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                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

 2d Session                                                      Part 1
_______________________________________________________________________


 
                   TORTURE VICTIMS RELIEF ACT OF 1998

_______________________________________________________________________


               September 14, 1998.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Gilman, from the Committee on International Relations, submitted 
                             the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 4309]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

  The Committee on International Relations, to whom was 
referred the bill (H.R. 4309) to provide a comprehensive 
program of support for victims of torture, having considered 
the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and 
recommend that the bill as amended do pass.
  The amendment is as follows:
  Strike out all after the enacting clause and insert in lieu 
thereof the following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Torture Victims Relief Act of 1998''.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

  Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) The American people abhor torture by any government or 
        person. The existence of torture creates a climate of fear and 
        international insecurity that affects all people.
          (2) Torture is the deliberate mental and physical damage 
        caused by governments to individuals to destroy individual 
        personality and terrorize society. The effects of torture are 
        long term. Those effects can last a lifetime for the survivors 
        and affect future generations.
          (3) By eliminating the leadership of their opposition and 
        frightening the general public, repressive governments often 
        use torture as a weapon against democracy.
          (4) Torture survivors remain under physical and psychological 
        threats, especially in communities where the perpetrators are 
        not brought to justice. In many nations, even those who treat 
        torture survivors are threatened with reprisals, including 
        torture, for carrying out their ethical duty to provide care. 
        Both the survivors of torture and their treatment providers 
        should be accorded protection from further repression.
          (5) A significant number of refugees and asylees entering the 
        United States have been victims of torture. Those claiming 
        asylum deserve prompt consideration of their applications for 
        political asylum to minimize their insecurity and sense of 
        danger. Many torture survivors now live in the United States. 
        They should be provided with the rehabilitation services which 
        would enable them to become productive members of our 
        communities.
          (6) The development of a treatment movement for torture 
        survivors has created new opportunities for action by the 
        United States and other nations to oppose state-sponsored and 
        other acts of torture.
          (7) There is a need for a comprehensive strategy to protect 
        and support torture victims and their treatment providers, 
        together with overall efforts to eliminate torture.
          (8) By acting to heal the survivors of torture and protect 
        their families, the United States can help to heal the effects 
        of torture and prevent its use around the world.

SEC. 3. DEFINITION.

  As used in this Act, the term ``torture'' has the meaning given the 
term in section 2340(1) of title 18, United States Code, and includes 
the use of rape and other forms of sexual violence by a person acting 
under the color of law upon another person under his custody or 
physical control.

SEC. 4. FOREIGN TREATMENT CENTERS.

  (a) Amendments to the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.--Part I of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.) is amended by 
adding at the end of chapter 1 the following new section:

``SEC. 129. ASSISTANCE FOR VICTIMS OF TORTURE.

  ``(a) In General.--The President is authorized to provide assistance 
for the rehabilitation of victims of torture.
  ``(b) Eligibility for Grants.--Such assistance shall be provided in 
the form of grants to treatment centers and programs in foreign 
countries that are carrying out projects or activities specifically 
designed to treat victims of torture for the physical and psychological 
effects of the torture.
  ``(c) Use of Funds.--Such assistance shall be available--
          ``(1) for direct services to victims of torture; and
          ``(2) to provide research and training to health care 
        providers outside of treatment centers or programs described in 
        subsection (b), for the purpose of enabling such providers to 
        provide the services described in paragraph (1).''.
  (b) Funding.--
          (1) Authorization of appropriations.--Of the amounts 
        authorized to be appropriated for fiscal years 1999 and 2000 
        pursuant to chapter 1 of part I of the Foreign Assistance Act 
        of 1961, there are authorized to be appropriated to the 
        President $5,000,000 for fiscal year 1999 and $7,500,000 for 
        fiscal year 2000 to carry out section 129 of the Foreign 
        Assistance Act, as added by subsection (a).
          (2) Availability of funds.--Amounts appropriated pursuant to 
        this subsection shall remain available until expended.
  (c) Effective Date.--The amendment made by subsection (a) shall take 
effect October 1, 1998.

SEC. 5. DOMESTIC TREATMENT CENTERS.

