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                                                       Calendar No. 470
104th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE

   2d Session                                                   104-295
_______________________________________________________________________


 
      FOREIGN OPERATIONS, EXPORT FINANCING, AND RELATED PROGRAMS 
                        APPROPRIATION BILL, 1997

                                _______
                                

                 June 27, 1996.--Ordered to be printed

_______________________________________________________________________


  Mr. McConnell, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 3540]

    The Committee on Appropriations to which was referred the 
bill (H.R. 3540), making appropriations for Foreign Assistance 
and related programs for the fiscal year ending September 30, 
1997, and for other purposes, reports the same to the Senate 
with amendments and recommends that the bill as amended do 
pass.


Amounts in new budget authority

Fiscal year 1996 appropriations......................... $12,379,536,669
Fiscal year 1997 budget estimate........................  12,925,309,810
Amount of bill as passed by House.......................  11,919,044,710
Amount of bill as reported to Senate....................  12,217,980,710
Bill as recommended to Senate compared to:
    1996 appropriations.................................    -161,555,959
    Budget estimate.....................................    -707,329,100
    House passed bill...................................    +298,936,000

                                                     SUMMARY TABLE: AMOUNTS IN NEW BUDGET AUTHORITY                                                     
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                    Increase (+) or decrease (-), Senate
                                                                                                                             bill compared with         
                           Item                             Budget estimate     House reported     Recommended by  -------------------------------------
                                                                                     bill         Senate Committee                       House reported 
                                                                                                                     Budget estimate          bill      
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Export assistance........................................       $646,165,000       $630,614,000       $632,000,000       -$14,165,000        +$1,386,000
Economic assistance--Bilateral...........................      7,304,326,000      7,152,176,000      7,155,826,000       -148,500,000         +3,650,000
Military assistance......................................      3,217,250,000      3,199,725,000      3,223,000,000         +5,750,000        +23,275,000
Economic assistance--Multilateral........................      1,757,568,810        936,529,710      1,207,154,710       -543,414,100       +270,625,000
                                                          ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, fiscal year 1997............................     12,925,309,810     11,919,044,710     12,217,980,710       -707,329,100       +298,936,000
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Summary of total budget authority in the bill....................     5
Historical totals of foreign assistance..........................     5
Items of special interest........................................    19
    Foreign aid and economic growth..............................    19
Title I--Export assistance:
    Export-Import Bank of the United States......................    21
    Overseas Private Investment Corporation......................    21
    Trade and Development Agency.................................    22
Title II--Bilateral economic assistance:
    Development assistance.......................................    23
    International disaster assistance............................    34
    Payment to the foreign service retirement and disability fund    34
    AID operating expenses.......................................    35
    Operating expenses of the Office of Inspector General........    35
    Other bilateral economic assistance..........................    35
    International Fund for Ireland...............................    37
    Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltic States..........    37
    Assistance for the New Independent States of the former 
      Soviet Union...............................................    38
    Independent Agencies:
        African Development Foundation...........................    45
        Inter-American Foundation................................    45
        Peace Corps..............................................    45
    Department of State:
        International narcotics control..........................    45
        Migration and refugee assistance.........................    46
        Emergency refugee and migration assistance fund..........    48
        Antiterrorism............................................    48
        Nonproliferation and disarmament fund....................    48
Title III--Military assistance:
    International military education and training................    51
    Foreign military financing...................................    51
    Special defense acquisition fund.............................    55
    Peacekeeping operations......................................    55
Title IV--Multilateral economic assistance:
    International financial institutions summary.................    56
    International Bank for Reconstruction and Development........    56
    International Development Association........................    57
    International Finance Corporation............................    58
    Inter-American Development Bank..............................    58
    Asian Development Bank.......................................    59
    Asian Development Fund.......................................    60
    African Development Bank and Fund............................    61
    European Bank for Reconstruction and Development.............    61
    North American Development Bank..............................    62
    Enhanced structural adjustment facility of the International 
      Monetary Fund..............................................    63
    Department of State: Voluntary contributions to international 
      organizations and programs.................................    63
Title V--General provisions......................................    64
Compliance with paragraph 7, rule XVI of the standing rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................    67
Compliance with paragraph 7(c), rule XXVI of the standing rules 
  of the Senate..................................................    67
Compliance with paragraph 12, rule XXVI of the standing rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................    68
Budget impact statement..........................................    73
             SUMMARY OF TOTAL BUDGET AUTHORITY IN THE BILL

    The Committee recommends a net total of $12,217,980,710 in 
new budget authority, divided into the following categories:

Multilateral economic assistance........................  $1,207,154,710
Bilateral economic assistance...........................   7,155,826,000
Military assistance.....................................   3,223,000,000
Export-import assistance................................     632,000,000

    The Committee recommendations represent a total decrease of 
$707,329,100 below the President's fiscal year 1997 request.
    The Committee recommends budget authority of $912,154,710 
for the international financial institutions, which is 
$513,414,100 below the requested amount.

                HISTORICAL TOTALS OF FOREIGN ASSISTANCE

    As in the past, the Committee is including in its report 
several tables and graphs, updated with the latest available 
data, which illustrate certain trends in U.S. foreign 
assistance.

         Table 1.--Foreign Aid Expenditures by Donor Countries

    The following table shows the amounts expended by donor 
countries on foreign aid in 1995 and what percent of their GNP 
that amount represents:

                             OFFICIAL DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE [ODA] 1995--PRELIMINARY                            
                                              [Dollars in millions]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                            GNP       Donor aid 
                              Country                                      Amount        (percent)    per capita
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Australia..........................................................             $1,136         0.34       $63.82
Austria............................................................                747          .32        93.37
Belgium............................................................              1,033          .38       102.28
Canada.............................................................              2,113          .39        72.36
Denmark............................................................              1,628          .97       313.08
Finland............................................................                387          .32        75.88
France.............................................................              8,439          .55       145.75
Germany............................................................              7,481          .31        91.79
Ireland............................................................                143          .27        39.72
Italy..............................................................              1,521          .14        26.64
Japan..............................................................             14,484          .28       115.87
Luxembourg.........................................................                 68          .38       174.35
Netherlands........................................................              3,321          .80       215.65
New Zealand........................................................                123          .23        35.14
Norway.............................................................              1,244          .87       289.30
Portugal...........................................................                269          .27        27.17
Spain..............................................................              1,309          .23        33.48
Sweden.............................................................              1,982          .89       225.23
Switzerland........................................................              1,084          .34       154.86
United Kingdom.....................................................              3,185          .29        54.54
United States......................................................              7,303          .10        28.01
                                                                    --------------------------------------------
      Total DAC....................................................             59,002          .38  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

        Table 2.--U.S. Foreign Assistance, Fiscal Years 1946-95

    The following tables illustrate the total amount of foreign 
assistance furnished to other nations by the United States 
during the fiscal years 1946-95 and amounts by region and 
country for 1946-95:

              U.S. FOREIGN ASSISTANCE, FISCAL YEARS 1946-95             
                        [In millions of dollars]                        
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Economic     Military              
             Country                assistance   assistance     Total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Total economic and military                                             
 assistance, fiscal years 1946-                                         
 95..............................    293,865.9    158,629.3    452,495.2
Total other U.S. loans and                                              
 grants, fiscal years 1946-95....     82,521.5  ...........     82,521.5
                                  --------------------------------------
      Grand total................    376,387.4    158,629.3    535,016.7
------------------------------------------------------------------------


 U.S. ECONOMIC AND MILITARY ASSISTANCE: DETAIL BY REGION AND BY COUNTRY-
                          FISCAL YEARS 1946-95                          
                        [In millions of dollars]                        
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                     Economic     Military              
             Country                assistance   assistance     Total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Near East:                                                              
    Algeria......................        206.2          1.1        207.3
    Bahrain......................          2.4          1.7          4.1
    Cento........................         39.6  ...........         39.6
    Egypt........................     22,798.9     19,908.6     42,707.5
    Iran.........................        767.7      1,404.9      2,172.6
    Iraq.........................         56.4         50.0        106.4
    Israel.......................     22,870.5     36,627.4     59,497.9
    Jordan.......................      2,004.7      1,935.4      3,940.1
    Lebanon......................        431.3        278.4        709.7
    Morocco......................      2,198.0      1,221.8      3,419.8
    Near East regional...........        733.7           .1        733.8
    Oman.........................        192.1        155.9        348.0
    Saudi Arabia.................         31.8        292.3        324.1
    Sinai support mission........  ...........  ...........  ...........
    Syria........................        352.3           .1        352.4
    Tunisia......................      1,263.6        770.4      2,034.0
    West Bank/Gaza...............        106.4  ...........        106.4
    Yemen Arab Republic..........        483.4         30.3        513.7
    Yemen, Peoples Democratic                                           
     Republic of.................         26.5  ...........         26.5
                                  --------------------------------------
      Regional total.............     54,565.5     62,678.3    117,243.8
                                  ======================================
Sub-Saharan Africa:                                                     
    Africa regional..............      1,445.4         52.4      1,497.8
    Angola.......................        182.8  ...........        182.8
    Benin........................        147.5          1.0        148.5
    Botswana.....................        357.8         35.0        392.8
    Burkina Faso.................        368.0          1.2        369.2
    Burundi......................        197.2          1.9        199.1
    Cameroon.....................        317.7         36.3        354.0
    Cape Verde...................        118.9          1.2        120.1
    Central African Republic.....         73.2          2.3         75.5
    Chad.........................        271.7         37.4        309.1
    Comoros......................         16.9           .5         17.4
    Congo........................         52.8           .8         53.6
    Cote d'Ivoire................        166.2          3.4        169.6
    Djibouti.....................         51.8         15.9         67.7
    East Africa (Regional                                               
     Development Office).........         33.3  ...........         33.3
    Entente States...............          8.5  ...........          8.5
    Equatorial Guinea............         16.6          1.8         18.4
    Eritrea......................         40.5           .1         40.6
    Ethiopia.....................      1,191.7        261.4      1,453.1
    Gabon........................         42.8         26.0         68.8
    Gambia, the..................        155.6          1.2        156.8
    Ghana........................        719.3          5.6        724.9
    Guinea.......................        482.1         10.8        492.9
    Guinea-Bissau (formerly                                             
     Portuguese Guinea)..........         76.6          1.0         77.6
    Kenya........................        994.2        282.9      1,277.1
    Lesotho......................        329.0           .6        329.6
    Liberia......................        989.2         95.0      1,084.2
    Libya........................        212.5         17.6        230.1
    Madagascar...................        322.2          5.3        327.5
    Malawi.......................        511.2          9.3        520.5
    Mali.........................        576.2          5.5        581.7
    Mauritania...................        191.6           .8        192.4
    Mauritius....................         82.3           .3         82.6
    Mozambique...................        834.2           .5        834.7
    Namibia......................         53.9           .8         54.7
    Niger........................        531.1         33.4        564.5
    Nigeria......................        522.9          3.1        526.0
    Rwanda.......................        297.4          2.5        299.9
    Sahel regional...............        260.6  ...........        260.6
    Sao Tome and Principe........         15.3           .8         16.1
    Senegal......................        741.3         52.4        793.7
    Seychelles...................         39.8           .6         40.4
    Sierra Leone.................        235.4          2.4        237.8
    Somalia......................        880.0        240.8      1,120.8
    South Africa.................        466.7           .1        466.8
    Southern Africa region-Osarac        161.1  ...........        161.1
    Sudan........................      1,609.2        375.7      1,984.9
    Swaziland....................        190.3           .8        191.1
    Tanzania.....................        543.5           .7        544.2
    Togo.........................        186.5           .8        187.3
    Uganda.......................        417.1          1.5        418.6
    Zaire........................      1,218.7        438.7      1,657.4
    Zambia.......................        513.6           .6        514.2
    Zimbabwe.....................        665.0          3.1        668.1
                                  --------------------------------------
      Regional total.............     21,126.6      2,073.7     23,200.3
                                  ======================================
Latin America:                                                          
    Argentina....................        195.5        269.6        465.1
    Bahamas......................          6.0           .6          6.6
    Barbados.....................          4.2           .5          4.7
    Belize.......................        140.2          5.0        145.2
    Bolivia......................      1,608.1        227.5      1,835.6
    Brazil.......................      2,457.9        640.8      3,098.7
    Caribbean regional...........        721.2         47.6        768.8
    Central America regional.....  ...........  ...........  ...........
    Chile........................      1,342.7        221.1      1,563.8
    Colombia.....................      1,719.5        510.1      2,229.6
    Costa Rica...................      1,730.7         40.1      1,770.8
    Cuba.........................          4.0         16.1         20.1
    Dominican Republic...........      1,551.0        102.7      1,653.7
    Ecuador......................        830.3        191.3      1,021.6
    El Salvador..................      4,080.4      1,174.7      5,255.1
    Grenada......................         60.1           .2         60.3
    Guatemala....................      1,615.9         75.8      1,691.7
    Guyana.......................        117.0          6.0        123.0
    Haiti........................      1,107.9         15.3      1,123.2
    Honduras.....................      1,607.3        553.5      2,160.8
    Jamaica......................      1,810.0         48.1      1,858.1
    Latin America regional.......      1,588.1         25.4      1,613.5
    Mexico.......................        670.2         18.8        689.0
    Nicaragua....................        915.7         30.5        946.2
    Panama.......................      1,050.0         77.4      1,127.4
    Paraguay.....................        237.3         32.1        269.4
    Peru.........................      2,145.9        348.3      2,494.2
    Regional Office Central                                             
     America and Panama [ROCAP]..        752.8  ...........        752.8
    Suriname.....................         22.9           .3         23.2
    Trinidad and Tobago..........         43.2          2.3         45.5
    Uruguay......................        202.0         92.7        294.7
    Venezuela....................        209.4        154.7        364.1
                                  --------------------------------------
      Regional total.............     30,547.3      4,929.2     35,476.5
                                  ======================================
Asia:                                                                   
    Afghanistan..................        729.2          5.6        734.8
    Asia regional................      1,140.7  ...........      1,140.7
    Associated Southeastern Asian                                       
     Nations [ASEAN].............         10.2  ...........         10.2
    Bangladesh...................      2,905.7          4.7      2,910.4
    Bhutan.......................          8.0  ...........          8.0
    China, Peoples Republic of...          3.2  ...........          3.2
    Hong Kong....................         43.8  ...........         43.8
    India........................     12,061.8        149.5     12,211.3
    Indochina Associated States..        825.6        731.5      1,557.1
    Indonesia....................      3,809.3        692.7      4,502.0
    Japan........................      2,685.9      1,239.6      3,925.5
    Kampuchea....................      1,006.6      1,280.4      2,287.0
    Korea........................      6,086.9      8,796.3     14,883.2
    Laos.........................        917.3      1,606.7      2,524.0
    Malaysia.....................         92.0        196.9        288.9
    Maldives.....................          2.7           .4          3.1
    Mongolia.....................         74.1           .2         74.3
    Myanmar......................        231.3         90.5        321.8
    Nepal........................        537.2          4.3        541.5
    Pakistan.....................      7,939.9      2,951.5     10,891.4
    Philippines..................      4,963.7      2,345.6      7,309.3
    Ryukyu Islands (U.S.)........        413.8  ...........        413.8
    Singapore....................          2.8         19.6         22.4
    Sri Lanka....................      1,438.5          8.1      1,446.6
    Taiwan.......................      2,218.7      4,360.4      6,579.1
    Thailand.....................      1,086.1      2,318.6      3,404.7
    Viet Nam (South), Republic of      6,952.5     16,416.1     23,368.6
    Western Samoa................         23.2           .1         23.3
                                  --------------------------------------
      Regional total.............     58,210.9     43,219.3    101,430.2
Europe:                                                                 
    Albania......................         99.6           .5        100.1
    Austria......................      1,136.1        122.1      1,258.2
    Belgium......................        589.1      1,275.3      1,864.4
    Berlin, West.................        131.9  ...........        131.9
    Bosnia Hercegovina...........         86.7  ...........         86.7
    Bulgaria.....................         24.4           .9         25.3
    Croatia......................         18.9  ...........         18.9
    Cyprus.......................        266.4  ...........        266.4
    Czech Republic...............          3.9          1.0          4.9
    Czechoslovakia...............        195.6          1.0        196.6
    Denmark......................        276.5        640.1        916.6
    East European regional.......      1,132.3  ...........      1,132.3
    Estonia......................         10.0           .2         10.2
    European regional............      1,082.4           .2      1,082.6
    Finland......................         51.2           .8         52.0
    France.......................      3,917.0      4,548.6      8,465.6
    Germany, Democratic Republic                                        
     of..........................           .8  ...........           .8
    Germany, Federal Republic of.      3,844.0        939.4      4,783.4
    Greece.......................      1,901.6      8,495.4     10,397.0
    Hungary......................         42.2          2.6         44.8
    Iceland......................         76.9           .3         77.2
    Italy........................      3,420.8      2,545.3      5,966.1
    Latvia.......................         10.0           .3         10.3
    Lithuania....................         52.7           .3         53.0
    Macedonia....................         15.5  ...........         15.5
    Malta........................         84.1           .7         84.8
    Netherlands..................      1,027.6      1,284.7      2,312.3
    Norway.......................        299.9        943.8      1,243.7
    Poland.......................        955.9          2.6        958.5
    Portugal.....................      1,367.5      1,797.7      3,165.2
    Republic of Ireland (formerly                                       
     Ireland)....................        326.8           .1        326.9
    Romania......................        151.8           .6        152.4
    Slovak Republic..............          1.0           .4          1.4
    Slovenia.....................          1.0           .2          1.2
    Spain........................      1,084.5      3,446.5      4,531.0
    Sweden.......................        109.0  ...........        109.0
    Switzerland..................  ...........  ...........  ...........
    Turkey.......................      4,851.8     12,925.6     17,777.4
    United Kingdom...............      7,672.1      1,107.4      8,779.5
    U.S.S.R......................        186.4  ...........        186.4
    Yugoslavia...................      1,836.4        723.7      2,560.1
                                  --------------------------------------
      Regional total.............     38,342.2     40,808.2     79,150.4
                                  ======================================
New Independent States:                                                 
    Armenia......................        183.3  ...........        183.3
    Azerbaijan...................         21.3  ...........         21.3
    Belarus......................        103.9           .2        104.1
    Georgia......................        137.1           .1        137.2
    Kazakhstan...................        109.6           .3        109.9
    Kyrgyz Republic..............        114.4  ...........        114.4
    Moldova......................        105.4           .1        105.5
    New Independent States.......        743.8           .3        744.1
    Russia.......................      1,593.6           .9      1,594.5
    Tajikistan...................         72.4  ...........         72.4
    Turkmenitan..................         60.5           .1         60.6
    Ukraine......................        194.0          1.0        195.0
    Uzbekistan...................         26.1  ...........         26.1
                                  --------------------------------------
      Regional total.............      3,465.6          2.9      3,468.5
                                  ======================================
Oceania and others:                                                     
    Australia....................          8.0        115.6        123.6
    Fiji.........................  ...........  ...........  ...........
    New Zealand..................          4.3          4.3          8.6
    Oceania regional.............        289.5          1.9        291.4
    Pacific Islands, Trust                                              
     Territory of the............        824.2  ...........        824.2
    Papua New Guinea.............         17.6           .8         18.4
    Solomon Islands..............  ...........  ...........  ...........
    Tonga........................  ...........  ...........  ...........
                                  --------------------------------------
      Regional total.............      1,143.5        122.7      1,266.2
                                  ======================================
Canada...........................         17.5         13.0         30.5
                                  ======================================
Interregional activities.........     86,446.8      4,782.3     91,229.1
                                  --------------------------------------
      Grand total................    293,865.9    158,629.3    452,495.2
------------------------------------------------------------------------

       Table 3.--Appropriations for Bilateral Foreign Assistance

    The following table shows the amounts appropriated for 
bilateral economic and military assistance for 1985-96 in 
constant and current dollars:

                           APPROPRIATIONS FOR FOREIGN ASSISTANCE--FISCAL YEARS 1985-96                          
                                            [In billions of dollars]                                            
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                   Current dollars        Constant 1996 dollars 
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                              Development    Security   Development    Security 
                                                               assistance   assistance   assistance   assistance
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1985........................................................        4.957       13.726        6.904       19.116
1986........................................................        3.954        9.515        5.348       12.870
1987........................................................        4.189        8.952        5.503       11.759
1988........................................................        4.361        8.559        5.528       10.849
1989........................................................        4.644        8.560        5.633       10.383
1990........................................................        5.158        8.818        5.999       10.255
1991........................................................        6.265        8.788        6.995        9.813
1992........................................................        6.131        7.315        6.649        7.933
1993........................................................        7.520        6.223        7.967        6.593
1994........................................................        6.629        5.337        6.886        5.544
1995........................................................        7.378        5.648        7.526        5.761
1996........................................................        6.505        5.902        6.505        5.902
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

   Table 4.--Appropriations for International Financial Institutions

    The following table shows the amounts appropriated for 
multilateral assistance for 1985-96 in constant and current 
dollars:

