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105th Congress                                            Rept. 105-105
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

 1st Session                                                     Part 1
_______________________________________________________________________


 
                   DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES ACT OF 1997

                                _______
                                

                  May 20, 1997.--Ordered to be printed

_______________________________________________________________________


    Mr. Burton of Indiana, from the Committee on Government Reform 
                 Oversight, and submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 956]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

  The Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, to whom was 
referred the bill (H.R. 956) to amend the National Narcotics 
Leadership Act of 1988 to establish a program to support and 
encourage local communities that first demonstrate a 
comprehensive, long-term commitment to reduce substance abuse 
among youth, and for other purposes, having considered the 
same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and recommend 
that the bill as amended do pass.

                                Contents

                                                                   Page
  I. Purpose and Summary..............................................8
 II. Background and Need for the Legislation..........................9
III. Legislative Hearings and Committee Action.......................12
 IV. Oversight Findings..............................................14
  V. Explanation of Bill.............................................16
 VI. Compliance with Rule XI.........................................24
VII. Statement of CBO Cost Estimate..................................24
VIII.Statement of Constitutional Authority...........................26

 IX. Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.), Section 5(b)....26
  X. Changes in Existing Law.........................................27
 XI. Congressional Accountability Act; Public Law 104-1..............36
XII. Budget Analysis.................................................37
XIII.Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Public Law 104-4, Section 423.....37

XIV. Appendix........................................................37

  The amendment is as follows:
  Strike out all after the enacting clause and insert in lieu 
thereof the following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Drug-Free Communities Act of 1997''.

SEC. 2. NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL PROGRAM.

  (a) In General.--The National Narcotics Leadership Act of 1988 (21 
U.S.C. 1501 et seq.) is amended--
          (1) by inserting between sections 1001 and 1002 the 
        following:

         ``CHAPTER 1--OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY'';

        and
          (2) by adding at the end the following:

                   ``CHAPTER 2--DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES

``SEC. 1021. FINDINGS.

  ``Congress finds the following:
          ``(1) Substance abuse among youth has more than doubled in 
        the 5-year period preceding 1996, with substantial increases in 
        the use of marijuana, inhalants, cocaine, methamphetamine, LSD, 
        and heroin.
          ``(2) The most dramatic increases in substance abuse has 
        occurred among 13- and 14-year-olds.
          ``(3) Casual or periodic substance abuse by youth today will 
        contribute to hard core or chronic substance abuse by the next 
        generation of adults.
          ``(4) Substance abuse is at the core of other problems, such 
        as rising violent teenage and violent gang crime, increasing 
        health care costs, HIV infections, teenage pregnancy, high 
        school dropouts, and lower economic productivity.
          ``(5) Increases in substance abuse among youth are due in 
        large part to an erosion of understanding by youth of the high 
        risks associated with substance abuse, and to the softening of 
        peer norms against use.
          ``(6)(A) Substance abuse is a preventable behavior and a 
        treatable disease; and
          ``(B)(i) during the 13-year period beginning with 1979, 
        monthly use of illegal drugs among youth 12 to 17 years of age 
        declined by over 70 percent; and
          ``(ii) data suggests that if parents would simply talk to 
        their children regularly about the dangers of substance abuse, 
        use among youth could be expected to decline by as much as 30 
        percent.
          ``(7) Community anti-drug coalitions throughout the United 
        States are successfully developing and implementing 
        comprehensive, long-term strategies to reduce substance abuse 
        among youth on a sustained basis.
          ``(8) Intergovernmental cooperation and coordination through 
        national, State, and local or tribal leadership and 
        partnerships are critical to facilitate the reduction of 
        substance abuse among youth in communities throughout the 
        United States.

``SEC. 1022. PURPOSES.

  ``The purposes of this chapter are--
          ``(1) to reduce substance abuse among youth in communities 
        throughout the United States, and over time, to reduce 
        substance abuse among adults;
          ``(2) to strengthen collaboration among communities, the 
        Federal Government, and State, local, and tribal governments;
          ``(3) to enhance intergovernmental cooperation and 
        coordination on the issue of substance abuse among youth;
          ``(4) to serve as a catalyst for increased citizen 
        participation and greater collaboration among all sectors and 
        organizations of a community that first demonstrates a long-
        term commitment to reducing substance abuse among youth;
          ``(5) to rechannel resources from the fiscal year 1998 
        Federal drug control budget to provide technical assistance, 
        guidance, and financial support to communities that demonstrate 
        a long-term commitment in reducing substance abuse among youth;
          ``(6) to disseminate to communities timely information 
        regarding the state-of-the-art practices and initiatives that 
        have proven to be effective in reducing substance abuse among 
        youth;
          ``(7) to enhance, not supplant, local community initiatives 
        for reducing substance abuse among youth; and
          ``(8) to encourage the creation of and support for community 
        anti-drug coalitions throughout the United States.

``SEC. 1023. DEFINITIONS.

  ``In this chapter:
          ``(1) Administrator.--The term `Administrator' means the 
        Administrator appointed by the Director under section 1031(c).
          ``(2) Advisory commission.--The term `Advisory Commission' 
        means the Advisory Commission established under section 1041.
          ``(3) Community.--The term `community' shall have the meaning 
        provided that term by the Administrator, in consultation with 
        the Advisory Commission.
          ``(4) Director.--The term `Director' means the Director of 
        the Office of National Drug Control Policy.
          ``(5) Eligible coalition.--The term `eligible coalition' 
        means a coalition that meets the applicable criteria under 
        section 1032(a).
          ``(6) Grant recipient.--The term `grant recipient' means the 
        recipient of a grant award under section 1032.
          ``(7) Nonprofit organization.--The term `nonprofit 
        organization' means an organization described under section 
        501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 that is exempt 
        from taxation under section 501(a) of the Internal Revenue Code 
        of 1986.
          ``(8) Program.--The term `Program' means the program 
        established under section 1031(a).
          ``(9) Substance abuse.--The term `substance abuse' means--
                  ``(A) the illegal use or abuse of drugs, including 
                substances listed in schedules I through V of section 
                112 of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812);
                  ``(B) the abuse of inhalants; or
                  ``(C) the use of alcohol, tobacco, or other related 
                product as such use is prohibited by State or local 
                law.
          ``(10) Youth.--The term `youth' shall have the meaning 
        provided that term by the Administrator, in consultation with 
        the Advisory Commission.

``SEC. 1024. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  ``(a) In General.--There are authorized to be appropriated to the 
Office of National Drug Control Policy to carry out this chapter--
          ``(1) $10,000,000 for fiscal year 1998;
          ``(2) $20,000,000 for fiscal year 1999;
          ``(3) $30,000,000 for fiscal year 2000;
          ``(4) $40,000,000 for fiscal year 2001; and
          ``(5) $43,500,000 for fiscal year 2002.
  ``(b) Administrative Costs.--Not more than the following percentages 
of the amounts authorized under subsection (a) may be used to pay 
administrative costs:
          ``(1) 10 percent for fiscal year 1998.
          ``(2) 6 percent for fiscal year 1999.
          ``(3) 4 percent for fiscal year 2000.
          ``(4) 3 percent for fiscal year 2001.
          ``(5) 3 percent for fiscal year 2002.

         ``Subchapter I--Drug-Free Communities Support Program

``SEC. 1031. ESTABLISHMENT OF DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES SUPPORT PROGRAM.

  ``(a) Establishment.--The Director shall establish a program to 
support communities in the development and implementation of 
comprehensive, long-term plans and programs to prevent and treat 
substance abuse among youth.
  ``(b) Program.--In carrying out the Program, the Director shall--
          ``(1) make and track grants to grant recipients;
          ``(2) provide for technical assistance and training, data 
        collection, and dissemination of information on state-of-the-
        art practices that the Director determines to be effective in 
        reducing substance abuse; and
          ``(3) provide for the general administration of the Program.
  ``(c) Administration.--Not later than 30 days after receiving 
recommendations from the Advisory Commission under section 1042(a)(1), 
the Director shall appoint an Administrator to carry out the Program.
  ``(d) Contracting.--The Director may employ any necessary staff and 
may enter into contracts or agreements with national drug control 
agencies, including interagency agreements to delegate authority for 
the execution of grants and for such other activities necessary to 
carry out this chapter.

``SEC. 1032. PROGRAM AUTHORIZATION.

