Report text available as:

(PDF provides a complete and accurate display of this text.) Tip?



[House Report 105-834]
[From the U.S. Government Publishing Office]




                                                 Union Calendar No. 475

105th Congress, 2d Session - - - - - - - - - - - - House Report 105-834


 
            REPORT ON LEGISLATIVE AND OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES

                                 of the

                         COMMITTEE ON RESOURCES

                                 of the

                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

                               during the

                       ONE HUNDRED FIFTH CONGRESS




 December 29, 1998.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                               --------

                    U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE                    
69-006                     WASHINGTON : 1999





                         COMMITTEE ON RESOURCES

                      DON YOUNG, Alaska, Chairman

W.J. (BILLY) TAUZIN, Louisiana       GEORGE MILLER, California
JAMES V. HANSEN, Utah                EDWARD J. MARKEY, Massachusetts
JIM SAXTON, New Jersey               NICK J. RAHALL II, West Virginia
ELTON GALLEGLY, California           BRUCE F. VENTO, Minnesota
JOHN J. DUNCAN, Jr., Tennessee       DALE E. KILDEE, Michigan
JOEL HEFLEY, Colorado                SAM GEJDENSON, Connecticut \2\
JOHN T. DOOLITTLE, California        BILL RICHARDSON, New Mexico \4\
WAYNE T. GILCHREST, Maryland         PETER A. DeFAZIO, Oregon
KEN CALVERT, California              ENI F.H. FALEOMAVAEGA, American 
RICHARD W. POMBO, California         Samoa
BARBARA CUBIN, Wyoming               NEIL ABERCROMBIE, Hawaii
HELEN CHENOWETH, Idaho               SOLOMON P. ORTIZ, Texas
LINDA SMITH, Washington              OWEN B. PICKETT, Virginia
GEORGE P. RADANOVICH, California     FRANK PALLONE, Jr., New Jersey
WALTER B. JONES, Jr., North          CALVIN M. DOOLEY, California
Carolina                             CARLOS ROMERO-BARCELO, Puerto Rico
WILLIAM M. (MAC) THORNBERRY, Texas   MAURICE D. HINCHEY, New York
JOHN B. SHADEGG, Arizona             ROBERT A. UNDERWOOD, Guam
JOHN E. ENSIGN, Nevada               SAM FARR, California
ROBERT F. SMITH, Oregon              PATRICK J. KENNEDY, Rhode Island
CHRIS CANNON, Utah                   ADAM SMITH, Washington
KEVIN BRADY, Texas                   WILLIAM D. DELAHUNT, Massachusetts
JOHN E. PETERSON, Pennsylvania       CHRIS JOHN, Louisiana
RICK HILL, Montana                   DONNA CHRISTIAN-GREEN, Virgin 
BOB SCHAFFER, Colorado               Islands
JIM GIBBONS, Nevada                  NICK LAMPSON, Texas \3\
MICHAEL D. CRAPO, Idaho \1\          RON KIND, Wisconsin \5\
                                     LLOYD DOGGETT, Texas \6\

__________
\1\ Appointed to Committee on Resources pursuant to H.Res. 32 on 
January 21, 1997.
\2\ Resigned from the Committee on Resources on February 5, 1997.
\3\ Appointed to Committee on Resources pursuant to H.Res. 36 on 
February 5, 1997, and resigned from the Committee on Resources on April 
17, 1997.
\4\ Resigned from the House of Representatives on February 13, 1997.
\5\ Appointed to Committee on Resources pursuant to H.Res. 58 on 
February 13, 1997.
\6\ Appointed to Committee on Resources pursuant to H.Res. 120 on April 
17, 1997.



          STANDING SUBCOMMITTEES OF THE COMMITTEE ON RESOURCES

                    National Parks and Public Lands

                       JAMES V. HANSEN, Chairman

ELTON GALLEGLY                       ENI F.H. FALEOMAVAEGA*
JOHN J. DUNCAN, Jr.                  EDWARD J. MARKEY
JOEL HEFLEY                          BRUCE F. VENTO
WAYNE T. GILCHREST                   DALE E. KILDEE
RICHARD W. POMBO                     CARLOS A. ROMERO-BARCELO
HELEN CHENOWETH                      MAURICE D. HINCHEY
LINDA SMITH                          ROBERT A. UNDERWOOD
GEORGE P. RADANOVICH                 PATRICK J. KENNEDY
WALTER B. JONES, Jr.                 WILLIAM D. DELAHUNT
JOHN B. SHADEGG                      DONNA CHRISTIAN-GREEN
JOHN E. ENSIGN                       RON KIND
ROBERT F. SMITH                      LLOYD DOGGETT
RICK HILL                            ------ ------
JIM GIBBONS

                                 ______

              Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans

                          JIM SAXTON, Chairman

W.J. (BILLY) TAUZIN                  FRANK PALLONE, Jr.*
WAYNE T. GILCHREST                   NEIL ABERCROMBIE
WALTER B. JONES, Jr.                 SOLOMON P. ORTIZ
JOHN E. PETERSON                     SAM FARR
MICHAEL D. CRAPO                     PATRICK J. KENNEDY

                                 ______

                      Energy and Mineral Resources

                        BARBARA CUBIN, Chairman

W.J. (BILLY) TAUZIN                  CARLOS A. ROMERO-BARCELO*
JOHN J. DUNCAN, Jr.                  NICK JOE RAHALL II
KEN CALVERT                          SOLOMON P. ORTIZ
WILLIAM M. (MAC) THORNBERRY          CALVIN M. DOOLEY
CHRIS CANNON                         CHRIS JOHN
KEVIN BRADY                          DONNA CHRISTIAN-GREEN
JIM GIBBONS                          ------ ------

__________
*The first listed Minority Member is counterpart to the Subcommittee 
Chairman.

                            Water and Power

                      JOHN T. DOOLITTLE, Chairman

KEN CALVERT-                         PETER A. DeFAZIO*
RICHARD W. POMBO                     GEORGE MILLER
HELEN CHENOWETH                      OWEN B. PICKETT
LINDA SMITH                          CALVIN M. DOOLEY
GEORGE P. RADANOVICH                 SAM FARR
WILLIAM M. (MAC) THORNBERRY          ADAM SMITH
JOHN B. SHADEGG                      RON KIND
JOHN E. ENSIGN                       LLOYD DOGGETT
ROBERT F. SMITH                      ------ ------
CHRIS CANNON                         ------ ------
MICHAEL D. CRAPO

                                 ______

                       Forests and Forest Health

                       HELEN CHENOWETH, Chairman

JAMES V. HANSEN                      MAURICE D. HINCHEY*
JOHN T. DOOLITTLE                    BRUCE F. VENTO
GEORGE P. RADANOVICH                 DALE E. KILDEE
JOHN PETERSON                        ENI F.H. FALEOMAVAEGA
RICK HILL                            ------ ------
BOB SCHAFFER                         ------ ------

__________
*The first listed Minority Member is counterpart to the Subcommittee 
Chairman.

                          Full Committee Staff

                     Lloyd A. Jones, Chief of Staff
                 Elizabeth R. Megginson, Chief Counsel
            Christine A. Kennedy, Chief Clerk/Administrator
                 Cynthia A. Ahwinona, Legislative Staff
                 Christina Delmont, Investigative Staff
                 Deborah A. Callis, Deputy Chief Clerk
           Kurt Christensen, Investigative/Legislative Staff
                    Michael Correia, Staff Assistant
                  Zachary Falcon, Investigative Staff
           Christopher Fluhr, Investigative/Legislative Staff
                    Doug Fuller, Investigative Staff
          Duane R. Gibson, General Counsel for Investigations
                          Tim Glidden, Counsel
                 Jose M. Guillen, Systems Administrator
               Steven M. Hansen, Communications Director
               Aloysius Hogan, Counsel/Legislative Staff
     Linda J. Livingston, Executive Assistant to the Chief of Staff
                 T.E. Manase Mansur, Legislative Staff
                       Karen Needy, Receptionist
                   Lisa Pittman, Deputy Chief Counsel
                      John Ramage, Printing Clerk
            John C. Rishel, Investigative/Legislative Staff
     Marcia M. Stewart, Legislative Assistant to the Chief Counsel
                     Marion Tucker, Printing Clerk*
                Ann C. Vogt, Legislative Calendar Clerk
              Margherita T. Woods, Chief Financial Officer

                             minority staff

                     John Lawrence, Staff Director
                   Jeffrey P. Petrich, Chief Counsel
          Marie J. Howard Fabrizio, Minority Legislative Staff
                   Joycelyn Johnson, Staff Assistant
               Carrie Yourd Moore, Legislative Aide/Clerk
                    Joseph Novotny, Staff Assistant
        Ann N. Owens, Executive Assistant to the Staff Director
        Christopher Stearns, Minority Counsel/Legislative Staff*
                 Daniel Weiss, Communications Director

                           subcommittee staff

            subcommittee on national parks and public lands

                Room H1-814 O'Neill, Phone 202/226-7736

                   Allen D. Freemyer, Staff Director
                    Gary Griffith, Legislative Staff
                      Tod Hull, Legislative Staff
                    Nancy Laheeb, Subcommittee Clerk
                   Cherie Sexton, Subcommittee Clerk
                     Dan Smith, Legislative Staff*
                    Steve Hodapp, Legislative Staff*
               Richard Healy, Minority Legislative Staff

__________
*This staff person is no longer with the Committee on Resources.


      subcommittee on fisheries conservation, wildlife and oceans

                Room H1-805 O'Neill, Phone 202/226-0200

                   Harry F. Burroughs, Staff Director
                   Bonnie B. Bruce, Legislative Staff
                  Maryanne Harper, Subcommittee Clerk
                  Sharon I. McKenna, Legislative Staff
                 Kathleen A. Miller, Subcommittee Clerk
                 John Clark Rayfield, Legislative Staff
                   David S. Whaley, Legislative Staff
                      Doug Hodum, Sea Grant Fellow
                     Mike Oetker, Sea Grant Fellow
                     Greg Balco, Sea Grant Fellow*
                    Joseph Love, Subcommittee Clerk*
                    Lisa Rulli, Subcommittee Clerk*
                  Michelle Sparck, Subcommittee Clerk*
                Jean Flemma, Minority Legislative Staff
              Christopher Mann, Minority Legislative Staff
              John Clark Field, Minority Sea Grant Fellow
               Karen Steuer, Minority Legislative Staff*
                Dan Terrell, Minority Sea Grant Fellow*

                                 ______

              subcommittee on energy and mineral resources

                Room 1626 Longworth, Phone 202/225-9297

                   William S. Condit, Staff Director
                    Dawn Criste, Subcommittee Clerk
                  Michael K. Henry, Legislative Staff
  David Wunsch, Congressional Science Fellow, U.S. Geological Service
                 Sharla F. Bickley, Legislative Staff*

        Deborah Von Hoffmann Lanzone, Minority Legislative Staff

                                 ______

                    subcommittee on water and power

                Room 1522 Longworth, Phone 202/225-8331

                    Robert C. Faber, Staff Director
                   Joshua Johnson, Legislative Staff
     Ken Fisher, Detailee from Public Heath Service, Environmental 
                          Protection Service*
                   Natalie Nelson, Subcommittee Clerk
             Fred Ore, Detailee from Bureau of Reclamation*
                 Lara Chamberlain, Subcommittee Clerk*
                  Valerie S. West, Legislative Staff*
         Elizabeth Birnbaum, Minority Counsel/Legislative Staff
             J. Stevens Lanich, Minority Legislative Staff

                                 ______

               subcommittee on forests and forest health

                Room 1377 Longworth, Phone 202/225-0691

                     Doug Crandall, Staff Director
                 Anne Heissenbuttel, Legislative Staff
              Kathy Crook Jarmiolowski, Subcommittee Clerk
                    William Simmons, Staff Director*

__________
*This staff person is no longer with the Committee on Resources.



                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                          House of Representatives,
                                    Committee on Resources,
                                 Washington, DC, December 29, 1998.
Hon. Robin H. Carle,
Clerk of the House of Representatives,
The Capitol, Washington, DC.
    Dear Ms. Carle: Pursuant to clause 1(d) of Rule XI and Rule 
X of the Rules of the House of Representatives, here is a 
report of the legislative and oversight activities of the 
Committee on Resources during the 105th Congress.
            Sincerely,
                                                 Don Young,
                                                          Chairman.


                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Letter of Transmittal............................................   VII
Overview.........................................................     1
    Full Committee...............................................    3-
        Legislative Activities...................................     8
        Oversight Activities.....................................    21
    Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands..............    34
        Legislative Activities...................................    36
        Oversight Activities.....................................    49
    Subcommittee on Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans-.    59
        Legislative Activities...................................    60
        Oversight Activities.....................................    67
    Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources.................    77
        Legislative Activities...................................    79
        Oversight Activities.....................................    80
    Subcommittee on Water and Power..............................    87
        Legislative Activities...................................    88
        Oversight Activities.....................................    91
    Subcommittee on Forests and Forest Health....................    97
        Legislative Activities...................................    98
        Oversight Activities.....................................   104
Appendices-......................................................   111
    Printed Hearings.............................................   111
    List of Public Laws-.........................................   120
    Committee Prints.............................................   122



105th Congress                                                   Report
  2d Session            HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                105-834
_______________________________________________________________________



  LEGISLATIVE AND OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES OF THE COMMITTEE ON RESOURCES, 
                             105TH CONGRESS

                                _______
                                

  December 29, 1998.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______


  Mr. Young of Alaska, from the Committee on Resources, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                                Overview

    The Committee on Resources meet on February 5, 1997, for an 
organizational meeting of the 105th Congress under the 
direction of Chairman Don Young of Alaska. The Committee 
Membership was 50 Members with 27 Republicans (Congressman 
Michael D. Crapo of Idaho had been appointed to the Committee 
on January 21, 1997) and 23 Democrats.
    On February 5, 1997, Congressman Sam Gejdenson on 
Connecticut resigned from the Committee and the Democratic 
Conference appointed Congressman Nick Lampson of Texas to the 
Committee. On February 13, 1997, Congressman Bill Richardson of 
New Mexico resigned from the Committee to become Ambassador to 
the United Nations and the Democratic Conference appointed 
Congressman Ron Kind to the Committee.
    On April 17, 1997, Congressman Nick Lampson of Texas 
resigned from the Committee and the Democratic Conference 
appointed Congressman Lloyd Doggett of Texas to the Committee.
    The Committee set up five subcommittees: National Parks and 
Public Lands (James V. Hansen, Chairman); Fisheries 
Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans (Jim Saxton, Chairman); 
Energy and Mineral Resources (Barbara Cubin, Chairman); Water 
and Power (John T. Doolittle, Chairman); and Forests and Forest 
Health (Helen Chenoweth, Chairman).

                              Jurisdiction

    (1) Fisheries and wildlife, including research, 
restoration, refuges, and conservation.
    (2) Forest reserves and national parks created from the 
public domain.
    (3) Forfeiture of land grants and alien ownership, 
including alien ownership of mineral lands.
    (4) Geological Survey.
    (5) International fishing agreements.
    (6) Interstate compacts relating to apportionment of waters 
for irrigation purposes.
    (7) Irrigation and reclamation, including water supply for 
reclamation projects, and easements of public lands for 
irrigation projects, and acquisition of private lands when 
necessary to complete irrigation projects.
    (8) Measures relating to the care and management of 
Indians, including the care and allotment of Indian lands and 
general and special measures relating to claims which are paid 
out of Indian funds.
    (9) Measures relating generally to the insular possessions 
of the United States, except those affecting the revenue and 
appropriations.
    (10) Military parks and battlefields, national cemeteries 
administered by the Secretary of the Interior, parks within the 
District of Columbia, and the erection of monuments to the 
memory of individuals.
    (11) Mineral land laws and claims and entries thereunder.
    (12) Mineral resources of the public lands.
    (13) Mining interests generally.
    (14) Mining schools and experimental stations.
    (15) Marine affairs (including coastal zone management), 
except for measures relating to oil and other pollution of 
navigable waters.
    (16) Oceanography.
    (17) Petroleum conservation on the public lands and 
conservation of the radium supply in the United States.
    (18) Preservation of prehistoric ruins and objects of 
interest on the public domain.
    (19) Public lands generally, including entry, easements, 
and the grazing thereon.
    (20) Relations of the United States with the Indians and 
the Indian tribes.
    (21) Trans-Alaska Oil Pipeline (except ratemaking).
    (22) Oversight functions provided for in clause 3(e) of the 
House Rules with respect to all programs affecting Indians.

    Source: Rule X(l) of the House of Representatives.

                           Activities Report

                   committee on resources statistics

Total number of bills and resolutions referred-...................   628
Total number of bills reported from committee-....................   142
Total number of reports filed-....................................   141
    Legislative reports-..........................................   139
    Oversight reports-............................................     2
Total number of bills passed by the House-........................   157
Total number of resolutions approved by both Houses-..............     1
Total number of bills enacted into law-...........................   170

                             Full Committee

                            I. Introduction

Alaska Legislation

    Alaska Public Lands: The Committee held hearings and 
favorably reported several bills addressing public lands issues 
in the State of Alaska. Alaska has more federally owned land 
than any other state, including the largest systems of national 
parks, wildlife refuges, national forests, and wilderness areas 
in the country. There are also a great variety, uses and broad 
dispersal of Federal lands, waters and resources in the state, 
and a large number of Natives living in all regions. Bills 
considered by the Committee were intended to resolve problems 
or conflicts involving claims to, use or management of, and 
access to these Federal lands and interests, and uphold the 
United States' trust responsibilities to Alaska Natives. A 
majority of the bills considered by the Committee provided for 
land exchanges to achieve a certain goal in the public interest 
or in the interest of Alaska Natives. In addition, two of the 
bills provided for grants of access across Federal lands to 
address particular problems, and one bill granted recognition 
of aboriginal land claims of five Native communities in the 
southeastern panhandle of the state. All hearings on these 
bills were held in Washington, D.C. H.R. 1948, the Hood Bay 
Land Exchange Act, and H.R. 3903, the Glacier Bay National Park 
Boundary Adjustment Act, were signed into law. A compromise 
version of H.R. 2259, the King Cove Health and Safety Act, was 
included in the Omnibus Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year (FY) 
1999.

Native American Legislation

    Numerous bills relating to Native Americans were considered 
by the 105th Congress. Most of that legislation was related to 
specific Native American Tribes. The following is a compilation 
of those Tribes affected by legislation acted on by the 
Committee on Resources.
    Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians: Legislation (H.R. 
700) was enacted relating to the distribution of certain 
revenues to members of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla 
Indians.
    Arikaara, Mandan and Hidatsa Tribes: Legislation (S. 2069) 
was enacted to permit the mineral leasing of Indian land 
located within the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in any case 
in which there is consent from a majority interest in the 
parcel of land under consideration for lease.
    Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation: 
Legislation (S. 391) was enacted to provide for the disposition 
of certain funds appropriated to pay a judgment in favor of the 
Assiniboine and Sioux Tribes of the Fort Peck Reservation.
    Barona Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians: 
Legislation (H.R. 2742) was passed by the House which would 
transfer 5.03 acres of surplus Bureau of Land Management land 
to the Barona Group of Capitan Grande Band of Mission Indians.
    Bay Mills Indian Community: Legislation (H.R. 1604) was 
enacted which provides for the distribution of certain judgment 
funds to the Bay Mills Indian Community.
    Burt Lake Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians: Legislation 
(H.R. 948) to reaffirm and clarify the Federal relationship of 
the Burt Lake Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians was reported 
out of the Resources Committee but did not receive enough votes 
on the Floor of the House to be passed.
    Cabazon Indian Tribe: Legislation (H.R. 4068) was enacted 
which will extend the leasing authority of the Cabazon Indian 
Tribe to 99 years.
    Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of Oregon: 
Legislation (H.R. 4068) was enacted which will expand the 
service area of the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians of 
Oregon to include certain additional counties in Oregon.
    Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde Community of Oregon: 
Legislation (H.R. 4068) was enacted which will extend the 
leasing authority of the Confederated Tribes of the Grand Ronde 
Community of Oregon to 99 years.
    Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Restoration Act: 
Legislation (H.R. 4068) was enacted which will add certain 
lands to the Coos, Lower Umpqua, and Siuslaw Reservation.
    Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe: Legislation (H.R. 4068) was 
enacted which directs the Secretary of the Interior to take 
certain land within the State of Oregon into trust for the 
benefit of the Cow Creek Band of Umpqua Tribe.
    Cuyapaipe Band of Mission Indians: Legislation (H.R. 2742) 
was passed by the House which would transfer 1,360 acres of 
surplus Bureau of Land Management land to the Cuyapaipe Band of 
Mission Indians.
    Fort Bidwell Community of Paiute Indians: Legislation (H.R. 
2742) was passed by the House which would transfer 299.04 acres 
of surplus Bureau of Land Management land to the Fort Bidwell 
Community of Paiute Indians.
    Fort Independence Community of Paiute Indians: Legislation 
(H.R. 2742) was passed by the House which would transfer 200.06 
acres of surplus Bureau of Land Management land to the Fort 
Independence Community of Paiute Indians.
    Grand Traverse Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians: 
Legislation (H.R. 1604) was enacted which provides for the 
distribution of certain judgment funds to the Grand Traverse 
Band of Ottawa and Chippewa Indians.
    Hoopa Valley Tribe: The Hoopa Valley Reservation South 
Boundary Adjustment Act (H.R. 70) was enacted to transfer land 
to the Tribe and adjusts the boundary of the Reservation to 
correct a survey mistake made decades ago.
    Jicarilla Apache Tribe: Legislation (H.R. 4068) was enacted 
in which Congress approves a settlement agreement which has 
become a part of the Jicarilla Apache Tribe Water Rights 
Settlement Act.
    Ketchikan Indian Corporation: Legislation (H.R. 4068) was 
enacted which removes a non-health use restriction imposed upon 
a facility operated by the Ketchikan Indian Corporation next to 
the Ketchikan General Hospital.
    Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma: Legislation (H.R. 2314) was 
passed by the House to restore Federal Indian services to 
members of the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma residing in Maverick 
County, Texas.
    La Jolla, Rincon, San Pasqual, Pauma and Pala Bands of 
Mission Indians: Legislation (H.R. 4068) was enacted which 
authorizes and directs the Secretary of the Interior to 
disburse certain funds to the La Jolla, Rincon, San Pasqual, 
Pauma and Pala Bands pursuant to the San Luis Rey Indian Water 
Rights Settlement Act.
    Little River Band of Ottawa Indians of Michigan: 
Legislation (H.R. 1604) was enacted which provides for the 
distribution of certain judgment funds to the Little River Band 
of Ottawa Indians of Michigan.
    Little Traverse Bay Bands of Odawa Indians of Michigan: 
Legislation (H.R. 1604) was enacted which provides for the 
distribution of certain judgment funds to the Little Traverse 
Bay Bands of Odawa Indians of Michigan.
    Lower Brule Sioux Tribe: The Lower Brule Sioux Tribe 
Infrastructure Development Trust Fund Act (S. 156) was enacted 
to establish an infrastructure development trust fund for the 
Tribe using certain receipts generated by the Pick-Sloan 
Missouri River Basin power project.
    Lower Sioux Indian Community in Minnesota: Legislation 
(H.R. 4068) was enacted which authorizes the Lower Sioux Indian 
Community in Minnesota to sell certain land which it owns in 
fee.
    Manzanita Band of Mission Indians: Legislation (H.R. 2742) 
was passed by the House which would transfer 1,000.78 acres of 
surplus Bureau of Land Management land to the Manzanita Band of 
Mission Indians.
    Miccosukee Tribe of Florida: The Miccosukee Settlement Act 
of 1997 (H.R. 1476) was enacted to transfer certain Florida 
State land to the Tribe and transferred other land from the 
Tribe to the State of Florida.
    Legislation (H.R. 3055) was also enacted which modifies the 
boundary of the Miccosukee reservation in Florida.
    Morongo Band of Mission Indians: Legislation (H.R. 2742) 
was passed by the House which would transfer 40 acres of 
surplus Bureau of Land Management land to the Morongo Band of 
Mission Indians.
    Pala Band of Mission Indians: Legislation (H.R. 2742) was 
passed by the House which would transfer 59.2 acres of surplus 
Bureau of Land Management land to the Pala Band of Mission 
Indians.
    Pit River Tribe: Legislation (H.R. 2742) was passed by the 
House which would transfer 561.69 acres of surplus Bureau of 
Land Management land to the Pit River Tribe.
    Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Michigan: Legislation (H.R. 1604) 
was enacted to provide for the distribution of certain judgment 
funds to the Sault Ste. Marie Tribe of Michigan.
    Sisseton and Wahpeton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota: 
Legislation (S. 391) was enacted to provide for the disposition 
of certain funds appropriated to pay a judgment in favor of the 
Sisseton and Wahpeton Sioux Tribe of South Dakota.
    Spirit Lake Tribe of North Dakota: Legislation (S. 391) was 
enacted to provide for the disposition of certain funds 
appropriated to pay a judgment in favor of the Spirit Lake 
Tribe of North Dakota.
    United Auburn Indian Community: Legislation (H.R. 1805) was 
passed by the House to amend the Auburn Indian Restoration Act 
to restrict gaming on and use of land held in trust for the 
United Auburn Indian Community of the Auburn Rancheria of 
California.
    The following pieces of legislation affect numerous, if not 
all, Native American tribes:
    Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act Amendments: Alaska 
Native Claims Settlement Act amendments (H.R. 2000) were passed 
to resolve many of the technical problems which have arisen 
since the passage of ANCSA and the Alaska National Interest 
Lands Conveyance Act. These amendments, identified by the 
Alaska Federation of Natives, relate to land trades, the 
retention of certain mineral estates, the distribution of 
certain bonds, the granting of certain subsurface rights, the 
Calista Native Corporation land exchange, the administering of 
certain mining claims, and certain Native allotment 
applications.
    Tribal Self-Governance Amendments: Legislation (H.R. 1833) 
was passed by the House which would make the Self-Governance 
demonstration program within the Department of Health and Human 
Services a permanent program.
    Indian Federal Recognition Administrative Procedures Act: 
Legislation (H.R. 1154) intended to reform the Federal 
recognition process for Indian tribes was reported out of the 
Resources Committee but failed to receive enough votes to be 
passed by the House.
    Indian Health Care Improvement Act: Legislation (H.R. 4068) 
was passed which amends portions of the Indian Health Care 
Improvement Act to extend certain funding through FY 2002.
    Advisory Council on California Indian Policy: Legislation 
(H.R. 3069) was enacted which will extend the life of the 
Advisory Council on California Indian Policy to allow the 
Council to advise Congress and other officials on the 
implementation of its proposals and recommendations.

                            Insular Affairs

    The Committee focused on increasing self-sufficiency and 
self-governance in the United States flag islands and the 
freely associated states in Micronesia during the 105th 
Congress. These insular affairs objectives were accomplished 
primarily through Congressional hearings and oversight in 
Washington and the various islands in the Caribbean and 
Pacific. Formal requests from the individual governments often 
formed the basis for legislative action by Congress to improve 
self-government and self-sufficiency.
    The Committee: (1) acted to improve self-government in the 
insular areas with the approval of the ``United States-Puerto 
Rico Political Status Act'' (H.R. 856) by authorizing a long-
term self-determination process exceeding ten years to respond 
to the request of the Puerto Rico Legislature to resolve the 
political status problem for the nearly 4 million American 
citizens of Puerto Rico; (2) passed the ``Guam Organic Act 
Amendments'' (H.R. 2370) authorizing changes to the Federal law 
authorizing the government structure in Guam by allowing the 
people of Guam to determine if the Attorney General should be 
an elected office, adjust the size of the legislative quorum to 
a simple majority to correspond with the size of the 
legislature, and to clarify the authority of the legislature 
over local matters; and (3) passed ``Increased Territorial 
Election Authority'' (H.R. 1460) providing the people of Guam 
with a streamlined election process for the Guam Delegate by 
eliminating a separate ballot requirement in the existing law, 
which will result in savings to the territory. The Committee 
also acted on legislation to increase self-reliance and self-
sufficiency among the island communities with: (1) the passage 
of the ``Hawaiian Homes Commission Act Amendments'' (H.J. Res. 
32) emphasizing the importance of the extended family and self-
reliance among Native Hawaiians by permitting people awarded 
Hawaiian homesteads to be able to designate grandchildren as 
successors and separately to permit the issuance of hurricane 
insurance coverage for lessees of Hawaiian home lands; (2) the 
passage of the ``Program Extension For Communities In The 
Former United States Trust Territory'' (H.R. 1460) extending 
specific support for the small Micronesian atolls that were 
affected by U.S. nuclear testing and are part of a radiological 
rehabilitation and resettlement process to restore their self-
sufficiency; and (3) the passage of the ``American Samoa 
Development Act'' (H.R. 757) establishing an economic 
development commission to analyze alternative to spur private 
sector development in America's principal inhabited territory 
south of the equator.

                            ii. jurisdiction

    (1) Measures and matters concerning the transportation of 
natural gas from or within Alaska and disposition of oil 
transported by the trans-Alaska oil pipeline.
    (2) Measures and matters relating to Alaska public lands, 
including forestry and forest management issues, and Federal 
reserved water rights.
    (3) Environmental and habitat measures and matters of 
general applicability.
    (4) Measures relating to the welfare of Native Americans, 
including management of Indian lands in general and special 
measures relating to claims which are paid out of Indian funds.
    (5) All matters regarding the relations of the United 
States with the Indians and the Indian tribes, including 
special oversight functions under clause 3(e) of Rule X of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives.
    (6) All matters regarding Native Alaskans and Native 
Hawaiians.
    (7) All matters related to the Federal trust responsibility 
to Native Americans and the sovereignty of Native Americans.
    (8) All matters regarding insular areas of the United 
States.
    (9) All measures or matters regarding the Freely Associated 
States and Antarctica.
    (10) Cooperative efforts to encourage, enhance and improve 
international programs for the protection of the environment 
and the conservation of natural resources within the 
jurisdiction of the Committee.
    (11) All measures and matters retained by the Full 
Committee under Committee rule 6(e).
    (12) General and continuing oversight and investigative 
authority over activities, policies and programs within the 
jurisdiction of the Committee under House Rule X.