      APPROPRIATIONS FOR MULTILATERAL LENDING--FISCAL YEARS 1985-96     
                        [In billions of dollars]                        
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               Constant 
                                                  Current        1996   
                                                  dollars      dollars  
------------------------------------------------------------------------
1985..........................................    1,548.178    2,156.148
1986..........................................    1,142.512    1,545.362
1987..........................................    1,207.142    1,585.702
1988..........................................    1,205.570    1,528.181
1989..........................................    1,314.630    1,594.515
1990..........................................    1,469.191    1,708.669
1991..........................................    1,618.835    1,807.591
1992..........................................    1,516.415    1,644.552
1993..........................................    1,493.419    1,582.128
1994..........................................    1,404.861    1,459.510
1995..........................................    1,730.881    1,765.499
1996..........................................    1,153.264    1,153.264
------------------------------------------------------------------------

                  Table 5.--AID Assistance Per Country

    The following table lists the total dollar AID assistance 
per country by ascending per capita gross national product:

                  AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT, TOTAL DOLLAR ASSISTANCE PER COUNTRY LISTED BY PER CAPITA GROSS NATIONAL PRODUCT                 
                                                                 [Dollars in thousands]                                                                 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                  Fiscal year 1994 \1\     Fiscal year 1995 \1\      Fiscal year 1996   
                                                                      GNP per   ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                              Country                                  capita      Dollar    Cumulative     Dollar    Cumulative    Dollar    Cumulative
                                                                       (1994)       level      percent      level       percent      level      percent 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Bosnia-Hercegovina................................................      ( \2\ )  ..........  ..........      12,640   ..........     257,047  ..........
Afghanistan.......................................................      ( \2\ )  ..........       1,995  ...........  ..........  ..........  ..........
Cambodia..........................................................      ( \2\ )      29,475  ..........      35,493   ..........      25,000  ..........
Djibouti..........................................................      ( \2\ )       1,000  ..........  ...........  ..........          50  ..........
Eritrea...........................................................      ( \2\ )       9,999  ..........       3,820   ..........       8,973  ..........
Liberia...........................................................      ( \2\ )       3,696  ..........  ...........  ..........       7,500  ..........
Somalia...........................................................      ( \2\ )      15,941  ..........       5,018   ..........       4,000  ..........
West Bank/Gaza....................................................      ( \2\ )      56,769  ..........      80,263   ..........      76,012  ..........
Burma.............................................................      ( \3\ )  ..........  ..........         100   ..........  ..........  ..........
Rwanda............................................................          80   ..........  ..........       9,648   ..........       6,306  ..........
Mozambique........................................................          90       36,400  ..........      26,768   ..........      51,305  ..........
Ethiopia..........................................................         100       32,416  ..........      24,264   ..........      39,766  ..........
Tanzania..........................................................         140       19,685  ..........      27,662   ..........      23,343  ..........
Burundi...........................................................         160        4,497  ..........       4,996   ..........       3,169  ..........
Sierra Leone......................................................         160          468  ..........         450   ..........          73  ..........
Malawi............................................................         170       28,190  ..........      33,338   ..........      33,831  ..........
Chad..............................................................         180        5,150  ..........       1,970   ..........         455  ..........
Uganda............................................................         190       33,862  ..........      44,250   ..........      30,622  ..........
Madagascar........................................................         200       27,590  ..........      25,250   ..........      20,149  ..........
Nepal.............................................................         200       16,799  ..........      14,280   ..........      23,184  ..........
Vietnam (South)...................................................         200          688  ..........  ...........  ..........  ..........  ..........
Bangladesh........................................................         230       43,200  ..........      21,099   ..........      42,731  ..........
Haiti.............................................................         230       62,857  ..........     139,593   ..........      86,009  ..........
Niger.............................................................         230       16,115  ..........      11,950   ..........      10,344  ..........
Guinea-Bissau.....................................................         240        4,100  ..........       4,150   ..........       5,331  ..........
Kenya.............................................................         250       17,183  ..........      14,650   ..........      24,351  ..........
Mali..............................................................         250       34,204  ..........      27,779   ..........      30,334  ..........
Sao Tome..........................................................         250          800  ..........         300   ..........          25  ..........
Nigeria...........................................................         270        5,893  ..........       2,377   ..........       7,610  ..........
Yemen.............................................................         280        2,999  ..........       6,994   ..........  ..........  ..........
Burkina...........................................................         300        2,627  ..........          16   ..........         994  ..........
Mongolia..........................................................         310        7,000  ..........      11,319   ..........       4,000  ..........
India.............................................................         320       35,684  ..........      56,861   ..........      49,495  ..........
Togo..............................................................         320            4  ..........  ...........  ..........         100  ..........
Gambia............................................................         330        6,750  ..........       1,556   ..........         853  ..........
Georgia...........................................................         340   ..........  ..........      39,273   ..........      25,080  ..........
Nicaragua.........................................................         340       77,730  ..........      22,691   ..........      21,435  ..........
Zambia............................................................         350       18,850  ..........      19,789   ..........      20,816  ..........
Tajikistan........................................................         360   ..........  ..........       8,401   ..........       4,060  ..........
Benin.............................................................         370       20,061  ..........      14,821   ..........      16,545  ..........
Central African Republic..........................................         370        2,316  ..........       2,267   ..........         987  ..........
Albania...........................................................         380   ..........  ..........      29,956   ..........      22,351  ..........
Ghana.............................................................         410       33,135  ..........      28,680   ..........      39,283  ..........
Pakistan..........................................................         430   ..........  ..........       7,480   ..........  ..........  ..........
Mauritania........................................................         480   ..........  ..........  ...........  ..........         342  ..........
Azerbaijan........................................................         500   ..........  ..........       9,848   ..........       8,050  ..........
Zimbabwe..........................................................         500       15,747  ..........      17,650   ..........      23,272  ..........
Comoros...........................................................         510   ..........  ..........         300   ..........          25  ..........
Cote d'Ivoire.....................................................         510   ..........  ..........  ...........  ..........         190  ..........
Guinea............................................................         520       18,437  ..........      16,423   ..........      15,252  ..........
Guyana............................................................         530        2,559  ..........       1,651   ..........       2,200  ..........
Honduras..........................................................         600       19,060  ..........      14,265   ..........      16,615  ..........
Senegal...........................................................         600       30,925  ..........      17,540   ..........      25,037  ..........
Congo.............................................................         620          700  ..........         700   ..........         865  ..........
Sri Lanka.........................................................         640       12,200  ..........      11,366   ..........      11,605  ..........
Armenia...........................................................         680   ..........  ..........      51,523   ..........      92,163  ..........
Cameroon..........................................................         680           49  ..........  ...........  ..........          92  ..........
Egypt.............................................................         720      591,642  ..........     974,077   ..........     969,142  ..........
Lesotho...........................................................         720        2,072  ..........       3,948   ..........         131  ..........
                                                                   -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................  ...........   1,409,519       43.32   1,928,863        42.13   1,940,453       42.28
                                                                   =====================================================================================
Angola............................................................      ( \4\ )  ..........  ..........  ...........  ..........      20,913  ..........
Lebanon...........................................................      ( \4\ )       1,661  ..........      13,308   ..........       2,819  ..........
Turkmenistan......................................................      ( \4\ )  ..........  ..........       4,382   ..........       6,118  ..........
Bolivia...........................................................         770       50,781  ..........      33,224   ..........      43,002  ..........
Macedonia.........................................................         820        5,000  ..........      13,512   ..........      12,570  ..........
Kirghizstan.......................................................         850   ..........  ..........      23,297   ..........      23,154  ..........
Moldova...........................................................         870   ..........  ..........      10,518   ..........      29,963  ..........
Indonesia.........................................................         880       13,405  ..........      55,040   ..........      54,600  ..........
Cape Verde........................................................         920          800  ..........         800   ..........          48  ..........
Philippines.......................................................         950       45,214  ..........      35,941   ..........      53,136  ..........
Uzbekistan........................................................         960   ..........  ..........      10,561   ..........      21,548  ..........
Lithuania.........................................................       1,090   ..........  ..........      12,737   ..........       9,456  ..........
Swaziland.........................................................       1,100        6,255  ..........      10,464   ..........         204  ..........
Morocco...........................................................       1,140       17,571  ..........      12,862   ..........      17,073  ..........
Kazakhstan........................................................       1,160   ..........  ..........      38,443   ..........      44,076  ..........
Guatemala.........................................................       1,200       26,777  ..........      19,562   ..........      21,258  ..........
Bulgaria..........................................................       1,250   ..........  ..........      37,388   ..........      33,077  ..........
Romania...........................................................       1,270   ..........  ..........      39,599   ..........      26,253  ..........
Ecuador...........................................................       1,280        9,625  ..........       8,062   ..........      11,328  ..........
Dominican Republic................................................       1,330       10,719  ..........       9,230   ..........       8,963  ..........
El Salvador.......................................................       1,360       56,425  ..........      62,672   ..........      40,874  ..........
Jordan............................................................       1,440       28,000  ..........      12,200   ..........      11,484  ..........
Jamaica...........................................................       1,540        8,929  ..........       9,814   ..........      10,979  ..........
Paraguay..........................................................       1,580   ..........  ..........  ...........  ..........       3,200  ..........
Togo..............................................................       1,590            4  ..........  ...........  ..........         100  ..........
Colombia..........................................................       1,670          172  ..........         850   ..........         120  ..........
Tunisia...........................................................       1,790          985  ..........  ...........  ..........  ..........  ..........
Ukraine...........................................................       1,930   ..........  ..........     151,499   ..........     243,219  ..........
Namibia...........................................................       1,970       12,799  ..........       6,800   ..........       9,559  ..........
Peru..............................................................       2,110       37,612  ..........      55,080   ..........      27,705  ..........
Slovakia..........................................................       2,250   ..........  ..........      27,597   ..........      17,866  ..........
Russia............................................................       2,290       90,000  ..........     282,307   ..........     316,112  ..........
Belarus...........................................................       2,320   ..........  ..........       2,263   ..........       7,200  ..........
Latvia............................................................       2,320   ..........  ..........       6,326   ..........       4,493  ..........
Costa Rica........................................................       2,400        3,257  ..........       2,585   ..........  ..........  ..........
Poland............................................................       2,410   ..........  ..........      81,576   ..........      51,969  ..........
Thailand..........................................................       2,410        5,082  ..........  ...........  ..........  ..........  ..........
Estonia...........................................................       2,430   ..........  ..........       2,368   ..........          50  ..........
Turkey............................................................       2,500   ..........  ..........     165,709   ..........      37,500  ..........
Belize............................................................       2,530        2,196  ..........       2,599   ..........  ..........  ..........
Croatia...........................................................       2,560   ..........  ..........      12,345   ..........      13,241  ..........
Panama............................................................       2,580        4,346  ..........       7,857   ..........       5,221  ..........
Botswana..........................................................       2,800        4,775  ..........       2,648   ..........         392  ..........
                                                                   -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................  ...........     440,729       13.54   1,266,335        27.66   1,210,993       26.39
                                                                   =====================================================================================
Brazil............................................................       2,970   ..........  ..........  ...........  ..........      13,238  ..........
South Africa......................................................       3,040      133,674  ..........      99,979   ..........     122,442  ..........
Mauritius.........................................................       3,150   ..........  ..........  ...........  ..........          25  ..........
Czech Republic....................................................       3,200   ..........  ..........      18,037   ..........       5,655  ..........
Hungary...........................................................       3,840   ..........  ..........      22,111   ..........      20,365  ..........
Gabon.............................................................       3,880   ..........  ..........  ...........  ..........         508  ..........
Mexico............................................................       4,180          500  ..........  ...........  ..........      35,774  ..........
Slovenia..........................................................       7,040   ..........  ..........       3,417   ..........       5,479  ..........
Cyprus............................................................      10,260       29,999  ..........  ...........  ..........      15,000  ..........
Ireland...........................................................      13,530       39,408  ..........      39,200   ..........      19,600  ..........
Israel............................................................      14,530    1,200,000  ..........   1,200,000   ..........   1,200,000  ..........
                                                                   -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal....................................................  ...........   1,403,581       43.14   1,382,744        30.20   1,438,086       31.33
                                                                   =====================================================================================
      Total country programs......................................  ...........   3,253,829      100.00   4,577,942       100.00   4,589,532      100.00
                                                                   =====================================================================================
Non-country programs:                                                                                                                                   
    Caribbean regional............................................  ...........       3,735  ..........       3,199   ..........  ..........  ..........
    N.I.S. regional...............................................  ...........   1,387,620  ..........      83,138   ..........     120,115  ..........
    Eastern Europe regional.......................................  ...........     476,643  ..........      80,239   ..........     110,389  ..........
    ASEAN.........................................................  ...........       2,678  ..........       1,955   ..........  ..........            
    Africa regional...............................................  ...........     101,413  ..........      79,692   ..........      85,866  ..........
    Asia Near East regional.......................................  ...........      33,817  ..........      36,426   ..........      22,634  ..........
    LAC regional..................................................  ...........      56,502  ..........      52,010   ..........      43,321  ..........
    Near East regional............................................  ...........       1,000  ..........  ...........  ..........  ..........  ..........
    REDSO/E.......................................................  ...........       2,000  ..........       4,500   ..........       3,080  ..........
    REDSO/W.......................................................  ...........       2,500  ..........      13,525   ..........       7,590  ..........
    ROCAP.........................................................  ...........       6,903  ..........      13,210   ..........      11,244  ..........
    Sahel regional................................................  ...........  ..........  ..........  ...........  ..........       6,637  ..........
    South Africa regional/SADCC...................................  ...........      46,491  ..........      85,309   ..........      38,000  ..........
    Southeast Asia contingency....................................  ...........       7,040  ..........  ...........  ..........       1,000  ..........
    South Pacific.................................................  ...........      14,000  ..........      14,000   ..........      14,000  ..........
    Global programs, field support and research...................  ...........     604,564  ..........     791,287   ..........     461,681  ..........
    BHR...........................................................  ...........      57,045  ..........     100,812   ..........      72,913  ..........
    PPC...........................................................  ...........       7,485  ..........       8,681   ..........       9,865  ..........
    Housing subsidy...............................................  ...........      15,179  ..........      19,023   ..........       4,000  ..........
    Housing administration........................................  ...........       7,845  ..........       7,898   ..........       7,000  ..........
    Housing subsidy reestimate....................................  ...........  ..........  ..........      (2,443)  ..........  ..........  ..........
    MSED (PSIP) subsidy...........................................  ...........         992  ..........       1,416   ..........       1,500  ..........
    MSED (PSIP) administration....................................  ...........         194  ..........         494   ..........         500  ..........
    MSED subsidy reestimate.......................................  ...........  ..........  ..........         (98)  ..........  ..........  ..........
    OFDA..........................................................  ...........      51,427  ..........  ...........  ..........  ..........  ..........
    Other.........................................................  ...........         793  ..........      27,641   ..........     193,947  ..........
    International disaster assistance.............................  ...........     151,786  ..........     205,105   ..........     204,369  ..........
    African disaster..............................................  ...........         952  ..........         163   ..........         456  ..........
    Housing guaranty liquidating account..........................  ...........      67,007  ..........      67,785   ..........      64,000  ..........
    Operating expenses............................................  ...........     516,604  ..........     530,982   ..........     492,754  ..........
    Operating expenses--Inspector General.........................  ...........      38,773  ..........      36,064   ..........      37,962  ..........
    Foreign service retirement and disability.....................  ...........      44,151  ..........      45,118   ..........      43,914  ..........
    Miscellaneous trust funds.....................................  ...........       4,768  ..........  ...........  ..........  ..........  ..........
    AID loan repayments...........................................  ...........   (539,838)  ..........    (539,000)  ..........  ..........  ..........
    Miscellaneous trust funds receipts............................  ...........     (1,183)  ..........      (5,495)  ..........  ..........  ..........
                                                                   -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total noncountry programs...................................  ...........   3,170,886  ..........   1,762,636   ..........   2,058,737  ..........
                                                                   =====================================================================================
      Grand total.................................................  ...........   6,424,715  ..........   6,340,578   ..........   6,648,269  ..........
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Country levels for fiscal years 1994 and 1995 do not include attributions of regional and central funds as in the fiscal year 1997 congressional    
  presentation.                                                                                                                                         
\2\ Estimated to be low income ($725 or less).                                                                                                          
\3\ Estimated to be lower middle income ($726 to $2,895).                                                                                               
\4\ Data not available.                                                                                                                                 

    Table 6.--Unliquidated Balances of the Agency for International 
                              Development

    Below is a table showing the unliquidated balances of the 
Agency for International Development:



UNLIQUIDATED BALANCES OF THE AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT


(As of December 31, 1995)

                        [In thousands of dollars]

Development assistance:                                           Amount
    Development Assistance Program......................      1,355,910 
    Agriculture, rural development, and nutrition.......        101,104 
    Population planning.................................        690,969 
    Health..............................................         37,682 
    AIDS prevention.....................................          4,835 
    Child survival......................................         25,529 
    Education and human resources development...........         13,102 
    Private sector, environment and energy..............         40,845 
    In-transit/reconciling items........................     (1,179,218)
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, functional development assistance.......      1,090,668 
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    American schools and hospitals abroad...............         17,795 
    Operating expenses..................................        146,581 
    Operating expenses, inspector general...............         10,511 
    International disaster assistance...................        204,761 
    Sub-Saharan and South Africa development............      1,755,530 
    Central America reconciliation assistance...........            469 
    Special assistance initiatives......................        815,218 
    Foreign Service retirement fund.....................          8,958 
    New Independent States..............................      1,232,273 
    African disaster assistance.........................         12,149 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, development assistance.....................      5,294,913 
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Economic support fund...................................      2,538,643 
Demobilization and transition fund......................            882 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, unliquidated balances......................      7,834,438 

                       ITEMS OF SPECIAL INTEREST

    The Committee believes the careful and effective 
administration of foreign assistance is a key tool essential to 
advancing U.S. economic and security interests around the 
world. In a newspaper editorial, Secretary of Defense Perry and 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. John Shalikashvili 
made the important point that foreign aid ``finances our 
diplomacy, and when diplomacy fails, conflict often results. 
Whatever the cost of foreign aid, it's cheaper than military 
combat.''
    As surveys continue to indicate the public perceptions 
regarding foreign assistance reflect a disconnection between 
resources and relevance to U.S. interests. The Committee has 
tried to respond to this gap by funding programs which address 
priorities of direct concern to American interests including 
the threats posed by international narcotics trafficking, 
nuclear smuggling, and the surge in activities of global 
criminal organizations.
    The funding levels appropriated for U.S. foreign assistance 
programs continue to decline. The reductions are, in part, a 
response to the Committee's judgment that all programs must 
contribute to the broad goal of balancing the Federal budget 
and, in part, to streamlining and more effectively matching 
resources and requirements.
    The Committee takes note of the fact that the 
administration's request was more realistic in the context of 
budget pressures. Nonetheless, the Committee urges the 
administration to undertake a serious review of our national 
priorities. To date, requests appear to reflect modest 
reductions of all programs across the board rather than a 
meaningful effort to establish and fund new and specific 
priorities.

                    foreign aid and economic growth

    A recent World Bank study entitled, ``Global Economic 
Prospects and Developing Countries'' concluded, ``the ratio of 
trade to GDP fell in some 44 out of 93 developing countries 
observed over the past 10 years. Although the developing 
countries share of foreign direct investment increased to 38 
percent of the world's total, two-thirds of these flows went to 
just eight countries.''
    These results track a recent Heritage Foundation report 
noting that of 67 less developed nations receiving aid from the 
World Bank for the past 25 years, 37 had not experienced any 
improvement and 20 were in worse condition. The report argued 
that slow economic growth stemmed from counterproductive 
government policies including high taxes, barriers to trade, 
restrictions on foreign investment, weak banking and monetary 
systems, and excessive wage and price controls.
    The Committee reiterates its strong commitment to 
contribute to policies and practices which strengthen both the 
opportunity and growth of the private sector. U.S. assistance 
cannot nor should it substitute for private investment and 
initiative.
    The Committee shares the House view that major 
infrastructure projects are both the fastest growing sector of 
American business overseas and key to long-term development. In 
simple terms, major infrastructure projects such as 
establishing a nation's telecommunications grid, provide the 
necessary tools for the commercial sector to function. In turn, 
to attract and sustain private investment governments, of 
necessity, carry out essential economic reforms.
    To support this dynamic of economic reforms and 
opportunities, the Committee has strongly supported projects 
and activities which promote public-private sector 
collaboration and partnerships. The Committee has emphasized 
this approach through its strong funding of the activities of 
organizations such as the Overseas Private Investment 
Corporation, the Trade and Development Agency, and the Export-
Import Bank as well as establishing guidelines within program 
and country accounts which leverage private and public 
resources.
                                TITLE I

                           EXPORT ASSISTANCE

                Export-Import Bank of the United States

                         subsidy appropriation

Appropriations, 1996....................................    $744,551,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     736,551,000
House allowance.........................................     726,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             730,000,000

                        administrative expenses

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $45,614,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      47,614,000
House allowance.........................................      47,614,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              40,000,000

    The Committee recommends a subsidy appropriation of 
$730,000,000 to support direct loans, tied-aid grants, and 
interest subsidies at the Export-Import Bank of the United 
States. The Committee recommends $40,000,000 for administrative 
expenses.
    The Committee has provided resources at the request level 
for the so-called tied-aid war chest. The Committee opposes the 
trade distorting effects of tied aid, but recognizes the 
resources made available are essential to countering 
concessionary financing by competitors' governments.
    The Committee has renewed the Bank's authority to transfer 
surplus resources to other trade agencies to assure the best 
use of export and investment resources.
    Due to serious concerns about the illegal use of retention 
allowances in more than 200 cases, the Committee has taken the 
unprecedented step of restricting funding for the salary and 
expenses of the incumbent Chairman and President, who serves in 
that position as a result of a recess appointment, until and 
unless the incumbent is confirmed for that office in the 
regular process by the U.S. Senate. The Committee is concerned 
that the recess appointment was made in order to avoid 
examination of the illegal use of retention allowances which 
allegedly were provided pursuant to the incumbent Chairman's 
direction. A proper nomination hearing should help clarify this 
matter.