  ``(a) Grant Eligibility.--To be eligible to receive an initial grant 
or a renewal grant under this subchapter, a coalition shall meet each 
of the following criteria:
          ``(1) Application.--The coalition shall submit an application 
        to the Administrator in accordance with section 1033(a)(2).
          ``(2) Major sector involvement.--
                  ``(A) In general.--The coalition shall consist of 1 
                or more representatives of each of the following 
                categories:
                          ``(i) Youth.
                          ``(ii) Parents.
                          ``(iii) Businesses.
                          ``(iv) The media.
                          ``(v) Schools.
                          ``(vi) Organizations serving youth.
                          ``(vii) Law enforcement.
                          ``(viii) Religious organizations.
                          ``(ix) Civic, volunteer, and fraternal 
                        groups.
                          ``(x) Health care professionals.
                          ``(xi) State, local, or tribal governmental 
                        agencies with expertise in the field of 
                        substance abuse (including, if applicable, the 
                        State authority with primary authority for 
                        substance abuse).
                          ``(xii) Other organizations involved in 
                        reducing substance abuse.
                  ``(B) Elected officials.--If feasible, in addition to 
                representatives from the categories listed in 
                subparagraph (A), the coalition shall have an elected 
                official (or a representative of an elected official) 
                from--
                          ``(i) the Federal Government; and
                          ``(ii) the government of the appropriate 
                        State and political subdivision thereof or the 
                        governing body or an Indian tribe (as that term 
                        is defined in section 4(e) of the Indian Self-
                        Determination Act (25 U.S.C. 450b(e))).
                  ``(C) Representation.--An individual who is a member 
                of the coalition may serve on the coalition as a 
                representative of not more than 1 category listed under 
                subparagraph (A).
          ``(3) Commitment.--The coalition shall demonstrate, to the 
        satisfaction of the Administrator--
                  ``(A) that the representatives of the coalition have 
                worked together on substance abuse reduction 
                initiatives, which, at a minimum, includes initiatives 
                that target drugs referenced in section 1023(9)(A), for 
                a period of not less than 6 months, acting through 
                entities such as task forces, subcommittees, or 
                community boards; and
                  ``(B) substantial participation from volunteer 
                leaders in the community involved (especially in 
                cooperation with individuals involved with youth such 
                as parents, teachers, coaches, youth workers, and 
                members of the clergy).
          ``(4) Mission and strategies.--The coalition shall, with 
        respect to the community involved--
                  ``(A) have as its principal mission the reduction of 
                substance abuse, which, at a minimum, includes the use 
                and abuse of drugs referenced in section 1023(9)(A), in 
                a comprehensive and long-term manner, with a primary 
                focus on youth in the community;
                  ``(B) describe and document the nature and extent of 
                the substance abuse problem, which, at a minimum, 
                includes the use and abuse of drugs referenced in 
                section 1023(9)(A), in the community;
                  ``(C)(i) provide a description of substance abuse 
                prevention and treatment programs and activities, 
                which, at a minimum, includes programs and activities 
                relating to the use and abuse of drugs referenced in 
                section 1023(9)(A), in existence at the time of the 
                grant application; and
                  ``(ii) identify substance abuse programs and service 
                gaps, which, at a minimum, includes programs and gaps 
                relating to the use and abuse of drugs referenced in 
                section 1023(9)(A), in the community;
                  ``(D) develop a strategic plan to reduce substance 
                abuse among youth, which, at a minimum, includes the 
                use and abuse of drugs referenced in section 
                1023(9)(A), in a comprehensive and long-term fashion; 
                and
                  ``(E) work to develop a consensus regarding the 
                priorities of the community to combat substance abuse 
                among youth, which, at a minimum, includes the use and 
                abuse of drugs referenced in section 1023(9)(A).
          ``(5) Sustainability.--The coalition shall demonstrate that 
        the coalition is an ongoing concern by demonstrating that the 
        coalition--
                  ``(A) is--
                          ``(i)(I) a nonprofit organization; or
                          ``(II) an entity that the Administrator 
                        determines to be appropriate; or
                          ``(ii) part of, or is associated with, an 
                        established legal entity;
                  ``(B) receives financial support (including, in the 
                discretion of the Administrator, in-kind contributions) 
                from non-Federal sources; and
                  ``(C) has a strategy to solicit substantial financial 
                support from non-Federal sources to ensure that the 
                coalition and the programs operated by the coalition 
                are self-sustaining.
          ``(6) Accountability.--The coalition shall--
                  ``(A) establish a system to measure and report 
                outcomes--
                          ``(i) consistent with common indicators and 
                        evaluation protocols established by the 
                        Administrator; and
                          ``(ii) approved by the Administrator;
                   ``(B) conduct--
                          ``(i) for an initial grant under this 
                        subchapter, an initial benchmark survey of drug 
                        use among youth (or use local surveys or 
                        performance measures available or accessible in 
                        the community at the time of the grant 
                        application); and
                          ``(ii) biennial surveys (or incorporate local 
                        surveys in existence at the time of the 
                        evaluation) to measure the progress and 
                        effectiveness of the coalition; and
                  ``(C) provide assurances that the entity conducting 
                an evaluation under this paragraph, or from which the 
                coalition receives information, has experience--
                          ``(i) in gathering data related to substance 
                        abuse among youth; or
                          ``(ii) in evaluating the effectiveness of 
                        community anti-drug coalitions.
  ``(b) Grant Amounts.--
          ``(1) In general.--
                  ``(A) Grants.--
                          ``(i) In general.--Subject to clause (iv), 
                        for a fiscal year, the Administrator may grant 
                        to an eligible coalition under this paragraph, 
                        an amount not to exceed the amount of non-
                        Federal funds raised by the coalition, 
                        including in-kind contributions, for that 
                        fiscal year.
                          ``(ii) Suspension of grants.--If such grant 
                        recipient fails to continue to meet the 
                        criteria specified in subsection (a), the 
                        Administrator may suspend the grant, after 
                        providing written notice to the grant recipient 
                        and an opportunity to appeal.
                          ``(iii) Renewal grants.--Subject to clause 
                        (iv), the Administrator may award a renewal 
                        grant to a grant recipient under this 
                        subparagraph for each fiscal year following the 
                        fiscal year for which an initial grant is 
                        awarded, in an amount not to exceed the amount 
                        of non-Federal funds raised by the coalition, 
                        including in-kind contributions, for that 
                        fiscal year, during the 4-year period following 
                        the period of the initial grant.
                          ``(iv) Limitation.--The amount of a grant 
                        award under this subparagraph may not exceed 
                        $100,000 for a fiscal year.
                  ``(B) Coalition awards.--
                          ``(i) In general.--Except as provided in 
                        clause (ii), the Administrator may, with 
                        respect to a community, make a grant to 1 
                        eligible coalition that represents that 
                        community.
                          ``(ii) Exception.--The Administrator may make 
                        a grant to more than 1 eligible coalition that 
                        represents a community if--
                                  ``(I) the eligible coalitions 
                                demonstrate that the coalitions are 
                                collaborating with one another; and
                                  ``(II) each of the coalitions has 
                                independently met the requirements set 
                                forth in subsection (a).
          ``(2) Rural coalition grants.--
                  ``(A) In general.--
                          ``(i) In general.--In addition to awarding 
                        grants under paragraph (1), to stimulate the 
                        development of coalitions in sparsely populated 
                        and rural areas, the Administrator, in 
                        consultation with the Advisory Commission, may 
                        award a grant in accordance with this section 
                        to a coalition that represents a county with a 
                        population that does not exceed 30,000 
                        individuals. In awarding a grant under this 
                        paragraph, the Administrator may waive any 
                        requirement under subsection (a) if the 
                        Administrator considers that waiver to be 
                        appropriate.
                          ``(ii) Matching requirement.--Subject to 
                        subparagraph (C), for a fiscal year, the 
                        Administrator may grant to an eligible 
                        coalition under this paragraph, an amount not 
                        to exceed the amount of non-Federal funds 
                        raised by the coalition, including in-kind 
                        contributions, for that fiscal year.
                          ``(iii) Suspension of grants.--If such grant 
                        recipient fails to continue to meet any 
                        criteria specified in subsection (a) that has 
                        not been waived by the Administrator pursuant 
                        to clause (i), the Administrator may suspend 
                        the grant, after providing written notice to 
                        the grant recipient and an opportunity to 
                        appeal.
                  ``(B) Renewal grants.--The Administrator may award a 
                renewal grant to an eligible coalition that is a grant 
                recipient under this paragraph for each fiscal year 
                following the fiscal year for which an initial grant is 
                awarded, in an amount not to exceed the amount of non-
                Federal funds raised by the coalition, including in-
                kind contributions, during the 4-year period following 
                the period of the initial grant.
                  ``(C) Limitations.--
                          ``(i) Amount.--The amount of a grant award 
                        under this paragraph shall not exceed $100,000 
                        for a fiscal year.
                          ``(ii) Awards.--With respect to a county 
                        referred to in subparagraph (A), the 
                        Administrator may award a grant under this 
                        section to not more than 1 eligible coalition 
                        that represents the county.

``SEC. 1033. INFORMATION COLLECTION AND DISSEMINATION WITH RESPECT TO 
                    GRANT RECIPIENTS.

  ``(a) Coalition Information.--
          ``(1) General auditing authority.--For the purpose of audit 
        and examination, the Administrator--
                  ``(A) shall have access to any books, documents, 
                papers, and records that are pertinent to any grant or 
                grant renewal request under this chapter; and
                  ``(B) may periodically request information from a 
                grant recipient to ensure that the grant recipient 
                meets the applicable criteria under section 1032(a).
          ``(2) Application process.--The Administrator shall issue a 
        request for proposal regarding, with respect to the grants 
        awarded under section 1032, the application process, grant 
        renewal, and suspension or withholding of renewal grants. Each 
        application under this paragraph shall be in writing and shall 
        be subject to review by the Administrator.
          ``(3) Reporting.--The Administrator shall, to the maximum 
        extent practicable and in a manner consistent with applicable 
        law, minimize reporting requirements by a grant recipient and 
        expedite any application for a renewal grant made under this 
        subchapter.
  ``(b) Data Collection and Dissemination.--
          ``(1) In general.--The Administrator may collect data from--
                  ``(A) national substance abuse organizations that 
                work with eligible coalitions, community anti-drug 
                coalitions, departments or agencies of the Federal 
                Government, or State or local governments and the 
                governing bodies of Indian tribes; and
                  ``(B) any other entity or organization that carries 
                out activities that relate to the purposes of the 
                Program.
          ``(2) Activities of administrator.--The Administrator may--
                  ``(A) evaluate the utility of specific initiatives 
                relating to the purposes of the Program;
                  ``(B) conduct an evaluation of the Program; and
                  ``(C) disseminate information described in this 
                subsection to--
                          ``(i) eligible coalitions and other substance 
                        abuse organizations; and
                          ``(ii) the general public.

``SEC. 1034. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND TRAINING.

  ``(a) In General.--
          ``(1) Technical assistance and agreements.--With respect to 
        any grant recipient or other organization, the Administrator 
        may--
                  ``(A) offer technical assistance and training; and
                  ``(B) enter into contracts and cooperative 
                agreements.
          ``(2) Coordination of programs.--The Administrator may 
        facilitate the coordination of programs between a grant 
        recipient and other organizations and entities.
  ``(b) Training.--The Administrator may provide training to any 
representative designated by a grant recipient in--
          ``(1) coalition building;
          ``(2) task force development;
          ``(3) mediation and facilitation, direct service, assessment 
        and evaluation; or
          ``(4) any other activity related to the purposes of the 
        Program.

                  ``Subchapter II--Advisory Commission

``SEC. 1041. ESTABLISHMENT OF ADVISORY COMMISSION.

  ``(a) Establishment.--There is established a commission to be known 
as the `Advisory Commission on Drug-Free Communities'.
  ``(b) Purpose.--The Advisory Commission shall advise, consult with, 
and make recommendations to the Director concerning matters related to 
the activities carried out under the Program.

``SEC. 1042. DUTIES.

  ``(a) In General.--The Advisory Commission--
          ``(1) shall, not later than 30 days after its first meeting, 
        make recommendations to the Director regarding the selection of 
        an Administrator;
          ``(2) may make recommendations to the Director regarding any 
        grant, contract, or cooperative agreement made by the Program;
          ``(3) may make recommendations to the Director regarding the 
        activities of the Program;
          ``(4) may make recommendations to the Director regarding any 
        policy or criteria established by the Director to carry out the 
        Program;
          ``(5) may--
                  ``(A) collect, by correspondence or by personal 
                investigation, information concerning initiatives, 
                studies, services, programs, or other activities of 
                coalitions or organizations working in the field of 
                substance abuse in the United States or any other 
                country; and
                  ``(B) with the approval of the Director, make the 
                information referred to in subparagraph (A) available 
                through appropriate publications or other methods for 
                the benefit of eligible coalitions and the general 
                public; and
          ``(6) may appoint subcommittees and convene workshops and 
        conferences.
  ``(b) Recommendations.--If the Director rejects any recommendation of 
the Advisory Commission under subsection (a)(1), the Director shall 
notify the Advisory Commission in writing of the reasons for the 
rejection not later than 15 days after receiving the recommendation.
  ``(c) Conflict of Interest.--A member of the Advisory Commission 
shall recuse himself or herself from any decision that would constitute 
a conflict of interest.

``SEC. 1043. MEMBERSHIP.

  ``(a) In General.--The President shall appoint 11 members to the 
Advisory Commission as follows:
          ``(1) 4 members shall be appointed from the general public 
        and shall include leaders--
                  ``(A) in fields of youth development, public policy, 
                law, or business; or
                  ``(B) of nonprofit organizations or private 
                foundations that fund substance abuse programs.
          ``(2) 4 members shall be appointed from the leading 
        representatives of national substance abuse reduction 
        organizations, of which no fewer than 3 members shall have 
        extensive training or experience in drug prevention.
          ``(3) 3 members shall be appointed from the leading 
        representatives of State substance abuse reduction 
        organizations.
  ``(b) Chairperson.--The Advisory Commission shall elect a chairperson 
or co-chairpersons from among its members.
  ``(c) Ex Officio Members.--The ex officio membership of the Advisory 
Commission shall consist of any 2 officers or employees of the United 
States that the Director determines to be necessary for the Advisory 
Commission to effectively carry out its functions.

``SEC. 1044. COMPENSATION.

  ``(a) In General.--Members of the Advisory Commission who are 
officers or employees of the United States shall not receive any 
additional compensation for service on the Advisory Commission. The 
remaining members of the Advisory Commission shall receive, for each 
day (including travel time) that they are engaged in the performance of 
the functions of the Advisory Commission, compensation at rates not to 
exceed the daily equivalent to the annual rate of basic pay payable for 
grade GS-10 of the General Schedule.
  ``(b) Travel Expenses.--Each member of the Advisory Commission shall 
receive travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of subsistence, in 
accordance with sections 5702 and 5703 of title 5, United States Code.

``SEC. 1045. TERMS OF OFFICE.

  ``(a) In General.--Subject to subsection (b), the term of office of a 
member of the Advisory Commission shall be 3 years, except that, as 
designated at the time of appointment--
          ``(1) of the initial members appointed under section 
        1043(a)(1), 2 shall be appointed for a term of 2 years;
          ``(2) of the initial members appointed under section 
        1043(a)(2), 2 shall be appointed for a term of 2 years; and
          ``(3) of the initial members appointed under section 
        1043(a)(3), 1 shall be appointed for a term of 1 year.
  ``(b) Vacancies.--Any member appointed to fill a vacancy for an 
unexpired term of a member shall serve for the remainder of the 
unexpired term. A member of the Advisory Commission may serve after the 
expiration of such member's term until a successor has been appointed 
and taken office.

