available 
for a new compact without negatively affecting services 
available to other tribes, IHS should not enter into the 
compact.
    Contract Support Costs.--The Committee recommends 
$153,100,000 for contract support including an increase of 
$60,000 above the fiscal year 1996 enacted level.
    The Committee has provided $7,500,000 for the Indian Self 
Determination Fund. These funds are to be used for new and 
expanded contracts.
    The Committee again expects IHS to work with the tribes, 
the BIA and the Inspector General at the Department of the 
Interior to contain the cost escalation in contract support 
costs. In today's constrained budget climate the contract 
support cost activity must receive its fair share of 
administrative streamlining and procurement reform funding 
reductions as well as the lower inflation allowances provided 
for all other programs within IHS.
    The Committee has provided bill language to allow funds 
``to remain available until expended.'' for Medicare and 
Medicaid payments. This will increase the flexibility of the 
IHS in managing its funds.

                        indian health facilities

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................    $238,958,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     275,251,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     227,701,000
Comparison:.............................................
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     -11,257,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -47,550,000

    The need for new Indian health care facilities has not been 
fully quantified but it is safe to say that many billions of 
dollars would be required to renovate existing facilities and 
construct all the needed new hospitals and clinics. Safe and 
sanitary water and sewer systems for existing homes and solid 
waste disposal needs currently are estimated to amount to over 
$600 million for those projects that are considered to be 
economically feasible.
    The amount recommended by the Committee as compared to the 
1996 enacted level by activity is shown on the following table:




    The Committee recommends $227,701,000 for Indian health 
facilities, a decrease of $11,257,000 below the fiscal year 
1996 appropriation and a decrease of $47,550,000 below the 
budget estimate.
    Maintenance and Improvement.--The Committee recommends 
$38,334,000 for maintenance and improvement the same as the 
fiscal year 1996 enacted level.
    New and Replacement Hospitals.--Given current budgetary 
constraints and the need to move towards a balanced budget the 
Committee has not provided any resources for constructing new 
facilities.
    Sanitation Facilities.--The Committee recommends 
$84,889,000 for sanitation facilities the same as the fiscal 
year 1996 enacted level.
    The Committee has not specified the amount of sanitation 
funds to be used for new and renovated homes or for addressing 
the backlog of needs for existing homes. Funds for sanitation 
facilities for new and renovated homes should be limited to 
projects serving the Bureau of Indian Affairs housing 
improvement program, homes new to the site during the funding 
year or the previous fiscal year and existing homes renovated 
during the funding year or the previous fiscal year. A 
renovation should include at least a bedroom or bathroom 
addition. All other needs should be included in the sanitation 
deficiency system and addressed in priority order. IHS project 
funds should not be used to provide sanitation facilities for 
new homes funded by the housing program of the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development.
    Equipment.--The Committee recommends $12,975,000 for 
equipment the same as the fiscal year 1996 enacted level.
    Facilities and Environmental Health Support.--The Committee 
recommends $91,021,000 for facilities and environmental health 
support including an increase of $1,040,000 for personnel 
related costs above the fiscal year 1996 enacted level.
    Contract Support Costs.--The Committee recommends $482,000 
for contract support costs, which is equal to the budget 
request and to the 1996 level.
    The Committee again recommends that funds provided for the 
facilities program should be distributed in accordance with a 
methodology that addresses the fluctuating annual workload and 
maintains parity among IHS areas and the tribes as the workload 
shifts.
    Bill language is included under Administrative Provisions 
allowing IHS to accept reimbursements from any source, 
including tribal contractors and compactors, for goods, 
services, and technical assistance. This language covers both 
Indian health services and Indian health facilities.

                        DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

              Office of Elementary and Secondary Education

                            indian education

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $52,500,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      81,500,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      52,500,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -29,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $52,500,000, 
the same as the 1996 enacted level. The Committee directs that 
funds provided for Indian education are for grants to local 
educational agencies only. The office of Indian education is 
directed to keep the costs of administering this grant program 
to a minimum.

                         OTHER RELATED AGENCIES

              Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian Relocation

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $20,345,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      25,000,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      20,345,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -4,655,000

    The dispute between the Hopi and Navajo tribes is 
centuries-old. The Hopi were the original occupants of the land 
with their origin tracking back to the Anasazi race whose 
presence is recorded back to 1150 A.D. Later in the 16th 
century the Navajo tribe began settling in this area. The 
continuous occupation of this land by the Navajo led to the 
isolation of the Hopi Reservation as an island within the area 
occupied by the Navajo. In 1882, President Arthur issued an 
Executive Order which granted the Hopi a 2.5 million acre 
reservation to be occupied by the Hopi and such other Indians 
as the Secretary of the Interior saw fit to resettle there. 
Intertribal problems arose between the larger Navajo tribe and 
the smaller Hopi tribe revolving around the question of the 
ownership of the land as well as cultural differences between 
the two tribes. Efforts to resolve these conflicts were not 
successful and led Congress to pass legislation in 1958 which 
authorized a lawsuit to determine ownership of the land. When 
attempts at mediation of the dispute as specified in an Act 
passed in 1974 failed, the district court in Arizona 
partitioned the Joint Use Area equally between the Navajo and 
Hopi tribes under a decree that has required the relocation of 
members of both tribes. Most of those to be relocated are 
Navajo living on the Hopi Partitioned Land.
    At this time approximately 692 households remain be 
relocated, of which 92 are full-time residents on the Hopi 
Partitioned Land. A total of 2,540 Navajo families had been 
relocated from the Hopi Partitioned lands, 1,591 to on-
reservation homesites and 960 to off-reservation homesites. Six 
hundred seventy-nine Navajo families remain to be relocated. To 
date a total of 2,629 families have been relocated.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $20,345,000 
for salaries and expenses of the Office of Navajo and Hopi 
Relocation, which is $4,655,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee expects the Office to stop further 
development on the New Lands beyond that required to meet 
expressed interest by relocatees in relocation to that area.
    The Committee continues to be concerned by the slow pace of 
relocation and the extraordinarily large number of appeals 
which are adding to the total number of families eligible for 
relocation. The Office should continue to work with the 
legislative committees of jurisdiction to provide for the 
orderly termination of the relocation program over the next few 
years and the transfer of the New lands to the Navajo Nation.

    Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture and Arts 
                              Development

                        payment to the institute

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $5,500,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       5,500,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       5,500,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee has provided an appropriation of $5,500,000 
for the Institute of American Indian and Alaska Native Culture 
and Arts Development, with the understanding that this will be 
the last year Federal funding will be provided.

                        Smithsonian Institution

    The Smithsonian Institution is unique in the Federal 
establishment. Established by the Congress in 1846 to carry out 
the trust included in James Smithson's will, it has been 
engaged for nearly 150 years in the ``increase and diffusion of 
knowledge among men'' in accordance with the donor's 
instructions. For some years, it utilized only the funds made 
available by the trust. Then, before the turn of the century, 
it began to receive Federal appropriations to conduct some of 
its activities. With the expenditure of both private and 
Federal funds over the years, it has grown into one of the 
world's great scientific, cultural, and intellectual 
organizations. It operates magnificent museums, outstanding art 
galleries, and important research centers. Its collections are 
among the best in the world. Its traveling exhibits bring 
beauty and information throughout the country.
    It attracted approximately 28,000,000 visitors in 1994 to 
its museums, galleries, and zoological park. Additional 
millions also view Smithsonian traveling exhibitions, which 
appear across the United States and abroad, and the annual 
Folklife Festival. As custodian of the National Collections, 
the Smithsonian is responsible for more than 100 million art 
objects, natural history specimens, and artifacts. These 
collections are displayed for the enjoyment and education of 
visitors and are available for research by the staff of the 
Institution and by hundreds of visiting students, scientists, 
and historians each year. Other significant study efforts draw 
their data and results directly from terrestrial, marine, and 
astrophysical observations at various Smithsonian 
installations.
    The Smithsonian complex presently consists of 15 exhibition 
buildings in Washington, D.C. and New York City in the fields 
of science, history, technology and art; a zoological park and 
an animal conservation and research center at Front Royal, 
Virginia; the Anacostia Museum, which performs research and 
exhibit activities in the District of Columbia; a preservation, 
storage and air and spacecraft display facility in Suitland, 
Maryland; two natural preserves in Panama and on the Chesapeake 
Bay; an oceanographic research facility in Fort Pierce, 
Florida; astrophysical stations in Cambridge, Massachusetts and 
Mt. Hopkins, Arizona, and elsewhere; and supporting 
administrative, laboratory, and storage areas.