                Overseas Private Investment Corporation

                         subsidy appropriation

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $72,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      72,000,000
House allowance.........................................      72,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              72,000,000

                        administrative expenses

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $26,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      32,000,000
House allowance.........................................      30,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              32,000,000

    The Committee recommends $72,000,000 for the subsidy cost 
of OPIC's direct and guaranteed loans. In addition, the 
Committee recommends $32,000,000 for administrative expenses.
    The Committee continues to support OPIC's self-sustaining 
capability. The Committee has included language requested by 
the administration allowing the Corporation to derive the costs 
of loans and guarantees from its noncredit account.

                      Trade and Development Agency

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $40,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      40,000,000
House allowance.........................................      38,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              40,000,000

    The Committee recommends the appropriation of $40,000,000 
for the Trade and Development Agency [TDA] for fiscal year 
1997.
    In last year's report, the Committee recommended that TDA 
increase its emphasis on private investor projects such as 
those carried out in the NIS which offer the opportunity to 
share and recoup costs. The Committee requests a report on 
TDA's efforts to respond to this recommendation.
    The Committee also supports making additional resources 
from the NIS account available for activities carried out by 
TDA.
                                TITLE II

                     BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

                  AGENCY FOR INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT

                         Development Assistance

Appropriations, 1996....................................  $1,879,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................   1,960,000,000
House allowance.........................................   1,958,500,000

Committee recommendation

                                                           1,929,000,000

    The amounts listed in the above table for fiscal year 1996 
appropriations and fiscal year 1997 administration requests 
include funding appropriated or requested under sustainable 
development assistance, child survival and disease programs, 
development assistance, the Development Fund for Africa, 
international disaster assistance, debt restructuring, micro 
and small enterprise development, and housing and other credit 
guarantee programs. The House level also includes funding for 
UNICEF, which the Committee has chosen to include in the 
``International organization and programs'' account. Additional 
account details are contained in the table at the end of this 
report (comparative statement of new budget (obligational) 
authority for fiscal year 1996 and budget estimates and amounts 
recommended in the bill for fiscal year 1997).
    The Committee recommends consolidation of a number of 
accounts including the ``Development assistance'' account, the 
Development Fund for Africa, and funds requested for the Africa 
Development Foundation and the Inter-American Foundation. The 
appropriation for family planning is contained in a separate 
account. The appropriate statutory authorities for activities 
and programs are included in the recommendation with a minimum 
of earmarking or designation of levels of assistance for the 
consolidated accounts. While the Committee has minimized 
earmarks, it does provide for specific levels of funding for 
Cyprus, Burma, debt restructuring, micro and small enterprise 
development programs, and the Housing Guaranty Program.
    It is the Committee's intention, through consolidation of 
these accounts, to provide the President flexibility in order 
to respond to development, economic, and humanitarian 
requirements.

         CHILD SURVIVAL, BASIC EDUCATION, and RELATED PROGRAMS

    The Committee believes that protecting the health and well-
being of children around world must be a high priority goal of 
U.S. foreign assistance. The Committee, therefore, encourages 
USAID to emphasize programs that promote the improved survival, 
health, and education of the world's children: child survival, 
vitamin A programs, UNICEF, AIDS prevention and other disease 
programs, and basic education
    Although the Committee has not designated a specific level 
of resources for child survival and related programs, there is 
strong bipartisan support for activities protecting the most 
vulnerable sector of all societies. However, the Committee 
notes a lack of clear consensus within the development 
community as to the definition, scope, and success of these 
activities. Therefore, in order to support the most cost 
effective, high impact, successful programs, the Committee 
directs USAID to provide, in summary form, a report estimating 
the costs and anticipated quantitative impact on child 
morbidity and mortality of each of the activities funded by 
child survival programs. In addition, the Committee requests a 
similar report in summary form of the estimate of costs and 
quantitative impact on enrollment and level of education 
attained of activities funded under basic education programs. 
The Committee intends that funds for basic education will also 
be available for childhood education teacher training programs. 
These reports are to be submitted to the Committees on 
Appropriations by May 1, 1997.

                             Adult Vaccines

    The Committee recognizes the need for strengthening the 
immunology and aging-research infrastructure in the newly 
independent Eastern European and Baltic States. Particular 
attention should be paid to basic, clinical, and public health 
research in adult vaccines, particularly influenza, pneumonia, 
hepatitis A and B, and other respiratory disease-related 
vaccines. The Committee urges the Agency for International 
Development to work with the Institute for Advanced Studies in 
Immunology and Aging to develop a proposal which helps 
facilitate the exchange of information between scientists in 
the United States and Eastern Europe. This should include the 
promotion of collaborative research and the exchange of 
academic faculty to improve research training in the Eastern 
European states.

         VOLUNTARY FAMILY PLANNING/CENTRAL OFFICE OF POPULATION

    The Committee again recommends an earmark under the 
``Development assistance'' account relating to voluntary family 
planning assistance which sets aside 65 percent of the funding 
for these programs for AID's central Office of Population.

                                 africa

    The Committee supports continued development assistance to 
Africa, the poorest continent. Although the Committee has not 
designated a separate ``Development Fund for Africa'' [DFA] 
account in this bill, it has included language in the bill to 
ensure that assistance to sub-Saharan Africa not be reduced 
beyond the proportional share of assistance the President 
requested for sub-Saharan Africa for fiscal year 1997.
    The Committee is concerned by the slow rate of economic 
growth continentwide. After years of substantial U.S. bilateral 
and multilateral aid and investment, economic and trade trends 
show little sign of improvement. It is clear that the 
administration has not yet developed a coherent strategy to 
match long-term, declining resource trends with ever expanding 
requirements. No new targets of development opportunity have 
been defined nor have innovative approaches been tested. AID 
has repackaged objectives while sustaining the same approaches 
it has carried out for four decades.
    While the administration continues to emphasize the 
inadequacy of appropriations, this is a problem which is 
unlikely to change prior to balancing the Federal budget. To 
assure that recipient nations, expectations about U.S. levels 
and types of resources are realistic, the Committee urges the 
Agency for International Development to carry out a 
comprehensive, long-range assessment of anticipated needs and 
the appropriate role U.S. aid might play in addressing those 
requirements. The Committee requests that the assessment 
evaluate these issues over a 10-year timespan.

                                 RWANDA

    The Rwandan justice system is overwhelmed with some 70,000 
individuals in custody waiting trial for genocide and other 
violations of international law. The Committee puts the highest 
priority on these cases being expeditiously and fairly 
adjudicated, and is concerned by reports of attacks and 
intimidation by Rwanadan soldiers against Rwandan prosecutors 
and judges. The Committee will follow this matter closely and 
expects the administration to give weight to the Rwandan 
Government's cooperation with and support for judicial 
personnel in connection with any disbursement of assistance.

                                 CYPRUS

    Consistent with the President's request and the House 
recommendation, the Committee has earmarked $15,000,000 for 
bicommunal confidence building initiatives in Cyprus. The 
Committee believes these efforts are crucial to securing 
cooperation in the withdrawal of troops and demilitarization of 
the island.

                                 BURMA

    The Committee has earmarked $2,500,000 to support the 
restoration of democracy in Burma. Funds may support Burmese 
students, individuals, and groups both inside and outside 
Burma. In fiscal year 1996 the Committee requested a report on 
a plan for the expenditure of funds to support free markets, 
democracy, and humanitarian programs. The results of the report 
were disappointing. Rather than structure activities uniquely 
responsive to the rapidly changing developments in and around 
Burma, the State Department recommended including Burmese 
students in ongoing USIA and AID programs and exchanges. No 
effort was made to coordinate with the exiled representatives 
of Aung San Suu Kyi. Contrary to Committee instruction, no 
effort was made to consult with Congress either in advance of 
or during the preparation of the report. As a result, a 
substantial amount of time was wasted during a key stage of 
Burma's political history.
    Once again, the Committee is earmarking resources to 
advance democracy in Burma. Assistance should be targeted to 
support organizations, individuals, or activities promoting 
implementation of the results of the 1990 elections.

                               guatemala

    The Committee welcomes the State Department's efforts to 
declassify documents related to United States citizens' human 
rights cases in Guatemala and urges the administration to 
expedite declassification of documents by other concerned 
agencies, including the Department of Defense and the Central 
Intelligence Agency. Declassification should deal with all 
documents relating to the case of Sister Dianna Ortiz.

                                Jamaica

    The Committee believes that continued assistance to Jamaica 
through bilateral development aid and counternarcotics 
programs, multilateral support, and debt reduction programs is 
vital to help Jamaica sustain a meaningful economic development 
agenda and to demonstrate the importance of the United States/
Jamaican relationship in the Caribbean. The Committee is 
particularly pleased to note Jamaica's strong commitment to 
halt the production and trafficking of illicit narcotics in the 
Caribbean basin, and urges the administration to support 
Jamaica's efforts to modernize air and sea assets to ensure 
that Jamaica remains an effective partner in interdiction and 
eradication efforts.
    For the longer term, the Committee notes Jamaica's 
continuing trade liberalization efforts to bring about closer 
United States/Jamaican trade and investment relations. In 1994, 
Jamaica became one of the first countries in the hemisphere to 
sign a bilateral investment treaty [BIT] and an intellectual 
property rights [IPR] agreement with the United States. In 
taking such measures, Jamaica is establishing a basis for 
sustainable, trade-based economic development while creating an 
important model for other Caribbean countries. The Committee 
welcomes such moves and encourages the administration to 
develop additional measures to strengthen this bilateral 
commercial partnership.

   COOPERATIVE PROJECTS AMONG UNITED STATES, ISRAEL, AND DEVELOPING 
                               COUNTRIES

    The Committee strongly urges funding for the cooperative 
development research [CDR] and cooperative development projects 
[CDP] programs among the United States, Israel, and developing 
and newly democratic countries at last year's level. Israel has 
the unique advantage of having highly technical expertise, 
critical language skills, and recent experiences in development 
that are relevant to both developing countries and the emerging 
democracies of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union.

              International Fertilizer Development Center

    The Committee strongly supports the fertilizer-related 
research and development being conducted by the International 
Fertilizer Development Center [IFDC] and further directs the 
Administrator [AID] to make at least $2,000,000 available for 
the core grant to the IFDC.

                           DEBT RESTRUCTURING

    The Committee has provided $27,000,000 to meet the 
administration's debt restructuring requirements as a component 
of economic assistance. The Committee joins the House in 
reiterating the requirement that the administration submit a 
report which addresses the concern that nations provided the 
opportunity to engage in debt restructuring not be burdened 
with new or excessive debt.
    The Committee has provided authority to complete the debt 
relief initiative for Jordan. However, given the limited 
availability of resources and the acute needs of other 
countries for debt restructuring, the Committee expects the 
relief to be stretched out over 2 years.

             MICRO and SMALL ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT [MSED]

    The Committee has provided $1,500,000 for micro and small 
enterprise development programs. MSED has effectively mobilized 
credit to strengthen the private sector. The Committee has not 
funded the administration's request for a new Enhanced Credit 
Program due to budgetary constraints.

                 HOUSING GUARANTEE [HG] PROGRAM ACCOUNT

    The Committee has provided resources to sustain the housing 
guarantee [HG] program. The program supports U.S. private 
sector initiatives which provide long-term financing for 
housing and urban infrastructure requirements such as sewage 
and water facilities. The Committee places a special emphasis 
on carrying out initiatives in Eastern Europe and South Africa, 
consistent with the President's commitment.

                          Vietnam Legal Reform

    The Committee has included language which authorizes the 
use of development assistance funds to assist Vietnam in the 
reform of its trade regime. The Committee urges AID to provide 
up to $1,500,000 for a Vietnam legal reform initiative. The 
Committee is aware of the particular expertise of the American 
Bar Association, the International Law Institute, and the 
United States-Vietnam Trade Council and strongly recommends 
that AID consider implementing the initiative through these 
organizations. This initiative seeks to assist the Government 
of Vietnam's efforts to develop trade relations with other 
nations through, among other things, reforming its legal system 
and trade regime so as to provide the necessary framework for 
commercial transactions, foreign investment, and trade.

               U.S. TELECOMMUNICATIONS TRAINING INSTITUTE

    The Committee recommends that AID provide $650,000 to the 
U.S. Telecommunications Institute [USTTI]. USTTI is a nonprofit 
joint venture between the public and private sectors dedicated 
to providing tuition free communications and broadcast training 
to professionals from around the world. The USTTI's Government/
industry collaboration results in cash and in-kind 
contributions of approximately $3,500,000 from industry with 
USAID grants providing travel and per diem costs for 
participants from the poorest nations.

                         RURAL ELECTRIFICATION

    The Committee continues to be concerned about the need to 
maintain an adequate level of support for rural electrification 
development which has had a dramatic impact on living 
conditions and economic development in every country where it 
has been introduced. The continued absence of modern energy 
supplies inhibits economic growth, contributes to environmental 
degradation and assures the continuation of poverty in rural 
areas. Two billion people worldwide still do not have access to 
electricity.
    The Committee strongly urges USAID to maintain or increase 
support for rural electrification through its centrally funded 
programs as well as through its field missions particularly in 
El Salvador, Bangladesh, the Philippines, and Bolivia.
    The Committee also recognizes the significant contribution 
of U.S. rural electric cooperatives as models for private 
initiatives in addressing this growing need in developing 
countries. The Committee encourages USAID to continue to work 
through U.S. electric cooperative programs in carrying out this 
mandate.

                 AMERICAN SCHOOLS and HOSPITALS ABROAD

    The Committee continues to strongly support the important 
work carried out by institutions funded under the American 
Schools and Hospitals Abroad [ASHA] Program. The Committee 
regards ASHA as one of the country's more effective public/
private partnerships supporting outstanding academic and 
medical institutions which promote American values, educational 
ideas, and practices.
    The Committee believes that several institutions which have 
received funding under ASHA have distinguished records and 
deserve further support. They include:
  --The American University in Beirut has trained Middle 
        Eastern leaders for 130 years in a strong liberal arts 
        tradition encouraging freedom of expression, private 
        initiative, and tolerance. Its academic quality, 
        longstanding relationship with regional governments, 
        network of prominent alumni and distinction as a hub of 
        high level global expertise make the university a 
        primary resource for regional development.
  --The Lebanese American University (formerly Beirut 
        University College) is the most rapidly growing 
        institution of higher learning in Lebanon and is an 
        increasingly important resource for talent in this 
        expanding region.
  --The Hadassah Medical Organization has established an 
        important record of outreach and service. Hadassah's 
        programs are designed to train native populations to 
        improve the health and welfare of their own people 
        using American ideas and technology. In addition, the 
        organization continues to offer excellent quality 
        medical care to all individuals regardless of 
        political, religious, or ethnic orientation. All 
        foreign assistance funds awarded to Hadassah are spent 
        in the United States for the latest in American medical 
        technology.
  --The Feinberg Graduate School [FGS] of the Weizmann 
        Institute of Science in Israel has long served as a 
        model of American scientific education for postgraduate 
        students and scholars from around the world. ASHA funds 
        have been used exclusively to purchase American-made 
        scientific equipment from American suppliers, enabling 
        FGS and Weizmann to maintain the level of excellence 
        required to attract and train future generations of 
        scientists from Israel and elsewhere, including many 
        from developing nations in Latin America, Asia, Africa, 
        and the Middle East. For these reasons, the Committee 
        believes that support for FGS should remain a priority 
        and recommends that FGS receive funding in fiscal year 
        1997 at no less than the level provided in fiscal year 
        1995.
  --The Johns Hopkins University's centers in Bologna, Italy 
        and Nanjing, China are vital national resources 
        promoting democracy and international market economics 
        in central and Eastern Europe and China. Both centers 
        are recognized for training professionals in world 
        affairs who assume leadership positions in government, 
        business, and the nonprofit sector.

               UNIVERSITY DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS

    The Committee recognizes that U.S. universities have a 
significant role to play in U.S. development policies 
throughout the globe. Therefore, the Committee encourages AID 
and the Department of State to expand the involvement of 
colleges and universities in development activities. The 
Committee takes note of the important contribution made by a 
number of universities in this regard including:
  --The University of Hawaii has played a key role in Pacific 
        regional development. The Committee strongly encourages 
        the administration to support programs conducted by the 
        university including providing resources for the 
        International Center for Democracy to extend the 
        democratic experience to local level community leaders 
        and citizens. The Committee strongly supports the 
        center's effort to develop a United States-Russian 
        partnership organizing voter education for young 
        people. The Committee also encourages AID to 
        collaborate with the university as it develops a new 
        initiative to train health and human service 
        professionals.
  --Florida International University's [FIU] Latin American 
        Journalism Program is making an important contribution 
        to strengthening democratic institutions by matching 
        Federal funding with private sector support. The 
        Committee supports FIU's request for $750,000, the 
        final year of the project's 7 year cycle.
  --Montana State University/Bozeman and its plant growth 
        center have recently discovered that the wheat stem 
        sawfly, which is the leading pest problem for wheat 
        producers in the Great Plain States, is not native to 
        North America but was introduced from the east area of 
        the former Soviet Union. This discovery raises the 
        possibility of controlling this pest by the 
        introduction of its natural enemies from the region of 
        origin. The Committee urges AID to support this 
        research activity.
  --The University of Northern Iowa has effectively managed the 
        Orava project in Slovakia which has incorporated 
        democratic concepts and practices into schools and 
        teacher education programs. The Committee encourages 
        AID to continue to support this important work.
  --The Committee recommends continued support of the Caribbean 
        Law Institute [CLI]. This institute has become a viable 
        and effective organization in fostering and promoting 
        the study and reform of law, especially laws relating 
        to commerce, trade, and investment in Caribbean 
        nations.
    Nursing.--The Committee recognizes the important 
contribution George Mason University is making to health care 
in Third World countries and recommends up to $1,000,000 be 
made available to continue and expand these worthy activities.

                    CASS/ECESP SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAMS

    The Committee agrees with the House and strongly recommends 
continued support for the scholarship programs currently known 
as the cooperative association of states for scholarships 
[CASS] and the East Central European Scholarship Program 
[ECESP]. Both of these programs utilize more than 30 community-
based institutions around the United States, primarily for 2-
year programs which offer degrees in various technical and 
vocational fields.

                 ORPHANS, DISPLACED, and BLIND CHILDREN

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for the displaced 
children and orphans fund. The Committee also continues to 
support a program of at least $1,000,000 to assist children who 
are blind. Many blind children in developing countries can be 
cured of their disability through simple operations and 
inexpensive care. AID should build on prior successes in this 
area.
    The Committee has provided authority to use up to $25,000 
in program funds for displaced and orphaned children and 
victims of war, to enable the AID office responsible for the 
design and management of these programs to monitor and oversee 
their implementation. AID is also encouraged to use other OE 
resources as necessary to further the effectiveness of the 
oversight of these programs.

                    MICROENTERPRISE POVERTY PROGRAMS

    The Committee believes that microcredit projects are an 
efficient and effective way to develop small enterprises, the 
key to employment and economic development. The Committee 
directs USAID to fund microenterprise activities at last year's 
funding level with at least one-half the resources targeted for 
a program offering loans of less than $300, made to the poorest 
50 percent of those living below the poverty line, particularly 
women, or the institutional development of organizations 
primarily engaged in making such loans. The Committee also 
encourages USAID to invest 25 percent of microenterprise 
resources through its central mechanism for support of United 
States and indigenous nongovernmental organizations.
    The Committee requests USAID to monitor and provide a 
report on the actual amount of microenterprise credit made 
available by program or project to the target poverty 
population and the amount of funding allocated to each 
institution engaged in making loans under $300.

                          WOMEN in DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee encourages AID to provide $13,000,000 in 
support for the Office of Women in Development. The Committee 
supports efforts to better integrate the concerns of women into 
AID's programs and policies and encourages AID to undertake the 
institutional changes needed to support women in development. 
Investing in women is crucial to reducing hunger and poverty, 
improving family well being and achieving sustainable economic 
growth.

                                HIV/AIDS

    The Committee expects the administration to provide at 
least the current level of funding for both bilateral and 
multilateral HIV/AIDS prevention and control programs and 
recommends that funding through nongovernmental organizations 
operating at the community level be maximized. The Committee 
continues to support efforts by the United Nations to increase 
coordination and consolidation of AIDS activities via UNAIDS, 
the joint and cosponsored program on HIV/AIDS at the World 
Health Organization. USAID is also urged to support the global 
initiatives agreed to at the 1994 AIDS summit, particularly 
those relating to women, NGO's and microbicide development.

                           POLIO ERADICATION

    Consistent with the House recommendation, the Committee 
urges AID to provide $25,000,000 to support a targeted program 
to eradicate polio. The Committee directs USAID to provide this 
support for the delivery of oral vaccine in conjunction with 
national days of immunization.