``SEC. 1046. MEETINGS.

  ``(a) In General.--After its initial meeting, the Advisory Commission 
shall meet, with the advanced approval of the Administrator, at the 
call of the Chairperson (or Co-chairpersons) of the Advisory Commission 
or a majority of its members or upon the request of the Director or 
Administrator of the Program.
  ``(b) Quorum.--6 members of the Advisory Commission shall constitute 
a quorum.

``SEC. 1047. STAFF.

  ``The Administrator shall make available to the Advisory Commission 
adequate staff, information, and other assistance.

``SEC. 1048. TERMINATION.

  ``The Advisory Commission shall terminate at the end of fiscal year 
2002.''.
  (b) References.--Each reference in Federal law to subtitle A of the 
Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988, with the exception of section 1001 of such 
subtitle, in any provision of law that is in effect on the day before 
the date of enactment of this Act shall be deemed to be a reference to 
chapter 1 of the National Narcotics Leadership Act of 1988 (as so 
designated by this section).

                         I. Purpose and Summary

    The purpose of H.R. 956, the ``Drug-Free Communities Act of 
1997,'' is to support and encourage local communities that have 
demonstrated a comprehensive, long-term commitment to reduce 
substance abuse among young people. The bill establishes within 
the Office of National Drug Control Policy a program to provide 
matching grants to communities that have established 
sustainable and accountable anti-drug efforts involving every 
major sector of a community. The bill recognizes that local 
communities must have flexibility to fashion their own 
solutions to reduce substance abuse. The bill is also designed 
to bring national and State leadership to local communities in 
a systematic manner throughout the United States.
    The principal features of the bill are as follows:

                       COMMUNITIES MUST ACT FIRST

    In order to receive Federal support, a community must first 
demonstrate a comprehensive, long-term commitment to address 
teenage drug abuse through major sector involvement 
(substantial volunteer participation from youth, parents, 
businesses, the media, schools, law enforcement, faith leaders, 
health care professionals and others), a focused mission, and 
the implementation of strategies to reduce drug abuse.

                               LEADERSHIP

    National, State and local leaders are encouraged to 
participate in the local community effort.

                             SUSTAINABILITY

    A community must demonstrate that its anti-drug coalition 
is an on-going concern that has non-Federal financial support 
to ensure the effort is self-sustaining.

                             ACCOUNTABILITY

    A community must have a system to evaluate the success of 
its anti-drug coalition efforts, consistent with commonly 
accepted standards.

           COMMUNITY LEADERS AND EXPERTS OVERSEE THE PROGRAM

    An Advisory Commission consisting of local community 
leaders and national and State experts in the field of 
substance abuse oversee the implementation of the program at 
the Office of National Drug Control Policy to ensure the 
program continues to be responsive to local needs.

              II. Background and Need for the Legislation

                        A. YOUTH SUBSTANCE ABUSE

    All recent studies have confirmed that teen drug abuse is a 
substantial problem. Data from the National Parents Resource 
Institute for Drug Education (PRIDE) released in 1996 shows one 
in four high school seniors using illicit drugs at least once a 
month; one in five using illicit drugs once a week; and one in 
ten using illicit drugs daily. The 1996 data on cocaine, 
hallucinogens, inhalants, and marijuana were the highest 
reported since PRIDE studies began in 1988.
    The National Household Survey, conducted by the Substance 
Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), 
confirms that these frightening rates of usage are part of an 
increasing trend. During the years 1994 to 1996, illicit drug 
use by 12-17 year olds rose 78 percent. LSD and hallucinogen 
use increased by 183 percent and cocaine use increased by 166 
percent over those three years.
    Research also indicates that parents are not talking to 
their kids about drugs. The PRIDE study indicates that under 30 
percent of children report that their parents talk to them 
frequently about the dangers of drugs--a decrease of over 25 
percent since 1990. A study by the National Center on Addiction 
and Substance Abuse at Columbia University (CASA) indicates 
that 94 percent of parents report talking to their children 
about drugs, but only 64 percent of teens report that their 
parents have talked to them about drugs at all.
    The CASA study also indicates that 40 percent of parents 
believe they have little influence over their children's 
decision to use drugs, blaming outside influences. The PRIDE 
study indicates that kids whose parents talk to them about 
drugs use illicit drugs at a lower rate--26.6 percent for those 
whose parents talk to them versus 35.5 percent for those whose 
parents do not talk to them.
    Teens are not perceiving the risks involved in drug use to 
the same extent they did just five years ago. The Monitoring 
the Future Study, conducted by Lloyd Johnson at the University 
of Michigan, indicates that the numbers of teens who indicate a 
great risk from using powder cocaine and crack cocaine have 
both dropped over ten percent among eighth graders and five 
percent among tenth graders. Similar trends exist for 
perception of risk in using LSD and marijuana. The CASA study 
reported that in just one year the number of 12-17 year olds 
who said they would never try an illegal drug dropped forty 
percent. The long-term trends presented in the Monitoring the 
Future Study show a strong inverse correlation between the 
perception of risk and the rate of use, making these recent 
statistics particularly disturbing.
    The risks of drug use are great, despite the decreased 
perception of risk. The Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN), 
which reports on drug-related emergency room episodes, shows a 
30 percent increase over three years from 1994 to 1996, for 12-
17 year olds. The consequencesof drug use are putting more 
teens in hospitals.
    The National Institute of Justice Drug Use Forecasting 
study reports on cocaine and marijuana use by individuals who 
enter the criminal justice system in cities around the county. 
Among males age 15 to 20, 22 percent tested positive for 
cocaine use and 53 percent tested positive for marijuana. 
Cocaine rates were similar for females while marijuana rates 
were lower. Among juveniles, those under 15, 41 percent tested 
positive for marijuana while substantially fewer tested 
positive for cocaine. Rates for both drugs were higher among 
juveniles who did not attend school than those who did. At some 
sites, those not in school were two and one-half times more 
likely to use cocaine.
    Youth drug use is clearly related to health problems, 
spiraling health care costs and violence. This link extends 
beyond youth drug use. Other important data sheds light on the 
costs of drug abuse. The National Institute of Justice 1994 
Drug Use Forecasting indicates that 50 percent of homicide and 
violent crime are drug-related. A 1995 Death Penalty 
Information Center Survey indicated that U.S. police chiefs 
believe the way to reduce violent crime is to reduce drug 
abuse. Data indicates that children who use drugs are two to 
five times more likely to drop out of school. Approximately 
one-quarter of all health care costs in the United States are 
related to substance abuse. More than half of all child and 
spousal abuse cases are related to substance abuse. Drug abuse 
is estimated to cost U.S. businesses approximately $60 billion 
every year in lost productivity due to absenteeism, accidents 
and medical claims.

                   B. COMMUNITY ANTI-DRUG COALITIONS

    Community coalitions seem to be one of the most effective 
demand-side tools to reduce youth drug abuse. By fostering 
cooperation among all sectors of a community and tailoring 
solutions to local problems, community coalitions have made 
substantial progress in selected locales:
    1. The General Accounting Office has found community 
coalitions to be a promising method of addressing youth drug 
abuse. Its findings are summarized under oversight findings in 
Section IV of this report.
    2. The Miami Coalition, in Miami, FL, has been able to move 
their population from having one of the highest rates of 
monthly teen drug use in 1988 to half of the national average 
for such monthly use by 1993. In a targeted media campaign, the 
Miami Coalition decreased usage rates by 55 percent in a two-
year period.
    3. A program in Little Rock, Arkansas, has reduced the 
victim crime rate and substantially reduced substance abuse by 
pregnant women. Little Rock voters have been so pleased with 
the program that they have actually added a \1/2\ cent sales 
tax to support and expand the program.
    4. In Hattiesburg, Mississippi, Project DREAM implemented 
youth-focused substance abuse education in subsidized housing, 
quarterly prevention seminars for new businesses, and school-
based programs for recovering teens. They report a marked 
decline in DUI related-accidents and arrests as a result of 
their programs.
    5. Project Freedom in Wichita, Kansas, implemented a 
comprehensive community-based initiative that reduced drug-
related vehicular deaths by 100 percent over a two-year period. 
DUI related arrests went down by 35 percent, juvenile drug-
related crime dropped 65 percent after a community-supported 
curfew was imposed, and birth of drug-exposed babies dropped 40 
percent.
    6. Safe Streets Coalition in Tacoma, Washington has closed 
down 600 drug-dealing locations with joint efforts of 
neighborhoods, law enforcement officials and churches.

                  C. DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES ACT PROGRAM

    The Drug-Free Communities Act applies the solutions 
developed from the experiences of community coalitions to the 
problems of teen drug abuse. Direct experience in establishing 
community-based, anti-drug coalitions, advice of experts in the 
field of drug prevention and insights gained from previous 
government programs informed the drafting of this legislation.
    This legislation is built on the belief that the local 
community commitment is absolutely essential to solving the 
drug problem. It recognizes that community grass-roots action 
and private sector involvement are the keys to solving our 
Nation's drug problem. In order to receive a Federal matching 
grant under this program, communities must first demonstrate a 
comprehensive, long-term commitment to reducing substance 
abuse. Experience in the field, good research and common sense 
tell us that communities which have every major sector involved 
in implementing strategies to reduce drug abuse are the most 
effective. This legislation supports those communities that 
have mobilized youth, parents, businesses, faith leaders, law 
enforcement, educators and other key sectors working together 
for at least 6 months with a focused mission and targeted 
strategies. At a minimum, coalitions must focus their efforts 
on illicit drugs.
    The local community must also demonstrate that there is 
substantial local will to address the substance abuse problems 
in that community. Without that local commitment, no program 
can survive over the long-run. The CSAP Community Partnership 
Program gave grants to communities that did not always have 
strong non-Federal financial and other support. During its 6-
year life, the CSAP Community Partnership Program has made over 
400 grants, typically ranging from $350,000 to $700,000, to 
local community programs; unfortunately, only 137 of the first 
252 grant recipients survive today. The Federal Government 
should be providing important early support to communities that 
will continue to sustain the effort with or without the Federal 
Government.
    Another key aspect of the Drug-Free Communities Act is that 
it requires the local coalition to have a system of evaluation 
in place. One of the criticisms of Federal programs that 
support State and local initiatives has been that such programs 
lack any accountability. Instead of trying to measure outcomes 
and conduct evaluations at the Federal level, which would 
require a large bureaucracy and would not necessarily produce 
better results, the onus is on the localcoalition to establish 
a system that measures its progress--including outcomes, such as 
whether teenage drug abuse is declining over time. Those efforts around 
the country that are making a difference already have good systems of 
evaluation in place. They have to have such systems in order to justify 
their continued existence. The question is how such efforts can add 
value, and a system of performance measures is critical to determining 
that.
    The Federal support provided under this program redirects, 
at the most, less than three-tenths of 1 percent of existing 
money from the $16 billion Federal drug control budget to 
support, dollar for dollar up to $100,000 per community, local 
community efforts. This is another check to ensure that there 
is local commitment. Not one Federal dollar will be spent under 
this program without a dollar or more generated by the local 
community.
    To ensure that this program maintains the sophistication to 
give support only to those efforts that are truly working, 
while maintaining the flexibility to permit communities to 
continue to fashion local solutions, an advisory commission is 
charged with helping to select the administrator and will 
oversee the program. Local community leaders and experts at the 
national and State levels in the field of substance abuse 
prevention and treatment will be able to review grant 
applications, and policies and criteria relating to the 
program. Those who are working on the front lines of the drug 
problem will be able to offer valuable input to those 
administering the program.
    The Drug-Free Communities Act of 1997 redirects Federal 
drug control policy to help support local communities in the 
most responsible, sustainable, and cost-effective way. It 
empowers local communities to address their own problems by 
incorporating national and State leadership with all major 
sectors within their community.