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................    $311,188,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     328,716,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................     317,188,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      +6,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -11,528,000

    The amount recommended by the Committee for fiscal year 
1997, compared with the 1996 enacted level by activity, is 
shown in the following table:




    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $317,188,000 
for salaries and expenses, a reduction of $11,528,000 below the 
budget request and an increase of $6,000,000 above the current 
fiscal year. The change to the 1996 level includes an increase 
of $9,000,000 for inflation and other fixed cost requirements, 
which is offset partially by a decrease of $3,000,000 in one-
time costs for employee separation costs in 1996. An additional 
$8,000,000 was included specifically for fiscal year 1997 
uncontrollables including $5,025,000 for mandatory pay 
increases, $2,000,000 for utility increases and $975,000 for 
rental increases. The Committee transferred $2,000,000, 
contained in the current year's base funding for the one-time 
buyout costs, to the Repair and Restoration Account for 
critical maintenance needs at the oldest museum buildings. The 
remaining $1,000,000 was left in the base for program increases 
within this amount, the Committee has agreed to an increase of 
$720,000 for the initial operation expenses of the 
Submillimeter Array telescope in Hilo, Hawaii and $213,000 for 
increased maintenance needs at the new East Court project, 
which is part of the National Museum of Natural History.
    In light of fiscal constraints, the Committee feels that it 
has provided a more than adequate operational increase for the 
Smithsonian. The Committee was dismayed at the Administration's 
budget request for an additional $18.2 million for fixed costs. 
This total contained additional amounts that did not reflect 
the true fixed costs in fiscal year 1997.
    No other agency funded in this bill requested fixed cost 
increases to make up for prior year absorption of fixed costs. 
The Committee felt that it was inappropriate for the 
Smithsonian to forward this request.

        Construction and Improvements, National Zoological Park

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $3,250,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       4,000,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       3,250,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................        -750,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,250,000, 
which represents level funding at the fiscal year 1996 amount. 
The Committee urges the Smithsonian to concentrate these funds 
on ongoing repairs, preventive maintenance and improvements of 
its existing facilities which include nearly 500,000 square 
feet of buildings located on 163 acres.

                  repair and restoration of buildings

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $33,954,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      38,000,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      39,954,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      +6,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      +1,954,000

    The Committee recommends $39,954,000 for Repair and 
Restoration of Buildings, an increase of $6,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 1996 level and $1,954,000 above the 
Administration's request.
    The Committee felt that this was one of the highest 
priorities of the Smithsonian. Testimony received from the 
Smithsonian indicates that the unfunded facility renewal 
requirements total approximately $250 million. As the 
Smithsonian continues to reevaluate its short and long term 
priorities for next year's budget submission, the Committee 
urges the Institution to continue to limit new planning and 
construction investments as well as limit new acquisitions and 
continue to place this initiative at the top of their priority 
list for additional funding.

                              construction

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $27,700,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      13,000,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       7,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................     -20,700,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -6,000,000

    The Committee recommends $7,000,000, a decrease of 
$6,000,000 below the Administration's request. Included in the 
amount is $3,000,000 for ongoing planning and design of the Air 
and Space Extension at Dulles Airport and $4,000,000 for the 
Alterations and Modification account which includes funds for 
minor construction and improvements. The Committee did not 
include the request of $4,000,000 for further planning and 
design of the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI) 
mall project.
    Over the last few years, the Committee has provided nearly 
$70,000,000 in planning, construction and operating increases 
for two brand new facilities for the NMAI including the New 
York Customs House and the Suitland cultural center. The 
Committee directed the Smithsonian, in the current year's 
report, to develop additional cost scenarios for the proposed 
mall museum including possible downsizing of the building and 
decreasing the amount of federal appropriation by raising 
additional private dollars. The Committee, while supportive of 
the NMAI, collection is concerned about the additional taxpayer 
dollars required to complete the currently designed mall 
museum. The third stage of this project will cost the taxpayers 
an additional $80,000,000 along with total operational 
increases of $40,000,000 annually to support all three 
facilities when complete.
    Considering the $250,000,000 backlog of critical 
maintenance needs on existing facilities, the Committee feels 
that it is not prudent to spend any additional taxpayers 
dollars at this particular time on this project. The Committee 
would not object to non-Federal dollars being used to complete 
the planning and design phase and strongly encourages the 
Smithsonian to rethink the existing design and/or consider 
raising additional non-federal construction dollars for the 
project.

                        National Gallery of Art

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $51,844,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      53,899,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      53,899,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      +2,055,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The National Gallery of Art is one of the world's great 
galleries. Its magnificent works of art are displayed for the 
benefit of millions of visitors from across this Nation and 
from other nations. The National Gallery of Art serves as an 
example of a successful cooperative endeavor between private 
individuals and institutions and the Federal Government. The 
many special exhibitions shown in the Gallery and then 
throughout the country bring great art treasures to Washington 
and the Nation.
    The Committee recommends $53,899,000 for salaries and 
expenses, which is equal to the budget request and an increase 
of $2,055,000 above the 1996 level.
    The comparisons of the recommendation and the 1996 enacted 
level by activity is shown in the following table:




    At the level recommended by the Committee the Gallery will 
be able to fund the most pressing of its fixed cost increases 
and ensure that security functions are not degraded.

            repair, restoration and renovation of buildings

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $6,442,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       5,942,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       5,942,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        -500,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends $5,942,000 for repair, restoration 
and renovation of buildings, which is equal to the budget 
request and a decrease of $500,000 below the 1996 level.

             John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts

    The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts is a 
living memorial to the late President Kennedy and the national 
center for the performing arts. The Center consists of over 1.5 
million square feet of usable floor space with visitation 
averaging 10,000 on a daily basis.

                       operations and maintenance

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $10,323,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      10,875,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      10,875,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        +552,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends $10,875,000 for operations and 
maintenance, which is equal to the budget request and $552,000 
above the fiscal year 1996 level. This amount covers the 
operation and maintenance of the Kennedy Center building, 
structures, and surrounding grounds. Activities include 
maintenance, security, visitor information, interpretation, 
janitorial services, and short-term repair and improvement of 
the physical plant.
    The Committee commends the Kennedy Center leadership for 
its work this past year to make efficiencies in the operations 
of the Center. Its commitment to thoughtful consolidation and 
reorganization of facility and capital repair functions in 
order to concentrate on common area maintenance, improve 
coordination of overall building operations, and maximize the 
effectiveness of repair projects is to be commended.
    The Committee further notes the Center's efforts to develop 
performance standards and operational goals and objectives to 
ensure that the taxpayers are receiving maximum benefits for 
their dollars is something other federal agencies, particularly 
other cultural institutions should emulate.

                              construction

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $8,983,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       9,000,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       9,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................         +17,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Committee recommends $9,000,000, the budget request and 
an increase of $17,000 above the current fiscal year. These 
funds should be used for exterior restoration, major building 
system projects related to plumbing and electrical systems, 
urgent repair and replacement projects and interior and theater 
access projects for persons with disabilities

            Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $5,840,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       5,840,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       5,840,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars is a 
unique institution with a special mission to serve as a living 
memorial to the late Woodrow Wilson. The Center performs this 
mandate through its role as an international institute for 
advanced study as well as a facilitator for discussions among 
scholars, public officials, journalists and business leaders 
from across the country on major long-term issues facing 
America and the world.
    The Committee recommends $5,840,000, the same as the budget 
request and the current year allocation. The Committee is aware 
of the fact that the Center has received a Memorandum of 
Agreement and lease from the General Services Administration 
for the Center's occupancy of approximately 80,000 square feet 
in the Ronald Reagan Building and International Trade Center. 
This guarantees a 30 year lease at no cost to the Woodrow 
Wilson Center.
    The Committee has had serious reservations about this move 
from the beginning because of the significant high costs to the 
taxpayers for rent, additional building services and new 
furnishings. However, in light of this new agreement with GSA 
for no cost rent, the Committee agrees to allow the Center to 
make this move with some conditions. The Committee directs that 
no federal funds may be used to purchase new furnishings. The 
Committee continues to impress upon the Center the seriousness 
of the Nation's budgetary problems and the need for economies. 
Accordingly, the Center is encouraged in the strongest terms to 
continue to devote its federal funds only to essential core 
activities.
    In an effort to ensure that scarce resources are used 
wisely and in furtherance of its scholarly mission, the Center 
is directed to contract with the National Academy of Public 
Administration for a comprehensive review of the Center's 
mission, staffing policy, organizational structure and 
management. Up to $150,000 may be used for this purpose.
    The Committee expects the Center to conduct symposia on 
Franklin Delano Roosevelt History Month.

           NATIONAL FOUNDATION ON THE ARTS AND THE HUMANITIES

                    National Endowment for the Arts

                       grants and administration

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $82,259,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     115,000,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      82,734,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        +475,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -32,266,000

    The amount recommended by the Committee as compared to the 
1996 enacted level by activity is shown on the following table:




    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $82,734,000 
for grants and administration. This appropriation is consistent 
with the agreement reached on the floor of the House during 
debate over the fiscal year 1996 Interior appropriation bill in 
terms of the proposed reauthorization by the House legislative 
committee of jurisdiction to phase out Federal funding for the 
National Endowment for the Arts over a two year period. The 
Committee has provided bill language to allow funds ``to remain 
available until expended.'' This will increase the flexibility 
of the National Endowment for the Arts in managing its funds.-

                            matching grants

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $17,235,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      21,000,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      16,760,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        -475,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -4,240,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $16,760,000 
for matching grants.