                      iii. legislative Activities

A. Legislative hearings and markups

    February 5, 1997--Organization meeting held for the 105th 
Congress.
    March 5, 1997--Markup held on H.J. Res. 32, to consent to 
certain amendments enacted by the Legislature of the State of 
Hawaii to the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act, 1920; H.R. 63, to 
designate the reservoir created by Trinity Dam in the Central 
Valley Project, California, as Trinity Lake; H.R. 412, to 
approve a settlement agreement between the Bureau of 
Reclamation and the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District; H.R. 
437, to reauthorize and amend the National Sea Grant College 
Program Act; and H.R. 709, to reauthorize and amend the 
National Geologic Mapping Act of 1992.
    March 12, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 752, to amend the 
Endangered Species Act of 1973 to ensure that persons that 
suffer or are threatened with injury resulting from a violation 
of the Act or a failure of the Secretary to act in accordance 
with the Act have standing to commence a civil suit on their 
own behalf; and H.R. 757, to develop the economy of American 
Samoa.
    March 19, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 856, to provide a 
process leading to full self-government for Puerto Rico. 
Printed Hearing 105-16
    April 10, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 478, to amend the 
Endangered Species Act of 1973 to improve the ability of 
individuals and local, State and Federal agencies to comply 
with that Act in building, operating, maintaining, or repairing 
flood control projects, facilities, or structures and to 
determine whether Federal wildlife policies have impeded proper 
ongoing maintenance and repair of flood control structures. 
Printed Hearing 105-12
    April 16, 1997--Markup held on H. Con. Res. 8, expressing 
the sense of Congress with respect to the significance of 
maintaining the health and stability of coral reef ecosystems; 
H.R. 39, to reauthorize the African Elephant Conservation Act; 
H.R. 408, to amend the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 to 
support the International Dolphin Conservation Program in the 
eastern tropical Pacific Ocean; H.R. 449, to provide for the 
orderly disposal of certain Federal lands in Clark County, 
Nevada, and to provide for the acquisition of environmentally 
sensitive lands in the State of Nevada; and H.R. 478, to amend 
the Endangered Species Act of 1973 to improve the ability of 
individuals and local, State, and Federal agencies to comply 
with that Act in building, operating, and maintaining, or 
repairing flood control projects, facilities, or structures.
    April 19, 1997--Field hearing held in San Juan, Puerto 
Rico, on H.R. 856, to provide a process leading to full self-
government for Puerto Rico. Printed Hearing 105-28
    April 21, 1997--Field hearing held in Mayaguez, Puerto 
Rico, on H.R. 856, to provide a process leading to full self-
government for Puerto Rico. Printed Hearing 105-27
    April 30, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 1420, to amend the 
National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 to 
improve the management of the National Wildlife Refuge System.
    Hearing held on H.J. Res. 59, to disapprove a rule 
affecting polar bear trophies from Canada under the 1994 
amendments to the Marine Mammal Protection Act issued by the 
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service of the Department of the 
Interior. Printed Hearing 105-18
    May 5, 1997--Field hearing held in Tannersville, New York, 
on H.R. 901, to preserve the sovereignty of the United States 
over public lands and acquired lands owned by the United 
States, and to preserve State sovereignty and private property 
rights in non-Federal lands surrounding those public lands and 
acquired lands. Printed Hearing 105-26
    May 21, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 79, to provide for the 
conveyance of certain land in the Six Rivers National Forest in 
the State of California for the benefit of the Hoopa Valley 
Tribe; H.R. 985, to provide for the expansion of the Eagles 
Nest Wilderness within Arapaho and White River National 
Forests, Colorado, to include the lands known as the Slate 
Creek Addition upon the acquisition of the lands by the United 
States; H.R. 1019, to provide for a boundary adjustment and 
land conveyance involving the Raggeds Wilderness, White River 
National Forest, Colorado, to correct the effects of earlier 
erroneous land surveys; H.R. 1020, to adjust the boundary of 
the White River National Forest in the State of Colorado to 
include all National Forest System lands within Summit County, 
Colorado, which are currently part of the Dillon Ranger 
District of the Arapaho National Forest; H.R. 1439, to 
facilitate the sale of certain land in Tahoe National Forest in 
the State of California to Placer County, California; H.R. 856, 
to provide a process leading to full self-government for Puerto 
Rico; H.R. 858, Quincy Library Group Forest Recovery and 
Economic Stability Act of 1997; and H.R. 1127, to amend the 
Antiquities Act to require an Act of Congress and the 
concurrence of the Governor and State legislature for the 
establishment by the President of national monuments in excess 
of 5,000 acres, but did not complete action.
    June 10, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 901, to preserve the 
sovereignty of the United States over public lands and acquired 
lands owned by the United States, and to preserve State 
sovereignty and private property rights in non-Federal lands 
surrounding those public lands and acquired lands. Printed 
Hearing 105-26
    June 11, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 1278, National Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Administration Authorization Act of 1997.
    June 18, 1997--Joint hearing held with Senate Committee on 
Indian Affairs on H.R. 1082/S.569, to amend the Indian Child 
Welfare Act of 1978, and for other purposes. Printed Hearing 
105-44.
    June 24, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 700, to remove the 
restriction on the distribution of certain revenues from the 
Mineral Springs parcel to certain members of the Agua Caliente 
Band of Cahuilla Indians; H.R. 948, to reaffirm and clarify the 
Federal relationship of the Burt Lake Band as a distinct 
federally recognized Indian Tribe, and for other purposes; H.R. 
976, to provide for the disposition of certain funds 
appropriated to pay a judgment in favor of the Mississippi 
Sioux Indians, and for other purposes; and H.R. 1604, to 
provide for the division, use, and distribution of judgment 
funds of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan pursuant 
to dockets numbered 18-E, 58, 364, and 18-R before the Indian 
Claims Commission.
    June 25, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 1127, to amend the 
Antiquities Act to require an Act of Congress and the 
concurrence of the Governor and State legislature for the 
establishment by the President of national monuments in excess 
of 5,000 acres; H.R. 765, to ensure maintenance of a herd of 
wild horses in Cape Lookout National Seashore; H.R. 822, to 
facilitate a land exchange involving private land within the 
exterior boundaries of Wenatchee National Forest in Chelan 
County, Washington; H.R. 951, to require the Secretary of the 
Interior to exchange certain lands located in Hinsdale, 
Colorado; H.R. 960, to validate certain conveyances in the City 
of Tulare, Tulare County, California, and for other purposes; 
H.R. 1198, to direct the Secretary of the Interior to convey 
certain land to the City of Grants Pass, Oregon; H.R. 1658, to 
reauthorize and amend the Atlantic Striped Bass Conservation 
Act and related laws; S.J. Res. 29, to direct the Secretary of 
the Interior to design and construct a permanent addition to 
the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial in Washington, D.C., and 
for other purposes; and H.R. 901, to preserve the sovereignty 
of the United States over public lands and acquired lands owned 
by the United States, and to preserve State sovereignty and 
private property rights in non-Federal lands surrounding those 
public lands and acquired lands.
    July 16, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 799, to require the 
Secretary of Agriculture to make a minor adjustment in the 
exterior boundary of the Hells Canyon Wilderness in the States 
of Oregon and Idaho to exclude an established Forest Service 
road inadvertently included in the wilderness; H.R. 838, to 
require adoption of a management plan for the Hells Canyon 
National Recreation Area that allows appropriate use of 
motorized and nonmotorized river craft in the recreation area, 
and for other purposes; H.R. 1460, to allow for election of the 
Delegate from Guam by other than separate ballot, and for other 
purposes; H.R. 976, to provide for the disposition of certain 
funds appropriated to pay judgment in favor of the Mississippi 
Sioux Indians, and for other purposes; H.R. 700, to remove the 
restriction on the distribution of certain revenues from the 
Mineral Springs parcel to certain members of the Agua Caliente 
Band of Cahuilla Indians; H.R. 948, to reaffirm and clarify the 
Federal relationship of the Burt Lake Band as a distinct 
federally recognized Indian Tribe, and for other purposes; H.R. 
1604, to provide for the division, use, and distribution of 
judgment funds of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of Michigan 
pursuant to dockets numbered 18-E, 58, 364, and 18-R before the 
Indian Claims Commission; H.R. 1663, to clarify the intent of 
the Congress in Public Law 93-632 to require the Secretary of 
Agriculture to continue to provide for the maintenance of 18 
concrete dams and weirs that were located in the Emigrant 
Wilderness at the time the wilderness area was designated as 
wilderness in that Public Law; H.R. 1944, to provide for a land 
exchange involvingthe Warner Canyon Ski Area and other land in 
the State of Oregon; and H.R. 1855, to impose a moratorium on ``large 
fishing vessels'' in the Atlantic herring and mackerel fisheries.
    The Chairman of the Committee was also authorized to issue 
subpoenas concerning the matter of the Committee oversight 
review of hardrock bonding mining regulations.
    July 30, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 1948, to provide for 
the exchange of lands within Admiralty Island National 
Monument, and for other purposes.
    September 10, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 2259, to provide 
for a transfer of land interests in order to facilitate surface 
transportation between the cities of Cold Bay, Alaska, and King 
Cove, Alaska.
    Markup held on H.R. 136, to amend the National Parks and 
Recreation Act of 1978 to designate the Marjory Stoneman 
Douglas Wilderness and to amend the Everglades National Park 
Protection and Expansion Act of 1989 to designate the Ernest F. 
Coe Visitor Center; H.R. 708, to require the Secretary of the 
Interior to conduct a study concerning grazing use of certain 
land within and adjacent to Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, 
and to extend temporarily certain grazing privileges; H.R. 
1787, to assist in the conservation of Asian elephants by 
supporting and providing financial resources for the 
conservation programs of nations within the range of Asian 
elephants and projects of persons with demonstrated expertise 
in the conservation of Asian elephants; and H.R. 1948, to 
provide for the exchange of lands within Admiralty Island 
National Monument, and for other purposes.
    September 17, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 512, to prohibit 
the expenditure of funds from the Land and Water Conservation 
Fund for the creation of new National Wildlife Refuges without 
specific authorization from Congress pursuant to a 
recommendation from the United States Fish and Wildlife Service 
to create the refuge; H.R. 1849, to establish the Oklahoma City 
National Memorial as a unit of the National Park System, to 
designate the Oklahoma City Memorial Trust, and for other 
purposes; H. Con. Res. 131, expressing the sense of Congress 
regarding the ocean; H.R. 2233, to assist in the conservation 
of coral reefs; H.R. 1805, to amend the Auburn Indian 
Restoration Act to establish restrictions related to gaming on 
and use of land held in trust for the United Auburn Indian 
Community of the Auburn Rancheria of California; H.R. 2007, to 
amend the Act that authorized the Canadian River reclamation 
project, Texas, to direct the Secretary of the Interior to 
allow use of the project distribution system to transport water 
from sources other than the project; H.R. 134, to authorize the 
Secretary of the Interior to provide a loan guarantee to the 
Olivenhain Water Storage Project, and for other purposes; H.R. 
2314, Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma Federal Indian Services 
Restoration Act of 1997; and H.R. 1476, to settle certain 
Miccosukee Indian land takings claims within the State of 
Florida.
    September 24, 1997--The Chairman of the Committee was 
authorized to issue subpoenas for the production of records 
related to the Committee's review of the designation of the 
Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument.
    Hearing held on H.R. 1842, to terminate further development 
and implementation of the American Heritage Rivers Initiative. 
Printed Hearing 105-70.
    October 1, 1997--Markup held on H. Con. Res. 151, to 
express the sense of the Congress that the United States should 
manage its public domain National Forest to maximize the 
reduction of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere among many other 
objectives and that the United States should serve as an 
example and as a world leader in actively managing its public 
domain National Forests in a manner that substantially reduces 
the amount of carbon dioxide added to the atmosphere; H.R. 
1856, Volunteers for Wildlife Act of 1997; H.R. 2000, to amend 
the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to make certain 
clarifications to the land bank protection provisions; H.R. 
2259, to provide for a transfer of land interests in order to 
facilitate surface transportation between the cities of Cold 
Bay, Alaska, and King Cove, Alaska; and H.R. 2402, the 
Reclamation Technical Corrections Act of 1997.
    October 8, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 1270, to amend the 
Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982; and H.R. 2493, to establish a 
mechanism by which the Secretary of Agriculture and the 
Secretary of the Interior can provide for uniform management of 
livestock grazing on Federal lands.
    October 22, 1997--Markup held on S. 731, to extend the 
legislative authority for construction of the National Peace 
Garden Memorial; S. 423, to extend the legislative authority 
for the Board of Regents of Gunston Hall to establish a 
memorial to honor George Mason; H.R. 2283, to expand the 
boundaries of the Arches National Park in the State of Utah to 
include portions of the following drainages, Salt Wash, Lost 
Spring Canyon, Fish Sheep Draw, Clover Canyon, Cordova Canyon, 
Mine Draw, and Cottonwood Wash, which are currently under the 
jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management, and to include a 
portion of Fish Sheep Draw, which is currently owned by the 
State of Utah; H.R. 1739, to amend the Act designating the 
Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness to clarify certain 
provisions of law regarding activities authorized within the 
wilderness areas; H.R. 434, to provide for the conveyance of 
small parcels of land in the Carson National Forest and the 
Santa Fe National Forest, New Mexico, to the village of El Rito 
and the town of Jemez Springs, New Mexico; S. 459, Native 
American Programs Act Amendments of 1997; and H.R. 1842, to 
terminate further development and implementation of the 
American Heritage Rivers Initiative.
    A motion to reconsider previous vote to report on H.R. 
2493, Forage Improvement Act of 1997 was adopted and the bill 
was reported again.
    October 29, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 100, to establish 
the Commonwealth of Guam, and for other purposes; H.R. 2370, to 
amend the Organic Act of Guam for the purposes of clarifying 
the local judicial structure and the office of Attorney 
General; and S. 210, to amend the Organic Act of Guam, the 
Revised Organic Act of the Virgin Islands, and the Compact of 
Free Association, and for other purposes. Printed Hearing 105-
78.
    November 5, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 755, to amend the 
Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to allow individuals to designate 
any portion of their income tax overpayments, and to make other 
contributions, for the benefit of units of the National Park 
System; H.R. 1309, to provide for an exchange of lands within 
the city of Greeley, Colorado, and the Water Supply and Storage 
Company to eliminate private inholdings in wilderness areas, 
and for other purposes; and H.R. 1567, to provide for the 
designation of additional wilderness lands in the eastern 
United States.
    A motion to reconsider previous vote to report H.R. 1842, 
to terminate further development and implementation of the 
American Heritage Rivers Initiative, was adopted and the bill 
was ordered reported again.
    February 25, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 2756, Kake Tribal 
Corporation Land Exchange Act; H.R. 2812, Unrecognized 
Southeast Alaska Native Communities Recognition Act; H.R. 2924, 
to amend the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act to provide for 
selection of lands by certain veterans of the Vietnam era and 
by the Elim Native Corporation; H.R. 3087, to require the 
Secretary of Agriculture to grant an easement to Chugach Alaska 
Corporation; and H.R. 3008, to amend the Alaska Native Claims 
Settlement Act; regarding Huna Totem Corporation public 
interest land exchange.
    March 11, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 2186, to authorize the 
Secretary of the Interior to provide assistance to the National 
Historic Trails Interpretive Center in Casper, Wyoming; H.R. 
2376, National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Establishment Act 
Amendments of 1997; H.R. 2416, to provide for the transfer of 
certain rights and property to the United States Forest Service 
in exchange for a payment to the occupant of such property; 
H.R. 2574, to consolidate certain mineral interests in the 
National Grasslands in Billings County, North Dakota, through 
the exchange of Federal and private mineral interests to 
enhance land management capabilities and environmental and 
wildlife protection; H.R. 2807, Rhino and Tiger Labeling Act; 
H.R. 3087, to require the Secretary of Agriculture to grant an 
easement to Chugach Alaska Corporation; H.R. 3113, Rhinoceros 
and Tiger Conservation Reauthorization Act of 1998; and H.R. 
3164, to describe the hydrographic services functions of the 
Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration.
    March 17, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 1833, Tribal Self-
Governance Amendments of 1997; and H.R. 2742, California Indian 
Land Transfer Act.
    March 25, 1998--Markup held on S. 231, National Cave and 
Karst Research Institute Act of 1997; H.R. 1522, to extend the 
authorization for the National Historic Preservation Fund; H.R. 
1833, Tribal Self-Governance Amendments of 1997; H.R. 3069, 
Advisory Council on California Indian Policy Extension Act of 
1977; and H.R. 3297, to suspend the continued development of a 
roadless area policy on public domain units and other units of 
the National Forest System pending adequate public 
participation and determinations that a roadless area policy 
will not adversely affect forest health.
    April 29, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 1021, Miles Land 
Exchange Act of 1997; H.R. 2556, to reauthorize the North 
American Wetlands Conservation Act and the Partnerships for 
Wildlife Act; H.R. 2886, Granite Watershed Enhancement and 
Protection Act of 1997; and H.R. 2863, Migratory Bird Treaty 
Reform Act.
    May 20, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 1154, Indian Federal 
Recognition Administrative Procedures Act of 1997; H.R. 1635, 
National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom Act of 1997; 
H.R. 1865, Spanish Peaks Wilderness Act of 1997; H.R. 2411, to 
provide for a land exchange involving the Cape Cod National 
Seashore and to extend authority for the Cape Cod National 
Seashore Advisory Commission; H.R. 2538, Guadalupe-Hidalgo 
Treaty Land Claims Act of 1997; H.R. 2742, California Indian 
Land Transfer Act; H.R. 2795, Irrigation Project Contract 
Extension Act of 1997; H.R. 2812, Unrecognized Southeast Alaska 
Native Communities Recognition Act; H.R. 3267, Sonny Bono 
Memorial Salton Sea Reclamation Act; H.R. 3520, to adjust the 
boundaries of the Lake Chelan National Recreation Area and the 
adjacent Wenatchee National Forest in the State of Washington; 
H.R. 3796, to authorize the Secretary of Agriculture to convey 
the administrative site for the Rogue River National Forest and 
use the proceeds for the construction of improvement of offices 
and support buildings for the Rogue River National Forest and 
the Bureau of Land Management; H.R. 3797, to compensate the 
Wyandotte Tribe of Oklahoma for the taking of certain rights by 
the Federal Government; and approval of a Committee report on 
mining regulations promulgated by the Bureau of Land 
Management.
    June 10, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 2893, to amend the 
Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act to 
provide for appropriate study and repatriation of remains for 
which a cultural affiliation is not readily ascertainable; and 
H.R. 3903, to provide for an exchange of lands located near 
Gustavus, Alaska, and for other purposes.
    June 17, 1998--Markup held on H.J. Res. 113, a joint 
resolution approving the location of a Martin Luther King, Jr., 
Memorial in the Nation's Capitol; H.R. 1659, Mount St. Helens 
National Volcanic Monument Completion Act; H.R. 1728, National 
Park Service Administrative Amendment of 1997; H.R. 1983, 
Narragansett Justice Act; H.R. 2993, to provide for the 
collection of fees for the making of motion pictures, 
television productions, and sound tracks in National Park 
System and National Wildlife Refuge Systems units; H.R. 3460, 
to approve a Governing International Fishery Agreement between 
the United States and the Republic of Latvia; H.R. 3830, Utah 
Schools and Lands Exchange Act of 1998; and began consideration 
of a motion authorizing the Chairman of the Committee to issue 
subpoenas regarding matters under review associated with the 
Warner Creek timber sale and protest.
    June 24, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 1168, to encourage 
competition and tax fairness and to protect the tax base of 
State and local governments.
    July 15, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 4111, to provide for 
outlet modifications to Folsom Dam, a study for reconstruction 
of the Northfork American River cofferdam, and the transfer to 
the State of California all right, title, and interest in and 
to the Auburn Dam.
    July 22, 1998--Joint hearing held with Senate Committee on 
Indian Affairs on S. 1770, to elevate the position of Director 
of the Indian Health Service to Assistant Secretary of Health 
and Human Services, to provide for the organizational 
independence of the Indian Health Service within the Department 
of Health and Human Services; and H.R. 3782, to compensate 
certain Indian tribes for known errors in their tribal trust 
fund accounts, and to establish a process for settling other 
disputes regarding tribal trust fund accounts.
    Markup held on H.R. 1042, to amend the Illinois and 
Michigan Canal Heritage Corridor Act of 1984 to extend the 
Illinois and Michigan Canal Heritage Corridor Commission; H.R. 
2223, Education Land Grant Act; H.R. 3047, to authorize 
expansion of Fort Davis National Historic Site in Fort Davis, 
Texas, by 16 acres; H.R. 3055, to deem the activities of the 
Miccosukee Tribe on the Tamiami Indian Reservation to be 
consistent with the purposes of the Everglades National Park; 
H.R. 3109, Thomas Cole National Historic Site; H.R. 3498, 
Dungeness Crab Conservation and Management Act; H.R. 3625, San 
Rafael Swell National Heritage and Conservation Act; H.R. 3903, 
to provide for an exchange of lands located near Gustavus, 
Alaska, and for other purposes; and H.R. 4284, to authorize the 
Government of India to establish a memorial to honor Mahatma 
Gandhi in the District of Columbia.
    July 28, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 3987, to protect and 
conserve deer and elk and to provide for consistent and 
equitable hunting laws in the State of Washington.
    July 29, 1998--Markup held on H. Res. 494, expressing the 
sense of the House of Representatives that the United States 
has enjoyed the loyalty of the United States citizens of Guam, 
and that the United States recognizes the centennial 
anniversary of the Spanish-American War as an opportune time 
for Congress to reaffirm its commitment to increase self-
government consistent with self-determination for the people of 
Guam; H.R. 1110, Sudbury, Assabet, and Concord Wild and Scenic 
Rivers Act; H.R. 2370, Guam Judicial Empowerment Act of 1997; 
H.R. 2776, to amend the Act entitled ``An Act to provide for 
the establishment of the Morristown National Historical Park in 
the State of New Jersey, and for other purposes'' to authorize 
the acquisition of property known as the Warren property; H.R. 
3445, Oceans Act of 1998; H.R. 4068, to make certain technical 
corrections in laws relating to Native Americans; H.R. 4079, to 
authorize the construction of temperature control devices at 
Folsom Dam in California; and H.R. 4326, Oregon Public Lands 
Transfer and Protection Act of 1998.
    Hearing held on H.R. 2743, Indian Land Consolidation 
Amendment Act of 1997; and H.R. 4325, Indian Trust Estate 
Planning and Land Title Management Improvement Act.
    August 5, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 1467, to provide for 
the continuance of oil and gas operations pursuant to certain 
existing leases in the Wayne National Forest; H.R. 1481, Great 
Lakes Fish and Wildlife Restoration Act of 1997; S. 1693, 
Vision 2000 National Parks System Restoration Act; S. 1695, 
Sand Creek Massacre National Historic Site Preservation Act; 
H.R. 2108, Dutch John Federal Property Disposition and 
Assistance Act; H.R. 2756, Kake Tribal Corporation Land 
Exchange Act; H.R. 3056, to provide for the preservation and 
sustainability of the family farm through the transfer of 
responsibility for operation and maintenance of the Flathead 
Indian Irrigation Project, Montana; H.R. 3381, Gallatin Land 
Consolidation Act of 1998; H.R. 3878, to subject certain 
reserved mineral interests of the operation of the Mineral 
Leasing Act; H.R. 3972, to amend the Outer Continental Shelf 
Lands Act to prohibit the Secretary of the Interior from 
charging State and local government agencies for certain uses 
of the sand, gravel, and shell resources of the Outer 
Continental Shelf; H.R. 4023, to provide for the conveyance of 
the Forest Service property in Kern County, California, in 
exchange for county lands suitable for inclusion in Sequoia 
National Forest; H.R. 4166, to amend the Idaho Admission Act 
regarding the sale or lease of school land; H.R. 4313, to amend 
the Revised Organic Act of the Virgin Islands to provide that 
the number of members on the legislature of the Virgin Islands 
and the number of such members constituting a quorum shall be 
determined by the laws of the Virgin Islands; and H.R. 4389, to 
provide for the conveyance of various reclamation project 
facilities to local water authorities.
    September 2, 1998--Field hearing held in Pasco, Washington, 
on H.R. 4335, to transfer to the Secretary of the Interior the 
functions of the Secretary of Commerce and the National Marine 
Fisheries Service under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. 
Printed Hearing 105-111.
    September 3, 1998--Field hearing held in Boise, Idaho, on 
H.R. 4335, to transfer to the Secretary of the Interior the 
functions of the Secretary of Commerce and the National Marine 
Fisheries Service under the Endangered Species Act of 1973. 
Printed Hearing 105-111.
    September 16, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 1608, to authorize 
the Pyramid of Remembrance Foundation to establish a memorial 
in the District of Columbia or its environs to soldiers who 
have died in foreign conflicts other than declared wars; H.R. 
3088, to amend the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, 
regarding Huna Totem Corporation public interest land exchange; 
and H.R. 4223, Colusa Basin Watershed Integrated Resources 
Management Act.
    October 7, 1998--Approval of a Committee report concerning 
the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument. Report 105-
824.
    Hearing held on H.R. 2822, Swan Creek Black River 
Confederated Ojibwa Tribes of Michigan Act. Printed Hearing 
105-116.

B. Bills within the committee on resources' jurisdiction that were held 
        at the Speaker's desk and not referred to the Committee on 
        Resources

            Enacted into law
    S. 391, provides for the disposition of certain funds 
appropriated to pay judgment in favor of the Mississippi Sioux 
Indians, and for other purposes (Public Law 105-387).
    S. 538, authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to convey 
certain facilities of the Minidoka project to the Burley 
Irrigation District, and for other purposes (Public Law 105-
351).
    S. 587, requires the Secretary of the Interior to exchange 
certain lands located in Hinsdale County, Colorado (Public Law 
105-74).
    S. 588, provides for the expansion of the Eagles Nest 
Wilderness within the Arapaho National Forest and the White 
River National Forest, Colorado, to include land known as the 
Slate Creek Addition (Public Law 105-75).
    S. 589, provides for a boundary adjustment and land 
conveyance involving the Raggeds Wilderness, White River 
National Forest, Colorado, to correct the effects of earlier 
erroneous land surveys (Public Law 105-76).
    S. 591, transfers the Dillon Ranger District in the Arapaho 
National Forest to the White River National Forest in the State 
of Colorado (Public Law 105-77).
    S. 871, establishes the Oklahoma City National Memorial as 
a unit of the National Park System, to designate the Oklahoma 
City Memorial Trust, and for other purposes (Public Law 105-
58).
    S. 890, disposes of certain Federal properties located in 
Dutch John, Utah, to assist the local government in the interim 
delivery of basic services to the Dutch John community, and for 
other purposes (Public Law 105-326).
    S. 910, authorizes appropriations for carrying out the 
Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 for fiscal years 1998 
and 1999, and for other purposes (Public Law 105-47).
    S. 927, reauthorizes the Sea Grant Program (Public Law 105-
160).
    S. 931, designates the Marjory Stoneman Douglas Wilderness 
and the Ernest F. Coe Visitor Center (Public Law 105-82).
    S. 1559, provides for the design, construction, furnishing, 
and equipping of a Center for Historically Black Heritage 
within Florida A&M; University (Public Law 105-138).
    S. 1683, transfers administrative jurisdiction over part of 
the Lake Chelan National Recreation Area from the Secretary of 
the Interior to the Secretary of Agriculture for inclusion in 
the Wenatchee National Forest (Public Law 105-239).
    S. 2069, permits the mineral leasing of Indian land located 
within the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in any case in 
which there is consent from a majority interest in the parcel 
of land under consideration for lease (Public Law 105-188).
    S. 2106, expands the boundaries of Arches National Park, 
Utah, to include portions of certain drainages that are under 
the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management, and to 
include a portion of Fish Seep Draw owned by the State of Utah, 
and for other purposes (Public Law 105-329).
    S. 2413, prohibits the conveyance of Woodland Lake Park 
tract in Apache-Sitgreaves National Forest in the State of 
Arizona unless the conveyance is made to the town of Pinetop-
Lakeside or authorized by Act of Congress (Public Law 105-344).
            Passed House of Representatives
    S. 469, designate a portion of the Sudbury, Assabet, and 
Concord Rivers as a component of the National Wild and Scenic 
Rivers System. (Passed House amended).
    S. 1677, reauthorizes the North American Wetlands 
Conservation Act and the Partnerships for Wildlife Act. (Passed 
House amended).

C. Legislation enacted

    H.J. Res. 32, consents to certain amendments enacted by the 
Legislature of the State of Hawaii to the Hawaiian Homes 
Commission Act, 1920 (Public Law 105-21).
    H.R. 79, provides for the conveyance of certain land in the 
Six Rivers National Forest in the State of California for the 
benefit of the Hoopa Valley Tribe (Public Law 105-79).
    H.R. 700, removes the restriction on the distribution of 
certain revenues from the Mineral Springs parcel to certain 
members of the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians (Public 
Law 105-308).
    H.R. 1003, clarifies Federal law with respect to 
restricting the use of Federal funds in support of assisted 
suicide (Public Law 105-12).
    H.R. 1420, amends the National Wildlife Refuge System 
Administration Act of 1966 to improve the management of the 
National Wildlife Refuge System, and for other purposes (Public 
Law 105-57).
    H.R. 1460, allows for election of the Delegate from Guam by 
other than separate ballot, and for other purposes (Public Law 
105-209).
    H.R. 1476, settles certain Miccosukee Indian land takings 
claims within the State of Florida (enacted as part of Public 
Law 105-83).
    H.R. 1604, provides for the division, use, and distribution 
of judgment funds of the Ottawa and Chippewa Indians of 
Michigan pursuant to dockets numbered 18-E, 58, 364, and 18-R 
before the Indian Claims Commission (Public Law 105-143).
    H.R. 1948, provides for the exchange of lands within 
Admiralty Island National Monument (Public Law 105-60).
    H.R. 2000, amends the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act 
to make certain clarifications to the land bank protection 
provisions, and for other purposes (Public Law 105-333).
    H.R. 2259, provides for a transfer of land interests in 
order to facilitate surface transportation between the cities 
of Cold Bay, Alaska, and King Cove, Alaska, and for other 
purposes (enacted as part of Public Law 105-277).
    H.R. 2370, amends the Organic Act of Guam for the purposes 
of clarifying the local judicial structure and the office of 
Attorney General (Public Law 105-291).
    H.R. 2863, amends the Migratory Bird Treaty Act to clarify 
restrictions under that Act on baiting, to facilitate 
acquisition of migratory bird habitat, and for other purposes 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-312).
    H.R. 3042, amends the Morris K. Udall Scholarship and 
Excellence in National Environmental and Native American Public 
Policy Act of 1992 to establish the United States Institute for 
Environmental Conflict Resolution to conduct environmental 
conflict resolution and training, and for other purposes 
(Public Law 105-156).
    H.R. 3069, extends the Advisory Council on California 
Indian Policy to allow the Advisory Council to advise Congress 
on the implementation of the proposals and recommendations of 
the Advisory Council (Public Law 105-294).
    H.R. 3903, provides for an exchange of lands located near 
Gustavus, Alaska, and for other purposes (Public Law 105-317).
    H.R. 4068, makes certain technical corrections in laws 
relating to Native Americans, and for other purposes (Public 
Law 105-256).
    H.R. 4284, authorizes the Government of India to establish 
a memorial to honor Mahatma Gandhi in the District of Columbia 
(Public Law 105-284).
    H.R. 4326, transfers administrative jurisdiction over 
certain Federal lands located within or adjacent to the Rogue 
River National Forest and to clarify the authority of the 
Bureau of Land Management to sell and exchange other Federal 
lands in Oregon (Public Law 105-321).
    H.R. 4501, requires the Secretary of Agriculture and the 
Secretary of the Interior to conduct a study to improve the 
access for persons with disabilities to outdoor recreational 
opportunities made available to the public (Public Law 105-
359).
    S. 156, provides certain benefits of the Pick-Sloan 
Missouri River Basin program to the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe 
(Public Law 105-132).
    S. 1092, provides for a transfer of land interests in order 
to facilitate surface transportation between the cities of Cold 
Bay, Alaska, and King Cove, Alaska, and for other purposes 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-277).

D. Legislation passed House

    H. Con. Res. 151 (H. Rept. 105-330), expressing the sense 
of the Congress that the United States should manage its public 
domain National Forests to maximize the reduction of carbon 
dioxide in the atmosphere among many other objectives and that 
the United States should serve as an example and as a world 
leader in actively managing its public domain national forests 
in a manner that substantially reduces the amount of carbon 
dioxide added to the atmosphere.
    H. Res. 494 (H. Rept. 105-751), expressing the sense of the 
House of Representatives that the United States has enjoyed the 
loyalty of the United States citizens of Guam, and that the 
United States recognizes the centennial anniversary of the 
Spanish-American War as an opportune time for Congress to 
reaffirm its commitment to increase self-government consistent 
with self-determination for the people of Guam. -
    H.R. 856 (H. Rept. 105-131, Part I), to provide a process 
leading to full self-government for Puerto Rico.
    H.R. 901 (H. Rept. 105-245), to preserve the sovereignty of 
the United States over public lands and acquired lands owned by 
the United States, and to preserve State sovereignty and 
private property rights in non-Federal lands surrounding those 
public lands and acquired lands.
    H.R. 976 (H. Rept. 105-242), to provide for the disposition 
of certain funds appropriated to pay judgment in favor of the 
Mississippi Sioux Indians, and for other purposes. [See S. 391 
(P.L. 105-387) for further action]
    H.R. 1805 (H. Rept. 105-301), to amend the Auburn Indian 
Restoration Act to establish restrictions related to gaming on 
and use of land held in trust for the United Auburn Indian 
Community of the Auburn Rancheria of California.
    H.R. 1833 (H. Rept. 105-765), to amend the Indian Self-
Determination and Education Assistance Act to provide for 
further Self-Governance by Indian Tribes, and for other 
purposes.
    H.R. 2493 (H. Rept. 105-346, Part II), to establish a 
mechanism by which the Secretary of Agriculture and the 
Secretary of the Interior can provide for uniform management of 
livestock grazing on Federal lands.
    H.R. 2742 (H. Rept. 105-575), to provide for the transfer 
of public lands to certain California Indian Tribes.
    S. 1079, to permit the mineral leasing of Indian land 
located within the Fort Berthold Indian Reservation in any case 
in which there is consent from a majority interest in the 
parcel of land under consideration for lease. [See S. 2069 
(P.L. 105-188) for further action]

E. Legislation ordered reported by committee

    H.R. 478 (H. Rept. 105-75), to amend the Endangered Species 
Act of 1973 to improve the ability of individuals and local, 
State, and Federal agencies to comply with that Act in 
building, operating, maintaining, or repairing flood control 
projects, facilities, or structures.
    H.R. 752 (H. Rept. 105-42), to amend the Endangered Species 
Act of 1973 to ensure that persons that suffer or are 
threatened with injury resulting from a violation of the Act or 
a failure of the Secretary to act in accordance with the Act 
have standing to commence a civil suit on their own behalf.
    H.R. 757 (H. Rept. 105-38), to develop the economy of 
American Samoa.
    H.R. 948 (H. Rept. 105-351), to reaffirm and clarify the 
Federal relationship of the Burt Lake Band as a distinct 
federally recognized Indian Tribe, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 1154 (H. Rept. 105-737), to provide for administrative 
procedures to extend Federal recognition to certain Indian 
groups, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 1842 (H. Rept. 105-781), to terminate further 
development and implementation of the American Heritage Rivers 
Initiative.
    H.R. 1983 (H. Rept. 105-692), to amend the Rhode Island 
Indian Claims Settlement Act to conform that Act with the 
judgments of the United States Federal Courts regarding the 
rights and sovereign status of certain Indian Tribes, including 
the Narragansett Tribe, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 2314 (H. Rept. 105-707, Part I), to restore Federal 
Indian services to members of the Kickapoo Tribe of Oklahoma 
residing in Maverick County, Texas, to clarify United States 
citizenship status of such members, to provide trust land for 
the benefit of the Tribe, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 2756 (H. Rept. 105-783), to authorize an exchange of 
property between the Kake Tribal Corporation and the Sealaska 
Corporation and the United States.
    H.R. 2812 (H. Rept. 105-716), to provide for the 
recognition of certain Native communities under the Alaska 
Native Claims Settlement Act, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 3087 (H. Rept. 105-782), to require the Secretary of 
Agriculture to grant an easement to Chugach Alaska Corporation.
    H.R. 3088 (H. Rept. 105-784), to amend the Alaska Native 
Claims Settlement Act regarding Huna Totem Corporation public 
interest land exchange, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 3797 (H. Rept. 105-696), to compensate the Wyandotte 
Tribe of Oklahoma for the taking of certain rights by the 
Federal Government, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 4313, to amend the Revised Organic Act of the Virgin 
Islands to provide that the number of members of the 
legislature of the Virgin Islands and the number of such 
members constituting a quorum shall be determined by the laws 
of the Virgin Islands.
    H.R. 4389 (H. Rept. 105-785), to provide for the conveyance 
of various reclamation project facilities to local water 
authorities, and for other purposes.
    S. 459, to amend the Native American Programs Act of 1974 
to extend certain authorizations, and for other purposes. [Re-
referred to Committee on Education and the Workplace on October 
30, 1997.]

F. Reports approved by the Committee on Resources

    House Report 105-569, Abuse of Power: Hardrock Bonding 
Rule.
    House Report 105-824, Monumental Abuse: the Clinton 
Administration's Campaign of Misinformation In the 
Establishment of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National 
Monument.