             III. Legislative Hearings and Committee Action

                              A. HEARINGS

    The Subcommittee on National Security, International 
Affairs, and Criminal Justice held a hearing on March 12, 1997, 
at which Congressman Rob Portman and Congressman Sander Levin 
testified as sponsors of the bill. James E. Copple, president 
and CEO of Community Anti-Drug Coalitions of America (CADCA), 
and Robert Francis, executive director of Regional Youth Adult 
Substance Abuse Project (RYASAP) based in Bridgeport, CT, also 
testified in support of the bill. Congressman Charles B. Rangel 
submitted a written statement for the record in support of the 
legislation.
    Subcommittee Chairman J. Dennis Hastert began the hearing 
with a statement on the problems facing communities as they 
address the crisis of drug abuse and expressed his support for 
H.R. 956 as a means to support the efforts of communities as 
they face this deadly problem. The ranking Minority member of 
the subcommittee, Thomas M. Barrett attributed the rise in teen 
drug use to the lack of a strong community position and 
expressed his support for the bill as a way to deliver the 
message that drugs are dangerous.
    Congressman Rob Portman outlined the important provisions 
of the bill and the importance of the problem it addresses. The 
bill rechannels existing resources to support effective 
community efforts in turning back the increase in teen drug 
abuse and reversing the increasing belief by teens that drug 
use is socially acceptable. Congressman Portman labeled this a 
call to action particularly as it drives the increase in many 
other social problems. The bill provides incentives for 
communities to address this problem and supports those programs 
cost-effectively.
    Congressman Sander Levin described the bill's contribution 
to setting the role of the Federal Government in anti-drug 
abuse efforts. The Drug-Free Communities Act would express a 
national commitment, help communities learn from each others 
activities, and to spark new community efforts. He 
characterized the bill as a wise re-prioritization of Federal 
resources. In response to questions from the subcommittee, 
Congressman Levin described the program as support of 
communities rather than direction to them, so it would not be 
duplicative of existing programs.
    Mr. Copple stressed that coalitions are necessary so that 
an organized, coherent effort may be aimed at drug abuse. The 
Drug-Free Communities Act of 1997 unifies the whole community 
and provides essential resources to those in the field of drug 
prevention. Through an emphasis on outcome evaluation and 
increased participation by elected officials and citizens, this 
legislation will aid ONDCP in creating a coordinated effort 
against the drug problem.
    Mr. Francis attributed the success of RYASAP to many of the 
same principles that exist in H.R. 956. First, they focused on 
offering an entire spectrum of services and established task 
forces for each stage of the spectrum. Additionally, they 
strove for sustainability and attempted to achieve a community 
wide effort. Lastly, they realized young people must be offered 
meaningful alternatives, and seek long term solutions to their 
drug problem.

                          B. COMMITTEE ACTION

    The Subcommittee on National Security, International 
Affairs, and Criminal Justice favorably referred An Amendment 
in the Nature of a Substitute to the bill by voice vote on 
March 12, 1997, to the Committee on Government Reform and 
Oversight.
    On May 16, 1997, a quorum being present, the Committee on 
Government Reform and Oversight favorably reported the 
Amendment in the Nature of Substitute to H.R. 956 as amended.

Committee on Government Reform and Oversight--105th Congress Rollcall

    Date: May 16, 1997.
    Amendment #1.
    Description: Amendment in the Nature of a Substitute to 
H.R. 956.
    Offered by: Hon. Rob Portman (OH).
    Adopted by Voice Vote.
    Date: May 16, 1997.
    Amendment #2.
    Description: Amendment to the Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute to H.R. 956, Page 6, line 8, strike ``, tobacco,'.
    Offered by: Hon. Bob Barr (GA).
    Failed by Voice Vote.
    Date: May 16, 1997.
    Amendment #3.
    Description: Amendment to the Amendment in the Nature of a 
Substitute to H.R. 956, Page 15, strike lines 16 and 17 (and 
redesignated the subsequent subclauses accordingly).
    Offered by: Hon. Elijah E. Cummings (MD).
    Adopted by Voice Vote.
    Date: May 16, 1997.
    Motion to favorably report H.R. 956, as amended.
    Offered by: Hon. Dan Burton (IN).
    Adopted by Voice Vote.

                         IV. Oversight Findings

    Pursuant to rule XI, clause 2(l)(3) and rule X, clauses 
2(b)(1) and 4(c)(2), the committee presents the following 
oversight findings from its own investigation and the work of 
the General Accounting Office (GAO):

              A. GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE (GAO) FINDINGS

    1. A March 1997 U.S. General Accounting Office Report 
entitled, ``Drug Control: Observations on Elements of the 
Federal Drug Control Strategy'' stated, ``[r]ecent research 
demonstrates basically two types of prevention approaches that 
show promise when use in programs with school-age youths. * * * 
The second approach involves the use of multiple societal 
institutions (e.g., schools, families, media and community), 
working together in collaborative fashion, to achieve a 
multicomponent approach to prevention * * * '' The report 
continues, ``[c]ommon features of programs using a 
comprehensive approach included multistrategies to target 
multiple aspects of youths' lives, such as the individual, 
family, peer group, school and community.'' The GAO report 
demonstrates the promise of the comprehensive approach embodied 
in H.R. 956.
    2. GAO found the following features associated with 
positive outcomes: (1) increasing the awareness of the social 
influences that promote drug use; (2) modifying societal norms 
or expectations concerning drug use; and (3) targeting multiple 
aspects of youths' lives through the use of school, family, 
peer, and community factors.
    3. The Midwestern Prevention Project, a comprehensive 
community program, showed a 20- to 40-percent net reduction in 
use of two drugs by school-age youth over a three year period, 
according to GAO's review of recent research.

                         B. COMMITTEE FINDINGS

    During the 104th and 105th Congress, the Subcommittee on 
National Security, International Affairs, and Criminal Justice 
held several hearings on anti-drug abuse issues. Witnesses at 
several of the hearings testified to the importance of 
comprehensive community involvement:
    1. ``Report from the Front Line: The Drug War in 
California,'' September 23, 1996. Mr. Herman Wrice, director of 
Mantua Against Drugs, trains community representatives to 
activate their communities to resist the influences of drug 
abuse. He cited examples of success from Newnan, Georgia; 
Tupelo, Mississippi; Bangor, Maine; and South Philadelphia.
    2. ``The Epidemic of Teen Drug Use,'' September 26, 1996. 
Congressman Rob Portman testified as to the importance of 
community efforts in spreading the prevention message citing 
successful examples of comprehensive community-based coalition 
in Miami and Cincinnati. He also shared the commitment of over 
20 members on each side of the aisle to participate in 
coalitions in their districts reflecting the importance they 
place on this issue.
    3. ``The Epidemic of Teen Drug Use,'' September 26, 1996. 
Doug Hall, director of the National Parents Resource Institute 
for Drug Education (``PRIDE'') testified to the effectiveness 
of comprehensive community-based solutions and the support 
provided by national organizations like PRIDE.
    4. ``The Epidemic of Teen Drug Use,'' September 26, 1996. 
Dr. William Hansen, president of Tanglewood Reasearch, Inc., a 
group that develops education materials for substance abuse 
prevention programs, testified on his concern that there is no 
effective method of disseminating information about programs 
that work in communities. He also thinks social influence 
programs that bring all parts of a society to bear on the 
problem are the most effective based on his research.
    5. ``The Epidemic of Teen Drug Use,'' September 26, 1996. 
Nelson Cooney, senior vice-president of CADCA, testified on the 
success of comprehensive coalitions citing examples of law 
enforcement officials talking to the faith community, the faith 
community talking to schools, and all sectors involving elected 
leaders.
    6. ``Report from the Front Line: The Chicagoland Area's 
Battle Against Drugs,'' June 24, 1996. Ken Hinterlong detailed 
how in Aurora, as an organized neighborhood group, their 
organization had 600 members who met on a regular basis and 
formed neighborhood watch patrols. Through meetings with the 
police department and elected officials, the entirecommunity 
has a better understanding and has created a friendlier environment 
with the police. Additionally, residents are calling the police 15 
percent more while crime went down 35 percent.
    7. ``Report from the Front Line: Fort Wayne's Battle 
Against Drugs,'' June 24, 1996. Reverend Ternae Jordan's Stop 
the Madness program began in 1992, after a series of teenage 
deaths. It began with one meeting of 850 members of the 
community and later came to include a summer camp which taught 
young people about self-esteem, motivation, and the dangers of 
drugs and gangs. He believes that ``We, as a community'' must 
stop the larger drug suppliers.
    8. ``Report from the Front Line: Fort Wayne's Battle 
Against Drugs,'' June 24, 1996. Andre Patterson's Simba began 
as a rites of passage group for young men, but has evolved into 
a family program, with the schools and churches involved. In 
Simba everything is learned through the community, and the 
parents are now involved in their children's lives as a 
community.

                         V. Explanation of Bill

                        A. Purposes (Sec. 1022)

    The bill's purposes are outlined clearly, but one is worth 
highlighting. The bill redirects existing resources from the 
proposed fiscal year 1998 Federal drug control budget to 
provide the appropriations authorized. The sponsors of the 
legislation and the committee intend that funding for this 
program will come from existing Federal drug control dollars. 
The committee intends that funds for this program will be 
offset by reductions in other areas funded by the Treasury, 
Postal Service and General Government appropriations bill. The 
committee has been working with the Committee on Appropriations 
and its Subcommittee on Treasury, Postal Service and General 
Government to accomplish this objective. The principal sponsor 
of the bill has proposed a number of specific offsets for 
consideration by appropriators. One possible offset to provide 
the $10 million in fiscal year 1998 could be to the Treasury 
Forfeiture Fund. There is precedent for the Treasury Forfeiture 
Fund being used to support the national drug control strategy 
by discouraging youth activities which are related to drugs and 
by encouraging Federal, State and local cooperation, as this 
program would do. Another option would be to offset $10 million 
from the $30.8 million requested for laboratory construction 
for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms. The rationale 
for such an offset would be that the drug budget should not be 
used for purposes that do not directly relate to drug abuse 
reduction.
    The committee will continue to work with appropriators in 
future years to identify appropriate offsets from the Federal 
drug control budget.

                       B. Definitions (Sec. 1023)

    The bill does not provide a specific definition of 
``community''. The intention was to enable those with direct 
experience in the field and who serve on the Advisory 
Commission to provide guidance to the Director of ONDCP. The 
intent is to encourage and support the creation of community 
anti-drug coalitions in every region of the country. The 
program is flexible enough to give grants to more than one 
coalition serving a community so long as the coalitions 
independently meet the criteria of the program and are 
collaborating with one another. The committee believes every 
effort should be made to ensure that the program is not funding 
efforts that are duplicative. Every effort should be made to 
ensure that coalitions serving communities that are adjacent or 
in the same region are working in concert with one another.
    In developing the definition of ``community'' the 
Administrator and the Advisory Commission should consider the 
need for substance abuse prevention programs to reach into all 
sectors of society, especially inner cities and impoverished 
areas. The definition of community should encompass these areas 
and coalitions should consider their needs in developing 
missions and strategies.
    The bill defines ``substance abuse'' to include three 
separate categories of substances: 1) drugs, such as narcotics, 
depressants, stimulants, hallucinogens and cannabis, that are 
listed on schedules I through V of the Controlled Substances 
Act and are regulated under Federal law; 2) inhalants, which 
are not regulated under the Controlled Substances Act and are 
only subject to restrictions on the sale to minors in a few 
states; or 3) products that are prohibited by State or local 
law, such as the use of alcohol or tobacco by minors. Community 
anti-drug coalitions in the United States generally target 
illegal drugs. Some coalitions also include strategies that 
target teenage inhalant abuse and teenage drinking and smoking. 
The bill encourages coalitions to take a comprehensive approach 
to addressing these problems, but requires that any coalition 
funded under this program must include illegal drugs referenced 
in (1) in their comprehensive plan.

             C. Authorization of Appropriations (Sec. 1024)

    The bill authorizes a smaller amount of appropriations in 
fiscal year 1998 to ensure that the program is running 
efficiently before grants are dispersed. The amount is 
gradually increased in succeeding years, up to $43.5 million in 
fiscal year 2002. This is symbolic and represents an attempt to 
provide up to $100,000 to every Congressional district in the 
country. The committee received testimony regarding the very 
positive impact that small grant awards--even $3,000-$5,000--
can have on local community efforts. The committee believes in 
the utility of making a large number of smaller grant awards in 
addition to the larger grant awards that the Federal Government 
has traditionally made under similar programs.