  (a) Assistance for Treatment of Torture Victims.--The Secretary of 
Health and Human Services may provide grants to programs in the United 
States to cover the cost of the following services:
          (1) Services for the rehabilitation of victims of torture, 
        including treatment of the physical and psychological effects 
        of torture.
          (2) Social and legal services for victims of torture.
          (3) Research and training for health care providers outside 
        of treatment centers, or programs for the purpose of enabling 
        such providers to provide the services described in paragraph 
        (1).
  (b) Funding.--
          (1) Authorization of appropriations.--Of the amounts 
        authorized to be appropriated for the Department of Health and 
        Human Services for fiscal years 1999 and 2000, there are 
        authorized to be appropriated to carry out subsection (a) 
        (relating to assistance for domestic centers and programs for 
        the treatment of victims of torture) $5,000,000 for fiscal year 
        1999, and $7,500,000 for fiscal year 2000.
          (2) Availability of funds.--Amounts appropriated pursuant to 
        this subsection shall remain available until expended.

SEC. 6. MULTILATERAL ASSISTANCE.

  (a) Funding.--Of the amounts authorized to be appropriated for fiscal 
years 1999 and 2000 pursuant to chapter 3 of part I of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961, there are authorized to be appropriated to the 
United Nations Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture (in this section 
referred to as the ``Fund'') the following amounts for the following 
fiscal years:
          (1) Fiscal year 1999.--For fiscal year 1999, $3,000,000.
          (2) Fiscal year 2000.--For fiscal year 2000, $3,000,000.
  (b) Availability of Funds.--Amounts appropriated pursuant to 
subsection (a) shall remain available until expended.
  (c) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of the Congress that the 
President, acting through the United States Permanent Representative to 
the United Nations, should--
          (1) request the Fund--
                  (A) to find new ways to support and protect treatment 
                centers and programs that are carrying out 
                rehabilitative services for victims of torture; and
                  (B) to encourage the development of new such centers 
                and programs;
          (2) use the voice and vote of the United States to support 
        the work of the Special Rapporteur on Torture and the Committee 
        Against Torture established under the Convention Against 
        Torture and Other Cruel, Inhuman or Degrading Treatment or 
        Punishment; and
          (3) use the voice and vote of the United States to establish 
        a country rapporteur or similar procedural mechanism to 
        investigate human rights violations in a country if either the 
        Special Rapporteur or the Committee Against Torture indicates 
        that a systematic practice of torture is prevalent in that 
        country.

SEC. 7. SPECIALIZED TRAINING FOR FOREIGN SERVICE OFFICERS.

  (a) In General.--The Secretary of State shall provide training for 
foreign service officers with respect to--
          (1) the identification of torture;
          (2) the identification of the surrounding circumstances in 
        which torture is most often practiced;
          (3) the long-term effects of torture upon a victim;
          (4) the identification of the physical, cognitive, and 
        emotional effects of torture, and the manner in which these 
        effects can affect the interview or hearing process; and
          (5) the manner of interviewing victims of torture so as not 
        to retraumatize them, eliciting the necessary information to 
        document the torture experience, and understanding the 
        difficulties victims often have in recounting their torture 
        experience.
  (b) Gender-Related Considerations.--In conducting training under 
subsection (a) (4) or (5), gender-specific training shall be provided 
on the subject of interacting with women and men who are victims of 
torture by rape or any other form of sexual violence.

                            Committee Action

               Introduction and Consideration of the Bill

    H.R. 4309 was introduced on July 22, 1998, and referred by 
the Speaker to the Committee on International Relations and, in 
addition, to the Committee on Commerce for a period to be 
subsequently determined by the Speaker, in each case for 
consideration of such provisions as fall within the 
jurisdiction of the committee concerned. On July 24, 1998, the 
bill was referred to the Subcommittee on International 
Operations and Human Rights, which proceeded on that day to 
mark up the bill. During the consideration of the bill in 
subcommittee, a technical amendment was adopted and the bill 
was forwarded, amended, to the Full Committee by voice vote. On 
August 6, 1998, the bill was considered in the Full Committee. 
An amendment in the nature of a substitute, consisting of the 
text of the bill as recommended by the Subcommittee, was 
considered, and adopted, and the bill was ordered reported by 
voice vote, with the recommendation that the bill, as amended, 
do pass.