      IV. oversight activities of the full committee on resources

A. Introduction

    Trans-Alaska Pipeline: As of the 104th Congress, the 
Committee on Resources expanded its jurisdiction over the 
Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS). The Committee will 
continue its thorough oversight of the operation and safety of 
the pipeline. The Committee is particularly concerned that the 
repairs and maintenance upgrades agreed to by the operator of 
the pipeline (Alyeska Pipeline Service Company) as a result of 
Federal and internal audits, be sufficiently completed. The 
Committee will closely follow implementation of Alyeska's 
Quality Plan and the Native Utilization Agreement. Regular 
briefings and consultation will be required from Alyeska and 
the regulating agencies through the Joint Pipeline Office. In 
addition, Committee staff will perform field inspections of 
Alyeska equipment and facilities at least once a year to assess 
compliance and Alyeska's efforts and planning to manage 
declining crude oil throughout. A Member field inspection of 
the pipeline may occur as part of an Alaska issues field trip.
    The Committee continued to monitor the implementation of 
Alyeska's Quality Plan and Native Utilization Agreement. 
Committee staff performed field inspections and a Member field 
inspection occurred in August of 1997.
    Alaska Public Lands: In addition to the Trans-Alaska 
Pipeline, the full Committee retains jurisdiction over public 
lands in Alaska. The enormous mineral reserves, including 
petroleum, are of interest to the Committee. As the situation 
warrants, the Committee may hold one or more hearings on issues 
related to potential petroleum production in the Arctic 
National Wildlife Refuge. The National Petroleum Reserve-Alaska 
is the subject of renewed interest by the State of Alaska and 
the oil and gas industry. During this Congress, the Committee 
may hold an oversight hearing on the Department of the 
Interior's planning study of this area and any further 
development restrictions the Administration may pursue and to 
ensure that lease decisions are not overly process-oriented.
    Briefings by the Bureau of Land Management and by the 
Secretary of the Interior's Special Assistant for Alaska were 
held regarding plans for leasing a portion of the National 
Petroleum Reserve-Alaska for oil and gas development. The 
Chairman additionally submitted comments on the Bureau of Land 
Management planning document for such leasing. The Committee 
also held hearings on legislation to resolve a number of local 
land-use conflicts and problems in Alaska. The Committee's 
oversight of oil and gas leasing in this region continues.
    Matters Related to the Tongass National Forest: The Forest 
Service is expected to release its revision of the Tongass Land 
Management Plan in early 1997. Extensive oversight on the land 
management planning process used to compose the plan is needed. 
Criticisms of the draft plan and the planning process include 
the very expensive nature of the plan, the length of time taken 
to compose the plan, the questionable procedures used to gather 
information on the plan,the shallow scientific basis for the 
plan, and the lack of study on the community economic effects 
associated with options under the draft plan alternatives. Each of 
these may be reviewed in oversight proceedings.
    The Committee held two days of hearings with the Senate 
Energy and Natural Resources Committee on the Final Draft of 
the Tongass Land Management Plan as the first step in the 
Congressional review process provided by the 1996 amendments to 
the Regulatory Flexibility Act.
    Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Lease sales for oil 
exploration in the portion of the Arctic National Wildlife 
Refuge (ANWR) that is known as the ``1002 Area'' or the 
``Coastal Plain'' (an area reserved for oil exploration) was 
authorized in the Balanced Budget Act of 1995, but the Act was 
vetoed by the President. The Committee intends to conduct 
further oversight hearings on the strong justifications for 
authorizing such oil lease sales and appropriate environmental 
safeguards when exploration and production of oil begin in 
ANWR. Hearings expected to be held.
    Several Members of the Committee traveled to Alaska in 1997 
and flew over the 1002 area of ANWR, and also landed in the 
only Native village located there, where a meeting was held 
with the local village leaders. The Committee also monitored 
the U.S. Geological Survey's revised assessment of the oil and 
gas potential in the 1002 area. H.R. 4755 was introduced by the 
Chairman Don Young, to provide for the collection and 
interpretation of non-intrusive 3-dimensional seismic data on 
the 1002 area.
    Endangered Species Act Reauthorization: The Endangered 
Species Act (ESA) was last reauthorized in 1988 for four years. 
During the 104th Congress, the Committee on Resources focused a 
great deal of oversight on the implementation and 
administration of the ESA resulting in the introduction of H.R. 
2275, the Endangered Species Conservation and Management Act of 
1995. Although H.R. 2275 was reported by the Committee on 
Resources, it was not brought up by the House of 
Representatives. No further legislative action was taken on the 
ESA in the House of Representatives. However, the Committee on 
Resources held an additional five oversight hearings on the 
implementation and administration of the ESA.
    During the 105th Congress, the Committee plans to continue 
to hold oversight hearings on the Endangered Species Act. It is 
expected that legislation will be introduced during the 105th 
Congress to address many of the concerns raised in H.R. 2275 
and as a result of oversight hearings.
    Major issues that continue to be of concern include the 
credibility of the science used to list species, greater 
inclusion of States and local governments in ESA decision 
making, reducing frivolous litigation, protecting the rights of 
private property owners, ensuring that the goals of the ESA are 
reached through greater landowner incentives, determining 
whether the recovery goals of the ESA are being achieved, 
ensuring that the ESA does not impede important Federal laws 
and missions, particularly those designed to protect public 
health and safety, ensuring greater public involvement, greater 
consideration of socio-economic impacts, and others.
    During the 105th Congress, the Committee continued its 
oversight of the ESA. However, there was no comprehensive 
legislation introduced in the House of Representatives to 
rewrite the ESA. However, the Senate Committee on Environment 
and Public Works reported S. 1180 which was a broad rewrite of 
the ESA. S. 1180 was not passed by the Senate.
    On March 12, 1997, a markup was held on H.R. 752, ``The 
Citizen's Fair Hearing Act of 1997'', to ensure that persons 
who suffer or are threatened with injury resulting from a 
violation of the ESA or a failure of the Secretaries of the 
Interior or Commerce to act in accordance with the ESA have 
standing to commence a civil suit on their own behalf. This 
legislation was the result of an oversight hearing held on 
September 17, 1996, on the issue of standing to sue under the 
ESA. The issue was resolved in a unanimous decision by the 
Supreme Court on March 19, 1997, in Bennett v. Spear, 117 S. 
Ct. 1154, in which the court held that persons who were 
asserting an economic injury as a result of action under the 
ESA had standing to challenge the action in court. This made 
further action on the bill unnecessary since the Supreme Court 
decision was consistent with H.R. 752.
    On April 10, 1997, the Committee held a hearing in 
Washington, D.C. and via teleconference in Sacramento, 
California, on H.R. 478, to improve the ability of individuals 
and local, State, and Federal agencies to comply with the ESA 
in building, operating, maintaining, or repairing existing 
flood control projects, facilities, or structures and to 
determine whether Federal wildlife policies have impeded proper 
ongoing maintenance and repair of flood control structures.
    The bill was favorably reported as amended on April 16, 
1997, and considered by the House of Representatives on May 7, 
1997. After an amendment in the nature of a substitute was 
adopted, the bill was withdrawn prior to a vote on final 
passage.
    On March 5, 1998 an oversight hearing was held in 
Washington, D.C. on regional differences in the manner in which 
the ESA is implemented.
    On July 15, 1998, an oversight hearing was held on the 
implementation of the ESA in the Southwestern region of the 
United States.
    On September 2 and 3, 1998, oversight field hearings were 
held in Pasco, Washington, and Boise, Idaho, on the National 
Marine Fisheries Service role in implementing the ESA and on 
H.R. 4335 to transfer to the Secretary of the Interior the 
functions of the Secretary of Commerce and the National Marine 
Fisheries Services under the ESA.
    On October 26, 1998, the Full Committee conducted a field 
hearing in Clovis, New Mexico, on how the ESA has been 
implemented in New Mexico.
    UNESCO World Heritage Sites and Biosphere Reserves: On 
September 12, 1996, the Committee held an oversight hearing on 
designation of United Nations' World Heritage Sites and 
Biosphere Reserves in the United States. The Committee found 
that these designations can result in further centralization of 
policy-making authority at the Federal level, particularly in 
the Executive Branch. They also result in less chance for input 
into land use decisions by individuals and affect the use and 
market value of private lands adjacent to or intermixed with 
Federal lands. The Committee plans a field hearing in New York 
and another in Wyoming to further examine problems associated 
with these land use designations. It is anticipated that 
legislation will be sent to the House to correct the problems 
identified with these programs after these hearings are 
concluded. The hearings will be held.
    The Committee held an oversight field hearing on 
designation of United Nations World Heritage Sites and 
Biosphere Reserves in the United States at Tannersville, New 
York, on May 5, 1997. Without involving Congress, these 
designations give the Executive Branch a role in governing 
Federal lands that is in direct conflict with Article IV, 
section 3 of the Constitution which vests the power to make all 
needful rules and regulations governing lands belonging to the 
United States in the Congress. The Committee has found that 
these designations are made with little or no input from the 
affected local government, and that they result in further 
centralization of policy-making authority at the Federal level, 
particularly in the Executive Branch. They also affect the use 
and market value of private lands adjacent to or intermixed 
with Federal lands. Chairman Don Young introduced H.R. 901, The 
American Land Sovereignty Protection Act, to correct the 
problems identified with these international land use programs. 
The Committee held a legislative hearing on H.R. 901 on June 
10, 1997, and favorably reported the bill on June 25, 1997. The 
House passed H.R. 901 on October 8, 1997 by a vote of 236 to 
191.
    Environmental Matters in General: The Full Committee 
retains jurisdiction over environmental measures and matters 
generally as they affect fish, wildlife, public domain lands 
and other resources within the Committee's jurisdiction. Many 
such measures are costly and may not produce tangible 
environmental benefits. The Committee may conduct oversight on 
the National Environmental Policy Act, particularly as it 
relates to project level Environmental Impact Statements for 
timber sale activities conducted in National Forests and Bureau 
of Land Management lands.
    The Committee conducted oversight, including a hearing, on 
the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). The 
Administration admitted that it has ``not well implemented'' 
NEPA and testified to the shortcomings of NEPA: the huge 
proliferation of a purely paperwork bureaucracy; the 
unwarranted and unwise level of minutia into which NEPA delves; 
the sham of public participation when decisions have really 
been made already; the lack of collaboration among the Federal 
agencies; the Federal confrontations with state, local, and 
tribal governments; the intolerable delays in the disjointed 
process; the overly technical nature of the paperwork; the 
excruciating large amount of paperwork; the needless 
duplication of work; the endless litigation of NEPA; and thus 
the waste of taxpayers' money which can be better spent.
            Alaska native issues
    Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act Amendments: Chairman 
Don Young expects to reintroduce H.R. 2505, Alaska Native 
Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) technical amendments. The bill 
passed the House in the 104th Congress; however, the Senate 
took no action on the bill. Hearings may be needed to assist in 
formulating any modifications. No objections from 
Administration should occur with the last version of H.R. 2505.
    Chairman Don Young reintroduced an Alaska Native Claims 
Settlement Act (ANCSA) technical amendments bill (H.R. 2000) 
which was enacted into law.
    Alaska Native Veterans Allotment Bill (H.R. 2924): Alaska 
Native Veterans who served in the military during the Korean 
and Vietnam eras missed their deadline to apply for native 
allotment lands. The Department of the Interior (DOI) first 
supported opening an allotment application process for veterans 
only, then did an about face. In Public Law 104-42, Congress 
directed the DOI and the Department of Veterans Affairs to 
determine how many Alaska Native veterans missed out in this 
application process, which lands are available for possible 
selections, etc. DOI had until August of 1996 to submit this 
report. However, they were late with the report to Congress. 
Oversight hearings will be held with input from the State of 
Alaska, Alaska Native veterans and DOI.
    An oversight hearing was held in late 1997. Language was 
attached to the 1998 Interior Appropriations bill which 
authorized an ``opening'' of the application process for 
certain Alaska Native veterans. Additionally, the language 
called for a study with respect to the number of Alaska Native 
veterans who are affected by the limited dates of 1968-1975 for 
eligibility for an allotment. All other Vietnam agency programs 
use August 5, 1964 through May 7, 1975, the full extent of the 
Vietnam war. The Department of the Interior opposed using the 
full extent of the war years for eligibility for Alaska Natives 
to apply for their native allotment, thereby discriminating 
against a group of people who are eligible for other veteran 
benefits.
    Hazardous Waste Contaminants on Alaska Native Regional 
Corporation Lands: Public Law 104-42 directed DOI to conduct a 
study on hazardous wastes on lands transferred to Alaska Native 
Regional Corporations under ANCSA. DOI should have submitted 
its report to Congress by May 2, 1997. Based on the DOI 
exported report, legislation would have been introduced to help 
Native Corporations clean up any contaminated lands previously 
owned/used by the Federal government, then transferred to 
corporations under ANCSA. Oversight hearings on this issue will 
occur to examine liability issues, which are a major concern 
with cleanup efforts.
    As of December 1998, the DOI has failed to submit its 
report to Congress (which was due May 2, 1997) with regard to 
hazardous wastes on lands transferred to Alaska Native Regional 
Corporations under ANCSA. Again, the DOI is over a year late on 
important land issues with respect to Alaska Native Regional 
Corporation lands transferred pursuant to ANCSA.
    Alaska ``Indian Country'' Ruling: The Committee will 
closely monitor the effects of recent court rulings concerning 
the applicability of ``Indian County'' status within Alaska and 
the Committee may hold oversight hearings as needed.
    The Committee continued to monitor this situation and may 
hold oversight hearings next Congress if needed.
    Indian Child Welfare Act Amendments: An oversight hearing 
on the issues raised in H.R. 3828, the Indian Child Welfare Act 
Amendments, (which was introduced in the 104th Congress) and 
other aspects of the Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) may occur 
as needed before reintroduction of legislation.
    An oversight hearing was held on June 18, 1997, on H.R. 
3828/S. 1082, the Indian Child Welfare Act Amendments.
    Alaska Native Commission Report Follow-up: Based on the 
study that the Alaska Federation of Natives (AFN) is expected 
to complete by the end of this fiscal year, Chairman Don Young 
may conduct oversight on social problems of alcoholism, drug 
abuse, unemployment and domestic issues concerning Alaska 
Natives.
    The report is still being finalized. Oversight on this 
report should occur next Congress.
    Interior Appropriations Requests for Alaska: Chairman Young 
receives annual Interior Appropriations requests from different 
Native entities in Alaska for the Bureau of Indian Affairs, 
Indian Health Service and other native programs funded within 
this appropriations bill. As needed, oversight hearings may be 
scheduled on matters related to authorizing language that forms 
the basis for the appropriations requests.
    The Committee continued to monitor these requests and will 
hold oversight hearings next Congress on measures related to 
authorizing language.
    National Park System Management in Alaska Near Native 
Lands: The Committee plans to hold hearings to understand the 
way the National Park System is managed in Alaska and elsewhere 
in the U.S. and the role of Native Alaskans in the National 
Park System. An oversight hearing on the issues raised in H.R. 
3828, the Indian Child Welfare Act Amendments, (which was 
introduced in the 104th Congress) and other aspects of the 
Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) may occur as needed before 
reintroduction of that bill.
    The Committee was unable to schedule hearings on this issue 
due to time constraints and expects to follow up on this issue 
next Congress.
            Native American Affairs
    Budget Overview: Hearings will be held on that portion of 
the President's budget proposal which relates to Native 
Americans.
    No specific hearings were held on the President's budget 
for Native American issues; however, the Committee continued to 
review the President's budget requests.
    Indian Gaming: The Committee will oversee the many problems 
which plague the implementation of the 1988 Indian Gaming 
Regulatory Act, as well as the operation of the Indian Gaming 
Commission created pursuant to that Act.
    Efforts to amend the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act of 1988 
have focused upon a series of ongoing negotiations between 
representatives of the Tribes, representatives of the State's 
governors, representatives of the States' Attorneys General, 
and Congressional staff. Although the conduct of Indian gaming 
has resulted in extensive litigation throughout the Nation, the 
105th Congress, like those Congresses preceding it, was unable 
to craft and pass any meaningful legislation which would 
resolve the many gaming-related issues in dispute between 
Tribes and the States.
    Reorganization of the Bureau of Indian Affairs: The 
Committee will review ongoing efforts to reorganize the Bureau 
of Indian Affairs (BIA). It is alleged that the BIA has 
suffered from a bureau-wide loss of experienced personnel. The 
Committee continues to hear from Tribes which contend that most 
of the funds appropriated to the BIA are spent on Washington 
bureaucrats instead of the needs of Tribes.
    The Committee staff continued its efforts to review various 
proposals to reorganize the Bureau of Indian Affairs.
    Mismanagement of Indian Trust Accounts: In the Summer of 
1997 and again in the Spring of 1998, the Committee will review 
remedial steps taken by the Department of the Interior to 
terminate once and for all the mismanagement of Indian Trust 
Accounts. Funds which tribes and individual tribal members 
recover from land or water settlements, treaty provisions, oil 
or gas leases, hard rock mineral leases, timber sales, and so 
forth, are deposited in trust fund accounts managed by the 
Office of Trust Fund Management. As of January 1997, hundreds 
of thousands of these accounts could not be reconciled.
    A strategic plan, formulated by the Special Trustee for 
Native Americans and to be implemented by the Secretary, will 
be reviewed in late 1997 and early 1998. Oversight hearings may 
occur subsequent to submittal of the plan.
    Committee staff reviewed actions taken by the Department of 
the Interior to audit and account for the documented 
mismanagement of Indian trust accounts. These accounts, which 
consist of much of the money which tribes have received in 
years past from land or water settlements or treaty provisions, 
and which individual tribal members receive from the same 
sources or from oil or gas leases on reservation, are now 
managed by the Office of Trust Fund Management, an entity which 
has been removed from the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) and 
placed within the Office of the Secretary of the Department of 
the Interior. In addition, the ongoing policy disagreements 
between the Secretary of the Interior and the Office of the 
Special Trustee for American Indians continues to be reviewed 
by Committee staff.
    Regulation Reform: The Committee will review, in the Summer 
of 1997 and again in the Summer of 1998, the need for and 
advisability of reducing and eliminating those Federal rules 
and regulations falling within its jurisdiction which relate to 
Native Americans.
    As in years past the Committee continued in its efforts to 
review the need for and advisability of reducing and 
eliminating those Federal rules and regulations falling within 
its jurisdiction. Hearings were not held but may become 
necessary during the 106th Congress.
            Insular Affairs
    Resolving Puerto Rico's Political Status: The Puerto Rico 
Legislature, representing 3.8 million U.S. citizens in this 
American territory in the Caribbean, has requested that the 
105th Congress authorize a process to resolve their political 
status problem. Puerto Rico has successfully demonstrated the 
ability to operate under a local constitutional government 
first authorized and then conditionally approved by the 
Congress in 1950 and 1952, respectively. However, in spite of 
the decades of democratic changes of a republican form of local 
constitutional government under the U.S. Constitution, Puerto 
Rico has yet to achieve a permanent form of full self-
government. Puerto Rico held a referendum in 1993 with locally 
defined status options in which an enhanced ``commonwealth'' 
received a plurality of 48 percent, statehood 46 percent, and 
independence 4 percent. The Committee on Resources considered 
and overwhelmingly rejected on a bipartisan basis the enhanced 
``commonwealth'' ballot definition as unconstitutional and 
fiscally and politically inviable. The Puerto Rico 
Legislature's request makes it clear that permanent 
disenfranchisement is unacceptable, and that the U.S. must 
define the political status options of a final relationship of 
dignity to both parties.
    The United States-Puerto Rico Political Status Act, 
reported by the Committee on Resources as H.R. 3024 and 
subsequently updated as H.R. 4281 in the 104th Congress, 
provides a bipartisan and balanced framework ``to provide a 
process leading to full self-government for Puerto Rico.'' The 
legislation would have authorized a referendum in Puerto Rico 
before the end of 1998, in which the people would choose 
between separate sovereignty, statehood, or continuing the 
current Commonwealth of Puerto Rico structure of local self-
government as a territory. The vote would be repeated every 
four years until a majority of the people are ready to proceed 
toward complete enfranchisement under separate sovereignty or 
statehood. A transition plan of 10 years is required with a 
majority vote for separate sovereignty or statehood. Both 
Congress and the people of Puerto Rico would have been required 
to approve the transition plan. Similarly, the bill would have 
required a final implementation act to be approved by both 
Congress and the people of Puerto Rico. The legislation would 
have been a self-determination process, as the people of Puerto 
Rico have the final say in each of the three stages after 
Congress acts. The proposed legislation would have required 
English to be the official language of Federal courts and 
Federal agencies in Puerto Rico under statehood, required 
English language incentives in any statehood transition plan, 
and encouraged enhancement of the existing century old law in 
Puerto Rico establishing English as an official language while 
respecting the Tenth Amendment rights of the people and the 
state.
    Hearings on the legislation are expected to be held in 
Washington, D.C., and Puerto Rico to obtain views of the 
Administration, leaders of Puerto Rico, and individuals and 
organizations in Puerto Rico. A similar bill was introduced in 
the Senate in the 104th Congress and a bicameral effort is 
anticipated in the 105th Congress to enable the people of 
Puerto Rico to voice their preference in 1998 towards a final 
political status.
    Legislation was introduced to authorize a long-term process 
to resolve the United States' political status problem with the 
nearly four million U.S. citizens in the American territory of 
Puerto Rico, the United States-Puerto Rico Political Status Act 
(H.R. 856). Hearings were conducted in Washington and Puerto 
Rico prior to the passage of the bill by the Committee and 
subsequently the full House. The Senate then held five 
oversight and legislative hearings related Puerto Rico status 
legislation and H.R.856 and ultimately passed Senate Resolution 
279 endorsing a referendum in Puerto Rico, consistent with the 
intent of the House approved bill. The Government of Puerto 
Rico scheduled a referendum for December 1998 to petition 
Congress about their relationship with the U.S., using 
definitions consistent with H.R.856 and recognizing that only 
Congress can change Puerto Rico's status.
    Enforcement of Federal Criminal Laws in American Samoa: The 
Department of Justice forwarded a proposal to Congress in 
October 1996 to establish for the first time Federal court 
jurisdiction in American Samoa. A December 1994 report on 
white-collar crime in American Samoa from the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation indicated action was required by the Federal 
government to prosecute alleged violations of Federal law. 
However, without Federal district court jurisdiction, the 
Department of Justice claimed there could be no enforcement. 
There exists strong concern from leaders in all three branches 
of the American Samoa Government that the Department of Justice 
and the Department of the Interior have not adequately sought 
local input for a solution. Given the unique land tenure system 
and extended family structures, which areprimary factors in 
Samoan culture and are referenced in the original Deeds of Cession 
recognized by Congress, the Committee will obtain views from the 
leaders of American Samoa to develop appropriate measures to prosecute 
white-collar crime. A field hearing before the end of 1997 is important 
to gain the widest participation from the people of American Samoa as 
the Committee determines the best approach to enforce violations. The 
Committee expects to develop legislative recommendations with the 
Committee on the Judiciary.
    Oversight field meetings were conducted in American Samoa 
with the three branches of the Government of American Samoa 
regarding the Federal Department of Justice proposal to 
establish Federal court jurisdiction. Additional meetings were 
held in Washington with Federal and American Samoa officials 
about enforcement of Federal laws and alternatives to prosecute 
criminal violations in Federal and local Samoan courts.
    Compliance with Inspector General Audit Recommendations: 
The Inspector General of the Department of the Interior has 
conducted audits in the insular areas, citing numerous 
problems, some with estimated costs in the hundreds of millions 
of dollars. The recommendations contained in the audits are 
often ignored by the insular governments, even after repeated 
written and oral contacts. As the insular areas receive Federal 
programs and funds, the misuse of funds or mismanagement of 
resources, whether local or federal, creates liabilities which 
are ultimately born by the U.S. taxpayers. The 104th Congress 
set conditions for the receipt of certain Federal funds by an 
insular area. The Committee will examine alternative measures 
to condition the receipt of certain funding with compliance by 
insular areas with major Inspector General Audit 
recommendations. Discussions will be conducted with the 
Administration and the insular areas and hearings held on 
specific legislative approaches.
    Meetings were held with Federal officials regarding 
Inspector General audit reports and the lack of adequate 
response by the insular governments. Alternative legislative 
and executive approaches to ensuring compliance with audit 
recommendations and conditional receipt of Federal funds were 
discussed.
    Self-Sufficiency Initiatives for the Virgin Islands and 
American Samoa: The Committee will consider the request of 
leaders of the Virgin Islands and American Samoa for the 
establishment of limited duration, non-paid, public-private 
commissions to identify specific economic development 
strategies and recommendations. Any such legislatively created 
commissions to develop credible and effective fiscal and 
economic recommendations for private sector led development in 
these territories will require private sector input, 
consideration of the unique cultural and historical 
characteristics and geographic resources of the islands, and 
timely conclusion of the commissions. This will be accomplished 
through oversight hearings.
    Hearings were conducted to consider legislation to provide 
for executive branch commissions to identify specific economic 
development strategies and recommendations for American Samoa 
and the United States Virgin Islands, the American Samoa 
Development Act (H.R. 757) and the Omnibus Territories Act (S. 
210). The Committee approved H.R. 757 and it was placed on the 
Union Calendar for consideration by the House. The 
Administration subsequently established an economic development 
commission for the same purpose through existing authority, 
after formally supporting the objectives of H.R. 757 to analyze 
and plan for the economic future of American Samoa. There are 
indications that the Administration will also support directed 
efforts for economic development in the U.S. Virgin Islands.
    Changes to the Organic Acts of Guam and the Virgin Islands: 
The Committee will review proposals from the elected leaders of 
the U.S. territories of Guam and the Virgin Islands to amend 
certain provisions of their respective organic acts which 
provide the legal basis for the governance of these areas. 
Congressional action is required in absence of the adoption of 
local constitutions which Congress has already authorized to 
advance the territories toward self-government but without 
limiting the territories' further progress towards full self-
government. The Committee will consider legislative measures to 
effectuate the requested changes to the organic acts of Guam 
and the Virgin Islands.
    Hearings were held on changes to the organic acts and 
certain Federal laws pertaining to Guam and the Virgin Islands: 
the Guam Ballot Requirement (H.R. 1460), the Guam Organic Act 
(H.R. 2370), the Omnibus Territories Act (S. 210), and the 
Revised Organic Act of the Virgin Islands (H.R. 4313). Meetings 
were also conducted in both Guam and the Virgin Islands with 
leaders regarding various proposals to increase the powers of 
local self-government by changing Federal laws which provide 
the legal basis for the governance of these areas, as neither 
territory has yet to adopt constitutions. The House approved 
and the Congress enacted into law H.R. 1460 and H.R. 2370.
    Changes to the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act: The Committee 
will consider legislative action early in 1997 consenting to 
changes to the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act 1920 proposed by 
the State of Hawaii. The Hawaii State Legislature enacted 
measures to provide certain changes to the Hawaiian Homes 
Commission Act, which although they do not result in any 
increased cost to the Federal government, are helpful to Native 
Hawaiians. One provision would permit grandchildren of a Native 
Hawaiian leaseholder to assume the remainder of the home lease 
should that individual die. Another provision would facilitate 
certain disaster relief bonds. Congress must act on any 
proposed change to the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act by the 
State of Hawaii pursuant to the 1959 Hawaii State Admissions 
Act.
    The Committee approved legislation emphasizing the 
importance of the extended family and self-reliance among 
Native Hawaiians by permitting people awarded Hawaiian 
homesteads to be able to designate grandchildren as successors 
and separately to permit the issuance of hurricane insurance 
coverage for lessees of Hawaiian home lands, the Hawaiian Homes 
Commission Act Amendments (H.J. Res. 32). This measure 
subsequently was approved by the House and Senate and became 
public law (P.L. 105-21).
    Oversight of the Compacts of Free Association: The U.S. 
special free association relationship with the separate 
sovereign nations of the Republic of the Marshall Islands and 
the Federated States of Micronesia embodied in compacts of free 
association requires the Executive Branch to enter into 
negotiations during the next Congress. The Committee will 
conduct discussions and oversight hearings in the freely 
associated states by the end of 1997 and in early 1998 to 
establish a record and gain input on the effectiveness of 
Federal programs and funding to date and possible changes which 
will enhance the United States-Freely Associated States 
relationships. A joint hearing with the Committee on 
International Relations' Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific 
is intended to build on the cooperative efforts of the 104th 
Congress of the two committees of jurisdiction for the Compacts 
of Free Association.
    Oversight meetings were held in the freely associated 
states with leaders of the Republic of the Marshall Islands, 
the Federated States of Micronesia and the Republic of Palau, 
and U.S. officials regarding the current and prospective 
special free association relationship between the U.S. and 
islands of the former U.S. administered trust territory. On-
site inspections were conducted with Federal and Palauan 
officials of the proposed Compact road around the big island in 
Palau to insure appropriate compliance with Federal auditing, 
safety, and environmental standards in this major U.S. funded 
project. Additional discussions were conducted in Washington 
with officials of the freely associated states and the U.S. 
State, Defense, Interior, and Energy Departments. A hearing was 
held on introduced legislation calling for Program Extension 
For Communities In The Former United States Trust Territory 
(H.R. 1460), and also the Omnibus Territories Act (S. 210). The 
provision in H.R. 1460 was approved by the House and Senate and 
became law. A joint oversight hearing on the Compacts of Free 
Association was held with the Committee and the Committee on 
International Relations' Subcommittee on Asia and the Pacific.
    Consideration of Plan for Guam Excess Lands: The Committee 
will examine plans to dispose of Federal land in Guam which the 
Federal government has or will declare as excess to the needs 
of the military, who owns nearly one-third of the territory. An 
oversight hearing will be held by mid-1997 regarding the 
Government of Guam's plan for local public benefit use of 
certain Federal excess land on Guam and the Administration's 
progress in completing appraisals of those parcels as required 
in Public Law 103-339. Also during the first half of 1997, the 
Committee will also consider enacting legislation to establish 
a U.S. policy providing Guam with the initial opportunity to 
claim Federal land declared as excess.
    The Committee held a hearing to examine legislative 
proposals for a streamlined policy process for the disposition 
of Federal land in Guam declared excess by the Federal 
government, the Omnibus Territories Act (S. 210). Oversight 
discussions were conducted in Guam on plans to dispose of 
Federal land in Guam which the Federal government has or will 
declare as excess to the needs of the military. Meetings were 
conducted in Washington with Guam within U.S. officials 
regarding the completion of the transfer to Guam of Federal 
land authorized in Public Law 103-339.
    Advancing Hazardous Waste Clean-up Plans in the Northern 
Mariana Islands: The dynamic economy of the territory of the 
Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (NMI) requires 
timely implementation of hazardous waste clean-up and 
construction of a new landfill. Although an administrative 
compliance order is in effect regarding a phased hazardous 
waste clean-up schedule in Saipan, certain Federal agencies 
have not committed to pay their respective part of the 
hazardous waste clean-up plan. The Committee will conduct 
discussions and oversight field hearings with Federal agencies 
and the NMI government in the Marianas and in Washington, D.C., 
to advance the implementation of hazardous waste clean-up plans 
to ensure continuity in the increasingly self-sufficient 
economy.
    Oversight discussions were held with Federal officials 
regarding the Federal responsibilities in the court-ordered 
compliance with Federal environmental standards for the 
outdated waste disposal site in the Commonwealth of the 
Northern Mariana Islands. Inspections were conducted with NMI 
officials of the hazardous waste disposal site and the proposed 
new disposal locations. Meetings were held in Washington with 
NMI leaders regarding funding allocated for the establishment 
of an alternative waste disposal site and completion of 
hazardous waste clean-up plans meeting the court-ordered 
compliance.
            Additional oversight hearings held
    Government Performance and Results Act/Year 2000 Computer 
Problem: The Committee held a hearing on the Government 
Performance and Results Act as well as the Year 2000 computer 
problem. The Acting Inspector General for the Department of the 
Interior and the U.S. General Accounting Office (GAO) said 
Interior is not setting appropriate goals or measuring progress 
as required by law. Barry T. Hill with the GAO testified that 
Interior's plans ``do not provide a clear picture of intended 
performance.'' And he said Interior failed to come up with 
concrete plans to address many of the specific problem areas 
his agency and Congress have identified in recent years. They 
include:
    (1) Improving management of Indian trust funds, where 
accountability over its $3 billion in assets is shaky.
    (2) Prioritizing maintenance needs in parks.
    (3) Consolidating similar activities across its agencies 
such as the park service, wildlife service and the Bureau of 
Land Management to save money.
    The Acting Interior Inspector General said his review of 
the Interior land management agencies concluded they ``had 
inadequate management controls and/or insufficient funding to 
effectively manage their operations and maintenance activities 
and consequently, the inventory of needed facility repairs and 
rehabilitations has increased significantly in recent years. 
GAO also warned that Interior agencies may not be moving fast 
enough, something that Interior officials dispute, to solve its 
Year 2000 computer problems. He said many of Interior's key 
systems still have the problem where older programming contains 
only the last two digits of a year--so they will assume the 
year 2000 is actually 1900, which can cause a malfunction when 
2000 comes.

B. Oversight hearings

    April 9, 1997--Joint oversight hearing held with the 
Committee on Agriculture on the report on forest health by the 
Forest Health Science Panel requested by Representative Charles 
Taylor. Printed Hearing 105-1
    May 1, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the provision in the 
1997 Omnibus Appropriations Act which removed the Narragansett 
Indian Tribe of Rhode Island from the coverage of the Indian 
Gaming Regulatory Act. Printed Hearing 105-25 (See H.R. 1983)
    July 9, 1997--Joint oversight hearing with Senate Committee 
on Energy and Natural Resources on the Final Draft of the 
Tongass Land Management Plan as the first step in the 
Congressional review process provided by the 1996 amendments to 
the Regulatory Flexibility Act. Printed Hearing 105-48
    July 10, 1997--Joint oversight hearing with Senate 
Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on the Final Draft of 
the Tongass Land Management Plan as the first step in the 
Congressional review process provided by the 1996 amendments to 
the Regulatory Flexibility Act. Printed Hearing 105-48
    July 15, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the Clinton 
Administration's Proposal regarding the American Heritage 
Rivers Initiative. Printed Hearing 105-36 (See H.R. 1842)
    September 30, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the issues 
surrounding use of fire as a management tool and its risks and 
benefits as they relate to the health of the National Forests 
and the Environmental Protection Agency's National Ambient Air 
Quality Standards. Printed Hearing 105-45
    March 5, 1998--Oversight hearing held on the Endangered 
Species Act. Printed Hearing 105-80
    March 18, 1998--Oversight hearing held on problems and 
issues with the National Environmental Policy Act. Printed 
Hearing 105-102
    March 26, 1998--Joint oversight hearing held with the 
Budget Committee, and Appropriations Committee, Subcommittee on 
Interior on management of the U.S. Forest Service. Printed 
Hearing 105-82
    April 22, 1998--Oversight hearing on Government Performance 
and Results Act.
    May 13, 1998--Oversight hearing held on the National Forest 
Foundation.
    June 9, 1998--Oversight hearing held on the impact of 
Federal land use policies on rural communities. Printed Hearing 
105-90.
    July 15, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Endangered Species 
Act. Printed Hearing 105-96
    September 2, 1998--Oversight field hearing held in Pasco, 
Washington, on National Marine Fisheries Service role in 
implementing the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Printed 
Hearing 105-111
    September 3, 1998--Oversight field hearing held in Boise, 
Idaho, on National Marine Fisheries Service role in 
implementing the Endangered Species Act of 1973. Printed 
Hearing 105-111
    October 1, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Compacts of Free 
Association with the Marshall Islands, Federated States of 
Micronesia, and Palau. Printed Hearing 105-117
    October 26, 1998--Oversight field hearing held in Clovis, 
New Mexico, on the Endangered Species Act.

                      v. full committee statistics

Total number of bills and resolutions held at full committee......   121
Total number of bills held at Full Committee that were reported 
    from Committee................................................    42
Total number of bills held at Full Committee that were passed by 
    the House-....................................................    30
Total number of bills held at Full Committee that were enacted 
    into law..................................................        22
Public Hearings and Markups:
    Legislative Hearings..........................................    23
    Oversight Hearings............................................    17
    Markup Sessions...............................................    24
Total number of meetings (days)...................................    58

            Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands

                            I. introduction

    During the 105th Congress the Subcommittee on National 
Parks and Public Lands was very active in holding hearings on 
and passing numerous bills as part of the Subcommittee's 
legislative agenda. As part of the agenda, the Subcommittee, 
under the direction of Chairman James V. Hansen (R-UT), was 
heavily involved in the negotiation of and making amendments to 
S. 1693, ``The National Parks Omnibus Management Act of 1998''. 
This landmark legislation, crafted with bi-partisanship, made 
significant changes to National Park Service policy, especially 
in terms of concessions, the method that new units are added to 
the National Park System, and how science is evaluated and 
integrated into National Park management decisions. Overall, 
the Subcommittee was referred 266 bills, held hearings on 65 
bills, and enacted 74 bills.
    The Subcommittee deserves credit for passing an 
extraordinary amount of legislation in the 105th Congress 
either individually or as part of larger packages. For example, 
the Subcommittee is responsible for H.R. 3910, the Automobile 
National Heritage Corridor Act, which was amended with sixteen 
other pieces of legislation that substantially improves the 
National Park System. Passage of this bill created new National 
Park units and memorials, expanded other park units, authorized 
the study of possible additions to the Park Service, and re-
authorized many park unit commissions. Similarly, the 
Subcommittee can take credit for other legislation which 
provides opportunities for the public to enjoy units of the 
National Park System across the country. New wild and scenic 
rivers have been designated in Connecticut, national recreation 
areas expanded in Georgia, and new innovative park affiliations 
have been added in New York and in Arizona.
    The Subcommittee and Chairman Hansen can also claim credit 
for a major land exchange in Utah between the Federal 
government and the Utah State School Trust. This legislation, 
H.R. 3830, represented a landmark breakthrough in disposal of 
the School Trust Lands surrounded by Federal land. This 
legislation authorized the trade of these lands out of National 
Parks, Monuments and Reservations for economically developable 
lands elsewhere in the State, greatly benefitting the school 
children of Utah.
    Clearly, the 105th Congress and the Subcommittee on 
National Parks and Public Lands can be proud of the 
accomplishments to create, expand, and re-authorize National 
Park units and affiliated areas along with addressing many 
other important issues in regard to the management of public 
lands.

                            ii. jurisdiction

    (1) Measures and matters related to the National Park 
System and its units, including Federal reserve water rights.
    (2) The National Wilderness Preservation System, except for 
wilderness created from forest reserves from the public domain, 
and wilderness in Alaska.
    (3) Wild and Scenic Rivers System, National Trails System, 
national heritage areas and other national units established 
for protection, conservation, preservation or recreational 
development administered by the Secretary of the Interior, 
other than coastal barriers.
    (4) Military parks and battlefields, national cemeteries 
administered by the Secretary of the Interior, parks in and 
within the vicinity of the District of Columbia and the 
erection of monuments to the memory of individuals.
    (5) Federal outdoor recreation plans, programs and 
administration including the Land and Water Conservation Fund, 
except those in public forests.
    (6) Plans and programs concerning non-Federal outdoor 
recreation and land use, including related plans and programs 
authorized by the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 1965 
and the Outdoor Recreation Act of 1963, except those in public 
forests.
    (7) Preservation of prehistoric ruins and objects of 
interest on the public domain and other historic preservation 
programs and activities, including national monuments, historic 
sites and programs for international cooperation in the field 
of historic preservation.
    (8) Matters concerning the following agencies and programs: 
Urban Parks and Recreation Recovery Program, Historic American 
Buildings Survey, Historic American Engineering Record, and 
U.S. Holocaust Memorial.
    (9) Except for public lands in Alaska, public lands 
generally, including measures or matters relating to entry, 
easements, withdrawals, grazing and Federal reserved water 
rights.
    (10) Forfeiture of land grants and alien ownership, 
including alien ownership of mineral lands.
    (11) General and continuing oversight and investigative 
authority over activities, policies and programs within the 
jurisdiction of the Subcommittee.

