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                                                       Calendar No. 156
104th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE

   1st Session                                                  104-120
_______________________________________________________________________


 
         ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT APPROPRIATION BILL, 1996

                                _______
                                

    July 27 (legislative day, July 10), 1995.--Ordered to be printed

_______________________________________________________________________


   Mr. Domenici, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 1905]

    The Committee on Appropriations, to which was referred the 
bill (H.R. 1905) making appropriations for energy and water 
development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 1996, and 
for other purposes, reports the same to the Senate with 
amendments and recommends that the bill as amended do pass.


Amount in new budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 1996

Amount of bill as passed by the House................... $18,682,457,000
Budget estimates considered by Senate...................  20,681,648,000
Amount of bill as reported to the Senate................  20,162,093,000
The bill as reported to the Senate--
    Under the budget estimate, 1996.....................    -519,555,000
    Under enacted bill, 1995............................    -130,906,000


                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              

                                TITLE I

Department of Defense--Civil: Department of the Army:
    Corps of Engineers--Civil:
                                                                   Page
        General investigations...................................     9
        Construction, general....................................    24
        Flood control, Mississippi River and tributaries.........    42
        Operation and maintenance, general.......................    46
        Regulatory program.......................................    65
        Flood control and coastal emergencies....................    65
        Oilspill research........................................    65
        General expenses.........................................    66

                                TITLE II

Department of the Interior:
      Central Utah project completion account....................    68
    Bureau of Reclamation:
        General investigations...................................    68
        Construction Program.....................................    73
        Operation and maintenance................................    82
        Loan Program Account.....................................    83
        Central Valley project restoration fund..................    85
        General administrative expenses..........................    85

                               TITLE III

Department of Energy:
    Energy supply, research, and development activities..........    88
    Solar and renewable energy...................................    89
    Nuclear energy programs......................................    91
    Environment, safety, and health..............................    93
    Biological and environmental research........................    93
    Fusion Program...............................................    95
    Basic energy sciences........................................    96
    Other energy research programs...............................    97
    Energy support activities....................................    97
    Environmental restoration and waste management...............    99
    Uranium supply and enrichment activities.....................   100
    Uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund..   101
    General science and research activities......................   101
    Nuclear waste disposal fund..................................   102
    Atomic energy defense activities.............................   104
    Weapons activities...........................................   104
    Defense environmental restoration and waste management.......   108
    Other defense activities.....................................   113
    Defense nuclear waste disposal...............................   117
    Departmental administration..................................   118
    Miscellaneous revenues.......................................   118
    Office of Inspector General..................................   119
    Power marketing administrations:
        Alaska Power Administration..............................   119
        Bonneville Power Administration fund.....................   120
        Southeastern Power Administration........................   122
        Southwestern Power Administration........................   123
        Western Area Power Administration........................   123
    Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.........................   124

                                TITLE IV

Independent Agencies:
    Appalachian Regional Commission..............................   177
    Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board......................   177
    Delaware River Basin Commission..............................   177
    Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin.............   178
    Nuclear Regulatory Commission................................   178
    Office of Inspector General..................................   180
    Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board.........................   181
    Susquehanna River Basin Commission...........................   181
    Tennessee Valley Authority...................................   181

                                TITLE V

General provisions...............................................   183
Compliance with paragraph 7, rule XVI, of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   184
Compliance with paragraph 7(c), rule XXVI, of the Standing Rules 
  of the Senate..................................................   184
Compliance with paragraph 12, rule XXVI, of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   185
Budgetary impact statement.......................................   186
                                Purpose

    The purpose of this bill is to provide appropriations for 
the fiscal year 1996 beginning October 1, 1995, and ending 
September 30, 1996, for energy and water development, and for 
other related purposes. It supplies funds for water resources 
development programs and related activities of the Department 
of the Army, Civil Functions--U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' 
Civil Works Program in title I; for the Department of the 
Interior's Bureau of Reclamation in title II; for the 
Department of Energy's energy research activities (except for 
fossil fuel programs and certain conservation and regulatory 
functions), including environmental restoration and waste 
management, and atomic energy defense activities in title III; 
and for related independent agencies and commissions, including 
the Appalachian Regional Commission and Appalachian regional 
development programs, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and 
the Tennessee Valley Authority in title IV.

                Summary of Estimates and Recommendations

    The fiscal year 1996 budget estimates for the bill total 
$20,681,648,000 in new budget (obligational) authority. The 
recommendation of the Committee totals $20,162,093,000. This is 
$519,555,000 under the budget estimates and $130,906,000 under 
the enacted appropriation for the current fiscal year.

                     subcommittee budget allocation

    The Energy and Water Development Subcommittee allocation 
under section 602(b)(1) of the Budget Act totals 
$20,180,000,000 in budget authority and $20,216,000,000 in 
outlays for fiscal year 1996. The bill as recommended by the 
Committee is within the subcommittee allocation for fiscal year 
1996 in budget authority and outlays.

                            Bill Highlights

                    atomic energy defense activities

    The amount recommended in the bill includes $11,428,981,000 
for atomic energy defense activities. Major programs and 
activities include:

Stockpile stewardship...................................  $1,696,580,000
Stockpile management....................................   2,050,683,000
Verification and control technology.....................     450,842,000
Other defense programs..................................     988,270,000
Defense waste management and environmental restoration..   5,989,750,000

                energy supply, research, and development

    The bill recommended by the Committee provides a total of 
$2,798,324,000 for energy supply, research, development and 
demonstration programs including:

Solar and renewable energy..............................    $283,560,000
Environmental restoration and waste management 
    (nondefense)........................................     627,606,000
Nuclear fission R&D.....................................;     279,873,000
Magnetic fusion.........................................     225,144,000
Basic energy sciences...................................     791,661,000
Biological and environmental R&D........................;     428,591,000

                      general science and research

    The Committee recommendation also provides a net 
appropriation of $971,000,000 for general science and research 
activities in life sciences, high energy physics, and nuclear 
physics. Major programs are:

High energy physics research............................    $657,000,000
Nuclear physics.........................................     304,500,000

               regulatory and other independent agencies

    Also recommended in the bill is $919,531,000 for various 
regulatory and independent agencies of the Federal Government. 
Major programs include:

Appalachian Regional Commission.........................    $182,000,000
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission....................     131,290,000
Nuclear Regulatory Commission...........................     474,300,000
Tennessee Valley Authority..............................     110,339,000

                      water resources development

General investigations..................................    $137,557,000
Construction............................................   1,382,317,000
Operations and maintenance..............................   2,092,754,000

Corps of Engineers, regulatory activities

                                                             101,000,000

                      Water Resources Development

    The Committee has also recommended appropriations totaling 
approximately $4,035,275,000 for Federal water resource 
development programs. This includes projects and related 
activities of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers--Civil and the 
Bureau of Reclamation of the Department of the Interior. The 
Federal water resource development program provides lasting 
benefits to the Nation in the area of flood control, municipal 
and industrial water supply, irrigation of agricultural lands, 
water conservation, commercial navigation, hydroelectric power, 
recreation, and fish and wildlife enhancement.
    Water is our Nation's most precious and valuable resource. 
It is evident that water supply in the near future will be as 
important, if not more so, than energy. There is only so much 
water available. Water cannot be manufactured. Our Nation 
cannot survive without water, and economic prosperity cannot 
occur without a plentiful supply.
    While many areas of the country suffer from severe 
shortages of water, others suffer from the other extreme--an 
excess of water which threatens both rural and urban areas with 
floods. Because water is a national asset, and because the 
availability and control of water affect and benefit all States 
and jurisdictions, the Federal Government has historically 
assumed much of the responsibility for financing of water 
resource development.
    The existing national water resource infrastructure in 
America is an impressive system of dams, locks, harbors, 
canals, irrigation systems, reservoirs, and recreation sites 
with a central purpose--to serve the public's needs.
    Our waterways and harbors are an essential part of our 
national transportation system--providing clean, efficient, and 
economical transportation of fuels for energy generation and 
agricultural production, and making possible residential and 
industrial development to provide homes and jobs for the 
American people.
    Reservoir projects provide hydroelectric power production 
and downstream flood protection, make available recreational 
opportunities for thousands of urban residents, enhance fish 
and wildlife habitat, and provide our communities and 
industries with abundant and clean water supplies which are 
essential not only to life itself, but also to help maintain a 
high standard of living for the American people.
    When projects are completed, they make enormous 
contributions to America. The benefits derived from completed 
projects, in many instances, vastly exceed those contemplated 
during project development.

                 COLUMBIA RIVER BASIN ENDANGERED SALMON

    The Committee continues to support efforts to recover the 
threatened and endangered salmon runs in the Columbia River 
basin. Three of the Federal agencies under the Energy and Water 
Development Subcommittee's jurisdiction, the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineers, the Bureau of Reclamation, and the Bonneville Power 
Administration, are responsible for funding the majority of 
recovery measures currently being implemented.
    The Committee notes that both the Northwest Power Planning 
Council's strategy for salmon and the Snake River salmon 
recovery plan call for a broad range of recovery measures that 
cover hydroelectric operations, habitat improvements, hatchery 
reform, changes in harvest allocations and methods, and a 
revised oversight structure. The administration's primary focus 
on recovery activities has been on the hydroelectric system, 
and significant changes in hydro operations are being made.
    The Committee believes that salmon restoration will occur 
only if a broad-based strategy is implemented that addresses 
each aspect of the salmon life cycle, including the other 
critical recovery areas, including hatcheries, harvest, and 
habitat.

                         subcommittee hearings

    The Subcommittee on Energy and Water Development of the 
Committee on Appropriations held five sessions in connection 
with the fiscal year 1996 appropriation bill. Witnesses 
included officials and representatives of the Federal agencies 
under the subcommittee's jurisdiction.
    In addition, the subcommittee received numerous statements 
and letters from Members of the U.S. Senate and House of 
Representatives, Governors, State and local officials and 
representatives, and hundreds of private citizens of all walks 
of life throughout the United States. Testimony, both for and 
against many items, was presented to the subcommittee. The 
recommendations for fiscal year 1996, therefore, have been 
developed after careful consideration of available data.

                         votes in the committee

    The subcommittee, by unanimous vote on July 25, 1995, 
recommended that the bill, as amended, be reported to the full 
Committee on Appropriations.
    By unanimous vote of 28 to 0 the Committee on July 27, 
1995, recommended that the bill, as amended, be reported to the 
Senate.
                 TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE--CIVIL

                         DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

                       Corps of Engineers--Civil

                corps of engineers' civil works mission

    In the fiscal year 1996 budget request, the administration 
proposed radical changes in the civil works mission of the U.S. 
Army Corps of Engineers. Under these proposals, beginning in 
fiscal year 1996, the Corps would only be involved in projects 
and programs of ``national scope and significance.'' While it 
may at first seem reasonable that the Federal Government only 
be involved in programs of ``national significance'', a closer 
look at these proposals makes it apparent that they were ill-
conceived and are counterproductive to the well-being of the 
Nation.
    The most far reaching of these proposals involves the Corps 
of Engineers' role in protecting our citizens from the 
devastating effects of floods. Under the administration's 
proposal, the Corps would only participate in projects that 
meet the following three criteria: (1) more than one-half of 
the damaging flood water must come from outside the boundaries 
of the State where the damage is occurring; (2) the project 
must have a benefit-to-cost ratio of two or greater; and (3) 
the non-Federal sponsor must be willing and able to pay 75 
percent of the first cost of the project. The practical effect 
of applying those three criteria against all proposed projects 
would be to terminate the Federal Government's role in flood 
control activities. The first criterion alone would eliminate 
the Corps' role in flood control throughout much of the 
country, including three of our largest States: California, 
Texas, and Florida.
    The Committee concurs with the House action which strongly 
disagrees with the administration's proposal that the Federal 
Government end its historic role in protecting our citizens 
from the devastating effects of floods. The Committee is aware 
that every $1 invested in flood control projects has resulted 
in $6 of flood damages prevented. Terminating the Federal 
Government's role in flood control activities as a way to save 
money is clearly misguided.
    The Committee is equally troubled by the administration's 
proposals to terminate the Federal role in shore protection 
projects and smaller navigation projects. While these proposals 
would only directly affect the coastal States, including the 
Great Lakes States, the impacts of terminating the Federal 
Government's role in protecting our shorelines and maintaining 
small boat harbors would be felt throughout the Nation. The 
Committee also strongly rejects these proposals.
    Therefore, in making recommendations for fiscal year 1996, 
the Committee has recommended funding for projects without 
regard to these proposed new policies as the House did. The 
Committee expects the Secretary of the Army, acting through the 
Chief of Engineers, to proceed with those projects, all of 
which are fully authorized. The Committee further directs the 
Secretary of the Army and the Chief of Engineers to continue to 
process all decision documents, including the transmission of 
feasibility reports to the Congress for authorization, without 
regard to whether projects comply with the administration's 
proposed new policies.
    Finally, the Committee is troubled with the prospects of 
another extended period of stalemate, dispute, and lack of 
cooperation in the area of water resource policy. A similar 
dispute occurred between 1970 and 1986, a period of 16 years, 
when the water resource infrastructure needs of the Nation were 
neglected. The ever increasing population of the United States 
will require larger and larger amounts of water, not only for 
human needs, but also to support industrial development in 
order to sustain employment and create new jobs. Therefore, it 
is vitally important to the Nation that the executive branch 
and the Congress work together to develop sound and realistic 
water resource policy.

                         general investigations

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $181,199,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     155,625,000
House allowance.........................................     129,906,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             126,323,000

    The budget request and the approved Committee allowance are 
shown on the following table:


    St. Paul Harbor, AK.--The Committee recommendation includes 
an additional $50,000 for the Corps to initiate the feasibility 
phase of the St. Paul Harbor, AK, study.
    Arkansas River, Tucker Creek, AR.--The Committee has 
included $280,000, the same as the House allowance, for the 
Corps of Engineers to initiate feasibility phase studies for 
the Arkansas River, Tucker Creek, AR, project.
    Arkansas River levees, Arkansas.--An appropriation of 
$400,000 is recommended for the Corps of Engineers to continue 
engineering and design for repair work to certain segments of 
the Corps' Arkansas River levees, including the Plum Bayou 
levee in Arkansas.
    San Joaquin River basin, Kawaeh River, CA.--The Committee 
has provided $40,000 for the Corps to complete feasibility 
studies of the San Joaquin River basin, Kawaeh River, CA, 
project. This is the same as the budget request for fiscal year 
1996.
    Stockton metropolitan area, California.--The Committee has 
provided $400,000 for the Corps of Engineers to initiate a 
reconnaissance study to determine the extent and nature of 
flood control needs for the Stockton, CA, area.
    San Joaquin River basin, Caliente Creek stream group, 
California.--The Committee concurs with the House in providing 
$171,000 for the completion of the Caliente Creek, CA, 
feasibility study. This is the same as the budget request. The 
Committee directs that the Corps of Engineers take all steps 
necessary to ensure that this 12-year old study is completed in 
fiscal year 1996.
    Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Palm Beach County, FL.--The 
Committee recommends $150,000 for the Corps of Engineers to 
initiate a reconnaissance study of navigation improvements 
along the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Palm Beach County, 
FL.
    Indianapolis central waterfront, Indiana.--The Committee 
has provided $1,000,000 for the Corps of Engineers to proceed 
with preconstruction engineering and design for the elements of 
the master plan of the central waterfront project in 
Indianapolis, IN.
    McAlpine lock and dam, Indiana and Kentucky.--The Committee 
has provided $2,387,000 for the McAlpine lock and dam project 
in Indiana and Kentucky, an increase of $900,000 over the 
budget request. The additional funds will advance 
preconstruction engineering and design by 1 year and allow the 
project to be considered as a new start in 1997.
    Lake George, Hobart, IN.--The Committee understands that 
the Corps of Engineers will use previously appropriated funds 
to complete the general design memorandum and initiate plans 
and specifications for the Lake George, Hobart, IN, project.
    Little Calumet River basin, Cady Marsh ditch, Indiana.--The 
Committee understands the Corps of Engineers will use 
previously appropriated funds in fiscal year 1996 to complete 
the general design memorandum for the Cady Marsh ditch, 
Indiana, project.
    Coralville Lake, IA.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$200,000 for the Corps of Engineers to initiate a 
reconnaissance study to address the comprehensive reservoir 
regulation procedures, efficiency of the structure, and 
possible structural and nonstructural improvements at the 
Coralville Lake, IA.
    Grand (Neosho) River, KS.--The Committee has provided 
$500,000 for the Corps to initiate a study of the backwater 
effects of flood control operations along the Grand (Neosho) 
River in Kansas as far north as John Redmond Reservoir. 
Particular emphasis is to be given to the effect of flood pool 
levels on the extent and duration of flooding north of the 
Miami reach. To the greatest extent possible, the Corps should 
make use of already available U.S. Geologic Survey maps of the 
Neosho River basin. The Corps shall keep interested parties 
informed of its activities and progress on a regular basis.
    Frankfort, KY, Bellepoint floodwall.The Corps of Engineers 
is directed to use $65,000 of available funds to complete the 
feasibility study of the Bellepoint floodwall, Frankfort, KY, 
project.
    Amite River and tributaries, LA.--The Committee is aware of 
recent flooding in the Amite River basin which encompasses 
about 2,000 square miles in southeastern Louisiana and 
southwestern Mississippi. While the Corps continues to study 
some possible flood control solutions for this area, the 
Committee supports the examination of additional measures. 
Therefore, the Committee has included $200,000 to reevaluate 
the State of Louisiana's review of the previously suspended 
feasibility phase studies of Darlington Reservoir.
    Lake Charles ship channel, bypass and general anchorage 
area, Louisiana.--The Committee recommendation concurs with the 
House in providing an additional $540,000 for the Lake Charles 
ship channel, bypass and general anchorage area, Louisiana. The 
funds will be used to investigate the feasibility of developing 
a support service facility for the Calcasieu ship channel at 
Hackberry, LA, in the interest of improved navigability in the 
ship channel.
    Lafayette Parish, LA.--The Committee has included an 
additional $200,000 for the Corps of Engineers to complete the 
reconnaissance phase and initiate the feasibility phase of the 
Lafayette Parish, LA, study.
    Mississippi River ship channel, Louisiana.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $300,000 for the Corps to initiate a 
reconnaissance study of the long-term improvements needed for 
navigation on the Mississippi River and its outlets between 
Baton Rouge, LA, and the Gulf of Mexico.
    West Shore-Lake Pontchartrain, LA.--The Committee has 
provided $500,000, the same as the House allowance, for the 
Corps of Engineers to initiate a reconnaissance study of 
hurricane flooding problems west of Bonnet Carre spillway.
    Lower Truckee River, NV.--The bill includes an additional 
$400,000 for the Corps of Engineers to initiate the feasibility 
study for the restoration of riparian areas of the lower 
Truckee River in Nevada.
    Devils Lake, ND.--An additional $500,000 has been included 
for the Corps to accelerate work on the Devils Lake, ND, 
feasibility study. The Committee expects the study to address 
all aspects of the project set out in the study evaluation.
    Barnegat Inlet to Little Egg Inlet, NJ.--An appropriation 
of $200,000 is included in the bill for the Corps of Engineers 
to initiate the feasibility study of storm damage reduction 
measures for the Barnegat Inlet to Little Egg Inlet, NJ, 
project.
    Colonias along the United States-Mexico border, Texas.--The 
Committee has provided $300,000 for the Corps of Engineers to 
continue to provide technical and planning and design 
assistance to colonias along the United States-Mexico border.
    Tolchester S-turn, Maryland.--The Committee concurs with 
the House in urging the Corps of Engineers to complete its 
ongoing studies and related design work pertaining to the 
dangerous S-turn in the Tolchester channel, and to complete its 
report addressing the economic, environmental, and safety 
concerns of this modification in time for consideration during 
the deliberations on the fiscal year 1997 budget.
    Willamette River temperature control, Oregon.--The 
Committee has provided $1,000,000, for the Corps to continue 
engineering, design, and preparation of detailed plans and 
specifications for water temperature control facilities at the 
Cougar project on the McKenzie River. Over the last 5 years, 
Congress has directed the Corps to expedite completion of the 
feasibility study and design for this important project. The 
Committee again directs the Corps to proceed without further 
delay to complete preconstruction design in 1996 and to request 
construction funding in 1997 and to provide a report to the 
Committee no later than February 1996 on its activities and 
progress.
    These temperature control facilities are intended to 
correct unfavorable water temperatures resulting from the 
operation of the Cougar and Blue River projects. With more 
favorable water temperatures, wild salmon will regain their 
capacity to reproduce. The project modifications will help 
restore wild spring chinook salmon runs in the Willamette River 
drainage.
    The Committee supports installation of these fish 
facilities as project modifications which mitigate for the fish 
and wildlife of the Cougar Dam. The cost of the fish facilities 
would be repaid according to the allocations among the original 
project purposes.
    Research and development.--An appropriation of $31,432,000 
is recommended for research and development activities of the 
Corps of Engineers. This is the same as the House allowance. 
The Committee believes it inappropriate to earmark funding for 
university research institutions given the limited resources 
and severe budget constraints.
    The Committee has provided $1,000,000 for zebra mussel 
research, which is the same as the current year; $2,000,000 for 
wetlands research; and $2,400,000 for evaluation of 
environmental investments. In recommending $1,000,000 for zebra 
mussel research, the Committee expects the Corps of Engineers 
to apply the funds to various regions geographically, and on 
varying technologies and applications in order to accomplish 
the highest-priority work..
    The Midwestern flooding in 1993-94 has brought to light the 
possible need of the Corps of Engineers to develop and deploy 
updated comprehensive flood impact modeling capabilities. Using 
available funds, the Corps is to evaluate current operational 
capabilities and the need for enhanced on-line, predictive 
event modeling, including refinement of operational planning, 
intra-agency and interagency data base sharing, impacts and 
alternative proposals for flood control and water resource 
management, and optimum use of Corps flood control facilities 
to reduce damage and begin the effort if appropriate.
    Coordination and studies with other agencies.--The 
Committee recommendation for coordination and studies with 
other agencies includes $380,000 for the Corps of Engineers to 
continue to participate as a stakeholder in the interagency 
ecosystem management task force's Pacific Northwest forest case 
study with responsibility to restore, sustain, and develop 
coordinated watershed ecosystem management strategies for 
species viability on all public lands. These strategies will 
consider ecological, social, and economic principles to manage 
biological and physical systems in a manner that safeguards the 
long-term ecological sustainability, natural diversity, and 
productivity of the watershed and its landscapes. The 
strategies will include the evaluation, planning, design, and 
completion of restoration or demonstration projects and the 
development of coordinated directives for the management of 
aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems. In as much as possible, 
these strategies will complete or complement State and local 
watershed restoration efforts on public and private lands or in 
conjunction with American Indian tribes.
    Nonproject specific program reductions.--Because of the 
severe budgetary situation, the Committee has been forced to 
delete or reduce the funds requested by the administration for 
a number of nonproject specific activities funded under the 
``General investigations'' account. The Committee understands 
that this could adversely affect ongoing work and, therefore, 
expects the Corps to apply reductions in a way that limits the 
impacts to the extent possible and to bring an activity to a 
logical conclusion.