 D. Establishment of Drug-Free Communities Support Program (Sec. 1031)

    The committee believes that the appointment of the 
Administrator is one of the most important functions that the 
Director has under this program. The committee believes that it 
is vitally important for the Administrator to be responsive to 
the needs of local communities and to be well received in the 
substance abuse prevention field at large. The input from the 
Advisory Commission will be critical to ensuring that the 
Admininistrator is someone with the necessary qualifications, 
management skills and experience in the field of substance 
abuse to oversee this new program.
    The Director of ONDCP has the authority under this section 
to enter into contracts or agreements with national drug 
control program agencies to delegate authority for the 
execution of grants and other functions to carry out the 
program. Congressmen Barrett and Portman worked to develop this 
provision with the Administration. One of the purposes of this 
provision was to ensure that the program was carried out in the 
most efficient manner possible, using, where appropriate, 
existing resources in other national drug control program 
agencies to provide for the execution of grants and for 
technical assistance. The committee believes that the 
Administrator at ONDCP must play an active role in this program 
to ensure that the program is carried out in accordance with 
the purposes and intent of the bill. It is understood that an 
interagency agreement between ONDCP and another national drug 
control agency will include the terms outlined in the bill and 
will provide additional provisions consistent with the terms of 
the bill to ensure proper administration of the program.
    The Administrator will use the terms of the interagency 
agreement to oversee the program and ensure that it is operated 
and grants are awarded in accordance with the policies and 
criteria established for the program. The interagency agreement 
will establish a procedure whereby the Administrator may pre-
approve grant awards. The national drug control program agency 
will inform the Administrator when grants are awarded. In order 
to address concerns raised about the award of grants from an 
office within the Executive Office of the President, grant 
awards will be made by a national drug control program agency 
pursuant to the terms of the interagency agreement. The 
Administrator will have the authority to review the grant 
awards to evaluate compliance or non-compliance with the 
interagency agreement. The committee notes that grants may be 
executed using a peer review process.

                  E. Program Authorization (Sec. 1032)

    Eligibility criteria have been established based on the 
common traits of community efforts that are reducing substance 
abuse. As the March 1997 GAO report highlights (see Oversight 
Findings) and other studies have indicated, anti-drug efforts 
that engage every sector of a community and implement numerous 
initiatives with proven track records in reducing substance 
abuse can be very effective. To ensure collaboration with State 
and local governmental efforts, the criteria also include 
involvement of State, local or tribal governmental agencies 
with expertise in the field of substance abuse. The single 
State authority with primary responsibility for substance abuse 
should be tied into the local community effort.
    Because there is a recognition that the problem of 
substance abuse ultimately has to be solved at the local 
community level, the bill attempts to bring national, State and 
local leadership to local communities throughout the United 
States. The bill strongly encourages local coalitions to 
involve their elected officials at the Federal, State and local 
level, to the extent feasible. The committee notes the 
``Community Anti-Drug Coalition Initiative'' spearheaded by 
Congressman Rob Portman, which establishes a model for how 
Members of Congress can establish or help support existing 
community anti-drug coalitions in the districts they represent. 
The committee notes that 44 Members of Congress are currently 
participating in this initiative, and thatMembers of Congress 
can help mobilize sectors of a community, bring new leadership and 
ideas to the effort and help bring the expertise of national substance 
abuse organizations to a local community.
    The bill requires a local community to first demonstrate a 
strong commitment to reducing substance abuse in their 
community. Federal funding is generally not available until a 
local community can demonstrate that its representatives have 
worked together for at least 6 months in some kind of 
structured fashion. The committee also recognizes that 
substantial volunteer participation and community buy-in to the 
anti-drug effort are critical.
    The committee is particularly concerned that the coalition 
include, both in its membership and in its programming 
decisions, organizations not traditionally associated with 
substance abuse programs, but which engage in activities that 
prevent drug abuse. For example, a Boy Scout organization or a 
faith-based youth group that works on youth character 
development would be good candidates for involvement in a 
coalition.
    The bill also requires that a community effort have a 
focused mission with a principal emphasis on youth. This simply 
reflects the data which indicates that youth substance abuse is 
increasing dramatically but also demonstrates that if you can 
prevent someone from trying illegal drugs before they are 19, 
then there is about a 90 percent probability they will never 
have a drug problem. Of current adult cocaine users, for 
example, nine out of ten started using as teenagers. This 
criteria also reflects the fact that the key to reducing drug 
abuse on a sustained basis, generation by generation, is to 
focus on youth substance abuse. The committee believes that a 
comprehensive drug prevention effort targeting youth can have 
the most significant impact on reducing drug abuse in the short 
and long terms.
    The bill requires a demonstration that the local effort can 
be sustained over the long-term, without Federal support. The 
committee believes that local efforts and non-Federal financial 
support are critical to a program's long-term success. The 
committee wants to maximize the utility of Federal resources so 
that a smaller amount of Federal support tracks strong local 
commitment and financial support. The committee believes that 
the Federal Government should be providing support to those 
communities that have efforts that are effective and 
sustainable, not be a substitute for local community effort. It 
is hoped that Federal financial support will act as a catalyst 
to enhance what communities are already doing well and to spur 
the creation of other sustainable community anti-drug efforts.
    One of the common and often deserved criticisms of Federal 
programs that support State and local initiatives is that they 
lack accountability. This bill requires a coalition applying 
for a grant to have a system of evaluation in place that 
measures outcomes, consistent with common indicators. The 
committee notes that successful community efforts around the 
country evaluate their progress over time to be sure they are 
adding value. The committee also notes that is one of the 
benefits of having the private sector involved in these 
coalitions--it forces accountability. The committee notes that 
there are models of evaluation in the field that coalitions are 
usingeffectively. Some examples include Hawkins, Catalano & 
Miller, ``Risk and Protective Factors for Alcohol and other Drug 
Problems in Adolescence and early adulthood: implications for substance 
abuse prevention,'' Psychological Bulletin 112(1):64-105, 1992; Stephen 
B. Fawcett, Work Group Evaluation Handbook: Evaluating and Supporting 
Community Initiatives for Health and Development; U.S. Department of 
Justice, Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, Title V 
Delinquency Prevention Program Community Self-Evaluation Workbook.
    Coalitions have also reported that such systems of 
evaluation are critical to making their case to the community 
and seeking local financial support. This bill builds on that 
success by again requiring the local community to put in place 
such a system. The committee was also sensitive to comments 
from the field that requiring surveys can be very costly and 
that collecting existing data can be as effective and more 
cost-efficient. The committee included language giving 
coalitions the flexibility to use such existing data.
    The bill sets out limitations on the award of grants. All 
awards under this program are capped at $100,000. This was 
based on fiscal restraints at the Federal level and information 
collected from coalitions throughout the country. In fact, 
testimony indicated that coalitions around the country can 
benefit from very small grant awards. Ronda Kopelke from the 
North Woods Coalition in Marshfield, Wisconsin wrote, ``if you 
have Federal support based on community buy-in, then it can 
help us leverage support from the community. A small grant from 
the Federal Government--even $5,000--could enable our coalition 
to build a regional youth alliance, send youth to camp to learn 
drug and alcohol strategies and to hire a part-time person to 
marshal the volunteers necessary to sustain the effort over 
time.'' Karen Hoff, director of the Clean Focus Coalition in 
Charles Town, West Virginia, is implementing a peer mediation 
program which helps kids resist peer pressure to take drugs and 
teaches them life-enhancing decision-making skills. This 
program could be up and running with less than $5,000. With 
just $2,000 from the Federal Government, a locally supported 
parent education program could be expanded to reach 1,000 
parents in the Charles Town area.
    The bill also generally limits grant awards to one eligible 
coalition that represents a community. The goal is to provide 
financial incentives to encourage every sector of a community 
to work together. If an infrastructure of community-based anti-
drug efforts is going to be created in every region of the 
country, local efforts must collaborate with one another. 
Multiple coalitions serving a community may qualify for 
matching grants if they independently meet the program's 
criteria and demonstrate that they are collaborating with one 
another. The bill also recognizes that urban areas with high 
population densities may have numerous coalitions representing 
them. Finally, the bill recognizes the unique challenges that 
rural areas face. A rural community may not be able to meet all 
of the criteria outlined in the bill. Distances that must be 
traveled, sectors that may not be represented, and local data 
that may not be available are all challenges that rural 
communities often face. The bill gives the Administrator 
flexibility in reviewing grant applications from rural 
coalitions so that good-faith efforts that have a likelihood of 
success can receive support from the Federal Government. One 
requirementthat is not waivable, however, is the provision of 
matching grant. While a rural coalition may not meet all of the 
criteria outlined in the bill, the Federal Government will only provide 
financial support up to the amount generated by the rural coalition.
    The committee received information indicating that, in rare 
instances, anti-drug coalitions applied for Federal support and 
did not use the funds for anti-drug activities. Because of this 
possibility or the potential for a coalition to fail to 
continue to meet significant criteria of the program, the bill 
includes a provision to permit the Administrator to suspend a 
grant.

   F. Information Collection and Dissemination with Respect to Grant 
                         Recipients (Sec. 1033)

    The committee received testimony indicating that Federal 
support provided to communities under other programs often 
included onerous reporting requirements. Marilyn Culp, 
executive director of the highly successful Miami Coalition 
covering 1.8 million people in Miami, Florida, stated that 
under the current CSAP Community Partnership program the 
Federal reporting requirements are so cumbersome, that she had 
to hire a person just to comply with those requirements. 
Obviously, coalitions want and need to use their scarce 
resources on efforts to reduce substance abuse in their 
communities. The bill provides that the Administrator shall 
minimize reporting requirements by a grant recipient and 
expedite renewal requests to maximize the most efficient use of 
resources. The bill intentionally sets a high threshold for 
applicants to meet so that coalitions with a high likelihood of 
making an impact are funded and ongoing reporting requirements 
can be kept to a minimum.

          G. Establishment of Advisory Commission (Sec. 1041)

    The bill establishes an Advisory Commission to make 
recommendations to the Director so that the Federal program 
continues to be responsive to local community needs. The bill 
reflects the belief that those working on the front lines of 
the drug problem will be able to offer valuable input to those 
administering the program. The Advisory Commission membership 
will ensure that representatives from local communities, the 
States and national experts are able to provide input. A key 
focus of the bill is on drug prevention. The qualifications 
outlined for members of the Advisory Commission reflect this 
focus.
    The following is a section-by-section summary of the bill 
as reported:

                         SECTION. 1 SHORT TITLE

    The short title of this bill is the ``Drug-Free Communities 
Act of 1997''.

                 SEC. 2. NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL PROGRAM

    This section labels the current act, the National Narcotics 
Leadership Act of 1988, as ``Chapter 1--Office of National Drug 
Control Policy;'' and adds at the end a second chapter, 
``Chapter 2--Drug-Free Communities.'

                          SEC. 1021. FINDINGS

    Youth substance abuse is rising dramatically, is the cause 
of other social problems, and is a preventable behavior and a 
treatable disease; community anti-drug coalitions are 
implementing comprehensive, long-term strategies to reduce 
substance abuse; and national, State and local leadership and 
coordination are critical to help reduce substance abuse.

                          SEC. 1022. PURPOSES

    This section is designed to help reduce substance abuse by 
strengthening collaboration among communities and all levels of 
Government, to serve as a catalyst for increased citizen 
participation among all sectors of a community, to re-channel 
existing resources from the Federal drug control budget to 
provide technical assistance and financial support to 
communities that first demonstrate a long-term commitment to 
reduce substance abuse among youth, and to encourage the 
creation of and support for community anti-drug coalitions.

                         SEC. 1023. DEFINITIONS

    ``Substance Abuse'' means: 1) the illegal use or abuse of 
drugs, including substances listed on the schedules of the 
Controlled Substances Act; 2) the abuse of inhalants; or 3) the 
use of alcohol, tobacco, or other related product as such use 
is prohibited by State or local law.