                      iii. legislative activities

A. Legislative hearings and markups

    March 13, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 449, to provide for 
the orderly disposal of certain Federal lands in Clark County, 
Nevada, and to provide for the acquisition of environmentally 
sensitive lands in the State of Nevada. Printed Hearing 105-5
    April 10, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 449, to provide for the 
orderly disposal of certain Federal lands in Clark County, 
Nevada, and to provide for the acquisition of environmentally 
sensitive lands in the State of Nevada.
    Hearing held on H.R. 136, to amend the National Parks and 
Recreation Act of 1978 to designate the Marjory Stoneman 
Douglas Wilderness and to amend the Everglades National Park 
Protection and Expansion Act of 1989 to designate the Ernest F. 
Coe Visitor Center; and H.R. 765, to ensure maintenance of a 
herd of wild horses in Cape Lookout National Seashore.
    May 8, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 1127, to amend the 
Antiquities Act to require an Act of Congress and the 
concurrence of the Governor and State legislature for the 
establishment by the President of national monuments in excess 
of 5,000 acres; and H.R. 765, to ensure maintenance of a herd 
of wild horses in Cape Lookout National Seashore.
    May 20, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 60, to authorize the 
Secretary of the Interior to provide assistance to the Casa 
Malpais National Historic Landmark in Springerville, Arizona; 
H.R. 951, to require the Secretary of the Interior to exchange 
certain lands located in Hinsdale, Colorado; H.R. 822, to 
facilitate a land exchange involving private land within the 
exterior boundaries of Wenatchee National Forest in Chelan 
County, Washington; H.R. 1198, to direct the Secretary of the 
Interior to convey certain land to the City of Grants Pass, 
Oregon; and H.R. 960, to validate certain conveyances in the 
City of Tulare, Tulare County, California, and for other 
purposes.
    June 10, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 588, to amend the 
National Trails System Act to create a new category of long-
distance trails to be known as national discovery trails, to 
authorize the American Discovery Trail as the first trail in 
that category, and for other purposes; and H.R. 1513, to amend 
the National Trails System Act to designate the Lincoln 
National Historic Trail as a component of the National Trails 
System. Printed Hearing 105-22
    June 17, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 1051, New Mexico 
Statehood and Enabling Act Amendments of 1997. Printed Hearing 
105-30. Hearing held on H.R. 1567, to provide for the 
designation of additional wilderness lands in the eastern 
United States. Printed Hearing 105-35
    June 19, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 822, to facilitate a 
land exchange involving private land within the exterior 
boundaries of Wenatchee National Forest in Chelan County, 
Washington; H.R. 951, to require the Secretary of the Interior 
to exchange certain lands located in Hinsdale, Colorado; H.R. 
960, to validate certain conveyances in the City of Tulare, 
Tulare County, California, and for other purposes; H.R. 1110, 
to designate a portion of the Sudbury, Assabet, and Concord 
Rivers as a component of the National Wild and Scenic Rivers 
System; and H.R. 1198, to direct the Secretary of the Interior 
to convey certain land to the City of Grants Pass, Oregon.
    June 24, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 1500, to designate 
certain Federal lands in the State of Utah as wilderness, and 
for other purposes; and H.R. 1952, to designate certain Bureau 
of Land Management lands in the State of Utah as wilderness. 
Printed Hearing 105-33
    July 22, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 708, to require the 
Secretary of the Interior to conduct a study concerning grazing 
use of certain land within and adjacent to Grand Teton National 
Park, Wyoming, and to extend temporarily certain grazing 
privileges; H.R. 755, to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 
1986 to allow individuals to designate any portion of their 
income tax overpayments, and to make other contributions, for 
the benefit of units of the National Park System; H.R. 1635, to 
establish within the United States National Park Service the 
National Underground Railroad Network to Freedom program, and 
for other purposes; andH.R. 1718, to provide for the conveyance 
of certain lands in Wyoming to the County of Park, Wyoming. Printed 
Hearing 105-37
    July 31, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 136, to amend the 
National Parks and Recreation Act of 1978 to designate the 
Marjory Stoneman Douglas Wilderness and to amend the Everglades 
National Park Protection and Expansion Act of 1989 to designate 
the Ernest F. Coe Visitor Center; H.R. 708, to require the 
Secretary of the Interior to conduct a study concerning grazing 
use of certain land within and adjacent to Grand Teton National 
Park, Wyoming, and to extend temporarily certain grazing 
privileges; and H.R. 1567, to provide for the designation of 
additional wilderness lands in the eastern United States.
    September 9, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 1849, to establish 
the Oklahoma City National Memorial as a unit of the National 
Park System, to designate the Oklahoma City Memorial Trust, and 
for other purposes. Printed Hearing 105-55
    September 16, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 351, to authorize 
the Secretary of the Interior to make appropriate improvements 
to a county road located in the Pictured Rocks National 
Lakeshore, and to prohibit construction of a scenic shoreline 
drive in that national lakeshore; H.R. 1714, to provide for the 
acquisition of the Plains Railroad Depot at the Jimmy Carter 
National Historic Site; H.R. 2136, to direct the Secretary of 
the Interior to convey, at fair market value, certain 
properties in Clark County, Nevada, to persons who purchased 
adjacent properties in good faith reliance on land surveys that 
were subsequently determined to be inaccurate; and H.R. 2283, 
to expand the boundaries of the Arches National Park in the 
State of Utah to include portions of the following drainages, 
Salt Wash, Lost Spring Canyon, Fish Sheep Draw, Clover Canyon, 
Cordova Canyon, Mine Draw, and Cottonwood Wash, which are 
currently under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land 
Management, and to include a portion of Fish Sheep Draw, which 
is currently owned by the State of Utah. Printed Hearing 105-51
    October 7, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 2313, to prohibit the 
construction of any monument memorial, or other structure at 
the site of the Iwo Jima Memorial in Arlington, Virginia; S. 
731, to extend the legislative authority for construction of 
the National Peace Garden Memorial; and S. 423, to extend the 
legislative authority for the Board of Regents of Gunston Hall 
to establish a memorial to honor George Mason. Committee on 
Resources--105th Congress
    Markup held on H.R. 1714, to provide for the acquisition of 
the Plains Railroad Depot at the Jimmy Carter National Historic 
Site; H.R. 2283, to expand the boundaries of the Arches 
National Park in the State of Utah to include portions of the 
following drainages, Salt Wash, Lost Spring Canyon, Fish Sheep 
Draw, Clover Canyon, Cordova Canyon, Mine Draw, and Cottonwood 
Wash, which are currently under the jurisdiction of the Bureau 
of Land Management, and to include a portion of Fish Sheep 
Draw, which is currently owned by the State of Utah; H.R. 755, 
to amend the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 to allow individuals 
to designate any portion of their income tax overpayments, and 
to make other contributions, for the benefit of units of the 
National Park System; H.R. 1635, to establish within the United 
States National Park Service the National Underground Railroad 
Network to Freedom program, and for other purposes; S. 731, to 
extend the legislative authority for construction of the 
National Peace Garden Memorial; and S. 423, to extend the 
legislative authority for the Board of Regents of Gunston Hall 
to establish a memorial to honor George Mason.
    October 9, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 2186, to authorize 
the Secretary of the Interior to provide assistance to the 
National Historic Trails Interpretive Center in Casper, 
Wyoming; H.R. 1811, to ensure the long-term protection of the 
resources of the portion of the Columbia River known as the 
Hanford Reach; and H.R. 1477, to amend the Wild and Scenic 
Rivers Act to designate a portion of the Columbia River as a 
recreational river, and for other purposes.
    October 21, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 1522, to extend the 
authorization for the National Historic Preservation Fund. 
Printed Hearing 105-66
    October 30, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 2186, to authorize 
the Secretary of the Interior to provide assistance to the 
National Historic Trails Interpretive Center in Casper, 
Wyoming.
    Hearing held on H.R. 2438, to encourage establishment of 
appropriate trails on abandoned railroad rights-of-way, while 
ensuring protection of certain reversionary property rights; 
and H.R. 1995, to provide for the protection of farmland at the 
Point Reyes National Seashore, and for other purposes. Printed 
Hearing 105-76
    November 6, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 588, to amend the 
National Trails System Act to create a new category of long-
distance trails to be known as national discovery trails, to 
authorize the American Discovery Trail as the first trail in 
the category, and for other purposes; and H.R. 2438, to 
encourage establishment of appropriate trails on abandoned 
railroad rights-of-way, while ensuring protection of certain 
reversionary property rights.
    February 5, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 2098, National Cave 
and Karst Research Institute Act of 1997; and H.R. 2989, to 
direct the Secretary of the Interior to convey to the St. 
Jude's Ranch for Children, Nevada, approximately 40 acres of 
land in Las Vegas, Nevada, to be used for the development of 
facilities for the residential care and treatment of 
adjudicated girls. Printed Hearing 105-59
    February 24, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 2223, Education 
Land Grant Act; H.R. 1728, National Park Service Administrative 
Amendment of 1997; and H.R. 2993, to provide for the collection 
of fees for the making of motion pictures, television 
productions, and sound tracks in National Park System and 
National Wildlife Refuge Systems units. Printed Hearing 105-71
    March 12, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 1522, to extend the 
authorization for the National Historic Preservation Fund; and 
H.R. 2098, National Cave and Karst Research Institute Act of 
1997.
    March 26, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 2538, Guadalupe-
Hidalgo Treaty Land Claims Act of 1997; H.R. 2776, to amend the 
Act entitled ``An Act to provide for the establishment of the 
Morristown National Historical Park in the State of New 
Jersey''; and H.R. 3047, to authorize expansion of Fort Davis 
National Historic Site in Fort Davis, Texas, by 16 acres.
    April 23, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 3625, San Rafael Swell 
National Heritage and Conservation Act. Printed Hearing 105-85
    April 28, 1998--Joint hearing held with Subcommittee on 
Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans, on H.R. 2800, 
Battle of Midway National Memorial Study Act.
    Hearing held on H.R. 3220, to authorize the use of certain 
land in Merced County, California, for an elementary school.
    May 7, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 2538, Guadalupe-Hidalgo 
Treaty Land Claims Act of 1997; and H.R. 2625, San Rafael Swell 
National Heritage and Conservation Act.
    May 12, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 3109, Thomas Cole 
National Historic Site; and H.R. 1390, to authorize the 
Government of India to establish a memorial to honor Mahatma 
Gandhi in the District of Columbia.
    May 19, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 3830, Utah Schools and 
Lands Exchange Act of 1998. Printed Hearing 105-89
    May 21, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 1042, to amend the 
Illinois and Michigan Canal Heritage Corridor Act of 1984 to 
extend the Illinois and Michigan Canal Heritage Corridor 
Commission; H.R. 1894, to reauthorize the Delaware Water Gap 
National Recreation Area Citizen Advisory Commission for ten 
additional years; H.R. 2233, Education Land Grant Act; H.R. 
2776, to amend the Act entitled ``An Act to provide for the 
establishment of the Morristown National Historical Park in the 
State of New Jersey''; H.R. 2993, to provide for the collection 
of fees for the making of motion pictures, television 
productions, and sound tracks in National Park System and 
National Wildlife Refuge System units; H.R. 3047, to authorize 
expansion of Fort Davis National Historic Site in Fort Davis, 
Texas, by 16 acres; and H.J. Res. 113, a joint resolution 
approving the location of a Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in 
the Nation's Capitol.
    June 9, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 3542, O&C; Lands 
Protection Act.
    June 11, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 1390, to authorize the 
Government of India to establish a memorial to honor Mahatma 
Gandhi in the District of Columbia; H.R. 1728, National Park 
Service Administrative Amendment of 1997; H.R. 3055, to deem 
the activities of the Miccosukee Tribe on the Tamiami Indian 
Reservation to be consistent with the purposes of the 
Everglades National Park; H.R. 3109, Thomas Cole National 
Historic Site; and H.R. 3830, Utah Schools and Lands Exchange 
Act of 1998.
    June 18, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 2970, National Historic 
Lighthouse Preservation Act of 1997; H.R. 3746, to authorize 
the addition of the Paoli Battlefield site in Malvern, 
Pennsylvania, to the Valley Forge National Historic Park; H.R. 
3883, to revise the boundary of the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace 
National Historic Site to include Knob Creek Farm; and H.R. 
3910, Automobile National Heritage Area Act of 1998.
    June 23, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 3705, to provide for 
the sale of certain public lands in the Ivanpah Valley, Nevada, 
to the Clark County Department of Aviation. Printed Hearing 
105-91.
    June 23, 1998--Markup held on S. 1693, to provide for 
improved management and increased accountability for certain 
National Park Service programs; H.R. 4004, to authorize the 
Secretary of the Interior to provide assistance to the Casa 
Malpais National Historic Landmark in Springerville, Arizona, 
and to establish the Lower East Side Tenement National Historic 
Site.
    July 16, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 3981, to modify the 
boundaries of the George Washington Birthplace National 
Monument; and -H.R. 4109, to authorize the Gateway Visitor 
Center at Independence National Historical Park; H.R. 4141, to 
amend the Act authorizing the establishment of the 
Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area to modify the 
boundaries of the Area, and to provide for the protection of 
lands, waters, and natural, cultural, and scenic resources 
within the national recreation area; and H.R. 4158, to 
authorize the private ownership and use of certain secondary 
structures and surplus lands administered as part of any 
national historical park that are not consistent with the 
purposes for which the park was established, if adequate 
protection of natural, aesthetic, recreational, cultural, and 
historical values is assured by appropriate terms, covenants, 
conditions, or reservations. -Printed Hearing 105-95
    July 28, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 2125, to authorize 
appropriations for the coastal Heritage Trail Route in New 
Jersey; H.R. 3950, Otay Mountain Wilderness Act of 1998; H.R. 
3963, to establish terms and conditions under which the 
Secretary of the Interior shall convey leaseholds in certain 
properties around Canyon Ferry Reservoir, Montana; H.R. 4144, 
Cumberland Island Preservation Act; H.R. 4211, to establish the 
Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, in association with the 
Tuskegee University, in the State of Alabama; H.R. 4230, to 
provide for a land exchange involving the El Portal 
Administrative Site of the Department of the Interior in the 
State of California; and H.R. 4287, Grand Staircase-Escalante 
National Monument Boundary Adjustment Act. Printed Hearing 105-
104
    August 6, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 576, to direct the 
Secretary of the Interior to undertake the necessary 
feasibility studies regarding the establishment of certain new 
units of the National Park System in the State of Hawaii; H.R. 
2125, to authorize appropriations for the Coastal Heritage 
Trail Route in New Jersey; H.R. 2800, Battle of Midway National 
Memorial Study Act; H.R. 2970, National Historic Lighthouse 
Preservation Act; H.R. 3705, Ivanpah Valley Airport Public 
Lands Transfer Act; H.R. 3746, to authorize the addition of the 
Paoli Battlefield site in Malvern, Pennsylvania, to the Valley 
Forge National Historical Park; H.R. 3883, to revise the 
boundary of the Abraham Lincoln Birthplace National Historic 
Site to include Knob Creek Farm; H.R. 3910, Automobile National 
Heritage Area Act of 1998; H.R. 3950, Otay Mountain Wilderness 
Act of 1998; H.R. 3963, to establish terms and conditions under 
which the Secretary of the Interior shall convey leaseholds in 
certain properties around Canyon Ferry Reservoir, Montana; H.R. 
3981, to modify the boundaries of the George Washington 
Birthplace National Monument; H.R. 4109, Gateway Visitor Center 
Authorization Act of 1998; H.R. 4141, to amend the Act 
authorizing the establishment of the Chattahoochee River 
National Recreation Area to modify the boundaries of the area, 
and to provide for the protection of lands, waters, and 
natural, cultural, and scenic resources within the national 
recreation area; H.R. 4144, Cumberland Island Preservation Act; 
H.R. 4158, National Park Enhancement and Protection Act; H.R. 
4182, to establish the Little Rock Central High School National 
Historic Site in the State of Arkansas; H.R. 4211, to establish 
the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, in association with 
the Tuskegee University, in the State of Alabama; H.R. 4230, to 
provide for land exchange involving the El Portal 
Administrative Site of the Department of the Interior in the 
State of California; H.R. 4287, Grand Staircase-Escalante 
National Monument Boundary Adjustments Act; and H.R. 4289, 
Wilcox Ranch Wildlife Habitat Acquisition Act.
    October 6, 1998--Hearing on H.R. 4119, to provide for the 
restoration of certain Federal land of religious and cultural 
significance to the Tohono O'odham Nation of Arizona, and for 
other purposes.

                        B. -Legislation enacted

    H.J. Res. 113, a joint resolution approving the location of 
a Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial in the Nation's Capitol 
(Public Law 105-201).
    H.R. 60, authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to 
provide assistance to the Casa Malpais National Historic 
Landmark in Springerville, Arizona (enacted as part of Public 
Law 105-378).
    H.R. 351, authorize the Secretary of the Interior to make 
appropriate improvements to a county road located in the 
Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, and to prohibit construction 
of a scenic shoreline drive in that national lakeshore (enacted 
as part of Public Law 105-378).
    H.R. 449, provides for the orderly disposal of certain 
Federal lands in Clark County, Nevada, and to provide for the 
acquisition of environmentally sensitive lands in the State of 
Nevada (Public Law 105-263).
    H.R. 576, directs the Secretary of the Interior to 
undertake the necessary feasibility studies regarding the 
establishment of certain new units of the National Park System 
in the State of Hawaii (enacted as part of Public Law 105-355).
    H.R. 708, to require the Secretary of the Interior to 
conduct a study concerning grazing use of certain land within 
and adjacent to Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, and to 
extend temporarily certain grazing privileges (Public Law 105-
81).
    H.R. 765, to ensure maintenance of a herd of wild horses in 
Cape Lookout National Seashore (Public Law 105-229).
    H.R. 822, to facilitate a land exchange involving private 
land within the exterior boundaries of Wenatchee National 
Forest in Chelan County, Washington (enacted as part of Public 
Law 105-83).
    H.R. 960, to validate certain conveyances in the City of 
Tulare, Tulare County, California (Public Law 105-195).
    H.R. 1042, amends the Illinois and Michigan Canal Heritage 
Corridor Act of 1984 to extend the Illinois and Michigan Canal 
Heritage Corridor Commission (enacted as part of Public Law 
105-355).
    H.R. 1163, amends title 10, United States Code, to transfer 
jurisdiction over Naval Oil Shale Reserves Numbered 1 and 3 to 
the Secretary of the Interior and to authorize the leasing of 
such reserves for oil and gas exploration and production 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-85).
    H.R. 1198, to direct the Secretary of the Interior to 
convey certain land to the City of Grants Pass, Oregon (Public 
Law 105-39).
    H.R. 1424, to amend the Petroglyph National Monument 
Establishment Act of 1990 to adjust the boundary of the 
monument (enacted as part of Public Law 105-174).
    H.R. 1635, to establish within the United States National 
Park Service the National Underground Railroad Network to 
Freedom program (Public Law 105-203).
    H.R. 1894, to reauthorize the Delaware Water Gap National 
Recreation Area Citizen Advisory Commission for ten additional 
years (enacted as part of Public Law 105-355).
    H.R. 1994, amend the Act entitled ``An Act to provide for 
the establishment of the Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore, and 
for other purposes'' to ensure an opportunity for persons who 
convey property for inclusion in that national lakeshore to 
retain a right of use and occupancy for a fixed term, and for 
other purposes (enacted as part of Public Law 105-277).
    H.R. 2136, to direct the Secretary of the Interior to 
convey, at fair market value, certain properties in Clark 
County, Nevada, to persons who purchased adjacent properties in 
good faith reliance on land surveys that were subsequently 
determined to be inaccurate (enacted as part of Public Law 105-
83).
    H.R. 2186, to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to 
provide assistance to the National Historic Trails Interpretive 
Center in Casper, Wyoming (Public Law 105-290).
    H.R. 2201, establishes the Lower East Side Tenement 
National Historic Site, and for other purposes (enacted as part 
of Public Law 105-378).
    H.R. 2411, provides for a land exchange involving the Cape 
Cod National Seashore and to extend the authority for the Cape 
Cod National Seashore Advisory Commission (Public Law 105-280).
    H.R. 2776, amends the Act entitled ``An Act to provide for 
the establishment of the Morristown National Historical Park in 
the State of New Jersey, and for other purposes'' to authorize 
the acquisition of property known as the Warren property 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-355).
    H.R. 2958, reauthorizes the Delaware and Lehigh Navigation 
Canal National Heritage Corridor Act, and for other purposes 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-355).
    H.R. 3047, authorizes expansion of Fort Davis National 
Historic Site in Fort Davis, Texas, by 16 acres (enacted as 
part of Public Law 105-355).
    H.R. 3055, deems the activities of the Miccosukee Tribe on 
the Tamiami Indian Reservation to be consistent with the 
purposes of the Everglades National Park, and for other 
purposes (Public Law 105-313).
    H.R. 3220, authorizes the use of certain land in Merced 
County, California, for an elementary school (enacted as part 
of Public Law 105-355).
    H.R. 3499, to authorize the Washington Interdependence 
Council to establish a memorial to Mr. Benjamin Banneker in the 
District of Columbia (enacted as part of Public Law 105-355).
    H.R. 3522, amends the Act entitled ``An Act to establish 
the Blackstone River Valley National Heritage Corridor in 
Massachusetts and Rhode Island'' to reauthorize assistance for 
historic, recreational, and environmental education projects 
related to the Blackstone River Valley National Heritage 
Corridor (enacted as part of Public Law 105-355).
    H.R. 3542, clarifies the Bureau of Land Management's 
authority to make sales and exchanges of certain Federal lands 
in the State of Oregon, and for other purposes (enacted as part 
of Public Law 105-321).
    H.R. 3569, transfers administrative jurisdiction over 
certain parcels of public domain land in Lake County, Oregon, 
to facilitate management of the land, and for other purposes 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-321).
    H.R. 3689, transfers administrative jurisdiction over the 
Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area to the 
Secretary of Agriculture (enacted as part of Public Law 105-
277).
    H.R. 3830, provides for the exchange of certain lands 
within the State of Utah (Public Law 105-335).
    H.R. 3883, revises the boundary of the Abraham Lincoln 
Birthplace National Historic Site to include Knob Creek Farm, 
and for other purposes (enacted as part of Public Law 105-355).
    H.R. 3910, authorizes the Automobile National Heritage Area 
(Public Law 105-355).
    H.R. 3957, renames Wolf Trap Farm Park for the Performing 
Arts as ``Wolf Trap National Park for the Performing Arts'' 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-277).
    H.R. 3963, establishes terms and conditions under which the 
Secretary of the Interior shall convey leaseholds in certain 
properties around Canyon Ferry Reservoir, Montana (enacted as 
part of Public Law 105-277).
    H.R. 4004, authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to 
provide assistance to the Casa Malpais National Historic 
Landmark in Springerville, Arizona, and to establish the Lower 
East Side Tenement National Historic Site, and for other 
purposes (enacted as part of Public Law 105-378).
    H.R. 4166, amends the Idaho Admission Act regarding the 
sale or lease of school land (Public Law 105-296).
    H.R. 4211, establishes the Tuskegee Airmen National 
Historic Site, in association with the Tuskegee University, in 
the State of Alabama, and for other purposes (enacted as part 
of Public Law 105-355).
    H.R. 4230, provides for a land exchange involving the El 
Portal Administrative Site of the Department of the Interior in 
the State of California (enacted as part of Public Law 105-
363).
    H.R. 4287, makes technical corrections and minor 
adjustments to the boundaries of the Grand Staircase-Escalante 
National Monument in the State of Utah (enacted as part of 
Public Law 105-355).
    H.R. 4289, provides for the purchase by the Secretary of 
the Interior of the Wilcox ranch in Eastern Utah for management 
as wildlife habitat (enacted as part of Public Law 105-363).
    H.R. 4548, makes a technical correction to the Columbia 
River Gorge National Scenic Area Act of 1986 (enacted as part 
of Public Law 105-277).
    H.R. 4575, authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to 
acquire interests in real property for addition to the 
Chickamauga and Chattanooga National Military Park (enacted as 
part of Public Law 105-277).
    H.R. 4671, redesignates the Marsh-Billings National 
Historical Park in the State of Vermont as the ``Marsh 
Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park'' (enacted as 
part of Public Law 105-277).
    H.R. 4816, authorizes the acquisition of the Valles Caldera 
currently managed by the Baca Land and Cattle Company, to 
provide for an effective land and wildlife management program 
for this resource within the Department of Agriculture through 
the private sector, and for other purposes (enacted as part of 
Public Law 105-277).
    H.R. 4867, directs the Secretary of the Interior to convey 
certain public lands to the Town of Pahrump, Nevada, for use 
for a recreation complex (enacted as part of Public Law 105-
277).
    S.J. Res. 29, joint resolution to direct the Secretary of 
the Interior to design and construct a permanent addition to 
the Franklin Delano Roosevelt Memorial in Washington, D.C. 
(Public Law 105-29).
    S. 231, establishes the National Cave and Karst Research 
Institute in the State of New Mexico (Public Law 105-325).
    S. 423, extends the legislative authority for the Board of 
Regents of Gunston Hall to establish a memorial to honor George 
Mason (Public Law 105-182).
    S. 430, amends the Act of June 20, 1910, to protect the 
permanent trust funds of the State of New Mexico from erosion 
due to inflation and modify the basis on which distributions 
are made from those funds (Public Law 105-37).
    S. 669, provides for the acquisition of the Plains Railroad 
Depot at the Jimmy Carter National Historic Site (Public Law 
105-106).
    S. 731, extends the legislative authority for construction 
of the National Peace Garden Memorial (Public Law 105-202).
    S. 1175, to reauthorize the Delaware Water Gap National 
Recreation Area Citizen Advisory Commission for ten additional 
years (enacted as part of Public Law 105-355).
    S. 1333, amends the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act of 
1965 to allow national park units that cannot charge an 
entrance or admission fee to retain other fees and charges 
(Public Law 105-327).
    S. 1132, modifies the boundaries of the Bandelier National 
Monument to include the lands within the headwaters of the 
Upper Alamo Watershed which drain into the Monument and which 
are not currently within the jurisdiction of a Federal land 
management agency, to authorize purchase or donation of those 
lands, and for other purposes (Public Law 105-376).
    S. 1408, establishes the Lower East Side Tenement National 
Historic Site (Public Law 105-378).
    S. 1665, reauthorizes the Delaware and Lehigh Navigation 
Canal National Heritage Corridor Act, and for other purposes 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-355).
    S. 1693, provides for improved management and increased 
accountability for certain National Park Service programs 
(Public Law 105-391).
    S. 1695, authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to study 
the suitability and feasibility of designating the Sand Creek 
Massacre National Historic Site in the State of Colorado as a 
unit of the National Park System (Public Law 105-243).
    S. 1718, amends the Weir Farm National Historic Site 
Establishment Act of 1990 to authorize the acquisition of 
additional acreage for the historic site to permit the 
development of visitor and administrative facilities and to 
authorize the appropriation of additional amounts for the 
acquisition of real and personal property (Public Law 105-363).
    S. 1807, transfers administrative jurisdiction over certain 
parcels of public domain land in Lake County, Oregon, to 
facilitate management of the land, and for other purposes 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-321).
    S. 1990, authorizes expansion of Fort Davis National 
Historic Site in Fort Davis, Texas, by 16 acres (enacted as 
part of Public Law 105-355).
    S. 2068, revises the boundaries of the George Washington 
Birthplace National Monument (enacted as Public Law 105-355).
    S. 2129, eliminates restrictions on the acquisition of 
certain land contiguous to Hawaii Volcanoes National Park 
(Public Law 105-380).
    S. 2232, establishes the Little Rock Central High School 
National Historic Site in the State of Arkansas (Public Law 
105-356).
    S. 2240, establishes the Adams National Historical Park in 
the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, and for other purposes 
(Public Law 105-342).
    S. 2241, provides for the acquisition of lands formerly 
occupied by the Franklin D. Roosevelt family at Hyde Park, New 
York, and for other purposes (Public Law 105-364).
    S. 2246, amends the Act which established the Frederick Law 
Olmsted National Historic Site, in the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts, by modifying the boundary and for other purposes 
(Public Law 105-343).
    S. 2272, amends the boundaries of Grant-Kohrs Ranch 
National Historic Site in the State of Montana (Public Law 105-
365).
    S. 2285, establish a commission, in honor of the 150th 
Anniversary of the Seneca Falls Convention, to further protect 
sites of importance in the historic efforts to secure equal 
rights for women (Public Law 105-341).
    S. 2427, amends the Omnibus Parks and Public Lands 
Management Act of 1996 to extend the legislative authority for 
the Black Patriots Foundation to establish a commemorative work 
(Public Law 105-345).
    S. 2468, designates the Biscayne National Park Visitor 
Center as the Dante Fascell Visitor Center (Public Law 105-
307).
    S. 2513, transfers administrative jurisdiction over certain 
Federal land located within or adjacent to Rogue River National 
Forest and to clarify the authority of the Bureau of Land 
Management to sell and exchange other Federal land in Oregon 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-321).

                      C. -Legislation passed House

    H. Res. 144, a resolution to express support for the 
bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark Expedition.
    H.R. 951 (H. Rept. 105-170), to require the Secretary of 
the Interior to exchange certain lands located in Hinsdale, 
Colorado. [See S. 587 for further action]
    H.R. 1127 (H. Rept. 105-191), to amend the Antiquities Act 
to require an Act of Congress and the concurrence of the 
Governor and State legislature for the establishment by the 
President of national monuments in excess of 5,000 acres.
    H.R. 1270 (H. Rept. 105-290, Part II), to amend the Nuclear 
Waste Policy Act of 1982.
    H.R. 1522 (H. Rept. 105-484), to extend the authorization 
for the National Historic Preservation Fund.
    H.R. 1728 (H. Rept. 105-612), to provide for the 
development of a plan and a management review of the National 
Park System and to reform the process by which areas are 
considered for addition to the National Park System.
    H.R. 2283 (H. Rept. 105-386), to expand the boundaries of 
Arches National Park in the State of Utah to include portions 
of the following drainages, Salt Wash, Lost Spring Canyon, Fish 
Sheep Draw, Clover Canyon, Cordova Canyon, Mine Draw, and 
Cottonwood Wash, which are currently under the jurisdiction of 
the Bureau of Land Management, and to include a portion of Fish 
Sheep Draw, which is currently owned by the State of Utah. [See 
S. 2106 for further action]
    H.R. 2538 (H. Rept. 105-594), to establish a Presidential 
commission to determine the validity of certain land claims 
arising out of the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo of 1848 
involving the descendants of persons who were Mexican citizens 
at the time of the Treaty.
    H.R. 2993 (H. Rept. 105-678), to provide for the collection 
of fees for the making of motion pictures, television 
productions, and sound tracks in National Park System and 
National Wildlife Refuge System units, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 3109 (H. Rept. 105-695), to establish the Thomas Cole 
National Historic Site in the State of New York.
    H.R. 3520, adjusts the boundaries of the Lake Chelan 
National Recreation Area and the adjacent Wenatchee National 
Forest in the State of Washington. [See S. 1683 for further 
action]
    H.R. 4735, to make technical corrections to the Omnibus 
Parks and Public Lands Management Act of 1996.
    H.R. 4829, to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to 
transfer administrative jurisdiction over land within the 
boundaries of the Home of Franklin D. Roosevelt National 
Historic Site to the Archivist of the United States for the 
construction of a visitor center.

D. Legislation ordered reported by the full committee

    H.R. 136 (H. Rept. 105-328) to amend the National Parks and 
Recreation Act of 1978 to designate the Marjory Stoneman 
Douglas Wilderness and to amend the Everglades National Park 
Protection and Expansion Act of 1989 to designate the Ernest F. 
Coe Visitor Center. [See S. 931 for further action]
    H.R. 755 (H. Rept. 105-482, Part I) to amend the Internal 
Revenue Code of 1986 to allow individuals to designate any 
portion of their income tax overpayments, and to make other 
contributions, for the benefit of units of the National Park 
System.
    H.R. 1110 (H. Rept. 105-691) to designate a portion of the 
Sudbury, Assabet, and Concord Rivers as a component of the 
National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. [See S. 469 for further 
action]
    H.R. 1567 (H. Rept. 105-814) to provide for the designation 
of additional wilderness lands in the eastern United States.
    H.R. 1608 (H. Rept. 105-753) to authorize the Pyramid of 
Remembrance Foundation to establish a memorial in the District 
of Columbia or its environs to soldiers who have died in 
foreign conflicts other than declared wars.
    H.R. 1849 (H. Rept. 105-316) to establish the Oklahoma City 
National Memorial as a unit of the National Park System, to 
designate the Oklahoma City Memorial Trust. [See S. 871 for 
further action]
    H.R. 2223 (H. Rept. 105-693) to amend the Act popularly 
known as the Recreation and Public Purposes Act to authorize 
transfers of certain public lands or national forest lands to 
local education agencies for use for elementary or secondary 
schools, including public charter schools, and for other 
purposes.
    H.R. 3625 (H. Rept. 105-685) to establish the San Rafael 
Swell National Heritage Area and the San Rafael Swell National 
Conservation Area in the State of Utah.

E. Legislation marked up at subcommittee

    H.R. 588, to amend the National Historic Trials System Act 
to create a new category of long-distance trails to be known as 
national discovery trails, to authorize the American Discovery 
Trail as the first trail in that category.
    H.R. 1390, to authorize the Government of India to 
establish a memorial to honor Mahatma Gandhi in the District of 
Columbia. [See H.R. 4284 for further action]
    H.R. 1714, to provide for the acquisition of the Plains 
Railroad Depot at the Jimmy Carter National Historic Site. [See 
S. 669 for further action]
    H.R. 2098, to establish the National Cave and Karst 
Research Institute in the State of New Mexico, and for other 
purposes. [See S. 231 for further action]
    H.R. 2125, to authorize appropriations for the Coastal 
Heritage Trail Route in New Jersey, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 2800, to provide for a study of the establishment of 
Midway Atoll as a national memorial to the Battle of Midway, 
and for other purposes.
    H.R. 2970, to amend the National Historic Preservation Act 
for purposes of establishing a national historic lighthouse 
preservation program.
    H.R. 3705, to provide for the sale of certain public lands 
in the Ivanpah Valley, Nevada, to the Clark County Department 
of Aviation.
    H.R. 3746, to authorize the addition of the Paoli 
Battlefield site in Malvern, Pennsylvania, to the Valley Forge 
National Historical Park, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 3950, to designate a portion of the Otay Mountain 
region of California as wilderness.
    H.R. 3981, to modify the boundaries of the George 
Washington Birthplace National Monument, and for other 
purposes.
    H.R. 4109, to authorize the Gateway Visitor Center at 
Independence National Historical Park, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 4141, to amend the Act authorizing the establishment 
of the Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area to modify 
the boundaries of the Area, and to provide for the protection 
of lands, waters, and natural, cultural, and scenic resources 
within the national recreation area, and for other purposes. 
[See S. 469 for further action]
    H.R. 4144, Cumberland Island Preservation Act.
    H.R. 4158, to authorize the private ownership and use of 
certain secondary structures and surplus lands administered as 
part of any national historical park that are not consistent 
with the purposes for which the park was established, if 
adequate protection of natural, aesthetic, recreational, 
cultural, and historical values is assured by appropriate 
terms, covenants, conditions, or reservations.
    H.R. 4182, to establish the Little Rock Central High School 
National Historic Site in the State of Arkansas, and for other 
purposes. [See S. 2232 for further action]

  IV. Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee on National Parks and 
                              Public Lands