                      Rollcall Votes on Amendments

    Clause (2)(l)(2)(B) of rule XI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires the record of committee roll call 
votes on final passage or amendments during the committee's 
consideration of H.R. 4309. No such roll call votes were taken.

                         Background and Purpose

    H.R. 4309, the Torture Victims Relief Act of 1998, is the 
product of bipartisan congressional efforts to address the 
continuing worldwide problem of torture and its lingering 
effects on torture survivors. The bill has broad support in the 
Congress and in the International Relations Committee.
    Since May 8, 1996, when it held a hearing on an earlier 
version of the Torture Victims Relief Act, the Subcommittee on 
International Operations and Human Rights has received 
testimony from numerous victims of torture from around the 
world. They have included a native of Uganda who suffered at 
the hands of the Idi Amin regime; a Tibetan physician who was 
tortured by the Chinese Communists; an Indonesian democracy 
advocate who was ``disappeared'' by secretive forces apparently 
connected with the Suharto regime; a Cuban pastor who was 
tortured by Fidel Castro's security forces; and an American who 
became a torture victim in Saudi Arabia after he had a falling-
out with his employer, the Saudi government. These and other 
witnesses confirmed the continued and widespread persistence of 
torture in the world today, and its lingering effects on 
torture survivors.
    According to experts, there are millions of torture victims 
in the world today, and there may be as many as 400,000 
survivors of torture living in the United States. The ordeal of 
torture often does not end when victims are released by their 
captors. Many survivors require medical care for physical 
damage caused by torture. The most common need, however, is for 
treatment of the psychological effects of torture. Victims can 
require months of therapy before they are able to return to 
their respective communities as productive members.
    Against this background, the Torture Victims Relief Act 
contains a number of important provisions designed to assist 
torture victims.
    It authorizes grants for rehabilitation services for 
victims of torture and related purposes, in both foreign and 
domestic treatment centers. At present, there are more than 190 
treatment centers for torture victims worldwide, and 
approximately 15 centers in the United States for victims of 
foreign governmental torture. Many, if not most, of these 
centers are inadequately funded, and they often rely on health 
professionals providing services on a pro bono basis. Very few 
of the victims treated at centers in the United States have 
health insurance.
    The bill also authorizes a voluntary contribution from the 
United States to the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Victims 
of Torture in the amount of $3 million for FY 1999 and $3 
million for FY 2000. The Voluntary Fund was established in 1982 
to provide grants to torture victim treatment centers. The 
United States contribution to the fund in 1998 was $1.5 
million. The Voluntary Fund had only about $5 million to 
distribute during 1998. The International Rehabilitation 
Council for Torture Victims estimates the worldwide annual need 
for torture treatment funding to be $28 million.
    In an effort to ensure that proper consideration is given 
to torture victims who apply for refugee status, this bill also 
provides specialized training for foreign service officers in 
the identification of evidence of torture, techniques for 
interviewing torture victims, and related subjects.
    Finally, the bill contains an expression of the sense of 
Congress that the United States shall use its voice and vote in 
the United Nations to support the investigation and elimination 
of the practices prohibited by the Convention Against Torture.

                      Committee Oversight Findings

    In compliance with clause 2(l)(3)(A) of rule XI of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, the Committee reports 
the findings and recommendations of the Committee, based on 
oversight activities under clause 2(b)(1) of rule X of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, are incorporated in the 
descriptive portions of this report.

         Committee on Government Reform and Oversight Findings

    No findings or recommendations of the Committee on 
Government Reform and Oversight were received as referred to in 
clause 2(l)(3)(D) of rule XI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives.

                      Advisory Committee Statement

    No advisory committees within the meaning of section 5(b) 
of the Federal Advisory Committee Act were created by this 
legislation.

                Applicability to the Legislative Branch

    The Committee finds that the legislation does not relate to 
the terms and conditions of employment or access to public 
services or accommodations within the meaning of section 
102(b)(3) of the Congressional Accountability Act.