               SEC. 1024. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

    This provision authorizes the following amounts to be 
appropriated to the Office of National Drug Control Policy $10 
million (FY 1998), $20 million (FY 1999), $30 million (FY 
2000), $40 million (FY 2001) and $43.5 million (FY 2002). This 
provision also limits administrative costs to 10 percent in FY 
1998, decreasing to 3 percent in 2002.

          Subchapter I--Drug-Free Communities Support Program

   SEC. 1031. ESTABLISHMENT OF DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES SUPPORT PROGRAM

    The Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy 
establishes a program to make and track grants to grant 
recipients, and to provide for technical assistance, data 
collection, and dissemination of information on state-of-the-
art practices. The Director appoints an Administrator to carry 
out the program. The Director may employ necessary staff and 
may enter into contracts or agreements to delegate authority 
for activities to carry out the program.

                    SEC. 1032. PROGRAM AUTHORIZATION

    This provision sets out eligibility criteria and grant 
amounts. To qualify for a grant, the program requires: (1) an 
application; (2) that one or more representatives of the major 
sectors of a community, including, if applicable, the single 
State authority for substance abuse and, if feasible, an 
elected official from local or tribal, State and the Federal 
Government, are involved in the coalition; (3) the coalition to 
have been in existence for at least 6 months, with substantial 
voluntary participation especially among individuals involved 
with youth; (4) a focused mission and strategies; (5) that the 
coalition can be sustained as on ongoing concern with non-
Federal financial support; and, (6) a system to evaluate 
outcomes. Grants may be made to a coalition representing a 
community up to the amount of non-Federal funds raised by a 
coalition, including in-kind contributions. No grant may exceed 
$100,000. Grants may be made to more than one coalition 
representing a community if the coalitions are cooperating and 
independently meet the criteria above. Coalitions representing 
a rural county with less than 30,000 people that may not be 
able to meet all of the criteria above can receive up to 
$100,000 in Federal matching funds. Grants will be executed 
using a peer review process. In all cases, grants may be 
suspended, after notice and an opportunity to appeal, if a 
grant recipient fails to continue to meet the required 
criteria, and renewed for 4 consecutive years if a coalition 
continues to meet the criteria in each such year.

  SEC. 1033. INFORMATION COLLECTION AND DISSEMINATION WITH RESPECT TO 
                            GRANT RECIPIENTS

    This provision gives the Administrator general auditing 
authority, requires the issuance of a request for proposal 
regarding the application, grant awards, renewals, and the 
suspension or withholding of grants. The provision also 
requires the Administrator to minimize reporting burdens 
consistent with existing law. It also provides authority for 
the collection and dissemination of information and evaluation 
of the program.

              SEC. 1034. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND TRAINING

    This provision gives the Administrator the authority to 
offer training and technical assistance to coalitions and 
provides contract and agreement authority to assist the 
Administrator's efforts.

                   Subchapter II--Advisory Commission

            SEC. 1041. ESTABLISHMENT OF ADVISORY COMMISSION

    This section establishes an Advisory Commission on Drug-
Free Communities.

                            SEC. 1042 DUTIES

    This section provides that the Advisory Commission makes 
recommendations to the Director on the selection of an 
Administrator, the award of grants and contracts, and the 
policies and criteria of the program. The Advisory Commission 
may also collect information on substance abuse initiatives and 
programs, appoint subcommittees, and convene workshops and 
conferences. If the Director rejects a recommendation of the 
Advisory Commission, the Director must notify the Advisory 
Commission within 15 days of the reasons for such rejection.

                          SEC. 1043 MEMBERSHIP

    This section requires that the President appoints 11 
Members to the Advisory Commission: 4 from the general public 
that shall include leaders in the fields of youth development, 
public policy, law or business, or non-profit or private 
foundations that fund substance abuse programs; 4 from leading 
representatives of national substance abuse reduction 
organizations (3 of whom must have extensive training or 
experience in drug prevention); and 3 from leading 
representatives of substance abuse reduction in the States. The 
Advisory Commission elects a chair and may include two ex 
officio members appointed by the Director.

                         SEC. 1044 COMPENSATION

    This provision provides that the members of the Advisory 
Commission shall receive for each day they are performing 
Commission duties compensation at rates not to exceed the daily 
equivalent to the annual rate of basic pay payable for GS-10 of 
the General Schedule and travel expenses.

                       SEC. 1045 TERMS OF OFFICE

    This section provides for 3 year terms of office for 
members of the Advisory Commission on a staggered basis.

                           SEC. 1046 MEETINGS

    This section requires that the Advisory Commission meets at 
the request of the Chair, a majority of members, or at a 
request of Director or Administrator. Six members are needed 
for a quorum.

                            SEC. 1047 STAFF

    The Administrator must make available to the Advisory 
Commission adequate staff, information and other assistance.

                         SEC. 1048. TERMINATION

    This section provides for termination of the Advisory 
Commission at the end of fiscal year 2002.

                      VI. Compliance with Rule XI

    Pursuant to rule XI, clause 2(l)(3)(A) of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, under the authority of rule X, clause 
2(b)(1) and clause 3(f), the results and findings from 
committee oversight activities are incorporated in the bill and 
this report.

                  VII. Statement of CBO Cost Estimate

    Pursuant to rule XI, clause 2(l)(3)(c) of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee was provided the 
following estimate of the cost of H.R. 956 prepared by the 
Congressional Budget Office.

               congressional budget office cost estimate

H.R. 956--Drug-Free Communities Act of 1997

    Summary: H.R. 956 would direct the Office of National Drug 
Control Policy (ONDCP) to establish a federal program to assist 
local communities in developing and implementing programs to 
prevent and treat substance abuse by minors. The bill would 
authorize annual matching grants of up to $100,000 to programs 
that meet the bill's eligibility requirements. In addition, the 
bill would require that ONDCP select a federal agency to 
administer the programs, which would include awarding and 
tracking grants and providing technical assistance and training 
to approved communities.
    H.R. 956 also would establish the Advisory Commission on 
Drug-Free Communities, which would work with ONDCP in 
establishing and implementing the federal program created by 
the bill, including recommending which federal agency should 
make the grants and which localities should receive grants 
under the bill. The President would appoint the commission's 11 
members. The bill would authorize that members who are not 
employees or officers of the federal government receive 
compensation for time spent performing commission duties. All 
members would be reimbursed for travel expenses. The commission 
would terminate at the end of fiscal year 2002.
    To cover its costs, H.R. 956 would authorize the 
appropriation of $143.5 million over the 1998-2002 period. Of 
that total, the bill would limit the amount spent on 
administrative costs to $5.9 million. Because the bill would 
not affect direct spending or receipts, pay-as-you-go 
procedures would not apply. H.R. 956 contains no 
intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as defined in the 
Unfunded Mandates Reform Act of 1995 (UMRA) and would impose no 
costs on state, local, or tribal governments.

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                       Washington DC, May 19, 1997.
Hon. Dan Burton,
Chairman, Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, House of 
        Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 956, the Drug-Free 
Communities Act of 1997.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contacts are John R. 
Righter (for federal costs) and Theresa Gullo (for the state 
and local impact).
            Sincerely,
                                         June E. O'Neill, Director.
    Enclosure:
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of H.R. 956 is shown in the table below. For 
the purposes of this estimate, CBO assumes that all amounts 
authorized in H.R. 956 would be appropriated by the start of 
each fiscal year. Outlays are estimated based on the bill's 
requirements, the experience of other federal grant programs, 
and information provided by ONDCP.

                                    [By fiscal year, in millions of dollars]                                    
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                       1998     1999     2000     2001     2002 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION                                       
Authorization level................................................       10       20       30       40       44
Estimated outlays..................................................        2       14       24       33       41
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The costs of this legislation fall within budget function 
800 (general government).
    Pay-as-you-go considerations: None.
    Estimated impact on State, local, and tribal governments: 
The bill contains no intergovernmental mandates as defined in 
UMRA and would impose no costs on state, local, or tribal 
governments. Community coalitions (including state, local, and 
tribal governments) that choose to apply for grants under the 
program established by this bill would be required to comply 
with certain application and operating procedures including 
matching 100 percent of the federal funds they receive. These 
grant recipients would also be eligible for technical 
assistance and training to be provided by ONDCP.
    Estimated impact on the private sector: The bill would 
impose no new private-sector mandates as defined in UMRA.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Cost--John R. Righter; impact 
on State, local, and tribal governments: Theresa Gullo.
    Estimate approved by: Paul N. Van de Water, Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

              VIII. Statement of Constitutional Authority

    Pursuant to rule XI, clause 2(l)(4) of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee finds that Congress is 
specifically granted the power to enact this law under Article 
I, Section 8, clause 1 under which Congress is granted the 
``Power To * * * provide for the * * * general Welfare of the 
United States[.]''

    IX. Federal Advisory Committee Act (5 U.S.C. App.) Section 5(b)

    A. Pursuant to Section 5(b) of the Federal Advisory 
Committee Act, the Committee has determined that the functions 
of the Advisory Commission on Drug-Free Communities established 
by H.R. 956, section 1041(a) are not being and could not be 
performed by an existing agency or advisory committee.
    B. Subchapter II of H.R. 956 meets the specific 
requirements of Section 5(b) of the Federal Advisory Committee 
Act.
    1. The purpose of the Advisory Commission on Drug-Free 
Communities is clearly defined in section 1041(b).
    2. The membership of the Advisory Commission, as set out in 
section 1043, provides for a fair balance in terms of the 
points of view represented and the functions to be performed by 
the Advisory Commission.
    3. Section 1042(a) provides for self-recusal to eliminate 
any conflict of interest and insure that the advice and 
recommendations of the advisory committee will not be 
inappropriately influenced by the appointing authority or by 
any special interest, but will instead be the result of the 
advisory committee's independent judgment.
    4. Section 1024 authorizes appropriations for the Drug-Free 
Communities Act including Subchapter II on the Advisory 
Commission.
    5. Section 1047 provides for adequate staff and other 
resources for the Commission.

                       X. Changes in Existing Law

    In compliance with clause 3 of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

               NATIONAL NARCOTICS LEADERSHIP ACT OF 1988

             TITLE I--COORDINATION OF NATIONAL DRUG POLICY

               Subtitle A--National Drug Control Program

SEC. 1001. SHORT TITLE.

  This subtitle may be cited as the ``National Narcotics 
Leadership Act of 1988''.

           CHAPTER 1--OFFICE OF NATIONAL DRUG CONTROL POLICY

SEC. 1002. ESTABLISHMENT OF OFFICE.

  (a) Establishment of Office.--There is established in the 
Executive Office of the President the ``Office of National Drug 
Control Policy''.
          * * * * * * *

                    CHAPTER 2--DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES

SEC. 1021. FINDINGS.

  Congress finds the following:
          (1) Substance abuse among youth has more than doubled 
        in the 5-year period preceding 1996, with substantial 
        increases in the use of marijuana, inhalants, cocaine, 
        methamphetamine, LSD, and heroin.
          (2) The most dramatic increases in substance abuse 
        has occurred among 13- and 14-year-olds.
          (3) Casual or periodic substance abuse by youth today 
        will contribute to hard core or chronic substance abuse 
        by the next generation of adults.
          (4) Substance abuse is at the core of other problems, 
        such as rising violent teenage and violent gang crime, 
        increasing health care costs, HIV infections, teenage 
        pregnancy, high school dropouts, and lower economic 
        productivity.
          (5) Increases in substance abuse among youth are due 
        in large part to an erosion of understanding by youth 
        of the high risks associated with substance abuse, and 
        to the softening of peer norms against use.
          (6)(A) Substance abuse is a preventable behavior and 
        a treatable disease; and
          (B)(i) during the 13-year period beginning with 1979, 
        monthly use of illegal drugs among youth 12 to 17 years 
        of age declined by over 70 percent; and
          (ii) data suggests that if parents would simply talk 
        to their children regularly about the dangers of 
        substance abuse, use among youth could be expected to 
        decline by as much as 30 percent.
          (7) Community anti-drug coalitions throughout the 
        United States are successfully developing and 
        implementing comprehensive, long-term strategies to 
        reduce substance abuse among youth on a sustained 
        basis.
          (8) Intergovernmental cooperation and coordination 
        through national, State, and local or tribal leadership 
        and partnerships are critical to facilitate the 
        reduction of substance abuse among youth in communities 
        throughout the United States.