                   PATRICK J. LEAHY WAR VICTIMS FUND

    The Committee continues its strong support for the Patrick 
J. Leahy war victims fund, a $5,000,000 annual appropriation to 
provide medical and related assistance to people who have 
suffered disabling war injuries. The fund has been used 
primarily to provide artificial limbs to victims of landmines. 
The Committee strongly supports the use of the fund in Angola 
where landmines have already claimed over 70,000 amputees, and 
Laos, where unexploded ordnance left from the Vietnam war 
continues to claim innocent victims.

                             PARKS in PERIL

    The Committee notes its strong support of USAID's Parks in 
Peril Program, a public-private partnership to promote 
biodiversity conservation in critically imperiled ecosystems in 
Latin America and the Caribbean. This program has provided 
crucial support to local nongovernmental organizations in the 
protection and management of parks and reserves at 28 sites in 
12 countries, helping to protect 18 million acres of land. 
Parks in Peril has also helped enhance the development of 
enterprise and democracy in the region through its support of 
private organizations and local communities.

                      USAID BIODIVERSITY PROGRAMS

    The Committee strongly supports continued funding for 
biodiversity conservation and tropical forest protection in 
developing countries, which are critical to U.S. economic 
prosperity, especially for the U.S. agricultural and 
pharmaceutical industries. AID conservation activities should 
continue to emphasize the use of nongovernmental organizations. 
As it downsizes, AID through NGO partnerships should remain 
active in regions that are significant for global biodiversity, 
including in countries where AID does not have a presence or 
where AID missions have been closed, especially where lack of 
participation would undermine the success of a regional 
strategy.

                      NEOTROPICAL MIGRATORY BIRDS

    The Committee recommends that funding be continued at the 
current level for the implementation of the neotropical forest 
and grassland migratory bird conservation initiative. The 
decline in populations of neotropical migratory birds has been 
linked to habitat loss and degradation in Central America and 
the Caribbean. Further decline of these species could pose 
domestic economic and environmental problems, as these birds 
play a significant role in control of forest and agricultural 
pests. The Committee urges AID to make this program part of its 
budget request for fiscal year 1998 to provide the continuity 
required to implement this program.

                           DAIRY DEVELOPMENT

    The Committee continues to place a high priority on dairy 
development, and encourages AID to maintain funding for this 
program.

                            FARMER-TO-FARMER

    The Committee strongly supports maintaining funding for the 
Volunteers in Overseas Cooperative Assistance [VOCA] Farmer-to-
Farmer Program, especially in the former Soviet Union. This is 
a cost-effective way to transfer practical skills and know-how 
to farmers and agribusinesses. The Committee also continues to 
support two-way programs in which new agribusiness 
entrepreneurs and private farm leaders are brought to the 
United States for training.

                   AGRICULTURAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

    The Committee is concerned that USAID may be deemphasizing 
the key role of agricultural development in its projects. The 
Committee urges AID to maintain a focus on agricultural 
development projects as these projects affect commercial, child 
survival, environmental, and other aspects of integrated 
development. In the years ahead, most developing countries must 
dramatically increase their food production if they are to feed 
their burgeoning populations. Food aid is not a viable option 
given the massive needs. Agricultural research, community-based 
agricultural development, small rural enterprise development, 
and food systems restructuring programs exemplify the type of 
investments USAID should focus upon.

                            RENEWABLE ENERGY

    The Committee urges AID to continue the unique programs at 
its Office of Energy, Environment, and Technology, supporting 
its U.S. renewable energy private sector initiatives such as 
project preparation, training, multimedia, and related 
activities in cooperation with the Committee on Renewable 
Energy, Commerce, and Trade.

                 international executive service corps

    The Committee recognizes that the International Executive 
Service Corps [IESC] has provided 32 years of excellent 
volunteer expert services for the development of business 
enterprises, business support institutions, and new markets in 
developing countries. IESC is an important vehicle for 
promoting technology transfer, economic growth, and sustainable 
development around the world, while also opening new areas of 
economic participation to American firms. The Committee, 
therefore, strongly urges that AID provide IESC annually with 
grant funds sufficient to support their operations and to 
ensure the continued availability of their services worldwide.

              office of private and voluntary cooperation

    The Committee recommends continued strong support for AID's 
Office of Private and Voluntary Cooperation in fiscal year 
1997. The Committee also recognizes the important contribution 
of private voluntary organizations and cooperatives in 
establishing and administering food aid programs overseas. The 
Committee suggests that funding be made available for these 
organizations under the title II Food Aid Institutional Support 
Program at a level comparable with prior years.

                 COOPERATIVE AND CREDIT UNION PROGRAMS

    The Committee strongly supports continued central funding 
from the Office of Private Voluntary Cooperation that enables 
U.S. cooperatives to share their self-help business approaches 
with developing countries and those undergoing transitions to 
democracy and market economies.
    The Committee continues to support private sector to 
private sector development efforts carried out by U.S. 
cooperatives and credit unions. These programs promote free 
markets, create U.S. business linkages, export American 
technology, and build local economies and a friendly climate 
for new and expanding U.S. markets.
    Cooperatives enable people to achieve dignity and lasting 
economic independence through member-owned democratic 
businesses. They spread their economic benefits widely through 
community-based businesses, and provide opportunities for 
millions of people to directly participate in democratic 
processes.

                    private voluntary organizations

    The Committee has again included language in the bill that 
is intended to ensure that the level of funding to private and 
voluntary organizations is maintained. This is consistent with 
current law and AID's commitment to enhance support for PVO's 
at a time when they are being increasingly called upon to 
implement U.S. foreign assistance programs.

                              AFGHANISTAN

    The Committee urges AID to make available development and 
disaster assistance funds through nongovernmental organizations 
for reconstruction and capacity building in Afghanistan, in 
areas of the country that are stable and where economic 
development has begun. The Committee is aware of the enormous 
need for this assistance in Afghanistan and is encouraged that 
a number of nongovernmental organizations are already working 
there.

                   population, development assistance

    The Committee reaffirms that stabilizing population growth 
is essential to reducing poverty, protecting the environment, 
promoting economic development, and improving the lives and 
health of millions of women, children, and families.
    The Committee deplores the House decision to cut by one-
third funds for AID's population assistance program. The 
inevitable consequence of this action will be to deny family 
planning services to millions of couples who want them, with a 
resulting increase in unwanted pregnancies and abortions.
    In order to emphasize its unequivocal support for AID's 
family planning program and its goals, the Committee has 
reestablished a separate account for population assistance, 
funded at a level of $410,000,000. The Committee continues the 
longstanding prohibition against the use of any funds in the 
act for abortion or to lobby for or against abortion. It also 
stipulates that in determining eligibility for population 
assistance, nongovernmental and multilateral organizations 
shall not be subject to requirements more restrictive than 
those applicable to foreign governments for such assistance.

                   International Disaster Assistance

Appropriations, 1996....................................    $181,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     190,000,000
House allowance.........................................     190,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             190,000,000

    The Committee recommends $190,000,000 for the 
``International disaster assistance'' account for fiscal year 
1997.
    The Committee recommends an increase in the appropriation 
for international disaster assistance over fiscal year 1996 
levels in recognition of the unique role the United States has 
played in responding to emergencies.

     Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $43,914,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      43,826,000
House allowance.........................................      43,826,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              43,826,000

    The Foreign Service retirement and disability fund is a 
mandatory expense of the Agency for International Development.

                         AID Operating Expenses

Appropriations, 1996....................................    $465,750,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     495,000,000
House allowance.........................................     465,750,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             495,000,000

    Consistent with the administration's request, the Committee 
recommends an appropriation of $495,000,000 for the ``Operating 
expenses'' account of the Agency for International Development 
for fiscal year 1997. In noting it is fully funding this 
request, the Committee strongly objects to recent statements by 
senior AID officials asserting that congressional reductions in 
funding are responsible for recent decisions to proceed with a 
sizable reduction in force [RIF's].
    Levels of funding in both fiscal year 1996 and fiscal year 
1997 have reflected the Administrator's public testimony 
regarding operating expenses. Thus, any unanticipated RIF's 
which ensue are either a direct result of AID's 
misunderstanding of its internal requirements or AID's 
misleading Congress regarding its budgetary request.
    The Committee directs AID to provide a report within 30 
days of enactment of the fiscal year 1997 appropriations, 
detailing the timetable and cost estimates related to the 
recent decision to proceed with a RIF. The Committee expects 
the report to include the number of personnel and their status 
as either Schedule C, noncareer Senior Executive Service, 
administratively determined, or career direct hire.

       Operating Expenses of the Office of the Inspector General

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $30,200,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      30,000,000
House allowance.........................................      30,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              28,000,000

    Budgetary pressure and the anticipated proportional 
reduction in the Agency have resulted in the Committee 
recommendation. To alleviate this pressure, the Committee has 
included language so that funds may remain available until 
expended.

                  Other Bilateral Economic Assistance

                         Economic Support Fund

Appropriations, 1996....................................  $2,340,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................   2,408,000,000
House allowance.........................................   2,336,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                           2,340,000,000

    The Committee recommends that this account be earmarked as 
follows: $1,200,000,000 for Israel and $815,000,000 for Egypt, 
in both cases the administration's requested levels for 
assistance. The Committee believes that this support is crucial 
to sustain American interests in peace, stability, and 
prosperity in the region.

                                  iran

    The Committee has made $3,000,000 available on a one-time 
basis to establish a Radio Free Iran broadcasting capability. 
The Committee is concerned about the lack of accurate 
political, economic, and cultural information available to the 
citizens of Iran. The Committee expects the funds to be made 
available to establish a program through existing services or 
facilities. However, the Committee directs no resources may be 
made available to expand or enhance activities carried out by 
Voice of America.

                MIDDLE EAST REGIONAL COOPERATIVE PROGRAM

    The Committee continues its strong support of the Middle 
East Regional Cooperative Program [MERC] and expects the 
administration to continue funding at last year's level. MERC 
programs have helped nurture and deepen the peace process by 
fostering cooperative projects of a scientific and 
technological nature between Israel and its neighbors. Common 
problem solving by MERC projects in the fields of agriculture, 
health, energy, the environment, education, water resources, 
and the social sciences has helped lead to common understanding 
in the region.

                           WEST BANK and GAZA

    The Committee regards funding for programs in the West Bank 
and Gaza as an investment in the Middle East peace process. The 
Committee is concerned by the continuation of reports from both 
Israeli and Palestinian officials that the United States 
commitment is not achieving visible results. Resources have 
been provided on a bilateral basis for several years, 
supplementing a World Bank coordinated effort. Nonetheless, 
little improvement is evident. The Committee requests USAID 
provide an assessment of the completed projects funded with 
bilateral resources.

                               GUATEMALA

    The Committee notes the recent progress in the peace 
negotiations between the Guatemalan Government and the URNG, 
and fully expects a final settlement of the conflict to be 
achieved this year. With over 30 years of divisiveness and 
bloodshed behind them, the Guatemalan people will need 
international assistance to support reconciliation, equitable 
economic development, and an independent judicial system that 
has the people's confidence. The Committee urges the 
administration to contribute to this effort.

            TELECOMMUNICATIONS and ECONOMIC REFORM in EGYPT

    The Committee continues to support the current 
telecommunications sector support project [TSSP] and the 
modernization of Egypt's telecommunications as keys to both 
economic reform and growth. The Committee appreciates the 
political difficulty created by further reforms, but encourages 
the Government of Egypt to proceed with the telecommunications 
sector initiatives as agreed to with USAID. In particular, the 
Committee urges the prime minister to sign the national 
telecommunications policy in order to implement the next phase 
of reforms.
    In conjunction with additional reforms, the Committee urges 
USAID to identify projects which would leverage United States 
aid with private sector and Government of Egypt resources.

                              Tuna Treaty

    The Treaty on Fisheries between the United States and the 
governments of certain Pacific Island States, popularly known 
as the South Pacific Regional Fisheries Treaty, requires that 
$14,000,000 in economic assistance be provided annually to the 
South Pacific Island States. Therefore, the Committee 
recommends that the treaty obligations be met through the 
payment of the full $14,000,000 in fiscal year 1997.

                     International Fund for Ireland

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $19,600,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................................
House allowance.........................................      19,600,000

Committee recommendation

                                             ...........................

    The Committee supports continued efforts to bring peace and 
stability to Northern Ireland. However, given budget 
considerations and Ireland's unique access to European 
Community resources, the Committee believes the United States 
can play a more effective role in encouraging investment and 
trade. The Committee notes the successful work of a six 
university consortium which includes Montana State University/
Bozeman, Virginia Commonwealth, and Portland State. This 
consortium has worked to establish long distance learning as a 
viable method for cross-cultural understanding with Ireland. 
Its work includes sharing resources, particularly in business 
and entrepreneurship. The Committee urges the International 
Fund for Ireland to support this activity.

          Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltic States

Appropriations, 1996....................................    $522,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     475,000,000
House allowance.........................................     475,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             475,000,000

    The Committee recommends $475,000,000 for the Eastern 
Europe special assistance initiative.
    The Committee continues to believe that completing the 
transition to free market democracies in the region is vital to 
U.S. interests. Last year, the Committee included the NATO 
Participation Act Amendments as a part of the fiscal year 1996 
appropriations. To further the objectives included in that 
legislation, the Committee reiterates its strong commitment to 
provide adequate resources to expand military training and ties 
which, in turn, will expedite the expansion of NATO's 
membership. To meet these needs, the Committee has once again 
provided up to $20,000,000 in transfer authority from this 
account and the ``New Independent States'' account to support 
extending the stabilizing influence of NATO into central and 
Eastern Europe.

                           LEGAL INITIATIVES

    The Committee encourages and expects AID to continue to 
support the central and Eastern European law initiative 
[CEELI], a project of the American Bar Association. CEELI is 
providing critical legal expertise to nations that are 
restructuring their entire law enforcement and judicial 
systems. CEELI has emphasized key areas including 
constitutional reforms, criminal and commercial law and 
procedure, judicial reform, as well as the reform of legal 
education. The 4,000 American attorneys, judges, and law 
professors are drawn from every State and participate as 
volunteers.

  Assistance for the New Independent States of the Former Soviet Union

Appropriations, 1996....................................    $641,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     640,000,000
House allowance.........................................     590,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             640,000,000

    The Committee recommends $640,000,000 for the New 
Independent States [NIS] of the former Soviet Union for fiscal 
year 1997, full funding of the administration's request. As in 
prior years, the bill makes applicable the provisions of 
section 498B(j) of the Foreign Assistance Act to funds 
appropriated under this heading, as well as making applicable 
the other provisions of chapter 11 of part I of that act to 
funds appropriated by the bill for the NIS.
    For 3 years the Committee has urged the administration to 
expand assistance to the non-Russian states of the NIS. The 
administration points to a shift from two-thirds of our aid 
flowing to Russia in 1993 compared with slightly less than one-
half of our current year program. However, as of March 1996, 
with regard to the total of both expended and budgeted 
resources, Russia's allocation exceeded the combined total for 
all other 11 states. Moreover, the Committee continues to 
oppose the administration's approach of replicating or 
expanding Russian programs in other nations without any 
consideration of cultural, political, or economic interests.
    The Committee believes that strengthening free market 
democracies throughout the NIS enhances U.S. interests through 
increased stability, security, and prosperity. Accordingly, the 
Committee has continued with past practices of earmarking 
support for Ukraine, Armenia, and Georgia. The Committee also 
requires the President to provide $10,000,000 to support a 
Trans-Caucasus Enterprise Fund.

                                 RUSSIA

    There is enormous uncertainty associated with the outcome 
of the Russian elections. President Yeltsin has made 
extravagant campaign pledges which, if fulfilled, would 
substantially increase spending in an effort to improve the 
financial well-being of constituents adversely affected by 
reforms. These promises risk a return to hyperinflation, 
frustrate prospects for economic progress, and undermine the 
mandatory fiscal austerity measures imposed by the IMF, 
thereby, jeopardizing its continued monthly payments of a 
$10,000,000,000 loan.
    The Committee is equally concerned about public statements 
by many of President Yeltsin's opponents suggesting economic 
reforms would be abandoned altogether. Communist leader Gennady 
Zyuganov has suggested the need to re-establish state control 
and subsidies to key industries, a decision which would 
directly challenge emerging free markets and threaten 
investment.
    As these circumstances reflect, United States assistance is 
less important to Russia's future than the political and 
economic choices both the citizens and their elected leaders 
will make in the coming months. The Committee notes that in 
addition to the $10,000,000,000 IMF loan, the United States has 
budgeted $4,200,000,000 for Russia through fiscal year 1996 for 
a range of activities including privatization and capital 
market initiatives, nuclear dismantling and security programs, 
and rule of law, agricultural and humanitarian projects.
    The Committee believes this is an important transition year 
for the Russia program. The Committee expects this to be a year 
in which aid is phased out and that Russia will graduate from 
most foreign operations related programs in fiscal year 1997. 
The Committee intends to continue to provide modest support for 
health and humanitarian needs, democracy and rule of law 
programs, nuclear safety, and security initiatives.

                         violence against women

    Violence against women is rampant in Russia, where in a 
single year an estimated 15,000 women die and 50,000 are 
hospitalized as a result of domestic violence. The Committee 
has earmarked $1,000,000 to support law enforcement training 
programs to address this urgent problem.

                Community-Based Law Enforcement Training

    The Committee recognizes that a significant problem facing 
the emerging democracy in Russia is the lack of effective 
training to enable their newly established, democratically 
based criminal justice system to cope with an outbreak of 
criminal activity, and believes that it is in the national 
interest of the United States to help alleviate this problem. 
Further, the Committee believes the training already being 
provided by the Federal Bureau of Investigation and other law 
enforcement agencies needs to be supplemented with on the 
ground training in U.S. local and State law enforcement 
methods.
    To accomplish this objective, the Committee recommends that 
$1,000,000 be made available to fund the establishment of a 
program to train Russian law enforcement officers at an 
established college of criminal justice in the United States. 
The college chosen to provide this training must: (1) be a 
nationally accredited university with a college of criminal 
justice which offers a bachelor of science and a masters of 
criminal justice program; (2) be in partnership with State and 
local law enforcement agencies to provide local and community-
based training; and (3) be already in partnership with a 
Russian university involved in related training.

                           Independent Media

    The Committee strongly supports independent media programs, 
including the training of journalists, broadcasters, and news 
anchors, in helping establish autonomous, self-sustaining 
television news networks in the NIS. While the Committee notes 
the relative success of the various programs in expanding the 
openness of the media environment, recent reports show that 
independent media, particularly in Russia, remains insecure. 
Therefore, the Committee strongly urges USAID continue to 
provide adequate funds to independent media programs for their 
democracy building activities.

                           pushchino project

    The Russian-United States technical, education, and 
economic development consortium has made significant progress 
implementing a project entitled, ``Uniting Science and 
Education and the Transfer of Technology to Support Sustainable 
Economic Development and Environmental Protection of South 
Central European Russia.'' The so-called Pushchino project has 
carried out activities which promote economic development, 
restore the environment and train entrepreneurs, 
agriculturalists, and environmental professionals. The results 
have been mutually beneficial particularly in the testing and 
development of technologies with practical applications 
including the control of wheat and barley root disease and 
remediation of environmental pollutants. The Committee urges 
continued funding for this collaboration between research 
institutions, universities, and private firms.

                            russian far east

    The Russian far east is increasingly being recognized as 
vital to the overall development of Russia's market economy. 
Its rich natural resource base and proximity to the rapidly 
expanding Pacific rim economies have won it the attention of 
increasing numbers of industries and companies. However, 
attempts to coordinate trade promotional efforts between the 
two regions have been sporadic and often ill conceived.
    Meanwhile U.S. competitors in the region have been 
effective in integrating public and private sector activities. 
Partly in response to this situation, the United States and 
Russian governments agreed during the December 1994 meeting of 
the Gore-Chernomyrdin Commission [GCC] in Moscow, to establish 
the United States west coast-Russian far east ad hoc working 
group. The working group is charged with developing a 
bilaterally sanctioned framework to increase trade and 
investment opportunities between the Russian far east and the 
United States west coast.
    The role this working group can play to increase 
opportunities between our two regions is significant. The 
Committee recommends that authority and funding for this group 
and the subsequent initiatives approved by this bilateral body 
be given priority.

                                UKRAINE

    The Committee is extremely disappointed by the 
administration's continued reluctance to seriously and fully 
address Ukraine's requirements. The USAID mission in this 
country and the program administrators in Washington have 
preferred to expand existing contracts with Russian-based 
organizations rather than assess and respond to the unique 
social, economic, and political requirements in Ukraine.
    For example, in fiscal year 1996 the conferees recommended 
USAID invest $5,000,000 to screen, diagnose, and treat women 
who have developed breast cancer as a result of radiation 
exposure from Chornobyl. The conferees expected and made clear 
the funds should be made available for a project which would be 
accessible to women in the Chornobyl contamination areas in 
Ukraine and Belarus, and include medical professionals with 
established experience in mammography, treatment, and surgery, 
who were prepared to staff and fully equip a health clinic. The 
Committee impressed upon USAID the urgency of addressing this 
emerging problem.
    In response, USAID recommended disbursing funds through an 
existing contract with a children's hospital. The hospital did 
not have doctors, nurses, technicians, or equipment suitable 
for any oncology program. Moreover, one of the sites 
recommended by USAID for the program was Odessa, a city that is 
farther away from the contaminated areas than Warsaw, Poland or 
Vilnius, Lithuania. Selecting such a distant contractor, both 
ill equipped and inexperienced to manage the program is only 
one of many examples of USAID's ongoing reluctance or inability 
to tailor a program to meet Ukraine's unique needs.