    Another major function of the Subcommittee deals with 
oversight activities of the issues and agencies under its 
jurisdiction. The Subcommittee takes its oversight 
responsibility seriously and aggressively pursues oversight 
hearings on a wide variety of important issues. During the 
105th Congress the Subcommittee focused oversight activities on 
the two main Federal agencies within its jurisdiction--the 
National Park Service and the Bureau of Land Management and 
held 17 oversight hearings. Although steadfast in its pursuit 
of identifying and highlighting important problems and possible 
abuses by these agencies, the Subcommittee, nonetheless, is 
also committed to finding solutions to any of the identified 
problems. The goal, of course, is to provide for better 
management of the Nation's Federal lands and national treasures 
so that the American public can benefit from and enjoy these 
resources. In its continuing efforts to reach this goal, the 
Subcommittee investigated, through oversight activities, 
mismanagement of public lands and national parks, wasted 
expenditures, over-burdensome and outdated Federal regulations, 
public access issues, health of the natural resources, and 
alternative or modified management policies.
            National Park Service
    Financial Management in the National Park Service: This 
issue is a high priority oversight issue for the Subcommittee 
during the 105th Congress. It is clear that the National Park 
Service's (NPS) budget has increased far in excess of inflation 
in recent years (52 percent above inflation from 1980-1995), 
the number of park personnel has increased (22 percent in the 
last decade), and visitation has remained flat. At the same 
time, it is also clear that visitor services are being 
curtailed, and that key park resources are at risk or 
deteriorating. What is not clear is why the increased funding 
and personnel provided have not successfully addressed these 
critical park problems.
    There are repeated stories in the media about shortfalls in 
park funding. Recently, the Superintendent of Yellowstone 
National Park reported that despite a budget increase in excess 
of the amount requested by the President, the park was 
considering curtailing visitor services.
    Congress has attempted to address this concern by 
authorizing NPS to keep increased fees and has examined other 
programs to raise funds for the agency. However, it is clear 
that these additional sources of funds will only provide 
limited funding increases. Therefore, it is critical that the 
agency direct its current funding to the highest priority 
needs. The General Accounting Office (GAO) and Department of 
the Interior Inspector General have both testified that the NPS 
has no process in place to ensure that its funds are allocated 
to the highest priority needs.
    Similarly, the NPS has no accurate idea of how large its 
shortfall is, and therefore has no plan in place to address the 
shortfall. For example, in 1993 when GAO visited 16 park areas 
toreview their reported shortfalls in funding for housing, not 
a single park could justify the numbers submitted to the Washington 
office.
    In fact, NPS did not even have an accurate financial 
control system in place and had failed to balance its books for 
three years, until this fact was exposed through Subcommittee 
oversight hearings two years ago. The agency has worked hard to 
address this problem over the last year.
    The Subcommittee intends to again hold joint hearings early 
in the year to examine the results of ongoing work by the GAO 
about the NPS budget and priority-setting process. The 
Subcommittee will also hold oversight hearings this Summer on 
another GAO report analyzing and comparing the effectiveness of 
State management of parks versus Federal management of parks.
    The Subcommittee is also considering holding oversight 
hearings on the implementation of the Government Performance 
and Review System by NPS later this year. It is possible that 
this new budget allocation system could assist the agency in 
developing a priority setting system which could address some 
of these concerns.
    The Subcommittee held a hearing on the Recreational Fee 
Demonstration Program. The Program was initially authorized in 
the Omnibus Consolidated Rescissions Act of 1996 and amended to 
keep the program going in subsequent legislation. Several 
Federal agencies are authorized to collect a variety of 
entrance and user fees to be used for recovery of operation and 
maintenance costs and to address the backlog of repair and 
maintenance of infrastructure. This oversight provided the 
Subcommittee with the necessary information to consider 
legislation that would provide permanent authorization for the 
Fee Demonstration Program.
    The Subcommittee also participated in the Full Committee 
hearing on the implementation of the Government Performance and 
Review System.
    National Park Service Natural Resource Management Policy 
and Science Program: The NPS has never had a very strong 
research program. No less than 12 major reports since 1963 have 
called for the development of a stronger research program 
within the agency. The most recent major report, completed at 
the request of Congress in 1992 by the National Research 
Council, found the science program in need of substantial 
revision. Yet, two years after the release of that report, the 
NPS science program was abolished and relocated to the U.S. 
Geological Survey to ``catalogue everything which flies, 
crawls, walks or swims.'' There are no biological scientists 
doing research for the agency today.
    The effects of the elimination of the research program may 
place park resources at risk. In successive reports in recent 
years, the GAO has reported that the NPS has inadequate data on 
the condition of resources entrusted to its management. More 
than one-third of threats to park resources have yet to be 
scientifically evaluated. The lack of sound science within the 
agency may lead directly to policies which threaten the 
resources which the agency is charged to protect. Last 
September, U.S. News and World Report published an article 
which outlined how the NPS ``natural regulation'' policy is 
threatening to destroy Yellowstone National Park resources.
    This lack of a sound science program and basic data on park 
resources is of greater concern because Congress is already 
allocating over $210 million per year to the agency for 
resource stewardship. In light of the amount of funding already 
allocated for this function and large increases to the NPS 
generally, it is unclear why the science and resource 
management program is so deficient.
    The Subcommittee held an oversight hearing regarding how 
science is integrated into NPS decisions. To date, the NPS has 
little scientific information about either the current 
condition of park resources, or trends in the condition of park 
resources. As a result, the agency is unable to adequately 
formulate strategies to address threats to park resources. This 
oversight hearing explored better ways to integrate science 
back into NPS decisions and also how to hold the park 
superintendents accountable for the condition of the resources 
in the park unit that they manage.
    State Land and Water Conservation Fund Renewal: In the last 
two years, Federal funding for the State Land and Water 
Conservation Fund program has been eliminated, in favor of 
dedicating all funds to Federal land acquisition. At a time 
when the Federal government already owns 30 percent of the 
land, and cannot adequately manage the lands under its 
jurisdiction, continued expansion of the Federal estate is 
difficult to justify. In fact, three years ago, the Interior 
Inspector General recommended that the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service discontinue all land acquisition until they could 
properly care for the lands already under their jurisdiction. 
Further, the need for public outdoor recreation space is 
greatest in urban and suburban areas of this country. For these 
reasons, continued exclusive focus on Federal land acquisition 
cannot be justified.
    Current law specifies that no less than 50 percent of the 
funds allocated from the Land and Water Conservation Fund Act 
must be spent on Federal land acquisition; however, there is no 
cap on the amount which can be spent on Federal land 
acquisition. During the Bush Administration, the Administration 
sought, and Congress provided, annual allocation of about $25 
million for the State Land and Water Conservation program. For 
the last two years, the Clinton Administration has recommended 
no funding. There has been a continuing record of bipartisan 
support for this program from the Resources Committee. The 
Subcommittee intends to hold hearings on where the greatest 
need for outdoor recreation opportunities are, and whether the 
existing funding allocation is targeted toward meeting that 
need.
    An oversight hearing was held which focused on the 
disparity between the ``state side'' of the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund and the ``Federal side.''
    Land Exchange Promises: In the last four years, the 
Administration has announced a number of major land exchange 
``agreements.'' The total cost of these proposals is in the 
staggering hundreds of millions of dollars. These major 
exchange proposals include: the California Desert Protection 
Act (estimated cost: over $100 million); the Crown Butte Mine 
in Montana (estimated cost: $65 million); the Pacific northwest 
timber buy out (estimated cost: several hundred million 
dollars); and Headwaters Forest (estimated cost: $380 million 
dollars). Although each of these ``deals'' have been announced 
with great fanfare, none of them appear to be close to closure. 
Further, in every case, the government entered into these 
agreements with no idea of where the lands for these exchanges 
would come from.
    The Subcommittee will work with the Subcommittee on Forests 
and Forest Health to examine the status of these agreements, 
and the prospects that they will be implemented in the near 
future.
    The Subcommittee did not hold hearings on this issue, but 
continued to monitor the status of the land exchanges.
    National Trail System Program: There are now over 35,000 
miles of federally-designated trails in the country. National 
trails have proven to be popular designations, generally with 
little political opposition. However, there has been little 
consideration given to the long-term consequences of these 
designations. For example, the Federal government is now 
spending about $2 million per mile to acquire the viewshed 
along the Appalachian Trail. Further, while most of these 
trails are presented largely as volunteer efforts, there is 
increasing support within the trail-user community for these 
trails to be designated as units of the park system, and to 
receive an annual appropriation. Currently, there is a proposal 
to add a new category to the national trail system, and 
designate the 6,000 mile American Discovery Trail. It is 
important to examine and understand the long term consequences 
of the current program, before expanding the scope of the 
national trail system.
    The Subcommittee did not hold hearings on this issue, but 
plans to continue to examine the National Trail System Program 
in the 106th Congress.
    Efficiency of Federal Land Management: The Subcommittee 
will continue its work into analyzing the efficiency of Federal 
land management, with a particular interest in examining 
whether Federal lands could be more efficiently managed. 
Following on with a hearing held last Congress comparing the 
efficiency of Federal versus State management of lands, this 
Congress the Subcommittee expects the release of a major GAO 
report which will compare management of park, forest and 
multiple use lands between the State and Federal governments. 
In addition, in another joint House-Senate effort, GAO is 
examining the magnitude of overlap and duplication between the 
various Federal agencies. Both of these efforts are designed to 
identify cost savings which could be implemented in Federal 
land management.
    An oversight hearing was held to examine the different 
management strategies and policies of state parks and how these 
may be integrated into the National Park System.
            Additional National Park Service Oversight Hearings Held
    Yosemite National Park: The Subcommittee held a field 
oversight hearing in El Portal, California and focused on the 
National Park Service plans for the restoration of Yosemite 
National Park. The Park suffered major damage during floods 
which occurred in winter of 1996 and 1997.
    Wilderness Act Implementation: In April the Subcommittee 
held a joint oversight hearing with the Subcommittee on Forests 
and Forest Health which concentrated on the Wilderness Act of 
1964. The Wilderness Act has caused numerous access problems 
for the public and is one of the most misunderstood Federal 
laws dealing with our natural resources. This oversight hearing 
explored many of the problems associated with wilderness 
designations.
    Proposal to Drain Lake Powell, Arizona and Utah: In 
November of 1996, the Sierra Club Board of Directors passed a 
resolution to support a proposal to drain Lake Powell on the 
border of Arizona and Utah. Since the Glen Canyon dam was 
built, Lake Powell has become a major attraction for 
recreational use. The Sierra Club far reaching proposal became 
a major environmental issue for recreationists, water users, 
and environmentalists who support the Sierra Club. This 
oversight hearing focused on the Sierra Club's proposal to 
drain the lake and somehow restore Glen Canyon while 
eliminating recreational use of the lake.
    Miccosukee Tribe and Everglades National Park: Since 1962, 
the Miccosukee Tribe has held a special use permit from the 
National Park Service at the northern edge of Everglades 
National Park. The permit provides an area of approximately 333 
acres for the Tribe to provide administrative, educational 
facilities, and places to live and sell handicrafts. This 
oversight hearing examined many of the problems between the 
Park Service and the Tribe in regard to the special use permit 
and explored possible solutions to the ongoing problems.
    National Park Service Air Tour Overflights: Conflicts 
between air tour operators conducting overflights over national 
parks, the National Park Service and environmental groups have 
been ongoing for many years. Although there was a lack of 
evidence, the Park Service determined that the overflights were 
causing significant impacts to the natural quiet of parks. This 
oversight hearing focused on the continuing problems in the 
definition of natural quiet, the alleged impacts of air tours 
on park resources, along with pending legislation dealing with 
air tour overflights.
    National Park Concession Reform: Since enactment of the 
Concessions Policy Act of 1965, the National Park Service and 
various concessioners have experienced problems. Some of the 
problems include fair monetary returns to the government, 
possessory interest, and rights of contract renewal. This 
oversight hearing focused on these major issues and on future 
legislation that could be developed to address these problems.
    Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park: Glacier 
National Park contains 137 miles of paved and unpaved roads 
that are critical to serve park visitors. The Going-to-the-Sun, 
completed in 1936, is one of the most important of these roads. 
Although use has increased from 40 thousand to 660 thousand 
vehicles over the years, there has been no program of 
sustainable repair or rehabilitation. Because of this, it will 
take millions of dollars to bring the road up to standards. 
This oversight hearing examined the problems and importance of 
the Going-to-the-Sun Road and how to solve them.
    Grand Canyon National Park--Wilderness Plan and Data Use 
for Overflights: This oversight hearing focused on two very 
important issues in the Grand Canyon National Park. The Grand 
Canyon has recently proposed that 94 percent of the park be 
designated as wilderness per the Wilderness Act of 1964. This 
invariably will cause public access problems to the park. In 
addition, the Colorado River and its recreational use by 
thousands of visitors would be severely impacted by wilderness 
designation. The other unresolved issue with the Grand Canyon 
National Park regards air tour overflights and how the Park 
Service determined the noise impacts on natural quiet. It is 
apparent the Park Service manipulated the data in using models 
that showed that air tour aircraft were having impacts on park 
resources. This part of the oversight hearing focused on both 
on the data the Park Service used for the models and also the 
results of these models.
            Bureau of Land Management
    Grand Staircase--Escalante National Monument: On September 
18, 1996, in the midst of his re-election campaign, President 
Bill Clinton utilized the 1906 Antiquities Act to create a 1.7 
million-acre national monument in Southern Utah.
    The creation of the monument was made by the President 
under powers given to him under the Antiquities Act of 1906. A 
national monument is the designation given to a particular area 
to protect ``objects of historic or scientific interest that 
are situated upon the lands owned or controlled by the 
government of the United States.'' The 1906 Antiquities Act has 
been used by previous Presidents to create some of the Nation's 
crown jewel preserves, but that was before modern Federal land-
use laws were enacted to give Congress and the public a voice 
in how the lands would be managed.
    The decision to create the monument was done without 
Congressional oversight and input. Even the Federal land 
managers, who are responsible for managing the lands for future 
generations, were shut out of the process of developing the 
monument allegedly in order to accommodate the wishes of the 
Clinton/Gore `96 campaign.
    The monument was created in an attempt to erase the 
possibility of mining 62 billion tons of the cleanest, most 
environmentally beneficial coal in the U.S. At least 16 billion 
tons of recoverable coal exists within the boundaries of the 
monument and could be extracted using underground mining 
techniques. The loss of revenue created by this action will 
cost the State of Utah an estimated $9.25 billion in lost 
mineral revenues.
    Additionally, the monument imposes an obstacle to the 
possibility of generating an estimated $2 billion for 
schoolchildren in Utah. President Clinton during his remarks at 
the Grand Canyon establishing the monument proclaimed: ``I know 
the children of Utah have a big stake in school lands located 
within the boundaries of the monument that I am designating 
today . . . I will say again, creating this national monument 
should not and will not come at the expense of Utah's 
children.'' Seeing that the President's promise is kept is an 
issue of central concern to all, and upmost on the priority 
list of Utah's Congressional Delegation and Governor, Mike 
Leavitt.
    This national monument is the first in history for which 
management responsibility has been given to the BLM. The 
proclamation establishing the monument states that the monument 
is to be managed pursuant to applicable law, which includes but 
is not limited to the Federal Land Policy and Management Act 
(FLPMA). The proclamation withdraws Federal lands within the 
monument for entry, location, selection, sale, leasing or other 
disposition. It mandates respect for valid existing rights, 
recognizes the State of Utah's responsibility and authority for 
fish and wildlife, maintains current grazing permits, and 
continues existing reservations.
    The management plan for the monument is to be prepared over 
the next three years. Because of the way the monument was 
created and lack of specific information regarding the 
Proclamation's directives, many questions remain unanswered. 
The Subcommittee will hold oversight hearings on the 
establishment of the monument early in the 105th Congress. The 
hearings will be used to obtain further information concerning 
the monument.
    An additional issue that may be addressed as part of the 
hearings on the monument is the 1906 Antiquities Act. Shortly 
after the establishment of the monument, legislation was 
introduced in both the House and Senate in the 104th Congress 
to limit the powers of the President to designate national 
monuments under the Antiquities Act. It is expected that this 
issue will be addressed either as part of the hearing on the 
monument or separately.
    An oversight hearing was held which focused on how the 
Clinton administration abused the 1906 Antiquities Act amid 
accusations that it was for political gain. On September 18th 
1996, President Clinton stood on the south rim of the Grand 
Canyon, pointed toward Utah and created, by Presidential 
proclamation, the Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument. 
He did this without consulting or even notifying anyone from 
Utah. White House E-Mail and documents show that Clinton 
created the monument to sway votes in California, Nevada, New 
Mexico and Arizona. This oversight hearing examined how the 
Administration abused and engineered the process in the 
designation of this monument.
    H.R. 1127, the National Monument Fairness Act, was 
introduced by Subcommittee Chairman Jim Hansen (R-UT). The 
legislation sought to amend the Antiquities Act to prohibit the 
President from issuing a proclamation designating more than 
50,000 acres in a single State in a single calendar year as a 
national monument until 30 days after the President has 
transmitted the proposed proclamation to the Governor of the 
affected State. The bill further provides that the proclamation 
shall cease to be effective two years after it is issued unless 
the Congress has approved it by joint resolution. The bill was 
reported from Committee and passed the Full House of 
Representatives.
    Bureau of Land Management Law Enforcement Regulations: On 
November 7, 1996, BLM published in the Federal Register a 
proposed rule to revise and consolidate many of BLM's existing 
criminal law enforcement regulations. The rule according to BLM 
was designed to help the public understand and locate the 
regulatory provisions detailing the activities that are 
prohibited on BLM lands. Prior to this action, these provisions 
were contained in nearly a dozen separate parts dealing with 
recreation, cultural resources, minerals, etc.
    Due to the timing and content of the regulations, many 
members of the public reacted negatively to the proposed 
regulations. In response to the controversy, the commend period 
was extended to February 5, 1997.
    Additionally, the BLM briefed Congressional staff in 
December 1996 to answer questions regarding the proposed 
regulations. At the meeting, the BLM promised to supply 
information to Congress regarding the legislative authority to 
promulgate the new regulations.
    On January 17, 1997, a second notice appeared in the 
Federal Register further extending the comment period to March 
7, 1997.
    Due to the controversial nature of the regulations and the 
many questions that remain unanswered, the Subcommittee intends 
to conduct oversight hearings on the BLM's law enforcement 
regulations.
    An oversight hearing was held to focus on some of the 
problems associated with having an independent BLM law 
enforcement force. Some abuses were illustrated. The hearing 
also showed how there are often clashes between the BLM and 
local law enforcement agencies. Ways to improve BLM law 
enforcement were debated.
    Effect of Public Land Policies on Rural Communities: How 
the public lands affect rural communities is a key to nearly 
every public lands issue from grazing to timber harvesting. 
Environmental groups have suggested that the public lands can 
benefit rural economies byincreasing tourism. Some have 
suggested that tourism and recreation provide the ``new'' paradigm for 
rural development.
    With regards to the Grand Staircase-Escalante National 
Monument, what will be the effect of transferring from a 
resource-to a tourism-based economy deserves attention. Several 
studies including work done by the Political Economy Research 
Center have shown some of the effects. Although we can 
speculate that tourism can be a viable growth industry in rural 
areas, confirming the full impact of public lands policies 
should be explored.
    Studies are currently being conducted by academia into the 
effects of public land policies on rural economies. The 
Subcommittee is considering holding an oversight hearing to 
investigate the facts surrounding what the effects of changing 
public lands policies are on rural economies.
    Hearings were not held on this issue by the Subcommittee.
    Access to Public Lands: Responding to a request made in 
1992, GAO conducted a review of the adequacy of public access 
to land managed by the Department of Agriculture's Forest 
Service and the Department of the Interior's BLM. Specifically, 
GAO was asked to look at the extent and effects of, as well as 
the reasons for, inadequate public access and the methods used 
by the Forest Service and BLM to resolve access problems.
    The public continues to be frustrated by inadequate access 
to the public lands. Because the agencies do not maintain 
information at a central location on access problems, facts and 
conclusions regarding the question of access have been 
difficult to surmise.
    Many complain that one of the reasons for inadequate public 
access to Forest Service and BLM lands has to do with private 
landowners' unwillingness to grant public access across their 
land. Factors contributing to inadequate access across private 
lands deal with concerns of landowners about vandalism and 
potential liability, and landowners' desire for privacy and 
exclusive personal use. The other main complaint heard is that 
the Forest Service and BLM, due to cost reduction and other 
reasons, have prevented access to the public lands.
    The Subcommittee intends to conduct oversight hearings on 
access to public lands. Many questions regarding access to 
public lands need to be answered before a solution can be 
properly fashioned.
    The Subcommittee did not hold hearings on access to Public 
Lands.
    Current Status of Implementation of Rangeland Reform: On 
August 9, 1993, Secretary of the Interior Bruce Babbitt 
announced ``Rangeland Reform `94.'' ``Rangeland Reform `94'' 
included proposed rangeland rules, including a proposal to more 
than double the grazing fee over three years and to 
substantially modify Federal rangeland policy. The new rules 
provedextremely controversial producing several revisions. The 
rules were published in February 1995. Final rules went into effect 
August 21, 1995, but did not contain an increase in the grazing fee.
    In an attempt to fight implementation of ``Rangeland Reform 
`94,'' an industry-led lawsuit was filed in the Wyoming 10th 
district court. On June 12, 1996, the Wyoming Federal District 
court ruled that Secretary Babbitt had violated the law with 
regard to four aspects of the regulations.
    The four areas of the regulations held invalid were: (1) 
the elimination of statutory grazing preference rights and 
replacement of those rights with the term ``permitted use;'' 
(2) the regulations providing that the U.S. shall have full 
title to all future range improvements; (3) the regulations 
providing for conservation use permits; and (4) the regulations 
reducing the mandatory qualifications for a grazing permit.
    The Federal government filed an appeal to the case in 
August of 1996 and filed their appellate brief on November 15, 
1996. Arguments on the appeal are expected to take place in 
1997 with a decision around the Fall of 1998.
    The implementation of ``Rangeland Reform `94'' continues to 
move forward with many of the State Resource Advisory Councils 
formed and advancing with their work. Concerns continue to be 
raised about the sweeping nature of the new Interior Department 
grazing management regulations. In light of the facts brought 
out by the 10th District decision and the controversial nature 
of the policy, the Subcommittee intends to conduct oversight of 
implementation of ``Rangeland Reform `94'' and to pursue 
necessary legislative solutions.
    An oversight hearing was held which focused on some of the 
issues involved with grazing reductions.
    The Subcommittee also worked with the Agriculture Committee 
on H.R. 2493, to establish a mechanism by which the Secretary 
of Agriculture and the Secretary of the Interior can provide 
for uniform management of livestock grazing on Federal lands. 
H.R. 2493 was favorably reported from Committee and passed the 
House of Representatives.
            Additional Bureau of Land Management oversight hearings 
                    held
    Oversight Hearing on BLM land exchanges and realty 
appraisals: The ``checkerboard'' pattern of land ownership in 
the west makes Federal lands difficult to manage, and causes 
numerous problems for state and private landowners. Land 
exchanges are the preferred method for blocking-up the public 
lands into manageable tracts, but unfortunately, even minor 
land exchanges are taking years to complete. One of the biggest 
problems is land appraisals. The landowner knows his land is 
much more valuable than the appraisals say it is, and the BLM 
refuses to accept public interest value as a legitimate 
criteria on which to base an appraisal. Often, neither side 
will budge. No one benefits from this deadlock. An oversight 
hearing was held to focus on problems with appraisals, and on 
ways to improve land exchanges.
    Wild Horse and Burro Field Hearing (Reno, Nevada): An 
oversight hearing was held to focus on range issues and 
problems with the Wild Horse and Burro Act and its 
implementation. The BLM faces numerous challenges as it tries 
to manage feral horses and burros on the public lands. These 
include: overpopulation, disease, habitat destruction, 
degradation of riparian areas, competition with other 
domesticated animals on the range such as sheep and cattle, and 
competition with wildlife. This hearing provided an opportunity 
for environmentalists, state and local government officials, 
and concerned citizens to present ideas on how to improve 
management of feral horses and burros while protecting our 
public lands.

B. Hearings

    February 27, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Research and 
Resource Management in the National Park Service. Printed 
Hearing 105-3
    March 11, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Federal funding 
of the State Land and Water Conservation Act Programs. Printed 
Hearing 105-2
    March 22, 1997--Oversight field hearing held in El Portal, 
California, on the National Park Service plans for restoration 
of Yosemite National Park following this winter's flood. 
Printed Hearing 105-11
    April 15, 1997--Joint oversight hearing with Subcommittee 
on Forests and Forest Health, on implementation of the 1964 
Wilderness Act on BLM and Forest Service lands. Printed Hearing 
105-13
    April 29, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Grand Staircase-
Escalante National Monument: From Designation to Management. 
Printed Hearing 105-20
    May 15, 1997--Oversight hearing on Bureau of Land 
Management Law Enforcement Authorities.
    July 10, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Federal versus 
State management of parks. Printed Hearing 105-43
    September 23, 1997--Joint oversight hearing with 
Subcommittee on Water and Power on the proposal to drain Lake 
Powell or reduce its water storage capability. Printed Hearing 
105-56
    September 25, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Everglades 
National Park and the Miccosukee Tribe of Indians in Florida. 
Printed Hearing 105-65
    September 30, 1997--Oversight hearing held on grazing 
reductions and other issues on Bureau of Land Management lands. 
Printed Hearing 105-52
    November 17, 1997--Joint oversight field hearing in St. 
George, Utah, with the Subcommittee on Aviation of the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, on National 
Park Service Overflight Policy. Printed Hearing 105-67
    February 26, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Fee 
Demonstration Programs: Successes and Failures. Printed Hearing 
105-73
    March 12, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Concession Reform
    March 24, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Realty Appraisal 
Process on BLM Land Exchange. Printed Hearing 105-86
    July 13, 1998--Oversight field hearing in Reno, Nevada, on 
Wild Horse and Burro Act. Printed Hearing 105-105
    September 21, 1998--Oversight field hearing held in 
Kalispell, Montana, on future maintenance and repair of the 
Going-to-the Sun Road in Glacier National Park. Printed Hearing 
105-115
    September 24, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Grand Canyon 
National Park. Printed Hearing 105-109.

                       v. subcommittee statistics

Total number of bills and resolutions referred....................   266
Total number of bills reported from Subcommittee..................    58
Total number of bills reported from Full Committee................    40
Total number of bills passed by the House.........................    48
Total number of bills enacted into law............................    73
Public Hearings and Markups:
    Legislative...................................................    26
    Oversight.....................................................    17
    Markup sessions...............................................    13
Total number of subcommittee meetings (days)......................    52

      Subcommittee on Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans

                            i. introduction

    After a highly successful initial two years, the 
Subcommittee on Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans 
worked hard to build upon its successful accomplishments for 
the American people. By any objective standard, the 
Subcommittee's performance during the 105th Congress was 
superb.
    Drawing on its bi-coastal membership, the Subcommittee, 
under the leadership of Chairman Jim Saxton of Mt. Holly, New 
Jersey, conducted 21 legislative and 22 oversight hearings on 
topics ranging from corals reefs on the bottom of the oceans to 
the top of the world in the Arctic.
    During this Congress, the Subcommittee was instrumental in 
enacting legislation to implement an international treaty to 
protect dolphins; to conserve highly endangered Asian 
elephants; to establish a nationwide refuge volunteer 
coordination program; to improve the collection and use of 
hydrographic data; to prohibit the importation of products 
containing parts of endangered rhinoceros and tigers; to 
protect coral reef ecosystems throughout the world and to 
reform Federal protections for migratory birds by prohibiting 
baited fields, while ensuring that sportsmen are treated 
fairly. Furthermore, the Subcommittee took a leadership role in 
promoting the passage of the National Wildlife Refuge System 
Improvement Act of 1997. This historic law sponsored by 
Chairman Don Young established for the first time an organic 
statute for our nation's 94 million acre, 514 unit National 
Wildlife Refuge System.
    Finally, the Subcommittee was responsible for moving a 
number of bills to extend valuable fish, wildlife and ocean 
resource programs. These included reauthorization of: the 
African Elephant Act of 1988, the Atlantic Striped Bass 
Conservation Act of 1984, the Atlantic Tunas Convention of 
1975, the National Sea Grant College Program Act of 1967, the 
North American Wetlands Conservation Act of 1989, the 
Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Act of 1994 and the Sikes Act 
of 1960.

                            ii. jurisdiction

    (1) Fisheries management and fisheries research generally, 
including the management of all commercial and recreational 
fisheries, the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and 
Management Act, interjurisdictional fisheries, international 
fisheries agreements, aquaculture, seafood safety and fisheries 
promotion.
    (2) Wildlife resources, including research, restoration, 
refuges and conservation.
    (3) All matters pertaining to the protection of coastal and 
marine environments, including estuarine protection.
    (4) Coastal barriers.
    (5) Oceanography.
    (6) Ocean engineering, including materials, technology and 
systems.
    (7) Coastal zone management.
    (8) Marine sanctuaries.
    (9) U.N. Convention on the Law of the Sea.
    (10) Sea Grant programs and marine extension services.
    (11) General and continuing oversight and investigative 
authority over activities, policies and programs within the 
jurisdiction of the Subcommittee.

                      iii. legislative activities

A. Legislative hearings and markups

    February 27, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 437, to reauthorize 
the National Sea Grant College Program Act.
    March 6, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 511, to amend the 
National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act of 1966 to 
improve the management of the National Wildlife Refuge System; 
and H.R. 512, to prohibit the expenditure of funds from the 
Land and Water Conservation Fund for the creation of new 
National Wildlife Refuges without specific authorization from 
Congress pursuant to a recommendation from the United States 
Fish and Wildlife Service. Printed Hearing 105-7
    March 13, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 39, to reauthorize the 
African Elephant Conservation Act; and H. Con. Res. 8, 
expressing the Sense of Congress with respect to the 
significance of maintaining the health and stability of coral 
reef ecosystems. Printed Hearing 105-4
    March 19, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 39, to reauthorize the 
African Elephant Conservation Act; and H. Con. Res. 8, 
expressing the Sense of Congress with respect to the 
significance of maintaining the health and stability of coral 
reef ecosystems.
    April 9, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 408, to amend the 
Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 to support the 
International Dolphin Conservation Program in the eastern 
tropical Pacific Ocean.
    April 10, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 408, to amend the 
Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 to support the 
International Dolphin Conservation Program in the eastern 
tropical Pacific Ocean.
    May 6, 1997--Hearing held on H. Res. 87, expressing the 
sense of the House of Representatives that the United States 
and the United Nations should condemn coral reef fisheries that 
are harmful to coral reef ecosystems and promote the 
development of sustainable coral reef fishing practices 
worldwide; H.R. 608, to direct the Secretary of the Interior to 
convey the Marion National Fish Hatchery and the Claude Harris 
National Aquacultural Research Center to the State of Alabama; 
and H.R. 796, to direct the Secretary of the Interior to make 
technical corrections to a map relating to the Coastal Barrier 
Resources System.
    May 15, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 741, to clarify hunting 
prohibitions and provide for wildlife habitat under the 
Migratory Bird Treaty Act. Printed Hearing 105-23
    May 22, 1997--Markup held on H. Res. 87, expressing the 
sense of the House of Representatives that the United States 
and the United Nations should condemn coral reef fisheries that 
are harmful to coral reef ecosystems and promote the 
development of sustainable coral reef fishing practices 
worldwide; H.R. 608, to direct the Secretary of the Interior to 
convey the Marion National Fish Hatchery and the Claude Harris 
National Aquacultural Research Center to the State of Alabama; 
H.R. 796, to direct the Secretary of the Interior to make 
technical corrections to a map relating to the Coastal Barrier 
Resources System; H.R. 1278, National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration Authorization Act of 1997; and H.R. 1658, to 
reauthorize and amend the Atlantic Striped Bass Conservation 
Act and related laws.
    May 22, 1997--Joint hearing with the Committee on National 
Security Subcommittee on Military Installations and Facilities 
on H.R. 374, to amend the Act popularly known as the ``Sikes 
Act'' to enhance fish and wildlife conservation and natural 
resources management programs.
    June 18, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 1856, Volunteers for 
Wildlife Act of 1997.
    June 26, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 1855, to impose a 
moratorium on ``large fishing vessels'' in the Atlantic herring 
and mackerel fisheries.
    July 31, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 1787, to assist in the 
conservation of Asian elephants by supporting and providing 
financial resources for the conservation programs of nations 
within the range of Asian elephants and projects of persons 
with demonstrated expertise in the conservation of Asian 
elephants. Printed Hearing 105-49
    Markup held on H.R. 512, to prohibit the expenditure of 
funds from the Land and Water Conservation Fund for the 
creation of new National Wildlife Refuges without specific 
authorization from Congress pursuant to a recommendation from 
the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to create the 
refuge; H.R. 1856, Volunteers for Wildlife Act of 1997; and 
H.R. 2233, to assist in the conservation of coral reefs.
    September 11, 1997--Markup held on H. Con. Res. 131, 
expressing the sense of Congress regarding the ocean.
    September 25, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 2376, to 
reauthorize and amend the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation 
Establishment Act. Printed Hearing 105-54
    October 23, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 2376, to reauthorize 
and amend the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation 
Establishment Act.
    Hearing held on H.R. 2401, to direct the Secretary of the 
Interior to make technical corrections to a map relating to the 
Coastal Barrier Resources System; and H.R. 2556, to reauthorize 
the North American Wetlands Conservation Act and the 
Partnerships for Wildlife Act. Printed Hearing 105-64
    October 30, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 2556, to reauthorize 
the North American Wetlands Conservation Act and the 
Partnerships for Wildlife Act.
    February 5, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 2807, Rhino and 
Tiger Product Labeling Act; and H.R. 3113, Rhinoceros and Tiger 
Conservation Reauthorization Act. Printed Hearing 105-69
    February 12, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 2807, Rhino and 
Tiger Product Labeling Act; H.R. 3113, Rhinoceros and Tiger 
Conservation Reauthorization Act; and H.R. 3164, Hydrographic 
Services Improvement Act of 1998.
    March 3, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 2973, Sportfishing and 
Boating Improvement Act of 1997.
    March 19, 1998--Hearing held on S. 1213, Oceans Act of 
1997; H.R. 2547, to develop and maintain a coordinated, 
comprehensive, and long-range national policy with respect to 
ocean and coastal activities that will assist the Nation in 
meeting specified objectives; and H.R. 3445, Ocean Commission 
Act. Printed Hearing 105-75
    April 23, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 3445, Oceans Act of 
1998.
    April 28, 1998--Joint hearing held with Subcommittee on 
National Parks and Public Lands on H.R. 2800, Battle of Midway 
National Memorial Study Act.
    May 7, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 3498, Dungeness Crab 
Conservation and Management Act.
    May 14, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 2760, Disabled 
Sportsmen's Access Act. Printed Hearing 105-84
    May 19, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 2291, to amend the Fish 
and Wildlife Improvement Act of 1978 to enable the Secretary of 
the Interior to more effectively utilize the proceeds of sales 
of certain items; H.R. 3460, to approve a Governing 
International Fishery Agreement between the United States and 
the Republic of Latvia, to reauthorize the Atlantic Tunas 
Convention Act of 1975 and extend the Northwest Atlantic 
Fisheries Convention Act of 1995; H.R. 3461, to approve a 
Governing International Fishery Agreement between the United 
States and the Republic of Poland; and H.R. 3647, to make a 
technical correction in unit FL-35 (Pumpkin Key) of the Coastal 
Barrier Resources System;
    June 4, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 2291, to amend the Fish 
and Wildlife Improvement Act of 1978 to enable the Secretary of 
the Interior to more effectively utilize the proceeds of sales 
of certain items; H.R. 3460, to approve a Governing 
International Fishery Agreement between the United States and 
the Republic of Latvia, to reauthorize the Atlantic Tunas 
Convention Act of 1975 and extend the Northwest Atlantic 
Fisheries Convention Act of 1995; and H.R. 3498, Dungeness Crab 
Conservation and Management Act.
    June 18, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 1481, Great Lakes Fish 
and Wildlife Restoration Act of 1997.
    July 16, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 1481, Great Lakes Fish 
and Wildlife Restoration Act of 1997.-
    September 17, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 4337, Nutria 
Eradication and Control Pilot Program.
    Hearing held on H.R. 2304, to direct the Secretary of the 
Interior to make technical corrections to a map relating to the 
Coastal Barrier Resources System; H.R. 4248, to authorize the 
use of receipts from the sale of the Migratory Bird Hunting and 
Conservation Stamps to promote additional stamp purchases; and 
H.R. 4517, Neotropical Migratory Bird Habitat Enhancement Act.

B. Legislation enacted

    H.R. 39, reauthorizes the African Elephant Conservation Act 
(Public Law 105-217).
    H.R. 374, to amend the Act popularly known as the ``Sikes 
Act'' to enhance fish and wildlife conservation and natural 
resources management programs (enacted as part of Public Law 
105-85).
    H.R. 408, amends the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 
to support the International Dolphin Conservation Program in 
the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, and for other purposes 
(Public Law 105-42).
    H.R. 511, amends the National Wildlife Refuge System 
Administration Act of 1966 to improve the management of the 
National Wildlife Refuge System, and for other purposes 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-57).
    H.R. 741, clarifies hunting prohibitions and provide for 
wildlife habitat under the Migratory Bird Treaty Act (enacted 
as part of Public Law 105-312).
    H.R. 796, directs the Secretary of the Interior to make 
technical corrections to a map relating to the Coastal Barrier 
Resources System (enacted as part of Public Law 105-277).
    H.R. 1481, amends the Great Lakes Fish and Wildlife 
Restoration Act of 1990 to provide for implementation of 
recommendations of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service 
contained in the Great Lakes Fishery Restoration Study Report 
(Public Law 105-265).
    H.R. 1658, reauthorizes and amend the Atlantic Striped Bass 
Conservation Act and related laws (Public Law 105-146).
    H.R. 1787, assists in the conservation of Asian elephants 
by supporting and providing financial resources for the 
conservation programs of nations within the range of Asian 
elephants and projects of persons with demonstrated expertise 
in the conservation of Asian elephants (Public Law 105-96).
    H.R. 1855, establishes a moratorium on large fishing 
vessels in Atlantic herring and mackerel fisheries (enacted as 
part of Public Law 105-119).
    H.R. 1856, amends the Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956 to 
direct the Secretary of the Interior to conduct a volunteer 
pilot project at one national wildlife refuge in each United 
States Fish and Wildlife Service region, and for other purposes 
(Public Law 105-242).
    H.R. 2401, directs the Secretary of the Interior to make 
technical corrections to a map relating to the Coastal Barrier 
Resources System (enacted as part of Public Law 105-277).
    H.R. 2556, reauthorize the North American Wetlands 
Conservation Act and the Partnerships for Wildlife Act (enacted 
as part of Public Law 105-312).
    H.R. 2760, amends the Sikes Act to establish a mechanism by 
which outdoor recreation programs on military installations 
will be accessible to disabled veterans, military dependents 
with disabilities, and other persons with disabilities (enacted 
as part of Public Law 105-261).
    H.R. 2807, amends the Rhinoceros and Tiger Conservation Act 
of 1994 to prohibit the sale, importation, and exportation of 
products labeled as containing substances derived from 
rhinoceros or tiger (Public Law 105-312).
    H.R. 2973, amends the Act popularly known as the Federal 
Aid in Fish Restoration Act, authorizing assistance to the 
States for fish restoration and management projects, and for 
other purposes (enacted as part of Public Law 105-178).
    H.R. 3113, reauthorize the Rhinoceros and Tiger 
Conservation Act of 1994 (enacted as part of Public Law 105-
312).
    H.R. 3164, describes the hydrographic services functions of 
the Administrator of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration, and for other purposes (enacted as part of 
Public Law 105-384).
    H.R. 3460, approves a governing international fishery 
agreement between the United States and the Republic of Latvia, 
and for other purposes (enacted as part of Public Law 105-384).
    H.R. 3461, approve a governing international fishery 
agreement between the United States and the Republic of Poland 
(Public Law 105-384).
    H.R. 3498, amends the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation 
and Management Act to authorize the States of Washington, 
Oregon, and California to regulate the Dungeness crab fishery 
in the exclusive economic zone (enacted as part of Public Law 
105-384).
    H.R. 3544, amends the National Sea Grant College Program 
Act with respect to the treatment of Lake Champlain (enacted as 
part of Public Law 105-174).
    H.R. 3569, transfers administrative jurisdiction over 
certain parcels of public domain land in Lake County, Oregon, 
to facilitate management of the land, and for other purposes 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-321).
    H.R. 3647, directs the Secretary of the Interior to make 
technical corrections to a map relating to the Coastal Barrier 
Resources System (enacted as part of Public Law 105-277).
    H.R. 3689, transfers administrative jurisdiction over the 
Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area to the 
Secretary of Agriculture (enacted as part of Public Law 105-
277).
    H.R. 4180, reduces fishing capacity in United States 
fisheries (enacted as part of Public Law 105-277).
    H.R. 4235, authorizes appropriations for the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to conduct research, 
monitoring, education, and management activities for the 
prevention, reduction, and control of harmful algal blooms, 
including blooms of Pfiesteria piscicida and other aquatic 
toxins, hypoxia, and for other purposes (enacted as part of 
Public Law 105-383).
    H.R. 4248, authorizes the use of receipts from the sale of 
the Migratory Bird Hunting and Conservation Stamps to promote 
additional stamp purchases (Public Law 105-269).
    H.R. 4289, provides for the purchase by the Secretary of 
the Interior of the Wilcox ranch in Eastern Utah for management 
as wildlife habitat (enacted as part of Public Law 105-363).
    H.R. 4337, authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to 
provide financial assistance to the State of Maryland for a 
pilot program to develop measures to eradicate or control 
nutria and restore marshland damaged by nutria (Public Law 105-
322).
    H.R. 4585, establishes the Northwest Straits Advisory 
Commission (enacted as part of Public Law 105-384).
    H.R. 4634, catalyzes restoration of estuary habitat through 
more efficient financing of projects and enhanced coordination 
of Federal and non-Federal restoration programs, and for other 
purposes (enacted as part of Public Law 105-312).
    S. 1104, directs the Secretary of the Interior to make 
corrections in maps relating to the Coastal Barrier Resources 
System (enacted as part of Public Law 105-277).
    S. 1807, transfers administrative jurisdiction over certain 
parcels of public domain land in Lake County, Oregon, to 
facilitate management of the land, and for other purposes 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-321).
    S. 1883, directs the Secretary of the Interior to convey 
the Marion National Fish Hatchery and the Claude Harris 
National Aquacultural Research Center to the State of Alabama, 
and for other purposes (Public Law 105-239).
    S. 2094, amends the Fish and Wildlife Improvement Act of 
1978 to enable the Secretary of the Interior to more 
effectively use the proceeds of sales of certain items (Public 
Law 105-328).
    S. 2317, improves the National Wildlife Refuge System, and 
for other purposes (enacted as part of Public Law 105-312).
    S. 2505, directs the Secretary of the Interior to convey 
title to the Tunnison Lab Hagerman Field Station in Gooding 
County, Idaho, to the University of Idaho (Public Law 105-346).

C. Resolutions approved by both houses

    H. Con. Res. 8 (H. Rept. 105-69), expressing the sense of 
Congress with respect to the significance of maintaining the 
health and stability of coral reef ecosystems.--

D. Legislation passed House

    H. Con. Res. 124, expressing the sense of the Congress 
regarding acts of illegal aggression by Canadian fishermen with 
respect to the Pacific salmon fishery, and for other purposes.
    H. Con. Res. 131 (H. Rept. 105-262), expressing the sense 
of Congress regarding the ocean.
    H.R. 437 (H. Rept. 105-22, Pt. I), to reauthorize the 
National Sea Grant College Program Act, and for other purposes. 
[See S. 927 for further action]
    H.R. 512 (H. Rept. 105-276), to prohibit the expenditure of 
funds from the Land and Water Conservation Fund for the 
creation of new National Wildlife Refuges without specific 
authorization from Congress pursuant to a recommendation from 
the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to create the 
refuge.
    H.R. 2233 (H. Rept. 105-277), to assist in the conservation 
of coral reefs.
    H.R. 3445 (H. Rept. 105-718, Part I), to establish the 
Commission on Ocean Policy, and for other purposes.

E. Legislation ordered reported by the full committee

    H.R. 1278 (H. Rept. 105-66, Part II), to authorize 
appropriations for the activities of the National Oceanic and 
Atmospheric Administration for fiscal years 1998 and 1999, and 
for other purposes.
    H.R. 2376 (H. Rept. 105-483), to reauthorize and amend the 
National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Establishment Act.
    H.R. 2993 (H. Rept. 105-678), to provide for the collection 
of fees for the making of motion pictures, television 
productions, and sound tracks in National Park System and 
National Wildlife Refuge System units, and for other purposes.