                         construction, general

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $983,668,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     785,125,000
House allowance.........................................     807,846,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             778,456,000

    The budget request and the approved Committee allowance are 
shown on the following table:


    Homer Spit, AK, repair and extension.--The Committee 
recommends $3,800,000 for emergency repairs and extension of 
the local cost sharing agreement for the Homer Spit storm 
damage reduction project at Homer, AK, as authorized in the 
Water Resources Development Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-640). 
The original project was to provide a long-term solution to 
erosion of the Homer Spit and consisted of 1,430 feet of rock 
revetments with periodic beach nourishment at approximately 10-
year intervals for 50 years. The Committee recognizes that 
within 2 months after construction of the first phase of the 
project, an unusually severe storm caused considerable damage 
adjacent to the revetments and undermined the Spit Road. 
Utilities and access to the port facilities at the end of the 
spit are currently threatened, requiring emergency repairs and 
extension of the Federal project if the original project 
purpose is to be preserved.
    McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River navigation system (Montgomery 
Point lock and dam), Arkansas.--The bill includes $6,000,000 
for the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River navigation project, the 
same as the budget request. The bill also directs the Corps of 
Engineers to use $4,900,000 for activities relating to 
Montgomery Point lock and dam. The Committee directs the Corps 
to use $2,000,000 to construct an access road and service 
facilities as authorized by law. The Committee notes that 
Montgomery Point was included in the original waterway design 
that predates the inland waterways trust fund. Given the large 
Federal investment in the waterway, the Committee believes that 
it is imperative that a decision be made regarding the 
financing of the Montgomery Point lock and dam. The Committee 
again points out that it will be impossible to sustain ongoing 
construction funding through completion without executive 
branch support.
    Red River emergency bank protection, Arkansas.--An 
appropriation of $6,600,000 is included in the bill for the 
Corps of Engineers to initiate and complete construction of the 
Dickson revetment feature of the Red River emergency bank 
protection project in Arkansas. This is the same as the House 
allowance.
    Sacramento River flood control project, (Glenn-Colusa 
irrigation district), California.--The Committee has provided 
$300,000, the same as the House allowance, for the Corps of 
Engineers to continue work on the riffle restoration project 
and continue participation in, and, when necessary and 
appropriate, provide direct support to the State-Federal effort 
to develop a long-term solution to the fish passage problem at 
the Hamilton City pumping plant.
    Los Angeles Harbor, CA.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $100,000, the full budget request, for the Corps of 
Engineers complete engineering and design and to execute the 
project cooperation agreement for the Los Angeles Harbor 
project in California.
    Klamath-Glen levee repairs, California.--The Committee 
believes that the question of the local contribution on the 
Klamath-Glen levee project in California should more 
appropriately be addressed by the authorizing committees of the 
Congress.
    Santa Ana River mainstem, California.--The Committee does 
not concur with the House regarding the San Timoteo Creek 
feature of the Santa Ana River mainstem project in California. 
The Committee understands that the next usable increment, phase 
3, has a current estimated cost of $20,000,000. Therefore, 
continuation of the San Timoteo Creek feature from within funds 
available for the Santa Ana mainstem project would have 
significant impact on the overall project schedule.
    Kissimmee River restoration, Florida.--The Committee 
understands that carryover funds from prior years 
appropriations are sufficient to continue engineering and 
design on the Kissimmee River restoration project in Florida.
    The Committee recognizes the continued Federal obligation 
to this important multiyear project and is committed to it's 
completion at the earliest possible date. In addition, it is 
the Committee's intent to continue to work with the State of 
Florida and the Corps of Engineers by providing support funding 
in future years as such funds may become obligated.
    McCook and Thronton Reservoirs, IL.--While the budget 
request for the McCook and Thornton Reservoirs, IL, project 
does not include a request for new funding, the Committee 
understands that $11,478,000 of previously appropriated funding 
is available and adequate to undertake scheduled activities in 
fiscal year 1996.
    The Committee is concerned with the continued reliance by 
the Corps of Engineers on its 1986 design memorandum described 
in the Water Resources Act of 1988. This design memorandum does 
not take into proper consideration the impact on the McCook 
quarry or the impact on the surrounding community. The 
Committee, therefore, directs the Corps to continue their 
assessment of other options which would minimize the impact on 
this valuable limestone resource.
    O'Hare Reservoir, IL.--The Committee concurs with the House 
in urging the Corps to reprogram additional funds, as needed, 
to complete the O'Hare Reservoir, IL, project as efficiently 
and quickly as possible.
    Ohio River flood protection (Indiana shoreline), Indiana.--
The Committee has provided $275,000, the full budget request, 
under general investigations for the Corps of Engineers to 
continue cost-shared feasibility studies related to the Ohio 
River flood protection (Indiana shoreline) project in Indiana.
    Salyersville, KY.--The Committee has provided $500,000, the 
same as the House, for the Corps of Engineers to continue 
construction of the Salyersville, KY, cut-through project.
    McAlpine lock and dam, Kentucky and Indiana.--The Committee 
has transferred the McAlpine lock and dam project to the 
``General investigations'' account and provided $2,387,000, an 
increase of $900,000 over the budget request, to complete 
planning, engineering, and design. This will advance project 
planning by 1 full year allowing the project to be considered 
as a new start in 1997.
    Lake Pontchartrain and vicinity (hurricane protection), 
Louisiana.--The Committee recommendation concurs with the House 
allowance of $11,848,000 for the Lake Pontchartrain and 
vicinity (hurricane protection), Louisiana project. In 
addition, in light of recent devastating flooding, the Corps is 
directed to evaluate the feasibility of expediting the 
remaining features of the project in the vicinity of St. 
Charles Parish, and to provide the Committee with an 
accelerated construction schedule and funding profile through 
project completion, along with the feasibility and impacts of 
incorporating four additional pumping stations, and other 
needed structures, in the New Orleans west unit, St. Charles 
Parish levee part of the project.
    Lake Pontchartrain storm water discharge, Louisiana.--The 
Committee has included $850,000 to continue the development of 
this project. Further, the facility owners shall receive credit 
for design and construction, compatible with project 
requirements, accomplished by the facility owner prior to 
execution of the necessary agreements with the non-Federal 
sponsor.
    Ouachita River levees, Louisiana.--The Committee recommends 
an appropriation of $2,300,000 for the Corps of Engineers to 
complete the rehabilitation or replacement of deteriorated 
drainage structures in the Ouachita River levee system in 
Louisiana.
    Baltimore Harbor and channels, Maryland.--The Committee has 
provided $339,000 for the Corps of Engineers to complete the 
limited reevaluation report for the Brewerton channel 
extension.
    Red River below Denison Dam, Louisiana, Arkansas, and 
Texas.--The Committee has provided $2,000,000, the full 
capability of the Corps of Engineers to undertake work on the 
Red River below Denison Dam project in Texas, Arkansas, and 
Louisiana.
    Southeast Louisiana flooding, Louisiana.--The Committee 
concurs with the House regarding flooding in southeast 
Louisiana.
    The Committee is aware of the devastating record flooding 
due to torrential rainfalls in southeast Louisiana that 
occurred May 8 through May 10, 1995. At least seven lives were 
lost and over 35,000 homes were flooded along with thousands of 
businesses and public facilities. There was significant street 
and highway damage. Estimated property and infrastructure 
losses exceed $3,000,000,000. More flood insurance claims have 
been filed already from this disaster than any other incident 
nationwide except for a storm that hit five Northeastern States 
in December 1992. Flood insurance claims alone for six major 
rainfall floods in this area between 1978 and 1989 have already 
totaled $227,000,000. This Committee and the House 
Infrastructure and Transportation Committee have received 
proposals for authorizing and funding rainfall drainage flood 
control projects for this area which have preliminary positive 
benefit-cost ratios. The Committee believes that despite 
current Corps of Engineers policies and the administration's 
proposed radical changes in the civil works mission of the 
Corps, Congress may want to consider funding urban rainfall 
flood control projects that prevent the expenditure of hundreds 
of millions of dollars in future Federal disaster claims, 
grants, and public assistance. The Committee is carefully 
reviewing these proposals and has deferred action without 
prejudice at this time on this and all other flood control 
projects requiring new legislative authority pending future 
action later this year by the authorization committees on an 
omnibus water resources bill. The Corps has informed the 
Committee that ongoing studies for urban rainfall mitigation in 
southeast Louisiana are fully funded so they can proceed as 
quickly as possible. As in past years, the Committee has 
provided full funding for these studies. However, the current 
Corps project study process takes too long. Therefore, with a 
goal toward completing these studies faster than the current 
Corps process allows, the Committee directs the Corps to 
provide a report to the Committee, prior to the conference with 
the House on this bill, on a plan for having the private sector 
assist with or conduct this and other important Corps project 
study work.
    Ste. Genevieve, MO.--The Committee is aware that the Corps 
of Engineers plans to use up to $3,000,000 in previously 
appropriated funds for construction of the Ste. Genevieve, MO, 
project in fiscal year 1996. Because of the urgent need to 
complete this project as soon as possible, the Committee has 
provided an additional $1,000,000 for construction in fiscal 
year 1996. The Committee expects the Corps of Engineers to take 
all steps necessary to expedite construction of this project.
    Kill Van Kull and Newark Bay channels, New York and New 
Jersey.--The Committee understands that $3,100,000 in 
previously appropriated funds will be available in fiscal year 
1996 for the Corps of Engineers to continue engineering and 
design of phase II of the Kill Van Kull and Newark Bay 
channels, New York and New Jersey project.
    Onondaga Lake, NY.--In fiscal years 1994-95, the Congress 
provided a total of $4,000,000 for design of the Onondaga Lake, 
NY combined sewer overflow project authorized by section 307 of 
the Water Resources Development Act of 1992. At that time, the 
scope of the project had not yet been finalized and, therefore, 
construction costs had not yet been determined. Since then, the 
local sponsor has better defined the project and determined 
that design and construction of the project can be fully funded 
using the $4,000,000 of Federal funds already appropriated. In 
addition, the Committee understands that the sponsor has agreed 
to finance any excess funding requirements over the Federal 
appropriation of $4,000,000. Accordingly, the Committee concurs 
with the House committee and has no objection to the Corps of 
Engineers utilizing the $4,000,000 in previously appropriated 
funds for construction of the Onondaga Lake project.
    Acequias irrigation system, New Mexico.--The Committee has 
provided $1,620,000 for the acequias irrigation system project 
in New Mexico. Those funds, combined with $1,900,000 in 
programmed carryover will provide a total of $3,520,000 for 
acequia rehabilitation projects in fiscal year 1996. The 
Committee remains concerned about the slow pace of work on this 
program and directs the Corps of Engineers to work more closely 
with acequia district members in order to accelerate the number 
of acequia projects undertaken. The Committee encourages the 
Corps to work with acequia district members to permit them to 
perform some of their own repairs, if appropriate.
    Columbia River treaty fishing access sites, Oregon and 
Washington.--The Committee recommendation includes $1,720,000 
to continue activities associated with the Columbia River 
Treaty fishing access sites project authorized by Public Law 
100-581, including $1,120,000 for construction of phase I sites 
and $600,000 for engineering and design of an additional six 
Bonneville pool sites planned under phase II.
    In addition, the Committee understands that the Department 
of the Army, the Department of the Interior, and the Bonneville 
Power Administration have recently signed a memorandum of 
agreement to capitalizes the long-term operation and 
maintenance costs of each site when that site is funded for 
construction and to provide these funds to the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs to be held in trust for annual operation and 
maintenance expenses. The Committee has included language in 
the bill to carry out the agreement.
    Broad Top region, Pennsylvania.--The Committee has provided 
$2,000,000 for wetlands restoration and the completion of acid 
mine drainage mitigation projects for the Broad Top region of 
Huntington and Bedford Counties in Pennsylvania.
    Columbia River juvenile fish mitigation, Washington, 
Oregon, and Idaho.--The Committee has provided $78,800,000, the 
full budget request, for the Corps to continue activities and 
work on the Columbia River juvenile fish mitigation project in 
Oregon and Washington.
    The Committee commends the Corps of Engineers for 
requesting funds to continue the Juvenile Fish Bypass Program. 
Significant progress is being made on improving fish survival 
at several of the Columbia and Snake River hydroelectric 
projects. The Committee urges the Corps to move forward as 
quickly as possible with planned modifications and other 
improvements to the projects, including the adult fishways. The 
Committee directs the Corps to aggressively improve the 
effectiveness and efficiency of the bypass systems, reduce 
predator mortality, and enhance passage conditions. 
Improvements to the fish bypass systems include: dispersed 
release sites, new flumes, PIT-tag facilities, spillway/
stilling basin modifications and testing and installation of 
surface flow bypass systems.
    The Committee remains committed to development of the most 
effective bypass system for the Dalles project, and its 
installation at the earliest possible date. There is growing 
evidence, however, that surface-oriented juvenile fish bypass 
systems may be more effective and cost less than screened 
bypass systems, particularly at the Dalles project. Therefore, 
the Committee directs the Corps to give priority continued 
testing of a prototype surface flow system at the Dalles. This 
should lead to an expeditious decision in 1996 on further 
bypass system development at the Dalles, independent of 
progress on surface bypass at the other projects.
    To help broaden evaluations of fish survival in the 
Columbia River system, passive integrated transponder tag (PIT 
tag) detectors must be installed at John Day and Bonneville 
projects. Completion of these facilities must be of the highest 
priority to the Corps. The facilities should be completed as 
soon as possible by the following dates: John Day--spring 1997; 
Bonneville--spring 1998.
    The Committee supports the development of a comprehensive 
monitoring program to ensure that spill is carefully monitored 
and its effects on dissolved gas levels and fish survival are 
fully evaluated. This program must be in place before the 
provision of additional spills. In addition, it is critical 
that dissolved gas abatement technologies such as slotted or 
baffled gates and flip lips be installed without further delay 
to reduce dissolved gas levels from both intentional and 
unintentional spill. Flip lips or flow deflectors shall be 
designed and installed at John Day and Ice Harbor projects by 
spring 1997. Another modification, identified by both Federal 
and private engineers, is baffled or slotted spillway gates. 
Experience from non-Federal Columbia River dams indicates that 
slotted spillway gates could improve fish passage efficiency 
and reduce dissolved gas levels, as well as the cost of the 
spill program. The Committee directs the Corps to immediately 
test, evaluate, and construct spillway gate modifications on at 
least two projects by the spring of 1996. An additional two 
projects should be improved by 1997. The Corps is encouraged to 
use private sector engineering firms and any other available 
means to accelerate the work as necessary to assist in 
completing this effort at the earliest possible date. The 
Committee directs the Corps to reallocate funds within this 
program, if necessary, from studies, design, and even 
construction of extended length screens and related activities 
in order to provide adequate funds in fiscal year 1996 to meet 
this schedule on gas abatement technologies.
    The Committee has included funding for advanced planning 
and design of a drawdown of John Day Reservoir to minimum 
operating pool. The Committee, however, is concerned about the 
costs and justification for the proposed John Day drawdown as 
an effective method for salmon recovery. The Committee is aware 
that studies conducted by the Corps, the Snake River Salmon 
Recovery Team, the National Marine Fisheries Service, and a 
consultant to the Northwest Power Planning Council have all 
drawn various conclusions about the potential effectiveness of 
this salmon recovery measure. Because of these divergent views, 
the power council, using an independent scientific panel, has 
initiated a review and reevaluation of the science underlying 
the John Day drawdown measure. In light of these studies and 
the current reevaluation of the scientific information 
available, the Committee urges the Corps to continue to work 
with the National Marine Fisheries Service and the power 
council on this drawdown measure and consult regularly with the 
council and other regional, State, and tribal interests. The 
Committee urges the administration to furnish the scientific 
justification for the John Day drawdown as an effective means 
of recovery, or abandon the proposal altogether.
    The Committee is pleased that the Corps is evaluating 
options for improving the efficiency of hydroelectric units at 
its Snake and Columbia River powerhouses in order to improve 
juvenile salmon survival. The Committee urges the Corps to 
continue its efforts in concert with other interested agencies 
and organizations.
    Levisa and Tug Forks of the Big Sandy River and Upper 
Cumberland River, West Virginia, Kentucky, and Virginia.--The 
Committee has provided a total of $26,200,000 for the Levisa 
and Tug Forks of the Big Sandy River and Upper Cumberland River 
project. In addition to amounts provided in the budget request, 
the bill includes $12,000,000 to continue phase III of the 
Harlan, KY, element of the project; $4,100,000 for the 
Williamsburg, KY, element of the project to continue 
floodproofing, complete real estate acquisition and perform 
levee/floodwall construction; and $1,600,000 for design work, 
the acquisition of real estate, and the continuation of 
floodproofing on the Middlesboro, KY, element of the project. 
In addition, the Corps is directed to continue construction of 
the Pike County, KY, element using funds previously 
appropriated.
    The Committee has recommended and additional $2,000,000 
over the House allowance for the Upper Mingo County element and 
$200,000 for the Hatfield Bottom nonstructural element of the 
Levisa and Tug Forks of the Big Sandy River and Upper 
Cumberland River (sec. 202) project.
    Portage levee, Wisconsin.--The Committee includes $250,000 
to begin construction work on the Portage levee in the State of 
Wisconsin. The Committee expects the levee to be constructed to 
an elevation necessary to meet the State of Wisconsin's 
floodplain criteria (100-year flood, plus 3 feet), as 
originally authorized.
    Aquatic plant control program.--The Committee has included 
$5,000,000 to continue the aquatic plant control program. In 
light of severe budget constraints and the fact that this is a 
nationwide program, the Committee believes it inappropriate to 
earmark the small amount of funding available for fiscal year 
1996. The appropriations are to undertake the highest priority 
activities.
    Continuing authorities programs.--The Committee agrees with 
the House in rejecting the administration's proposal to 
terminate funding for the section 103, section 208, section 14, 
section 205, section 111, and section 107 continuing 
authorities programs beginning in fiscal year 1997. 
Furthermore, the Committee is aware that the Corps of Engineers 
has implemented a plan to cease work on projects which are not 
scheduled for construction approval by the end of fiscal year 
1996. The programs, which require only modest amounts of 
budgetary resources, have proven to be of great value and are 
particularly important in providing much needed assistance to 
many small communities throughout the Nation. Therefore, the 
Committee directs the Secretary of the Army to continue the 
planning, engineering, design and construction of projects 
under all sections of the continuing authorities program in 
fiscal year 1995-96 whether or not they will be approved for 
construction by the end of fiscal year 1996, initiate new 
projects under its normal procedures for the continuing 
authorities programs in fiscal year 1995-1996, and continue 
budgeting these programs in fiscal year 1997 and beyond.
    Small flood control projects (sec. 205).--Due to budgetary 
constraints, the Committee recommendation for section 205 small 
flood control projects is $15,000,000. This is $1,600,000 below 
the amount provided for the current fiscal year.
    The Committee recommendation includes $500,000 to complete 
feasibility studies and initiate plans and specifications and 
construction of the Snoqualmie, WA, project; and $100,000 to 
initiate and complete a feasibility study for First Creek in 
Knoxville, Knox County, TN. The Committee recommendation 
concurs with the House on the Muscle Shoals, AL, projects.
    Small navigation projects (sec. 107).--An appropriation of 
$6,500,000 is recommended for small navigation projects, 
section 107, projects, including $1,000,000 for Ouzinkie 
Harbor, AK; $1,000,000 for Larsen Bay Harbor, AK; $1,300,000 
for Williamsport, AK; $250,000 for Tatitlik Harbor, AK; 
$200,000 for Valdez Harbor, AK; Tamgas, AK, $200,000; and 
Whittier Harbor, AK, $50,000.
    Projects modifications for improvement of the environment 
(sec. 1135).--The Committee has provided a total of $10,850,000 
for section 1135, projects modifications for improvements of 
the environment. The recommendation includes $100,000 for the 
St. Paul Harbor, salt lagoon, Alaska project; and $750,000 for 
the Valdez Harbor, AK intertidal water retention project.
    Wetland and aquatic habitat creation program.--Due to the 
severe budgetary constraints, the Committee has provided 
$2,500,000 for the wetland and aquatic habitat creation 
program. Given that this is a nationwide program and the 
limited funding available, the Committee believes it 
inappropriate to earmark the limited funds available.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of the Poplar 
Island, MD, beneficial use of dredged material project to the 
Chesapeake Bay restoration efforts and the Port of Baltimore's 
dredging program. The Committee directs the Corps to expedite 
completion of the feasibility report on Poplar Island and, if 
the project is found to be feasible, to support construction of 
the project out of the finding provided for wetland and aquatic 
habitat creation (sec. 204 funds) and/or other appropriate 
accounts.
    Upper Mississippi River System Environmental Management 
Program.--The Committee concurs with the House Committee 
regarding providing funding to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service. The Committee believes that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service should obtain the funds it needs to carry out its role 
in connection with this program through its own budget.