                         children of Chornobyl

    The Committee has earmarked $5,000,000 to diagnose and 
treat children suffering from cancer and other illnesses 
resulting from exposure to Chornobyl's radiation. The Committee 
is particularly concerned about the increase in the incidence 
of psychological problems associated with surviving the 
accident and encourages USAID to provide at least $1,000,000 to 
support clinical training programs in the region.

                    small business incubator program

    The Committee has earmarked funds for a small business 
incubator program strongly supported by the United States 
Ambassador along with the Ukrainian Government. The Committee 
understands that as a measure of its support, the Ukrainian 
Government is prepared to make a commitment to share the costs 
of this important program.

                             nuclear safety

    Once again, the Committee has recommended specific earmarks 
to address the ongoing problems of nuclear safety in Ukraine. 
In meetings to review the disbursement of fiscal year 1996 
funds, State Department officials represented that specific 
reports established that most reactors in Ukraine were safe 
compared to the Chornobyl-type reactor. The State Department 
urged the Committee to shift resources to securing the 
sarcophagus at Chornobyl, a project which the G-7 Group has 
committed to fund and which is estimated to cost between 
$200,000,000 and $1,200,000,000. The Committee understands a 
French consortium has contracted to carry out a project to 
build a new structure to secure the existing sarcophagus.
    After consultation with independent experts, the Committee 
established that no reactor in Ukraine has undergone a safety 
analysis report [SAR] or a probabilistic risk assessment [PRA], 
crucial accident prevention and management analyses which are 
performed routinely on Western reactors. Thus, the actual 
safety status of any reactor is highly uncertain. The Committee 
has earmarked funds to move forward with the acquisition of 
safety control systems, simulators, and related training to 
diminish the serious risk of an additional accident in Ukraine.
    The Committee has also earmarked resources to begin to 
fulfill United States obligations made under the memorandum of 
understanding between the Government of Ukraine and the G-7 
Group. The Committee expects the United States to fully meet 
the approximately $200,000,000 commitment made in December 1995 
to carry out the decommissioning of the Chornobyl plant, 
including removal of nuclear waste and the fuel assemblies.
    The Committee expects the administration to continue with 
crucial support to complete the modernization program of 
nuclear reactors. Currently under construction, these reactors 
assure Ukraine has alternatives to Chornobyl which are both 
reliable and safer.
    The Committee believes it is important to pursue an 
integrated approach in addressing the nuclear safety issues in 
Ukraine. This approach should develop Ukraine's internal 
capabilities and infrastructure to build upon United States 
commitments. To that end, the Committee recommends an emphasis 
on training, simulation, and reactor safety at each site, which 
should be integrated into a broader infrastructure that 
includes effective communications and a centralized accident 
response management system.

                              agriculture

    As noted by the Ukrainian Ambassador to the United States, 
agriculture comprises 60 percent of the nation's economy. While 
some steps have been taken to privatize the agricultural 
sector, U.S. support is crucial to strengthening this key 
sector. The Committee was disappointed by the Ambassador's 
report that the United States committed $7,000,000 to this 
sector in fiscal year 1996.
    The Committee has recommended a substantial increase in 
support to the privatization and development of the 
agricultural sector. The Committee directs that funds shall be 
made available for projects which leverage private sector to 
U.S. Government resources at a ratio of no less than 2 to 1.

                                ARMENIA

    The Committee recommends an increase in assistance to 
Armenia in recognition of progress that country has made on 
important economic and political reforms. As with Ukraine, the 
Committee believes energy self-sufficiency is essential to 
Armenia's full recovery and, therefore, encourages the 
coordinator to develop a plan which will support private sector 
efforts to develop an oil and gas pipeline in the region.

                               azerbaijan

    The Committee has included a provision which restates 
section 907 of the FREEDOM Support Act. In the fiscal year 1996 
bill, language was included allowing aid to be provided to the 
Government of Azerbaijan, notwithstanding section 907, if the 
President reached a determination that existing mechanisms 
relied on by nongovernmental organizations to deliver 
humanitarian assistance were inadequate. The Committee notes 
the administration has not submitted any such determination.
    The Committee directs that nongovernmental and 
international organizations shall not be precluded by this 
language from using and repairing Government facilities or 
services such as housing, warehouses, clinics, hospitals, and 
vehicles to effectively deliver humanitarian services and 
supplies to needy civilians. The Committee expects these 
organizations to maintain effective monitoring procedures to 
assure appropriate supervision over supplies and recipients.
    The Committee intends that Government personnel be allowed 
to distribute humanitarian commodities such as doctors giving 
out medicine to needy civilians and that these supplies may be 
transferred to Government personnel for the purpose of 
distribution. The Committee also intends that needy civilians, 
especially refugees and displaced persons, be permitted to 
receive assistance in growing food for their own sustenance, 
and are not precluded from selling excess in the private sector 
to begin the transition to personal economic self-sufficiency.

                      PRIVATE-PUBLIC PARTNERSHIPS

    The Committee continues to believe that the key to long-
term economic growth is the private sector. The Committee 
continues to be alarmed by the administration's continued 
reliance on consultants with exorbitant salaries, travel 
expenses, and overhead costs. Not only does this waste scarce 
resources, there is little evidence this approach develops a 
nation's indigenous capabilities assuring long-term benefits 
and improvements. The Committee expects that all assistance 
will be designed to use indigenous resources of recipient 
nations and more actively support joint ventures and 
partnerships with private enterprises in the region.

                          CRIME and CORRUPTION

    The Committee continues to believe the explosion of crime 
and corruption is one of the biggest impediments to private 
investment and economic growth in the NIS. The Committee has 
continued to earmark funds to combat this problem, particularly 
since the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation 
testified to the extensive problem Russian organized crime now 
poses in the United States.

            research, training, exchanges, and partnerships

    Training, exchanges, and partnership between the United 
States and the nations of Eurasia and central Europe are 
essential to the process of sustaining democracy and serve the 
interests of the United States. The Committee endorses full 
funding for the Russian, Eurasian, and East European Research 
and Training Program (title VIII) from the two appropriation 
accounts for the NIS and central Europe. The Committee also 
supports funding for other graduate fellowship and training 
projects in both regions such as the Central and Eastern 
European Graduate Fellowship Program. Student exchange 
programs, in general, are to be distributed in a more balanced 
manner among high school, college, and graduate/postgraduate 
categories.
    The Committee also supports increased funding for the 
institutional partnerships program in the former Soviet Union 
as well as its extension into central Europe and the Baltic 
States. Such grassroot partnerships have been highly successful 
at relatively low cost in improving business management, 
agricultural reform, and improved health and medical care.

                       PRIVATE SECTOR INITIATIVES

    The Committee encourages the administration to expand 
programs which leverage private sector resources to establish 
self-sustaining, free enterprise joint ventures, and 
development projects. The Committee has strongly supported the 
Food Systems Restructuring Program [FSRP], a private/public 
partnership leveraging the expertise and capital resources of 
American agribusiness to improve distribution and productivity 
in the NIS. The Committee directs that funding for this program 
be expanded proportional to the relative size of agriculture as 
a percentage of the economy of each nation.

                   VOLUNTARY FAMILY PLANNING PROGRAMS

    The Committee again recommends an earmark of $15,000,000 
under this account for voluntary family planning programs in 
Russia and the NIS. These programs address the extreme 
reproductive health needs of women in the former Soviet Union, 
many of whom suffer serial abortions because of a severe dearth 
of family planning services there.

                              PEACE CORPS

    The Committee concurs with the House recommendation that 
the Peace Corps programs in the NIS be supported by funding in 
this account, and recommends that not less than $12,000,000 be 
provided for Peace Corps programs in the region. The 
Committee's recommendation reflects an expectation that the 
administration will continue to provide appropriate support 
from the NIS account to the Peace Corps for small business 
development.

                        AMERICAN-RUSSIAN CENTER

    The Committee has included bill language which earmarks 
$2,500,000 for the American-Russian Center for operation and 
training programs. This Center was founded in 1993 with grants 
from the initial appropriation under the Freedom Support Act. 
The purpose of the Center is to provide business training and 
technical assistance to the Russian Far East, an area taking up 
almost one-quarter of Russian geography. The Center's training 
facilities in Yakutsk, Khabarovsk, Magadan, and Sakhalin have 
provided communications facilities, small business training, 
advanced internships with American business, and technical 
assistance to over 6,000 Russians since 1993.
    The Center has the goal of becoming self-sufficient by 1998 
and presently, local Russian industries and governments support 
70 percent of the Center's costs for training Russian personnel 
in the United States. These organizations have pledged 100 
percent support by 1997. The Committee believes that the 
operation of these centers is crucial to the future of market 
development and democracy building in this very important 
region of Russia.

                          INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

                     African Development Foundation

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $11,500,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      12,500,000
House allowance.........................................      11,500,000
Committee recommendation................................................

    Funding for this account has been included under the 
``Development assistance'' account.

                       Inter-American Foundation

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $20,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      20,000,000
House allowance.........................................      20,000,000
Committee recommendation................................................

    Funding for this account has been included under the 
``Development assistance'' account.

                              Peace Corps

Appropriations, 1996....................................    $205,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     220,000,000
House allowance.........................................     212,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             205,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $205,000,000 
for the Peace Corps for fiscal year 1997.
    The Committee is forced to recommend a reduction to the 
request due to severe budgetary constraints, but notes that it 
also recommends $12,000,000 for Peace Corps programs in the NIS 
account.

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

                    International Narcotics Control

Appropriations, 1996....................................    $115,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     213,000,000
House allowance.........................................     150,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             160,000,000

    The Committee recommends $160,000,000 for the International 
Narcotics Control Program.
    The recommendation reflects the Committee's concern about 
the continuing escalation of international crime and narcotics 
trafficking.

                BIOLOGICAL CONTROL OF ILLICIT DRUG CROPS

    The development of plant pathogens which are capable of 
destroying illicit drug crops including opium poppy, cocaine, 
and marijuana offer a potential weapon in the fight against 
illicit drugs. Montana State University has field tested some 
of these pathogens which have proved to be effective, and they 
propose to continue selection and improvements of these 
biocontrol agents. This kind of research, the Committee 
believes, warrants consideration for support by the Department 
of State's International Narcotics Program.

                               GUATEMALA

    Although the Committee has continued its prohibition on 
assistance to the Guatemalan armed forces due to ongoing 
concerns about human rights abuses, the Committee permits 
assistance to the Guatemalan Treasury Police's Department of 
Anti-Narcotics Operations [DOAN]. However, the Committee 
intends and expects that any such assistance is to be used only 
by DOAN and only for counternarcotics activities.

                    Migration and Refugee Assistance

Appropriations, 1996....................................    $671,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     650,000,000
House allowance.........................................     650,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             650,000,000

    The Committee recommends $650,000,000 for the Migration and 
Refugee Assistance Program, of which $80,000,000 is earmarked 
for refugees from the former Soviet Union and Eastern Europe 
and other refugees resettling in Israel.
    The people of Tibet continue to live under the repressive 
and brutal occupation of China. There are currently over 
140,000 Tibetan refugees living in India and Nepal, and 
thousands more flee Tibet each year. Since 1991, the United 
States has provided humanitarian assistance to this needy 
population, and the Committee recommends that $1,000,000 be 
provided through the State Department's Bureau of Population, 
Refugees, and Migration to assist Tibetan refugees in India and 
Nepal.

                          Indochinese Refugees

    As the comprehensive plan of action comes to a close, the 
Committee appreciates the State Department's efforts to bring 
this chapter of the United States' involvement in Southeast 
Asia to an honorable conclusion. The Committee is pleased that 
the State Department was able to obtain permission from the 
Thai Government to allow the remaining Hmong with refugee 
status access to resettlement in the United States. In 
addition, while not the most preferred option, the Committee 
supports the resettlement program [ROVR] established to ensure 
that Vietnamese asylum seekers who voluntarily return to 
Vietnam will be afforded another interview for resettlement in 
the United States. The Committee hopes that the standards for 
those asylum seekers with close ties to the United States will 
be generously applied. Finally, the Committee remains concerned 
about the recent change in policy regarding the resettlement of 
the adult, unmarried children of former reeducation camp 
prisoners. It was not the original intent of the program to see 
the former prisoners separated from their family in such a 
manner.

                            Bosnian Refugees

    The Committee urges that every effort be made to implement 
the civilian and humanitarian provisions of the Dayton accords, 
including the right of every person to return to his or her own 
home in safety and dignity. It recognizes, however, the 
difficulties that are being experienced in returning refugees 
and displaced persons to their homes in areas that are now 
ruled by a majority of another ethnicity. The United States 
must remain alert to this situation and be prepared to work 
with our European partners to provide assistance to those for 
whom permanent resettlement is the only viable solution.

                           Liberian Refugees

    The resumption of fighting in Liberia caught many observers 
by surprise. This year, despite the expectations of the 
international community, significant repatriation by Liberian 
refugees now in Guinea and Cote d'Ivoire is unlikely. The 
withdrawal of aid agencies from Liberia increases the 
likelihood of refugee outflows. Although a large percentage of 
Liberians have been refugees for more than 4 years, the rarity 
of income generating projects and the scarcity of economic 
opportunities especially in Guinea make their integration 
extremely difficult. Thus, the Committee urges the State 
Department to continue to push other donors to continue 
assistance to the region's refugees, and to work with the UNHCR 
and WFP officials to improve the registration of refugees and 
the distribution of food to those in need.

                                  Laos

    The reintegration of refugees to Laos is continuing. With 
the limited amount of usable agricultural land, this will 
undoubtedly be a slow process. Virtually all available land 
needs water, thus irrigation projects will be critical. The 
Committee hopes that the administration will continue their 
leadership role in this region and support international 
efforts to develop a long-term strategy to fully address the 
needs of returnees and to ensure that we build on the 
investment already made to guarantee that returnees reach self-
sufficiency.

                                Cambodia

    Returnees continue to face problems with reintegration in 
Cambodia due in part to the unavailability of usable land. It 
appears that for the returnees without family ties in Cambodia 
the main determinant of their success is whether they received 
land. This initial hope was to have a land option available for 
all who so desired. In reality, only a small proportion of 
returnees have received land, the rest having been persuaded to 
take cash because of the unavailability of land for returnees. 
The Committee continues to support adequate funding for 
demining efforts in Cambodia. To the extent extra funds are 
available for humanitarian demining in Cambodia, the Committee 
urges it to go toward the Cambodian Mine Action Center and 
other institutions with oversight by the Department of State. 
In addition, in order to help returnees become more self-
sufficient, the Committee supports programs such as food-for-
work projects and other programs to provide land to landless 
returnees.

                            Burmese Refugees

    The Committee is concerned about the fate of the over 5,000 
Rohingyan refugees who have fled Burma over the past few months 
for the border of Bangladesh. This population has been allowed 
little access to the international community and remains 
without the protections of the UNHCR.
    Those attempting to flee have been pushed back by 
Bangladeshi officials, while several hundred have been 
arrested. Interviews with this new group of refugees document 
an increase in forced relocation and forced labor in Burma. 
Furthermore, recent reports on the situation inside the 
country, including that of the U.N. Special Rapporteur to 
Burma, indicate that the Muslims of Arakan State are not being 
recognized by the government as citizens of Burma, continue to 
suffer persecution, and are categorically singled out for 
discriminatory treatment. We are hopeful that the State 
Department will continue to carefully monitor this situation 
and urge the Bangladesh Government to allow UNHCR access to 
these refugees.

            Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance Fund

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $50,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      50,000,000
House allowance.........................................      50,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              50,000,000

    The Committee recommends $50,000,000 for the emergency 
refugee and migration assistance fund.

                             Antiterrorism

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $16,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      17,000,000
House allowance.........................................................

Committee recommendation

                                             ...........................

    The Committee has included funds for antiterrorism programs 
under the heading ``Nonproliferation, Antiterrorism, Demining, 
and Related Programs.''

    Nonproliferation, Antiterrorism, Demining, and Related Programs

Appropriations, 1996....................................  ($157,000,000)
Budget estimate, 1997...................................   (154,000,000)
House allowance.........................................   (135,000,000)

Committee recommendation

                                                            140,000,000 

    The Committee recommends $140,000,000 for a new, 
consolidated account which includes the nonproliferation and 
disarmament fund, antiterrorism activities, demining programs, 
and funding for the International Atomic Energy Agency and the 
Korean Peninsula Energy Development Organization. In addition, 
funds for the President's request of $50,000,000 for 
antiterrorism assistance to Israel are included.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Fiscal year     Fiscal year      Committee  
                                                                   1996 enacted    1997 request   recommendation
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Antiterrorism...................................................     $16,000,000     $17,000,000     $16,000,000
NDF.............................................................      20,000,000      20,000,000      15,000,000
Demining........................................................       6,000,000       6,000,000      10,000,000
IAEA............................................................      43,000,000      36,000,000      36,000,000
KEDO............................................................      13,000,000      25,000,000      13,000,000
Israel..........................................................      50,000,000      50,000,000      50,000,000
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      Total.....................................................     157,000,000     154,000,000     140,000,000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             ANTITERRORISM

    The Committee has recommended $16,000,000 for 
antiterrorism, the same level funded in fiscal year 1996. 
Budget pressures and overlaps in the funding made available for 
Israel resulted in the modest reduction from the 
administration's request.
    The Committee is concerned about the alarming toll that 
Tamil terrorists have taken on innocent civilians in Sri Lanka, 
and urges the administration to seriously consider making 
$750,000 available in antiterrorism funds to combat this 
problem.

                  PULSED FAST NEUTRON ANALYSIS [PFNA]

    The Committee suggests that consideration be given to an 
overseas field demonstration of pulsed fast neutron analysis 
[PFNA] cargo inspection system [CIS] technology to be conducted 
in Israel.
    The Committee expects that any funds made available to 
Israel for PFNA will be used to purchase equipment developed, 
designed, and manufactured in the United States.

                    NONPROLIFERATION AND DISARMAMENT

    The Committee supports the activities carried out by this 
fund for controlling the spread of nuclear weapons and 
material, particularly efforts made to limit nuclear smuggling. 
However, the Committee shares the House view that traditional 
export control activities should be funded from the appropriate 
State Department account.

                                DEMINING

    In response to concerns raised by a number of members, the 
Committee has increased funds for demining activities. The 
Committee urges the administration to make at least $2,000,000 
available to support the U.N. demining program in Afghanistan, 
one of the countries worst affected by landmines.

            KOREAN PENINSULA ENERGY DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION

    The Committee provides $13,000,000 for administrative costs 
and the purchase of heavy fuel oil in accordance with the 
agreed framework. In requesting resources for fiscal year 1996, 
the administration justified $10,000,000 for fuel oil, 
$3,000,000 for administrative costs, and $9,000,000 to be 
applied to the design and acquisition of nuclear reactors. Many 
Members of Congress expressed reservations about contributing 
to an expensive, long-term North Korean nuclear program so the 
conferees agreed to only fund oil and administrative expenses. 
In response to administration concerns that the Congress not 
impede efforts to raise international funds for KEDO, the 
conferees did not include the number $13,000,000 in the bill. 
The administration argued that including the actual dollar 
amount would encourage other countries to limit their 
contributions to a comparable amount. The conferees included 
language in the bill which stated funds were available for 
specific, justified costs accompanied by report language 
supporting funding for oil and administrative expenses only.
    Subsequently, the administration chose to interpret this 
language to mean the full funding request of $22,000,000 was 
available for use for oil and administrative expenses. The 
Committee strongly opposed this revision of the original 
request and expected to be provided with a reprogramming 
notification consistent with the law's requirement that 
Congress be advised in funding changes or transfer of funds. 
The administration failed to provide a reprogramming 
notification and proceeded to make available $22,000,000 for a 
U.S. contribution to KEDO.
    In addition to substantially exceeding allowed and 
justified program funding levels, the administration failed to 
adequately address bill language requiring a determination on 
the concrete steps the United States was taking to advance a 
North-South dialog, including removing restrictions on trade, 
travel, and commercial activities.
    To assure no further misunderstandings, the Committee has 
provided funding for oil and administrative costs in an amount 
consistent with the information provided Congress at the time 
of the signing of the Framework Agreement.
                               TITLE III

                          MILITARY ASSISTANCE

                  Funds Appropriated to the President

             International Military Education and Training

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $39,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      45,000,000
House allowance.........................................      43,475,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              40,000,000

    The Committee recommends the appropriation of $40,000,000 
for the International Military Education and Training [IMET] 
Program.
    The following table details the amounts provided for IMET 
in constant and current dollars:

  INTERNATIONAL MILITARY EDUCATION AND TRAINING APPROPRIATIONS GRANTS,  
                          FISCAL YEARS 1985-97                          
                        [In millions of dollars]                        
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                         Constant           Current     
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fiscal year:                                                            
    1985..........................              72.27              56.2 
    1986..........................              77.37              52.1 
    1987..........................              74.7               56.0 
    1988..........................              61.0               47.4 
    1989..........................              58.7               47.4 
    1990..........................              56.8               47.2 
    1991..........................              54.2               47.2 
    1992 \1\......................              50.5               44.6 
    1993..........................              46.5               42.5 
    1994 \2\......................              23.9               22.25
    1995..........................              27.6               26.35
    1996..........................              40.0               39.0 
    1997 request..................              45.0               45.0 
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Fiscal year 1992 reflects net budget authority after rescission of  
  $1,925,000 applicable to fiscal year 1992 appropriation.              
\2\ Fiscal year 1994 includes $1,000,000 transferred from FMF.          
                                                                        
Note: DOD general inflation factor applied; IMET course costs generally 
  have increased at faster rate since fiscal year 1993.                 