                   Constitutional Authority Statement

    In compliance with clause 2(l)(4) of rule XI of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee cites the 
following specific powers granted to the Congress in the 
Constitution as authority for enactment of H.R. 4309 as 
reported by the Committee: Article I, section 8, clause 1 
(relating to providing for the common defense and general 
welfare of the United States); Article I, section 8, clause 3 
(relating to the regulation of commerce with foreign nations); 
and Article I, section 8, clause 18 (relating to making all 
laws necessary and proper for carrying into execution powers 
vested by the Constitution in the government of the United 
States).

New Budget Authority and Tax Expenditures, Congressional Budget Office 
             Cost Estimate, and Federal Mandates Statements

    The Committee adopts the cost estimate of the Congressional 
Budget Office as its submission of any new required information 
on new budget authority, new spending authority, new credit 
authority, or an increase or decrease in the national debt, 
which is set out below. It adopts the estimate of Federal 
mandates prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget 
Office pursuant to section 423 of the Unfunded Mandates Reform 
Act, also set out below.

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                 Washington, DC, September 4, 1998.
Hon. Benjamin A. Gilman,
Chairman, Committee on International Relations,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 4309, the Torture 
Victims Relief Act of 1998.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Sunita 
D'Monte.
            Sincerely,
                                         June E. O'Neill, Director.
    Enclosure.

               congressional budget office cost estimate

H.R. 4309--Torture Victims Relief Act of 1998

    Summary: H.R. 4309 would authorize appropriations for 
foreign and domestic assistance to victims of torture. CBO 
estimates that enacting the bill would increase spending 
subject to appropriation by about $4 million in 1999 and $30 
million over the 1999-2003 period, assuming appropriation of 
the necessary amounts. Because the bill would not affect direct 
spending and revenues, pay-as-you-go procedures would not 
apply. The bill contains no inter-governmental or private-
sector mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act 
(UMRA) and would impose no costs on state, local, or tribal 
governments.
     Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of H.R. 4309 is shown in the following table. 
The costs of this legislation fall within budget functions 150 
(international affairs) and 500 (education, training, 
employment, and social services).
    Foreign assistance.--The bill would authorize 
appropriations of $8 million in 1999 and $10.5 million in 2000 
for grants to the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Victims of 
Torture and for treatment centers in foreign countries. In 
addition, the State Department would be required to train 
consular officers in understanding and interviewing victims of 
torture and sexual violence. Based on information from the 
State Department, CBO estimates this requirement would cost 
less than $500,000 annually because it would be incorporated as 
an additional module in existing training rather than requiring 
stand-alone training.
    Domestic Programs.--The bill would permit the Secretary of 
Health and Human Services to provide grants to programs in the 
United States that provide psychological and physical 
rehabilitation, social services, and legal services to victims 
of torture. These grants would also be used to cover the cost 
of research and training for health care providers who treat 
victims of torture. H.R. 4309 would authorize appropriations of 
$5 million in fiscal year 1999 and $7.5 million in fiscal year 
2000. Assuming appropriation of the authorized amounts, CBO 
estimates additional discretionary spending of about $1 million 
in 1999 and $12.5 million over the 1999-2003 period.

                                    [By fiscal year, in millions of dollars]                                    
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              1998     1999     2000     2001     2002     2003 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                               FOREIGN ASSISTANCE                                               
                                                                                                                
Spending under current law for foreign assistance:                                                              
    Budget authority \1\..................................    1,461        0        0        0        0        0
    Estimated outlays.....................................    1,325    1,019      373      205      123       95
Proposed changes:                                                                                               
    Authorization level...................................        0        8       11    (\2\)    (\2\)    (\2\)
    Estimated outlays.....................................        0        3        6        5        2        1
Spending under H.R. 4309 for foreign assistance:                                                                
    Authorization level \1\...............................    1,461        8       11        b        b        b
    Estimated outlays.....................................    1,325    1,022      379      210      125       96
                                                                                                                