 Flood Control, Mississippi River and Tributaries Arkansas, Illinois, 
       Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $328,138,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     319,250,000
House allowance.........................................     307,885,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             307,885,000

    The budget request and the approved Committee allowance are 
shown on the following table:


    Louisiana State Penitentiary levee, Louisiana.--The 
Committee has included $100,000 for the Corps of Engineers to 
continue preconstruction engineering and design on the 
Louisiana State Penitentiary levee project in Louisiana.
    Arkabutla Reservoir, MS.--The Committee is aware of the 
roads at Arkabutla Reservoir in Mississippi caused by Corps of 
Engineer traffic to and from the reservoir in order to make 
necessary repairs. The Committee directs the Corps to use not 
to exceed $100,000 of available operation and maintenance funds 
to restore the roads to the dam that have been damaged, from 
Eudora to the project boundary on the north and from Arkabutla 
to the boundary on the south.
    Mississippi River levees and channel improvement.--The 
Committee is aware that the Corps of Engineers no longer 
requires the use of lands in the Vidalia, LA, area previously 
used for casting and storage of articulated concrete mats used 
for construction of the Mississippi River and tributaries 
project. In the interest of public safety and environmental 
restoration, the Committee directs the Secretary of the Army, 
acting through the Mississippi River Commission to use up to 
$900,000 of the funds provided herein to return the lands to 
acceptable environmental condition now that the casting 
operations have ceased.
    Yalobusha River, MS, flooding.--The Committee is concerned 
that the Corps of Engineers has not conducted authorized 
operation and maintenance work on the Grenada Reservoir, MS, 
project which has resulted in considerable backwater flooding 
along the Yalobusha River. The Committee directs the Corps to 
undertake normal, authorized operation and maintenance work at 
Grenada Reservoir necessary to mitigate the backwater flooding 
problem.
    Tallahatchie River, MS, bank erosion.--The Committee 
understands that damaging bank slide problems exist along the 
Tallahatchie River in Tallahatchie County, MS. The Corps is 
directed to use available funds to study the problem and to 
report to the Committee by February 1, 1996, if possible, on 
the extent of the problem and the cost to stabilize the river 
banks. The report should also address why the necessary repairs 
are not being undertaken under existing authority and within 
existing operation and maintenance funding.

                   operation and maintenance, general

Appropriations, 1995....................................  $1,646,535,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................   1,749,875,000
House allowance.........................................   1,712,123,000

Committee recommendation

                                                           1,696,998,000

    The budget request and the approved Committee allowance are 
shown on the following table:


    The Committee continues to believe that it is essential to 
provide adequate resources and attention to operation and 
maintenance requirements in order to protect the large Federal 
investment. Yet current and projected budgetary constraints 
require the Committee to limit the amount of work that can be 
accomplished in the fiscal year. In order to cope with the 
situation, the Corps has had to defer or delay scheduled 
maintenance activities. If the trend in deferred maintenance 
continues, Corps-managed facilities nationwide will continue to 
experience deterioration until failure occurs.
    The Committee is aware of the Corps' efforts to stretch the 
limited resources to cover all of its projects and to effect 
savings through a variety of means. As more and more projects 
enter the inventory and budgetary constraints continue, it is 
clear that the Corps will need to find innovated ways to 
accomplish required O&M; work nationwide. Adjustment in lower 
priority programs and noncritical work should be made in 
conjunction with efforts to optimize the use of the limited 
resources in order to maximize the public benefit.
    Program reductions.--Severe budgetary constraints have 
forced the Committee to make difficult choices and limit the 
amount of work that can be accomplished in fiscal year 1996. 
Accordingly, the Committee has reduce or deleted funding for 
several miscellaneous programs which do not have an immediate 
impact on the structural integrity of the water resource 
infrastructure. The Committee is aware that curtailment of 
funding for these items could prematurely terminate achievement 
of efficiencies, beneficial efforts, and products that serve to 
support project operation and maintenance. Therefore, the 
Committee does not intend to preclude the limited reprogramming 
of funds to bring these endeavors to a logical completion or 
reduced level of effort, provided that the Committee is 
consulted and informed prior to the reallocation of funding, 
and with assurance that sufficient funds are available to 
properly operate and maintain projects.
    Dredge Essayons.--The Committee is aware that the Corps of 
Engineers mobilized the Federal dredge Essayons from the 
Pacific Northwest to the gulf coast due to emergency shoaling 
problems in the Mississippi River. The Committee directs the 
Corps to provide a clear plan to return the Essayons to the 
Pacific Northwest as soon as possible. Given the volume of 
dreding work on the west coast, the Committee expects the 
Essayons to return to her regular assigned region at the 
earliest practical time so that all regularly scheduled west 
coast work can be completed as planned.
    Seward Harbor, AL.--Within available funds, the Corps is 
directed to use $100,000 to conduct bioassay analysis of 
contaminated dredge materials at Seward Harbor, AL, in order to 
comply with disposal permit processing.
    Valdez Harbor, AL.--The Committee has provided $275,000 for 
the Corps of Engineers to dredge Valdez Harbor, AL, to 
authorized project depths.
    Newport Bay Harbor, CA.--The Committee has provided 
$500,000 for the Corps of Engineers to initiate repair the 
jetties at Newport Bay Harbor, CA.
    St. Augustine Harbor, FL.--The Committee has provided an 
additional $800,000, the same as the House allowance, for the 
St. Augustine Harbor, FL, project for the Corps of Engineers to 
perform maintenance dredging and utilize the material to 
nourish the beaches at St. Augustine Beach.
    Mississippi River, Baton Rouge to the Gulf of Mexico, 
Louisiana.--The Committee is aware that the authorized 45-foot 
Mississippi River channel is subject to rapid shoaling during 
high water periods causing draft restrictions. At times, this 
shoaling reduces usable depth by as much as 2 to 3 feet. To 
lessen this problem, the Committee believes that the Corps of 
Engineers should consider performing a minimum of 2 feet of 
over depth dredging, or such other over depth as the Corps 
determines most effective, early in the dredging season to 
ensure that project depth can be maintained.
    Red River Waterway, Mississippi River to Shreveport, LA.--
The Committee is aware that very high rates of sedimentation 
have occurred in ox bow lakes formed by realignment of the 
navigation channel primarily as a result of flooding. The 
Committee notes that project documents projected that the 
environmental values of the ox bow lakes would be maintained 
over the life of the navigation project in order to attain the 
project's annual benefits. Therefore, the Committee has 
included an additional $1,000,000 for the Corps to conduct 
maintenance dredging and other related work for recreation and 
environmental purposes.
    Fort Peck Reservoir, MT.--The Committee is aware of the 
need for a breakwater to protect Fort Peck Marina in Montana 
from damage due to high winds and ensuing severe wave action. 
Lack of an effective breakwater is a major limiting factor in 
the State and local area not being able to realize the full 
potential of the recreational opportunities at the marina and 
Fort Peck Reservoir. The Committee is also aware of the 
difficulty non-Federal interests are having in satisfying the 
cost-sharing requirements necessary to proceed with 
construction of the breakwater.
    In light of the potential for severe damage, the Secretary 
of the Army is directed to review and report to the Committee 
no later than February 15, 1996, on the project with the 
objective of reducing the non-Federal cost as much as possible. 
The analysis should include consideration of possible 
innovative alternative solutions, use of in-kind contributions, 
and an appropriate explanation of the recommended cost-sharing 
requirements. The Committee expects the Secretary and the Corps 
of Engineers to work in a positive and cooperative spirit to 
resolve this longstanding problem.
    Abiquiu Dam, NM.--The Committee is aware that the Corps of 
Engineers is in the process of acquiring land adjacent to 
Abiquiu Dam, NM, to assure proper recreational access to the 
project as authorized by Public Law 100-522. In carrying out 
that authorization, the Committee directs the Corps, to the 
extent practicable, to obtain land only from willing sellers.
    Lake Sakakawea, ND.--The Corps is directed to use $50,000 
of available resources to continue mosquito control measures at 
Lake Sakakawea, ND, in fiscal year 1996.
    Port of Toledo, OR.--The Committee has included $500,000 
for the Corps to undertake channel maintenance at the Port of 
Toledo, OR.
    Astoria east boat basin, Oregon.--The Committee understands 
that severe erosion has occurred to the north breakwater at 
Astoria east boat basin in Oregon which is threatening nearby 
public facilities. An appropriation of $275,000 has been 
included in the bill to allow the Corps to continue and 
complete an evaluation report of measures needed to 
rehabilitate the north breakwater.
    Columbia River navigation channel, Oregon and Washington.--
The Committee is aware that the authorized 40-foot Columbia 
River channel is subject to shoaling at a number of locations 
in the river, causing restrictions in channel draft. The 
Committee directs that, within available project funds, the 
Corps of Engineers shall conduct necessary advance maintenance 
dredging to assure that project depth of 40 feet is maintained.
    Erie Harbor, PA.--In fiscal year 1993, the Corps of 
Engineers was provided $1,000,000 to dredge an access channel 
and berthing area for the vessel Niagara at Erie Harbor, PA. 
The Committee has been advised that additional funds may be 
required to complete the work. The Committee expects the Corps 
to continue work with the city and directs the Corps to use 
available funds to complete the dredging work.
    Charleston Harbor, Clouter Creek disposal area, South 
Carolina.--The Committee has included an additional $1,200,000 
for the Corps to accomplish ditching, clearing and site 
preparation for diking of the south and middle cells, and 
commencement of initial diking of the south cell of the Clouter 
Creek disposal area. The Committee understands that this 
restoration work is needed in order to ready to disposal site 
for reuse.
    Columbia River, Columbia Park, Kennewick, WA.--The 
Committee is aware of local community support for the 
development and construction of recreational opportunities at 
Columbia Park in Kennewick, WA. Further, the Committee 
understands that the Corps owns the land and that the city of 
Kennewick has provided operation and maintenance of the area. 
The Committee urges the Corps to work cooperatively and in an 
expeditious manner to assist the local community in developing 
a recreation plan for the area, and to develop a plan for the 
purchase of the property by the city.
    Port Chinook Harbor, WA.--The Committee directs the Corps 
to use available funds to complete maintenance dredging at Port 
Chinook Harbor, WA, that commenced in January and February, but 
was not completed.
    Green Bay Harbor, WI.--Upon resolution of the status of the 
section 401 permit, the Corps may use $250,000 of available 
funds to resume design work on the proposed expansion of the 
Renard Isle confined disposal facility.
    In addition, the attention of the Corps of Engineers is 
directed to the following projects in need of maintenance or 
review and for which the Committee has received requests: 
additional maintenance dredging of shoals and anchorages at 
Charleston Harbor, SC; maintenance dredging at Foley River and 
Port Royal Harbor, SC, and maintenance dredging at York Harbor 
and Scarborough River, ME.

                           regulatory program

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $101,000,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     112,000,000
House allowance.........................................     101,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             101,000,000

    An appropriation of $101,000,000 is recommended for 
regulatory programs of the Corps of Engineers.
    This appropriation provides for salaries and related costs 
to administer laws pertaining to regulation of navigable waters 
and wetlands of the United States in accordance with the Rivers 
and Harbors Act of 1899, the Clean Water Act of 1977, and the 
Marine Protection Act of 1972.
    In fiscal year 1996, the Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $101,000,000 for the Corps of Engineers' 
Regulatory Program, which is $11,000,000 below the budget 
request and the same as the fiscal year 1995 level. The 
Committee directs that the reduction below the budget request 
be derived from enforcement activities.
    The Committee understands that a certain municipal solid 
waste landfill project in Pierce County, WA, has an Army Corps 
of Engineers application No. OBY-4-013996 that must be 
completed immediately in order for the county to begin 
construction of a new landfill and avoid the need to long haul 
waste at a prohibitive cost. The Committee urges the Corps to 
use all possible speed to expedite the required permitting 
process.

                 Flood Control and Coastal Emergencies

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $14,979,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      20,000,000
House allowance.........................................      10,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              10,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $10,000,000 
for flood control and coastal emergencies. This is $10,000,000 
below the budget request and the same as the House allowance.
    This activity provides for flood emergency preparation, 
flood fighting and rescue operations, and repair of flood 
control and Federal hurricane or shore protection works. It 
also provides for emergency supplies of clean drinking water 
where the source has been contaminated and, in drought 
distressed areas, provision of adequate supplies of water for 
human and livestock consumption.

                           oilspill research

Appropriations, 1995....................................        $900,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................         850,000
House allowance.........................................         850,000

Committee recommendation

                                                                 850,000

    An appropriation of $850,000 is recommended for oilspill 
research for fiscal year 1996, which is the same as the House 
allowance and budget request.
    Section 7001 of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 established 
an Interagency Coordinating Committee on Oil Pollution Research 
to develop a plan for, and coordinate the implementation of, an 
oil pollution research, development, and demonstration program. 
Title VII of the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 also authorizes use 
of the oilspill liability trust fund to perform oil pollution 
research.
    As a member of the Interagency Coordinating Committee, the 
Corps of Engineers participates in the research program through 
the development of advanced displays, maps, and data management 
utilizing satellite and/or aircraft imaging data. These 
management tools will be developed for the on-the-scene spill 
coordinator's use for optimal allocation of resources and 
timely response to the specific oilspill situation.

                            general expenses

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $152,500,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     164,725,000
House allowance.........................................     150,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             153,000,000

    This appropriation finances the expenses of the Office, 
Chief of Engineers, the Division Offices, and certain research 
and statistical functions of the Corps of Engineers. The 
Committee recommends an appropriation of $153,000,000 which is 
$11,725,000 below the budget request.

                           GENERAL PROVISION

    Corps hopper dredges, (sec. 101).--For the past 3 fiscal 
years, Congress has made available to the private dredge fleet 
7.5 million cubic yards of work which had been accomplished in 
earlier years by the Federal hopper dredge fleet. The Committee 
recommendation continues the 7.5 million cubic yard set-aside 
in fiscal year 1996. During the period in which any of the 
Federal hopper dredges is out of service for lengthy repair or 
rehabilitation, reallocating this entire 7.5 million cubic 
yards among the three remaining Federal dredges would require 
further reduction in their days of service, thus making their 
operation more costly and less competitive. If any of the four 
Federal dredges is removed from service for repair or 
rehabilitation and is prevented from accomplishing the level of 
work it has carried out during the past 3 fiscal years, the 
Committee directs the Corps to reduce the 7.5 million cubic 
yards amount contained in subsection (a) by the share allocated 
to that dredge over the past 3 fiscal years which has been put 
out for bid for the private industry.
    The Committee recommendation would prohibit the Corps from 
undertaking improvements and major repairs to the dredge 
McFarland except normal maintenance and repair necessary to 
keep the vessel in it's current operational condition.
    Corps of Engineers headquarters building, South East 
Federal Center, (sec. 103).--The Committee is aware of the GSA 
plans to construct a building to house the Corps of Engineers 
in the South East Federal Center. However, during this time of 
downsizing of the Federal work force and the continual 
restructuring and reducing of the Corps' headquarters, the 
Committee believes that such a move in premature and ill 
advised. Therefore, the Committee has included language in the 
bill under section 103 which prohibits the Corps from 
participating in any way in the construction of this project. 
The Committee urges GSA to reflect on the building moratorium 
mandated by the Congress and to postpone award of any 
additional contracts until it has assessed the results of the 
downsizing of the Federal work force in the Washington, DC, 
area with the hope that additional construction will not be 
necessary.
                  TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                Central Utah Project Completion Account

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $40,163,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      44,139,000
House allowance.........................................      44,139,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              44,139,000

    The Committee recommendation for fiscal year 1996 to carry 
out the provisions of the Central Utah Project Completion Act 
is $44,139,000, the same as the budget request and House 
allowance.
    The Central Utah Project Completion Act (titles II-VI of 
Public Law 102-575) provides for the completion of the central 
Utah project by the Central Utah Water Conservancy District. 
The act also authorizes the appropriation of funds for fish, 
wildlife, and recreation mitigation and conservation; 
establishes an account in the Treasury for the deposit of these 
funds and of other contributions for mitigation and 
conservation activities; and establishes a Utah Reclamation 
Mitigation and Conservation Commission to administer funds in 
that account. The act further assigns responsibilities for 
carrying out the act to the Secretary of the Interior and 
prohibits delegation of those responsibilities to the Bureau of 
Reclamation.

                         Bureau of Reclamation

                         general investigations

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $14,190,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      13,602,000
House allowance.........................................      13,114,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              11,234,000

    An appropriation of $11,234,000 is recommended by the 
Committee for general investigations of the Bureau of 
Reclamation.
    The recommended amounts provided under this account for 
surveys and planning activities are shown in the following 
table, with Committee comments following immediately after the 
tabulation.


    Walker River Basin, Nevada.--The Committee directs the 
Department of the Interior, in cooperation with the University 
of Nevada, to undertake a 1-year appraisal study of the 
potential for water banking within the Walker River Basin of 
Nevada and California. Specifically, the study is to assess the 
extent to which voluntary water transfers involving private 
water rights holders and the Walker River Indian Reservation 
might be employed to assist in the stabilization and banking. 
Not more than $200,000, from funds appropriated herein for the 
Bureau of Reclamation, to be matched by contributions from 
State and local government entities or interested parties, 
shall be available for this purpose.
    San Juan River Gallup, Navajo water supply project, New 
Mexico.--The Committee has included $100,000 for the Bureau of 
Reclamation to continue activities related to the San Juan 
River Gallup, Navajo water supply project, New Mexico.
    Chiloquin Dam, OR.--The Committee is aware that fish 
passage through the existing fish ladders at Sprague River Dam 
(Chiloquin Dam) in Oregon has been questioned as insufficient. 
Within available funds, the Bureau of Reclamation may provide 
technical or other assistance, as appropriate, to mitigate the 
fish passage problem.
    Funding adjustment to various programs.--Due to the severe 
budget constraints and limited resources in future years, the 
Committee has not been able to include funding for some of the 
new studies proposed in the budget and included in the House-
passed bill. In addition, the Committee has found it necessary 
to reduce several nonproject specific programs in order to stay 
within the budget targets for fiscal year 1996. The Committee 
is aware that curtailment or reduced funding levels could 
prematurely terminate ongoing work. Therefore, the Committee 
expects that the Bureau of Reclamation to reprogram funds on a 
limited basis to insure activities are brought to a logical and 
efficient conclusion.

                          construction program

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $432,727,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     375,943,000
House allowance.........................................     417,301,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             390,461,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $390,461,000 
for construction programs of the Bureau of Reclamation.
    The amounts recommended by the Committee are shown on the 
following table along with the budget request and House 
allowance.


    Construction program budget request.--The Committee is 
disappointed and dismayed with the continued disregard of the 
funding needs for various ongoing projects in the construction 
program. On several projects, where construction contracts have 
been awarded and work is underway, the actual funding needs are 
two to four times greater than the amount requested in the 
budget. In some cases, the budget request is hardly sufficient 
to cover the costs which would be incurred if the project were 
terminated. Further, unrealistic assumptions regarding the 
level of non-Federal contributions have also created 
significant shortfalls.
    These factors and severe budgetary constraints, have forced 
the Committee to eliminate or substantially reduce new 
initiatives proposed for 1996, and reduce proposed increases in 
other programs to the current year level or lower in order to 
stay within the budgetary allocations for discretionary 
programs.
    Boulder Canyon project, Hoover Dam Visitors Center.--As the 
result of tremendous cost overruns for the Hoover Dam Visitors 
Center and so that ratepayers are not asked to absorb the 
excessive cost of these overruns, the Committee directs that 
the Bureau of Reclamation, within available funds, produce a 
study that will look at various options to reduce the burden on 
the ratepayers, and report back to the Committee within 6 
months.
    Central Arizona project, Gila River Indian community, 
Arizona.--The Committee has provided $1,842,000, the same as 
the House, for the Bureau of Reclamation to reimburse the Gila 
River Indian community for construction of irrigation works on 
the Sacaton Ranch as authorized by Public Law 103-435.
    Central Valley project.--Because of severe budgetary 
constraints and the need to augment the shortfall in funding 
for the higher priority Shasta temperature control device, the 
Committee has not been able to fund many of the Central Valley 
project activities at higher levels. The Committee is pleased 
with the efforts of the Department of the Interior, and all 
parties, in establishing the Central Valley Project Improvement 
Act roundtable. The Department is encouraged to strengthen this 
process so that the most critical and essential activities are 
identified and proposed for funding. This process will be 
essential in future years with smaller and smaller 
discretionary budgetary resources.
    The Secretary is directed to prepare and submit to the 
appropriate committees of Congress, by February 1996, a report 
which displays priorities and activities for a 5-year period 
beginning with fiscal year 1997, associated with the 
restoration requirements and goals of the CVPIA. The 
information shall be updated annually and made part of the 
CVPIA justification material which is prepared for the 
Committee. In preparation of such report the Secretary is 
encouraged to work closely with the Restoration Fund 
Roundtable, the State of California, and other stakeholders.
    Little Holland tract.--The Committee has not included funds 
for the Bureau to purchase the Little Holland tract in 
California due to significant regulatory and legal issues. The 
Committee further believes that if the purchase of the property 
can be justified for inclusion in the Stone Lake National 
Wildlife Refuge, funding for that purpose should be provided by 
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and not by the Bureau of 
Reclamation.
    Central Valley project, Shasta division, California.--The 
Committee has provided an additional $19,000,000 for continuing 
construction of the Shasta Dam temperature control device.
    The need for the Committee to add these funds has been 
brought about by the failure of the State of California to thus 
far provide the States cost-sharing obligations under the 
Central Valley Project Improvement Act, which requires that the 
State contribute 25 percent of the cost of the temperature 
control device. The Committee has added these funds only 
because of contractual commitments for ongoing construction 
work and the fact that continued operation of Shasta Dam 
without the temperature control device in place can cost the 
taxpayers as much as $11,000,000 a year to replace power lost 
when water is bypassed away from the turbines. The Committee 
has had to find offsetting reductions in order to maintain the 
work at Shasta which the Committee understands is the highest 
priority.
    San Diego area water reclamation project, California.--The 
Committee has provided $2,340,000 for the San Diego area water 
reclamation project in California, including $1,000,000 for the 
Escondido water reclamation program, and $1,340,000 for the San 
Diego water reclamation program.
    Animas-La Plata project, Colorado.--The Committee concurs 
with the House Committee regarding the slow pace of work on the 
Animas-La Plata project, a major element of the Colorado Ute 
Indian Water Rights Settlement Agreement. The Southern Ute and 
Ute Mountain Ute Tribes negotiated in good faith with the 
United States to reach this agreement. The tribes and the non-
Indian participants in the projects have met all their 
commitments. The only thing lacking has been the commitment of 
the Federal Government to fulfill its commitment and complete 
construction of the project. Therefore, the Committee has 
provided $10,000,000, the same as the House, for construction 
of the Animas-La Plata project in fiscal year 1996.
    Umatilla basin project, Oregon.--An additional $175,000 has 
been provided for the Umatilla basin project in Oregon. The 
additional funding is for a hydrology study of the basin that 
is needed for boundary expansion EIS.
    Lake Meredith salinity control.--The Committee directs the 
Bureau of Reclamation to use up to an additional $470,000 of 
available funds to accelerate Federal involvement in the Lake 
Meredith, TX salinity control project.
    Safety of dams, initiate corrective action.--The Committee 
recommends an appropriation of $28,175,000 for initial safety 
of dams corrective activities which include special studies, 
preparation of authorization reports, preconstruction 
activities, and accomplishment of modifications not exceeding 
$750,000.
    Congress appropriated $18,389,000 for these activities for 
the current year, but plans call for allocation of 
approximately $10,000,000. Further, the fiscal year 1996 budget 
request is $38,175,000, $28,000,000 more than the current 
program level and $20,000,000 more than the appropriation for 
1995.
    The Committee is sensitive to the funding needs and the 
critical nature of the work performed within the initiate 
corrective action line item. The Committee believes that the 
funding level recommended is adequate to cover critical program 
needs. The level recommended is just slightly under the highest 
appropriation since the program started, $28,443,000. It is 
also $15,000,000 more than the 8-year average of $13,300,000 
and $10,000,000 more than the appropriation for fiscal year 
1995.
    The Committee directs the Bureau of Reclamation to manage 
the resources to insure that funds are available for the most 
critical work. If additional funds are required to cover 
unforeseen needs in fiscal year 1996, the Committee expects the 
Secretary to exercise his emergency authority to make funds 
available.
    Ground Water Recharge Demonstration Program.--The Committee 
recommendation for the Ground Water Recharge Demonstration 
Program includes $500,000 for the Bureau of Reclamation to 
continue the Equus beds recharge project in Kansas. The 
Committee understands that the project is being cost shared on 
a 50-50 basis.
    The Committee does not concur with the House Committee in 
allowing the Bureau of Reclamation to proceed with new ground 
water recharge demonstration projects. The Committee is 
concerned that future domestic discretionary resources will not 
be sufficient to sustain major commitments of this type through 
completion.