SEC. 1022. PURPOSES.

  The purposes of this chapter are--
          (1) to reduce substance abuse among youth in 
        communities throughout the United States, and over 
        time, to reduce substance abuse among adults;
          (2) to strengthen collaboration among communities, 
        the Federal Government, and State, local, and tribal 
        governments;
          (3) to enhance intergovernmental cooperation and 
        coordination on the issue of substance abuse among 
        youth;
          (4) to serve as a catalyst for increased citizen 
        participation and greater collaboration among all 
        sectors and organizations of a community that first 
        demonstrates a long-term commitment to reducing 
        substance abuse among youth;
          (5) to rechannel resources from the fiscal year 1998 
        Federal drug control budget to provide technical 
        assistance, guidance, and financial support to 
        communities that demonstrate a long-term commitment in 
        reducing substance abuse among youth;
          (6) to disseminate to communities timely information 
        regarding the state-of-the-art practices and 
        initiatives that have proven to be effective in 
        reducing substance abuse among youth;
          (7) to enhance, not supplant, local community 
        initiatives for reducing substance abuse among youth; 
        and
          (8) to encourage the creation of and support for 
        community anti-drug coalitions throughout the United 
        States.

SEC. 1023. DEFINITIONS.

  In this chapter:
          (1) Administrator.--The term ``Administrator'' means 
        the Administrator appointed by the Director under 
        section 1031(c).
          (2) Advisory commission.--The term ``Advisory 
        Commission'' means the Advisory Commission established 
        under section 1041.
          (3) Community.--The term ``community'' shall have the 
        meaning provided that term by the Administrator, in 
        consultation with the Advisory Commission.
          (4) Director.--The term ``Director'' means the 
        Director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy.
          (5) Eligible coalition.--The term ``eligible 
        coalition'' means a coalition that meets the applicable 
        criteria under section 1032(a).
          (6) Grant recipient.--The term ``grant recipient'' 
        means the recipient of a grant award under section 
        1032.
          (7) Nonprofit organization.--The term ``nonprofit 
        organization'' means an organization described under 
        section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 
        that is exempt from taxation under section 501(a) of 
        the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.
          (8) Program.--The term ``Program'' means the program 
        established under section 1031(a).
          (9) Substance abuse.--The term ``substance abuse'' 
        means--
                  (A) the illegal use or abuse of drugs, 
                including substances listed in schedules I 
                through V of section 112 of the Controlled 
                Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812);
                  (B) the abuse of inhalants; or
                  (C) the use of alcohol, tobacco, or other 
                related product as such use is prohibited by 
                State or local law.
          (10) Youth.--The term ``youth'' shall have the 
        meaning provided that term by the Administrator, in 
        consultation with the Advisory Commission.

SEC. 1024. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) In General.--There are authorized to be appropriated to 
the Office of National Drug Control Policy to carry out this 
chapter--
          (1) $10,000,000 for fiscal year 1998;
          (2) $20,000,000 for fiscal year 1999;
          (3) $30,000,000 for fiscal year 2000;
          (4) $40,000,000 for fiscal year 2001; and
          (5) $43,500,000 for fiscal year 2002.
  (b) Administrative Costs.--Not more than the following 
percentages of the amounts authorized under subsection (a) may 
be used to pay administrative costs:
          (1) 10 percent for fiscal year 1998.
          (2) 6 percent for fiscal year 1999.
          (3) 4 percent for fiscal year 2000.
          (4) 3 percent for fiscal year 2001.
          (5) 3 percent for fiscal year 2002.

          Subchapter I--Drug-Free Communities Support Program

SEC. 1031. ESTABLISHMENT OF DRUG-FREE COMMUNITIES SUPPORT PROGRAM.

  (a) Establishment.--The Director shall establish a program to 
support communities in the development and implementation of 
comprehensive, long-term plans and programs to prevent and 
treat substance abuse among youth.
  (b) Program.--In carrying out the Program, the Director 
shall--
          (1) make and track grants to grant recipients;
          (2) provide for technical assistance and training, 
        data collection, and dissemination of information on 
        state-of-the-art practices that the Director determines 
        to be effective in reducing substance abuse; and
          (3) provide for the general administration of the 
        Program.
  (c) Administration.--Not later than 30 days after receiving 
recommendations from the Advisory Commission under section 
1042(a)(1), the Director shall appoint an Administrator to 
carry out the Program.
  (d) Contracting.--The Director may employ any necessary staff 
and may enter into contracts or agreements with national drug 
control agencies, including interagency agreements to delegate 
authority for the execution of grants and for such other 
activities necessary to carry out this chapter.

SEC. 1032. PROGRAM AUTHORIZATION.

  (a) Grant Eligibility.--To be eligible to receive an initial 
grant or a renewal grant under this subchapter, a coalition 
shall meet each of the following criteria:
          (1) Application.--The coalition shall submit an 
        application to the Administrator in accordance with 
        section 1033(a)(2).
          (2) Major sector involvement.--
                  (A) In general.--The coalition shall consist 
                of 1 or more representatives of each of the 
                following categories:
                          (i) Youth.
                          (ii) Parents.
                          (iii) Businesses.
                          (iv) The media.
                          (v) Schools.
                          (vi) Organizations serving youth.
                          (vii) Law enforcement.
                          (viii) Religious organizations.
                          (ix) Civic, volunteer, and fraternal 
                        groups.
                          (x) Health care professionals.
                          (xi) State, local, or tribal 
                        governmental agencies with expertise in 
                        the field of substance abuse 
                        (including, if applicable, the State 
                        authority with primary authority for 
                        substance abuse).
                          (xii) Other organizations involved in 
                        reducing substance abuse.
                  (B) Elected officials.--If feasible, in 
                addition to representatives from the categories 
                listed in subparagraph (A), the coalition shall 
                have an elected official (or a representative 
                of an elected official) from--
                          (i) the Federal Government; and
                          (ii) the government of the 
                        appropriate State and political 
                        subdivision thereof or the governing 
                        body or an Indian tribe (as that term 
                        is defined in section 4(e) of the 
                        Indian Self-Determination Act (25 
                        U.S.C. 450b(e))).
                  (C) Representation.--An individual who is a 
                member of the coalition may serve on the 
                coalition as a representative of not more than 
                1 category listed under subparagraph (A).
          (3) Commitment.--The coalition shall demonstrate, to 
        the satisfaction of the Administrator--
                  (A) that the representatives of the coalition 
                have worked together on substance abuse 
                reduction initiatives, which, at a minimum, 
                includes initiatives that target drugs 
                referenced in section 1023(9)(A), for a period 
                of not less than 6 months, acting through 
                entities such as task forces, subcommittees, or 
                community boards; and
                  (B) substantial participation from volunteer 
                leaders in the community involved (especially 
                in cooperation with individuals involved with 
                youth such as parents, teachers, coaches, youth 
                workers, and members of the clergy).
          (4) Mission and strategies.--The coalition shall, 
        with respect to the community involved--
                  (A) have as its principal mission the 
                reduction of substance abuse, which, at a 
                minimum, includes the use and abuse of drugs 
                referenced in section 1023(9)(A), in a 
                comprehensive and long-term manner, with a 
                primary focus on youth in the community;
                  (B) describe and document the nature and 
                extent of the substance abuse problem, which, 
                at a minimum, includes the use and abuse of 
                drugs referenced in section 1023(9)(A), in the 
                community;
                  (C)(i) provide a description of substance 
                abuse prevention and treatment programs and 
                activities, which, at a minimum, includes 
                programs and activities relating to the use and 
                abuse of drugs referenced in section 
                1023(9)(A), in existence at the time of the 
                grant application; and
                  (ii) identify substance abuse programs and 
                service gaps, which, at a minimum, includes 
                programs and gaps relating to the use and abuse 
                of drugs referenced in section 1023(9)(A), in 
                the community;
                  (D) develop a strategic plan to reduce 
                substance abuse among youth, which, at a 
                minimum, includes the use and abuse of drugs 
                referenced in section 1023(9)(A), in a 
                comprehensive and long-term fashion; and
                  (E) work to develop a consensus regarding the 
                priorities of the community to combat substance 
                abuse among youth, which, at a minimum, 
                includes the use and abuse of drugs referenced 
                in section 1023(9)(A).
          (5) Sustainability.--The coalition shall demonstrate 
        that the coalition is an ongoing concern by 
        demonstrating that the coalition--
                  (A) is--
                          (i)(I) a nonprofit organization; or
                          (II) an entity that the Administrator 
                        determines to be appropriate; or
                          (ii) part of, or is associated with, 
                        an established legal entity;
                  (B) receives financial support (including, in 
                the discretion of the Administrator, in-kind 
                contributions) from non-Federal sources; and
                  (C) has a strategy to solicit substantial 
                financial support from non-Federal sources to 
                ensure that the coalition and the programs 
                operated by the coalition are self-sustaining.
          (6) Accountability.--The coalition shall--
                  (A) establish a system to measure and report 
                outcomes--
                          (i) consistent with common indicators 
                        and evaluation protocols established by 
                        the Administrator; and
                          (ii) approved by the Administrator;
                   (B) conduct--
                          (i) for an initial grant under this 
                        subchapter, an initial benchmark survey 
                        of drug use among youth (or use local 
                        surveys or performance measures 
                        available or accessible in the 
                        community at the time of the grant 
                        application); and
                          (ii) biennial surveys (or incorporate 
                        local surveys in existence at the time 
                        of the evaluation) to measure the 
                        progress and effectiveness of the 
                        coalition; and
                  (C) provide assurances that the entity 
                conducting an evaluation under this paragraph, 
                or from which the coalition receives 
                information, has experience--
                          (i) in gathering data related to 
                        substance abuse among youth; or
                          (ii) in evaluating the effectiveness 
                        of community anti-drug coalitions.
  (b) Grant Amounts.--
          (1) In general.--
                  (A) Grants.--
                          (i) In general.--Subject to clause 
                        (iv), for a fiscal year, the 
                        Administrator may grant to an eligible 
                        coalition under this paragraph, an 
                        amount not to exceed the amount of non-
                        Federal funds raised by the coalition, 
                        including in-kind contributions, for 
                        that fiscal year.
                          (ii) Suspension of grants.--If such 
                        grant recipient fails to continue to 
                        meet the criteria specified in 
                        subsection (a), the Administrator may 
                        suspend the grant, after providing 
                        written notice to the grant recipient 
                        and an opportunity to appeal.
                          (iii) Renewal grants.--Subject to 
                        clause (iv), the Administrator may 
                        award a renewal grant to a grant 
                        recipient under this subparagraph for 
                        each fiscal year following the fiscal 
                        year for which an initial grant is 
                        awarded, in an amount not to exceed the 
                        amount of non-Federal funds raised by 
                        the coalition, including in-kind 
                        contributions, for that fiscal year, 
                        during the 4-year period following the 
                        period of the initial grant.
                          (iv) Limitation.--The amount of a 
                        grant award under this subparagraph may 
                        not exceed $100,000 for a fiscal year.
                  (B) Coalition awards.--
                          (i) In general.--Except as provided 
                        in clause (ii), the Administrator may, 
                        with respect to a community, make a 
                        grant to 1 eligible coalition that 
                        represents that community.
                          (ii) Exception.--The Administrator 
                        may make a grant to more than 1 
                        eligible coalition that represents a 
                        community if--
                                  (I) the eligible coalitions 
                                demonstrate that the coalitions 
                                are collaborating with one 
                                another; and
                                  (II) each of the coalitions 
                                has independently met the 
                                requirements set forth in 
                                subsection (a).
          (2) Rural coalition grants.--
                  (A) In general.--
                          (i) In general.--In addition to 
                        awarding grants under paragraph (1), to 
                        stimulate the development of coalitions 
                        in sparsely populated and rural areas, 
                        the Administrator, in consultation with 
                        the Advisory Commission, may award a 
                        grant in accordance with this section 
                        to a coalition that represents a county 
                        with a population that does not exceed 
                        30,000 individuals. In awarding a grant 
                        under this paragraph, the Administrator 
                        may waive any requirement under 
                        subsection (a) if the Administrator 
                        considers that waiver to be 
                        appropriate.
                          (ii) Matching requirement.--Subject 
                        to subparagraph (C), for a fiscal year, 
                        the Administrator may grant to an 
                        eligible coalition under this 
                        paragraph, an amount not to exceed the 
                        amount of non-Federal funds raised by 
                        the coalition, including in-kind 
                        contributions, for that fiscal year.
                          (iii) Suspension of grants.--If such 
                        grant recipient fails to continue to 
                        meet any criteria specified in 
                        subsection (a) that has not been waived 
                        by the Administrator pursuant to clause 
                        (i), the Administrator may suspend the 
                        grant, after providing written notice 
                        to the grant recipient and an 
                        opportunity to appeal.
                  (B) Renewal grants.--The Administrator may 
                award a renewal grant to an eligible coalition 
                that is a grant recipient under this paragraph 
                for each fiscal year following the fiscal year 
                for which an initial grant is awarded, in an 
                amount not to exceed the amount of non-Federal 
                funds raised by the coalition, including in-
                kind contributions, during the 4-year period 
                following the period of the initial grant.
                  (C) Limitations.--
                          (i) Amount.--The amount of a grant 
                        award under this paragraph shall not 
                        exceed $100,000 for a fiscal year.
                          (ii) Awards.--With respect to a 
                        county referred to in subparagraph (A), 
                        the Administrator may award a grant 
                        under this section to not more than 1 
                        eligible coalition that represents the 
                        county.