                 National Endowment for the Humanities

                       grants and administration

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $94,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     118,250,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      92,994,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      -1,006,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................     -25,256,000

    The amount recommended by the Committee as compared to the 
1996 enacted level by activity is shown on the following table:



    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $92,994,000 
for grants and administration. This appropriation is consistent 
with the agreement reached on the floor of the House during 
debate over the fiscal year 1996 Interior appropriation bill in 
terms of the proposed reauthorization by the House legislative 
committee of jurisdiction to phase out Federal funding for the 
National Endowment for the Humanities over a three year period. 
The Committee has provided bill language to allow funds ``to 
remain available until expended.'' This will increase the 
flexibility of the National Endowment for the Humanities in 
managing its funds.

                            matching grants

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $16,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      17,750,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      11,500,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      -4,500,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -6,250,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $11,500,000 
for matching grants.

                      Institute of Museum Services

                       grants and administration

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $21,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      23,000,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      21,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -2,000,000

    The Institute for Museum Services provides operating 
support, conservation support and professional services to 
assist museums. General Operating support awards assist museums 
with essential operating expenditures.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $21,000,000 
for the Institute of Museum Services. The Committee has 
provided bill language to allow funds ``to remain available 
until expended.'' This will increase the flexibility of the 
Institute of Museum Services in managing its funds. The amount 
recommended by the Committee as compared to the 1996 enacted 
level by activity is shown in the following table:



                        Commission of Fine Arts

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................        $834,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................         867,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................         867,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................         +33,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Commission of Fine Arts was established in 1910 to meet 
the need for a permanent body to advise the government on 
matters pertaining to the arts, and particularly, to guide the 
architectural development of Washington. Over the years the 
Commission's scope has been expanded to include advice on areas 
such as plans for parks, public buildings, location of national 
monuments and development of public squares. As a result, the 
Commission annually reviews approximately 500 projects. In 
fiscal year 1988 the Commission was given responsibility for 
the National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program.
    The Committee recommends $867,000 for salaries and expenses 
of the Commission of Fine Arts, which is equal to the budget 
request and an increase of $33,000 above the 1996 level.

               national capital arts and cultural affairs

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $6,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       6,733,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       6,000,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................        -733,000

    The National Capital Arts and Cultural Affairs program was 
established in Public Law 99-190 to support artistic and 
cultural programs in the Nation's Capital. This program was 
established by Congress in recognition of the fact that major 
arts institutions in the District of Columbia, unlike their 
counterparts in other cities, have little access to non-Federal 
public funding, particularly for general operating support 
purposes. But in order to assure that public funding does not 
displace the role of private sector support, no grant from this 
program may exceed 25 percent of an institution's annual income 
budget. For fiscal year 1997, the Committee recommends 
$6,000,000, which is $733,000 below the budget request and 
equal to the 1996 level.

               Advisory Council on Historic Preservation

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $2,500,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       2,500,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       2,500,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................................
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 established 
the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation. Its mandate is 
to further the national policy of preserving historic and 
cultural resources for the benefit of present and future 
generations. The Council advises the President and Congress on 
preservation matters and provides consultation on historic 
properties threatened by Federal action. The Committee 
recommends that the Advisory Council aggressively pursue 
private funding to support the council's technical development 
and training activities.
    The Committee recommends $2,500,000 to fund the Council at 
the fiscal year 1996 level. The Committee will recommend 
adjustments to this level depending on the authorizing 
committee action.

                  National Capital Planning Commission

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................      $5,090,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       5,885,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................       5,390,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................        +300,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................        -495,000

    The National Capital Planning Act of 1952 designated the 
National Capital Planning Commission as the central planning 
agency for the Federal government in the National Capital 
Region. The three major functions of the Commission are to 
prepare and adopt the federal elements of the National Capital 
Comprehensive Plan, prepare an annual report on a five-year 
projection of the Federal Capital Improvement Program, and 
review plans and proposals submitted to the Commission.
    To support this mission, the Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $5,390,000 for salaries and expenses of the 
National Capital Planning Commission, a decrease of $495,000 
below the budget request and an increase of $300,000 above the 
1996 level. The recommended increase covers uncontrollable rent 
and salary increases. The Committee is pleased with the 
successful display of the Monumental Core plan, and with the 
Commission's success at taking on the remaining activities of 
the Pennsylvania Avenue Development Corporation Plan.

             Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial Commission

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................        $147,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................         125,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................         125,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................         -22,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................................

    The Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial Commission, in 
conjunction with the National Park Service in the Department of 
the Interior, is responsible for having plans prepared for 
completion of a suitable memorial to President Franklin Delano 
Roosevelt. The Committee recommends $125,000 for salaries and 
expenses of the Commission. The Committee looks forward to the 
successful completion of the Memorial during fiscal year 1997 
and anticipates that the funds provided are sufficient to cover 
all close out costs needed by the Commission as it terminates 
itself after completing the Memorial dedication during fiscal 
year 1997.

                United States Holocaust Memorial Council

                       holocaust memorial council

Appropriation enacted, 1996.............................     $28,707,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      31,262,000
Recommended, 1997.......................................      29,707,000
Comparison:
    Appropriation, 1996.................................      +1,000,000
    Budget estimate, 1997...............................      -1,555,000

    In 1980 Congress passed legislation creating a 65 member 
Holocaust Memorial Council with the mandate to create and 
oversee a living memorial/museum to victims of holocausts. The 
museum opened in April 1993. Construction costs for the museum 
have come solely from donated funds being raised by the U.S. 
Holocaust Memorial Museum Campaign and appropriated funds have 
been used for planning and development of programmatic 
components, overall administrative support and annual 
commemorative observances. Since the opening of the museum, 
appropriated funds have been provided to pay for the ongoing 
operating costs of the museum as authorized by Public Law 102-
529.
    The Committee has provided $29,707,000 for the operations 
of the Holocaust Memorial Museum, a decrease of $1,555,000 
below the request and an increase of $1,000,000 above the 
current fiscal year. This funding level should in no way be 
construed as lessening the Committee's strong commitment for 
the Museum, in fact, the Holocaust Memorial Museum has received 
a 35% increase in operating costs since the opening in 1993. 
Last year, the Museum was the only agency in the entire 
Interior Appropriations bill which received the 
Administration's budget request, a $2,000,000 increase over the 
previous fiscal year.
    The Committee has provided specific increases as follows: 
$391,000 for mandatory pay increase, $52,000 for utilities, 
$26,000 for rental costs, $110,800 for security contracts, 
$65,000 for building maintenance contracts, and $353,983 for 
six security guards to operate the new Magnetometer security 
machines. The Committee has, over the last several years, 
provided generous increases in the levels of support for Museum 
operations. These costs should have leveled off now that the 
Museum has had three years of operating experiences and future 
budget requests should not include continued increases for 
routine Museum operations.
    Most of the increases over the past four years were an 
attempt to determine, through practice, what the actual costs 
to operate a facility of this type accurately are. A good 
portion of the increase was directed toward enhancements in 
security and building repairs. Although many of these items 
were in fact one time expenditures, the Committee agreed to 
keep the costs in the base funding to avoid accumulating a 
maintenance backlog.
    The Holocaust Memorial Council has testified before this 
Committee that it is committed to its status as a public-
private partnership. The Committee applauds its efforts to 
raise private dollars to date and encourages the Council to 
continue to do so including restricted funds for programs and 
unrestricted and endowment funds. These private funds should 
offset any increased operational or programmatic requirements.
    The Committee expects the Museum to follow closely the 
existing reprogramming guidelines and seek approval from both 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations prior to any 
realignment of funds.
    The Committee directs the Chairman of the United States 
Holocaust Memorial Council to prepare and submit to the 
Congress an annual report on the Council's efforts to (a) 
protect the integrity of the Holocaust history, (b) sustain the 
memory of the victims of the Holocaust, and (c) apply the 
lessons of the Holocaust to other acts of genocide and crimes 
against humanity, to include cases of historical revisionism.