                       operation and maintenance

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $284,300,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     288,759,000
House allowance.........................................     278,759,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             267,393,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $267,393,000. 
This is $11,366,000 below the House allowance and $21,366,000 
below the budget request. This reduction is necessary because 
of the severe budgetary limitations for non-Defense 
discretionary programs and the shortfall of funding in other 
parts of the Bureau's program.
    The appropriation recommended under this hearing provides 
for the operation and maintenance of a total of 36 projects, 
project areas, or divisions of projects. These projects are 
operated and maintained for power production, municipal and 
industrial water supplies, irrigation, flood control, and other 
benefits. Provision is also made for administration of 13 
associated programs. These programs seek to maximize benefits 
from existing projects. Project benefits and operations will be 
enhanced through water conservation measures, examination of 
existing structures, environmental considerations, improvement 
of recreation opportunities, and water quality improvement.
    The Committee recommendation includes $1,293,000 for joint 
use facilities of the San Luis unit of the Central Valley 
project. In addition, the Committee has provided an 
appropriation of $6,692,000 for the Central Valley Improvement 
Act, which is the same as the funding level for fiscal year 
1995.

               bureau of reclamation loan program account

Appropriations, 1995....................................      $9,600,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      16,668,000
House allowance.........................................      11,668,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              11,668,000

    The committee concurs with the House in recommending an 
appropriation of $11,668,000 for the small reclamation program 
of the Bureau of Reclamation.
    Under the Small Reclamation Projects Act (43 U.S.C. 422a-
422l), loans and/or grants can be made to non-Federal 
organizations for construction or rehabilitation and betterment 
of small water resource projects.
    As required by the Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990, this 
account records the subsidy costs associated with the direct 
loans, as well as administrative expenses of this program.
    New loan program activity.--Due to budgetary constraints, 
the Committee recommendation concurs with the House in deleting 
the $5,000,000 requested by the administration for the proposed 
new loan program.
    The budget request and the approved Committee allowance are 
shown on the following table:


                central valley project restoration fund

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $45,385,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      43,579,000
House allowance.........................................      43,579,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              43,579,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $43,579,000, 
the same as the budget request.
    The Central Valley project restoration fund was authorized 
in the Central Valley Project Improvement Act, title 34 of 
Public Law 102-575. This fund was established to provide 
funding from project beneficiaries for habitat restoration, 
improvement and acquisition, and other fish and wildlife 
restoration activities in the Central Valley project area of 
California. Revenues are derived from payments by project 
beneficiaries and from donations. Payments from project 
beneficiaries include several required by the act (Friant 
Division surcharges, higher charges on water transferred to 
non-CVP users, and tiered water prices) and, to the extent 
required in appropriations acts, additional annual mitigation 
and restoration payments.
    The Committee has provided $11,281,000, the full budget 
request, for the Shasta temperature control device.

                    general administrative expenses

Appropriation, 1995.....................................     $54,034,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      50,327,000
House allowance.........................................      48,150,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              48,150,000

    The Committee recommendation for general adminsitrative 
expenses is $48,150,000. This is the same as the House 
allowance.
    The general administrative expenses program provides for 
the executive direction and management of all reclamation 
activities, as performed by the Commissioner's offices in 
Washington, DC, Denver, CO, and five regional offices. The 
Denver office and regional offices charge individual projects 
or activities for direct beneficial services and related 
administrative and technical costs. These charges are covered 
under other appropriations.
                    TITLE III--DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    Funds recommended in title III provide for Department of 
Energy programs relating to: energy supply, research and 
development activities; uranium supply and enrichment 
activities; the uranium enrichment decontamination and 
decommissioning fund; general science and research activities; 
the nuclear waste disposal fund; atomic energy defense 
activities; departmental administration; the Office of 
Inspector General; Power Marketing Administrations; and the 
Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.

                        committee recommendation

    Funding recommendations for Department of Energy programs 
in fiscal year 1996 are significantly below the Department's 
fiscal year 1996 budget request in many areas. Absorbing these 
reductions will require much effort on the part of the 
Department to prioritize activities and seek the most cost-
effective means for accomplishing program goals. The Department 
must focus on specific program missions and reduce the number 
of activities currently being performed, many of which are not 
possible in a severely constrained funding environment.
    While the Committee acknowledges that these program 
reductions will be difficult, recent reviews such as the Galvin 
task force list numerous areas where improvements should be 
made. Examples of areas where the Committee expects to see 
reductions include: the number of Federal employees at 
headquarters who micromanage field and laboratory activities 
instead of setting policy and allowing implementation of these 
policies at the field level; the number of individual sites and 
offices throughout the country where Department of Energy 
employees are stationed; the number of support service 
contractors paid to do work which should be performed by 
Federal employees at headquarters and in field offices; the 
number of internal departmental regulations requiring 
facilities and laboratories to far exceed the requirements 
applied to comparable commercial facilities; and the subsequent 
compliance reviews conducted by every level of Federal and 
contractor management.

                       departmental restructuring

    The Committee is aware of the Secretary of Energy's efforts 
to restructure operations enabling the Department to deliver 
its core critical missions to the Nation at a lower cost to the 
taxpayer. Reducing Federal costs through downsizing and 
management will help the Department maintain its essential 
defense, research, energy security, and environmental cleanup 
activities vital to the Nation's security. The Department has 
announced a comprehensive plan to achieve $14,000,000,000 in 
savings over the next 5 years. Of this amount, $1,700,000,000 
is expected to be derived from: reengineering of the 
Department's field and headquarters operations to achieve a 27-
percent reduction in Federal employees, elimination of 3,788 
positions; more focused management of support service 
contractors; improved management of information technology; 
reforms in employee and contractor travel; sales of surplus 
inventory assets; and reforms in environmental policy 
procedures. The Committee is pleased that the Department is 
taking these steps to downsize and increase the efficiency of 
its operations. The Committee emphasizes, however, that the 
very survival of the Department may depend upon the success of 
its efforts. The Committee urges the Department to attain its 
goals in this regard, and to continue to seek ways to further 
streamline its operations.

                         laboratory management

    The Committee concurs with the insights of the Galvin task 
force regarding the management of Department laboratories, and 
expresses its frustration with the Department's lack of 
progress in either implementing the far-reaching solutions 
proposed by the Galvin report or proposing alternative 
solutions to the inefficient and oppressive oversight and 
regulation endured by the laboratories. The Department's 
inability to make meaningful reforms in these areas has 
resulted in increased cost and reduced productivity at the 
national laboratories that, if allowed to continue, could 
jeopardize the laboratories' ability to fulfill their missions.
    The Committee is encouraged by DOE's ongoing consideration 
of moving to outside regulation of the laboratories and 
strongly endorses any approach that removes the duplication of 
oversight that currently exists between DOE and outside 
regulators.

                      support service contractors

    The Committee shares the House's concern regarding the 
extensive use of support service contractors by the Department 
of Energy at headquarters and the field offices. As Federal 
staffing declines in response to streamlining initiatives, 
budget reductions, and redirections there will be increasing 
pressure to substitute support service contractors for Federal 
employees. This must be resisted, and support service contract 
costs must be reduced significantly. Certain services such as 
custodial services, physical security, mail room operations, 
and facility and grounds maintenance, are usually performed 
cost effectively by the private sector. However, there are 
other support service contractors who perform services which 
appear to be inherently governmental in nature or noncritical. 
The Department is directed to review its support service 
contracts rigorously and eliminate those which are of low 
priority or which are inappropriate.
    The Committee realizes that there is a need for the 
Department to contract with the private sector in order to 
obtain unbiased technical expertise, unavailable within the 
Department. Technical services contracts provide the Federal 
Government with the necessary flexibility in acquiring the 
appropriate labor quantity and skills mix to meet changing 
program requirements. This approach is clearly cost effective, 
as needed expertise can be used for a limited period of time 
until program needs or tasks are completed. It would be much 
more difficult and expensive to maintain a Federal labor force 
given the diversity of technical expertise needed. In addition, 
contracting for technical services is consistent with the 
Government's long-standing policy of contracting out work for 
which there is an available private sector capability, as long 
as the Government refrains from contracting out inherently 
governmental functions or personal services.
    The Committee is aware that the Department is implementing 
a plan which would force support service contractor cost 
savings of $450,000,000 over 5 years (fiscal years 1996 through 
2000). While this is encouraging, the Committee believes that 
higher savings are possible. The Department should, at a 
minimum, require demonstrable savings of not less than 
$90,000,000 in fiscal year 1996. Further, future budget 
requests for support services must be free of all contracts 
which cannot be justified on the basis of a cost-benefit 
analysis or as a short-term requirement for expertise in a 
technical specialty area. The Department should report annually 
on its progress in reducing these expenditures.

               operating and capital funding requirements

    The Committee agrees with the House action to merge capital 
equipment, general plant projects, and most accelerator 
improvements project funds with operating funds to expedite the 
allocation of resources for operations and infrastructure 
activities and to ensure the operation of the Department's 
laboratories and facilities in the most efficient and cost-
effective manner. The Committee hopes this will help alleviate 
instances of excessive administrative and procedural oversight.
    Construction activity in the atomic energy defense 
activities areas exceeding the general plant project threshold 
of $2,000,000 will continue to require specific authorization 
and appropriation by Congress. Any construction activity that 
does not exceed the $2,000,000 threshold will be included in 
the ``Operation and maintenance'' account.
    In implementing this change, the Committee directs the 
Department to continue to reflect the capital equipment, 
general plant projects, and accelerator improvement projects in 
the financial and accounting reports.

           energy supply, research and development activities

Appropriations, 1995....................................  $3,314,548,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................   3,396,535,000
House allowance.........................................   2,575,700,000

Committee recommendation

                                                           2,798,324,000

    The appropriations recommended for energy supply, research 
and development activities provide for the Department of 
Energy's solar and renewable energy programs; environment, 
safety and health; nuclear energy programs; energy research 
programs including fusion, biological and environmental 
research, and basic energy sciences; and environmental 
restoration programs.
    The Committee recommendation for fiscal year 1996 supports 
to the extent possible the role of Federal participation in 
basic research and development programs in energy supply 
activities. Due to budget constraints, significant reductions 
in certain of the Department's programs are necessary. To 
provide more flexibility in program execution in a time of 
declining budgetary resources, the recommended funding levels 
have merged operating, capital equipment and general plant 
project funding. Funding for programs which have accelerator 
improvement projects costing less than $2,000,000 has also been 
merged to provide flexibility.

                       SOLAR AND RENEWABLE ENERGY

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $388,108,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     423,397,000
House allowance.........................................     266,394,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             283,560,000

    Solar energy.--Funding for fiscal year 1996 is 
$283,560,000, and will support both basic and applied research, 
and technology development. In addition, the Committee supports 
the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's work in association 
with other national laboratories in renewable energy technology 
development. While current budget constraints prevent the 
Committee from funding the solar programs at higher levels, the 
Committee believes that the resources provided will be 
sufficient to maintain the program at a level which will result 
in continuing advances in solar technologies.
    Within the total funding provided for solar energy, the 
Committee has included $2,988,000, the same as the budget 
request, for the renewable energy production incentive program. 
The Committee urges the Department to fully fund both tier 1 
and tier 2 projects as outlined in its recently published 
regulations.
    The Committee believes there is significant potential in 
the proposed collaboration between the National Renewable 
Energy Laboratory and efforts to design and implement energy 
efficient technologies, using cost effective, locally sourced 
materials, including waste-based ones, in the cold regions of 
the country, where energy demands are high and transportation 
costs substantial. The Committee has included $750,000 for 
continued research, development and specific site demonstration 
of these technologies.
    Photovoltaics.--From within the available photovoltaic 
funds, an addition of $1,000,000 shall be made available to 
support the ongoing research in photovoltaics being conducted 
by the Southeast and Southwest Regional Photovoltaic Experiment 
Station.
    The Committee supports the development of integrated 
roofing materials and other technologies which blend 
photovoltaic systems and architectural components. The 
Committee encourages the Department to continue its support for 
such technologies.
    Solar thermal.--Within the funds available, the Committee 
has included $3,100,000 for the operations and testing of the 
solar II central receiver facility.
    Biomass.--Within the funds provided, the Committee 
recommendation includes the full budget request to test the 
gasifier/hot-gas cleanup system in Hawaii and the wood-burning 
gasifier in Vermont.
    The Committee has provided $3,940,000 for the regional 
biomass program. This funding level is the same as the budget 
request. The Committee has provided no funds for an ethanol 
production plant in the city of Gridley, CA.
    The Committee urges the Department to continue funding for 
high quality, peer-reviewed, university-based research with 
practical applications in the Biofuels Program.
    Wind.--The Committee is aware of the efforts at Kotzebue, 
AK, to displace a portion of its high-cost diesel power with a 
wind-energy system. The project will provide important data on 
the operation of a wind-energy system in a cold climate. The 
Committee directs the Department to provide technical 
assistance and other appropriate support for this project.
    Solar international.--The Committee has provided $6,500,000 
for solar international programs. The Committee expects funding 
to be divided between activities associated with the Committee 
on Renewable Energy Commerce and Trade [CORECT] and joint 
implementation projects.
    Geothermal.--The Committee recommendation is $29,892,000, 
an increase of $4,163,000 over the House. Requested funding to 
maintain the Energy Technology Engineering Center has not been 
included.
    The Geothermal Energy Program addresses the use of heat 
from the Earth for electricity generation, direct heating of 
facilities, and for geothermal heat pumps. State-of-the-art, 
properly designed geothermal installations need relatively 
little surface area, do not contaminate ground water supplies, 
and are benign to the atmosphere. The purpose of the geothermal 
program is to reduce economic and technological barriers to 
expanded use of this technology through Government-industry 
cost shared efforts involving research, development, and 
demonstration.
    During the past year, industry cost sharing has 
significantly expanded within this program. The program's past 
years' results are illustrated by the $4,000,000,000 in 
overseas goethermal plant construction contracts recently won 
by American companies, as described in the testimony. The 
Committee notes that the geothermal industry pays over 
$30,000,000 per year to the Federal Government in royalties and 
leases.
    The Committee recommendation provides funds for the cost-
shared project to inject treated waste water effluent from Lake 
County, CA, into the geothermal heat reservoir at the geysers 
field. No funds, however, are provided to study the feasibility 
of piping treated effluent from Santa Rosa to the geysers.
    The Committee has provided $300,000, the same as the budget 
request, for the Geo-Heat Center at the Oregon Institute of 
Technology.
    Hydrogen research.--The Committee proposes to fund hydrogen 
research at $7,500,000, an increase of $166,000 over the budget 
request.
    Hydropower.--The Committee has provided $3,000,000, an 
increase of $2,020,000 over the budget request. The additional 
funds are provided to support the cost-shared program to 
develop an advanced energy-efficient turbine which reduces 
environmental impacts on fish species.
    Electric energy systems and storage.--The Committee 
recommendation for electric energy systems and storage is 
$32,309,000. The Committee recommends $4,000,000 for the energy 
storage systems program.
    The Committee recommendation includes the administration's 
budget request of $9,924,000 for the electric and magnetic 
fields research program.
    Ocean energy systems.--Within available funds, the 
Committee has included $300,000 to continue the ocean thermal 
energy conversion and ocean energy systems as provided in past 
fiscal years. The Committee understands that this will be the 
final year of Federal funding for this program.
    Policy and management.--The Committee recommendation for 
policy and management is $13,775,000. The Committee has 
consolidated all program direction funds for the solar and 
renewable programs in this single account.

                        nuclear energy programs

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $293,228,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     382,817,000
House allowance.........................................     235,698,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             274,873,000

    The recommendation includes $40,000,000, the same as the 
House, for the design certification and standardization 
activities for the advanced light water reactor program.
    To ensure that the advanced light water reactor program 
goes forward within current budget constraints, the Committee 
directs that the Department provide sufficient resources to 
attain final design approval of the midsize passively safe 
pressurized water reactor by December 31, 1996. The Committee 
further directs that the Department give priority to supporting 
the completion of design certification of authorized large 
water reactors.
    The National Academy of Sciences' Committee on 
Electrometallurgical Techniques for DOE Spent Fuel Treatment 
concluded that electrometallurgical techniques being developed 
at the Argonne National Laboratory could represent a 
sufficiently promising technology for treating a variety of DOE 
spent fuels and warrants continued research and development.
    However, due to budget constraints, the Committee 
recommends no funding for the nuclear technology research and 
development program in this account. Funding for research on 
the electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuels has 
been provided under technology development in the ``Defense 
environmental restoration and waste management'' account, 
consistent with the authorizing committee's recommendation.
    The Committee has included an appropriation of $12,500,000 
which shall be used by the Department of Energy for 
continuation of the development of the gas turbine-modular 
helium reactor [GT-MHR], a new and unique power reactor concept 
that combines the passively safe gas-cooled reactor with a 
state-of-the-art high-efficiency gas turbine. This represents 
an increase in funding of $5,000,000 over the closeout funding 
requested by the DOE. Notwithstanding the above, no more than 
$5,000,000 shall be made available to the program until an 
evaluation of the technical feasibility and economic potential 
of the GT-MHR for power generation shall be completed by the 
National Research Council and the results reported to the 
appropriate authorizing and appropriating committees of the 
Congress.
    The Committee understands that the GT-MHR has the 
capability to destroy 90 percent of the plutonium 239 in 
weapons grade plutonium when used alone and over 99 percent of 
the plutonium 239 when used in combination with an accelerator 
driven reactor, without the need of reprocessing or recycle of 
the material. The evaluation shall also include, therefore, a 
review of the technical capability of the reactor to accomplish 
the near total destruction of weapons grade plutonium alone or 
in combination with an accelerator without reprocessing and 
recycle. The study shall be supported by funds within this 
account and shall be completed no later than 90 days following 
the signing of this bill into law. If the results reported are 
positive the balance of the funding shall be released to 
continue the development of the GT-MHR and if negative the 
balance of the funding shall be applied to program closeout.
    The Committee recommendation includes $40,000,000 for the 
Soviet-designed reactor safety program. The House provided no 
funds for this initiative. While the Committee realizes that 
this program competes with important domestic programs for 
scarce budgetary resources, the Committee believes that the 
long-term benefits of improving the safety of these foreign 
nuclear facilities far outweigh the costs.
    The Committee has provided no funds for the Russian 
replacement power initiative. Unlike the Soviet-designed 
reactor safety program, the replacement power initiative does 
not require the unique technical expertise possessed by the 
Department of Energy, and would be more appropriately funded 
under a foreign assistance or national security program.
    Due to the downsizing of the nuclear energy program, the 
Committee's recommendation for program direction and policy and 
management is adjusted accordingly.
    Isotope support.--The Committee recommendation is 
$25,358,000, the same as the budget request and $700,000 over 
the House. The Committee agrees with the House that in order to 
consolidate related isotope activities, the funding for test 
reactor hot cells, $1,400,000, is transferred from nuclear 
energy research and development to the isotope support program, 
and is included within available funding. The Committee also 
has provided $1,700,000 for program direction.
    The Committee understands that the Department of Energy and 
the Idaho Brain Tumor Center [IBTC] signed a lease agreement 
that may lead the way for the IBTC to prepare the Power Burst 
Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory to 
perform brain cancer therapy. The IBTC will assume 
responsibility for the surveillance and maintenance of the 
facility when the necessary NRC permits have been approved and 
other lease conditions have been met. The Committee supports 
this arrangement, and expects to be informed of any 
developments that would preclude the use of the Power Burst 
Facility in boron neutron capture therapy treatment.

                civilian waste research and development

    Due to funding contraints, the Committee concurs with the 
House recommendation and has not provided the budget request of 
$699,000 for this program in fiscal year 1996.

                     environment, safety and health

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $143,920,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     166,759,000
House allowance.........................................     128,433,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             128,433,000

    The Environmental, Safety, and Health Program [ES&H;] was 
established to assure protection of the environment, safety of 
DOE workers, the public, and DOE property. The ES&H; program 
implements these goals by defining DOE policy, providing 
guidance and technical assistance, performing safety related 
research of a generic nature and performing independent 
overview and assessment.
    Much criticism has been heard regarding excessive 
compliance reviews and audits of field facilities and 
laboratories. With the reduction in funding resources, the 
Committee expects the Department to make every effort to 
coordinate reviews and eliminate excessive oversight by 
headquarters and field organizations, and to reduce the use of 
support service contract employees to perform Federal 
functions.
    Radiation Effects Research Foundation.--Over the last few 
months, the Department has made a number of proposals to alter 
the institutional arrangements for following up on the health 
of survivors of the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombing. Since 1946, 
the U.S. Government has relied on the National Academy of 
Sciences to serve as the neutral intermediary for the provision 
of support and oversight of scientific research on the 
consequences of the acute radiation exposures suffered by the 
population of these two cities.
    Most of our information on radiation effects to human 
health comes from this research, and results of such research 
over the next decade--as individuals who were exposed to 
radiation as children enter the later years of their life--
promises to provide important information on long-term effects 
of radiation exposure.
    The Committee understands that the Department would like to 
change the current institutional arrangement to provide for 
more training of radiation epidemiologists, but sees no 
rationale for altering the current organizational and 
management relationship with the National Academy.
    Accordingly, the Secretary shall keep this relationship 
intact. This judgment should not be seen as signaling 
disinterest by the Committee in the training of the next 
generation of radiation scientists, but as a reflection of the 
Committee's judgment that the current program of the Radiation 
Effects Research Foundation Program is sound and not in need of 
institutional alteration.