                       Foreign Military Financing

                          total program level

Appropriations, 1996....................................  $3,342,790,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................   3,268,250,000
House allowance.........................................   3,257,250,000

Committee recommendation

                                                           3,284,000,000

                              grant level

Appropriations, 1996....................................  $3,278,390,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................   3,228,250,000
House allowance.........................................   3,222,250,000

Committee recommendation

                                                           3,224,000,000

                (limitation on administrative expenses)

Appropriations, 1996....................................   ($23,250,000)
Budget estimate, 1997...................................    (23,250,000)
House allowance.........................................    (23,250,000)

Committee recommendation

                                                            (23,250,000)

                  subsidy appropriations--direct loans

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $64,400,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      40,000,000
House allowance.........................................      35,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              60,000,000

                        (estimated loan program)

Appropriations, 1996....................................  ($544,000,000)
Budget estimate, 1997...................................   (370,028,000)
House allowance.........................................   (323,815,000)

Committee recommendation

                                                           (540,000,000)

    The Committee recommends a total program level of 
$3,284,000,000 for the Foreign Military Financing Program. Of 
this amount, $3,224,000,000 are for military grants, including 
an earmarked $1,800,000,000 for Israel, and $1,300,000,000 for 
Egypt. As provided in previous years, funds appropriated for 
Israel must be disbursed within 30 days of enactment of this 
act, or by October 1, 1996.

                             NATO EXPANSION

    The Committee has provided strong support in the past for 
the President's initiative to provide equipment and resources 
to enhance the military interoperability of NATO members and 
nations involved in the Partnership for Peace. However, the 
Committee believes the time has come to concentrate resources 
on the most likely immediate candidates for admission to NATO 
and has provided a total of $50,000,000 in grants and loans to 
accomplish this goal. The Committee has designated Poland, 
Hungary, and the Czech Republic eligible to receive assistance 
under prior legislation regarding NATO expansion. The Committee 
expects the administration to continue to fund Partnership for 
Peace programs to strengthen the military capabilities of 
potential candidates, including the Baltic nations, Ukraine, 
and Armenia. The United States has a vital interest in 
extending the stabilizing influence of NATO to include the new 
democracies in central Europe and the NIS.

                           GREECE and TURKEY

    The Committee supports the House provision which maintains 
the balance of military assistance to Greece and Turkey at a 
ratio of 7 to 10.

                                 TURKEY

    The Committee reaffirms its strong support for Turkey, a 
staunch and reliable NATO ally, and notes the extraordinary 
contribution that Turkey has made in support of Operation 
Provide Comfort.
    In 1994, the Committee received a report from the Secretary 
of State in consultation with the Secretary of Defense, 
indicating incidents of misuse of U.S. military aircraft and 
helicopters in attacks against Kurdish villages. The Committee 
requests that an updated report on this subject be provided by 
June 1, 1997, including a description of efforts by the 
administration to monitor end-use of United States military 
aircraft, including helicopters, in Turkey.

                               LANDMINES

    The Committee again includes language permitting demining 
equipment to be made available on a grant basis to foreign 
countries. The Committee strongly supports continued use of FMF 
funds for activities to assist in locating and destroying 
unexploded landmines and ordnance that maim and kill innocent 
people around the world.
    The following table details the amounts provided for the 
Foreign Military Financing Program in constant and current 
dollars and amounts of U.S. military export sales:

                                                                     FOREIGN MILITARY FINANCING PROGRAM FISCAL YEARS 1985-97                                                                    
                                                                                    [In millions of dollars]                                                                                    
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                  Constant fiscal year 1997                                                  Current                            
                                                             -----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                         FMF grants/                                                       FMF grants/                          
                                                                Treasury   Concessional    forgiven    MAP grants     Total       Treasury   Concessional    forgiven    MAP grants     Total   
                                                               rate loans   rate loans      loans                                rate loans   rate loans      loans                             
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fiscal year:                                                                                                                                                                                    
    1985....................................................     2,388.48        922.50     3,634.95     1,146.39     8,092.32     1,692.00        653.50     2,575.00       812.10     5,732.60
    1986....................................................     1,475.63      1,207.60     4,084.11     1,092.92     7,860.27     1,071.90        877.20     2,966.70       793.90     5,709.70
    1987....................................................  ...........      1,272.60     4,137.70     1,250.30     6,660.60  ...........        953.40     3,100.00       936.70     4,990.10
    1988....................................................  ...........        982.40     4,230.70       896.70     6,109.80  ...........        763.00     3,286.00       696.50     4,745.50
    1989....................................................  ...........        508.00     4,785.00       569.70     5,862.70  ...........        410.00     3,862.00       459.80     4,731.80
    1990....................................................  ...........        486.30     5,241.10  ...........     5,727.40  ...........        404.00     4,353.80  ...........     4,757.80
    1991....................................................  ...........        548.90     4,841.90  ...........     5,390.80  ...........        477.90     4,215.40  ...........     4,693.30
    1992....................................................  ...........        389.10     4,431.60  ...........     4,820.70  ...........        345.00     3,929.50  ...........     4,274.50
    1993....................................................  ...........        936.40     3,578.80  ...........     4,515.20  ...........        855.20     3,268.50  ...........     4,123.70
    1994....................................................       823.00  ............     3,366.60  ...........     4,189.60       769.50  ............     3,147.80  ...........     3,917.30
    1995....................................................       584.80  ............     3,308.10  ...........     3,892.90       557.69  ............     3,154.56  ...........     3,712.25
    1996 estimate...........................................       557.70  ............     3,361.10  ...........     3,918.80       544.00  ............     3,278.39  ...........     3,822.39
    1997 request............................................       370.03  ............     3,228.25  ...........     3,598.28       370.03  ............     3,228.25  ...........     3,598.28
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    Special Defense Acquisition Fund

    The Committee recommends no new obligational authority for 
the special defense acquisition fund [SDAF] for fiscal year 
1997. The language included in the fiscal year 1993 bill, which 
requires that all receipts into the fund be returned to the 
Treasury, remains in effect and will reduce the deficit by 
approximately $166,000,000 in fiscal year 1997.

                        Peacekeeping Operations

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $70,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      70,000,000
House allowance.........................................      65,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              65,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $65,000,000, a 
reduction from the request of $70,000,000. Although the account 
is designed to afford the administration a measure of 
flexibility to respond to emerging problems, the Committee has 
not been satisfied with the administration's record in 
fulfilling commitments. To that end, the Committee has 
continued bill language which requires notification before any 
of the funds provided for this account may be obligated or 
expended.
                                TITLE IV

                    MULTILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE

              International Financial Institutions Summary

Appropriations, 1996....................................  $1,153,263,669
Budget estimate, 1997...................................   1,432,568,810
House allowance.........................................     800,529,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             912,154,710

    The Committee recommends the total level of paid-in capital 
funding shown above for the international financial 
institutions funded by this bill--the International Bank for 
Reconstruction and Development, the International Development 
Association, the International Finance Corporation, the Inter-
American Development Bank, the Asian Development Bank and Fund, 
the African Development Bank and Fund, the European Bank for 
Reconstruction and Development, the North American Development 
Bank, and the enhanced structural adjustment facility of the 
International Monetary Fund.
    Unfortunately, given the size of the international 
institutional requests, budget pressures have compelled 
reductions in virtually every account. The Committee urges the 
administration to consult carefully before concluding 
negotiations for replenishment of institutional resources.

         International Bank for Reconstruction and Development

    Although no funds have been requested for the IBRD, the 
Committee supports the Bank's ongoing efforts to respond to 
women living in poverty. The Committee urges the Bank to give 
greater preference in funding allocations to governments that 
demonstrate a strong commitment to poverty alleviation, 
including a commitment to invest in activities which assure 
women equal access to land, credit and agricultural extension 
services.

                      global environment facility

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $35,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     100,000,000
House allowance.........................................      30,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              35,000,000

    The Committee recommends $35,000,000 for the Global 
Environment Facility [GEF] consistent with last year's level. 
Although the facility continues to be a high priority for the 
Congress and the administration, budget pressures have prompted 
the reduction. The Committee believes the restructured GEF will 
play a central role in addressing the most serious threats to 
the Earth's environment, particularly to combat ocean 
pollution, ozone depletion, and the loss of biodiversity, 
especially as bilateral sources of funding decline.
    Tables reflecting U.S. contributions to the World Bank, as 
well as the current replenishment of these resources, follow:

                        ACTUAL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS                       
                          [Dollars in millions]                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 U.S.   
     Through fiscal year 1996         Total      U.S. share   percent of
                                                                total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Paid-in..........................      $10,858     $1,964.4         18.1
Callable.........................      165,580     28,869.0         17.4
Global Environment Facility......  ...........        155.0  ...........
                                  --------------------------------------
      Total......................      176,438     30,988.0         17.5
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                              CURRENT REPLENISHMENT                                             
                                              [Dollars in millions]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                            United                              
                                                                         States as a  Appropriated  Appropriated
           Through fiscal year 1996               Total      U.S. share   percent of   U.S. share    percent of 
                                                                            total                    U.S. share 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Restructured GEF (1994)......................     $2,022.5       $430.0         21.8        $155.0          36.0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                 International Development Association

Appropriations, 1996....................................    $700,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     934,503,100
House allowance.........................................     525,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             626,000,000

    The Committee has provided $626,000,000 for the interim 
trust fund to be administered by the International Development 
Association [IDA]. During negotiations over U.S. arrears and 
the next replenishment of IDA, the administration voted to 
support a proposal segregating $3,300,000,000 into an account 
which banned procurement competition for U.S. companies and 
suppliers. Historically, the United States has adamantly 
opposed efforts to establish procurement restrictions.
    The United States has consistently been the single largest 
donor to IDA, yet at no point has sought to offer any advantage 
to American corporations by establishing procurement ratios 
proportional to contribution. The Committee believes the U.S. 
long-term commitment and replenishments should be relevant to 
any discussion concerning arrears. Moreover, as all donors are 
aware, replenishments are provided subject to the availability 
and approval of funds.
    The Committee expects its treatment of this matter will 
prompt the administration to renegotiate and remove any 
restrictions on U.S. suppliers.
    The Committee also notes deep concern about the 
administration's apparent new commitment to a level of 
$800,000,000 for IDA-11. The Committee warned the 
administration to consult prior to entering into any 
commitment. This commitment substantially exceeds funding 
provided last year, a level which the Committee notes was only 
made available after the President made a personal appeal to 
the conferees.
    Tables reflecting U.S. contributions to the IDA, as well as 
the current replenishment of these resources, follow:

                          ACTUAL CONTRIBUTIONS                          
                          [Dollars in millions]                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 U.S.   
     Through fiscal year 1995         Total      U.S. share   percent of
                                                                total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Contribution.....................    $92,891.1    $21,831.5         23.5
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                              CURRENT REPLENISHMENT                                             
                                              [Dollars in millions]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                            United                              
                                                                         States as a  Appropriated  Appropriated
           Through fiscal year 1995               Total      U.S. share   percent of   U.S. share    percent of 
                                                                            total                    U.S. share 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
9th replenishment............................      $14,725       $3,180         21.6      $3,106.2          97.7
10th replenishment...........................       18,100        3,750         20.9       2,815.5          75.1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   International Finance Corporation

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $60,900,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................       6,656,000
House allowance.........................................       6,656,000

Committee recommendation

                                                               6,656,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $6,656,000 for 
a U.S. contribution to the International Finance Corporation 
[IFC].
    The Committee strongly supports the IFC, which was 
established to encourage economic growth in developing member 
countries by promoting private investment. The IFC's main role 
is to make medium- and long-term loans and equity investments 
at market-determined rates without Government guarantees to 
support private sector projects.
    Like the House, the Committee believes the IFC should adopt 
environmental assessment procedures which are comparable to the 
other international financial institutions.

                    Inter-American Development Bank

                     interregional paid-in capital

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $25,952,110
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      25,610,667
House allowance.........................................      25,610,667

Committee recommendation

                                                              25,610,667

                     limitation on callable capital

Appropriations, 1996....................................($1,523,767,142)
Budget estimate, 1997................................... (1,503,718,910)
House allowance......................................... (1,503,718,910)

Committee recommendation

                                                         (1,503,718,910)

                      fund for special operations

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $10,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      31,411,000
House allowance.........................................      10,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              10,000,000

        Enterprise for the americas multilateral investment fund

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $53,750,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      27,500,000
House allowance.........................................      27,500,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              27,500,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $25,610,667, 
the budget request for paid-in capital together with 
$1,503,718,910 in callable capital and $27,500,000 for the 
Enterprise for the Americas Multilateral Investment Fund. The 
Committee recommends an appropriation of $10,000,000 for the 
Fund for Special Operations.
    Tables reflecting U.S. contributions to the IDB, as well as 
the current replenishment of these resources, follow:

                        ACTUAL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS                       
                          [Dollars in millions]                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 U.S.   
    Through calendar year 1994        Total      U.S. share   percent of
                                                                total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Paid-in..........................     $3,338.7     $1,149.4         34.4
Callable.........................     57,524.9     19,984.4         34.7
FSO..............................      8,675.0      4,715.9         54.4
IIC..............................        200.0         51.0         25.5
                                  --------------------------------------
      Total......................     69,738.6     26,900.7         37.1
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                          CURRENT REPLENISHMENT (IDB-8)                                         
                                              [Dollars in millions]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                            United                              
                                                                         States as a  Appropriated  Appropriated
           Through fiscal year 1995               Total      U.S. share   percent of   U.S. share    percent of 
                                                                            total                    U.S. share 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
IDB-8:                                                                                                          
    Paid-in..................................       $1,000       $153.6         30.0         $54.1          35.2
    Callable.................................       39,000      9,022.3         30.0       3,118.4          34.6
    FSO......................................        1,000         82.3          8.2          31.3          38.1
                                              ------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total..................................       41,000      9,258.2  ...........       3,203.8          34.6
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                         Asian Development Bank

                            PAID-IN CAPITAL

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $13,221,596
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      13,221,596
House allowance.........................................      13,221,596

Committee recommendation

                                                              13,221,596

                     LIMITATION ON CALLABLE CAPITAL

Appropriations, 1996....................................  ($647,858,204)
Budget estimate, 1997...................................   (647,858,204)
House allowance.........................................   (647,858,204)

Committee recommendation

                                                           (647,858,204)

    The Committee recommends the provision of $13,221,596 in 
paid-in capital and $647,858,204 in callable capital, the 
amounts requested by the administration. This appropriation 
represents the second installment of the 6-year capital 
subscription to the fourth general capital increase of this 
institution.

                         Asian Development Fund

Appropriations, 1996....................................    $100,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     100,000,000
House allowance.........................................     100,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             100,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $100,000,000 
for the soft-loan window of the Asian Development Bank, known 
as the Asian Development Fund [ADF].
    The Committee supports the operations of the Asian 
Development Fund and regrets the administration did not request 
full funding for the arrears. Asian markets are a high priority 
for the United States. The Committee urges the administration 
to provide funding for the Bank and Fund comparable with the 
region's importance.
    Tables reflecting U.S. contributions to the ADB, as well as 
the current replenishment of these resources, follow:

                   ACTUAL SUBSCRIPTIONS/CONTRIBUTIONS                   
                          [Dollars in millions]                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 U.S.   
    Through calendar year 1995        Total      U.S. share   percent of
                                                                total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Paid-in..........................     $3,435.3       $492.8         14.3
Callable.........................     39,642.6      3,611.5          9.1
Asian Development Fund...........     19,039.5      2,087.9         11.0
                                  --------------------------------------
      Total......................     62,117.4      6,192.2         10.0
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                   CURRENT REPLENISHMENT (ADB-GCI-IV, ADF-VI)                                   
                                              [Dollars in millions]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                            United                              
                                                                         States as a  Appropriated  Appropriated
           Through fiscal year 1996               Total      U.S. share   percent of   U.S. share    percent of 
                                                                            total                    U.S. share 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Fourth general capital increase:                                                                                
    Paid-in..................................       $427.1        $66.6         16.0         $13.2          19.8
    Callable.................................     20,931.3      3,264.2         16.0         647.9          19.8
Fifth replenishment (1991): Asian Development                                                                   
 Fund (VI)...................................      4,200.0        680.0         16.2         343.0          50.4
                                              ------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total..................................     25,558.4      4,010.8         15.7       1,004.0          25.0
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   African Development Bank and Fund

                        African Development Bank

                            paid-in capital

Appropriations, 1996....................................................
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     $16,000,000
House allowance.........................................................

Committee recommendation

                                             ...........................

                     limitation on callable capital

Appropriations, 1996....................................................
Budget estimate, 1997...................................  ($112,000,000)
House allowance.........................................................

Committee recommendation

                                             ...........................

                        african development fund

Appropriations, 1996....................................................
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     $50,000,000
House allowance.........................................................

Committee recommendation

                                             ...........................

    The Committee concurs with the House recommendation that no 
funding be provided to the African Development Fund. There are 
a number of significant issues outstanding with regard to the 
current replenishment, including financial accountability, 
which must be addressed before the Committee will entertain 
funding requests for this institution.
    Tables reflecting U.S. contributions to the AFDF, as well 
as the current replenishment of these resources, follow:

                          ACTUAL CONTRIBUTIONS                          
                          [Dollars in millions]                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 U.S.   
    Through calendar year 1995        Total      U.S. share   percent of
                                                                total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Contribution.....................       $9,737       $1,295         13.3
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                         CURRENT REPLENISHMENT (AFDF-7)                                         
                                              [Dollars in millions]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                            United                              
                                                                         States as a  Appropriated  Appropriated
           Through fiscal year 1997               Total      U.S. share   percent of   U.S. share    percent of 
                                                                            total                    U.S. share 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
7th replenishment............................       $1,600         $200         10.0  ............  ............
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

            European Bank for Reconstruction and Development

                            paid-in capital

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $70,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      11,916,447
House allowance.........................................      11,916,447

Committee recommendation

                                                              11,916,447

                     limitation on callable capital

Appropriations, 1996....................................  ($163,333,333)
Budget estimate, 1997...................................    (27,805,043)
House allowance.........................................    (27,805,043)

Committee recommendation

                                                            (27,805,043)

    The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development is 
playing an important role in central and Eastern Europe and the 
former Soviet Union. The Committee notes that this institution 
is living up to its original commitments that it would 
emphasize private sector projects in the region. However, the 
Committee is concerned about the increase in reports that U.S. 
companies and suppliers are not receiving fair consideration of 
bid proposals. The Committee requests the Secretary of Treasury 
to submit a report 180 days after enactment of the fiscal year 
1997 bill, identifying the amount of all contracts and 
nationality of corporate recipient.
    Tables reflecting U.S. contributions to the EBRD, as well 
as the current replenishment of these resources, follow:

                        ACTUAL U.S. SUBSCRIPTIONS                       
                          [Dollars in millions]                         
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 U.S.   
    Through calendar year 1995        Total      U.S. share   percent of
                                                                total   
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Paid-in..........................     $3,316.9       $268.2            8
Callable.........................      8,074.0        625.8            8
                                  --------------------------------------
      Total......................     11,390.9        894.0            8
------------------------------------------------------------------------


                                              CURRENT REPLENISHMENT                                             
                                              [Dollars in millions]                                             
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                            United                              
                                                                         States as a  Appropriated  Appropriated
           Through fiscal year 1996               Total      U.S. share   percent of   U.S. share    percent of 
                                                                            total                    U.S. share 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Paid-in......................................       $3,501       $350.1           10        $338.2            97
Callable.....................................        8,169        816.9           10         789.1            97
                                              ------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total..................................       11,670      1,167.0           10       1,127.3            97
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    North American Development Bank

                            paid-in capital

Appropriations, 1996....................................     $56,250,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      56,250,000
House allowance.........................................      50,625,000

Committee recommendation

                                                              56,250,000

                     limitation on callable capital

Appropriations, 1996....................................  ($318,750,000)
Budget estimate, 1997...................................   (318,750,000)
House allowance.........................................   (318,750,000)

Committee recommendation

                                                           (318,750,000)

 Enhanced Structural Adjustment Facility of the International Monetary 
                                  Fund

Appropriations, 1996....................................................
Budget estimate, 1997...................................      $7,000,000
House allowance.........................................................

Committee recommendation

                                             ...........................

    Budgetary constraints require the Committee to concur with 
the House recommendation that no funding be provided for this 
facility in fiscal year 1997. The Committee believes that other 
institutions, particularly the International Development 
Association, along with regular IMF programs can provide 
support for programs intended to be funded under this facility.