                                                DOMESTIC PROGRAMS                                               
                                                                                                                
Proposed changes:                                                                                               
    Authorization level...................................        0        5        8        0        0        0
    Estimated outlays.....................................        0        1        3        6        3    (\2\)
                                                                                                                
                                             TOTAL PROPOSED CHANGES                                             
                                                                                                                
Authorization level.......................................        0       13       18    (\2\)    (\2\)    (\2\)
Estimated outlays.........................................        0        4        9       11        5        1
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ The 1998 level is the amount appropriated for that year.                                                    
\2\ Less than $500,000.                                                                                         

    Pay-as-you-go considerations: None.
    Estimated impact on State, local, and tribal governments: 
The bill contains no intergovernmental mandates as defined in 
UMRA and would impose no costs on state, local, or tribal 
governments. The bill would authorize appropriations of $12.5 
million over fiscal years 1999 and 2000 for grants to treat 
torture victims residing in the United States. State and local 
agencies would be eligible to apply for these grants.
    Estimated impact on the private sector: The bill would 
impose no new private-sector mandates as defined in UMRA.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal costs: Sunita D'Monte for 
foreign assistance and Cynthia Dudzinski for domestic programs; 
Impact on State, local, and tribal governments: Pepper 
Santalucia; Impact on the private sector: Leslie Frymier.
    Estimate approved by: Paul N. Van de Water, Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                         Jurisdictional Issues

    Materials related to jurisdictional issues are provided 
below for the information of Members.

                     U.S. House of Representatives,
                                     Committee on Commerce,
                                Washington, DC, September 10, 1998.
Hon. Benjamin A. Gilman,
Chairman, House Committee on International Relations,
Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC.
    Dear Ben: On August 6, 1998 the Committee on International 
Relations ordered reported H.R. 4309, the Torture Victims 
Relief Act of 1998. H.R. 4309, as ordered reported by the 
Committee on International Relations, provides for the support 
and treatment of torture victims through a variety of sources. 
As you know, the Committee on Commerce was granted an 
additional referral upon the bill's introduction pursuant to 
the Committee's jurisdiction over health and health facilities 
under Rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives.
    Because of the importance of this matter, I recognize your 
desire to bring this legislation before the House in an 
expeditious manner. I also understand that you have agreed to 
address this Committee's concern over the authorization of 
appropriations in section 5 in a manager's amendment to be 
offered on the Floor. Therefore, with that understanding, I 
will waive consideration of the bill by the Commerce Committee. 
By agreeing to waive its consideration of the bill, The 
Commerce Committee does not waive its jurisdiction over H.R. 
4309. In addition, the Commerce Committee reserves its 
authority to seek conferees on any provisions of the bill that 
are within the Commerce Committee's jurisdiction during any 
House-Senate conference that may be convened on this 
legislation. I ask for your commitment to support any request 
by the Commerce Committee for conferees on H.R. 4309 or related 
legislation.
    I request that you include this letter as a part of the 
Committee's report on H.R. 4309 and as part of the record 
during consideration of the legislation on the House floor.
    Thank you for your attention to these matters.
            Sincerely,
                                              Tom Bliley, Chairman.
                              ----------                              

              Committee on International Relations,
                                  House of Representatives,
                                Washington, DC, September 10, 1998.
Hon. Tom Bliley,
Chairman, House Committee on Commerce,
Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC.
    Dear Tom: I am writing to thank the Committee on Commerce 
for its willingness to waive consideration of H.R. 4309, the 
Torture Victims Relief Act of 1998. As you correctly note, the 
Committee on International Relations and the sponsors of the 
bill believe it is important to bring this legislation before 
the House as expeditiously as possible.
    I am writing to confirm our understanding, upon which your 
agreement to waive Committee consideration of the bill was 
premised:
    First, I will address the Commerce Committee's concern over 
the authorization of appropriations in section 5 of the bill in 
a manager's amendment that I will offer on the Floor. I have 
enclosed a draft of that amendment, which I understand will 
meet the Committee's concerns.
    Second, although I am hopeful that the Senate will pass the 
bill as passed by the House, I agree to support the appointment 
of Commerce Committee conferees, should a conference be 
convened on this legislation.
    Finally, I will gladly include your September 10, 1998 
letter in the International Relations Committee's report on 
H.R. 4309 and as part of the record during consideration of the 
bill by the House.
    Thank you again for your prompt attention to this time-
sensitive matter. Do not hesitate to contact me with any 
additional questions or suggestions you may have.
    With best wishes,
            Sincerely,
                                      Benjamin A. Gilman, Chairman.