                     TITLE III--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The Committee applauds the Departments of the Interior and 
Energy on their efforts to enhance educational and career 
opportunities for minority students in the areas of science and 
technology. The Committee strongly encourages the Departments 
to include participation by Hispanic-Serving Institutions in 
any current or future plans to increase its predesignated or 
targeted research, development, and education funds.
    Committee recommends continuing several provisions carried 
in previous bills as follows:
    Section 301 provides for public availability of information 
on consulting services contracts.
    Section 302 limits non-competitive leasing of oil and 
natural gas on the Shawnee National Forest, Illinois.
    Section 303 prohibits activities to promote public support 
or opposition to legislative proposals.
    Section 304 provides for annual appropriations unless 
expressly provided otherwise in this Act.
    Section 305 limits the use of personal cooks, chauffeurs or 
servants.
    Section 306 limits assessments against programs without 
Committee approval.
    Section 307 contains Buy American procedures and 
requirements.
    Section 308 limits the sale of giant sequoia trees by the 
Forest Service.
    Section 309 prohibits the use of funds by the National Park 
Service to enter into a contract requiring the removal of the 
underground lunchroom at Carlsbad Caverns NP.
    Section 310 allows the Secretary to determine the use of 
certain construction funds after consultation with tribes.
    Section 311 provides that quarterly payments to tribes may 
be made on the first business day following the first day of a 
fiscal year.
    Section 312 provides that no funds can be used for 
Americorps unless it is funded in the VA, HUD and Independent 
Agencies fiscal year 1997 appropriations, and make use of such 
funds subject to reprogramming.
    Section 313 continues a limitation of funding relating to a 
pedestrian bridge between New Jersey and Ellis Island.
    Section 314 continues a limitation on accepting and 
processing applications for patents and on the patenting of 
Federal lands; permits processing of grandfathered 
applications; and permits third-party contractors to process 
grandfathered applications.
    Section 315 provides that no funds can be used for the 
purposes of acquiring lands in the counties of Lawrence, 
Monroe, or Washington, Ohio, for the Wayne National Forest
    Section 316 limits grants to individuals, seasonal support, 
and sub-grants, except grants to State, regional and local arts 
agencies, that are awarded by the National Endowment for the 
Arts.
    Section 317 provides that Forest Service approval of 
alternative site 2 on December 6, 1993 is consistent with, and 
permissible under, the terms of Public Law 100-696.
    Section 318 continues a limitation on issuance of a final 
rulemaking on jurisdiction, management and control over 
navigable waters in the State of Alaska with respect to 
subsistence fishing.
    Section 319 keeps in place only the regulations and interim 
rules in effect prior to September 8, 1995 (36 CFR 223.48, 36 
CFR 223.87, 36 CFR 223 Subpart D, 36 CFR 223 Subpart F, and 36 
CFR 261.1) governing the export of State and federal timber in 
the western United States. This language is retained so that 
the Administration, Congress and affected parties can have more 
time to address policy issues with respect to Public Law 101-
382, the Forest Resources Conservation and Shortage Relief Act 
of 1990. The language prohibits the Secretary of Agriculture or 
the Secretary of the Interior from reviewing or making 
modification to existing sourcing areas. The language prohibits 
either Secretary from enforcing or implementing regulations 
promulgated on September 8, 1995 at 36 CFR Part 223. The bill 
language also directs the Secretary of Commerce to continue the 
100 percent ban on the export of logs that originate from 
Washington State-owned public lands.
    Section 320 extends for one year the Recreational Fee 
Demonstration program established as section 315 in the 
Department of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations 
Act of 1996.

                              Rescissions

    Pursuant to clause 1(b), rule X of the House of 
Representatives, the following table is submitted describing 
the rescissions recommended in the accompanying bill:

                   RESCISSION RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL

        Department and activity       Amounts recommended for rescission
Department of the Interior: Land and Water Conservation 
    Fund (contract authority)...........................     $30,000,000
Department of Energy, Alternative Fuels Production......       2,500,000

                           Transfer of Funds

    Pursuant to clause 1(b), rule X of the House of 
Representatives, the following table is submitted describing 
the transfer of funds provided in the accompanying bill.
    The table shows the appropriations affected by such 
transfers.

                                 APPROPRIATION TRANSFERS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL                                
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Account from which transfer                    
  Account to which transfer is to be made          Amount               is to be made                Amount     
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Energy, Alternative Fuels             $1,500,000  General Fund of the Treasury.         $1,500,000
 Production.                                                                                                    
Department of Energy, Strategic Petroleum          220,000,000  Treasury, SPR Fund...........        220,000,000
 Reserve.                                                                                                       
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 Changes in Application of Existing Law