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

  Voluntary Contributions to International Organizations and Programs

Appropriations, 1996....................................    $285,000,000
Budget estimate, 1997...................................     325,000,000
House allowance.........................................     136,000,000

Committee recommendation

                                                             295,000,000

    The Committee recommends a total of $295,000,000 for this 
account. The administration requested $325,000,000. However, 
included in this requested amount is a total of $61,000,000 
which the administration had requested for KEDO and IAEA, and 
for which the Committee has provided funding under a different 
account. Therefore, the Committee's recommendation represents 
an increase of $31,000,000 over the requested level. The 
Committee intends that most of this increase be provided to 
UNDP to compensate for the disproportionate cut in funding it 
received last year.

          united nations voluntary fund for victims of torture

    The United Nations Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture 
provides modest financial grants to treatment programs for 
victims of torture. These programs provide medical and 
psychological services to victims both in countries of refuge 
and in the victim's country of origin. Programs exist in 
California, Illinois, Minnesota, and New York. Most U.S. 
programs receive or are applying for assistance from the 
voluntary fund.
    Therefore, the Committee recommends that the administration 
continue the U.S. contribution to the voluntary fund in fiscal 
year 1997 at its current level. The Committee also urges the 
Department of State to undertake diplomatic activity to 
encourage other governments to increase their own 
contributions.

                       preserving the environment

    The Committee recognizes the importance of international 
environmental organizations and programs as crucial to 
protecting the health and environment of the American people. 
The Committee urges that adequate funding be provided for these 
activities.
                                TITLE V

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The following explains changes the Committee is 
recommending to the general provisions contained in previous 
law, as well as new provisions recommended by the Committee:
    Section 506 amends current law by referring to the new 
``Nonproliferation, antiterrorism, demining and related 
programs'' account in lieu of ``International organizations and 
programs''.
    Section 510 amends current law by updating the current 
provision.
    Section 513 amends current law by deleting a proviso 
permitting the Chairman of the Export-Import Bank to make a 
determination with regard to financing for the expansion or 
establishment of production of commodities that are in surplus 
on the world market, the financing of which may cause 
substantial injury to U.S. producers of the same, similar, or 
competing commodity.
    Section 515 amends current law by reconciling the list of 
accounts to the account structure in the act, by adding the 
Export-Import Bank to the list of accounts subject to 
notification, and by relating prior notifications to the 
authorization of funds.
    Section 516 amends current law by updating the current 
provision.
    Section 519 is a new provision that: (1) restates current 
prohibitions on abortion funding, (2) prohibits funding for 
abortion lobbying, and (3) requires that in determining 
eligibility for population planning assistance funds, 
nongovernmental and multilateral organizations shall not be 
subjected to requirements more restrictive than those 
applicable to foreign governments.
    Section 521 amends current law to revise the list of 
countries for special notification by deleting the Dominican 
Republic, Nicaragua, Peru, and Russia. The requirement for 
special notification of activities for Russia is contained 
elsewhere in the act.
    Section 525 amends current law by extending the current 
provision regarding reciprocal leasing for another year.
    Section 537 amends current law by updating the current 
provision.
    Section 538 amends current law by extending the limitations 
regarding excess defense articles for the Mediterranean for 
another year.
    Section 542 amends current law to allow the President to 
direct the transfer of Department of Defense services and 
commodities to the Government of Bosnia and Heregovina in an 
aggregate amount during fiscal years 1996 and 1997 of 
$100,000,000. The section also deletes policy language that has 
since been overtaken by events.
    Section 544 amends current law by prohibiting the 
obligation of funds contained in this act, as well as the 
obligation and expenditure of prior year funds, for any country 
or organization that the Secretary of State determines is 
cooperating, tactically or strategically, with the Khmer Rouge 
in their military operations, or to the military of any country 
that is not acting vigorously to prevent its members from 
facilitating the export of timber from Cambodia by the Khmer 
Rouge. In addition, the Secretary is to submit two reports to 
the Committees on Appropriations that are to contain his 
conclusions as to whether there are any such countries, 
organizations, or militaries, and the reasons why he has come 
to the conclusion that there are or are not countries, 
organizations, or militaries for which assistance is prohibited 
because of the operation of this provision. This section also 
amends current law by updating the current provision.
    Section 547 amends current law by updating the current 
provision.
    Section 550 amends current law by updating the current 
provision, by adding certain countries eligible for assistance 
under the Partnership for Peace to be eligible to receive 
excess defense articles, and to repeal the sunset provision for 
this authority in current law.
    Section 558 amends current law by updating statutory 
citations.
    Section 561 amends current law by continuing the authority 
regarding crating, packing, handling, and transportation of 
nonlethal excess defense articles and makes the authority 
available for all excess defense articles transferred to 
certain countries eligible to participate in the Partnership 
for Peace.
    Section 562 amends current law by extending the moratorium 
period contained in current law.
    Section 563 amends current law by making this limitation 
notwithstanding any other provision of law.
    Section 566 amends current law by making permanent the 
current prohibition on assistance to countries that restrict 
the transport or delivery of U.S. humanitarian assistance.
    Section 569 is a new provision that requires the President 
to impose certain economic sanctions on Burma.
    The Committee has retained two provisions from last year's 
bill sections 570 and 571, to authorize debt reduction for the 
poorest of the poor and to extend a program under which 
qualified Caribbean Basin and Latin American countries can buy 
back their debt from the United States at no budget costs. The 
Committee believes that such programs represent creative, and 
cost-efficient ways, of reducing burdensome debt levels, a 
hindrance to economic growth in many developing countries. The 
Committee is particularly pleased to note that several 
countries--including Jamaica, a successful participant in the 
Enterprise for the Americas Initiative--are working with the 
administration to gain access to the debt buyback program.
    Section 575 is a new provision that requires that, 
beginning in fiscal year 1997, all United States Government 
publications shall refer to the capital of Israel as Jerusalem.
    Section 576 amends current law to extend for another year 
the authority to adjust the status of certain aliens.
    Section 577 is a new provision which requires U.S. ED's to 
the MDB's to oppose loans to governments which do not provide 
audits of their military budgets to the institutions.
    Section 578 is a new provision that requires the denial of 
a visa to the senior official of a government receiving aid 
under the act if the Secretary of State has credible evidence 
that the official has committed a gross violation of an 
internationally recognized human right.
    Section 579 is a new provision regarding the budget 
treatment for fiscal year 1997 of certain guarantees contained 
in the Fiscal Year 1993 Foreign Operations Appropriations Act.
  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a 
general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify 
each recommended amendment, with particularity, which proposes 
an item of appropriation which is not made to carry out the 
provisions of an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act 
or resolution previously passed by the Senate during that 
session.
    Several items provide funding for fiscal year 1997 which 
are either over Senate-passed authorization or lack 
authorization altogether. Those items are as follows:

Export-Import Bank tied-aid grants......................     $50,000,000
Development assistance, including Inter-American 
    Foundation, African Development Foundation, 
    population assistance...............................   1,700,000,000
International disaster assistance.......................     190,000,000
Debt restructuring......................................      27,000,000
Micro and Small Enterprise Development Program..........       2,000,000
Housing Guaranty Program................................      10,000,000
AID operating expenses..................................     495,000,000
AID operating expenses, Office of Inspector General.....      28,000,000
Economic support fund...................................   2,340,000,000
Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltics...........     475,000,000
Assistance for the New Independent States of the former 
    Soviet Union........................................     640,000,000
Peace Corps.............................................     205,000,000
International narcotics control.........................     160,000,000
Migration and refugee assistance........................     650,000,000
Nonproliferation, antiterrorism, demining, and related 
    programs............................................     140,000,000
International military education and training...........      40,000,000
Foreign Military Financing Program......................   3,284,000,000
Peacekeeping operations.................................      65,000,000
Global environment facility.............................      35,000,000
Interim trust fund at the International Development 
    Association.........................................     626,000,000
International organizations and programs................     295,000,000
Trade and Development Agency............................      40,000,000

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(C), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, the accompanying 
bill was ordered reported from the Committee, subject to 
amendment and subject to appropriate scoring, by recorded vote 
of 27-0, a quorum being present.
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Hatfield
Mr. Cochran
Mr. Specter
Mr. Domenici
Mr. Bond
Mr. Gorton
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Mack
Mr. Burns
Mr. Shelby
Mr. Jeffords
Mr. Gregg
Mr. Bennett
Mr. Campbell
Mr. Byrd
Mr. Inouye
Mr. Hollings
Mr. Johnston
Mr. Leahy
Mr. Bumpers
Mr. Lautenberg
Mr. Harkin
Ms. Mikulski
Mr. Reid
Mr. Kerrey
Mr. Kohl
Mrs. Murray

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of rule XXVI requires that Committee report on 
a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any statute or 
part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the statute or 
part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and (b) a 
comparative print of that part of the bill or joint resolution 
making the amendment and of the statute or part thereof 
proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through type and 
italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate typographical 
devices the omissions and insertions which would be made by the 
bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form recommended by 
the committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, the following changes in 
existing law proposed to be made by the bill are shown as 
follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets, new matter is printed in italic, and existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman.

                           reciprocal leasing

    The accompanying bill would amend section 61(a) of the Arms 
Export Control Act or extend the leasing authority of that 
section, as follows:

    Sec. 61. Leasing Authority.--(a) The President may lease 
defense articles in the stocks of the Department of Defense to 
an eligible foreign country or international organization if--
          (1) he determines that there are compelling foreign 
        policy and national security reasons for providing such 
        articles on a lease basis rather than on a sales basis 
        under this Act;
          (2) he determines that the articles are not for the 
        time needed for public use; and
          (3) the country or international organization has 
        agreed to pay in United States dollars all costs 
        incurred by the United States Government in leasing 
        such articles, including reimbursement for depreciation 
        of such articles while leased, the costs of restoration 
        or replacement cost (less any depreciation in the 
        value) if the articles are lost or destroyed while 
        leased.
    The requirement for paragraph (3) shall not apply to leases 
entered into for purposes of cooperative research or 
development, military exercises, or communications or 
electronics interface projects, or to any defense article which 
has passed three-quarters of its normal service life.
    The President may waive the requirement of paragraph (3) 
with respect to a lease which is made in exchange with the 
lessee for a lease on substantially reciprocal terms of defense 
articles for the Department of Defense, except that this waiver 
authority--
          (A) may be exercised only if the President submits to 
        the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on 
        Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
        Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on 
        Appropriations of the Senate, in accordance with the 
        regular notification procedures of those Committees, a 
        detailed notification for each lease with respect to 
        which the authority is exercised; and
          (B) may be exercised only during the fiscal year 
        [1996] 1997 and only with respect to one country, 
        unless the Congress hereafter provides otherwise.

                        excess defense articles

    The accompanying bill would amend section 516 of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 and section 31 of the Arms 
Export control Act with regard to excess defense articles, as 
follows:

    Sec. 516. Modernization of Defense Capabilities of 
Countries of NATO's Southern Flank.--(a) Authority To Transfer 
Excess Defense Articles.--Notwithstanding any other provision 
of law and subject to subsection (b), the President may 
transfer (1) to those member countries of the North Atlantic 
Treaty Organization (NATO) on the southern flank of NATO which 
are eligible for United States security assistance and which 
are integrated into NATO's military structure, (2) to major 
non-NATO allies on the southern and southeastern flank of NATO 
which are eligible for United States security assistance, and 
(3) to those countries which, as of October 1, 1990, 
contributed armed forces to deter Iraqi aggression in the 
Arabian Gulf, and which either received Foreign Military 
Financing (FMF) assistance in fiscal year 1990 or are in the 
Near East Region and received Foreign Military Financing (FMF) 
assistance in fiscal year 1991 or fiscal year 1992, such excess 
defense articles as the President determines necessary to help 
modernize the defense capabilities of such countries. Such 
excess defense articles may be transferred without cost to the 
recipient countries. Transfers to recipient countries under 
this subsection shall be consistent with the policy framework 
for the Eastern Mediterranean region established in section 
620C of this Act.
    (b) Limitations on Transfers.--The President may transfer 
excess defense articles under this section only if--
          (1) the equipment is drawn from existing stocks of 
        the Department of Defense;
          (2) no funds available to the Department of Defense 
        for the procurement of defense equipment are expended 
        in connection with the transfer;
          (3) the President determines that the transfer of the 
        excess defense articles will not have an adverse impact 
        on the military readiness of the United States; and
          (4) the President first considers the effects of the 
        transfer of the excess defense articles on the national 
        technology and industrial base, particularly the 
        extent, if any, to which the transfer reduces the 
        opportunities of entities in the national technology 
        and industrial base to sell new equipment to the 
        country or countries to which the excess defense 
        articles are transferred.
    (c) Notification to Committees of Congress.--The President 
may not transfer excess defense articles under this section 
until 30 days after he has notified the Committees on Armed 
Services and Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committees 
on Armed Services and Foreign Affairs of the House of 
Representatives of the proposed transfer. This notification 
shall include a certification of the need for the transfer and 
an assessment of the impact of the transfer on the military 
readiness of the United States.
    (d) Waiver of Requirement for Reimbursement of DOD 
Expenses.--Section 632(d) shall not apply with respect to 
transfers of excess defense articles under this section.
    (e) Definition.--As used in subsection (a), the term 
``member countries of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization 
(NATO) on the southern flank of NATO'' means Greece, Italy, 
Portugal, Spain, and Turkey.
    [(f) Duration of Authority.--The authority of this section 
shall be effective during fiscal years 1992 through 1996.]
    Sec. 31. Authorization and Aggregate Ceiling on Foreign 
Military Sales Credits.--(a) There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the President to carry out this Act 
$5,371,000,000 for fiscal year 1986 and $5,371,000,000 for 
fiscal year 1987. Credits may not be extended under section 23 
of this Act in an amount, and loans may not be guaranteed under 
section 24(a) of this Act in a principal amount, which exceeds 
any maximum amount which may be established with respect to 
such credits or such loan guarantees in legislation 
appropriating funds to carry out this Act. Unobligated balances 
of funds made available pursuant to this section are hereby 
authorized to be continued available by appropriations 
legislation to carry out this Act.
    (b) (1) The total amount of credits extended under section 
23 of this Act shall not exceed $5,371,000,000 for fiscal year 
1986 and $5,371,000,000 for fiscal year 1987.
    (2) Of the aggregate amount of financing provided under 
this section, not more than $553,900,000 for fiscal year 1986 
and not more than $553,900,000 for fiscal year 1987 may be made 
available at concessional rates of interest. If a country is 
released from its contractual liability to repay the United 
States Government with respect to financing provided under this 
section, such financing shall not be considered to be financing 
provided at concessional rates of interest for purposes of the 
limitation established by this paragraph.
    (c) For fiscal year 1986 and fiscal year 1987, the 
principal amount of credits provided under section 23 at market 
rates of interest with respect to Greece, the Republic of 
Korea, the Philippines, Portugal, Spain, Thailand, and Turkey 
shall (if and to the extent each country so desires) be repaid 
in not more than twenty years, following a grace period of ten 
years on repayment of principal.
    (d) The aggregate acquisition cost to the United States of 
excess defense articles ordered by the President in any fiscal 
year after fiscal year 1976 for delivery to foreign countries 
or international organizations under the authority of chapter 2 
of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 [or pursuant 
to sales under this Act] may not exceed $250,000,000 (exclusive 
of ships and their onboard stores and supplies transferred in 
accordance with law, and of any defense articles with respect 
to which the President submits a certification under section 
36(b) of this Act).

                               landmines

    The accompanying bill would amend section 1365(c) of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1993, as 
follows:

    (a) Findings.--* * *.
    (b) Statement of Policy.--* * *.
    (c) Moratorium on Transfers of Anti-Personnel Landmines 
Abroad.--[During the five-year period beginning on October 23, 
1992] During the eight-year period beginning on October 23, 
1992.--
          (1) no sale may be made or financed, no transfer may 
        be made, and no license for export may be issued, under 
        the Arms Export control Act, with respect to any anti-
        personnel landmine; and
          (2) no assistance may be provided under the Foreign 
        Assistance Act of 1961, with respect to the provision 
        of any anti-personnel landmine.
    (d) Definition.--* * *.

                        humanitarian assistance

    The accompanying bill would amend the Foreign Assistance 
Act of 1961, by adding the following new section:

            ``Sec. 620I. Prohibition on Assistance to Countries 
        That Restrict United States Humanitarian Assistance.--
                  ``(a) Prohibition.--No assistance shall be 
                furnished under this Act or the Arms Export 
                control Act to any country when it is made known 
                to the President that the government of such 
                country prohibits or otherwise restricts, 
                directly or indirectly, the transport or 
                delivery of United States humanitarian 
                assistance.
                  ``(b) Exception.--Assistance may be furnished 
                without regard to the prohibition contained in 
                subsection (a) if the President determines that 
                to do so is in the national security interest of 
                the United States.''

                               guarantees

    The accompanying bill would amend section 251(b)(2) of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as 
amended, as shown:

SEC. 251. ENFORCING DISCRETIONARY SPENDING LIMITS.

          * * * * * * *
    (b) Adjustments to Discretionary Spending Limits.--* * *.
          * * * * * * *
    (2) When OMB submits a sequestration report under section 
254(g) or (h) for fiscal year 1991, 1992, 1993, 1994, 1995, 
1996, 1997, or 1998 (except as otherwise indicated), OMB shall 
calculate (in the order set forth below), and the sequestration 
report, and subsequent budgets submitted by the President under 
section 1105(a) of title 21, United States Code, shall include, 
adjustments to discretionary spending limits (and those limits 
as adjusted) for the fiscal year and each succeeding year 
through 1998, as follows:
    (A) IRS funding.--* * *.
          * * * * * * *
    (G) Net Guarantee Costs.--The net costs for [fiscal year 
1994 and 1995] fiscal years 1994, 1995, and 1997 of the 
appropriation made under section 601 of Public Law 102-391 are 
not subject to the discretionary spending limits or the 
Appropriations Committee's Foreign Operations Subcommittee's 
602(b) allocation in [fiscal years 1994 and 1995] fiscal years 
1994, 1995, and 1997.

                                            BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL                                            
  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS  
                                                     AMENDED                                                    
                                            [In millions of dollars]                                            
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  Budget authority               Outlays        
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                               Committee    Amount  of   Committee    Amount  of
                                                               allocation      bill      allocation      bill   
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations                                                    
 to its subcommittees of amounts in the First Concurrent                                                        
 Resolution for 1997: Subcommittee on Foreign Operations,                                                       
 Export Financing, and Related Programs:                                                                        
    Defense discretionary...................................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........
    Nondefense discretionary................................       12,250       12,246       13,311   \1\ 13,376
    Violent crime reduction fund............................  ...........  ...........  ...........  ...........
    Mandatory...............................................           44           44           44           44
Projections of outlays associated with the recommendation:                                                      
    1997....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........    \2\ 5,239
    1998....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        3,721
    1999....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        1,210
    2000....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........          762
    2001 and future year....................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        1,044
Financial assistance to State and local governments for 1997                                                    
 in bill....................................................           NA  ...........           NA  ...........
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.                                                          
\2\ Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.                                                          
                                                                                                                
NA: Not applicable.                                                                                             
                                                                                                                
NOTE: Upon enactment into law of section 579, CBO will score the bill lower by $72,000,000 in budget authority  
  and outlays.                                                                                                  