                        energy research programs

                 biological and environmental research

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $444,822,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     431,664,000
House allowance.........................................     379,645,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             428,591,000

    This program has two main objectives: (1) to develop the 
knowledge base necessary to identify, understand, and 
anticipate the long-term health and environmental consequences 
of energy use and development; and (2) to utilize the 
Department's unique scientific and technological capabilities 
to solve major scientific problems in medicine and biology.
    Within funds available, the Committee has included 
$9,461,000, the same as the budget request, for the boron 
neutron capture therapy program.
    The Committee encourages the Department to support research 
in the development and shared use of high MR instruments for 
the study of brain function in centers where these research 
efforts can lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of the 
mentally ill.
    The Committee has provided $7,000,000 to the Biomedical 
Research Foundation of northwest Louisiana to create the Center 
for Biomedical Technology Innovation. The center will serve as 
a focal point for the ongoing biomedical research and 
development that is ongoing at many of the national 
laboratories and for the clinical testing of products that 
result from that research. It will focus specifically on the 
development of instrumentation for minimally invasive 
procedures (including advanced imaging technologies), 
technologies for individual self care, telemedicine and medical 
robotics. Priority will be given to those technologies which 
are most likely to reduce the cost of care. The center will be 
housed within the Foundation's Biomedical Research Institute, 
and managed by a consortium organized and led by the Biomedical 
Research Foundation.
    Within available funding, the Committee supports the 
National Institute for Global Environmental Change.
    The Committee is aware of the serious environmental threats 
facing the Arctic and Bering Sea ecosystem that supports the 
fishery resources of great importance to the Nation. 
Accordingly, the Committee strongly supports the atmospheric 
radiation measurement [ARM] program and the establishment of 
the third ARM site on the North Slope of Alaska. Within the 
funds available, the Committee has included $1,000,000 for this 
activity which will enhance the monitoring of the Arctic's 
atmospheric processes.
    The Committee has included $8,500,000 for the continued 
development of a statewide, high-speed information, education, 
and data gathering network managed by the Oregon Health 
Sciences University. Of this amount, $5,000,000 will be 
dedicated to enhancing network infrastructure and capabilities 
at OHSU, with the additional $3,500,000 for a collaborative 
effort with the Oregon Graduate Institute to develop and test 
new delivery technologies that can improve access to critical 
data and expand multimedia applications in the field.
    The Human Genome Program represents one of the most 
important and ambitious biological research efforts being 
pursued by the Department of Energy. The human genome contains 
about 3 billion DNA bases and some 80,000 genes, of which 
approximately 5,000 genes have already been mapped. Considering 
the long-term benefits of this research project on human health 
and the development of new medical applications, the Committee 
continues its strong support of this program, and has provided 
the full budget request in its recommendation.
    The Committee supports the important work conducted at the 
Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute, and has included 
within the funds provided the full budget request for this 
facility.
    The Committee recommendation includes $50,000,000, the same 
as the budget request, for the Environmental and Molecular 
Sciences Laboratory.

                             fusion program

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $372,563,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     366,045,000
House allowance.........................................     229,144,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             225,144,000

    Due to severe budgetary constraints, the Committee is 
forced to propose significant reductions in funding for the 
fusion energy program. The Committee's recommendation of 
$225,144,000 is a reduction of $140,901,000 from the budget 
request.
    Consistent with the direction provided in the conference 
report to the Energy and Water Development Appropriations bill 
for fiscal year 1995 (H. Rept. 103-672), the President's 
Advisory Council on Science and Technology [PCAST] initiated a 
review and evaluation of the fusion energy program. In that 
review, which the Committee understands was completed last 
month, the PCAST panel recommended a stable level of funding of 
approximately $320,000,000 per year. A program funded at that 
level would provide for a core research program, operation of 
the Tokamak fusion test reactor [TFTR], and continued 
participation in the ITER project. While the Committee 
appreciates the efforts of the PCAST panel, the resources to 
fund such a program are not available.
    The Committee provides funding to support a domestic core 
physics research and development program following the 
recommendation of the PCAST panel, and to continue the U.S. 
participation in the engineering design activities phase of the 
international thermonuclear experimental reactor [ITER] 
project, to which the United States is committed through fiscal 
year 1998.
    The Committee has been advised that the administration will 
develop a strategy for restructuring the fusion program at a 
reduced level of funding using the PCAST panel report as the 
framework. Pending receipt of the restructured recommendations 
next year, the funds made available are to provide for the 
domestic core program in plasma science and fusion technology 
of about $180,000,000 per year which includes the continued 
operation within the core program of the DIII-D device and the 
Alcator C-MOD device. Funds are also included to continue the 
EDA phase of ITER. The heavy ion fusion research effort 
previously under this program is to be continued under the 
inertial confinement fusion subprogram. In addition, the 
Committee recommends that the computer work included in this 
budget be transferred to other programs in the Department 
during this transition. Termination, severance and separation 
costs should also be covered under other activities within the 
Department.
    The Committee believes that, because of the stringent 
budget realities facing this Nation, the promise of fusion 
energy can only be realized through international 
collaboration. The high cost of fusion development points to 
the increasing importance of international cooperation as a 
means of designing, building, and financing magnetic fusion 
facilities in the future. Because the United States has 
committed to such an approach, it is crucial that a 
restructuring of the fusion program not undermine our 
credibility as a reliable international partner.

                         basic energy sciences

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $747,296,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     811,419,000
House allowance.........................................     791,661,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             791,661,000

    The Committee acknowledges the important and essential 
contributions of the Department in the Nation's basic science 
and research programs. The collaboration between the national 
labs and the university community has provided the foundation 
for scientific breakthroughs and achievements in energy-related 
research. To continue this progress, the Committee 
recommendation strongly supports the budget request to enhance 
the utilization of the Department's fundamental science and 
user facilities.
    A recommendation of $7,000,000, the same as the House, is 
included to continue the Department's Experimental Program to 
Stimulate Competitive Research [EPSCoR] Program at the fiscal 
year 1995 level.
    The Committee continues its strong support for the 
Department's participation in the domestic natural gas and oil 
initiative through the advanced computational initiative.
    The Midwest Superconductivity Consortium is continued at 
the fiscal year 1995 funding level of $3,200,000.
    Energy Bioscience Program.--There exists a substantial need 
to discover and develop the appropriate technology to aid in 
environmental restoration initiatives. The Committee believes 
that more basic research must be conducted if the United States 
is to successfully surmount the numerous environmental cleanup 
and waste treatment challenges the Nation currently faces. The 
Committee notes the success the Division of Energy Biosciences 
has had in support of other energy-related fields, such as 
energy production, and is encouraged by current research 
initiatives involving bioremediation. Accordingly, the 
Committee has included the budget request for this program.
    Materials Sciences Program.--The Committee supports an 
appropriation for $8,000,000 for research and development and 
conceptual design activities for a new spallation neutron 
source. The Committee recognizes that the expertise to develop 
a new spallation neutron source, including high-power 
accelerators, neutron targets, materials and instrumentation, 
resides primarily at Argonne and Los Alamos National 
Laboratories, based on operation and use of their spallation 
neutron research facilities over the past 15 years. However, 
Brookhaven and Oak Ridge National Laboratories are also 
potential sites due to their neutron expertise developed from 
their extensive reactor experience. Accordingly, the Committee 
rejects the House's endorsement of the Oak Ridge National 
Laboratory as the preferred site for the new spallation neutron 
source.
    The Committee directs the Department of Energy to establish 
and pursue a competitive site selection process for this 
proposed facility. The Department is directed to seek formal 
input from the scientists involved in neutron science to 
establish a long-range plan which will ensure the 
revitalization of this discipline over the next decade. 
Consideration should be given to the most cost-effective 
improvements of the existing neutron beam facilities at 
Argonne, Brookhaven, Los Alamos, and Oak Ridge Laboratories, as 
well as the possibilities for a next-generation accelerator-
based source. The Committee directs the Department to report to 
the Committees on Appropriations no later than December 1, 
1995, on its plans to establish a competitive site selection 
process for the new spallation neutron source.

                     other energy research programs

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $141,493,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     125,235,000
House allowance.........................................      45,256,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              70,256,000

    Other energy research programs such as energy research 
analyses, laboratory technology transfer, advisory and 
oversight, multiprogram energy laboratory support, and policy 
and management are funded in this section.
    Due to funding constraints, the Committee's recommendation 
for the laboratory technology transfer program is $25,000,000. 
The Committee recommends that the Department determine which 
cooperative research and development agreements [CRADA's] are 
the most promising, and complete the most promising CRADA's 
during fiscal year 1996.
    Indian Energy Resource Program.--From within funds 
available in the ``Energy supply, research, and development'' 
appropriation, the Committee allowance includes $15,000,000 to 
fund and implement Indian energy resource programs authorized 
under section 2603 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Within 
this amount, the Committee directs that $6,600,000, the same as 
the current year, be provided for continued preconstruction 
activities for the Navajo transmission project, and $3,000,000 
be provided for the Haida Alaska Native Village Corp.'s 
Reynolds Creek hydroelectric project.
    The Committee supports the budget request for the 
construction projects in the multiprogram energy laboratories 
program. The capital equipment and general plant projects 
accounts are merged with the energy research program that is 
supported by the specific capital items.
    To the extent that nonprogram specific general plant 
projects and general plant equipment are required for the Oak 
Ridge National Laboratory/Oak Ridge Institute for Science and 
Education, they are to be funded within the Biological and 
Environmental Research Program.

                       energy support activities

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $113,109,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     104,810,000
House allowance.........................................      12,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              42,000,000

    Due to severe budgetary constraints, the Committee 
recommends a funding level of $30,000,000 for the university 
and science education programs. The Committee has reviewed the 
Department's efforts in science education and remains strongly 
committed to the Department's continued participation in 
science, primarily at the national laboratories. Funding is 
provided with the understanding that resources will be provided 
to those laboratories that are the most outstanding performers.
    The Committee does not, however, believe that the 
Department's science education programs are being managed in a 
holistic manner. Therefore, the Committee directs the Secretary 
to centralize all the science education programs within the 
Office of Energy Research where they were located from 1977 to 
1993. In that way, the programs will be closely coupled with 
the Department's research programs.
    The Committee directs the Department to make every effort 
to continue support for innovative partnerships which have been 
developed with the departmental laboratories and the Nation's 
historically black colleges and universities and other minority 
institutions at last year's levels. These partnerships were 
designed to redress the real and documented need to improve the 
representation of minorities in our Nation's science and 
engineering work force. Important steps have been made, but 
much remains to be done and partnerships such as the Science 
and Engineering Alliance developed by the Lawrence Livermore 
National Laboratory with four HBCU's and the PREP awards which 
have helped many minority institutions improve undergraduate 
science curricula should be continued and improved.
    Also, $500,000 is provided to continue support for the 
partnership with Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National 
Laboratories and institutions of higher education to support 
the Louisiana systemic initiative which addresses the need to 
increase representation of minorities and women in science, 
math technology, engineering, and related disciplines.
    Funds should also be made available to continue the 
important environmental education initiatives and to extend 
these efforts such as the BATmobile and environmental education 
program developed by PNL-Hanford to the Lower Mississippi Delta 
area.
    Within available funds, the Committee has provided $700,000 
for the Einstein Fellowship Program as authorized by Public Law 
103-382.
    Since 1981, the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, the Ana G. 
Mendez University System, and Jackson State University have 
enjoyed a productive relationship intended to promote minority 
participation in the sciences and enhance computer science and 
scientific research at all three institutions. The Committee is 
encouraged by the success of this effort and directs the 
Department to maintain and support this program at the fiscal 
year 1995 level.
    In support of its science education mission and activities, 
the Committee urges the Department to disseminate information 
in a linguistically and culturally appropriate manner and 
undertake outreach activities to reach all minority populations 
that are affected by its operations. For example, the Committee 
recognizes that Hispanic Americans are the fastest growing 
minority population in the United States, and there are large 
Hispanic communities adjacent to the Department's major 
environmental remediation sites at Hanford and Rocky Flats. 
Currently, however, Hispanics are underrepresented as 
scientists and technicians both in the Department of Energy and 
relative to the general population, and currently account for 
less than 2 percent of all Ph.D graduates in scientific fields 
critical to the mission of the Department of Energy.
    Because the Department operates significant programs 
adjacent to large Hispanic populations, and employs laborers 
drawn from Hispanic migrant populations, the Committee urges 
the Department to undertake a national strategic outreach 
effort that will encourage U.S. Hispanic citizens to pursue 
educational and career opportunities in the sciences and new 
technologies. The Committee emphasizes that such a program must 
be communicated in a culturally and linguistically appropriate 
manner. The Committee directs the Department to report on its 
efforts to establish such an outreach strategy no later than 
June 1, 1996.
    The Committee recognizes and supports the efforts to 
promote work force and economic development through the close 
cooperation of Government, tribes, the private sector, 
professional societies, Federal laboratories, and the academic 
community. It is recognized in particular that quality 
education and work force development will be key to social and 
economic advancement of our native American citizens. The 
Committee, therefore, supports the partnership for 
environmental technology education [PETE] tribal college 
initiative for addressing the long-tern needs of native 
American students, and expects the Department to give priority 
to implementing such a program.
    Within available funds, the Committee has provided $500,000 
to support the Nebraska math and science initiative's effort to 
partner with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to 
support, through the use of electronic technology, rural youth 
programs to utilize data, and expertise to solve community 
problems related to energy and environment and investigate 
career options.
    Due to the significant reduction in funding for technology 
transfer activities throughout the Department, the Committee 
concurs with the House recommendation and does not include 
funds for a separate technology partnership organization.
    The In-house Energy Management Program has been in 
existence over 20 years. It appears that energy efficiency is 
an integral part of the operating philosophy of the 
Department's facilities; therefore, the Committee agrees with 
the House and does not see the need for a separate funding 
source for these alternatives.

             environmental restoration and waste management

                              (nondefense)

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $744,041,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     712,990,000
House allowance.........................................     626,541,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             627,606,000

    The Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Program 
funds activities necessary to meet milestones and legal 
requirements included in compliance agreements, consent orders, 
and Federal and State statutes and regulations, and provides 
for implementation of all DOE orders and highest priority 
discretionary activities including those relating to reducing 
risk to the environment, safety, and health. The budget request 
is submitted under two appropriation accounts--``Energy supply, 
research and development'' and the ``Defense environmental 
restoration and waste management'' account.
    From within available funds, the Committee recommendation 
is to continue the support of the University Research Program 
in robotics at $3,500,000, the same as the House 
recommendation.
    Due to the relationship between corrective activities and 
waste management, the operating expenses for corrective 
activities have been combined with waste management. In 
addition, beginning in fiscal year 1997 all new corrective 
activities construction projects should be included in the 
waste management program.

                          funding adjustments

    The Department proposed to use $79,300,000 of prior year 
balances to offset current year funding requirements and 
$50,000,000 to be achieved by implementing savings recommended 
by the Galvin task force. The Committee recommendation includes 
$73,800,000 of prior year balances, but not the undistributed 
general reduction. Specific program reductions have been taken 
which will reflect savings from implementing recommendations of 
the Galvin task force.

                         recommendation summary

    Details of the Committee's recommendations are included in 
the table at the end of this title.

                Uranium Supply and Enrichment Activities

                          Gross Appropriation

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $63,310,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      42,292,000
House allowance.........................................      29,294,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              29,294,000

                                Revenues

Appropriations, 1995....................................     -$9,900,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     -34,903,000
House allowance.........................................     -34,903,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             -34,903,000

    The Uranium Supply and Enrichment Activities Program funds 
the Department's efforts in overseeing the Government's 
continuing interest in the operation of the gaseous diffusion 
plants managed by the United States Enrichment Corp. [USEC]; 
developing means for using or disposing of depleted uranium; 
monitoring Russian uranium processing facilities to ensure that 
low enriched uranium being purchased by USEC is derived from 
Russian highly enriched uranium removed from dismantled nuclear 
weapons; transferring enrichment-related technologies to the 
private sector; and leading the Department's uranium 
revitalization efforts.
    The budget request for fiscal year 1996 includes 
$102,898,000 for operation, maintenance, and construction 
activities, and is offset by the receipt of $34,903,000 in 
revenues and the use of $25,703,000 from unobligated balances 
carried over from prior years' funding, resulting in a net 
budget request of $42,292,000. Due to severe budget 
constraints, the Committee agrees with the House by 
recommending a reduction of $12,998,000 from the budget 
request.

                        summary recommendations

    Details of the Committee's recommendations are included in 
the table at the end of this title.

      Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $301,327,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     288,807,000
House allowance.........................................     278,807,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             278,807,000

    The uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning 
[D&D;] fund supports D&D;, remedial actions, waste management, 
and surveillance and maintenance associated with preexisting 
conditions at sites leased and operated by the USEC, as well as 
Department of Energy facilities at these and other uranium 
enrichment sites. The sites covered by this D&D; fund include 
the operating uranium enrichment facilities at Portsmouth, OH, 
and Paducah, KY, and the inactive K-25 site in Tennessee, 
formerly called the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant. 
Environmental restoration efforts at these three sites are 
supported from the D&D; fund established by a tax on domestic 
utilities and by congressional appropriations.
    Due to severe budget constraints, the Committee agrees with 
the House recommendation of a reduction of $10,000,000 from the 
budget request of $288,807,000. However, the recommendation 
includes full funding of $42,000,000 to implement the 
reimbursement for disposal of mill tailings in accordance with 
title X, subtitle A, of the Energy Policy Act of 1992.
    The administration proposed legislation to collect fees 
from foreign utilities similar to the decontamination and 
decommissioning fund assessment that is being collected from 
domestic utilities. This proposed language has not been 
included by the Committee.

                General Science and Research Activities

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $984,031,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................   1,017,530,000
House allowance.........................................     991,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             971,000,000

    The general science and research activities programs are 
concerned with understanding the nature of matter and energy 
and the fundamental forces and particles of nature. The 
knowledge acquired in this basic research is an essential part 
of the intellectual foundation of other scientific disciplines 
and technical permits. Deeper understanding correspondingly 
contributes to all of the scientific disciplines and to our 
Nation's technological base. The general science and research 
activities programs are organized into two interrelated 
scientific programs, high-energy physics, and nuclear physics. 
While these programs are not directly associated with energy 
technology in the near or midterm, they support basic research 
whose aim is to provide new knowledge which is expected to have 
long-term scientific and technological impacts on energy 
development and utilization and on other aspects of our 
society.
    The Committee's funding recommendation for general science 
and research activities reflects the continued role of the 
Federal Government in fundamental scientific research where 
research is not market driven and is difficult for the private 
sector to conduct. The Committee strongly supports the budget 
request for the scientific facilities utilization initiative to 
enhance and increase the use of fundamental science and user 
facilities, but due to severe funding constraints, has found it 
necessary to reduce the overall budget request. It is the 
Committee's hope that congressional actions such as merging 
operating and capital funding along with a lessening of 
departmental internal regulations and oversight reviews will 
compensate in part for this reduction.
    As described in the introductory section of this report, 
operating and capital funding requests have been merged to 
permit more effective operation of the research facilities and 
laboratories. The Committee recommendation reflects 
redistribution of the capital equipment, general plant 
projects, and accelerator improvements projects funding to the 
appropriate program accounts.
    Due to budget constraints, the Committee recommendation for 
high-energy physics is 657,000,000, a $20,000,000 reduction 
from the House. The recommendation for nuclear energy physics 
is $304,500,000, the same as the House. Funding for program 
direction has been reduced to $9,500,000 from the request of 
$10,900,000. This is identical to the House recommendation.

                        summary recommendations

    Details of the Committee's recommendations are included in 
the table at the end of this title.

                      Nuclear Waste Disposal Fund

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $392,800,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................................
House allowance.........................................     226,599,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             151,600,000

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1992 and the Nuclear Waste 
Policy Act Amendments of 1987 authorize a waste management 
system for the disposal of spent nuclear fuel and high-level 
radioactive waste from commercial and atomic energy defense 
activities. These laws establish the nuclear waste disposal 
fund to finance disposal activities through the collection of 
fees from the owners and generators of nuclear waste. The 
Committee recommends $151,600,000 to be derived from the fund 
in fiscal year 1996. Combined with the appropriation to the 
``Defense nuclear waste disposal'' account, a total of 
$400,000,000 will be available for program activities in fiscal 
year 1996. This is $24,599,000 below the House's total 
recommendation.
    The Committee shares the House's frustration with the 
administration's lack of enthusiasm for resolving the Nation's 
civilian high-level radioactive waste storage problem. Last 
year, the Department informed the Committee that the nuclear 
waste repository would not be operational before 2010, and then 
only if the planned program were revised substantially and 
annual appropriations for the program were increased 
significantly. The Committee endorsed the Department's revised 
program and increased funding accordingly in fiscal year 1995. 
Spending limitations for fiscal year 1996, however, now make it 
impossible for the Committee to appropriate sufficient funds to 
continue the program on its present course.
    The Committee recognizes that failure to fund the program 
adequately will delay completion of the repository 
indefinitely. The Committee also recognizes that the Department 
now has no alternative program for managing nuclear waste 
pending completion of the repository. Nuclear waste is 
currently scattered among over 113 nuclear reactors across the 
country. At least 26 of these reactors will run out of storage 
space by 1998 and 80 more by 2010. Plainly, steps must be taken 
to provide alternative storage capacity pending completion of 
the permanent repository.
    Accordingly, the Committee directs the Department to 
provide for the interim storage of spent nuclear fuel beginning 
on January 31, 1998, or as soon thereafter as practicable, 
notwithstanding any restrictions on the siting or construction 
of a interim storage facility in section 145 or 148 of the 
Nuclear Waste Policy Act. Of the combined amount appropriated 
to the Department from the Nuclear Waste Fund and for Defense 
Nuclear Waste Disposal, $85,000,000 shall be available for 
interim storage activities.
    In addition, the Committee directs the Department to 
refocus the repository program on completing core scientific 
activities at Yucca Mountain. The Department should complete 
excavation of the exploratory tunnel and the scientific tests 
needed to assess the performance of the repository. It should 
defer preparation and filing of a license for the repository 
with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission until a later date. The 
Department's goal should be to collect the scientific 
information needed to determine the suitability of the Yucca 
Mountain site and to complete a conceptual design for the 
repository and waste package for later submission to the 
Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Of the combined amount 
appropriated to the Department from the Nuclear Waste Fund and 
for Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal, $250,000,000 shall be 
available for these activities.
    Consistent with the program redirection compelled by this 
appropriation, and pending the enactment of new authorizing 
legislation respecting the civilian radioactive waste program, 
no funds are included for the State of Nevada or units of local 
government affected by activities associated with the 
characterization of a permanent repository site. Subject to the 
provisions of this bill or any new authorization, however, 
funds made available by this appropriation may be used by the 
Department to provide payments to units of State and local 
government affected by site characterization or interim storage 
activities. The use of such funds would be restricted to 
purposes authorized by law, subject to the conditions 
enumerated in prior Energy and Water Development appropriations 
acts, and submitted for review and approval of the 
Appropriations Committees of both Houses prior to payment by 
the Department of Energy.