    Pursuant to clause 3, rule XXI of the rules of the House of 
Representatives, the following statements are submitted 
describing the effect of provisions in the accompanying bill 
which directly or indirectly change the application of existing 
law. In most instances these provisions have been included in 
prior appropriations Acts.
    The bill provides that certain appropriations items remain 
available until expended or extends the availability of funds 
beyond the fiscal year where programs or projects are 
continuing in nature under the provisions of authorizing 
legislation but for which that legislation does not 
specifically authorize such extended availability. Most of 
these items have been carried in previous appropriations Acts. 
This authority tends to result in savings by preventing the 
practice of committing funds at the end of the fiscal year.
    The bill includes, in certain instances, limitations on the 
obligation of funds for particular functions or programs. These 
limitations include restrictions on the obligation of funds for 
administrative expenses, travel expenses, the use of 
consultants, and programmatic areas within the overall 
jurisdiction of a particular agency.
    The Committee has included limitations for official 
entertainment or reception and representation expenses for 
selected agencies in the bill.
    Language is included in the various parts of the bill to 
continue ongoing activities of those Federal agencies which 
require annual authorization or additional legislation which to 
date has not been enacted.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Management of lands and resources, prohibiting the destruction 
of healthy, unadopted, wild horses and burros.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
management of lands and resources, permitting the collection of 
fees for processing applications and for certain public land 
uses, and permitting the use of these fees for program 
operations.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Central hazardous materials fund, providing that sums received 
from a party for remedial actions shall be credited to the 
account, and defining non-monetary payments.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Service charges, deposits, and forfeitures, to allow use of 
funds on any damaged public lands.
    Language is included under Bureau of Land Management, 
Administrative provisions, providing for cost-sharing 
arrangements for printing services.
    Language is included under United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service, Resource management, allowing for the maintenance of 
the herd of long-horned cattle on the Wichita Mountains 
Wildlife Refuge. Without this language, the long-horned cattle 
would have to be removed from the refuge. Language is also 
included providing for a Youth Conservation Corps.
    Language is included under United States Fish and Wildlife 
Service, Administrative provisions, providing for repair of 
damage to public roads; options for the purchase of land not to 
exceed $1; installation of certain recreation facilities; the 
maintenance and improvement of aquaria; the acceptance of 
donated aircraft; cost-shared arrangements for printing 
services. Language is also included limiting the use of funds 
for the purchase of lands.
    Language is included under National Park Service, Operation 
of the National Park System to allow road maintenance service 
to trucking permittees on a reimbursable basis. This provision 
has been included in annual appropriations Acts since 1954.
    Language is included under National Park Service, Operation 
of the National Park System, providing for a Youth Conservation 
Corps program.
    Language is included under National Park Service, 
Administrative provisions, preventing the implementation of an 
agreement for the redevelopment of the southern end of Ellis 
Island and limiting the use of funds to specified amounts for 
certain offices.
    Language is included under United States Geological Survey, 
Surveys, investigations and research, providing for two-year 
availability of funds for biological research and for the 
operations of cooperative research units; permitting the 
purchase of passenger motor vehicles; prohibiting the conduct 
of new surveys on private property; and providing for a review 
every 5 years by the National Academy of Sciences on biological 
research activities; and requiring cost sharing cooperative 
topographic mapping activities.
    Language is included under United States Geological Survey, 
Administrative provisions, providing for the reimbursement to 
the GSA for security guard services; for contracting for 
topographic maps and geophysical or other surveys; and for the 
use of contracts, grants, and cooperative agreements.
    Language is included under Minerals Management Service, 
Royalty and offshore minerals management, providing for the use 
of certain receipts for a technical information system; 
providing for reasonable expenses related to volunteer beach 
and marine clean-up activities; providing for refunds for 
overpayments on Indian allottee leases and providing for 
collecting royalties and late payment interest on amounts 
received in settlements associated with Federal and Indian 
leases.
    Language is included under Office of Surface Mining 
Reclamation and Enforcement, Regulation and technology, to 
allow the use of performance bond forfeitures by the regulatory 
authority to conduct reclamation activities; the use of monies 
collected pursuant to assessment of civil penalties to reclaim 
lands affected by coal mining after August 3, 1977; and 
permitting payment to State and tribal personnel for travel and 
per diem expenses for training.
    Language is included under Office of Surface Mining 
Reclamation and Enforcement, Abandoned mine reclamation fund, 
which earmarks specific amounts in the account for emergency 
reclamation projects and which allows use of debt recovery to 
pay for debt collection. Language also is included permitting 
donations and providing for supplemental grants to States for 
remediating acid mine drainage.
    Language is included under Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
Operation of Indian programs, for advance payments to Indian 
schools and business enterprises. Language also is included to 
change the dates of payments for grants to schools under Public 
Law 100-297 and to permit local school boards to determine 
teacher compensation rates.
    Language is included under Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
Operation of Indian programs, allowing reprogramming of Self-
Governance funds, allowing changes to certain eligibility 
criteria by tribal governments, allowing the transfer of 
certain forestry funds, providing for an Indian self-
determination fund, prohibiting support of Alaska schools in 
1997; limiting the number of Bureau schools, and limiting the 
use of funds for any expanded grade levels in schools.
    Language is included under Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
Construction, providing that 6 percent of Federal Highway Trust 
Fund contract authority may be used for management costs, 
providing for the transfer of Navajo irrigation project funds 
to the Bureau of Reclamation, and providing Safety of Dams 
funds on a non-reimbursable basis.
    Language is included under Departmental Offices, Insular 
Affairs, Assistance to Territories, requiring audits of the 
financial transactions of the Territorial governments by the 
General Accounting Office, providing grant funding under 
certain terms of the Agreement of the Special Representatives 
on Future United States Financial Assistance for the Northern 
Mariana Islands, providing a grant to the Close-Up foundation, 
and allowing appropriations for disaster assistance to be used 
as non-Federal matching funds for hazard mitigation grants 
provided pursuant to other law.
    Language is included under Departmental Offices, 
Administrative provisions, prohibiting the use of working 
capital or consolidated working funds to augment certain 
offices, and allowing the sale of existing aircraft with 
proceeds used to offset the purchase price of replacement 
aircraft.
    Language is included under General provisions, Department 
of the Interior, to allow transfer of funds in certain 
emergency situations, requiring replacement with a supplemental 
appropriation request, and designating certain transferred 
funds as ``emergency requirements'' under the Balanced Budget 
and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985.
    Language is included under General provisions, Department 
of the Interior, to consolidate services and receive 
reimbursement for said services. Language also is included 
providing for uniform allowances.
    Language is included under General provisions, Department 
of the Interior, to allow for obligations in connection with 
contracts issued for services or rentals for periods not in 
excess of 12 months beginning at any time during the fiscal 
year.
    Language is included under General provisions, Department 
of the Interior, to provide for the transfer of funds among the 
various Departmental land acquisition accounts; to permit the 
transfer of funds for the Presidio upon establishment of a 
Presidio Trust; and prohibiting the use of funds for a 
rulemaking concerning certain rights-of-way.
    Language is included under General provisions, Department 
of the Interior, restricting various oil and gas preleasing, 
leasing, exploration and drilling activities within the Outer 
Continental Shelf in the Georges Bank-North Atlantic planning 
area, Mid-Atlantic and South Atlantic planning area, Eastern 
Gulf of Mexico planning area, North Aleutian Basin planning 
area, Northern, Southern and Central California planning areas, 
and Washington/Oregon planning area.
    Language is included under General provisions, Department 
of the Interior, establishing a pilot franchise fund; and 
requiring Committee approval prior to redesign of Pennsylvania 
Avenue in front of the White House.
    Language is included under General Provisions, Department 
of the Interior, limiting the use of funds by the Fish and 
Wildlife Service with respect to marbled murrelet critical 
habitat designations on private lands in California; and 
limiting the use of funds by the Bureau of Indian Affairs for 
taking lands into trust unless there is an agreement with State 
and local officials on the payment of taxes by retail 
establishments on said land.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Forest and 
rangeload research, permitting merger of funds from the old 
Forest research account into this account.
    Language is included under Forest Service, National Forest 
system, earmarking funds for obliteration of roads.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Wildland fire 
management, allowing the use of funds to repay advances from 
other accounts, and the merger of funds from other accounts.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Reconstruction 
and Construction, providing that funds may be granted to the 
Ohio State Highway Patrol as the federal share of the cost of 
constructing a new Supervisor's office for the Wayne National 
Forest and that the Forest Service may use their share of the 
facility without charge for the life of the building.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Land 
acquisition, requiring Committee approval prior to use of 
funds.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Acquisition of 
lands to complete exchanges, and Acquisition of lands for 
national forest special acts, to provide that revenues and 
funds deposited are made available for appropriation.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Range Betterment 
Fund, to provide that 6 percent of the funds may be used for 
administrative expenses.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Administrative 
provisions, limiting the availability of funds to change the 
boundaries of or abolish any region or to move or close any 
regional office. Language is also provided to allow for 
advances for firefighting and emergency rehabilitation of 
burned-over lands, to provide for the use of collected fire 
funds, and to provide that proceeds from the sale of aircraft 
may be used to purchase replacement aircraft.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Administrative 
provisions, to provide for a Youth Conservation Corps program.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Administrative 
provisions, allowing funds to be used through the Agency for 
International Development and the Foreign Agricultural Service 
for work in foreign countries, and to support forestry 
activities outside of the United States; and providing that 
money collected from States for fire suppression may be used 
for authorized programs.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Administrative 
provisions, to prohibit transfer of funds among appropriations 
without advance approval of the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations, and to prohibit transfer of funds to the 
working capital fund of the Department of Agriculture without 
approval of the Chief of the Forest Service.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Administrative 
provisions, providing for nonmonetary awards, and allowing 
payment for emergency work.
    Language is included under Forest Service, Administrative 
provisions, allowing reimbursement of certain pipeline rights-
of-way costs, allowing payments in emergency situations at 
regular rates of pay, limiting clearcutting in the Wayne 
National Forest, Ohio, prohibiting preparation of certain 
timber sales in the Shawnee National Forest, Illinois, 
permitting the transfer of certain funds to the State of 
Washington fish and wildlife department for planned projects, 
allowing technical assistance to rural communities, providing 
$1,000,000 for matching funds for the National Forest 
Foundation, and providing that funds shall be available for 
payment to counties within the Columbia River Gorge National 
Scenic Area pursuant to Public Law 99-663.
    Language is included under Department of Energy, Fossil 
energy research and development, which places a limitation on 
the field testing of nuclear explosives for the recovery of oil 
and gas.
    Language is included under Department of Energy, Naval 
Petroleum and oil shale reserves waiving sales requirements 
based on Strategic Petroleum Reserves oil purchases.
    Language is included under Department of Energy, Energy 
conservation, which provides for an allocation of grants to 
State and local programs.
    Language is included under Department of Energy, Strategic 
Petroleum Reserve, which provides for the sale of SPR oil and 
the use of proceeds for SPR operations and waiving the Budget 
Act.
    Language is included under Department of Energy, SPR 
petroleum account, which places an outlay ceiling on the 
account, and which waives minimum purchase requirements for 
operating Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1.
    Language is included under Administrative provisions, 
Department of Energy, limiting programs of price supports and 
loan guarantees to what is provided in appropriations Acts; 
providing for the transfer of funds to other agencies of the 
Government; providing for retention of revenues by the 
Secretary of Energy on certain projects; requiring certain 
contracts be submitted to Congress prior to implementation; 
prohibiting issuance of procurement documents without 
appropriations; and permitting the use of contributions and 
fees for cooperative projects.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, Indian 
health services, providing that contracts and grants may be 
performed in two fiscal years and for a Self-Determination 
Fund; and providing for use of collections under Title IV of 
the Indian Health Care Improvement Act.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, Indian 
health facilities, providing that funds may be used to purchase 
land, modular buildings and trailers.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, 
Administrative provisions, providing for payments for telephone 
service in private residences in the field, purchase of 
reprints, purchase and erection of portable buildings, and 
allowing deobligation and reobligation of funds applied to 
self-governance funding agreements.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, 
Administrative provisions, providing that health care may be 
extended to non-Indians at Indian Health Service facilities and 
providing for expenditure of funds transferred to IHS from the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, 
Administrative provisions, to prevent the Indian Health Service 
from billing Indians in order to collect from third-party 
payers until Congress has agreed to implement a specific 
policy.
    Language is included under Indian Health Service, 
Administrative provisions, allowing payment of expenses for 
meeting attendance, specifying that certain funds shall not be 
subject to certain travel limitations, prohibiting the 
expenditure of funds to implement new eligibility regulations, 
providing that funds be apportioned only in the appropriation 
structure in this Act, and prohibiting changing the 
appropriations structure without approval of the Appropriations 
Committees.
    Language is included under Office of Navajo and Hopi Indian 
Relocation, salaries and expenses, defining eligible 
relocatees; prohibiting movement of any single Navajo or Navajo 
family unless a new or replacement home is available; limiting 
relocatees to one new or replacement home; and establishing a 
priority for relocation of Navajos to those certified eligible 
who have selected and received homesites on the Navajo 
reservation or selected a replacement residence off the Navajo 
reservation.
    Language is included under Smithsonian Institution, 
Salaries and expenses, to allow for advance payments to 
independent contractors performing research services or 
participating in official Smithsonian presentations, and 
providing that funds may be used to support American overseas 
research centers.
    Language is included under Smithsonian Institution, 
Construction and improvements, National Zoological Park, and 
Repair and restoration of buildings, to construct facilities by 
contract or otherwise.
    Language is included under Smithsonian Institution, Repair 
and restoration of buildings, to permit the Smithsonian 
Institution to select contractors for certain purposes on the 
basis of contractor qualifications as well as price.
    Language is included under National Gallery of Art, 
Salaries and expenses, for payment in advance for membership in 
library, museum, and art associations or societies and for 
restoration and repair of works of art by contract without 
advertising.
    Language is included under National Gallery of Art, Repair, 
restoration and renovation of buildings, to perform work by 
contract or otherwise and to select contractors for certain 
purposes on the basis of contractor qualifications as well as 
price.
    Language is included under National Foundation on the Arts 
and the Humanities, Matching grants, to allow for the 
obligation of current and preceding fiscal years' funds of 
gifts, bequests, and devises of money for which equal amounts 
have not previously been appropriated.
    Language is included under Advisory Council on Historic 
Preservation, to restrict hiring anyone at Executive Level V or 
higher positions.
    Language is included under National Capital Planning 
Commission, salaries and expenses, to provide for a pay level 
at the rate of Executive Level IV for all appointed members.
    Title III--General provisions contains language carried in 
previous appropriations Acts, which limits the use of funds for 
the leasing of oil and natural gas by noncompetitive leasing 
within the boundaries of the Shawnee National Forest and 
prohibits use of funds to distribute literature either to 
promote or oppose legislative proposals on which Congressional 
action is incomplete.
    Language is included in Title III--General provisions to 
prohibit the use of funds to provide personal cooks, chauffeurs 
or other personal servants to any office or employee and to 
limit use of consulting services.
    Language is included in Title III--General provisions 
prohibiting assessments against programs funded in this bill 
and providing Buy American requirements.
    Language is included in Title III--General provisions 
prohibiting the sale of giant sequoia trees in a manner 
different from 1996.
    Language is included in Title III--General provisions 
prohibiting the use of funds by the National Park Service to 
enter into a concession contract requiring the removal of the 
underground lunchroom at Carlsbad Caverns NP.
    Language is included in Title III--General provisions 
regarding the use of excess funds from contracts with Indian 
tribes; allowing payments to tribes on the first business day 
of a fiscal quarter; limiting use of funds for the AmeriCorps 
program; and limiting use of funds relating to a bridge between 
New Jersey and Ellis Island.
    Language is included in Title III--General provisions 
continuing a limitation on accepting and processing 
applications for patents and on the patenting of Federal lands; 
permitting processing of grandfathered applications; and 
permitting third-party contractors to process grandfathered 
applications.
    Language is included in Title III--General provisions, 
limiting the use of funds for the Wayne National Forest.
    Language is included in Title III--General provisions, 
limiting grants to individuals, seasonal support, and sub-
grants, except for State, local, and regional groups, that are 
awarded by the National Endowment for the Arts.
    Language is included in Title III--General provisions, 
deeming Forest Service approval of a site for a telescope on 
Mount Graham consistent with the Arizona-Idaho Conservation 
Act; limiting the use of funds for issuing a final rulemaking 
on jurisdiction over subsistence fishing in Alaska; limiting 
the use of funds for enforcing certain timber policies; and 
extending for one year the pilot recreational fee demonstration 
for the land management agencies in this bill.