F. Legislation marked up at subcommittee

    H. Res. 87, expressing the sense of the House of 
Representatives that the United States and the United Nations 
should condemn coral reef fisheries that are harmful to coral 
reef ecosystems and promote the development of sustainable 
coral reef fishing practices worldwide.
    H.R. 608, to direct the Secretary of the Interior to convey 
the Marion National Fish Hatchery and the Claude Harris 
National Aquacultural Research Center to the State of Alabama. 
[See S. 1883 for further action]
    H.R. 2291, to amend the Fish and Wildlife Improvement Act 
of 1978 to enable the Secretary of the Interior to more 
effectively utilize the proceeds of sales of certain items. 
[See S. 2094 for further action]

IV. oversight activities of the subcommittee on fisheries conservation, 
                          wildlife and oceans

A. Introduction

    The Subcommittee also seriously pursued and aggressively 
carried out its oversight responsibilities. In fact, more than 
50 percent of the Subcommittee's public hearings were dedicated 
to ensuring that Federal programs were working and that U.S. 
taxpayer dollars were being wisely spent. This Congress, the 
Subcommittee conducted oversight hearings on: the budget 
requests of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; the environmental 
impact of snow geese on the Arctic Tundra; the impact of 
pfiesteria on our fishing resources; the International Year of 
the Ocean activities; the management of our Nation's fisheries 
by the National Marine Fisheries Service; west coast 
groundfish; U.S. ownership of fishing vessels; and U.S. 
participation in the Convention on International Trade in 
Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES).
    Budget Review: The Subcommittee will hold an oversight 
hearing on the President's Fiscal Year (FY) 1998 budget 
recommendations for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the 
National Marine Fisheries Service, and certain ``wet'' programs 
of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). 
The Fish and Wildlife Service operates the National Wildlife 
Refuge System and NOAA implements the Coastal Zone Management 
Act, the National Marine Sanctuaries Act, the National Sea 
Grant College Act, and U.S. fishing laws. Both agencies 
implement the Endangered Species Act.
    Oversight hearings were held on the budgets of NOAA and US 
Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS) for FY 1998 and 1999 in 1997 
and 1998, respectively.
            U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
    African Elephant Conservation Act of 1988: The major 
provisions of this landmark conservation law are: to require 
the Secretary of the Interior to evaluate the effectiveness of 
the elephant conservation program of each ivory-producing 
nation; to prohibit ivory imports from African countries unable 
to adequately protect their elephants; to require intermediary 
countries to stop selling illegally obtained ivory; and to 
provide up to $5 million per year to assist African nations in 
their elephant conservation efforts. Congress has previously 
reauthorized money for the African Elephant Conservation Fund. 
This authorization expires on September 30, 1998. During the 
104th Congress, the Subcommittee conducted an oversight hearing 
(June 20, 1996) on this historic law. The Subcommittee will 
conduct a hearing on legislation to further extend the African 
Elephant Conservation Fund.
    The Subcommittee held a legislative hearing on H.R. 39, the 
African Elephant Conservation Reauthorization Act, on March 13, 
1997. The legislation was favorably reported from Committee and 
passed the Full House of Representatives. The African Elephant 
Conservation Reauthorization Act was then enacted (Public Law 
105-217).
    Coastal Barrier Resources System: The Coastal Barrier 
Resources Act of 1982 ended Federal financial assistance on 
undeveloped coastal barriers included in the Coastal Barrier 
Resources System. Inclusion in the System does not prevent 
private development, but restricts the use of Federal funds for 
flood insurance, highway construction, and water and sewer 
grants. During the 104th Congress, legislation was enacted that 
removed certain coastal barrier lands in Florida, New York, and 
South Carolina that were incorrectly incorporated within the 
System. Legislation may be introduced during the next two years 
to remove additional lands from the System. The Subcommittee 
will carefully examine, through public hearings, the merits of 
each of these proposals.
    Hearings were held and legislation was enacted on various 
coastal barrier resources issues. H.R. 796, S. 1104, H.R. 2401, 
and H.R. 3647 were included in Public law 105-277.
    Federal Fish Hatcheries: There are currently 72 Federal 
fish hatcheries operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 
that produce various species of fish that are distributed as 
part of the Service's nationwide stocking programs in lakes, 
ponds, and streams throughout the U.S. Duringthe 104th 
Congress, legislation was enacted that transferred title of eight 
Federal fish hatcheries to State and local governmental entities. The 
Subcommittee will conduct an oversight hearing on whether additional 
facilities should be transferred. Furthermore, it is likely that 
legislation will be introduced to transfer additional hatcheries in the 
105th Congress. These bills will be carefully reviewed.
    Legislation to transfer the Marion National Fish Hatchery 
and the Claude Harris National Aquacultural Research Center to 
the State of Alabama (S. 1883) was enacted into law (Public Law 
105-239).
    Marine Mammal Protection Act: The Marine Mammal Protection 
Act (MMPA) was enacted in 1972 for the purpose of ensuring that 
marine mammals are maintained at, or in some cases restored to, 
healthy population levels. This Act governs a variety of 
subjects including public display, scientific research, 
subsistence use of marine mammals, and the incidental take of 
marine mammals during commercial fishing operations. 
Jurisdiction over marine mammals under the MMPA is divided 
between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which has 
responsibility for dugongs, manatees, polar bears, sea otters, 
and walrus, and the National Marine Fisheries Service, which 
has responsibility for all other marine mammals. In 1994, 
Congress enacted the Marine Mammal Protection Act Amendments 
(Public Law 103-238). This law reauthorized Federal funding for 
the MMPA until September 30, 1999, and made a number of 
significant changes in the Act. The Subcommittee will conduct 
oversight hearings during the 105th Congress on the 
effectiveness of MMPA.
    The Subcommittee continued to conduct oversight of the MMPA 
in preparation of reauthorizing the Act. Oversight and 
legislative hearings will be held during the 106th Congress.
    National Wildlife Refuge System: This System is comprised 
of Federal lands that have been acquired for the conservation 
and enhancement of fish and wildlife. Totaling about 91.7 
million acres, the System provides habitat for hundreds of fish 
and wildlife species, including more than 165 species listed as 
threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act. At 
present, the System is comprised of 511 refuges, which are 
located in all 50 States and the five territories. During the 
last Congress, the Subcommittee conducted a number of 
legislative and oversight hearings on our Refuge System. 
Additionally, the House of Representatives overwhelmingly 
adopted H.R. 1675, the National Wildlife Refuge Improvement 
Act, on April 24, 1996. This legislation is expected to be 
reintroduced in the 105th Congress and will be the subject of a 
Subcommittee hearing.
    At the beginning of the 105th Congress H.R. 511 (the 
successor bill to H.R. 1674) was introduced and a hearing was 
held on March 7, 1997. After consultations with the 
Administration a new bill was introduced (H.R. 1420) to improve 
the management of our National Wildlife Refuges. H.R. 1420 was 
favorably reported by the Committee on Resources and 
overwhelmingly passed the House of Representatives. H.R. 1420 
was then enacted into law (Public Law 105-57).
    National Wildlife Refuge System--Maintenance Backlog: 
During the 104th Congress, the Subcommittee conducted two 
oversight hearings on the growing maintenance backlog issue at 
our Nation's Wildlife Refuge System. According to the U.S. Fish 
and Wildlife Service, this backlog has now risen to $440 
million. This backlog represents deferred maintenance at 
visitor centers, picnic pavilions, observation towers, public 
use buildings, roads, bridges, dams, canals, and other water 
management structures. The Subcommittee intends to hold a 
series of oversight hearings in Washington, D.C., and other 
places on this backlog maintenance issue. The purpose of these 
hearings will be to clearly identify the problem and to seek 
effective solutions so that the System can be revitalized 
before the 100th birthday of the National Wildlife Refuge 
System in 2003.
    The Subcommittee conducted hearing on this issue on April 
21, 1997, and during consideration of the budget request for 
the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
    National Fish and Wildlife Foundation Act of 1984: This 
Foundation, which was established as a non-profit corporation, 
was created to encourage, accept, and administer private gifts 
of property for the benefit of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife 
Service and to conduct activities to further the conservation 
and management of the fish, wildlife, and plant resources of 
the U.S. During the 104th Congress, the Subcommittee conducted 
an oversight hearing on the Foundation, whose authorization of 
appropriations expires on September 30, 1998. The Subcommittee 
will hold a hearing on legislation related to reauthorization 
of the Foundation in the future.
    The Subcommittee held a legislative hearing on H.R. 2376 to 
reauthorize and amend the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation 
Establishment Act on September 25, 1997. The legislation was 
then ordered reported to the Full Committee who favorably 
reported the legislation on March 11, 1998. The Senate 
companion bill, S. 2095, was brought to the House of 
Representatives under Suspension of the Rules, but failed to 
receive the necessary two-thirds vote to pass.
    Natural Resource Management on Military Lands Act of 1960: 
The Department of Defense (DOD) manages nearly 25 million acres 
at approximately 900 military bases nationwide. These lands 
contain a wealth of plant and animal life, they provide vital 
habitat for thousands of migratory waterfowl, and they are home 
for nearly 100 endangered or threatened species. First enacted 
in 1960, the Sikes Act provides protection for threatened and 
endangered species of fish, plants, and wildlife on these 
military lands. The authorization of appropriations for the Act 
expired on September 30, 1993. During the last Congress, the 
House of Representatives overwhelmingly adopted H.R. 1141, the 
Sikes Act Improvement Amendments, which reauthorized funding 
until September 30, 1998. Regrettably, the Senate took no 
action on this bill. TheSubcommittee will conduct a joint 
hearing with the Committee on National Security's Subcommittee on 
Military Installations and Facilities on legislation to reauthorize the 
Sikes Act.
    H.R. 374, the Sikes Act Improvement Amendments, was 
introduced on January 7, 1997, to enhance fish and wildlife 
conservation and natural resources management programs. A joint 
hearing was held with the Committee on National Security, 
Subcommittee on Military Installations and Facilities, on May 
22, 1997. H.R. 374 was incorporated into Public Law 105-85, the 
Defense Authorization Act (H.R. 1119).
    National American Wetlands Conservation Act of 1989: The 
purpose of the North American Wetlands Conservation Act is to 
conserve wetland ecosystems and the species they support, which 
are primarily waterfowl. This Act also provides the financial 
assistance necessary for the implementation of the North 
American Waterfowl Management Plan, an agreement originally 
signed in 1986, to reverse the loss of wetlands and to stem the 
decline in populations of migratory birds. The authorization of 
appropriations for the Act expires on September 30, 1998. The 
Subcommittee will conduct a hearing on legislation to extend 
the Act.
    A legislative hearing was held on October 27, 1997, on H.R. 
2556, to reauthorize the North American Wetlands Conservation 
Act and the Partnerships for Wildlife Act. The Subcommittee 
reported the legislation to the Full Committee who favorably 
reported the bill to the House of Representatives. H.R. 2556 
was passed by the House and then incorporated into Public Law 
105-312, Rhino and Tiger Product Labeling Act (H.R. 2807).
    Sport Fish Restoration Programs:
    (A) Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Act of 1952 
(Sport Fishing and Boating Enhancement Fund or the Wallop-
Breaux Trust Fund): This fund is derived from fees, taxes, and 
duties imposed on fishing equipment, motorboat fuel, imported 
watercraft, and fishing tackle. The revenues are allocated to 
the States, on a formula basis, and are used to protect natural 
resources and enhance recreational opportunities for millions 
of Americans. Since its inception, more than $2 billion has 
been collected and allocated to the States.
    (B) Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration Act of 1937 
(Pittman-Robertson): Nearly 60 years ago, hunters lobbied 
Congress to impose a tax on themselves. The money is derived 
from an 11 percent excise tax on sporting arms and ammunition; 
a 10 percent tax on pistols and revolvers; and an 11 percent 
tax on certain archery equipment. Hunters have now paid more 
than $2.6 billion into the Federal Aid in Wildlife Restoration 
Program. Federal aid money is distributed by the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service to the States to fund wildlife conservation 
and hunter education programs. These funds have been largely 
responsible for the recovery of many species, including 
pronghorn antelope, white-tailed deer, wood ducks, and wild 
turkey. Many State wildlife agencies could not operate without 
this money.
    (C) Capital Construction Fund: Section 607 of the Merchant 
Marine Act of 1936 was enacted to provide an incentive to build 
and document commercial and fishing vessels in the U.S. by 
allowing companies to establish individual Capital Construction 
Fund (CCF) accounts funded by tax-deferred deposits. The 
commercial and fishing vessel programs are administered by the 
Maritime Admistration (MARAD) and NOAA respectively. 
Overcapitalization of some U.S. fisheries has prompted calls 
for changes in the CCF regulations to allow early withdrawal or 
alternative uses of the funds rather than requiring the 
construction of additional new fishing vessels. These ideas 
will be examined, as well as attempts by the Internal Revenue 
Service to exert sole authority over the CCF program.
    The Subcommittee intends to hold several oversight hearings 
on these three funding proposals. The purpose of these hearings 
is to examine their effectiveness, how the money is allocated 
to the States, and whether these resources have been 
effectively spent.
    A legislative hearing was held on H.R. 3972, the 
Sportfishing and Boating Improvement Act, on March 3, 1998. The 
legislation was incorporated into Public Law 105-178, 
Transportation Reauthorization Bill--TEA 21 (H.R. 2400).
    ``Teaming With Wildlife'': The International Association of 
Fish and Wildlife Agencies and the National Association of 
State Park Directors have developed a new funding concept to 
raise additional revenues that would be allocated to the States 
for the more than 1,800 wildlife species for which no reliable 
funded conservation programs exist. These species include 
butterflies, frogs, herons, songbirds, turtles, and otters. 
Under this concept, a new excise fee of up to five percent of 
the value of a product would be placed on an extensive list of 
recreational items including backpacks, canoes, film, hiking 
boots, sport utility vehicles, and sleeping bags. The goal is 
to raise some $350 million in new revenues each year. The 
Subcommittee may conduct an oversight hearing on this issue.
    The Subcommittee conducted no hearings on this issue in the 
105th Congress.
    Trinity River Basin Fish and Wildlife Management Act of 
1984: This Act implemented 11 actions recommended by a federal/
State Trinity River Basin Fish and Wildlife Task Force to 
restore the habitat of the watershed. These actions were 
necessary because 90 percent of the River's flow was diverted 
to the Central Valley of California for agricultural, 
municipal, and industrial uses. During the 104th Congress, 
legislation was enacted to extend the authorization of 
appropriations until September 30, 1998. The Subcommittee will 
conduct an oversight hearing on this issue and is likely to 
extend the authorization beyond its current deadline.
    The Subcommittee conducted no hearings on this issue in the 
105th Congress.
            National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS)
    Aquaculture: Each year, Federal funds are appropriated to 
the National Marine Fisheries Service to promote the growth of 
marine aquaculture industry. The Subcommittee will hold an 
oversight hearing to evaluate the effectiveness of this program 
and whether continued investment by the Federal government is 
warranted.
    No oversight hearing was held.
    Atlantic Tunas Convention Act of 1975: This is the 
implementing legislation for the International Convention for 
the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas, an international treaty for 
the conservation and management of highly migratory tuna and 
tuna-like species of the Atlantic Ocean and Gulf of Mexico. 
During the 104th Congress, the authorization of appropriations 
for this Act was extended until September 30, 1998. The 
Subcommittee will reevaluate the effectiveness and whether 
there is an ongoing need for further Federal funding of this 
program in the future.
    A provision was included in Public Law 105-384 (H.R. 3461) 
to reauthorize the Atlantic Tunas Convention Act of 1975.
    Artificial Reefs: In recent years, there have been several 
proposals to allow National Defense Reserve Fleet surplus ships 
to be sold for scrap or used for artificial reefs. The 
Subcommittee may hold an oversight hearing on the effectiveness 
of artificial reefs in building new fish and shellfish 
habitats.
    The Subcommittee conducted no hearings on this issue in the 
105th Congress.
    Fish Passages Technology: The Office of Technology 
Assessment has issued a report on the state of technology of 
fish passages and other systems for transferring hatchlings 
around Federal power projects. The Subcommittee will hold a 
hearing on this report during the 105th Congress.
    The Subcommittee conducted no hearings on this issue in the 
105th Congress.
    Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act: 
This Act provides a national program for the conservation and 
management of our Nation's marine fishery resources within our 
200-mile Exclusive Economic Zone. The Act established eight 
Regional Fishery Management Councils that have primary 
responsibility for managing the fishery resources outside of 
State waters. During the 104th Congress, landmark legislation 
was enacted to improve and extend the authorization of 
appropriations for the Magnuson Act. This authorization expires 
on September 30, 1999. The Subcommittee will conduct an 
oversight hearing on Public Law 104-297.
    The Subcommittee conducted oversight hearings on the 
management of our Nation's fishery resources on July 24, 1997; 
August 15, 1997; September 11, 1997; October 9, 1997; April 30, 
1998; and June 4, 1998.
    Pacific Salmon Treaty: The U.S. and Canada signed the 
Pacific Salmon Treaty in 1985. Since then, the two countries 
have met numerous times to further negotiate outstanding issues 
related to the Treaty. While a series of yearly agreements have 
been successfully approved, a final resolution of these 
negotiations is still pending. The Subcommittee will hold an 
oversight hearing on these negotiations.
    An oversight hearing was held on the U.S.-Canada Pacific 
Salmon Treaty negotiations on September 18, 1997.
    Saltonstall-Kennedy Program: The Saltonstall-Kennedy Grant 
Program is administered by the National Marine Fisheries 
Service and is used to provide grants for fisheries research 
and development projects. Funding is provided by the Department 
of Agriculture as a percentage of the gross receipts collected 
on imported fish and fish products. All grant projects undergo 
technical and industry review and are encouraged to have a 
cost-sharing component. The Subcommittee will review the 
amounts received and granted under this program.
    The Subcommittee conducted no hearings on this issue in the 
105th Congress.
    Seafood Safety and Inspection Programs: Legislation to 
develop an expanded, mandatory national seafood safety program 
has been introduced and debated at length in previous 
Congresses. There is an ongoing debate over who should be the 
lead agency for seafood safety--the Food and Drug 
Administration, NOAA, or the Agriculture Department. The 
Subcommittee will hold an oversight hearing on this subject.
    The Subcommittee conducted no hearings on this issue in the 
105th Congress.
    Tuna/Dolphin Issue: In October of 1995, twelve nations, 
including the U.S., completed negotiations on an international 
agreement to protect dolphins and other species in the eastern 
tropical Pacific Ocean. During the 104th Congress, the House of 
Representatives approved legislation, the International Dolphin 
Conservation Program of 1996, to codify the international 
agreement. The U.S. Senate took no action on this issue. The 
Subcommittee may conduct further deliberations on this issue 
during the 105th Congress.
    H.R. 408, to amend the Marine Mammal Protection Act of 1972 
to support the international Dolphin Conservation Program in 
the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean, was enacted into law 
(Public Law 105-42).
            National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
    Arctic Research: In 1995, Congress directed the National 
Science Foundation to submit a report on the relationship of 
those Federal resources used for Arctic and Antarctic 
scientific research. The statutory deadline for this report is 
February 20, 1997. The Subcommittee intends to conduct an 
oversight hearing on that report and on other Federal programs 
involving Arctic research, including NOAA's new Arctic 
Initiative.
    An oversight hearing was held on Arctic Snow Geese: Is the 
Arctic Ecosystem in Peril? This hearing was held on April 23, 
1998.
    Atlantic Striped Bass Conservation Act: This law, which was 
first enacted in 1984, requires that States implement 
conservation measures that are consistent with interstate 
fishery management plans adopted by the Atlantic States Marine 
Fisheries Commission. In the past 12 years, the resurgence of 
the Atlantic Striped Bass has been a major fishery management 
success story. During the 104th Congress, the House of 
Representatives overwhelmingly adopted legislation (H.R. 1139 
and H.R. 4139) to extend this conservation law until September 
30, 1997. The U.S. Senate took no final action on either of 
these proposals. The Subcommittee intends to hold a hearing on 
legislation to reauthorize the Act.
    Legislation to reauthorize and amend the Atlantic Striped 
Bass Conservation Act and related laws (H.R. 1658) was enacted 
into law (Public Law 105-146).
    Coastal Zone Management Act: Enacted in 1972, the Coastal 
Zone Management Act (CZMA) encourages States to regulate land 
and water uses that affect their coastal zones. While the 
program is voluntary, States receive grant money to develop a 
plan which, when approved by NOAA, makes them eligible for 
further Federal assistance to help manage their coastal 
programs. Last year, Congress enacted the Coastal Zone 
Protection Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-150), which reauthorized 
the CZMA funding programs until September 30, 1999. During the 
second session of the 105th Congress, the Subcommittee will 
conduct an oversight hearing on Public Law 104-150 to evaluate 
the ongoing effectiveness and need for future funding of CZMA 
programs as well as implementation of the CZMA amendments of 
1996.
    The Subcommittee conducted no hearings on this issue in the 
105th Congress.
    Mapping and Charting Program: In the last 15 years, 
advances in computer technology have caused dramatic leaps 
forward in marine navigation technology. Satellite-based 
Differential Global Positioning Systems and the ability to 
monitor real-time and current data hold the promise of 
significant economic efficiencies. Unfortunately, these 
efficiencies can only be exploited if we have accurate, up-to-
date nautical charts. Many of the charts we use today are based 
on data collected in the last century. The accuracy of this 
information is totally insufficient for today's larger ships 
and advanced navigation capabilities. NOAA is preparing a plan 
on how it will update its charts and develop real-time tide and 
current information. The Subcommittee will hold an oversight 
hearing on this plan.
    An oversight hearing was held on the future of hydrography 
on April 24, 1997. Legislation was subsequently introduced: 
H.R. 3164, the Hydrographic Services Improvement Act. This 
legislation was incorporated into Public Law 105-384 (H.R. 
3461).
    NOAA Corps: NOAA has under its jurisdiction a 358-person 
uniform corps that is trained in both science and vessel 
operations. The Corps, which operates 16 active ships and 10 
aircraft, receives military type pay and benefits. The 
Subcommittee will hold an oversight hearing to evaluate the 
purpose, role, and mission of the Corps in the future.
    The Subcommittee conducted no hearings on this issue in the 
105th Congress.
    NOAA's Generic Laws: The Subcommittee will hold one or more 
oversight hearings on those programs and responsibilities under 
the jurisdiction of the Resources Committee.
    H.R. 1278, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Administration Authorization Act was introduced on April 10, 
1997. The legislation was later favorably reported by the 
Committee on Resources.
    NOAA Fleet Modernization: As part of the NOAA Authorization 
Act of 1992, Congress approved a provision requiring NOAA to 
prepare and submit a fleet modernization plan for the agency's 
ongoing 16 research vessel fleet. While NOAA has submitted its 
plan, fundamental questions remain about whether these vessels 
should be replaced or if these functions could be effectively 
contracted out to private sector vessels.
    The Subcommittee conducted no hearings on this issue in the 
105th Congress.
    National Marine Sanctuaries Program: The National Marine 
Sanctuaries Act of 1972 authorizes the Secretary of Commerce to 
designate areas of the marine environment with nationally 
significant aesthetic, ecological, historical, or recreational 
values as National Marine Sanctuaries. The primary objective of 
this law is to protect marine resources, such as coral reefs, 
sunken historical vessels, or unique habitats, while allowing 
all compatible public and private uses of these resources. In 
short, marine sanctuaries are our Nation's underwater parks. 
During the 104th Congress, legislation was approved, the 
National Marine Sanctuaries Preservation Act of 1996 (Public 
Law 104-283), to reauthorize this landmark environmental law 
until September 30, 1999. During the 105th Congress, the 
Subcommittee will conduct an oversight hearing on the 
management of the National Marine Sanctuaries Program.
    An oversight hearing was held on November 6, 1997, to hear 
testimony on the management of the MONITOR National Marine 
Sanctuary.
    National Sea Grant College Program: The National Sea Grant 
College Program was established in 1966 to improve marine 
resource conservation, management, and utilization. The Program 
is patterned after the Land Grant College Program, which was 
created in 1862. There are currently 26 sea grant colleges and 
three smaller institutional programs which manage a network of 
over 300 universities and affiliated institutions. 
Authorization for the program expired on September 30, 1995. 
While the House Resources Committee approved a bill, H.R. 1175, 
the Marine Resources Revitalization Act of 1995, to extend the 
Program until September 30, 1998, no further action was taken 
on this legislation. The Subcommittee intends to make the 
reauthorization of the National Sea Grant College Program a top 
legislative priority and will hold a hearing on a bill to 
extend funding on February 27, 1997.
    A legislative hearing was held on H.R. 437, to reauthorize 
the National Sea Grant College Program Act, on February 27, 
1997. H.R. 437 was passed by the House of Representatives. The 
Senate companion bill, S. 927, was then passed by both Houses 
and enacted into law (Public Law 105-160).

B. Hearings

    February 27, 1997--Oversight hearing held on National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration FY 1998 budget request.
    March 19, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service FY 1998 budget request.
    April 21, 1997--Oversight field hearing held in Manahawkin, 
New Jersey, on the management of the National Wildlife Refuge 
System and the importance of interactions between striped bass, 
bluefish, and forage fish. Printed Hearing 105-14
    April 24, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the future of 
hydrography. Printed Hearing 105-15
    June 3, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the upcoming CITES 
(Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of 
Wild Fauna and Flora) meeting. Printed Hearing 105-29
    July 17, 1997--Oversight hearing held on results of 
Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild 
Fauna and Flora. Printed Hearing 105-29
    July 24, 1997--Oversight hearing held on review of the 
authority and decisionmaking processes of the National Marine 
Fisheries Service Northwest Region. Printed Hearing 105-34
    August 15, 1997--Oversight field hearing held in Boise, 
Idaho, on National Marine Fisheries Service management of 
Columbia River Basin salmon (continuation of the hearing held 
on July 24, 1997). Printed Hearing 105-34
    September 11, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the review of 
the management of our Nation's fisheries by the National Marine 
Fisheries Service. Printed Hearing 105-39
    September 18, 1997--Oversight hearing held on U.S.-Canada 
Pacific Salmon Treaty negotiations. Printed Hearing 105-57
    October 9, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Pfiesteria and 
its impact on our fishery resources. Printed Hearing 105-63
    October 30, 1997--Oversight hearing held on examining 
activities being planned by the Administration for the 
International Year of the Ocean in 1998.
    November 6, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the management 
of the MONITOR National Marine Sanctuary. Printed Hearing 105-
68
    February 26, 1998--Oversight hearing held on U.S. Fish and 
Wildlife Service FY 1999 budget request.
    March 18, 1998--Oversight hearing held on National Marine 
Fisheries Service FY 1999 budget request and other National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration programs.
    April 23, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Arctic Snow 
Geese: Is the Arctic Ecosystem in Peril? Printed Hearing 105-81
    April 30, 1998--Oversight hearing held on West Coast 
Groundfish Issue. Printed Hearing 105-99.
    June 4, 1998--Oversight hearing held on United States 
Ownership of Fishing Vessels. Printed Hearing 105-98
    June 11, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Spiny Dog Fish 
Fishery Impact on Striped Bass.
    July 16, 1998--Oversight hearing held on a pilot program to 
control the nonindigenous species nutria at the Blackwater 
National Wildlife Refuge in Maryland. Printed Hearing 105-97
    July 30, 1998--Oversight hearing on status of oceanographic 
monitoring and assessment efforts on both global and local 
scales. Printed Hearing 105-106
    September 29, 1998--Oversight hearing held on research 
being conducted in National Marine Sanctuaries. Printed Hearing 
105-113

                       V. Subcommittee Statistics

Total number of bills and resolutions referred....................   106
Total number of bills reported from Subcommittee..................    23
Total number of bills reported from Full Committee................    22
Total number of bills passed by the House.........................    25
Total number of resolutions approved both Houses..................     1
Total number of bills enacted into law............................    38
Public Hearings and Markups:
    Legislative-..................................................    21
    Oversight.....................................................    22
    Markup sessions...............................................    12
Total number of subcommittee meetings (days)......................    44

              Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources

                            I. Introduction

    The Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources acted 
promptly in the 105th Congress to enact a bill to reauthorize 
and amend the National Geologic Mapping Act (NGMA). The NGMA is 
a cooperative effort by the U.S. Geological Survey and the 
various state geological surveys and academia to share 
responsibilities for prioritizing geologic mapping for societal 
needs, and for cost-sharing between Federal and state 
governments. The program's authorization had expired September 
30, 1996, after the U.S. Senate failed to act upon House-passed 
legislation for reauthorization. H.R. 709 (introduced by 
Congresswoman Barbara Cubin, R-WY) was introduced February 12, 
1997, heard in the Subcommittee on February 27, 1997, and 
reported favorably with an amendment to the full committee, 
reported favorably by the Committee to the full House on March 
5, 1997, (H. Rept. 105-17, and adopted by voice vote by the 
full House of Representatives on March 11, 1997. The Senate 
considered and passed H.R. 709 on July 23, 1997. President 
Clinton signed the National Geologic Mapping Reauthorization 
Act of 1997 into law on August 5, 1997, as Public Law 105-36.
    On March 19, 1998, the Subcommittee held a legislative 
hearing on H.R. 3334 (introduced by Congressman William M. 
``Mac'' Thornberry, R-TX), a bill to mandate the collection of 
Federal oil and gas lease royalties in-kind. This complex 
legislation required a follow-up legislative hearing on May 14, 
1998, to further elicit views from governments and industry as 
to the practicality of such revision from the current practice 
of collecting the royalty obligation from lessees in value, a 
complex system in and of itself which has led to enormous audit 
and enforcement burdens upon the Federal government and equally 
steep costs for lessees to defend themselves from arbitrary 
rulings on valuation. On June 18, 1998, the Subcommittee 
reported the bill with an amendment to the full Committee on 
Resources. The 105th Congress adjourned before the 
Congressional Budget Office responded to Chairmen Don Young and 
Barbara Cubin's request for a cost estimate on the subcommittee 
reported bill. A cost analysis is critical given the huge 
disparity between revenue estimates of Administration and the 
industry.
    On October 15, 1998, the full House debated and passed S. 
2500, (identical to H.R. 4598 [Cubin]) a bill to recognize and 
protect the sanctity of coalbed methane leases and contracts in 
situations where the U.S. owns coal rights but has patented all 
other minerals and the surface estate to other parties. The 
bill was made necessary by a ruling of the Tenth Circuit Court 
of Appeals (Southern Ute Tribe v. Amoco) which jeopardized 
legitimate private leases. S. 2500 does not apply where the 
Secretary of the Interior holds coal rights in trust for Indian 
tribes. S. 2500 was signed into law on November 10, 1998, as 
Public Law 105-367.
    On July 21, 1998, the Subcommittee held a hearing on H.R. 
3972, a bill to amend the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act to 
require the Secretary of the Interior to make available to 
state and local governments sand resources from the Outer 
Continental Shelf without charge. The bill was discharged from 
the Subcommittee and reported without amendment from the Full 
Committee on August 5, 1998. On October 15, 1998 the full House 
debated and passed H.R. 3972 under suspension of the rules, but 
the Senate failed to act upon it prior to adjournment.
    On July 21, 1998, the Subcommittee held a hearing on H.R. 
1467, a bill to allow the Secretary of the Interior to waive 
Federal bonding requirements for certain oil lessees on the 
Wayne National Forest in deference to the State of Ohio's 
orphan well program, which currently is an adequate guarantor 
of reclamation funds in the event improper abandonment occurs 
because of bankruptcy. The wells in question are on formerly 
private leases, now Federal through the expiration of private 
mineral reservations made when the surface was acquired by the 
Secretary of Agriculture under the Weeks Act of 1911. The bill 
was discharged from the Subcommittee, and reported with an 
amendment offered by Subcommittee Chairman Cubin, from the Full 
Committee on August 5, 1998. On October 15, 1998, the full 
House debated and passed H.R. 1467 under suspension of the 
rules, but the Senate failed to act upon it prior to 
adjournment.
    On July 21, 1998, the Subcommittee held a hearing on H.R. 
3878, a bill to subject certain reserved mineral rights to the 
operation of the Mineral Leasing Act of 1920. This legislation 
was introduced by Chairman Cubin to allow the Secretary of the 
Interior to lease two tracts of land in the Big Piney area of 
Sublette County, Wyoming, in which all minerals were reserved 
when the surface estate was sold under a 1964 statute requiring 
withdrawals of such reserved minerals if deemed to be in 
conflict with the purposes for which the sale occurred. The 
bill was discharged from the Subcommittee and reported without 
amendment from the Full Committee on August 5, 1998. On October 
15, 1998, the full House debated and passed H.R. 3878 under 
suspension of the rules. The Senate chose not to act upon H.R. 
3878, per se; however, this provision (the exact same language) 
became Section 132 of Public Law 105-277, the Omnibus 
Appropriations Act of 1998, signed October 21, 1998.-

                            II. Jurisdiction

    (1) All measures and matters concerning the U.S. Geological 
Survey, except for the activities and programs of the Water 
Resources Division or its successor.
    (2) All measures and matters affecting geothermal 
resources.
    (3) Conservation of United States uranium supply.
    (4) Mining interests generally, including all matters 
involving mining regulation and enforcement, including the 
reclamation of mined lands, the environmental effects of 
mining, and the management of mineral receipts, mineral land 
laws and claims, long-range mineral programs and deep seabed 
mining.
    (5) Mining schools, experimental stations and long-range 
mineral programs.
    (6) Mineral resources on public lands.
    (7) Conservation and development of oil and gas resources 
of the Outer Continental Shelf.
    (8) Petroleum conservation on the public lands and 
conservation of the radium supply in the United States.
    (9) General and continuing oversight and investigative 
authority over activities, policies and programs within the 
jurisdiction of the Subcommittee.

                      iii. legislative activities

A. Legislative hearings and markups

    February 27, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 709, to reauthorize 
and amend the National Geologic Mapping Act of 1997.
    Markup held on H.R. 709, to reauthorize and amend the 
National Geologic Mapping Act of 1997.
    March 19, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 3334, to provide 
certainty for, reduce administrative and compliance burdens 
associated with, and streamline and improve the collection of 
royalties from Federal and outer continental shelf oil and gas 
leases. (Part I) Printed Hearing 105-92
    May 21, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 3334, to provide 
certainty for, reduce administrative and compliance burdens 
associated with, and streamline and improve the collection of 
royalties from Federal and outer continental shelf oil and gas 
leases. (Part II) Printed Hearing 10592
    June 18, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 3334, to provide 
certainty for, reduce administrative and compliance burdens 
associated with, and streamline and improve the collection of 
royalties from Federal and outer continental shelf oil and gas 
leases.
    July 21, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 1467, to provide for 
the continuance of oil and gas operations pursuant to certain 
existing leases in the Wayne National Forest; H.R. 3878, to 
subject certain reserved mineral interests of the operation of 
the Mineral Leasing Act; and H.R. 3972, to amend the Outer 
Continental Shelf Lands Act to prohibit the Secretary of the 
Interior from charging State and local government agencies for 
certain uses of the sand, gravel, and shell resources of the 
Outer Continental Shelf. Printed Hearing 105-101

B. Legislation enacted

    H.R. 709, reauthorizes and amends the National Geologic 
Mapping Act of 1992, and for other purposes (Public Law 105-
36).
    H.R. 1163, amend title 10, United States Code, to transfer 
jurisdiction over Naval Oil Shale Reserves Numbered 1 and 3 to 
the Secretary of the Interior and to authorize the leasing of 
such reserves for oil and gas exploration and production 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-85).
    H.R. 1659, to provide for the expeditious completion of the 
acquisition of private mineral interests within the Mount St. 
Helens National Volcanic Monument mandated by the 1982 Act that 
established the Monument, and for other purposes. (Public Law 
105-279)
    H.R. 3689, to transfer administrative jurisdiction over the 
Land Between the Lakes National Recreation Area to the 
Secretary of Agriculture. (enacted as part of Public Law 105-
277)
    H.R. 3878, to subject certain reserved mineral interests of 
the operation of the Mineral Leasing Act, and for other 
purposes. (enacted as part of Public Law 105-277)
    H.R. 3962, to provide for the ratification of payments made 
under preexisting onshore and offshore royalty-in-kind 
programs. (enacted as part of Public Law 105-277)
    S. 750, to consolidate certain mineral interests in the 
National Grasslands in Billings County, North Dakota, through 
the exchange of Federal and private mineral interests to 
enhance land management capabilities and environmental and 
wildlife protection, and for other purposes. (Public Law 105-
167)
    S. 2500, to protect the sanctity of contracts and leases 
entered into by surface patent holders with respect to coalbed 
methane gas. (Public Law 105-367)

C. Legislation passed House

    H.R. 1467 (H. Rept. 105-770), to provide for the 
continuance of oil and gas operations pursuant to certain 
existing leases in the Wayne National Forest.
    H.R. 2249, to authorize appropriations for carrying out the 
Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 for fiscal years 1998 
and 1999, and for other purposes. [See S. 910 for further 
action]
    H.R. 3972 (H. Rept. 105-766), to amend the Outer 
Continental Shelf Lands Act to prohibit the Secretary of the 
Interior from charging State and local government agencies for 
certain uses of the sand, gravel, and shell resources of the 
outer Continental Shelf.

4. Legislation ordered reported by the full committee

    H.R. 2574 (H. Rept. 105-471), to consolidate certain 
mineral interests in the National Grasslands in Billings 
County, North Dakota, through the exchange of Federal and 
private mineral interests to enhance land management 
capabilities and environmental and wildlife protection, and for 
other purposes. [See S. 750 for further action]

E. Legislation marked up at subcommittee

    H.R. 3334, to provide certainty for, reduce administrative 
and compliance burdens associated with, and streamline and 
improve the collection of royalties from Federal and outer 
continental shelf oil and gas leases, and for other purposes.