                    Atomic Energy Defense Activities

    The atomic energy defense activities programs of the 
Department of Energy are divided into four separate 
appropriation accounts: weapons activities; defense 
environmental restoration and waste management; other defense 
programs; and defense nuclear waste disposal. Descriptions of 
each of these accounts are provided below.

                           Weapons Activities

Appropriations, 1995....................................  $3,229,069,000
Budget estimate, 1996..................................\1\ 3,489,367,000
House allowance.........................................   3,273,014,000

Committee recommendation

                                                           3,751,719,000

\1\ Reflects budget amendment contained in H.Doc. 104-100 not considered 
by House.

    Weapons activities support the Nation's national security 
mission of nuclear deterrence by preserving nuclear weapons 
technology and competence in the laboratories and maintaining 
the reliability and safety of the weapons in the enduring 
nuclear stockpile. The United States continues to retain 
strategic nuclear forces sufficient to deter future hostile 
countries from seeking a nuclear advantage. In the past, 
confidence in the nuclear weapons stockpile was assured through 
a combination of underground nuclear testing and laboratory 
testing. Since October 1992, the United States has maintained a 
moratorium on underground nuclear testing and has explored 
other means to assure confidence in the safety, reliability, 
and performance of nuclear weapons.
    The Department's nuclear weapons program has two 
complementary elements--stockpile stewardship and stockpile 
management. Without the option of underground tests and with no 
new design or production requirements planned, confidence in 
safety and performance must be based on confidence in the 
engineering skills and scientific judgments exercised at the 
national laboratories and production facilities.
    The Committee's recommendation for weapons activities is 
$3,751,719,000, an increase of $211,544,000 over the budget 
request. Details of the recommended funding levels follow.

                         stockpile stewardship

    An appropriation of $1,696,580,000 is recommended for the 
stockpile stewardship activities of the Department of Energy.
    The Committee recommendation for stockpile stewardship 
reflects the merger of operating, capital equipment, and 
general plant project funding to provide increased program 
flexibility as described in the introductory section of title 
III of this report.
    Core stockpile stewardship.--The Core Stockpile Stewardship 
Program provides the physical, technical, and intellectual 
infrastructure necessary to support a reliable, safe, and 
secure nuclear weapons stockpile. The Committee has recommended 
a total of $1,209,708,000 for core stockpile stewardship 
programs. This is $106,600,000 more than the House and 
$100,000,000 more than the budget request.
    The Committee is concerned that the funding level proposed 
for fiscal year 1996 may not be sufficient to address the 
concerns expressed by some about the aging stockpile. The 
Committee believes that preservation of core intellectual and 
technical competencies and the continued ability of the weapons 
laboratories to respond to changing world situations is 
critically important.
    The Committee is pleased with the progress made in the past 
year in focussing plans for stockpile stewardship activities. 
An increase of $40,000,000 is included for the accelerated 
strategic computing initiative [ASCI], including additional 
research on high end hardware development. ASCI, along with 
other initiatives such as the Los Alamos neutron scattering 
facility will enhance the core capabilities needed to ensure 
confidence in the scientific and engineering information base 
that will support the enduring stockpile over the long term.
    The Committee is also supportive of other new initiatives 
for stewardship of the aging stockpile, including enhanced 
surveillance and dual revalidation. New surveillance 
technologies, coupled with advanced predictive capability, are 
needed to understand the effects of aging on component and 
weapon performance. The Committee directs that $40,000,000 of 
the increase be applied to an enhanced surveillance program 
which will address current and expanded activities in both the 
stewardship and management programs to transition surveillance 
from a reactive to predictive mode. In addition, funding of 
$20,000,000 is provided for a dual revalidation program which 
should be initiated to establish baseline assessments of each 
weapon type in the stockpile.
    The Committee recommendation also provides an additional 
$10,000,000 over the budget request, the same as the House, for 
operation of the Los Alamos neutron scattering facility, for 
total funding of $35,000,000.
    Project 96-D-105, contained firing facility addition, 
LLNL.--The Committee recommendation includes $6,600,000 for the 
contained firing facility addition at Lawrence Livermore 
Laboratory. The Committee believes that this facility is 
critical to the national defense needs of the Nation. In 
addition, the proposed project provides much needed 
environmental protection.
    Inertial confinement fusion [ICF].--An appropriation of 
$240,667,000 is recommended for the Inertial Confinement Fusion 
Program. The ICF Program continues to be a major contributor to 
the science and technology base supporting the nuclear deterent 
through improved understanding of the underlying physics of 
nuclear weapons and computational modeling that will provide 
the future basis for ensuring safety, reliability, and 
performance on nuclear components.
    The Committee is pleased to recognize the achievements of 
the Naval Research Laboratory [NRL] which has recently 
completed the Nike laser, and the University of Rochester which 
has completed the Omega laser. The recommendation provides the 
full budget request for these programs. The Committee has 
consistently supported these facilities and expects both to 
contribute to the research and technology development efforts 
in the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program in fiscal year 1996 
and future years. The Committee continues to support the very 
useful work performed by the NRL and provides the full budget 
request of $8,000,000 for Nike activities at NRL.
    Project 96-D-111, national ignition facility.--The 
Committee has restored funding for the national ignition 
facility [NIF] deferred by the House Committee. The NIF is a 
key facility in maintaining the nuclear weapons science 
expertise required for the stockpile stewardship program and 
supporting the weapons effects testing. An appropriation of 
$37,400,000 is recommended for the NIF project, which is the 
same as the budget request. The Committee understands that 
first-year funding for the project does not initiate physical 
construction, but allows orderly progress to proceed to meet 
key decision 1 milestones, including title I engineering and 
design, refinement of costs, preparation of NEPA documentation 
and safety analysis, and activities with commercial vendors. 
This is the minimum level of support needed to avoid stretch 
out of project schedules and associated increase in project 
costs.
    Technology transfer and education.--The technology transfer 
and education program directly support core competencies 
through the development of technologies and intellectual 
capabilities to meet current and future defense mission needs.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $239,405,000 
for these activities for fiscal year 1996. This is $10,000,000 
below the budget request. The amount recommended includes 
$229,405,000 for a redirected technology transfer program.
    The Committee believes that there have been benefits to the 
national security programs through collaborations with 
industrial partners and have been supportive of efforts to 
assure strong dual benefits to the weapons core missions. 
However, in light of the concerns in this area, the Committee 
urges the Department to transition and refocus the current 
technology transfer activities into other areas, particularly 
advanced manufacturing and advanced computing to develop the 
capability to support future manufacturing and technological 
needs which directly support the weapons programs through 
weapon support agreements. The Committee recommendation, 
therefore, includes $50,000,000 to complete the highest 
priorities cooperative research and development agreements 
which remain. The remaining resources are to be allocated to 
carry out a redirected program. The Committee supports 
laboratory industrial partnerships and expects the Department 
to leverage this funding, when appropriate, to meet stockpile 
stewardship and management missions. The Committee 
recommendation includes the full-budget request for the 
advanced computational technology initiative.
    The Committee has also provided $10,000,000 to support 
science education activities ranging from high school, 
graduate, and post-graduate levels through its national 
laboratories and Nevada operations office. These activities 
help ensure a highly trained, diverse, and scientific work 
force is available to fill defense programs needs.
    Marshall Islands.--Funding of $6,800,000 is provided for 
the Marshall Islands, the same as the budget request.

                          stockpile management

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,050,683,000 
for stockpile management activities. The stockpile management 
mission is to provide for maintenance, evaluation, 
dismantlement, transportation, and disposal of nuclear weapons 
in accordance with quality, quantity, and schedule requirements 
approved by the President in the nuclear weapons stockpile 
plan.
    The Committee has provided an additional $141,600,000 over 
the budget request for enhanced stockpile surveillance, 
advanced manufacturing, and core stockpile management 
activities. The Committee recognizes the concerns of the 
authorization committee about the Department's national 
security infrastructure. However, the Committee believes it is 
premature to initiate long-term capital improvements in advance 
of the outcome of the stockpile stewardship/management 
programmatic environmental impact statement process currently 
underway. The Committee is supportive of more fundamental 
initiatives in advanced manufacturing, especially activities in 
partnership with private industry. Additional emphasis and 
attention should be given to advanced computerized 
manufacturing and dual revalidation techniques.
    The Committee recommendation for stockpile management 
reflects the merger of operating, capital equipment, and 
general plant project funding.
    New tritium source.--Funding of $50,000,000, as requested 
in the budget, is provided to initiate a new tritium source 
project. The Committee directs the Department to conduct a fair 
and impartial assessment of alternatives for providing tritium 
including various types of reactors and the accelerator 
concept. Establishing an assured supply of tritium for national 
security needs is the critical objective of this program. The 
Committee expects the Department to assure that the new tritium 
source will not in any way jeopardize the schedule for 
providing tritium in the necessary timeframe and that the 
operational regime does not compromise the ability of the 
Department of Energy to meet the tritium requirements of the 
Department of Defense.
    The Committee considers it prudent to pursue a backup 
source in case of a national emergency or substantial delay of 
a new tritium production source coming on-line. Therefore, the 
Committee recommendation includes funding to initiate light 
water tritium target contingency work requested in the budget 
request. The Committee directs these activities be strictly 
limited to evaluation of the emergency, contingency capability 
of the light water reactor. Funds are provided only for out of 
reactor testing, examination, and target development work.
    The Committee has included the total cost of $12,200,000 
for project D-126, tritium loading line modifications at the 
Savannah River site in South Carolina. This project, which was 
identified after the budget was submitted to Congress, will 
provide the capability to load a new tritium reservoir for 
existing weapons systems.

                           program direction

    An appropriation of $128,000,000 is recommended for program 
direction activities. The amount recommended is $10,000,000 
more than the House allowance and $31,852,000 below the 
appropriation for the current year. The Committee 
recommendation provides the full request for the community 
assistance program, and also continues support for the 
liquefied gaseous fuels spill test facility and the facility's 
modeling support center.
    The Committee expects the Department to address the support 
service contracts level in accordance with the guidance 
provided elsewhere in the Committee report.
    The Committee recommends the use of $86,344,000 in 
unobligated balances as identified in the budget request.

                        recommendation summaries

    Details of the Committee's recommendations are included in 
the table at the end of this title.

         Defense Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

Appropriations, 1995....................................  $4,892,691,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................   6,008,002,000
House allowance.........................................   5,265,478,000

Committee recommendation

                                                           5,989,750,000

    The Department's environmental management program is 
responsible for identifying and reducing risks and managing 
waste at sites where the Department carried out nuclear energy 
or weapons research and production activities which resulted in 
radioactive, hazardous, and mixed waste contamination. The 
number of sites and facilities continues to grow as the 
Department shifts its focus from production efforts to 
environmental management activities. Environmental management 
is budgeted under three appropriation accounts: defense 
environmental restoration and waste management; energy supply, 
research, and development; and the uranium enrichment 
decontamination and decommissioning fund.
    The ``Defense environmental restoration and waste 
management'' account includes waste management functions, 
environmental restoration activities, technology development 
efforts, nuclear materials and facilities stabilization 
functions, and a variety of crosscutting and program support 
initiatives.
    The recommended funding for defense environmental 
restoration and waste management is $5,989,750,000, an increase 
of $724,272,000 over the House allowance.
    The Committee believes that the environmental management 
program of the Department of Energy is at a critical juncture. 
While a sizable increase is requested for fiscal year 1996, the 
rate at which the budget is increasing has been slowed. Budget 
constraints will continue to check future increases and require 
additional efficiencies. However, even with these constraints, 
tremendous progress has been made both in tangible, on-the-
ground results and in the business practices within the 
program. The Committee expects the Department to continue to 
seek every opportunity to bring about more efficiencies and 
tough business-like approaches to program execution.
    While it is imperative that the Department's cleanup costs 
be brought down, there are instances where relative small 
amounts of additional funding invested in the near term offer 
the potential for significant reductions in long-term budgetary 
requirements. For example, the Committee is concerned both 
about the growing landlord costs of maintaining buildings and 
facilities that are ready for demolition, and the high costs 
associated with temporarily storing and monitoring wastes that 
are ready for permanent disposal. In order to reduce these 
costs in the future, it is important that the Department 
expedite demolition work, waste shipments, and permanent 
storage whenever possible. Therefore, in prioritizing spending 
for environmental management work, the Secretary should give 
special attention to those sites or portions of sites where 
increased near-term funding for actual physical remediation 
work and permanent waste disposal can save substantial future 
dollars. In the Department's fiscal year 1997 budget request, 
the Secretary shall report on the Department's efforts to lower 
costs in this manner.
    As noted in the introduction to title III of this report, 
the Committee is concerned with the level of support service 
contracts at the Department. The Committee expects the 
Department to apply those directions to the Environmental 
Restoration and Waste Management Program.
    The Galvin task force had many recommendations for reducing 
costs and increasing program effectiveness. Reducing the number 
of support service contracts, eliminating duplicative and 
overlapping organizational arrangements, and reducing employees 
performing functions such as safeguards and security, and 
environment, safety and health, which have separate 
headquarters organizations to provide guidance to contractors, 
should go a long way toward increasing productivity in the 
environmental management program.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding to maintain 
State studies in South Carolina, Tennessee, and Colorado 
involving birth defects at the $7,300,000 level in fiscal year 
1996.

                       environmental restoration

    An appropriation of $1,635,973,000 is recommended for 
environmental restoration programs. The purpose of this program 
is to reduce or eliminate risks to human health and the 
environment through assessment, remediation, and 
decontamination of contaminated Department of Energy sites. 
These sites include contaminated surface water, ground water, 
soil, and structures.
    The Committee has provided an additional $60,000,000 for 
the Department to undertake accelerate efforts to reduce 
growing landlord costs as discussed earlier in this report. The 
Committee concurs with the House regarding the cleanup of the 
Fernald site.
    The Committee urges the Department of Energy to consider 
adopting modeling techniques deployed by Lawrence Livermore 
Laboratory for ground water remediation at contaminated sites. 
The software used in the modeling techniques allows users to 
develop an optimum cleanup plan by analyzing a number of 
environmental parameters. Initial testing at Department of 
Defense environmental restoration sites has demonstrated the 
opportunity for significant savings.

                            waste management

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,470,868,000 
for the Waste Management Program, including the full budget 
request for operation and maintenance of $2,288,266,000. The 
Waste Management Program seeks to protect the public and 
workers by seeking to minimize, treat, store, and dispose of 
radioactive and hazardous waste.
    The Committee is concerned about the reduction recommended 
by the House. This program manages some of the highest risks in 
the world today. The fiscal year 1996 budget was carefully 
structured to address urgent risks and high overhead costs. The 
Committee feels that reductions proposed by the House are 
neither fiscally nor environmentally prudent. Therefore, the 
Committee has restored much of those reductions.
    The Committee recommends that the Department in making 
budget decisions consider risk and life cycle costs in 
establishing program priorities. Risk should focus on public 
health and safety impact as well as environmental impact.
    The Committee action concurs with the House in merging 
operating, capital, and general plant project funding to 
provide additional program flexibility, and consolidating five 
separate construction project requests into two consolidated 
projects, project 96-D-407, mixed waste low-level waste 
treatment projects at the Rocky Flats site, and project 96-D-
408, waste management upgrades at various locations.
    The Committee is concerned with the constantly fluctuating 
and reallocation of budgetary resources due to rescoping 
orders. This has resulted in an inability for managers to plan 
with any certainty or to enter into meaningful agreements with 
regulators. The Committee expects the Department to address 
this situation and take steps to insure funding levels remain 
as stable as possible.
    In addition to the budget request for TMI waste storage, 
the Committee has provided an additional $7,000,000 to design, 
engineer, or construct additional capacity for dry storage of 
spent nuclear fuel at the Idaho National Engineering 
Laboratory. The Committee recommendation also includes 
$5,000,000 for design and preliminary construction of an 
advanced mixed waste treatment facility at the Idaho National 
Engineering Laboratory.
    Startup of the defense waste processing facility [DWPF], 
which will vitrify the high-level waste at the Savannah River 
site in South Carolina, is critical to the credibility and 
success of the Department's Waste Management Program. The 
Committee expects the Department to maintain the current 
schedule for startup and operation of the DWPF.
    Nuclear fuels canister storage building and stabilization 
facility, 96-D-406.--The Committee recognizes the urgency of 
the plans to move spent nuclear fuel from inadequate storage in 
the K-Basin at Hanford to a new facility proposed in the fiscal 
year 1996 budget request. The new spent nuclear fuels canister 
storage building and stabilization facility project, 96-D-406 
(formerly called K-Basin Operations Program), will take 
advantage of previous design and construction efforts at 
Hanford, and new long-term, dry storage and fuel stabilization 
technologies to meet an accelerated removal schedule for K-
Basin spent nuclear fuel. The Department is directed to proceed 
expeditiously with scope, design and construction of the 
facility to store and stabilize spent nuclear fuel from the K-
Basin.

                         technology development

    The Committee recommendation for technology development 
activities is $490,510,000. The funding level recommended by 
the Committee is in line with the action recommended by the 
authorizing committee.
    The mission of the Office of Technology Development is to 
develop new technologies or improve existing technologies that 
will assist in managing DOE-generated wastes faster, safer, and 
more economically.
    The Committee continues to believe that advanced technology 
development is key to a successful restoration and waste 
management program, and to significantly reducing costs. In 
recommending this increase over the budget request, the 
Committee restates the goal of a technology development 
program, which is 10 percent of the total environmental 
restoration budget.
    The Committee recommendation supports the development of 
the electrometallurgical technology, a promising technology for 
treating a variety of DOE waste forms, at $40,000,000. The 
Committee has also provided up to $1,000,000 for the Department 
to undertake an initial evaluation of using Pentaborane for 
environmental remediation or other uses.
    The Committee believes that the application of new 
technologies and/or commercial waste remediation technologies 
offers significant long-term cost savings and is essential for 
the Department of Energy to make real progress on environmental 
remediation problems and reduce the overall costs of the 
Federal Government's cleanup efforts. Technology development 
provides the opportunity to demonstrate new or commercial 
technology applications at Department of Energy sites. The 
Committee directs that the Department include in its budget 
justification materials for fiscal year 1997 that is presented 
for congressional review, a description of specific activities 
funded by moneys appropriated for the Technology Development 
Program.
    There is continued concern that the Department's efforts to 
develop appropriate and effective technologies to facilitate 
the cleanup of its facilities are meeting with limited success. 
The Committee is seriously concerned that the Department may 
not be providing sufficient attention and resources for basic 
science research. The Committee believes that the Office of 
Environmental Management should seek out and expand the use of 
existing basic research infrastructure within the Office of 
Energy Research [OER]. The capabilities of OER could easily be 
used to address the mid- and long-term needs of environmental 
management. The Committee believes that strengthened ties 
between the Office of Environmental Management and the Office 
of Energy Research can only enhance the ability to the 
Department to succeed in its complex cleanup effort.

                       transportation management

    The full budget request of $16,158,000 is recommended for 
transportation management programs, which is $6,000,000 over 
the House allowance.
    Transportation management is responsible for assuring the 
safe, secure and economical transportation of materials, 
including radioactive and other hazardous materials.

             nuclear materials and facilities stabilization

    The Committee recommendation is $1,532,802,000, a reduction 
of $63,226,000 from the budget request and $30,000,000 more 
than the House allowance. The purpose of the Nuclear Materials 
and Facilities Stabilization Program is to coordinate and 
oversee the orderly transition of contaminated installation and 
facilities from other program offices to environmental 
management.
    Funding reductions are primarily directed toward program 
support and integration activities at headquarters and the 
field offices. Program support and integration funding includes 
support service contracts to provide technical support and 
contract expertise to assist the Federal staff with its line 
management and oversight functions. Support service contract 
reductions should be made as directed earlier in this report.
    The Committee recommendation supports the Hanford 
environmental dose reconstruction project and health 
information network at the budget request level. The Committee 
also has included $1,700,000 for the Hanford thyroid study, the 
same as the current fiscal year.
    The Committee has concurred with the House reductions 
proposed in the area of new construction projects in fiscal 
year 1996. The Committee is concerned with the proposal to 
initiate several new construction projects at departmental 
sites and facilities which will be undergoing considerable 
scrutiny and review of activities over the next year. Several 
projects begun last year are being reevaluated in view of 
current departmental contract reform initiatives and 
privatization efforts. Rather than start new projects and risk 
wasting money on preliminary efforts only to be stopped later, 
the Committee has deferred funding for these new projects 
without prejudice.

                  compliance and program coordination

    The Committee recommendation of $56,251,000 is a reduction 
of $25,000,000 from the budget request of $81,251,000, and is 
$25,000,000 more than the House allowance. This program is 
responsible for providing policy guidance, oversight and 
assessment, and technical support and assistance.
    The Committee concurs with the Galvin task force assessment 
that the Department is mired in layers of management and 
oversight which hinder efficient program operations. Many 
functions proposed in this program area should be performed by 
the line program managers in the environmental management 
organization or by separate headquarters organizations such as 
environment, safety, and health. In a time of severely 
constrained resources, use of existing resources for direct 
cleanup activities must have first priority.

                analysis, education and risk management

    The Committee recommendation for analysis, education, and 
risk management is $97,022,000, a $20,000,000 increase over the 
House allowance. Funding in this account provides for Federal 
salaries, support service contracts, education and training, 
risk management assessments, and public accountability and 
outreach activities.
    The Department proposes to increase public accountability 
efforts from less than $4,000,000 in fiscal year 1995 to more 
than $32,000,000. The Committee believes that, while this 
program can help develop appropriate consensus, increases of 
the amount proposed for fiscal year 1996 divert needed 
resources away from critical cleanup work. An appropriation of 
$20,000,000 is recommended for public accountability 
activities. The Committee directs that none of these funds be 
used for reimbursement of travel expenses of individuals 
traveling to Washington, DC.