                  Appropriations Not Authorized by Law

    Pursuant to clause 3 of rule XXI of the House of 
Representatives, the following table lists the appropriations 
in the accompanying bill which, in whole or in part, are not 
authorized by law:
    Department of the Interior:
    Bureau of Land Management, Management of Lands and 
            Resources
        Bureau of Land Management, Construction and Access
        U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Resource Management
        National Park Service, National Recreation and 
        Preservation
    Department of Energy:
        Fossil Energy Research and Development
        Energy Conservation
        Economic Regulation
        Strategic Petroleum Reserve
        Energy Information Administration
        Other Related Agencies:
    National Foundation on the Arts and the Humanities (all 
            accounts)
    Advisory Council on Historic Preservation
    The Committee notes that authorizing legislation for many 
of these programs is in various stages of the legislative 
process and these authorizations are expected to be enacted 
into law later this year.

                  Compliance With Rule XIII--Clause 3

    In compliance with clause 3 of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):
    Section 315(f) under the heading ``Title III--General 
Provisions'' in section 101(c) of Public Law 104-134 is amended 
as follows:
    (f) The authority to collect fees under this section shall 
commence on October 1, 1995, and end on September 30, [1998] 
1999. Funds in accounts established shall remain available 
through September 30, [2001] 2002.

                    Five-Year Projection of Outlays

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the following table contains five-year projections 
associated with the budget authority provided in the 
accompanying bill:

                              [In millions]

Budget authority:                                                $12,176
Outlays:
    Fiscal year 1997....................................           8,085
    Fiscal year 1998....................................           3,014
    Fiscal year 1999....................................             708
    Fiscal year 2000....................................             189
    Fiscal year 2001 and future years...................              63

               Assistance to State and Local Governments

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(D) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the financial assistance to State and local 
governments is as follows:

                              [In millions]

New budget authority....................................            $931
Fiscal year 1997 outlays resulting therefrom............             418

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 2(l)(2)(b) of rule XI 
of the House of Representatives, the results of each roll call 
vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, together with 
the names of those voting for and those voting against, are 
printed below:

                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 2(l)(2)(b) of rule XI 
of the House of Representatives, the results of each roll call 
vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, together with 
the names of those voting for and those voting against, are 
printed below:

                             rollcall no. 1

    Date: June 12, 1996.
    Measure: Fiscal year 1997 Interior appropriations bill.
    Motion by: Mr. Yates.
    Description of Motion: To restrict funding for issuing 
permits for telecommunications facilities in National Parks, 
Refuges or Forests when the permit is required under the 
Telecommunications Act of 1996 unless the appropriate Cabinet 
Secretary determines, after pubic notice and comment, that the 
facility will not be detrimental to the area.
    Results: Rejected 22 to 23.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Bevill                          Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Chapman                         Mr. Bunn
Mr. Coleman                         Mr. Dickey
Mr. Foglietta                       Mr. Dicks
Mr. Forbes                          Mr. Hobson
Mr. Hefner                          Mr. Istook
Mr. Kingston                        Mr. Knollenberg
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Murtha                          Mr. Lewis
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Lightfoot
Ms. Pelosi                          Mr. Livingston
Mr. Regula                          Mr. Miller
Mr. Sabo                            Mr. Myers
Mr. Serrano                         Mr. Nethercutt
Mr. Skaggs                          Mr. Neumann
Mr. Stokes                          Mr. Packard
Mr. Thornton                        Mr. Parker
Mr. Torres                          Mr. Porter
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Rogers
Mr. Walsh                           Mr. Skeen
Mr. Wolf                            Mrs. Vucanovich
Mr. Yates                           Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Young

                             Rollcall No. 2

    Date: June 12, 1996.
    Measure: Fiscal year 1997 Interior appropriations bill.
    Motion by: Mr. Yates.
    Description of Motion: To limit the use of funds for 
implementing the salvage timber provisions in Public Law 104-
19.
    Results: Rejected 14 to 28.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Dixon                           Mr. Bevill
Mr. Durbin                          Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Fazio                           Mr. Bunn
Mr. Hefner                          Mr. Callahan
Mr. Hoyer                           Mr. DeLay
Ms. Kaptur                          Mr. Dickey
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Forbes
Ms. Pelosi                          Mr. Istook
Mr. Porter                          Mr. Kingston
Mr. Skaggs                          Mr. Knollenberg
Mr. Thornton                        Mr. Lewis
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Lightfoot
Mr. Walsh                           Mr. Livingston
Mr. Yates                           Mr. Miller
                                    Mr. Mollohan
                                    Mr. Murtha
                                    Mr. Nethercutt
                                    Mr. Packard
                                    Mr. Parker
                                    Mr. Regula
                                    Mr. Riggs
                                    Mr. Rogers
                                    Mr. Skeen
                                    Mr. Taylor
                                    Mrs. Vucanovich
                                    Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Wolf
                                    Mr. Young
                             rollcall no. 3
    Date: June 12, 1996.
    Measure: Fiscal year 1997 Interior appropriations bill.
    Motion by: Mr. Parker.
    Description of Motion: To amend the Committee report 
language on the Department of Energy codes and standards 
program.
    Results: Adopted 27 to 17.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Bonilla                         Mr. Bevill
Mr. Bunn                            Mr. Dixon
Mr. Callahan                        Mr. Durbin
Mr. DeLay                           Mr. Fazio
Mr. Dickey                          M. Hefner
Mr. Forbes                          Mr. Hoyer
Mr. Istook                          Ms. Kaptur
Mr. Kingston                        Mrs. Lowey
Mr. Knollenberg                     Mr. Mollohan
Mr. Lewis                           Mr. Murtha
Mr. Lightfoot                       Mr. Obey
Mr. Livingston                      Ms. Pelosi
Mr. Miller                          Mr. Porter
Mr. Myers                           Mr. Skaggs
Mr. Nethercutt                      Mr. Visclosky
Mr. Packard                         Mr. Walsh
Mr. Parker                          Mr. Yates
Mr. Regula
Mr. Riggs
Mr. Rogers
Mr. Skeen
Mr. Taylor
Mr. Thornton
Mrs. Vucanovich
Mr. Wicker
Mr. Wolf
Mr. Young
                             rollcall No. 4
    Date: June 12, 1996.
    Measure: Fiscal year 1997 Interior appropriations bill.
    Motion by: Mr. Istook.
    Description of Motion: To limit the transfer of lands into 
trust for Indians unless there is agreement with State and 
local officials on the payment of State and local taxes by 
retail establishments on such lands.
    Results: Adopted 19 to 15.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Bonilla                         Mr. Bevill
Mr. Bunn                            Mr. Callahan
Mr. Dickey                          Mr. Dicks
Mr. Forbes                          Mr. Hoyer
Mr. Istook                          Mr. Lewis
Mr. Kingston                        Mr. Livingston
Mr. Knollenberg                     Mr. Packard
Mr. Lightfoot                       Ms. Pelosi
Mr. Miller                          Mr. Regula
Mr. Nethercutt                      Mr. Riggs
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Rogers
Mr. Parker                          Mr. Skaggs
Mr. Porter                          Mr. Stokes
Mr. Skeen                           Mr. Thornton
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Yates
Mrs. Vucanovich
Mr. Walsh
Mr. Wicker
Mr. Wolf