                 COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 1996 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL YEAR 1997                
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                         Senate Committee recommendation compared with (+ or -) 
                           Item                                    1996         Budget estimate    House allowance       Committee     ---------------------------------------------------------
                                                              appropriation                                            recommendation   1996 appropriation   Budget estimate    House allowance 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                                                                                                
         TITLE I--EXPORT AND INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                                                                                
          EXPORT-IMPORT BANK OF THE UNITED STATES                                                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Limitation on Program Activity:                                                                                                                                                                 
    Subsidy appropriations................................      $744,551,000       $736,551,000       $726,000,000       $730,000,000        -$14,551,000        -$6,551,000        +$4,000,000 
    Administrative expenses...............................        45,614,000         47,614,000         46,614,000         40,000,000          -5,614,000         -7,614,000         -6,614,000 
    Negative subsidy......................................       -89,646,000        -58,000,000        -58,000,000        -58,000,000         +31,646,000   .................  .................
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Export-Import Bank of the United States......       700,519,000        726,165,000        714,614,000        712,000,000         +11,481,000        -14,165,000         -2,614,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
          OVERSEAS PRIVATE INVESTMENT CORPORATION                                                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Administrative expenses...................................        26,000,000         32,000,000         30,000,000         32,000,000          +6,000,000   .................        +2,000,000 
Insurance fees and other offsetting collections...........      -202,500,000       -224,000,000       -224,000,000       -224,000,000         -21,500,000   .................  .................
Direct loans:                                                                                                                                                                                   
    Loan subsidy..........................................         4,000,000          4,000,000          4,000,000          4,000,000   ..................  .................  .................
    (Loan authorization)..................................       (79,523,000)       (80,000,000)       (80,000,000)       (80,000,000)          (+477,000)  .................  .................
Guaranteed loans:                                                                                                                                                                               
    Loan subsidy..........................................        68,000,000         68,000,000         68,000,000         68,000,000   ..................  .................  .................
    (Loan authorization)..................................    (1,351,900,000)    (1,360,000,000)    (1,360,000,000)    (1,360,000,000)        (+8,100,000)  .................  .................
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Overseas Private Investment Corporation......      -104,500,000       -120,000,000       -122,000,000       -120,000,000         -15,500,000   .................        +2,000,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
            FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT                                                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
               Trade and Development Agency                                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Trade and development agency..............................        40,000,000         40,000,000         38,000,000         40,000,000   ..................  .................        +2,000,000 
    (By transfer).........................................  .................        (5,000,000)        (5,000,000)        (5,000,000)        (+5,000,000)  .................  .................
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
      Total, title I, Export and investment assistance....       636,019,000        646,165,000        630,614,000        632,000,000          -4,019,000        -14,165,000         +1,386,000 
          (Loan authorizations)...........................    (1,431,423,000)    (1,440,000,000)    (1,440,000,000)    (1,440,000,000)        (+8,577,000)  .................  .................
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
          TITLE II--BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                                                                                                
            FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT                                                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
           Agency for International Development                                                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Sustainable development assistance........................  .................     1,006,000,000   .................  .................  ..................    -1,006,000,000   .................
Child survival and disease programs fund..................  .................  .................       600,000,000   .................  ..................  .................      -600,000,000 
Development assistance....................................     1,675,000,000   .................     1,150,000,000      1,290,000,000        -385,000,000     +1,290,000,000       +140,000,000 
Population, Development assistance........................  .................  .................  .................       410,000,000        +410,000,000       +410,000,000       +410,000,000 
Development Fund for Africa...............................  .................       704,000,000   .................  .................  ..................      -704,000,000   .................
International disaster assistance.........................       181,000,000        190,000,000        190,000,000        190,000,000          +9,000,000   .................  .................
Debt restructuring........................................        10,000,000         47,000,000         10,000,000         27,000,000         +17,000,000        -20,000,000        +17,000,000 
    (By transfer).........................................        (5,000,000)  .................  .................  .................        (-5,000,000)  .................  .................
Micro and Small Enterprise Development program:                                                                                                                                                 
    Subsidy appropriations................................         1,500,000          1,500,000          1,500,000          1,500,000   ..................  .................  .................
    Administrative expenses...............................           500,000            500,000            500,000            500,000   ..................  .................  .................
    (Direct loan authorization)...........................        (1,435,000)        (1,000,000)        (1,000,000)        (1,000,000)          (-435,000)  .................  .................
    (Guaranteed loan authorization).......................       (16,700,000)       (17,000,000)       (17,000,000)       (17,000,000)          (+300,000)  .................  .................
Housing and other credit guaranty programs:                                                                                                                                                     
    Subsidy appropriations................................         4,000,000          5,000,000            500,000          4,000,000   ..................        -1,000,000         +3,500,000 
    Operating expenses....................................         7,000,000          6,000,000          6,000,000          6,000,000          -1,000,000   .................  .................
    (Guaranteed loan authorization).......................       (33,700,000)       (42,000,000)       (10,000,000)       (33,600,000)          (-100,000)       (-8,400,000)      (+23,600,000)
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, development assistance....................     1,879,000,000      1,960,000,000      1,958,500,000      1,929,000,000         +50,000,000        -31,000,000        -29,500,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability                                                                                                                                        
 Fund.....................................................        43,914,000         43,826,000         43,826,000         43,826,000             -88,000   .................  .................
Operating expenses of the Agency for International                                                                                                                                              
 Development..............................................       465,750,000        495,000,000        465,750,000        495,000,000         +29,250,000   .................       +29,250,000 
    (By transfer).........................................        (3,000,000)  .................  .................        (5,000,000)        (+2,000,000)       (+5,000,000)       (+5,000,000)
Operating expenses of the Agency for International                                                                                                                                              
 Development Office of Inspector General..................        30,200,000         30,000,000         30,000,000         28,000,000          -2,200,000         -2,000,000         -2,000,000 
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Agency for International Development......     2,418,864,000      2,528,826,000      2,498,076,000      2,495,826,000         +76,962,000        -33,000,000         -2,250,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
            Other Bilateral Economic Assistance                                                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Economic support fund:                                                                                                                                                                          
    Camp David countries..................................     2,015,000,000      2,015,000,000      2,015,000,000      2,015,000,000   ..................  .................  .................
    Other.................................................       325,000,000        393,000,000        321,000,000        325,000,000   ..................       -68,000,000         +4,000,000 
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Economic support fund.....................     2,340,000,000      2,408,000,000      2,336,000,000      2,340,000,000   ..................       -68,000,000         +4,000,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
International fund for Ireland............................        19,600,000   .................        19,600,000   .................        -19,600,000   .................       -19,600,000 
Assistance for Eastern Europe and the Baltic States.......       522,000,000        475,000,000        475,000,000        475,000,000         -47,000,000   .................  .................
Assistance for the New Independent States of the Soviet                                                                                                                                         
 Union....................................................       641,000,000        640,000,000        590,000,000        640,000,000          -1,000,000   .................       +50,000,000 
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Other Bilateral Economic Assistance.......     3,522,600,000      3,523,000,000      3,420,600,000      3,455,000,000         -67,600,000        -68,000,000        +34,400,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
      Total, Agency for International Development.........     5,941,464,000      6,051,826,000      5,918,676,000      5,950,826,000          +9,362,000       -101,000,000        +32,150,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
              African Development Foundation                                                                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Appropriations............................................  .................        12,500,000         11,500,000   .................  ..................       -12,500,000        -11,500,000 
    (By transfer).........................................       (11,500,000)  .................  .................       (10,500,000)        (-1,000,000)      (+10,500,000)      (+10,500,000)
                                                                                                                                                                                                
                 Inter-American Foundation                                                                                                                                                      
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Appropriations............................................  .................        20,000,000         20,000,000   .................  ..................       -20,000,000        -20,000,000 
    (By transfer).........................................       (20,000,000)  .................  .................       (18,000,000)        (-2,000,000)      (+18,000,000)      (+18,000,000)
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
      Total, Funds Appropriated to the President..........     5,941,464,000      6,084,326,000      5,950,176,000      5,950,826,000          +9,362,000       -133,500,000           +650,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
                        Peace Corps                                                                                                                                                             
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Appropriations............................................       205,000,000        220,000,000        212,000,000        205,000,000   ..................       -15,000,000         -7,000,000 
    (By transfer).........................................  .................        (5,000,000)       (12,000,000)       (12,000,000)       (+12,000,000)       (+7,000,000)  .................
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
                    Department of State                                                                                                                                                         
                                                                                                                                                                                                
International narcotics control...........................       115,000,000        213,000,000        150,000,000        160,000,000         +45,000,000        -53,000,000        +10,000,000 
    (By transfer).........................................       (20,000,000)  .................  .................  .................       (-20,000,000)  .................  .................
Migration and refugee assistance..........................       671,000,000        650,000,000        650,000,000        650,000,000         -21,000,000   .................  .................
Refugee resettlement assistance...........................         5,000,000   .................         5,000,000   .................         -5,000,000   .................        -5,000,000 
United States Emergency Refugee and Migration Assistance                                                                                                                                        
 Fund.....................................................        50,000,000         50,000,000         50,000,000         50,000,000   ..................  .................  .................
Anti-terrorism assistance.................................        16,000,000         17,000,000   .................  .................        -16,000,000        -17,000,000   .................
Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund.....................        20,000,000         20,000,000   .................  .................        -20,000,000        -20,000,000   .................
Nonproliferation and anti-terrorism.......................  .................  .................       135,000,000        140,000,000        +140,000,000       +140,000,000         +5,000,000 
Counter-terrorism assistance to Israel....................        50,000,000         50,000,000   .................  .................        -50,000,000        -50,000,000   .................
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Department of State..........................       927,000,000      1,000,000,000        990,000,000      1,000,000,000         +73,000,000   .................       +10,000,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
      Total, title II, Bilateral economic assistance......     7,073,464,000      7,304,326,000      7,152,176,000      7,155,826,000         +82,362,000       -148,500,000         +3,650,000 
          (By transfer)...................................       (59,500,000)        (5,000,000)       (12,000,000)       (45,500,000)       (-14,000,000)      (+40,500,000)      (+33,500,000)
          (Loan authorizations)...........................       (51,835,000)       (60,000,000)       (28,000,000)       (51,600,000)          (-235,000)       (-8,400,000)      (+23,600,000)
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
              TITLE III--MILITARY ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                                                                                                
            FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT                                                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
International Military Education and Training.............        39,000,000         45,000,000         43,475,000         40,000,000          +1,000,000         -5,000,000         -3,475,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
Foreign Military Financing Program:                                                                                                                                                             
    Grants:                                                                                                                                                                                     
        Camp David countries..............................     3,100,000,000      3,100,000,000      3,100,000,000      3,100,000,000   ..................  .................  .................
        Other.............................................       178,390,000        128,250,000        122,250,000        124,000,000         -54,390,000         -4,250,000         +1,750,000 
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, grants................................     3,278,390,000      3,228,250,000      3,222,250,000      3,224,000,000         -54,390,000         -4,250,000         +1,750,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
    (Limitation on administrative expenses)...............       (23,250,000)       (23,250,000)       (23,250,000)       (23,250,000)  ..................  .................  .................
    Direct concessional loans:                                                                                                                                                                  
        Subsidy appropriations............................        64,400,000         40,000,000         35,000,000         60,000,000          -4,400,000        +20,000,000        +25,000,000 
        (Loan authorization)..............................      (544,000,000)      (370,028,000)      (323,815,000)      (540,000,000)        (-4,000,000)     (+169,972,000)     (+216,185,000)
    FMF program level.....................................    (3,822,390,000)    (3,598,278,000)    (3,546,065,000)    (3,764,000,000)       (-58,390,000)     (+165,722,000)     (+217,935,000)
        (By transfer).....................................  .................  .................  .................       (20,000,000)       (+20,000,000)      (+20,000,000)      (+20,000,000)
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Total, Foreign military assistance..............     3,342,790,000      3,268,250,000      3,257,250,000      3,284,000,000         -58,790,000        +15,750,000        +26,750,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
Special Defense Acquisition Fund: Offsetting collections..      -220,000,000       -166,000,000       -166,000,000       -166,000,000         +54,000,000   .................  .................
Peacekeeping operations...................................        70,000,000         70,000,000         65,000,000         65,000,000          -5,000,000         -5,000,000   .................
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
      Total, title III, Military assistance programs......     3,231,790,000      3,217,250,000      3,199,725,000      3,223,000,000          -8,790,000         +5,750,000        +23,275,000 
          (Limitation on administrative expenses).........       (23,250,000)       (23,250,000)       (23,250,000)       (23,250,000)  ..................  .................  .................
          (Loan authorization)............................      (544,000,000)      (370,028,000)      (323,815,000)      (540,000,000)        (-4,000,000)     (+169,972,000)     (+216,185,000)
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
        TITLE IV--MULTILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                                                                                
            FUNDS APPROPRIATED TO THE PRESIDENT                                                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
           International Financial Institutions                                                                                                                                                 
                                                                                                                                                                                                
                     World Bank Group                                                                                                                                                           
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Contribution to the International Bank for Reconstruction                                                                                                                                       
 and Development:                                                                                                                                                                               
    Paid-in capital.......................................        28,189,963   .................  .................  .................        -28,189,963   .................  .................
    (Limitation on callable capital)......................      (911,475,013)  .................  .................  .................      (-911,475,013)  .................  .................
    Contribution to the International Finance Corporation.        60,900,000          6,656,000          6,656,000          6,656,000         -54,244,000   .................  .................
    Contribution to the Global Environment Facility.......        35,000,000        100,000,000         30,000,000         35,000,000   ..................       -65,000,000         +5,000,000 
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, contribution to the International Bank for                                                                                                                                         
       Reconstruction and Development.....................    (1,035,564,976)      (106,656,000)       (36,656,000)       (41,656,000)      (-993,908,976)      (-65,000,000)       (+5,000,000)
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
Contribution to the International Development Association.       700,000,000        934,503,100        525,000,000        626,000,000         -74,000,000       -308,503,100       +101,000,000 
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, World Bank Group.............................    (1,735,564,976)    (1,041,159,100)      (561,656,000)      (667,656,000)    (-1,067,908,976)     (-373,503,100)     (+106,000,000)
          Budget authority................................       824,089,963      1,041,159,100        561,656,000        667,656,000        -156,433,963       -373,503,100       +106,000,000 
          (Limitation on callable capital)................      (911,475,013)  .................  .................  .................      (-911,475,013)  .................  .................
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
Contribution to the Inter-American Development Bank:                                                                                                                                            
    Inter-regional paid-in capital........................        25,952,110         25,610,667         25,610,667         25,610,667            -341,443   .................  .................
    (Limitation on callable capital)......................    (1,523,767,142)    (1,503,718,910)    (1,503,718,910)    (1,503,718,910)       (-20,048,232)  .................  .................
    Fund for special operations...........................        10,000,000         31,411,000         10,000,000         10,000,000   ..................       -21,411,000   .................
    Enterprise for the Americas Multilateral Investment                                                                                                                                         
     Fund.................................................        53,750,000         27,500,000         27,500,000         27,500,000         -26,250,000   .................  .................
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
        Total, contribution to the Inter-American                                                                                                                                               
         Development Bank.................................    (1,613,469,252)    (1,588,240,577)    (1,566,829,577)    (1,566,829,577)       (-46,639,675)      (-21,411,000)  .................
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
Contribution to the Asian Development Bank:                                                                                                                                                     
    Paid-in capital.......................................        13,221,596         13,221,596         13,221,596         13,221,596   ..................  .................  .................
    (Limitation on callable capital)......................      (647,858,204)      (647,858,204)      (647,858,204)      (647,858,204)  ..................  .................  .................
    Development fund......................................       100,000,000        100,000,000        100,000,000        100,000,000   ..................  .................  .................
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, contribution to the Asian Development Bank...      (761,079,800)      (761,079,800)      (761,079,800)      (761,079,800)  ..................  .................  .................
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
Contribution to the African Development Fund..............  .................        50,000,000   .................  .................  ..................       -50,000,000   .................
Contribution to the African Development Bank:                                                                                                                                                   
    Paid-in capital.......................................  .................        16,000,000   .................  .................  ..................       -16,000,000   .................
    (Limitation on callable capital)......................  .................      (112,000,000)  .................  .................  ..................     (-112,000,000)  .................
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, contribution to the African Development Bank.  .................      (128,000,000)  .................  .................  ..................     (-128,000,000)  .................
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
Contribution to the European Bank for Reconstruction and                                                                                                                                        
 Development:                                                                                                                                                                                   
    Paid-in capital.......................................        70,000,000         11,916,447         11,916,447         11,916,447         -58,083,553   .................  .................
    (Limitation on callable capital)......................      (163,333,333)       (27,805,043)       (27,805,043)       (27,805,043)      (-135,528,290)  .................  .................
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, contribution to the European Bank for                                                                                                                                              
       Reconstruction and Development.....................      (233,333,333)       (39,721,490)       (39,721,490)       (39,721,490)      (-193,611,843)  .................  .................
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
North American Development Bank:                                                                                                                                                                
    Paid-in capital.......................................        56,250,000         56,250,000         50,625,000         56,250,000   ..................  .................        +5,625,000 
    (Limitation on callable capital)......................      (318,750,000)      (318,750,000)      (318,750,000)      (318,750,000)  ..................  .................  .................
Contribution to the Bank for Economic Cooperation and                                                                                                                                           
 Development in the Middle East and North Africa:                                                                                                                                               
    Paid-in capital.......................................  .................        52,500,000   .................  .................  ..................       -52,500,000   .................
    (By transfer).........................................  .................  .................  .................  .................  ..................  .................  .................
    (Limitation on callable capital)......................  .................      (157,500,000)  .................  .................  ..................     (-157,500,000)  .................
                                                                                                                                                                                                
                International Monetary Fund                                                                                                                                                     
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Contribution to the enhanced structural adjustment                                                                                                                                              
 facility.................................................  .................         7,000,000   .................  .................  ..................        -7,000,000   .................
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
      Total, contribution to International Financial                                                                                                                                            
       Institutions.......................................    (4,718,447,361)    (4,200,200,967)    (3,298,661,867)    (3,410,286,867)    (-1,308,160,494)     (-789,914,100)     (+111,625,000)
          Budget authority................................     1,153,263,669      1,432,568,810        800,529,710        912,154,710        -241,108,959       -520,414,100       +111,625,000 
          (Limitation on callable capital)................    (3,565,183,692)    (2,767,632,157)    (2,498,132,157)    (2,498,132,157)    (-1,067,051,535)     (-269,500,000)  .................
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
         International Organizations and Programs                                                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                                                                                                
International organizations and programs..................       285,000,000        325,000,000        136,000,000        295,000,000         +10,000,000        -30,000,000       +159,000,000 
    (By transfer).........................................       (30,000,000)  .................  .................       (30,000,000)  ..................      (+30,000,000)      (+30,000,000)
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
      Total, title IV, contribution for Multilateral                                                                                                                                            
       Economic Assistance................................    (5,003,447,361)    (4,525,200,967)    (3,434,661,867)    (3,705,286,867)    (-1,298,160,494)     (-819,914,100)     (+270,625,000)
          Budget authority................................     1,438,263,669      1,757,568,810        936,529,710      1,207,154,710        -231,108,959       -550,414,100       +270,625,000 
          (By transfer)...................................       (30,000,000)  .................  .................       (30,000,000)  ..................      (+30,000,000)      (+30,000,000)
          (Limitation on callable capital)................    (3,565,183,692)    (2,767,632,157)    (2,498,132,157)    (2,498,132,157)    (-1,067,051,535)     (-269,500,000)  .................
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
      Grand total, all titles:                                                                                                                                                                  
          New budget (obligational) authority.............    12,379,536,669     12,925,309,810     11,919,044,710     12,217,980,710        -161,555,959       -707,329,100       +298,936,000 
          (By transfer)...................................       (89,500,000)       (10,000,000)       (17,000,000)      (100,500,000)       (+11,000,000)      (+90,500,000)      (+83,500,000)
          (Limitation on administrative expenses).........       (23,250,000)       (23,250,000)       (23,250,000)       (23,250,000)  ..................  .................  .................
          (Limitation on callable capital)................    (3,565,183,692)    (2,767,632,157)    (2,498,132,157)    (2,498,132,157)    (-1,067,051,535)     (-269,500,000)  .................
          (Loan authorizations)...........................    (2,027,258,000)    (1,870,028,000)    (1,791,815,000)    (2,031,600,000)        (+4,342,000)     (+161,572,000)     (+239,785,000)
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
         TITLE I--EXPORT AND INVESTMENT ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Export Assistance Appropriations..........................       928,165,000        928,165,000        912,614,000        914,000,000         -14,165,000        -14,165,000         +1,386,000 
Negative Subsidies and Offsetting Collections.............      -292,146,000       -282,000,000       -282,000,000       -282,000,000         +10,146,000   .................  .................
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Export Assistance............................       636,019,000        646,165,000        630,614,000        632,000,000          -4,019,000        -14,165,000         +1,386,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
          TITLE II--BILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                               
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Bilateral Development Assistance..........................     3,550,864,000      3,781,326,000      3,731,576,000      3,700,826,000        +149,962,000        -80,500,000        -30,750,000 
Other Bilateral Economic Assistance.......................     3,522,600,000      3,523,000,000      3,420,600,000      3,455,000,000         -67,600,000        -68,000,000        +34,400,000 
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bilateral Economic Assistance................     7,073,464,000      7,304,326,000      7,152,176,000      7,155,826,000         +82,362,000       -148,500,000         +3,650,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
              TITLE III--MILITARY ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                                    
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Foreign Military Financing Program:                                                                                                                                                             
    Grants................................................     3,278,390,000      3,228,250,000      3,222,250,000      3,224,000,000         -54,390,000         -4,250,000         +1,750,000 
    Direct loans, subsidy costs...........................        64,400,000         40,000,000         35,000,000         60,000,000          -4,400,000        +20,000,000        +25,000,000 
    (Estimated level of direct loans).....................      (544,000,000)      (370,028,000)      (323,815,000)      (540,000,000)        (-4,000,000)     (+169,972,000)     (+216,185,000)
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Subtotal, Foreign Military Financing Program:                                                                                                                                             
          Budget authority................................     3,342,790,000      3,268,250,000      3,257,250,000      3,284,000,000         -58,790,000        +15,750,000        +26,750,000 
          (Program level).................................    (3,822,390,000)    (3,598,278,000)    (3,546,065,000)    (3,764,000,000)       (-58,390,000)     (+165,722,000)     (+217,935,000)
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
Other, Military...........................................       109,000,000        115,000,000        108,475,000        105,000,000          -4,000,000        -10,000,000         -3,475,000 
Special Defense Acquisition Fund..........................      -220,000,000       -166,000,000       -166,000,000       -166,000,000         +54,000,000   .................  .................
                                                           -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Military Assistance Programs.................     3,231,790,000      3,217,250,000      3,199,725,000      3,223,000,000          -8,790,000         +5,750,000        +23,275,000 
                                                           =====================================================================================================================================
        TITLE IV--MULTILATERAL ECONOMIC ASSISTANCE                                                                                                                                              
                                                                                                                                                                                                
Contributions to International Financial Institutions.....     1,153,263,669      1,425,568,810        800,529,710        912,154,710        -241,108,959       -513,414,100       +111,625,000 
International organizations and programs..................       285,000,000        325,000,000        136,000,000        295,000,000         +10,000,000        -30,000,000       +159,000,000 
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      Total, contribution for Multilateral Economic Assist-                                                                                                                                     
         ance.............................................     1,438,263,669      1,750,568,810        936,529,710      1,207,154,710        -231,108,959       -543,414,100       +270,625,000 
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      Grand total, all titles.............................    12,379,536,669     12,925,309,810     11,919,044,710     12,217,980,710        -161,555,959       -707,329,100       +298,936,000 
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