                          funding adjustments

    The Committee recommendation includes the use of 
$276,240,000 of prior-year balances and the use of $37,000,000 
from the Savannah River pension fund.

                        recommendation summaries

    Details of the Committee's recommendations are included in 
the table at the end of this title.

                        Other Defense Activities

Appropriations, 1995....................................  $1,849,657,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................   1,432,159,000
House allowance.........................................   1,323,841,000

Committee recommendation

                                                           1,439,112,000

    An appropriation of $1,439,112,000 is recommended by the 
Committee. This is $6,953,000 over the budget request and 
$115,271,000 over the House allowance.
    This account includes the following programs: verification 
and control technology, nuclear safeguards and security, 
security investigations, security evaluations, the Office of 
Nuclear Safety, Worker, and Community Transition Assistance, 
fissile materials control and disposition, emergency 
management, and naval reactors. In prior years this account 
funded the materials support program conducted at the Savannah 
River site in South Carolina. This program has been transferred 
to the ``Defense environmental restoration and waste 
management'' appropriation in fiscal year 1996. Descriptions of 
each of the remaining accounts are provided below.

                  VERIFICATION AND CONTROL TECHNOLOGY

    The Verification and Control Technology Program includes 
activities related to nonproliferation and verification 
research and development, arms control, and intelligence. The 
Department is engaged in an active nuclear nonproliferation 
program through research and development activities performed 
at the national laboratories, by providing technical and 
analytical support to treaty development and implementation, 
and by providing intelligence support to these efforts. The 
Committee recommendation of $450,842,000 is the same as the 
budget request.
    The Committee recommendation for verification and control 
technology includes $30,000,000 for Department of Energy 
efforts related to Soviet designed reactor safety work. It 
should be pointed out that production of nuclear material for 
weapons and nuclear energy for civilian use in the former 
Soviet Union was and is more highly integrated than in other 
countries. Facilities often fulfill dual functions or are 
highly interdependent. The Committee believes this program is 
important to the national security interest of the United 
States and has, therefore, provided funding under verification 
and control technology to continue these important activities.
    Research and development.--The objective of the Research 
and Development Program is to conduct applied research, 
development tests, and evaluations of systems and technologies 
in support of nonproliferation and treaty verification 
requirements.
    The Committee continues to strongly support these 
activities and has restored the House reduction of $62,642,000. 
The Department has long been actively involved in preventing 
proliferation of nuclear weapons technology and protecting 
nuclear material and facilities. Moreover, in the post-cold war 
era, the Department and its system of national laboratories 
have conducted a vigorous program of nonproliferation research 
and development and provide unique capabilities to respond to a 
broad range of domestic and international situations.
    The Committee believes that the House reduction creates an 
unacceptable risk to the core competencies and poses 
substantial national security concerns.
    Arms control.--The arms control program supports the 
development and implementation of U.S. and international 
policies aimed at preventing the spread of nuclear weapons and 
other weapons of mass destruction. It also promotes effective 
international safeguards and physical protection of nuclear 
materials and control of the export of nuclear-related 
equipment, technologies, and materials.
    The Committee recommendation of $162,364,000 for arms 
control activities is the same as the budget request. The 
recommendation supports the Industrial Partnering Program at 
$10,000,000 and provides $5,000,000 to support spent fuel 
activities in North Korea. The Committee strongly supports the 
Industrial Partnership Program and would support the Department 
applying additional funding of not to exceed $10,000,000, if 
warranted.
    Intelligence.--The Office of Intelligence provides 
information and technical analyses on international arms 
proliferation, foreign nuclear programs, and other energy-
related matters to policy makers in the Department and other 
U.S. Government agencies. The focus of the Department's 
intelligence analysis and reporting is on emerging proliferant 
nations, nuclear technology transfers, foreign nuclear 
materials production, and proliferation implications of the 
breakup of the former Soviet Union. The Committee concurs with 
the House in providing the budget request of $42,336,000.

                    NUCLEAR SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY

    This program includes activities to assure adequate 
protection of nuclear weapons, nuclear materials, facilities, 
and classified information against theft, sabotage, espionage, 
and terrorist activities. As departmental sites and facilities 
are decommissioned, safeguards and security costs would be 
expected to decrease Department-wide, but this does not seem to 
be the case. The Committee urges the Department to review these 
costs and make necessary adjustments since it does not seem 
reasonable that projected fiscal year 1996 security costs would 
increase over the previous year.
    The Committee concurs with the House recommending an 
appropriation of $83,395,000, a reduction of $6,121,000 below 
the budget request of $89,516,000. Current program activities 
should be reviewed and prioritized within available funding.
    Declassification initiative.--In streamlining the 
Department's ongoing declassification process, as part of the 
``National Performance Review,'' the Committee directs the 
Department to take the necessary action to meet the 
requirements of the new declassification policies established 
by the Congress or the executive branch. The declassification 
productivity initiative will develop technical and analytical 
services in knowledge engineering, linguistics, cognitive 
modeling, systems engineering, and computer automation designed 
to improve the document declassification review process. The 
Committee recommends that $3,000,000 be made available to 
continue this important initiative.

                        SECURITY INVESTIGATIONS

    This program includes those activities necessary for 
granting appropriate security clearances to agency and 
Government contractor personnel who must in the performance of 
their work have access to restricted data, national security 
information, or special nuclear material, or who occupy a 
designated critical sensitive position.
    An appropriation of $20,000,000 is recommended by the 
Committee. This is a reduction of $13,247,000 from the budget 
request of $33,247,000 and reflects continuing large uncosted 
balances in this account.

                          SECURITY EVALUATIONS

    The Security Evaluations Program provides oversight of the 
effectiveness of the Department of Energy's safeguards and 
security policies and programs by conducting inspections and 
assessments of these policies and programs, and reviewing their 
implementation in the field. The program also includes funds 
for the Radioactive Materials Packaging Certification Program 
which certifies that radioactive material packages are in 
compliance with Federal safety regulations. The Committee 
recommendation is $14,707,000, the same as the budget request 
and House allowance.

                        OFFICE OF NUCLEAR SAFETY

    The Office of Nuclear Safety provides safety oversight of 
DOE nuclear operations to ensure that the Department and its 
contractors provide the workers and the public the highest 
level of protection reasonably achievable from radiological 
hazards.
    Many groups have noted the extensive duplication of 
oversight of the Department's nuclear facilities. The Committee 
agrees with the House's concern about the multiple oversight 
efforts and notes that the Department has committed to reduce 
this duplication of reviews. The compliance and oversight 
review process is currently being modified by the Office of 
Environment, Safety, and Health, and this should result in 
reduced costs and personnel resources devoted to this effort.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $17,679,000, a 
reduction of $7,000,000 from the budget request of $24,679,000. 
The Committee has included $2,000,000 within the recommendation 
to support nuclear safety activities.

               WORKER AND COMMUNITY TRANSITION ASSISTANCE

    In accordance with section 3161 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act of 1993 and as a result of a change in the 
work force at defense nuclear facilities, defense employees of 
the Department may be provided various options to minimize 
impacts of these work force structure changes. These options 
include retraining, early retirement incentives, preference in 
hiring, outplacement assistance, and relocation assistance. In 
addition, this program funds contractor employment reduction 
requirements for severance and separation payments.
    The Committee recommendation is $90,000,000, a reduction of 
$10,000,000 from the budget request of $100,000,000. The 
Committee has restored $15,000,000 of the House reduction for 
this activity. The increased funding will assist in limiting 
the impacts from additional personnel reductions planned in 
fiscal year 1996, and to reduce the need to fund transition 
costs from program budgets. The Committee will be reviewing the 
costs of employee buyout proposals to ensure that they do not 
exceed acceptable standards. The Committee is concerned that 
the buyout packages may exceed acceptable standards and urges 
the Department to review established guidelines to insure they 
are in line with those in the private sector.

               FISSILE MATERIALS CONTROL AND DISPOSITION

    The Fissile Materials Control and Disposition Program is 
responsible for the technical and management activities to 
assess, plan, and direct efforts to provide for the safe, 
secure, environmentally sound long-term storage of all weapons-
usable fissile materials and the disposition of fissile 
materials declared surplus to national defense needs. The 
Committee recommendation is $70,000,000, the same as the budget 
request and House allowance.

                          EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

    The Committee concurs with the House in consolidating 
funding for emergency management activities. Its effort is to 
streamline the Department of Energy's emergency effort to 
streamline the Department of Energy's emergency-related 
organizations and eliminate redundancy consolidating. Funding 
for these activities had previously been included in the 
``Weapons activities program direction'' account and 
``Emergency preparedness'' account which has been funded in the 
Department of the Interior and Other Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act in previous years. The fiscal year 1996 
budget request for emergency management is $20,056,000, and 
$8,219,000 for emergency preparedness. The Committee has 
combined these two programs and provided a total of $23,321,000 
for fiscal year 1996, the same as the House allowance. The 
Committee believes that efficiencies and savings realized from 
this consolidation will allow the Department to carry out 
essential planning and oversight activities.

                             NAVAL REACTORS

    The Naval Reactors Program provides for the design, 
development, testing, and evaluation of improved naval nuclear 
propulsion plants and reactor cores having long fuel life, high 
reliability, improved performances, and simplified operating 
and maintenance requirements. The nuclear propulsion plants and 
cores cover a wide range of configurations and power ratings 
suitable for installation in naval combatants varying in size 
from small submarines to large surface ships. The Committee 
recommendation is $682,168,000, the same as the budget request 
and House allowance.

                          FUNDING ADJUSTMENTS

    The Committee recommendation includes the use of 
$13,000,000 in prior-year balances as proposed in the budget 
request.

                        RECOMMENDATION SUMMARIES

    Details of the Committee's recommendations are included in 
the table at the end of this title.

                     Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $129,430,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     198,400,000
House allowance.........................................     198,400,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             248,400,000

    The Committee recommends $248,400,000 for defense nuclear 
waste disposal.
    Since passage of the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982, as 
amended, the nuclear waste fund has incurred costs for 
activities related to disposal of high-level waste generated 
from the atomic energy defense activities of the Department of 
Energy. At the end of fiscal year 1994, the balance owed by the 
Federal Government to the nuclear waste fund was $664,000,000 
(including principal and interest). The ``Defense nuclear waste 
disposal'' appropriation was established to ensure payment of 
the Federal Government's contribution to the nuclear waste 
fund. Through fiscal year 1995, a total of $361,930,000 has 
been paid into the nuclear waste fund for atomic energy defense 
activities.
    The Committee recommendation increases the Federal 
Government's share by $50,000,000 and brings the deficit 
between the balance owed and that paid into the fund to 
$54,070,000.

                      Departmental Administration

                           net appropriations

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $245,822,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     317,138,000
House allowance.........................................     239,944,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             239,820,000

                         miscellaneous revenues

Appropriation, 1995.....................................    $161,490,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................    -122,306,000
House allowance.........................................    -122,306,000

Committee recommendation

                                                            -137,306,000

    The funding recommended for Departmental Administration 
provides for general management and program support functions 
benefiting all elements of the Department of Energy. The 
account funds a wide array of activities not directly 
associated with program execution such as: salaries, travel and 
other costs associated with the management and support of the 
Department; development and analysis of energy policy 
proposals, legislation, and evaluation of programs; 
coordination of policies and programs for communicating with 
the news media and the general public; support for training and 
education programs; development of international energy policy 
and international cooperation in energy matters; performance of 
work for non-Federal entities; and revenues from the sale of 
products and services and their related costs.
    Due to severe budget constraints and the proposed 
downsizing of the Department of Energy, the Committee 
recommendation for administrative activities is $377,126,000, a 
decrease of $62,318,000 from the budget request of 
$439,444,000. Program activities in most areas of the 
Department are being reduced which should result in decreasing 
needs for administrative and support activities.
    The recommendation for the cost of work for others program 
is $22,826,000, the same as the budget request. This reflects 
the latest estimate of work to be performed for non-Federal 
entities in fiscal year 1996. The Committee recognizes that 
funds received from reimbursable activities may be used to fund 
general purpose capital equipment which is used in support of 
those activities.

                                revenues

    The revenue estimate for fiscal year 1996 is $137,306,000, 
a $15,000,000 increase over the budget request, but a reduction 
of $24,184,000 from the revenues estimated for fiscal year 
1995.

                        summary recommendations

    Details of the Committee's recommendations are included in 
the table at the end of this title.

                      Office of Inspector General

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $26,465,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      30,998,000
House allowance.........................................      26,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      25,000,000

    The Office of Inspector General provides agencywide audit, 
inspection, and investigative functions to identify and correct 
management and administrative deficiencies which create 
conditions for existing or potential instances of fraud, waste, 
and mismanagement. The audit function provides financial and 
performance audits of programs and operations. The inspection 
function provides independent inspections and analyses of the 
effectiveness, efficiency, and economy of programs and 
operations. The investigative function provides for the 
detection and investigation of improper and illegal activities 
involving programs, personnel, and operations.
    Due to severe budget constraints and the proposed 
downsizing of the Department of Energy, the Committee 
recommendation is $25,000,000. This is a reduction of 
$5,998,000 from the budget request of $30,998,000.

                    Power Marketing Administrations

    Public Law 95-91 transferred to the Department of Energy 
the power marketing functions under section 5 of the Flood 
Control Act of 1944 and all other functions of the Department 
of the Interior with respect to the Alaska Power 
Administration, Bonneville Power Administration, Southeastern 
Power Administration, Southwestern Power Administration, and 
the power marketing functions of the Bureau of Reclamation, now 
included in the Western Area Power Administration.
    All power marketing administrations except Bonneville are 
funded annually with appropriations, and related receipts are 
deposited in the Treasury. Bonneville operations are self-
financed under authority of Public Law 93-454, the Federal 
Columbia River Transmission System Act of 1974, which 
authorizes Bonneville to use its revenues to finance operating 
costs, maintenance and capital construction, and sell bonds to 
the Treasury if necessary to finance any remaining capital 
program requirements.

         operation and maintenance, alaska power administration

Appropriations, 1995....................................      $6,494,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................       4,260,000
House allowance.........................................       4,260,000

Committee recommendation

                                                               4,260,000

    The Alaska Power Administration is responsible for 
operation, maintenance, and marketing of power for Alaska's two 
Federal hydroelectric projects. The operating projects are the 
30 megawatt Eklutna project near Anchorage and the 78 megawatt 
Snettisham project near Juneau. Project facilities include 
dams, reservoirs, powerplants, transmission systems, and 
necessary maintenance facilities.
    The administration's fiscal year 1996 budget assumes that 
the assets of the Alaska Power Administration will be sold; 
however, the budget assumes that no asset transfers will occur 
before the end of fiscal year 1996. The Committee 
recommendation is $4,260,000, the same as the budget request.

                  bonneville power administration fund

    The Bonneville Power Administration is the Federal electric 
power marketing agency in the Pacific Northwest, a 300,000-
square-mile service area that encompasses Oregon, Washington, 
Idaho, western Montana, and small portions of adjacent Western 
States in the Columbia River drainage basin. Bonneville markets 
hydroelectric power from 30 Corps of Engineers and Bureau of 
Reclamation projects, as well as thermal energy from non-
Federal generating facilities in the region. Bonneville also 
markets and exchanges surplus electric power interregionally 
over the Pacific Northwest-Pacific Southwest Intertie with 
California, and in Canada over interconnections with utilities 
in British Columbia.
    Bonneville constructs, operates and maintains the Nation's 
largest high-voltage transmission system, consisting of 14,800 
circuit-miles of transmission line and 390 substations with an 
installed capacity of 22,279 megawatts.
    Public Law 93-454, the Federal Columbia River Transmission 
System Act of 1974, placed Bonneville on a self-financed basis. 
With the passage in 1980 of Public Law 96-501, the Pacific 
Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act, 
Bonneville's responsibilities were expanded to include meeting 
the net firm load growth of the region, investing in cost-
effective, regionwide energy conservation, and acquiring 
generating resources to meet these requirements.
    Borrowing authority.--A total of $3,750,000,000 has been 
made available to Bonneville as permanent borrowing authority. 
Each year the Committee reviews the budgeted amounts Bonneville 
plans to use of this total and reports a recommendation on 
these borrowing requirements. For fiscal year 1996, the 
Committee recommends an additional increment of $378,000,000 in 
new borrowing authority, the same as the budget request, for 
transmission system construction, system replacement, energy 
resources, fish and wildlife, and capital equipment programs.
    The Committee continues to support the concept of financing 
a portion of capital investments from revenues and alternatives 
such as the use of third-party financing to extend the 
availability of the current total borrowing authority. The 
Committee commends Bonneville's efforts to date to review 
current spending programs. With the severe budget constraints 
expected to continue in the future, appropriating additional 
funds to replenish Bonneville's borrowing authority will be 
very difficult.
    Budget revisions and notification.--The Committee expects 
Bonneville to adhere to the borrowing authority estimates 
recommended by the Congress and promptly inform the Committee 
of any exceptional circumstances which would necessitate the 
need for Bonneville to obligate borrowing authority in excess 
of such amounts.
    Repayment.--During fiscal year 1996, Bonneville plans to 
pay the Treasury $762,400,000, of which $200,800,000 is to 
repay principal on the Federal investment in these facilities.
    Limitation on direct loans.--Language was requested 
permitting Bonneville to make direct loan obligations not to 
exceed $29,000,000. The Committee has not included this 
provision and recommends that no new direct loans be made in 
fiscal year 1996.
    Regional technical forum on conservation program evaluation 
and verification.--Bonneville's reinvention of conservation is 
intended to allow utilities to develop and implement 
conservation strategies that are better tailored to their local 
situations. As a consequence, the Northwest can anticipate a 
more diversified approach to conservation acquisition. With 
this diversification comes the need to develop regionally 
consistent evaluation standards and protocols for assessing the 
energy savings produced by these more varied programs, and 
ensuring that the region continues to meet the Northwest Power 
Planning Council's targets for securing cost-effective 
conservation. In order to facilitate development of such 
standards and protocols, Bonneville and the Northwest Power 
Planning Council should promptly convene a regional technical 
forum on conservation program evaluation and verification. The 
forum's membership should include individuals with technical 
expertise and experience in conservation program planning, 
implementation, and evaluation. Its services should be 
available to all Northwest utilities, and its immediate 
priority should be to develop consistent standards and 
protocols for verification and evaluation of energy savings, in 
consultation with all interested parties. By developing 
standards and protocols of generalized applicability, the forum 
should help utilities improve program quality and reduce 
program costs.
    Renewable energy.--The Committee has been interested in 
Bonneville's efforts to support the development of renewable 
energy in the Pacific Northwest. Given Bonneville's mission, it 
is important for Bonneville to play a leadership role in 
assuring that renewable energy is included in the mix of the 
region's resources. The Committee understands that Bonneville 
is developing a green power product to market the power from 
renewable resources. The Committee expects that Bonneville will 
be aggressive in these marketing efforts. The Committee 
understands that Bonneville is reevaluating its current 
portfolio of renewable resources and urges Bonneville to 
support renewable resource development. The Committee supports 
the efforts of Bonneville and the project developers to reduce 
the costs of the proposed projects.
    Residential exchange.--The Committee is concerned that in 
the recently proposed rate case for the Bonneville Power 
Administration, there is a proposal to reduce rates for public 
power and direct service industries but substantially increase 
the cost of power exchanged with some residential customers of 
investor owned and publicly owned utilities. The Committee has 
been told that this increase in residential rates results from 
the implementation of a provision of the Pacific Northwest 
Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act. It has been 
suggested by some that the provision has been applied 
inequitably, while others argue that it has been done properly. 
The Committee would be gravely concerned if the provision has 
been applied unfairly or inappropriately. Bonneville is 
directed to provide the Committee with an explanation and 
justification of its proposal at the earliest possible date.
    BPA competitiveness.--The Committee understands BPA is 
operating in a very competitive electric utility environment. 
The Committee understands that recently, three of BPA's 
longstanding customers announced that they were removing a 
total of 200 megawatts of load off the BPA system in addition 
to the 275 megawatts of load which BPA customers removed from 
the BPA system earlier in the year. The Committee further 
understands that these customers have signed contracts for 
purchased power below BPA's existing rate for 1 to 5 years. 
Utility deregulation has fostered a strong independent 
wholesale electric power production industry nationwide, and in 
the Northwest BPA customers now have alternatives. The 
Committee is aware that the cost of new power sources has 
dropped sharply in recent years, causing the gap between BPA's 
historical low costs and the higher cost of alternative power 
sources to narrow dramatically and now be effectively closed. 
The Committee is very concerned about these customer losses and 
the real possibility of future additional losses due to 
increased electric supplier competition and/or cost pressures, 
including the increasing cost of salmon recovery. The Committee 
is informed that, in order to stay competitive, BPA has taken 
aggressive steps to control costs which are within its control 
and to improve customer service. The Committee commends BPA's 
efforts to be competitive now and in the future.

      operation and maintenance, southeastern power administration

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $22,431,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      19,843,000
House allowance.........................................      19,843,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              19,843,000

    The Southeastern Power Administration markets hydroelectric 
power produced at Corps of Engineers projects in 10 
Southeastern States. There are 23 projects now in operation 
with an installed capacity of 3,092 megawatts. Southeastern 
does not own or operate any transmission facilities and carries 
out its marketing program by utilizing the existing 
transmission systems of the power utilities in the area. This 
is accomplished through wheeling arrangements between 
Southeastern and each of the area utilities with transmission 
lines connected to the projects. The utility agrees to deliver 
specified amounts of Federal power to customers of the 
Government, and Southeastern agrees to compensate the utility 
for the wheeling service performed.
    The Committee recommendation of $19,843,000 is the same as 
the budget request. In addition to this appropriated amount, 
$10,059,000 of prior year unobligated funds are available for 
use in fiscal year 1996.

      operation and maintenance, southwestern power administration

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $21,316,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      29,778,000
House allowance.........................................      29,778,000
Commmittee recommendation...............................      29,778,000

    The Southwestern Power Administration is the marketing 
agent for the power generated at Corps of Engineers' 
hydroelectric plants in the six-State area of Kansas, Oklahoma, 
Texas, Missouri, Arkansas, and Louisiana with a total installed 
capacity of 2,158 megawatts. It operates and maintains some 
1,380 miles of transmission lines, 24 generating projects, and 
24 substations, and sells its power at wholesale primarily to 
publicly and cooperatively owned electric distribution 
utilities.
    The Committee recommendation for fiscal year 1996 is 
$29,778,000, the same as the budget request.

 construction, rehabilitation, operation and maintenance western area 
                          power administration

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $222,285,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     306,352,000
House allowance.........................................     257,652,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             257,652,000

    The Western Area Power Administration is responsible for 
marketing electric power generated by the Bureau of 
Reclamation, the Corps of Engineers, and the International 
Boundary and Water Commission which operate hydropower 
generating plants in 15 Central and Western States encompassing 
a 1,300,000-square-mile geographic area. Western is also 
responsible for the operation and maintenance of 16,727 miles 
of high-voltage transmission lines with 257 substations. 
Western distributes power generated by 55 plants with a maximum 
operating capacity of 10,576 megawatts.
    Western, through its power marketing program, must secure 
revenues sufficient to meet the annual costs of operation and 
maintenance of the generating and transmission facilities, 
purchased power, wheeling, and other expenses, in order to 
repay all of the power investment with interest, and to repay 
that portion of the Government's irrigation and other nonpower 
investments which are beyond the water users' repayment 
capability. Under the Colorado River basin power marketing 
fund, which encompasses the Colorado River basin, Fort Peck, 
and Colorado River storage facilities, all operation and 
maintenance and power marketing expenses are financed from 
revenues.
    Colorado River Dam fund.--The Committee recommends bill 
language as requested by the administration to implement the 
provisions of the Hoover Power Plant Act of 1984.