                             rollcall no. 5

    Date: June 12, 1996.
    Measure: Fiscal year 1997 Interior appropriations bill.
    Motion by: Mr. Riggs as amended by Mr. Regula.
    Description of Motion: To limit the use of funds for 
continuing or enforcing the critical habitat designation for 
the marbled murrelet on private lands in California, excluding 
the Headwaters Grove.
    Results: Adopted 22 to 18.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Bonnilla                        Mr. Bevill
Mr. Bunn                            Mr. Dicks
Mr. Callahan                        Mr. Forbes
Mr. DeLay                           Mr. Hoyer
Mr. Dickey                          Ms. Kaptur
Mr. Istook                          Mr. Livingston
Mr. Kingston                        Mrs. Lowey
Mr. Knollenberg                     Mr. Mollohan
Mr. Kolbe                           Mr. Murtha
Mr. Lewis                           Mr. Obey
Mr. Lightfoot                       Ms. Pelosi
Mr. Miller                          Mr. Porter
Mr. Nethercutt                      Mr. Skaggs
Mr. Packard                         Mr. Stokes
Mr. Parker                          Mr. Thornton
Mr. Regula                          Mr. Visclosky
Mr. Riggs                           Mr. Walsh
Mr. Rogers                          Mr. Yates
Mr. Skeen
Mrs. Vucanovich
Mr. Wicker
Mr. Wolf

                             rollcall no. 6

    Date: June 12, 1996.
    Measure: Fiscal year 1997 Interior appropriations bill.
    Motion by: Mr. Obey.
    Description of Motion: To increase funding for the 
operation of the National Park system.
    Results: Rejected 14 to 25.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Bevill                          Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Fazio                           Mr. Bunn
Mr. Hoyer                           Mr. Callahan
Ms. Kaptur                          Mr. Dickey
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Forbes
Mr. Mollohan                        Mr. Istook
Mr. Murtha                          Mr. Kingston
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Knollenberg
Ms. Pelosi                          Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Skaggs                          Mr. Lewis
Mr. Strokes                         Mr. Lightfoot
Mr. Thornton                        Mr. Livingston
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Miller
Mr. Yates                           Mr. Nethercutt
                                    Mr. Packard
                                    Mr. Parker
                                    Mr. Porter
                                    Mr. Regula
                                    Mr. Riggs
                                    Mr. Rogers
                                    Mr. Skeen
                                    Mrs. Vucanovich
                                    Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Wolf

                             Rollcall No. 7

    Date: June 12. 1996.
    Measure: Fiscal year 1997 Interior appropriations bill.
    Motion by: Mr. Obey.
    Description of motion: To increase funding for National 
Park Service construction.
    Results: Rejected 13 to 25.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Bevill                          Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Fazio                           Mr. Bunn
Mr. Hoyer                           Mr. Callahan
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Dickey
Mr. Mollohan                        Mr. Forbes
Mr. Murtha                          Mr. Istook
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Kingston
Ms. Pelosi                          Mr. Knollenberg
Mr. Skaggs                          Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Stokes                          Mr. Lewis
Mr. Thornton                        Mr. Lightfoot
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Livingston
Mr. Yates                           Mr. Miller
                                    Mr. Nethercutt
                                    Mr. Packard
                                    Mr. Parker
                                    Mr. Porter
                                    Mr. Regula
                                    Mr. Riggs
                                    Mr. Rogers
                                    Mr. Skeen
                                    Mrs. Vucanovich
                                    Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Wolf

                             Rollcall No. 8

    Date: June 12, 1996.
    Measure: Fiscal year 1997 Interior appropriations bill.
    Motion by: Mr. Obey.
    Description of motion: To increase funding for National 
Park Service land acquisition; Forest Service, State and 
private forestry; Forest Service, National Forest system; and 
Department of Energy, energy conservation.
    Results: Rejected 13 to 25.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Bevill                          Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Fazio                           Mr. Bunn
Mr. Hoyer                           Mr. Callahan
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Dickey
Mr. Mollohan                        Mr. Forbes
Mr. Murtha                          Mr. Istook
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Kingston
Ms. Pelosi                          Mr. Knollenberg
Mr. Skaggs                          Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Stokes                          Mr. Lewis
Mr. Thornton                        Mr. Lightfoot
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Livingston
Mr. Yates                           Mr. Miller
                                    Mr. Nethercutt
                                    Mr. Packard
                                    Mr. Parker
                                    Mr. Porter
                                    Mr. Regula
                                    Mr. Riggs
                                    Mr. Rogers
                                    Mr. Skeen
                                    Mrs. Vucanovich
                                    Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Wolf


                                    
  SUPPLEMENTAL VIEWS REGARDING THE DOE CODES AND STANDARDS PROGRAM OF 
              HON. JAMES T. WALSH AND HON. DAVID E. SKAGGS

    We take strong exception to the language of the committee 
report which would encumber the Department of Energy with novel 
and impractical requirements for setting new energy efficiency 
standards for appliances and lighting equipment. Appliance 
efficiency standards save consumers billions of dollars, 
protect the environment, and shield manufactures from the cost 
and complexity of different efficiency standards that will 
otherwise be imposed by many individual States. While the 
language of the bill contains no extension of the moratorium on 
standard-setting that was enacted for FY 1996, the language of 
the report throws up such impediments to standard-setting as to 
create a de facto moratorium for fiscal year 1997. This is 
unnecessary and unwise.
    We are sensitive to the complaints of some manufacturers 
who are regulated by this program. Over the past eight months, 
however, DOE has conducted an extensive review of its standard-
setting process, involving many meetings and workshops with 
manufacturers and their trade associations. DOE is now 
committed to responding to these concerns, and will issue a 
final administrative rule codifying improvements in the 
standards process within the coming month.
    The importance of this modest program should not be lost in 
the rush to implement regulatory improvements. In addition to 
providing huge energy bill savings for consumers, appliance 
standards are one of America's great environmental success 
stories, because energy saved is pollution prevented. Current 
appliance standards are expected to save 88 billion kilowatt-
hours of electricity per year by the year 2000, equal to about 
3% of the projected national electricity use for that year. The 
impact of such reductions will be to cut annual carbon 
emissions by 26 million metric tons, which equals the output of 
about 15 million autos. Clearly, appliance standards are 
critical in U.S. efforts to combat global warming, and 
manufacturers who develop cost-effective energy-saving 
technologies should be rewarded for their innovation.
    The report language seeks to preclude the Department from 
issuing new energy efficiency standards in the absence of 
consensus. While consensus among interested parties is a 
laudable goal, it cannot always be achieved, particularly if 
one or more parties make unreasonable demands. Furthermore, if 
parties know that DOE cannot issue standards without consensus, 
then any party has veto power, and gridlock is likely to 
result. The most obstreperous companies will be rewarded, while 
the most innovative will be disadvantaged. Manufacturers will 
be encouraged to ``dumb down'' the efficiency of their products 
in pursuit of production cost advantages, thus drying up 
opportunities for consumer energy savings.
    The report language adds ``product determinations'' to the 
list of actions for which consensus is a prerequisite--a new 
restriction that goes beyond the scope of the fiscal year 1996 
statutory moratorium. Product determinations are made before 
any standard-setting activity begins. A product determination 
is a preliminary decision by DOE that the potential savings 
from efficiency standards are significant enough to proceed 
with a standard-setting rulemaking. If that determination is 
positive, then a rulemaking would begin, using the new DOE 
standard-setting process, including workshops with interested 
parties, analysis on technical feasibility and economic 
justification, and several Federal Register notices. This 
standard-setting process is an important forum for all parties 
to learn about different perspectives on the issues, to collect 
important information, to explore creative solutions, and to 
gradually work towards consensus before a final rule is 
published. To insist on consensus before the consensus-building 
process begins does not make any sense.
    The current moratorium which prevents DOE from issuing any 
new draft or final appliance efficiency standards will expire 
at the end of this fiscal year. We strongly object to any 
attempt to extend this moratorium into fiscal year 1997, either 
with legislative language or with the language of the committee 
report. To do so would add greatly to the regulatory 
uncertainty of U.S. manufacturers and distributors and deny to 
American consumers--business, industry, and householders 
alike--the benefits of new technology to use energy more 
efficiently.
                                   James T. Walsh.
                                   David E. Skaggs.
                 DISSENTING VIEWS OF HON. DAVID R. OBEY