  IV. Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral 
                               Resources

A. Introduction

    Agency Budget Oversight: The Subcommittee oversees three 
Interior Department agencies in toto and programs in two 
others: U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Office of Surface 
Mining(OSM), Minerals Management Service (MMS), the energy and minerals 
program of the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), and the minerals and 
geology program of the Forest Service (USDA). The Subcommittee will 
examine these agencies' programs for streamlining, privatization 
opportunities, contracting out work, and otherwise streamlining 
research programs. Outside witnesses familiar with the programs' output 
may be asked to testify regarding prioritizing programs/turning work 
over to State agencies and the private sector. Particular attention 
will be paid to proposed funding of traditional earth sciences programs 
versus biological studies to be performed by the new Department of the 
Interior Biological Research Division.
    The Subcommittee held oversight hearings on the 
Administration's budget details for the USGS, OSM, MMS and 
BLM's energy and minerals programs on March 4, 1997 (Printed 
Hearing 105-9) for FY 1998 and on February 26, 1998 (Printed 
Hearing 105-74) for FY 1999.
    Hardrock Mineral Exploration and Development: At least one 
oversight field hearing will examine mining royalty issues. 
During these hearings, the Subcommittee will examine means of 
increasing the return to the taxpayer from mining on public 
lands in a way which preserves the long-term viability of an 
important industry. Royalties must be structured so that they 
do not reduce mining activity.
    In the 104th Congress, a hearing was held to examine 
factual investment data for trend in capital flow with industry 
and environmental testimony explaining reasons for these 
trends. The Subcommittee may hold a hearing with testimony from 
foreign governments explaining how they balance attracting 
investment versus regulatory oversight of mining proposals. The 
purpose of this hearing is to explore ways to improve the U.S. 
business climate for development of mineral resources on lands 
within our jurisdiction. Summer 1997.
    The Subcommittee held an oversight field hearing in Elko, 
Nevada on September 22, 1997 (Printed Hearing 105-53) regarding 
the Administration's planned rewrite of the surface management 
regulations and the existing relationship between Federal land 
management agencies (BLM and U.S. Forest Service) and the State 
of Nevada's Department of Environmental Protection in the 
permitting of mineral activities. The issue of proposed 
structuring for royalties on hardrock mineral production was 
not addressed in the hearing, however.
    Coal Mining Regulatory Reform: The Subcommittee will likely 
address the issue of giving States exclusive jurisdiction to 
enforce the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 
(SMCRA), as was intended by Congress but which the Federal 
Office of Surface Mining (OSM) has thwarted through improper 
implementation of State ``primacy'' for regulation of existing 
coal mine operations. State regulators interpreting Federal 
standards are routinely second-guessed by OSM inspectors. 
Federal inspectors continue to penalize operators rather than 
conduct a broad-based statewide program to oversee the adequacy 
of a State's regulation of coal mining. In addition, the 
Subcommittee may hold field hearings to investigate OSM's 
recently issued regulations for use of ten-day notices.
    Subcommittee Chairman Cubin was satisfied by actions taken 
by OSM Director Karpan (consistent with the Committee's budget 
views and estimates) to work better with the coal-producing 
primacy states' regulatory agencies to oversee enforcement of 
SMCRA-permitted active mining operations.
    Regulatory Streamlining for Coal and Other Minerals: In the 
104th Congress, H.R. 1975, a bill to incorporate equity and 
fairness into oil and gas royalty collection from Federal 
lands, was signed into law (Public Law 104-185). The 
Subcommittee will pursue oversight hearings of MMS' ability and 
intent to broaden these streamlining measures to coal and other 
minerals.
    The Subcommittee is satisfied by the directives of the MMS 
to apply Public Law 104-185 provisions to other Mineral Leasing 
Act commodities as appropriate, in particular, the commitment 
to finalize appeals of Royalty Management Program decisions 
within 33 months.
    Abandoned Mine Lands Funding: The Subcommittee will 
investigate the recent and historical uses of the Abandoned 
Mine Lands (AML) funds, the annual funding level appropriated 
for the AML, and possibly the effect of taking AML funds off-
budget.
    OSM Director Karpan indicated during the FY 1999 budget 
hearing a strong willingness to seek approval of an increased 
budget for abandoned mined land reclamation for FY 2000, 
payable from the AML trust fund established for this purpose, 
consistent with the Committee's budget views and estimates for 
the last several years. Likewise, the position of the states' 
AML agencies is to support the Subcommittee's and OSM's efforts 
to allow a larger portion of the $1.3 billion unappropriated 
balance in the AML trust fund.
    Energy Policy: In the 104th Congress, the Subcommittee held 
two oversight hearings on energy policy: the first examined the 
economic and employment implications of declining U.S. oil and 
gas production, and a second reviewed the Nation's oil and gas 
resource base and Federal initiatives for domestic oil and gas 
production. General oversight of the Administration's 
inadequate energy policy and resulting ever-increasing U.S. 
dependence on foreign sources of crude oil will remain a focus 
of the Subcommittee in the 105th Congress. Issues include 
access to public lands and the Outer Continental Shelf, which 
remain the areas most likely to provide significant new 
domestic discoveries of oil and gas. One element of this 
investigation will be to determine the total amount of Federal 
acreage off-limits to oil and gas exploration and development 
and the impact of these restrictions on the U.S. domestic 
economy. Field hearings are planned in western States with 
significant oil and gas production from Federal lands to 
investigate BLM's regulatory process for balancing 
environmental concerns, energy and mineral resource 
availability and economic factors.
    The Subcommittee held an oversight field hearing in Casper, 
Wyoming on June 30, 1997 (Printed Hearing 105-50) regarding the 
Bureau of Land Management's oil and gas regulations concerning 
access and permitting of surface disturbing activities 
necessary for exploration, development and production of 
hydrocarbons from onshore Federal lands.
    Outer Continental Shelf Oil and Gas Production-Boosting 
Initiatives: The Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Lands Act of 
1954 governs the leasing of tracts in Federal waters off our 
coasts. This program is by far the biggest revenue raiser of 
all Department of the Interior programs and is likely the 
second biggest in all the Federal government (after the 
Internal Revenue Service). MMS collects about $3 billion per 
year in bonus bids, rentals and royalties from oil and gas 
producers, of which a portion goes into the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund (LWCF) for Federal and State land acquisition 
programs. The Subcommittee will examine the types and amounts 
of funds spent through the LWCF and how those expenditures 
relate to State and local policies for oil and gas development.
    The Full Committee planned for, but subsequently canceled, 
an oversight hearing on the workings of the Land and Water 
Conservation Fund. But the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing on May 20, 1997 (Printed Hearing 105-40) regarding the 
expenditure of Land and Water Conservation Funds for the 
acquisition of private property rights in the New World mining 
district near Yellowstone National Park potentially threatening 
park values.
    The OCS leasing program has been subjected to numerous 
leasing and drilling bans via appropriations bills and 
executive order. In the 104th Congress, the Subcommittee held 
an oversight hearing on several bills introduced to provide for 
permanent moratoria on much of the U.S. coastline. The 
Subcommittee will explore the rationale for retention versus 
elimination of such bans on activity in various waters in an 
effort to find acceptable ways to increase production from the 
OCS.
    The Subcommittee held an oversight hearing on May 14, 1998 
(Printed Hearing 105-92) concerning oil and gas development on 
the outer continental shelf where coastal state Members of 
Congress were invited to testify as to the need for continuing 
leasing moratoria off various coastlines versus the likelihood 
of discovery of additional hydrocarbon reserves and the 
potential impacts of their development.
    Onshore Federal Oil and Gas Initiatives: The Subcommittee 
will continue to investigate the Department of the Interior's 
progress on a proposal to transfer BLM's oil and gas inspection 
and enforcement functions to the States. The States have 
current programs which duplicate these functions and are 
anxious to assume these duties. Through the efforts of the 
Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, the States fully 
support this proposal with appropriate funding. Following two 
hearings on this issue in the 104th Congress, the Subcommittee 
will likely invite the Federal and State government agencies to 
bring us up to date on the status of the transfer negotiations.
    The Subcommittee monitored continuing discussions between 
the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission on behalf of the 
oil-producing states and the BLM to attempt to find consensus 
on the regulatory activities which could be administratively 
transferred from Federal jurisdiction to a state. No such 
agreement was had by adjournment. A bill to guide transfer 
efforts may be introduced in the 106th Congress.
    Royalty-In-Kind/Valuation: The Subcommittee will pursue 
oversight of MMS' ability to collect royalties ``in-kind'' as 
opposed to the cash value as is currently paid. The cumbersome 
and costly collection procedures associated with collecting the 
government's share of revenue from production on Federal leases 
could be drastically reduced if MMS were to take their royalty-
in-kind (R-I-K). Using the R-I-K collection method would 
eliminate the controversial ``valuation'' issues surrounding 
the complicated oil and gas production and transportation 
systems. MMS conducted a one-year pilot program for gas only in 
the Gulf of Mexico. The FY 1997 Interior Appropriations 
legislation included instructions to the director of MMS to 
conduct further pilot studies. The Subcommittee will oversee 
MMS' initiation of these programs and the progress on its 
proposed crude oil valuation regulations and evaluate its 
effectiveness.
    The Subcommittee held an oversight hearing on this issue on 
July 31, 1997, and followed up on September 18, 1997, (Printed 
Hearing 105-41). The information gained led to the introduction 
of the Royalty Enhancement Act of 1998 (H.R. 3334) which 
attempted to mandate a broad-based oil and gas royalty-in-kind 
program by the United States in an effort to both equitably 
settle valuation disputes and enhance revenues to the states 
and Federal Treasury by gaining the ``uplift'' in the value of 
royalty oil and gas marketed downstream from the wellhead, as 
opposed to the current practice of receiving royalty-in-value 
at the wellhead.
    U.S. Geological Survey Reorganization: The Subcommittee is 
planning oversight of the USGS's reorganization and its ability 
to meet its mission, especially regarding mineral resources and 
the traditional role of the Federal survey to provide objective 
scientific data for land use decisions and the Nation's 
economic development. The Subcommittee is interested in the 
Administration's mission for the Biological Research Division 
with respect to the ``geosciences'' mission, particularly with 
likely smaller budgets in the future. The Subcommittee will pay 
close attention to how USGS restores its reputation for doing 
objective science in the wake of the ``unsanctioned'' USGS Ward 
Valley hydrology report which prompted Interior Secretary Bruce 
Babbitt to seek National Academy of Sciences peer review of the 
official USGS study (and oppose transfer of the BLM land to 
California), as well as allegations that the Arctic National 
Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) oil and gas estimates were reduced for 
``political science'' reasons.
    The Subcommittee monitored the USGS' organizational status 
in the wake of the FY 1999 budget hearing while the agency was 
led by an acting director. Subcommittee Chairman Cubin will be 
meeting soon with the newly confirmed Director, Dr. Charles 
Groat, about this matter.
    Disposition of Other Federal Minerals: The so-called 
fertilizer minerals, trona (a sodium carbonate mineral), 
phosphate and potash are produced from Federal leases in 
California, Colorado, Wyoming, Idaho and New Mexico. An 
oversight hearing will examine a number of associated issues 
including possible conflict between oil and gas production and 
potash development and oil and gas production and trona 
development. In addition, the Subcommittee may examine 
valuation methodology for these commodities.
    The Subcommittee corresponded with the MMS regarding the 
manner in which sodium (trona) lease production is valued for 
royalty purposes. The Subcommittee is monitoring an agreement 
for a study of the impacts on trona mine development by natural 
gas drilling in the Green River Basin of Wyoming, and is 
likewise monitoring the outcome of an appeal by oil lessees of 
a BLM decision regarding a potash leasing conflict in the 
Delaware Basin of New Mexico.
    Compensation for Land Exchanges: The Subcommittee will 
evaluate the substantial value of public resources traded to 
meet the President's environmental agenda, i.e. Utah's Grand 
Staircase-Escalante National Monument designation, California's 
Headwaters Forest acquisition, and Montana's New World Project 
mining land exchange. The Subcommittee may hold an oversight 
hearing on the Secretary's ability to trade mineral rights that 
are subject to the Federal Land Policy and Management Act and 
other relevant Federal statutes.
    The budget agreement of May 1997 obviated the 
Administration's plans for asset sales (mineral rights 
transfers) to pay for these high-profile land acquisitions. As 
a result, the Subcommittee held an oversight hearing on May 20, 
1997 (Printed Hearing 105-40) regarding the expenditure of Land 
and Water Conservation Funds for the acquisition of private 
property rights in the New World mining district near 
Yellowstone National Park potentially threatening park values.
    U.S. Geological Survey Mapping and Data Programs: The USGS 
is often criticized for failing to update maps and other data 
in a timely manner and for taking an excessive amount of time 
to publish the results of its research. During the last decade, 
great advances have been made in geographic information 
science, and application of some of this new technology to USGS 
programs would potentially improve the quality of the database 
and shorten the time required before publication, all at a 
lower cost. The Subcommittee will hold two hearings to examine 
this issue. One will be concerned with identifying the type, 
quality, and quantity of government geographic data needed and 
the other will identify useful new technologies and how they 
may be applied to USGS programs to achieve more timely 
dissemination of higher quality data at lower costs.
    The Subcommittee held no hearings on this issue, but did 
monitor the progress and results of a National Academy of 
Public Administration study (Geographic Information for the 
21st Century) on the needs for and ability of the BLM, USGS, 
USFS and the National Ocean Service to produce digital map 
products for the Nation, and opportunities for efficiencies in 
consolidation of these activities.
            Additional Oversight Hearings Held
    Abuse of Power: The Hardrock Bonding Rule: In February 
1997, the BLM published a ``Final Rule on Hardrock Bonding'' 
which amended its surface management regulations under the 
Federal Land Management Policy Act (FLPMA). The Subcommittee on 
Energy and Mineral Resources undertook its oversight 
responsibility after concluding that the new rule might not 
have been adopted according to law. Oversight hearings on this 
rule were held by the Subcommittee on March 20, 1997, and on 
June 19, 1997.
    The Department of the Interior (DOI) attempted to prevent 
and obstruct the Subcommittee from carrying out its oversight 
responsibilities by withholding key documents. Some records 
were produced by DOI pursuant to the Subcommittee's request, 
but many documents were withheld from the Subcommittee under a 
prospective claim of ``privilege.'' DOI also tried to impose 
rules and conditions under which the Subcommittee could have 
access to documents. After these tactics continued for more 
than three months, the Resources Committee subpoenaed the 
documents. As a result of DOI's drawn-out string of dilatory 
tactics to prevent and obstruct the Congress from carrying out 
its Constitutional oversight responsibilities, Chairman Don 
Young and Chairman Barbara Cubin directed that a Committee 
report on the DOI rule-making be prepared.
    The Committee approved this report, Abuse of Power: The 
Hardrock Bonding Rule, which analyzes the subpoenaed documents 
and concludes DOI actions constitute a coordinated effort by 
high level DOI political appointees to affirmatively 
mischaracterize the import and impact of the hardrock bonding 
rule. The report also found that DOI political appointees:
    (1) unduly interfered in the BLM rule-making;
    (2) ignored laws, such as the Administrative Procedure Act 
and the Regulatory Flexibility Act, that govern the rule-making 
process; and
    (3) obstructed the impartiality of the rule-making process 
by excluding interested parties from participating in the rule-
making process in a meaningful way.
    The Subcommittee's oversight activities clearly 
demonstrated that DOI did not comply with requirements of the 
Administrative Procedure Act or the Regulatory Flexibility Act 
in making the hardrock bonding regulation. DOI also concealed 
the fact that the bonding regulation was a significant rule, 
enabling the Department to evade a higher standard of scrutiny 
and avoid considering any alternatives to the new bonding rule.

B. Hearings

    March 4, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the FY 1998 budget 
for USGS and MMS Printed Hearing 105-9
    March 20, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Bureau of Land 
Management final rulemaking on bonding of hardrock mining 
operations. Why was there no meaningful public comment 
solicited? Printed Hearing 105-8
    May 20, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the proposed buyout 
of the New World Mine project in Montana. Printed Hearing 105-
40
    June 19, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the final bonding 
rule for hardrock mining operations on BLM-administered public 
lands (follow-up to the hearing on March 20, 1997). Printed 
Hearing 105-24
    June 30, 1997--Oversight field hearing held in Casper, 
Wyoming, on Bureau of Land Management's oil and gas regulations 
regarding access and permitting issues. Printed Hearing 105-50
    July 31, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Royalty-In-Kind 
for Federal oil and gas production. Printed Hearing 105-41
    September 18, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the Federal 
government collecting oil and gas royalties-in-kind (follow-up 
from July 31, 1997, hearing). Printed Hearing 105-41
    September 22, 1997--Oversight field hearing in Elko, 
Nevada, on Hardrock mining issues. Printed Hearing 105-53
    February 26, 1998--Oversight hearing held on the 
President's FY 1999 Budget request for Office of Surface 
Mining, Minerals Management Service, and the Energy and 
Minerals programs of the Bureau of Land Management. Printed 
Hearing 105-74
    May 14, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Outer Continental 
Shelf Oil and Gas Leasing. Printed Hearing 105-87

                       V. subcommittee statistics

Total number of bills and resolutions referred-...................    52
Total number of bills reported from subcommittee-.................     2
Total number of bills reported from full committee-...............     6
Total number of bills passed by the House-........................     8
Total number of bills enacted into law-...........................     8
Public Hearings and Markups:
    Legislative-..................................................     4
    Oversight-....................................................    10
    Markup sessions-..............................................     2
Total number of subcommittee meetings (days)-.....................    15

                    Subcommittee on Water and Power

                            I. introduction

    During the 105th Congress the Subcommittee on Water and 
Power Resources pursued legislation and held numerous hearings 
regarding the appropriate role of the Federal Government in 
many of the major water and public power projects throughout 
the United States. Consensus legislation was crafted, and later 
passed to transfer selected Federal water facilities to local 
entities, thus furthering the goal of a more efficient, smaller 
Federal Government. Additionally, the Subcommittee continued 
its oversight of the Bureau of Reclamation and Power Marketing 
Administrations.

                            ii. jurisdiction

    (1) Generation and marketing of electric power from Federal 
water projects by Federally chartered or Federal regional power 
marketing authorities.
    (2) All measures and matters concerning water resources 
planning conducted pursuant to the Water Resources Planning 
Act, water resource research and development programs and 
saline water research and development.
    (3) Compacts relating to the use and apportionment of 
interstate waters, water rights and major interbasin water or 
power movement programs.
    (4) All measures and matters pertaining to irrigation and 
reclamation projects and other water resources development 
programs, including policies and procedures.
    (5) General and continuing oversight and investigative 
authority over activities, policies and programs within the 
jurisdiction of the Subcommittee.

                      iii. legislative activities

A. Legislative hearings and markups

    June 24, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 134, to authorize the 
Secretary of the Interior to provide a loan guarantee to the 
Olivenhain Water Storage Project, and for other purposes; and 
H.R. 1400, to authorize the Secretary of the Interior, acting 
through the Bureau of Reclamation, to participate in a water 
conservation project with the Tumalo Irrigation District in the 
State of Oregon.
    July 29, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 2007, to amend the Act 
that authorized the Canadian River reclamation project, Texas, 
to direct the Secretary of the Interior to allow use of the 
project distribution system to transport water from sources 
other than the project.
    Markup held on H.R. 2007, to amend the Act that authorized 
the Canadian River reclamation project, Texas, to direct the 
Secretary of the Interior to allow use of the project 
distribution system to transport water from sources other than 
the project; and H.R. 134, toauthorize the Secretary of the 
Interior to provide a loan guarantee to the Olivenhain Water Storage 
Project, and for other purposes.
    September 11, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 2398, the Small 
Reclamation Water Resources Project Act of 1997.
    Markup held on H.R. 2402, the Reclamation Technical 
Corrections Act of 1997; and H.R. 1400, the Tumalo Irrigation 
District Water Conservation Project Authorization Act.
    March 12, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 2367, Sonny Bono 
Memorial Salton Sea Reclamation Act. Printed Hearing 105-77
    March 26, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 3267, Sonny Bono 
Memorial Salton Sea Reclamation Act.
    April 30, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 1282, to authorize the 
Secretary of the Interior to convey certain facilities of the 
Minidoka project to the Burley Irrigation District; H.R. 1943, 
Carlsbad Irrigation Project Acquired Land Transfer Act; H.R. 
2161, to direct the Secretary of the Interior to convey the 
Palmetto Bend Project to the State of Texas; H.R. 2506, 
Collbran Project Unit Conveyance Act; H.R. 3056, to provide for 
the preservation and sustainability of the family farm through 
the transfer of responsibility for operation and maintenance of 
the Flathead Indian Irrigation Project, Montana; H.R. 3677, to 
authorize and direct the Secretary of the Interior to convey 
certain works, facilities, and titles of the Gila Project, and 
Designated Lands within or adjacent to the Gila Project, to the 
Welton-Mohawk Irrigation and Drainage District; H.R. 3687, to 
authorize prepayment of amounts due under a water reclamation 
project contract for the Canadian River Project, Texas; H.R. 
3706, Clear Creek Distribution System Conveyance Act; and H.R. 
3715, Pine River Project, Colorado.
    May 19, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 1212, Fall River Water 
Users District Rural Water System Act.
    June 18, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 1688, Lewis and Clark 
Rural Water System Act of 1997; H.R. 2108, Dutch John Federal 
Property Disposition and Assistance Act of 1997; and H.R. 2306, 
Fort Peck Reservation Rural Water System Act of 1997.
    June 25, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 4111, to provide for 
outlet modifications to Folsom Dam, a study for reconstruction 
of the Northfork American River Cofferdam, and the transfer to 
the State of California all right, title, and interest in and 
to the Auburn Dam.
    Markup held on H.R. 1282, to authorize the Secretary of the 
Interior to convey certain facilities of the Minidoka project 
to the Burley Irrigation District; H.R. 1943, Carlsbad 
Irrigation Project Acquired Land Transfer Act; H.R. 3056, to 
provide for the preservation and sustainability of the family 
farm through the transfer of responsibility for operation and 
maintenance of the Flathead Indian Irrigation Project, Montana; 
H.R. 3687, to authorize prepayment of amounts due under a water 
reclamation project contract for the Canadian River Project, 
Texas; H.R. 4048, Sly Park Unit Conveyance Act; and H.R. 4111, 
to provide for outlet modifications to Folsom Dam, a study for 
reconstruction of the Northfork American River Cofferdam, and 
the transfer to the State of California all right, title, and 
interest in and to the Auburn Dam.
    July 16, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 2161, to direct the 
Secretary of the Interior to convey the Palmetto Bend Project 
to the State of Texas; H.R. 3677, to authorize and direct the 
Secretary of the Interior to convey certain works, facilities, 
and titles of the Gila Project, and Designated Lands within or 
adjacent to the Gila project, to the Welton-Mohawk Irrigation 
and Drainage District; H.R. 3706, Clear Creek Distribution 
System Conveyance Act; and H.R. 3715, Pine River Project, 
Colorado.
    July 28, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 3478, to amend the 
Colorado Ute Indian Water Rights Settlement Act to provide for 
a final settlement of the claims of the Colorado Ute Indian 
Tribes; and H.R. 745, to deauthorize the Animas-La Plata 
Federal Reclamation Project, and to direct the Secretary of the 
Interior to enter into negotiations to satisfy, in a manner 
consistent with all Federal laws, the water rights interests of 
the Ute Mountain Ute Indian Tribe and the Southern Ute Indian 
Tribe. Printed Hearing 105-103
    September 23, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 3658, to provide 
for the settlement of the water rights claims of the Chippewa 
Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Reservation. Printed Hearing 105-
112
    September 29, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 1213, to authorize 
the construction of the Perkins County Rural Water System and 
authorize the appropriations of Federal dollars to assist the 
Perkins County Rural Water System, Inc., a nonprofit 
corporation in the planning and construction of the water 
supply system.

B. Legislation enacted

    H.R. 63, designates the reservoir created by Trinity Dam in 
the Central Valley Project, California, as ``Trinity Lake''. 
(Public Law 105-44)
    H.R. 412, approves a settlement agreement between the 
Bureau of Reclamation and the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation 
District. (Public Law 105-9)
    H.R. 2355, extends the repayment periods for the repayment 
for Nueces River reclamation project. (enacted as part of 
Public Law 105-174)
    H.R. 2795, extends certain contracts between the Bureau of 
Reclamation and irrigation water contractors in Wyoming and 
Nebraska that receive water from Glendo Reservoir. (Public Law 
105-293)
    H.R. 3035, establishes an advisory commission to provide 
advice and recommendations on the creation of an integrated, 
coordinated Federal policy designed to prepare for and respond 
to serious drought emergencies. (Public Law 105-194)
    H.R. 3267, directs the Secretary of the Interior, acting 
through the Bureau of Reclamation, to conduct a feasibility 
study and construct a project to reclaim the Salton Sea. 
(Public Law 105-372)
    H.R. 3687, authorizes prepayment of amounts due under a 
water reclamation project contract for the Canadian River 
Project, Texas. (Public Law 105-316)
    H.R. 3964, authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to 
participate in the design, planning, and construction of the 
Willow Lake Natural Treatment System Project for the 
reclamation and reuse of water, and for other purposes. 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-321)
    H.R. 4079, authorizes the construction of temperature 
control devices at Folsom Dam in California. (Public Law 105-
295)
    S. 744, authorize the construction of the Fall River Water 
Users District Rural Water System and authorize financial 
assistance to the Fall River Water Users District, a non-profit 
corporation, in the planning and construction of the water 
supply system, and for other purposes. (Public Law 105-352)
    S. 2041, authorizes the Secretary of the Interior to 
participate in the design, planning, and construction of the 
Willow Lake Natural Treatment System Project for the 
reclamation and reuse of water, and for other purposes. 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-321)

C. Legislation passed House

    H.R. 2007 (H. Rept. 105-279), to amend the Act that 
authorized the Canadian River reclamation project, Texas, to 
direct the Secretary of the Interior to allow use of the 
project distribution system to transport water from sources 
other than the project. [See H.R. 2402 for further action]
    H.R. 2402 (H. Rept. 105-353), to make technical and 
clarifying amendments to improve management of water-related 
facilities in the Western United States.
    S. 2117, to authorize the construction of the Perkins 
County Rural Water System and authorize financial assistance to 
the Perkins County Rural Water System, Inc., a nonprofit 
corporation, in the planning and construction of the water 
supply system, and for other purposes. -

D. Legislation ordered reported by the full committee

    H.R. 134 (H. Rept. 105-327), to authorize the Secretary of 
the Interior to provide a loan guarantee to the Olivenhain 
Water Storage Project, and for other purposes. [See H.R. 2402 
for further action]
    H.R. 2108 (H. Rept. 105-714), to dispose of certain Federal 
properties located in Dutch John, Utah, and to assist the local 
government in the interim delivery of basic services to the 
Dutch John community, and for other purposes. [See S. 890 for 
further action]
    H.R. 3056 (H. Rept. 105-812), to provide for the 
preservation and sustainability of the family farm through the 
transfer of responsibility for operation and maintenance of the 
Flathead Indian Irrigation Project, Montana.
    H.R. 4111 (H. Rept. 105-811), to provide for outlet 
modifications to Folsom Dam, a study for reconstruction of the 
Northfork American River Cofferdam, and the transfer to the 
State of California all right, title, and interest in and to 
the Auburn Dam, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 4223 (H. Rept. 105-813), to assist in the development 
and implementation of projects to provide for the control of 
drainage, storm, flood and other waters as part of water-
related integrated resource management, environmental 
infrastructure, and resource protection and development 
projects in the Colusa Basin Watershed, California.

E. Legislation marked up at subcommittee

    H.R. 1400, to authorize the Secretary of the Interior, 
acting through the Bureau of Reclamation, to participate in a 
water conservation project with the Tumalo Irrigation District 
in the State of Oregon. -
    H.R. 1943, to convey certain real property within the 
Carlsbad Project in New Mexico to the Carlsbad Irrigation 
District. [See H.R. 4389 for further action]
    H.R. 2161, to direct the Secretary of the Interior to 
convey the Palmetto Bend Project to the State of Texas. [See 
H.R. 4389 for further action]
    H.R. 3677, to authorize and direct the Secretary of the 
Interior to convey certain works, facilities, and titles of the 
Gila Project, and Designated Lands within or adjacent to the 
Gila Project, to the Wellton-Mohawk Irrigation and Drainage 
District, and for other purposes. [See H.R. 4389 for further 
action]
    H.R. 3706, to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to 
implement the provisions of the Agreement conveying title to a 
Distribution System from the United States to the Clear Creek 
Community Services District. [See H.R. 4389 for further action]
    H.R. 3715, to authorize the Secretary of the Interior to 
convey the facilities of the Pine River Project, to allow 
jurisdictional transfer of lands between the Department of 
Agriculture, Forest Service, and the Department of the 
Interior, Bureau of Reclamation, and the Bureau of Indian 
Affairs, and for other purposes. [See H.R. 4389 for further 
action]
    H.R. 4048, to convey the Sly Park Dam and Reservoir to the 
El Dorado Irrigation District, and for other purposes. [See 
H.R. 4389 for further action]

    iv. oversight activities of the subcommittee on water and power

A. Introduction

    Budget Overview: The Subcommittee will hold a hearing each 
year on that portion of the President's budget proposal falling 
within its jurisdiction.
    On March 4, 1998, the Subcommittee on Water and Power held 
an oversight hearing on the President's proposed FY 1998 budget 
request for the Bureau of Reclamation, the Central Utah 
Project, and the Water Resources Division of the U.S. 
Geological Survey and the Power Marketing Administrations.
    Water Technology Development: The Subcommittee will hold 
hearings on various aspects of water technology development 
which affect Federal water management, reclamation activities, 
and how to assist the States in water resource planning.
    Congress passed the National Drought Policy Act of 1997 
(H.R. 3035) that creates a national program designed to help 
prepare for serious drought emergencies. Furthermore, the 
Subcommittee held a hearing, and Congress later passed 
legislation to address technology development for the Salton 
Sea Restoration project in California. Additionally, Congress 
passed H.R. 4079 to authorize the construction of temperature 
control devices at Folsom Dam in California for the benefit of 
fall-run chinook salmon and steelhead trout in the American 
River, California. The Subcommittee continued its participation 
in briefings and events concerning reverse osmosis, 
desalination, and hydrology prediction.
            Bureau of Reclamation
    Central Valley Project Improvement Act Implementation: The 
Subcommittee will continue to review actions taken by Federal 
and State agencies to implement the various provisions of the 
Central Valley Project Improvement Act (CVPIA), that was 
enacted in 1992. Legislative proposals to amend the CVPIA will 
be considered.
    A hearing was held in Fresno, California, that continued 
the series of oversight efforts concerning the 1992 law that 
radically altered the operations of the California Central 
Valley Project. Implementation of the law has caused 
significant hardships throughout the Central Valley, with 
environmentalists, farmers, and municipal water providers upset 
at the Administration for its mismanagement of the program and 
the environmental trust fund that was established under the 
law.
    Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District: The Subcommittee may 
mark up legislation to implement the pending settlement between 
the Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District and the Department of 
the Interior. Oversight will be needed regarding the 
settlement.
    Congress passed H.R. 412 that approved a settlement 
agreement between the Bureau of Reclamation and the Oroville-
Tonasket Irrigation District over disputes arising from the 
construction of the Oroville-Tonasket Unit Extension. 
Implementation of the settlement agreement includes transfer of 
the title to the Oroville-Tonasket Unit Extension Project 
Irrigation Works to the District.
    Garrison Diversion: The Subcommittee will review the status 
of the Garrison Diversion Unit and consider new proposals 
relating to water supply management in North Dakota. Oversight 
hearings, including possible field hearings, will be held. 
Legislation, if necessary, will be considered by the 
Subcommittee during the second session.
    On September 29, 1998, the Subcommittee held an oversight 
hearing on the Garrison Unit Reformulation. Along with hearing 
the various alternatives to the original Garrison Diversion 
project, the hearing addressed some of the issues raised by the 
Canadians and bordering states to North Dakota who would like 
to see more studies done prior to any project being funded.
    California Bay-Delta Funding: The Subcommittee will examine 
the Administration's funding request for those funds authorized 
in the 104th Congress to carry out restoration activities in 
California's Sacramento-San Joaquin Bay-Delta, since the 1996 
authorization did not specify how Federal funds were to be 
allocated among the various Federal agencies. The Subcommittee 
will also investigate how Federal programs and expenditures are 
being coordinated with State funding for the Bay-Delta area. 
State funding for such restoration activities and other water-
related activities was approved by the California Legislature 
and by voter referendum in 1996.
    The Subcommittee held two relevant oversight hearings 
during the 105th Congress. They were held on April 17, 1997, 
and on May 12, 1998. These hearings reviewed this new program 
and provided oversight to ensure the efficient development of a 
long-term comprehensive plan to restore ecological health and 
improve water management in the Bay-Delta system in coastal 
California while honoring the water rights and private property 
rights of residents. The oversight hearings have highlighted a 
lack of goal setting and measurements to evaluate the success 
of the $1 billion+ program.
    Phase I of the Bay-Delta Program resulted in the 
development of three possible comprehensive solutions to Bay-
Delta problems. At this time, capital costs for the three 
alternatives developed in Phase I are estimated to range from 
$4 billion to more than $8 billion, an amount to be paid over 
20 years.
    Central Arizona Project: The Subcommittee will review the 
status of the Central Arizona Project (CAP), and the financial 
and management practices of the Bureau of Reclamation as they 
relate to CAP. The Subcommittee will also investigate the 
breakdown of negotiations between the parties to restructure 
the project's debt.
    Due to the ongoing litigation within the State of Arizona 
over this project the Subcommittee did not hold any oversight 
hearings on the CAP. However, the Subcommittee remained 
involved through ongoing briefings.
    Bureau of Reclamation Project Transfers: The Subcommittee 
will review the status of the Administration's initiative to 
transfer Bureau of Reclamation facilities out of Federal 
ownership. Specific attention will be directed to case studies 
where project beneficiaries are seeking such title transfers. 
Field hearings will be held in several locations.
    The Resources Committee passed a number of bills 
transferring the ownership of Bureau of Reclamation projects 
and facilities to local entities who are in a better position 
to take responsibility for them. In taking these facilities off 
the Federal books, these transfers also represent real budget 
savings for the future. These transfers will help shrink the 
size and budget of the Federal Government, and help us manage 
our water resources in a more efficient way. The transfers 
approved by the Resources Committee include:

          Oroville-Tonasket Irrigation District (H.R. 412), 
        Washington
          Burley Irrigation District (H.R. 1282), Idaho
          Canadian River Project (H.R. 3687), Texas
          Dutch John Privatization (H.R. 2108), Utah
          Pine River Project Conveyance Act (H.R. 2142), 
        Colorado
          Wellton-Mohawk Transfer Act (H.R. 3677), Arizona
          Eldorado Irrigation District (H.R. 4389), California
          Clear Creek Distribution System Conveyance (H.R. 
        3706), California
          Carlsbad Irrigation District (H.R. 1943), New Mexico
          Palmetto Bend Project (H.R. 2161), Texas

    Oversight of Colorado River Operations: The Subcommittee 
will hold hearings on the operation of the Colorado River, and 
its impact on the States in both the Upper and Lower basins.
    The Subcommittee held several hearings that addressed 
issues associated with the Lower Colorado River operations. On 
October 3, 1997, and March 12, 1998, the Subcommittee held 
hearings that focused on the Salton Sea and Colorado River 
Allocations. Additionally, the Subcommittee considered 
agriculture return flows and salinity levels in the lower 
Colorado River on April 30, 1998, and the role of the 
desalination plant in the lower Colorado River Basin.
    Reclamation Reform Act Rules and Regulations: As required 
by the negotiated settlement to litigation, the Bureau of 
Reclamation recently promulgated new rules and regulations to 
implement the 1982 Reclamation Reform Act (RRA) on a West-wide 
basis. The Subcommittee will continue to monitor the 
enforcement of these rules by the various regional offices of 
the Bureau. The Subcommittee will also examine closely a 
related proposed rulemaking on the treatment of trusts, as that 
rulemaking moves forward.
    The Subcommittee passed H.R. 2402 to authorize the refund 
of monies overpaid under the RRA. Additionally, the 
Subcommittee was briefed by the Administration on the 
enforcement of the RRA. During the winter of 1998, the 
Administration will complete its new rulemaking.
    Bureau of Reclamation Contracting Policies: The 
Subcommittee will evaluate the Administration's policies 
concerning water service contracts and operations and 
maintenance contracts between the Bureau of Reclamation and 
various water districts. The Subcommittee will examine the 
extent to which Reclamation is using contract renewals in an 
effort to reallocate water for other uses in light of State 
supremacy in the allocation of water rights.
    The Committee monitored the Government Performance and 
Results Act compliance by the Bureau of Reclamation; U.S. 
Geological Survey--Water Resource Division; and the Department 
of Energy Power Marketing Administrations. On July 17, 1997, 
the Subcommittee focused onBureau of Reclamation project 
financing. The purpose of this new law is to ensure that government 
works efficiently to meets the needs of its citizens.
    Western Water Policy Review Advisory Commission Report: The 
Western Water Policy Review Advisory Commission is scheduled to 
release a report on western water resource issues and problems 
in October 1997. A hearing will be held on the recommendations 
in the report which affect Federal agencies under the 
Subcommittee's jurisdiction.
    On April 3, 1998, Chairman Don Young wrote a strong letter 
of opposition to the report and to many of the supporting 
documents prepared for the Commission that are heavily 
referenced throughout it. The opposition mainly focused on the 
tone of the report against irrigated agriculture and commodity 
production. Furthermore, the report failed to respect state 
water law, and advocated a significant expansion of the Federal 
role in watershed management.
    Truckee River Issues: The Subcommittee will monitor the 
cumulative environmental impacts of implementation of the 1990 
Truckee-Carson-Pyramid Lake Water Rights Settlement Act on the 
Lahontan Valley area in Nevada. The Subcommittee will also 
examine the impacts of the Act on irrigators who are dependent 
on Bureau of Reclamation facilities in the area for their water 
supply.
    The Subcommittee met with the interested parties and was 
briefed on the developments.
            Department of Energy--Power Marketing Administrations
    Cost Recovery by the Federal Power Marketing 
Administrations: The Subcommittee will review proposals to 
improve the management of the Department of Energy's power 
marketing administrations (PMAs), which market the electrical 
power produced at Federal hydroelectric facilities. The 
Subcommittee will be particularly involved in proposals to 
ensure full cost recovery, aimed at correcting the revenue 
shortfalls identified by the Subcommittee and the General 
Accounting Office (GAO).
    The Subcommittee has instigated an investigation with the 
GAO to determine how the Federal Government is maintaining and 
operating its Federal power generation facilities. In 1996 the 
Committee discovered through a GAO investigation that many of 
the Federal hydropower facilities operated in the southeast 
were falling into disrepair or being mismanaged. The current 
inquiry attempts to provide that information for a broader 
segment of the system. In addition, it looks at the ability of 
the Federal government to operate those facilities and market 
the power in light of the rapidly evolving national electric 
industry.
    The Comprehensive Review of the Northwest Energy System: 
The Subcommittee will hold hearings on the December 1996 
Comprehensive Review of the Northwest Energy System, which was 
prepared at the request of the Northwest Governors. The central 
theme of the review concerns the management and restructuring 
of the Bonneville Power Administration. Hearings are 
anticipated in both sessions of the 105th Congress.
    The Subcommittee held a hearing on June 12, 1997, that 
addressed the rapidly evolving national electricity 
restructuring and the particular process being undertaken in 
the Pacific Northwest. The Subcommittee remains actively 
involved in policy discussions with the Pacific Northwest 
delegation.
    Proposals to Reduce Power Marketed by the Bonneville Power 
Administration: There are several proposals to reoperate John 
Day Dam on the Columbia, in an effort to enhance juvenile 
salmon migration on the Columbia River. The Subcommittee will 
examine the impact of these various proposals on hydropower 
production at the Dam, and will scrutinize the science on which 
these proposals are based.
    The Subcommittee held an oversight field hearing on this 
issue in Lewiston, Idaho, on May 31, 1997.
    Operation and Maintenance of Facilities That Generate Power 
Marketed by the Federal Power Marketing Administrations: The 
Subcommittee will review proposals designed to ensure that 
adequate funding is allocated to, and spent for, the operation 
and maintenance of facilities that generate the power marketed 
by the PMAs.
    The Subcommittee instigated an investigation with the 
General Accounting Office to determine how the Federal 
Government is maintaining and operating its Federal power 
generation facilities. In 1996 the Committee discovered through 
a GAO investigation that many of the Federal hydropower 
facilities operated in the southeast were falling into 
disrepair or being mismanaged. The current inquiry attempts to 
provide that information for a broader segment of the system. 
In addition, it looks at the ability of the Federal government 
to operate those facilities and market the power in light of 
the rapidly evolving national electric industry.
            U.S. Geological Survey--Water Resources Division
    Program Management Within the Water Resources Division of 
the U.S. Geological Survey: The Subcommittee will review the 
programs within the Water Resources Division to determine if 
there are areas where better coordination can be encouraged 
with other State and Federal agencies. The Subcommittee will 
also be reviewing areas where State or university entities can 
supplement U.S. Geological Survey activity.
    The Subcommittee worked with appropriation subcommittees to 
strengthen State academic involvement in this area.