       Amendment to H.R. 4309 Offered by Mr. Smith of New Jersey

    On page 6, lines 10 and 11, strike ``fiscal years 1999 and 
2000,'' and insert ``for each fiscal year'';
    On page 6, line 14, strike ``$5,000,000'' and all that 
follows through the end of line 15, and insert ``such sums as 
may be necessary for each fiscal year.''

                      Section-by-Section Analysis

Section 1. Short Title

    This section states that this Act may be cited as the 
``Torture Victims Relief Act of 1998''

Section 2. Findings

    This section states that the Congress finds the use of 
torture abhorrent, acknowledges its long-term effects, and 
recognizes the need for the rehabilitation of torture 
survivors.

Section 3. Definition

    This section defines ``torture'' as having the meaning 
given in the Federal statute criminalizing torture (18 U.S.C. 
Sec. 2340) and as including the use of rape and other forms of 
sexual violence by a person acting under the color of law. The 
definition of ``torture'' applies only for purposes of this 
Act, and does not amend, alter, or expand the international 
obligations of the United States under the Convention Against 
Torture or other instruments.

Section 4. Foreign Treatment Centers

    This section authorizes the appropriation of $5 million in 
fiscal year 1999 and $7.5 million in fiscal year 2000 for 
grants to centers and programs that treat victims of torture in 
foreign countries.

Section 5. Domestic Treatment Centers

    This section authorizes the appropriation of $5 million in 
fiscal year 1999 and $7.5 million in fiscal year 2000 for 
grants to centers and programs in the United States that aid 
victims of torture.

Section 6. Multilateral Assistance

    This section authorizes the appropriation of $3 million in 
each of fiscal years 1999 and 2000 for the United Nations 
Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture. It also expresses the 
sense of Congress that the President, acting through the United 
States Permanent Representative to the United Nations, should: 
(1) request that the UN Voluntary Fund find new ways to support 
torture victim treatment programs and encourage the development 
of new such programs; (2) use the voice and vote of the United 
States to support the work of the U.N. Special Rapporteur on 
Torture and the U.N. Committee Against Torture; and (3) use the 
voice and vote of the United States to establish a country 
rapporteur in countries where the Special Rapporteur or the 
Committee Against Torture indicates that the systematic use of 
torture is prevalent.

Section 7. Specialized Training for Foreign Service Officers

    This section requires the Secretary of State to provide 
training for foreign service officers to help them identify 
torture and its effects, understand the manner in which those 
effects can affect the interview process, and learn the proper 
manner of interviewing victims of torture. It is the intention 
of the Committee that this training should be provided to all 
foreign service officers who would have a reasonable likelihood 
of dealing with torture victims in the course of their duties. 
Subsection (b) requires that this training include gender-
specific training on interacting with victims who were tortured 
by rape or other forms of sexual violence.

         Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3 of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by the 
bill, as reported, are shown as follows (new matter is printed 
in italic and existing law in which no change is proposed is 
shown in roman):

                     FOREIGN ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1961

                                 PART I

Chapter 1--Policy; Development Assistance Authorizations 

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


SEC. 129. ASSISTANCE FOR VICTIMS OF TORTURE.

  (a) In General.--The President is authorized to provide 
assistance for the rehabilitation of victims of torture.
  (b) Eligibility for Grants.--Such assistance shall be 
provided in the form of grants to treatment centers and 
programs in foreign countries that are carrying out projects or 
activities specifically designed to treat victims of torture 
for the physical and psychological effects of the torture.
  (c) Use of Funds.--Such assistance shall be available--
          (1) for direct services to victims of torture; and
          (2) to provide research and training to health care 
        providers outside of treatment centers or programs 
        described in subsection (b), for the purpose of 
        enabling such providers to provide the services 
        described in paragraph (1).