                             recommendation

    The Committee recommendation for Western for fiscal year 
1996 is $257,652,000, a decrease of $48,700,000 from the budget 
request of $306,352,000. This reduction is possible due to 
decreased purchase power requirements and construction costs.
    The amount to be derived from the Department of the 
Interior reclamation fund is $245,151,000, a reduction of 
$48,700,000 from the request of $293,851,000.

           falcon and amistad operating and maintenance fund

    Creation of the Falcon and Amistad operating and 
maintenance fund was directed by the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, fiscal years 1994-95. This legislation also 
directed that the fund be administered by the administrator of 
the Western Area Power Administration for use by the 
Commissioner of the United States Section of the International 
Boundary and Water Commission to defray operation, maintenance, 
and emergency costs for the hydroelectric facilities at the 
Falcon and Amistad Dams in Texas. Funds for these costs were 
previously included in the appropriations of the Department of 
State.
    The Committee recommendation is $1,000,000, the same as the 
budget request.

                        recommendation summaries

    Details of the Committee's recommendations are included in 
the table at the end of this title.

                  Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $166,173,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     136,567,000
House allowance.........................................     132,290,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             131,290,000

                salaries and expenses--revenues applied

Appropriation, 1995
                                                           -$166,173,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................    -136,567,000
House allowance.........................................    -132,290,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             131,290,000

    The Committee provides $131,290,000 for the Federal Energy 
Regulatory Commission. Revenues are established at a rate equal 
to the amount provided for program activities, resulting in a 
net appropriation of zero.
    The Committee concurs with the House's observation that the 
workload of the Commission with respect to the regulation of 
oil and natural gas is declining dramatically as those 
industries become more competitive. The budget request for the 
natural gas and oil pipelines program, though reduced from 
fiscal year 1995, fails to match this decline in 
responsibility.
    Because the FERC has largely deregulated the natural gas 
pipeline industry, a 20-percent reduction in the natural gas 
and oil pipeline staffing is recommended for fiscal year 1996. 
This is consistent with the House action to reduce staff by 10 
percent. This action will reduce fee charges being assessed on 
the natural gas industry and reduce unnecessary regulatory 
oversight.


                     TITLE IV--INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

                    Appalachian Regional Commission

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $282,000,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     183,000,000
House allowance.........................................     142,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             182,000,000

    The Appalachian Regional Commission [ARC] is a regional 
economic development agency established in 1965. It is composed 
of the Governors of the 13 Appalachian States and a Federal 
cochairman who is appointed by the President.
    The Committee has restored $40,000,000 of the House 
reduction and directs that these funds be applied to ARC 
corridor construction.

                Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $17,933,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      18,500,000
House allowance.........................................      17,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              17,000,000

    An appropriation of $17,000,000 is recommended for fiscal 
1996. This is $1,500,000 below the budget request.
    The Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board was created by 
the fiscal year 1989 National Defense Authorization Act. The 
Board, composed of five members appointed by the President, 
provides advice and recommendations to the Secretary of Energy 
regarding public health and safety issues at the Department's 
defense nuclear facilities. The Board is responsible for 
reviewing and evaluating the content and implementation of the 
standards relating to the design, construction, operation, and 
decommissioning of defense nuclear facilities of the Department 
of Energy.
    Due to severe budget constraints, the Committee finds it 
necessary to recommend the $17,000,000 reduction.

                    Delaware River Basin Commission

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 1995....................................        $343,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................         353,000
House allowance.........................................................

Committee recommendation

                                                                 343,000

    The recommendation provides $343,000 requested for salaries 
and expenses of the Delaware River Basin Commission.
    The Delaware River Basin Commission was created by compact 
under Public Law 87-328 among the States of Delaware, New York, 
New Jersey, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the Federal 
Government. The compact enables the Commission to participate 
jointly in the development of water and related resources of 
the region drained by the Delaware River and its tributaries.
    The amount recommended is for the expenses of the U.S. 
Commissioner and associated staff. The action holds the 
salaries and expenses at the current level because of the 
severe budget constraints.

            contribution to delaware river basin commission

Appropriations, 1995....................................        $478,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................         551,000
House allowance.........................................................

Committee recommendation

                                                                 478,000

    An appropriation of $478,000 is recommended by the 
Committee for fiscal year 1996. This appropriation provides the 
Federal share of the annual expenses of the Commission.
    Due to the severe budgetary limitations, the Committee has 
recommended that the contribution to the Delaware River Basin 
Commission be held at the current year's level.

            Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin

    contribution to interstate commission on the potomac river basin

Appropriations, 1995....................................        $511,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................         524,000
House allowance.........................................................

Committee recommendation

                                                                 511,000

    In light of the severe budgetary constraints, the Committee 
recommendation includes $511,000 for the contribution to the 
Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin. This is the 
same as the current fiscal year and $13,000 below the budget 
request.
    The Interstate Commission on the Potomac River Basin was 
created by compact among the States in the basin: Maryland, 
West Virginia, the Commonwealth of Virginia and the 
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the District of Columbia. The 
Commission has the responsibility for basinwide water quality, 
planning, program coordination, and assistance.

                     Nuclear Regulatory Commission

                         salaries and expenses

                          gross appropriation

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $520,501,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     520,300,000
House allowance.........................................     468,300,000
Committee recommendation................................     474,300,000

                                revenues

Appropriations, 1995....................................   -$498,501,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................    -498,300,000
House allowance.........................................    -457,300,000

Committee recommendation

                                                            -457,300,000

                           net appropriation

Appropriations, 1995....................................     $22,000,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      22,000,000
House allowance.........................................      11,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              17,000,000

    The Omnibus Reconciliation Act of 1990, as amended, 
requires that the Nuclear Regulatory Commission recover 100 
percent of its budget authority, less the appropriation from 
the nuclear waste fund, by assessing licenses and annual fees. 
The Committee recommends an appropriation of $474,300,000 for 
fiscal year 1996, a reduction from both the administration's 
budget request and the fiscal year 1995 level.
    The fiscal year 1996 budget request proposes that 
$22,000,000 of the agency's total appropriation be derived from 
the nuclear waste fund. These funds are requested for agency 
activities related to implementation of the Nuclear Waste 
Policy Act and in support of the Department of Energy's efforts 
to characterize Yucca Mountain as a potential site for a 
permanent nuclear waste repository. Consistent with the 
Committee's support for the development of a national interim 
storage program for the Nation's high level civilian 
radioactive waste, and the direction for the Department of 
Energy to continue site characterization activities at Yucca 
Mountain at a reduced level of effort, the Committee has 
restored $6,000,000 of the House reduction for the NRC's 
salaries and expenses appropriation. Considering that the NRC 
must review significant health and safety aspects of a 
potential interim storage program and the transportation 
program as well as maintain sufficient technical capability to 
assess geologic repository issues, the Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $17,000,000 to be derived from the nuclear 
waste fund, a reduction of $5,000,000 from the budget request.
    The Committee concurs with the House in directing the NRC 
to accelerate plans to downsize and streamline staff and 
organization.
    The Committee is encouraged by progress in the licensing 
for the General Electric advanced boiling water reactor and the 
ABB-combustion engineering system 80+ as shown by the issuance 
for public comment of the first two proposed design 
certification rules, and urges the Commission to act 
expeditiously to resolve public comments received, and to 
proceed to a final version of these rules. The Committee 
further urges the Commission to follow up these rules with 
detailed guidance on how the new licensing process will 
interface with existing practices, such as inspection and 
enforcement activities, so that future licensees, NRC staff, 
and the public will have a clear understanding of the 
regulatory framework in which these plants will be built and 
operated.
    The Committee also encourages the NRC to continue to give 
special attention to replacing unnecessary prescriptive 
requirements and guidance with performance-based requirements 
and guidance. The Committee believes that a performance-based 
regulatory approach can substantially improve the regulatory 
process and result in a more effective and efficient use of 
both the NRC and licensee resources.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about overly 
burdensome NRC review fees charged to ALWR design certification 
applicants. The Committee expects the timely completion of 
final design approval for the two small, passive reactors: the 
Westinghouse AP-600 and the General Electric simplified boiling 
water reactor.
    The Committee commends the NRC for expeditious actions to 
modify the license renewal rule for current operating 
licensees. The amended rule offers a stable, predictable 
regulatory process that utilities will use to demonstrate 
continued safe operation of one of the Nation's sources of 
electricity--nuclear power.
    The Committee is encouraged by the recent efforts to reduce 
most fees and to revise the method of calculating hourly rates 
to allocate the costs associated with the reactor program and 
with the waste and materials programs separately, and more 
equitably. The Committee is also pleased that the rates for 
each class of applicants and licensees have been reduced. The 
Committee supports the effort to streamline the fee program and 
improve the predictability of fees by eliminating the materials 
flat inspection fees and including these costs in annual 
licensing fees.
    However, the Committee continues to be concerned about 
issues of equity and fairness resulting from fees that are 
charged to licensees for which they receive no direct benefit, 
including international cooperative safety programs, and 
international safeguards activities, agreement State oversight, 
low-level waste disposal generic activities, and site 
decommissioning management plan activities. As an example, one 
area where the Committee expects an immediate change, by the 
close of this fiscal year, is the current policy of assessing 
fees to licensees for NRC licensing reviews and inspections for 
Federal agencies. The Committee sees no reason why the private 
sector should be required to pay for these activities.

                      Office of Inspector General

                          gross appropriation

Appropriations, 1995....................................      $5,080,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................       5,500,000
House allowance.........................................       5,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                               5,000,000

                                revenues

Appropriations, 1995....................................     -$5,080,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................      -5,500,000
House allowance.........................................      -5,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              -5,000,000

    This appropriation provides for the Office of Inspector 
General of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Pursuant to law, 
budget authority appropriated to the inspector general must be 
recovered through the assessment of license and annual fees.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,000,000 for 
fiscal year 1996. This recommendation, a reduction from both 
the administration request and the fiscal year 1995 level, is 
consistent with reductions to the Commission and congressional 
efforts to downsize and streamline the Federal Government.

                  Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board

Appropriations, 1995....................................      $2,664,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................       2,970,000
House allowance.........................................       2,531,000

Committee recommendation

                                                               2,664,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,664,000 for 
the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. This is the same as 
provided for the current fiscal year.
    The Committee recommendation provides continued funding for 
the Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board. The Nuclear Waste 
Policy Amendments Act of 1987 directed the Board to evaluate 
the technical and scientific validity of the activities of the 
Department of Energy's nuclear waste disposal program. The 
Board must report its findings not less than two times a year 
to the Congress and the Secretary of Energy.

                   Susquehanna River Basin Commission

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 1995....................................        $318,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................         332,000
House allowance.........................................................

Committee recommendation

                                                                 318,000

    In light of severe budgetary constraints, the Committee 
recommends an appropriation of $318,000 for salaries and 
expenses for the Susquehanna River Basin Commission.
    The Susquehanna River Basin Commission was created by 
compact under Public Law 91-575 among the States of Maryland, 
New York, the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, and the Federal 
Government. The compact enables the Commission members to 
participate jointly in the development of water and related 
resources of the region drained by the Susquehanna River and 
its tributaries.

           contribution to susquehanna river basin commission

Appropriations, 1995....................................        $288,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................         360,000
House allowance.........................................................
Committee recommendation................................         288,000

    An appropriation of $288,000 is recommended by the 
Committee for its contribution to the Susquehanna River Basin 
Commission for fiscal year 1996. The Committee finds it 
necessary to recommend a freeze at the 1995 level due the 
severe budgetary constraints.
    This appropriation provides the Federal share of the annual 
expenses of the Commission.

                       Tennessee Valley Authority

Appropriations, 1995....................................    $142,873,000
Budget estimate, 1996...................................     140,473,000
House allowance.........................................     103,339,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             110,339,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $110,339,000 
for the Tennessee Valley Authority. This is $30,134,000 below 
the budget request for fiscal year 1996. The Committee 
recommendation begins to phase down the programs and activities 
of the Tennessee Valley Authority.
    The Committee recommendation provides $72,303,000 for 
stewardship, land and water, $6,170,000 for land between the 
lakes [LBL], $6,866,000 for economic development, and 
$25,000,000 for TVA's Environmental Research Center.
    Environmental Research Center.--The Committee directs TVA 
to begin the process of transitioning its Environmental 
Research Center and accelerate the transition to funding to 
other than appropriated funds. TVA will immediately focus the 
research of the Center in those areas of greatest need for the 
country and areas that will leverage and attract funding from 
outside sources. It should also be pointed out that several 
years will be necessary for TVA to complete a multimillion-
dollar Resource Conservation and Recovery Act [RCRA] program 
currently underway at the Center. The Committee believes that 
an orderly transition in the financing of its activities is 
warranted in order to protect the previous research investment 
and to allow the development of a solid customer base.
    Land between the lakes.--The Committee understands that TVA 
is currently in the process of preparing a public use plan, a 
major step in shaping the future of LBL, and establishing a 
firm foundation for future development and cost recovery 
initiatives. The public use plan will be completed by October 
1, 1996. The Committee expects TVA to begin immediately to 
prepare for the phase down of appropriated funding and the 
shift to other sources of program financing once the public use 
plan is completed.
    Finally, budget constraints and limitations have forced the 
Committee to make funding adjustments to the Stewardship and 
Economic Development programs of TVA.
    The Committee is aware of and commends TVA for its efforts 
to reduce cost and limit its borrowing. TVA is encouraged to 
continue efforts in this regard. However, the Committee 
understands that TVA is considering further construction of 
power generation facilities which will require additional 
borrowing. In meeting those needs, TVA is encouraged to 
consider power generation facilities with the private sector 
which focus on technologies that have a proven record of 
performance. These ventures could help reduce TVA's borrowing 
requirement while providing electric power needs for its 
customers. Furthermore, the Committee commends to the attention 
of TVA a recent study by the Tennessee Valley Public Power 
Association which recommends that any new power generation 
should be located in the west end of the system to aid in 
reducing losses and supporting the transmission system.
                      TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The Committee recommendation includes several general 
provisions included in the House-passed bill.
    Section 509, Bonneville Power Administration, fish and 
wildlife activities.--In addition, the Committee has 
recommended a general provision, section 509, which establishes 
a long-term budget for the Bonneville Power Administration's 
fish and wildlife activities.
    The Committee is very concerned about the continuing 
decline in salmon populations in the Columbia River Basin. Many 
recent reports have indicated that reversing this decline will 
require a substantial long-term financial commitment. Much of 
the funding for this effort is expected to come from the 
Bonneville Power Administration [BPA].
    Yet, the Committee is very concerned about the impact of 
the increasingly competitive wholesale electric power market on 
BPA. In the last 6 months BPA has lost over 500 megawatts of 
its 8,000 megawatts of load to alternative power suppliers. The 
continued loss of customers poses a very serious risk to BPA's 
ability to maintain a high probability of making Treasury 
payments. While this Committee strongly supports Bonneville and 
its public agency mission, the Committee believes that not 
making full Treasury payments is a prescription for significant 
change in the structure of Bonneville (such as privatization). 
Such change would likely not benefit the public policy 
objectives which Bonneville implements including fish and 
wildlife efforts. Providing a stable long-term source of fish 
and wildlife funding requires a stable source of revenue. The 
Committee believes it is very important that actions be taken 
which increase customer confidence in Bonneville.
    A variety of factors are creating financial pressure on 
Bonneville, all of which must be addressed if its long-term 
competitive position in the market is to be stabilized. The 
Committee is aware that Bonneville has taken aggressive actions 
to cut its costs and increase its revenues, and believes these 
efforts must continue. The Committee also realizes that some 
past decisions, such as the ill-fated decision to proceed with 
construction of the Washington Public Power Supply System's 
nuclear plants, also have weakened Bonneville's financial 
position. A particular area of customer concern are the recent 
large increases in the Bonneville fish and wildlife budget. 
This bill includes language which would establish a long-term 
budget for Bonneville's fish and wildlife activities. The level 
of the budget is not established in this bill. The Committee 
urges interested regional parties to come together to establish 
a budget which improves efficiency, provides Bonneville greater 
predictability and stability and will lead to increasing fish 
and wildlife resources in the region. The Committee believes 
this should be done in a manner which does not increase costs 
for other beneficiaries of the Columbia River Basin 
hydrosystem. Should no consensus emerge, however, prior to the 
conference on this legislation, the Committee fully intends to 
act to achieve the goals outlined above.
    The Committee recognizes the economic, historical, and 
cultural importance of anadromous fish resources in the 
Columbia/Snake River basin. In addition, the Committee is 
committed to supporting appropriate steps to achieve fishery 
restoration and healthy fish populations in the basin. Such 
steps are necessary to meet requirements of the Northwest 
Powering Planning and Conservation Act; sustain commercial 
fisheries dependent on the basin; to meet U.S. treaty 
obligations under the Stevens Treaties of 1855; and to ensure a 
continued high quality of life in the Pacific Northwest.
    Nothing in this provision is intended to diminish, modify, 
affect, or abrogate any treaty obligation of the United States 
to Indian tribes.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 7 of rule XVI requires that Committee reports on 
general appropriations bills identify each Committee amendment 
to the House bill ``which proposes an item of appropriation 
which is not made to carry out the provisions of an existing 
law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution previously 
passed by the Senate during that session.''
    The recommended appropriations in title III, Department of 
Energy, generally are subject to annual authorization. However, 
the Congress has not enacted an annual Department of Energy 
authorization bill for several years, with the exception of the 
programs funded within the atomic energy defense activities 
which are authorized in annual defense authorization acts. The 
authorization for the atomic energy defense activities, 
contained in the National Defense Authorization Act of Fiscal 
Year 1996, has not passed the Senate.
    Also contained in title III, Department of Energy, in 
connection with the appropriation under the heading ``Nuclear 
Waste Disposal Fund,'' the recommended item of appropriation is 
brought to the attention of the Senate.
    In title IV, independent agencies, the recommended 
appropriation for the Appalachian Regional Commission is 
$182,000,000.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(C), RULE XXVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, the accompanying 
bill was ordered reported from the Committee, subject to 
amendment and subject to the subcommittee allocation, by 
recorded vote of 28-0.
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Hatfield                     
Mr. Stevens
Mr. Cochran
Mr. Specter
Mr. Domenici
Mr. Gramm
Mr. Bond
Mr. Gorton
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Mack
Mr. Burns
Mr. Shelby
Mr. Jeffords
Mr. Gregg
Mr. Bennett
Mr. Byrd
Mr. Inouye
Mr. Hollings
Mr. Johnston
Mr. Leahy
Mr. Bumpers
Mr. Lautenberg
Mr. Harkin
Ms. Mikulski
Mr. Reid
Mr. Kerrey
Mr. Kohl
Mrs. Murray

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI, OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee reports 
on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute 
or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or 
part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a 
comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution 
making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof 
proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and 
italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical 
devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the 
bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by 
the committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, changes in existing law 
proposed to be made by the bill are shown as follows: existing 
law to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets; new matter is 
printed in italic; and existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman.
    No change in existing statutes has been proposed.

                                            BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL                                            
  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS  
                                                     AMENDED                                                    
                                            [In millions of dollars]                                            
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  Budget authority               Outlays        
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                               Committee    Amount  of   Committee    Amount  of
                                                               allocation      bill      allocation      bill   
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations                                                    
 to its subcommittees of amounts in the First Concurrent                                                        
 Resolution for 1996: Subcommittee on Energy and Water                                                          
 Development:                                                                                                   
    Defense discretionary...................................       11,447       11,446       10,944   \1\ 10,907
    Nondefense discretionary................................        8,723        8,716        9,272        9,271
    Violent crime reduction fund............................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........
    Mandatory...............................................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........
Projections of outlays associated with the recommendation:                                                      
    1996....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........   \2\ 11,968
    1997....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        6,310
    1998....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        1,788
    1999....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........           66
    2000 and future year....................................  ...........  ...........  ...........           41
Financial assistance to State and local governments for 1996                                                    
 in bill....................................................           NA          188           NA           18
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.                                                          
\2\ Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.                                                          
                                                                                                                
NA: Not applicable.                                                                                             




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