    This legislation is woefully inadequate to address the 
Nation's needs in important natural resource and environmental 
programs. Total appropriations recommended in the bill are 
nearly $800 million below the Administration's request. They 
are even less than the very austere funding level proposed for 
fiscal year 1996. They are more than 10 percent below the 1995 
amounts, ignoring the effects of inflation. With inflation 
considered, the amounts in this bill are nearly 20 percent 
below amounts made available in 1995. This bill is on the 
slippery glideslope called for in the budget resolution that 
could result in reductions in real buying power for the 
activities funded in the bill of 30 to 40 percent during the 
next six years. Although this legislation has avoided some of 
the more contentious issues that were included as policy riders 
last year, it is my belief that is merely an election year 
interruption of the majority party's long term plans which will 
drastically alter the way this country manages its natural 
heritage.
    Many diverse programs funded in the bill deserve comment. 
Probably the most vivid impact the funding recommendations in 
this legislation have is on our natural, historical and 
cultural resources. The effects of the pernicious funding level 
are severe and growing. The Department of the Interior 
estimates its infrastructure backlog is nearly $8 billion--an 
increase of nearly $2 billion in the past 18 months. This 
includes more than $1 billion in deferred operational 
maintenance and $6.5 billion in needed rehabilitation and 
reconstruction projects. Estimates for the United States Forest 
Service include backlogs of more than $800 million in deferred 
maintenance and more than $1 billion for rehabilitation and 
reconstruction. Invariably, when maintenance is deferred, 
repairs cost more when ultimately performed. However, the 
effects go far beyond a deteriorating infrastructure. Many 
interpretive programs at National Parks, National Wildlife 
Refuges, and National Forests have been cut back or eliminated 
as a result of budget reductions. Millions of visitors to our 
parks, refuges, and forests will have a devalued experience as 
a result.
    Examples of the impact of the Republican budget reductions 
on programs funded in this bill include the following:
          Twenty percent of the campsites at Great Smoky 
        Mountains National Park, the system's most visited 
        unit, will not open this summer. The number of seasonal 
        rangers will be reduced by 70 percent.
          Yellowstone National Park has closed a 116 site 
        campground and two interpretive museums. A shortage of 
        rangers leaves the huge park's northern sector 
        virtually unattended by Park Service personnel.
          Independence National Historical Site has reduced by 
        50 percent the number of seasonal employees hired. 
        Declaration House is only open for three hours daily 
        compared with the usual eight hours.
          Yosemite National Park has reduced the number of back 
        country rangers to three and cut back on trash pickups.
          Mud and debris spoil picnic grounds and beaches in 
        the Delaware Water Gap National Recreational Area, one 
        of the most visited parks in the populous Middle 
        Atlantic states.
    In a similar vein, the funding recommendations in the bill 
will exacerbate shortfalls in energy efficiency and Native 
American programs. The energy conservation program has been 
reduced by more than one-third from the 1995 level and the 
amount requested by the Administration. The result will be more 
pollution and lost opportunities for industrial and consumer 
energy savings. The $55 million reduction in the weatherization 
program equates to 30,000 fewer families receiving assistance.
    Many Americans expressed outrage in response to the anti-
environmental excesses of the Congress last year. Our 
Republican colleagues would like the public to believe they 
have heard the concerns and have moderated their actions. This 
bill indicates otherwise. Although marginally better than the 
bill reported last year, it still contains too little funding 
for many important natural resource programs and too many 
provisions that are environmentally unfriendly. For the reasons 
stated here, and many others, the Secretary of the Interior and 
the Secretary of Agriculture deservedly recommend a 
Presidential veto of this bill as reported. As this measure 
proceeds through the legislative process, it requires 
significant changes to avoid a veto and meet the test of 
stewardship that is demanded for our natural heritage.
                                                     David R. Obey.
                DISSENTING VIEWS OF HON. NORMAN D. DICKS

    I wish to express my strong opposition to a provision that 
was included in the bill to prohibit the designation of 
Critical Habitat for the Marbled Murrelet on certain private 
lands in the State of California. Such a prohibition is short-
sighted and sets a dangerous precedent for addressing concerns 
related to the impacts of a species being listed legitimately 
under the current authority of the Endangered Species Act 
(ESA). While the listing of species as threatened or endangered 
has often led to difficult adjustments for impacted businesses, 
communities, and landowners, it is nevertheless inappropriate 
to supplant political judgment in place of biological data in 
making policy determinations on the management of species.
    There is a more effective and more appropriate means to 
deal with these matters than circumventing the law as this 
provision provides for. Section 10 of the Endangered Species 
Act (ESA) allows for landowners to enter into positive, 
productive, longterm agreements with the U.S. Fish & Wildlife 
Service known as Habitat Conservation Plans (HCP's). HCP's 
allow landowners to gain ``certainty'' on the commercial use of 
their private property over a period of time that can be 
negotiated for as far ahead as 100 years. Additionally, the HCP 
agreement provides for a plan that can ensure longterm 
viability for multiple species and the protection of their 
vital habitat. HCP's are negotiable agreements based on science 
and a recognition that the protection of species and ecological 
values are compatible with using land for commodity production. 
HCP's represent a meaningful and positive vehicle that is 
available under the current authority of the Endangered Species 
Act (ESA) to assist private companies.
    In my own State of Washington, two-thirds of our forest 
lands are state and privately owned. Furthermore, my 
Congressional district has large areas of land in multiple 
ownership that have been designated as Critical Habitat for two 
listed species: the Northern Spotted Owl and the Marbled 
Murrelet. We are also facing significant challenges in 
Washington State in addressing the recovery of wild salmon 
populations. The approach that a number of timber companies in 
my state are taking in response to the listings, is to enter 
into effective HCP agreements with the Fish & Wildlife Service. 
This approach is proving to be highly successful so far, and 
both species and private landowners are benefiting. Washington 
State, through the Murray Pacific Company has produced the 
first multi-species Habitat Conservation Plan in the nation, 
and the Department of Natural Resources is finalizing a 
statewide HCP on its lands. HCP's are working for all concerned 
in the Northwest, and are in my judgement the most productive 
vehicle for dealing with conflicts related to the listing of 
endangered species. In the case of the Marbled Murrelet, 78 
percent of the designated Critical Habitat is on federal lands 
(2.9 million acres), and only 48,000 areas has been designated 
as critical on private lands. Those concerned with the 
implications of the designation would be better served, as 
would the species, if they would negotiate HCP agreements with 
the agency rather than seeking to weaken the Endangered Species 
Act through the shortsighted provision included in this bill.

                                                   Norman D. Dicks.

  ADDITIONAL VIEWS OF REPRESENTATIVE DAVID E. SKAGGS REGARDING ENERGY 
                         CONSERVATION PROGRAMS

    While this bill would provide more funding than last year's 
for management of the nation's natural and cultural resources 
and to meet other obligations, it still has serious 
shortcomings. In particular, it would seriously underfund the 
programs managed by the Department of Energy's office of energy 
efficiency and renewable energy.
    As reported, the bill would inflict an additional cut of 
nearly 10% of funding for these energy conservation programs, 
which already were reduced by 25 percent for 1996, as compared 
with fiscal 1995. This would do serious damage to programs that 
have been successful in helping to boost America's economic 
growth, environmental quality, and continued world leadership 
in technology.
    This part of the bill funds a diversity of activities that 
can return big dividends, including important reductions in the 
amounts that the government must spend for energy--reductions 
that help reduce the budget deficits. These programs also help 
reduce or avoid pollution in our air, water, and soil at the 
same time that they lessen our dependence on foreign oil and 
help create jobs in American industry.
    The proposed reductions in funding for these important 
programs are extremely shortsighted. Failing to invest in the 
Federal Energy Management Program means higher energy bills for 
federal buildings. Underfunding the weatherization assistance 
program means higher heating and cooling bills for low-income 
people, and continued energy waste. Inadequate resources for 
the building technology programs means higher costs for 
business and consumers. And cuts in other programs mean a loss 
of momentum for important research on improved technology, 
including more fuel-efficient automobiles.
    When this bill comes to the floor, I will seek to amend it 
to provide additional funding for the energy conservation 
programs.

                                                   David E. Skaggs.