SEC. 1033. INFORMATION COLLECTION AND DISSEMINATION WITH RESPECT TO 
                    GRANT RECIPIENTS.

  (a) Coalition Information.--
          (1) General auditing authority.--For the purpose of 
        audit and examination, the Administrator--
                  (A) shall have access to any books, 
                documents, papers, and records that are 
                pertinent to any grant or grant renewal request 
                under this chapter; and
                  (B) may periodically request information from 
                a grant recipient to ensure that the grant 
                recipient meets the applicable criteria under 
                section 1032(a).
          (2) Application process.--The Administrator shall 
        issue a request for proposal regarding, with respect to 
        the grants awarded under section 1032, the application 
        process, grant renewal, and suspension or withholding 
        of renewal grants. Each application under this 
        paragraph shall be in writing and shall be subject to 
        review by the Administrator.
          (3) Reporting.--The Administrator shall, to the 
        maximum extent practicable and in a manner consistent 
        with applicable law, minimize reporting requirements by 
        a grant recipient and expedite any application for a 
        renewal grant made under this subchapter.
  (b) Data Collection and Dissemination.--
          (1) In general.--The Administrator may collect data 
        from--
                  (A) national substance abuse organizations 
                that work with eligible coalitions, community 
                anti-drug coalitions, departments or agencies 
                of the Federal Government, or State or local 
                governments and the governing bodies of Indian 
                tribes; and
                  (B) any other entity or organization that 
                carries out activities that relate to the 
                purposes of the Program.
          (2) Activities of administrator.--The Administrator 
        may--
                  (A) evaluate the utility of specific 
                initiatives relating to the purposes of the 
                Program;
                  (B) conduct an evaluation of the Program; and
                  (C) disseminate information described in this 
                subsection to--
                          (i) eligible coalitions and other 
                        substance abuse organizations; and
                          (ii) the general public.

SEC. 1034. TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND TRAINING.

  (a) In General.--
          (1) Technical assistance and agreements.--With 
        respect to any grant recipient or other organization, 
        the Administrator may--
                  (A) offer technical assistance and training; 
                and
                  (B) enter into contracts and cooperative 
                agreements.
          (2) Coordination of programs.--The Administrator may 
        facilitate the coordination of programs between a grant 
        recipient and other organizations and entities.
  (b) Training.--The Administrator may provide training to any 
representative designated by a grant recipient in--
          (1) coalition building;
          (2) task force development;
          (3) mediation and facilitation, direct service, 
        assessment and evaluation; or
          (4) any other activity related to the purposes of the 
        Program.

                   Subchapter II--Advisory Commission

SEC. 1041. ESTABLISHMENT OF ADVISORY COMMISSION.

  (a) Establishment.--There is established a commission to be 
known as the ``Advisory Commission on Drug-Free Communities''.
  (b) Purpose.--The Advisory Commission shall advise, consult 
with, and make recommendations to the Director concerning 
matters related to the activities carried out under the 
Program.

SEC. 1042. DUTIES.

  (a) In General.--The Advisory Commission--
          (1) shall, not later than 30 days after its first 
        meeting, make recommendations to the Director regarding 
        the selection of an Administrator;
          (2) may make recommendations to the Director 
        regarding any grant, contract, or cooperative agreement 
        made by the Program;
          (3) may make recommendations to the Director 
        regarding the activities of the Program;
          (4) may make recommendations to the Director 
        regarding any policy or criteria established by the 
        Director to carry out the Program;
          (5) may--
                  (A) collect, by correspondence or by personal 
                investigation, information concerning 
                initiatives, studies, services, programs, or 
                other activities of coalitions or organizations 
                working in the field of substance abuse in the 
                United States or any other country; and
                  (B) with the approval of the Director, make 
                the information referred to in subparagraph (A) 
                available through appropriate publications or 
                other methods for the benefit of eligible 
                coalitions and the general public; and
          (6) may appoint subcommittees and convene workshops 
        and conferences.
  (b) Recommendations.--If the Director rejects any 
recommendation of the Advisory Commission under subsection 
(a)(1), the Director shall notify the Advisory Commission in 
writing of the reasons for the rejection not later than 15 days 
after receiving the recommendation.
  (c) Conflict of Interest.--A member of the Advisory 
Commission shall recuse himself or herself from any decision 
that would constitute a conflict of interest.

SEC. 1043. MEMBERSHIP.

  (a) In General.--The President shall appoint 11 members to 
the Advisory Commission as follows:
          (1) 4 members shall be appointed from the general 
        public and shall include leaders--
                  (A) in fields of youth development, public 
                policy, law, or business; or
                  (B) of nonprofit organizations or private 
                foundations that fund substance abuse programs.
          (2) 4 members shall be appointed from the leading 
        representatives of national substance abuse reduction 
        organizations, of which no fewer than 3 members shall 
        have extensive training or experience in drug 
        prevention.
          (3) 3 members shall be appointed from the leading 
        representatives of State substance abuse reduction 
        organizations.
  (b) Chairperson.--The Advisory Commission shall elect a 
chairperson or co-chairpersons from among its members.
  (c) Ex Officio Members.--The ex officio membership of the 
Advisory Commission shall consist of any 2 officers or 
employees of the United States that the Director determines to 
be necessary for the Advisory Commission to effectively carry 
out its functions.

SEC. 1044. COMPENSATION.

  (a) In General.--Members of the Advisory Commission who are 
officers or employees of the United States shall not receive 
any additional compensation for service on the Advisory 
Commission. The remaining members of the Advisory Commission 
shall receive, for each day (including travel time) that they 
are engaged in the performance of the functions of the Advisory 
Commission, compensation at rates not to exceed the daily 
equivalent to the annual rate of basic pay payable for grade 
GS-10 of the General Schedule.
  (b) Travel Expenses.--Each member of the Advisory Commission 
shall receive travel expenses, including per diem in lieu of 
subsistence, in accordance with sections 5702 and 5703 of title 
5, United States Code.

SEC. 1045. TERMS OF OFFICE.

  (a) In General.--Subject to subsection (b), the term of 
office of a member of the Advisory Commission shall be 3 years, 
except that, as designated at the time of appointment--
          (1) of the initial members appointed under section 
        1043(a)(1), 2 shall be appointed for a term of 2 years;
          (2) of the initial members appointed under section 
        1043(a)(2), 2 shall be appointed for a term of 2 years; 
        and
          (3) of the initial members appointed under section 
        1043(a)(3), 1 shall be appointed for a term of 1 year.
  (b) Vacancies.--Any member appointed to fill a vacancy for an 
unexpired term of a member shall serve for the remainder of the 
unexpired term. A member of the Advisory Commission may serve 
after the expiration of such member's term until a successor 
has been appointed and taken office.

SEC. 1046. MEETINGS.

  (a) In General.--After its initial meeting, the Advisory 
Commission shall meet, with the advanced approval of the 
Administrator, at the call of the Chairperson (or Co-
chairpersons) of the Advisory Commission or a majority of its 
members or upon the request of the Director or Administrator of 
the Program.
  (b) Quorum.--6 members of the Advisory Commission shall 
constitute a quorum.

SEC. 1047. STAFF.

  The Administrator shall make available to the Advisory 
Commission adequate staff, information, and other assistance.

SEC. 1048. TERMINATION.

  The Advisory Commission shall terminate at the end of fiscal 
year 2002.

         XI. Congressional Accountability Act; Public Law 104-1

    The committee finds that the legislation does not relate to 
the terms and conditions of employment or access to public 
services or accommodations within the meaning of section 
102(b)(3) of the Congressional Accountability Act (PL 104-1).

                          XII. Budget Analysis

    Pursuant to rule XI, clause 2(l)(3)(B), and Section 
308(a)(1) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
committee finds that no new budget authority, new spending 
authority, new credit authority or an increase or decrease in 
revenues or tax expenditures results from enactment of this 
resolution.

   XIII. Unfunded Mandates Reform Act; Public Law 104-4, Section 423

    The committee finds that the legislation does not impose 
any Federal mandates within the meaning of section 423 of the 
Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (P.L. 104-4).

                          XIV. A P P E N D I X

                              ----------                              

                          House of Representatives,
                                     Committee on Commerce,
                                      Washington, DC, May 19, 1997.
Hon. Dan Burton,
Chairman, Committee on Government Reform and Oversight,
Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: On May 16, 1997, your Committee ordered 
reported H.R. 956, the Drug-Free Community Act. My Committee 
received a named additional referral on that measure when it 
was introduced on March 5, 1997, and subsequently referred the 
bill to the Commerce Committee Subcommittee on Health and 
Environment on March 14, 1997.
    It is my understanding that, under the terms of Section 
1031(d), the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration (SAMHSA) could qualify for an interagency 
agreement for the execution of grants. Based on this 
understanding of the bill, I will agree to allow the Commerce 
Committee to be discharged from further consideration of H.R. 
956. I would appreciate knowing whether your interpretation of 
the legislation is consistent with mine.
    By agreeing to be discharged, this Committee assists you in 
expediting consideration of this measure on the House Floor. 
However, the Commerce Committee does not waive future 
jurisdictional claims to this bill or other measures addressing 
the same issues. In fact, I hope to have your support of my 
effort to seek conferees on this or a companion Senate bill 
should a House-Senate conference be convened on this 
legislation.
    I would appreciate you including this letter as a part of 
the Government Reform and Oversight Committee's Report on H.R. 
956, and as part of the Record during consideration of this 
bill by the House.
            Sincerely,
                                              Tom Bliley, Chairman.
                                ------                                

                          House of Representatives,
              Committee on Government Reform and Oversight,
                                      Washington, DC, May 19, 1997.
Hon. Tom Bliley,
Chairman, Committee on Commerce,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: Thank you for your letter regarding your 
Committee's jurisdictional interest in H.R. 956, the Drug-Free 
Communities Act.
    I acknowledge your interest in this legislation, based on 
the Commerce Committee's named additional referral, and 
appreciate your cooperation in moving the bill to the House 
floor expeditiously. Your interpretation of the legislation, as 
put forth in your letter, is correct, and I agree that your 
decision to forgo further action on the bill will not prejudice 
the Commerce Committee with respect to its jurisdictional 
prerogatives on this or similar provisions.
    Thank you again for your cooperation.
            Sincerely,
                                              Dan Burton, Chairman.