B. Hearings

    March 4, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the FY 1998 budget 
for the Bureau of Reclamation, Power Marketing Administration 
on the Water Resource Division of the USGS.
    March 20, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Central Valley 
Project Operations and Administration Reform Process. Printed 
Hearing 105-21
    April 17, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Federal 
participation in the CALFED Program. Printed Hearing 105-17
    May 6, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the Bureau of 
Reclamation Project financing. Printed Hearing 105-31
    May 31, 1997--Oversight field hearing held in Lewiston, 
Idaho, on the Columbia/Snake River draw down proposals. Printed 
Hearing 105-32
    June 12, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the Bonneville 
Power Administration, Status of Regional Review Process.
    July 17, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Government 
Performance and Results Act status--Bureau of Reclamation, 
USGS, Water Resources and the Power Marketing Administration. 
Printed Hearing 105-46
    September 23, 1997--Joint oversight hearing with 
Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands on the proposal 
to drain Lake Powell or reduce its water storage capability. 
Printed Hearing 105-56
    October 3, 1997--Oversight field hearing held in Palm 
Desert, California, on potential solutions to the water quality 
and water level problems at the Salton Sea. Printed Hearing 
105-60
    October 30, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the Water 
Management Implications of the 1997/98 El Nino. Printed Hearing 
105-58
    April 15, 1998--Oversight field hearing held in Fresno, 
California, on Central Valley Project Implementation Act.
    May 12, 1998--Oversight hearing held on CALFED. Printed 
Hearing 105-83
    May 27, 1998--Oversight field hearing held in Sacramento, 
California, on Proposed Modifications of Folsom Dam. Printed 
Hearing 105-93
    September 29, 1998--Oversight hearing held on which 
alternatives should be pursued concerning the Garrison Unit 
Reformulation. Public Hearing 105-114

                       V. Subcommittee Statistics

Total number of bills and resolutions referred....................    67
Total number of bills reported from subcommittee..................    15
Total number of bills reported from full committee................    13
Total number of bills passed by the House.........................    11
Total number of bills enacted into law............................    11
Public Hearings and Markups:
    Legislative-..................................................    11
    Oversight.....................................................    14
    Markup sessions...............................................     5
Total number of subcommittee meetings (days)......................    26

               Subcommittee on Forests and Forest Health

                            I. Introduction

    The 105th Congress introduced the new Forests and Forest 
Health Subcommittee of the Resources Committee. This 
Subcommittee has actively moved and passed legislation with the 
purpose of improving forests health conditions on Federal lands 
by promoting the active and scientific management of these 
forests. The Subcommittee worked diligently to build consensus 
on these issues to help ensure passage of key bills. Eighty 
three bills were referred to the Subcommittee, 32 hearings 
(days) were held, 18 forest bills passed the House and 21 have 
become public law.

                            II. Jurisdiction

    (1) Except in Alaska, forest reservations, including 
management thereof, created from the public domain.
    (2) Except for forest lands in Alaska, public forest lands 
generally, including measures or matters related to entry, 
easements, withdrawals and grazing.
    (3) Except in Alaska, Federal reserved water rights on 
forest reserves.
    (4) Wild and Scenic Rivers System, National Trails System, 
national heritage areas and other national units established 
for protection, conservation, preservation or recreational 
development administered by the Secretary of Agriculture.
    (5) Federal and non-Federal outdoor recreation plans, 
programs and administration in public forests.
    (6) General and continuing oversight and investigative 
authority over activities, policies and programs within the 
jurisdiction of the Subcommittee.

                      III. Legislative Activities

A. Legislative hearings and markups

    March 5, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 858, Quincy Library 
Group Forest Recovery and Economic Stability Act of 1997. 
Printed Hearing 105-10
    March 20, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 799, to require the 
Secretary of Agriculture to make a minor adjustment in the 
exterior boundary of the Hells Canyon Wilderness in the States 
of Oregon and Idaho to exclude an established Forest Service 
road inadvertently included in the wilderness; and H.R. 838, to 
require adoption of a management plan for the Hells Canyon 
National Recreation Area that allows appropriate use of 
motorized and nonmotorized river craft in the recreation area, 
and for other purposes.
    April 24, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 858, Quincy Library 
Group Forest Recovery and Economic Stability Act of 1997.
    May 6, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 79, to provide for the 
conveyance of certain land in the Six Rivers National Forest in 
the State of California for the benefit of the Hoopa Valley 
Tribe; H.R. 985, to provide for the expansion of the Eagles 
Nest Wilderness within Arapaho and White River National 
Forests, Colorado, to include the lands known as the Slate 
Creek Addition upon the acquisition of the lands by the United 
States; H.R. 1019, to provide for a boundary adjustment and 
land conveyance involving the Raggeds Wilderness, White River 
National Forest, Colorado, to correct the effects of earlier 
erroneous land surveys; H.R. 1020, to adjust the boundary of 
the White River National Forest in the State of Colorado to 
include all National Forest System lands within Summit County, 
Colorado, which are currently part of the Dillon Ranger 
District of the Arapaho National Forest; and H.R. 1439, to 
facilitate the sale of certain land in Tahoe National Forest in 
the State of California to Placer County, California.
    May 8, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 79, to provide for the 
conveyance of certain land in the Six Rivers National Forest in 
the State of California for the benefit of the Hoopa Valley 
Tribe; H.R. 985, to provide for the expansion of the Eagles 
Nest Wilderness within Arapaho and White River National 
Forests, Colorado, to include the lands known as the Slate 
Creek Addition upon the acquisition of the lands by the United 
States; H.R. 1019, to provide for a boundary adjustment and 
land conveyance involving the Raggeds Wilderness, White River 
National Forest, Colorado, to correct the effects of earlier 
erroneous land surveys; H.R. 1020, to adjust the boundary of 
the White River National Forest in the State of Colorado to 
include all National Forest System lands within Summit County, 
Colorado, which are currently part of the Dillon Ranger 
District of the Arapaho National Forest; and H.R. 1439, to 
facilitate the sale of certain land in Tahoe National Forest in 
the State of California to Placer County, California.
    June 17, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 799, to require the 
Secretary of Agriculture to make a minor adjustment in the 
exterior boundary of the Hells Canyon Wilderness in the States 
of Oregon and Idaho to exclude an established Forest Service 
road inadvertently included in the wilderness; and H.R. 838, to 
require adoption of a management plan for the Hells Canyon 
National Recreation Area that allows appropriate use of 
motorized and nonmotorized river craft in the recreation area, 
and for other purposes.
    July 10, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 1663, to clarify the 
intent of the Congress in Public Law 93-632 to require the 
Secretary of Agriculture to continue to provide for the 
maintenance of 18 concrete dams and weirs that were located in 
the Emigrant Wilderness at the time the wilderness area was 
designated as wilderness in that Public Law; and H.R. 1944, to 
provide for a land exchange involving the Warner Canyon Ski 
Area and other land in the State of Oregon.
    July 22, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 1309, to provide for an 
exchange of lands with the city of Greeley, Colorado, and The 
Water Supply and Storage Company to eliminate private 
inholdings in wilderness areas, and for other purposes; and 
H.R. 1843, to amend title 31, United States Code, to address 
the failure to appropriate sufficient funds to make full 
payments in lieu of taxes under chapter 69 to such title by 
exempting certain users of the National Forest System from fees 
imposed in connection with such use.
    September 9, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 1739, to amend the 
Act designating the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness to 
clarify certain provisions of law regarding 
activitiesauthorized within the wilderness areas, and for other 
purposes; and H.R. 2149, to enhance the conservation and protection of 
the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness.
    September 18, 1997--Hearing held on H. Con. Res. 151, to 
maximize management of public domain forests to achieve the 
greatest greenhouse gas reductions. Printed Hearing 105-61
    September 23, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 2458, Community 
Protection and Hazardous Fuels Reduction Act of 1997. Printed 
Hearing 105-62
    September 25, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 434, to provide 
for the conveyance of small parcels of land in the Carson 
National Forest and the Santa Fe National Forest, New Mexico, 
to the village of El Rito and the town of Jemez Springs, New 
Mexico.
    October 7, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 1739, to amend the Act 
designating the Boundary Waters Canoe Area Wilderness to 
clarify certain provisions of law regarding activities 
authorized within the wilderness areas, and for other purposes; 
H.R. 1309, to provide for an exchange of lands with the city of 
Greeley, Colorado, and The Water Supply and Storage Company to 
eliminate private inholdings in wilderness areas, and for other 
purposes; and H.R. 434, to provide for the conveyance of small 
parcels of land in the Carson National Forest and the Santa Fe 
National Forest, New Mexico, to the village of El Rito and the 
town of Jemez Springs, New Mexico.
    October 28, 1997--Hearing held on H.R. 1659, to provide for 
the expeditious completion of the acquisition of private 
mineral interests within the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic 
Monument mandated by the 1982 Act that established the 
Monument, and for other purposes; H.R. 2416, to provide for the 
transfer of certain rights and property to the United States 
Forest Service in exchange for a payment to the occupant of 
such property, and for other purposes; and H.R. 2574, to 
consolidate certain mineral interests in the National 
Grasslands in Billings County, North Dakota, through the 
exchange of Federal and private mineral interests to enhance 
land management capabilities and environmental and wildlife 
protection, and for other purposes.
    November 4, 1997--Markup held on H.R. 1659, to provide for 
the expeditious completion of the acquisition of private 
mineral interests within the Mount St. Helens National Volcanic 
Monument mandated by the 1982 Act that established the Monument 
and for other purposes; H.R. 2416, to provide for the transfer 
of certain rights and property to the United States Forest 
Service in exchange for a payment to the occupant of such 
property, and for other purposes; and H.R. 2574, to consolidate 
certain mineral interests in the National Grasslands in 
Billings County, North Dakota, through the exchange of Federal 
and private mineral interests to enhance land management 
capabilities and environmental and wildlife protection, and for 
other purposes.
    March 5, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 2458, Community 
Protection and Hazardous Fuels Reduction Act of 1997.
    March 17, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 3297, to suspend the 
continued development of a roadless area policy on public 
domain units and other units of the National Forest System 
pending adequate public participation and determinations that a 
roadless area policy will not adversely affect forest health. 
Printed Hearing 105-72
    March 24, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 1021, Miles Land 
Exchange Act of 1997; H.R. 2886, Granite Watershed Enhancement 
and Protection Act of 1997; H.R. 3381, Gallatin Land 
Consolidation Act of 1998; and H.R. 3467, California Spotted 
Owl Interim Protection Act of 1998.
    April 23, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 1021, Miles Land 
Exchange Act of 1997; H.R. 2886, Granite Watershed Enhancement 
and Protection Act of 1997; H.R. 3381, Gallatin Land 
Consolidation Act of 1998; and H.R. 3467, California Spotted 
Owl Interim Protection Act of 1998.
    April 28, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 1865, Spanish Peaks 
Wilderness Act of 1997; H.R. 3186, Rogue River National Forest 
Interchange Act of 1998; H.R. 3187, to amend the Federal Land 
Policy and Management Act of 1976 to exempt not-for-profit 
entities that hold rights-of-way on public lands from certain 
strict liability requirements imposed in connection with such 
rights-of-way; and H.R. 3520, to adjust the boundaries of the 
Lake Chelan National Recreation Area and the adjacent Wenatchee 
National Forest in the State of Washington.
    May 7, 1998--Markup held on H.R. 1865, Spanish Peaks 
Wilderness Act of 1997; H.R. 3186, Rogue River National Forest 
Interchange Act of 1998; H.R. 3520, to adjust the boundaries of 
the Lake Chelan National Recreation Area and the adjacent 
Wenatchee National Forest in the State of Washington; and H.R. 
3796, to authorize the Secretary of Agriculture to convey the 
administrative site for the Rogue River National Forest and use 
the proceeds for the construction or improvement of offices and 
support buildings for the Rogue River National Forest and the 
Bureau of Land Management.
    July 21, 1998--Hearing held on H.R. 4021, Interstate 90 
Land Exchange Act of 1998; and H.R. 4023, to provide for the 
conveyance of the Forest Service property in Kern County, 
California, in exchange for county lands suitable for inclusion 
in Sequoia National Forest.

B. Legislation enacted

    H. Con. Res. 332, expressing the sense of Congress 
regarding the policy of the Forest Service toward recreational 
shooting and archery ranges on Federal land. (enacted as part 
of Public Law 105-277)
    H.R. 79, provides for the conveyance of certain land in the 
Six Rivers National Forest in the State of California for the 
benefit of the Hoopa Valley Tribe. (Public Law 105-79)
    H.R. 434, provides for the conveyance of small parcels of 
land in the Carson National Forest and the Santa Fe National 
Forest, New Mexico, to the village of El Rito and the town of 
Jemez Springs, New Mexico. (Public Law 105-224)
    H.R. 858, directs the Secretary of Agriculture to conduct a 
pilot project on designated lands within Plumas, Lassen, and 
Tahoe National Forests in the State of California to 
demonstrate the effectiveness of the resource management 
activities proposed by the Quincy Library Group and to amend 
current land and resource management plans for these national 
forests to consider the incorporation of these resource 
management activities. (enacted as part of Public Law 105-277)
    H.R. 1021, provides for a land exchange involving certain 
National Forest System lands within the Routt National Forest 
in the State of Colorado. (Public Law 105-288)
    H.R. 1439, facilitates the sale of certain land in Tahoe 
National Forest, in the State of California to Placer County, 
California. (Public Law 105-208)
    H.R. 1659, provides for the expeditious completion of the 
acquisition of private mineral interests within the Mount St. 
Helens National Volcanic Monument mandated by the 1982 Act that 
established the Monument, and for other purposes. (Public Law 
105-279)
    H.R. 1739, to amend the Act designating the Boundary Waters 
Canoe Area Wilderness to clarify certain provisions of law 
regarding activities authorized within the wilderness area, and 
for other purposes. (enacted as part of Public Law 105-178)
    H.R. 1779, a bill to make a minor adjustment in the 
exterior boundary of the Devils Backbone Wilderness in the Mark 
Twain National Forest, Missouri, to exclude a small parcel of 
land containing improvements. (Public Law 105-210)
    H.R. 1944, provides for a land exchange involving the 
Warner Canyon Ski Area and other land in the State of Oregon 
(Public Law 105-40).
    H.R. 2886, provides for a demonstration project in the 
Stanislaus National Forest, California, under which a private 
contractor will perform multiple resource management activities 
for that unit of the National Forest System. (Public Law 105-
281)
    H.R. 3186, provides for the transfer of administrative 
jurisdiction over certain public lands in the State of Oregon 
located within or adjacent to the Rogue River National Forest. 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-321)
    H.R. 3381, directs the Secretary of Agriculture and the 
Secretary of the Interior to exchange land and other assets 
with Big Sky Lumber Co. (Public Law 105-267)
    H.R. 3520, adjusts the boundaries of the Lake Chelan 
National Recreation Area and the adjacent Wenatchee National 
Forest in the State of Washington. (Public Law 105-238)
    H.R. 3796, authorizes the Secretary of Agriculture to 
convey the administrative site for the Rogue River National 
Forest and use the proceeds for the construction or improvement 
of offices and support buildings for the Rogue River National 
Forest and the Bureau of Land Management. (Public Law 105-282)
    H.R. 4021, provides for the exchange of certain land in the 
State of Washington. (enacted as part of Public Law 105-277)
    H.R. 4320, adjusts the boundaries of the Wasatch-Cache 
National Forest and Mount Naomi Wilderness in the State of Utah 
to correct a faulty land survey and to provide for the 
conveyance of the land that was subject to the faulty survey. 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-355)
    H.R. 4816, authorizes the acquisition of the Valles Caldera 
currently managed by the Baca Land and Cattle Company, to 
provide for an effective land and wildlife management program 
for this resource within the Department of Agriculture through 
the private sector, and for other purposes. (enacted as part of 
Public Law 105-277)
    S. Con. Res. 123, expressing the sense of Congress 
regarding the policy of the Forest Service toward recreational 
shooting and archery ranges on Federal land. (enacted as part 
of Public Law 105-277)
    S. 750, consolidates certain mineral interests in the 
National Grasslands in Billings County, North Dakota, through 
the exchange of Federal and private mineral interests to 
enhance land management capabilities and environmental and 
wildlife protection, and for other purposes. (Public Law 105-
167)
    S. 2513, transfer administrative jurisdiction over certain 
Federal land located within or adjacent to Rogue River National 
Forest and to clarify the authority of the Bureau of Land 
Management to sell and exchange other Federal land in Oregon. 
(enacted as part of Public Law 105-321)

C. Legislation passed House

    H.R. 985 (H. Rept. 105-111), to provide for the expansion 
of the Eagles Nest Wilderness within Arapaho and White River 
National Forests, Colorado, to include the lands known as the 
Slate Creek Addition upon the acquisition of the lands by the 
United States. [See S. 588 for further action]
    H.R. 1019 (H. Rept. 105-112), to provide for a boundary 
adjustment and land conveyance involving the Raggeds 
Wilderness, White River National Forest, Colorado, to correct 
the effects of earlier erroneous land surveys. [See S. 589 for 
further action]
    H.R. 1020 (H. Rept. 105-113), to adjust the boundary of the 
White River National Forest in the State of Colorado to include 
all National Forest System lands within Summit County, 
Colorado, which are currently part of the Dillon Ranger 
District of the Arapaho National Forest. [See S. 591 for 
further action]
    H.R. 1663 (H. Rept. 105-192), to clarify the intent of the 
Congress in Public Law 93-632 to require the Secretary of 
Agriculture to continue to provide for the maintenance of 18 
concrete dams and weirs that were located in the Emigrant 
Wilderness at the time the wilderness area was designated as 
wilderness in that Public Law.
    H. Con. Res. 151 (H. Rept. 105-330), expressing the sense 
of the Congress that the United States should manage its public 
domain National Forests to maximize the reduction of carbon 
dioxide in the atmosphere among many other objectives and that 
the United States should serve as an example and as a world 
leader in actively managing its public domain national forests 
in a manner that substantially reduces the amount of carbon 
dioxide added to the atmosphere.

D. Legislation ordered reported by the full committee

    H.R. 799 (H. Rept. 105-377), to require the Secretary of 
Agriculture to make a minor adjustment in the exterior boundary 
of the Hells Canyon Wilderness in the States of Oregon and 
Idaho to exclude an established Forest Service road 
inadvertently included in the wilderness.
    H.R. 838 (H. Rept. 105-378), to require adoption of a 
management plan for the Hells Canyon National Recreation Area 
that allows appropriate use of motorized and nonmotorized river 
craft in the recreation area, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 1309 (H. Rept. 105-489), to provide for an exchange of 
lands with the city of Greeley, Colorado, and The Water Supply 
and Storage Company to eliminate private inholdings in 
wilderness areas, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 1567 (H. Rept. 105-814), to provide for the 
designation of additional wilderness lands in the eastern 
United States.
    H.R. 1865 (H. Rept. 105-673), designate certain lands in 
the San Isabel National Forest, in Colorado, as the Spanish 
Peaks Wilderness.
    H.R. 2108 (H. Rept. 105-714), to dispose of certain Federal 
properties located in Dutch John, Utah, and to assist the local 
government in the interim delivery of basic services to the 
Dutch John community, and for other purposes. [See S. 890 for 
further action]
    H.R. 2223 (H. Rept. 105-693), to amend the Act popularly 
known as the Recreation and Public Purposes Act to authorize 
transfers of certain public lands or national forest lands to 
local education agencies for use for elementary or secondary 
schools, including public charter schools, and for other 
purposes.
    H.R. 2416 (H. Rept. 105-516), to provide for the transfer 
of certain rights and property to the United States Forest 
Service in exchange for a payment to the occupant of such 
property, and for other purposes.
    H.R. 2574 (H. Rept. 105-471), to consolidate certain 
mineral interests in the National Grasslands in Billings 
County, North Dakota, through the exchange of Federal and 
private mineral interests to enhance land management 
capabilities and environmental and wildlife protection, and for 
other purposes. [See S. 750 for further action]
    H.R. 3297 (H. Rept. 105-816, Part I), to suspend the 
continued development of a roadless area policy on public 
domain units and other units of the National Forest System 
pending adequate public participation and determinations that a 
roadless area policy will not adversely affect forest health.
    H.R. 4023 (H. Rept. 105-815), to provide for the conveyance 
of the Forest Service property in Kern County, California, in 
exchange for county lands suitable for inclusion in Sequoia 
National Forest.

E. Legislation marked up at subcommittee

    H.R. 2458, to provide new authority to the Secretary of 
Agriculture and the Secretary of the Interior to safeguard 
communities, lives, and property from catastrophic wildfire by 
eliminating hazardous fuels buildup, and to undertake other 
forest management projects to protect noncommodity resources on 
Federal lands where wildlands abut, or are located in close 
proximity to, urban areas.
    H.R. 3467, to address the protection of the California 
spotted owl and its habitat in the Sierran Province of Region 5 
of the Forest Service through the use of an interim management 
direction consistent with the requirements of existing public 
land management and environmental laws and by setting a date 
certain for the completion of a final environmental impact 
statement for the management of the California spotted owl.

  IV. Oversight Activities of the Subcommittee on Forests and Forest 
                                 Health

A. Introduction

    Along with passing legislation, the Subcommittee on Forests 
and Forest Health also aggressively adhered to its oversight 
mandate by conducting 30 hearings pertaining to forest health, 
Forest Service policies and management. The Subcommittee worked 
diligently to find solutions to the problems and controversies 
surrounding our national forests and other forest lands. 
Overall, Subcommittee activity was integral to the national 
forestry debate--working closely with state foresters, 
conservation organizations, local governments, and citizen 
groups in efforts to improve the management of our Nation's 
forests.
    Examine Administration Commitments Made for Land Exchanges: 
During the past years, President Clinton committed to a number 
of major exchanges without designating specifically any lands 
(or timber sales) to be exchanged. These include: a $65 million 
land swap to block a gold mine outside Yellowstone National 
Park; establishment of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National 
Monument in Utah to block coal mining and protect 1.8 million 
acres of Federal land (plus 200,000 acres of state/private 
land); a $380 million federal/State swap for ``Headwaters 
Forest,'' including $250 million from the U.S. and $130 million 
from California; and 225 million board feet of timber for 
canceled old growth timber sales in the Pacific Northwest. In 
addition, the Forest Service has estimated it needs over $50 
million to settle court adjudicated claims for other timber 
sales nationwide. The Subcommittee will work with the 
Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands to evaluate the 
potential opportunities and costs to fulfill each of the above 
land exchanges.
    The Subcommittee looked into the Administration's 
commitment to land exchanges during oversight hearings on the 
Forest Service Budget and assisted the Full Committee in the 
Budget and Appropriations joint oversight hearing on management 
of the Forest Service.
    Final ``1995'' Resources Planning Act Program and 
President's Statement of Policy: The Forest Service intends to 
complete its final Resources Planning Act (RPA) Program for the 
period 1995-2000 in March or April of 1997. At that time, 
Congress will have 90 consecutive days to review the 
Recommended Program and accompanying President's Statement of 
Policy and either approve, reject, or modify the Statement of 
Policy, as provided by the Resources Planning Act of 1974.
    Completion of the 1995 Program was already far behind 
schedule when the Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and 
Lands held an oversight hearing on the Draft Program on 
February 29, 1996. In response to concerns raised by 
Subcommittee Members prior to the hearing, on February 27, 
1996, Secretary of Agriculture Dan Glickman promised to delay 
submitting the final RPA Recommended Program to Congress until 
after the 105th Congressconvenes. In March 1996, Agriculture 
Secretary Dan Glickman also announced that the Forest Service would 
reopen the comment period on the draft for a 30-day period. The agency 
completed that process and is now making changes to the draft program.
    The Administration presented a draft strategic plan in May 
1997 as required by the Government Performance Review Act 
(GPRA). This plan replaced the Forest Service's RPA strategic 
plan. The Subcommittee reviewed, analyzed and offered comments 
and criticism during the July 31, 1997, oversight hearing on 
the Forest Service's Strategic Plan under GPRA. The 
Subcommittee identified problems and made suggestions on how 
the Forest Service could improve performance and 
accountability. The Subcommittee plans to remain engaged in the 
process as the agency prepares a new strategic plan for 2000.
    Forest Service Regulations on Land Management Planning: The 
Forest Service has proposed new regulations governing the land 
management planning process, and a final rule has been held in 
the Secretary's office for over two years. Agriculture Under 
Secretary Jim Lyons now says that completion of the final 
planning rules is a ``top priority.'' When the final rule is 
released, the Subcommittee should hold a hearing to review the 
new forest planning regulations. If it appears a rule will not 
be released, the Subcommittee should proceed with a hearing to 
evaluate implementation of the current planning rules and 
whether there is a need for new regulations.
    The Administration organized a committee of scientists to 
develop new rules. The rules have not yet been finalized and 
released. The Subcommittee plans to hold an oversight hearing 
once the rules become available.
    Forest Health: To support the introduction of forest health 
legislation, the Subcommittee may hold an oversight hearing on 
forest health issues, focusing on the Southwestern U.S. (In the 
104th Congress, the Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and 
Lands held a hearing on November 30, 1995, with witnesses from 
Virginia, Oregon, Idaho and Georgia and the Forest Service 
Chief). The Subcommittee will request information and testimony 
from other Forest Service regions regarding the problems 
resulting from forest overcrowding and increased insect/disease 
and fire risks.
    The continued oversight should support the development and 
enactment of legislation to remove barriers and provide 
incentives for management of the national forests to improve 
forest health. To achieve this goal, the Subcommittee may also 
hold field hearings.
    The Subcommittee held eight oversight hearings with an 
emphasis on forest health, in addition to legislative hearings 
addressing specific forest health issues. In addition, the 
issue of forest health played a large role in the hearings 
dealing with the Forest Service budget and accountability. The 
Subcommittee held a field hearing in New Mexico to address 
forest health concerns found in the Southwest, and two hearings 
in Washington, D.C., focusing on fire and forest health issues 
of concern in Florida.
    California Spotted Owl Review: In August 1996, Secretary of 
Agriculture Dan Glickman blocked release of a revised draft 
Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for management of 
California Spotted Owl habitat on the day the report was to be 
released for public comment. In response, Senator Larry Craig 
(Chairman of the Senate Subcommittee on Forests and Public Land 
Management) convened a review team of scientists who are 
currently evaluating the EIS. Meanwhile, Agriculture Under 
Secretary Jim Lyons initiated efforts to establish a Federal 
Advisory Committee Act (FACA) review team that will evaluate 
the draft owl EIS. As a result, the draft EIS remains delayed 
by agency and Administration officials.
    The Subcommittee anticipates a hearing on the findings of 
the scientific team and on the progress to date of the 
Secretary's review. Until the owl EIS is completed, the 
affected forests in California must continue to operate under 
temporary management guidelines which severely limit forest 
management opportunities. These interim guidelines were 
established as short term guidance pending completion of the 
EIS. They have already been in effect for four years and 
preclude needed fuel reduction and other forest management 
activities to reduce the high risk of catastrophic wildfire.
    As stated above, Under Secretary of Agriculture Jim Lyons 
established a Federal Advisory Committee (FACA) and the FACA 
committee which completed its report on the draft owl EIS. The 
Forest Service then initiated a Sierra Nevada Framework for 
conservation and Collaboration to develop a new EIS. The 
Subcommittee held a field hearing on September 13, 1997, in 
Sonora, California that focused on the impacts upon forest-
dependent communities in California resulting from overly-
restrictive interim management guidelines for the California 
Spotted Owl and reductions in harvest levels. The hearing also 
addressed the Administration's allegations that the science in 
the Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement (RDEIS), 
drafted to provide direction and replace the interim 
guidelines, was inadequate.
    Forest Service Decisions Pending at Secretary's Office: 
Numerous decisions affecting National Forest management 
activities have been sent by the Forest Service to the 
Secretary of Agriculture for approval, where they remain 
stalled without any action. The Subcommittee will review the 
Secretary's role in Forest Service decision making and the 
effect of his involvement on National Forest management and 
agency accountability to Congress.
    The Secretary hired a Chief Operating Officer, Francis 
Pandolfi, as an attempt to improve Forest Service management 
and accountability. The Subcommittee held several hearings that 
focused on management and accountability. For example, on July 
31, 1997, the Subcommittee held a hearing to examine the Forest 
Service's Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA) 
strategic plan. Under GPRA, all Federal agencies must prepare 
five-year strategic plans in consultation with Congress and 
include input from stakeholders and other interested inthe 
plan. The hearing focused on why the Forest Service failed to 
incorporate Committee concerns in its draft plan and how the agency 
intends to improve accountability.
    The Committees on Budget and Resources and the 
Appropriations Subcommittee on Interior held a hearing on the 
management of the U.S. Forest Service on March 26, 1998. The 
hearing focused on fiscal and administrative mismanagement. The 
hearing exposed Forest Service inefficiencies and lack of 
financial and administrative accountability.
    Forest Service Budget: The Forest Service's budget and 
accounting methods have been criticized by government officials 
and the public for a number of reasons. Issues include: 
accounting of the costs and benefits of Forest Service 
management programs and activities, ``below-cost'' sales, 
funding for Forest Service roads, and funding mechanisms for 
firefighting and pre-suppression activities.
    The Subcommittee should conduct oversight on the Forest 
Service budget for its land management activities, possibly in 
joint hearings with the Budget Committee. Recent Inspector 
General reports and GAO evaluations of the Forest Service 
budget and accounting methods should be addressed.
    On April 17, 1998, the Subcommittee heard from the Under 
Secretary of Agriculture on what steps the Forest Service had 
taken to improve fiscal accountability. This hearing addressed 
issues, concerns and questions regarding the Administration's 
proposed budget for the Forest Service for FY 1998. The 
Subcommittee explored the intent behind the Administration's 
funding initiatives and the effectiveness of the proposals, 
reviewed the agency's funding needs, and addressed Members' 
concerns about budget accountability and agency performance. 
The Administration provided little information on how it 
expects to monitor performance and ensure accountability.
    Review of Federal Land Management Policies: After 
completing oversight on a number of specific land management 
issues, the Subcommittee should conduct a broad review of 
current legal authorities and administrative policies guiding 
management of the National Forest System lands. The Committee 
should explore conflicting as well as complementary statutory 
objectives, procedural requirements, and proposals for amending 
such authorities to clarify, streamline or otherwise modify the 
statutory direction.
    The GAO completed a review for the Subcommittee of the 
Forest Service's decision-making procedures, concluding (in 
part) that a lack of agreement over the agency's mission and 
the lack of harmony between the agency's planning requirements 
and numerous environmental laws have seriously hindered its 
ability to carry out its statutory mandates. GAO also concluded 
that statutory changes needed to improve its operations cannot 
be identified until agreement is reached on the agency's 
mission priorities. The Subcommittee will continue to work on 
this critical issue in the 106th Congress.
    Review Status of the Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem 
Management Project: In December 1996, the Forest Service 
released its scientific findings for the Interior Columbia 
River Basin, covering Eastern Oregon and Washington, Idaho, and 
portions of Western Montana, Wyoming, Northern Nevada, and a 
small portion of California (along the State's northern 
boundary). In June 1997 the Forest Service plans to release for 
public comment two draft statements covering the assessment 
area. Both efforts are part of the Interior Columbia Basin 
Ecosystem Management Project (ICBEMP), scheduled for completion 
in 1998. The final decision document(s) will amend management 
direction for all land and resource management plans within the 
assessment area. The ICBEMP has cost $33 million, according to 
Forest Service testimony at an oversight hearing of the 
Subcommittee on National Parks, Forests and Lands in May 1996.
    The Forest Service is already incorporating information 
from the scientific assessment into project planning documents 
for individual national forests within the assessment area. The 
Subcommittee will conduct additional oversight hearings to 
review how the information is being used by national forests 
and how the final decision documents will affect individual 
forest plans.
    The Subcommittee held three hearings on ICBEMP. On May 15, 
1997, the Subcommittee worked with the Senate Subcommittee on 
Public Land Management to address concerns over the Forest 
Service decision making process and whether the legal 
authorities were consistent under National Forest Management 
Act (NFMA) and National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to 
conduct such a management projects as ICBEMP. On March 10, 
1998, the Subcommittee held a follow-up hearing to address 
additional concerns with the cost of the study and project 
implementation; the validity and soundness of the scientific 
findings of the project; and concerns about the ability of 
forest managers to implement the project and meet project 
goals. On April 14, 1998, the Subcommittee held a field hearing 
in Nampa, Idaho, to hear local concerns with the ICBEMP 
process. The Interior Department and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act of 1999 continued to fund the ICBEMP; 
however, it stipulated that the agencies involved with ICBEMP 
must provide a detailed estimation of the time and cost (for 
all participating Federal agencies) to accomplish each 
decision.
    Review the Forest Inventory and Analysis Program and Its 
Implications for National Forest Management: The Forest 
Service's Forest Inventory and Analysis program (FIA) has been 
in place since the early 1950s. This program provides 
fundamental resource information needed by agency managers and 
policy makers to make decisions regarding management of the 
National Forest System lands. There has been little, if any, 
Congressional review of this program since its early years. The 
Subcommittee should review the program and assess its 
effectiveness for agency land managers.
    The Subcommittee worked successfully to include language in 
the Fiscal Year 1999 Omnibus Spending Bill and the Research 
title of the 1998 Farm Bill to expand FIA to an annualized 
inventory and increase funding for the program by $6 billion.

                              B. -Hearings

    March 18, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Management of our 
Nation's forests and criteria for determining healthy forests. 
Printed Hearing 105-6
    April 8, 1997--Oversight hearing held on livestock grazing 
policies on public domain National Forests. Printed Hearing 
105-19
    April 15, 1997--Joint oversight hearing with Subcommittee 
on National Parks and Public Lands, on implementation of the 
1964 Wilderness Act on BLM and Forest Service lands. Printed 
Hearing 105-13
    April 17, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Forest Service 
budget.
    April 29, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Forest Health, 
Ecology, and Management.
    May 15, 1997--Joint oversight hearing, with Senate 
Committee on Energy and Natural Resources' Subcommittee on 
Forests and Public Land Management, on Interior Columbia Basin 
Ecosystem Management Project. Printed Hearing 105-38
    June 12, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the reintroduction 
of the grizzly bear in the public domain National Forests. 
Printed Hearing 105-42
    June 24, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Resident Exotic 
Plants and Pests threatening the health of the National 
Forests.
    July 31, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Forest Service 
Strategic Plan under the Government Performance and Results 
Act. Printed Hearing 105-47
    September 11, 1997--Oversight hearing held on the affect of 
international forestry agreements on U.S. Forest Service 
decision-making.
    September 13, 1997--Oversight field hearing in Sonora, 
California, on management of the Stanislaus National Forest.
    September 16, 1997--Oversight hearing on the implications 
to public domain national forests should a bill to require the 
appointment of the Chief of the Forest Service by the 
President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate be 
enacted.
    October 23, 1997--Oversight hearing held on Recreational 
Residence Use Fees on National Forest System lands.
    February 12, 1998--Oversight hearing on Tucson Rod and Gun 
Club, Arizona.
    February 25, 1998--Oversight hearing on Clinton-Gore 
Administration's Forest Service Roadless Area Moratorium (Part 
I). Printed Hearing 105-72
    March 10, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Interior Columbia 
Basin Ecosystem Management Project. Printed Hearing 105-88
    March 17, 1998--Oversight hearing on follow up on the 
Clinton-Gore's Forest Service Roadless Area Moratorium (Part 
II) Printed Hearing 105-72
    March 19, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Impact and Status 
of Northern Spotted Owl on National Forests. Printed Hearing 
105-79
    April 14, 1998--Oversight field hearing held in Nampa, 
Idaho, on Interior Columbia Basin Ecosystem Management Project. 
Printed Hearing 105-88
    April 28, 1998--Oversight hearing held on a proposal to 
permit the Forest Service to sell its office in Medford, 
Oregon, in order to fund an add-on to the Bureau of Land 
Management Medford District Office so it can co-locate.
    May 14, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Forest Health in 
the Rocky Mountain West.
    June 23, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Forest Service Law 
Enforcement. Printed Hearing 105-94.
    June 25, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Forest Service 
Training.
    July 16, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Regional Haze. 
Printed Hearing 105-100
    July 30, 1998--Oversight hearing held on NEPA parity. 
Printed Hearing 105-110
    August 4, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Fire Suppression. 
Printed Hearing 105-110
    August 15, 1998--Oversight field hearing held in Espanola, 
New Mexico, on Forest Service Management of the National 
Forests in Northern New Mexico. Printed Hearing 105-107
    September 15, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Forest Roads 
Management and Obliteration.
    September 17, 1998--Oversight hearing held on Forest 
Service--Backcountry Airstrip Management.
    September 28, 1998--Oversight hearing held on General 
Accounting Office Study on Forest Health.

                       V. Subcommittee Statistics

Total number of bills and resolutions referred....................    83
Total number of bills reported from subcommittee..................    24
Total number of bills reported from full committee................    27
Total number of bills passed by the House.........................    18
Total number of bills enacted into law............................    21
Public Hearings and Markups:
    Legislative-..................................................    14
    Oversight.....................................................    30
    Markup sessions...............................................     8
Total number of subcommittee meetings (days)......................    51


                          A P P E N D I C E S

                              ----------                              


                            Printed Hearings

    105-1--Joint oversight hearing on Forest Ecosystem Health 
in the United States. April 9, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Committee on Resources and Committee on Agriculture)
    105-2--Oversight hearing on State Land and Water 
Conservation Act. March 11, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-3--Oversight hearing on Science and Resources 
Management in the National Park Service. February 27, 1997, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on National Parks and Public 
Lands)
    105-4--Hearing on African Elephants (H.R. 39) and Coral 
Reefs (H.Con.Res. 8). March 13, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-5--Hearing on Nevada Lands (H.R. 449). March 13, 1997, 
in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on National Parks and Public 
Lands)
    105-6--Oversight hearing on Forest Health Criteria. March 
18, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Forests and 
Forest Health)
    105-7--Hearing on National Wildlife Refuge Improvement 
(H.R. 511 and H.R. 512). March 6, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-8--Oversight hearing on Hardrock Mineral Bonding. March 
20, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Energy and 
Mineral Resources)
    105-9--Oversight hearing on the Interior Department Budget 
Request for FY 1998. March 4, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources)
    105-10--Hearing on H.R. 858, Quincy Library Group Forest 
Recovery Act. March 5, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee 
on Forests and Forest Health)
    105-11--Oversight field hearing on Yosemite Restoration. 
March 22, 1997, in El Portal, CA. (Subcommittee on National 
Parks and Public Lands)
    105-12--Hearing on H.R. 478, Flood Control Projects and 
ESA. April 10, 1997, in Washington, D.C. and Sacramento, CA. 
(Full Committee)
    105-13--Joint oversight hearing on Implementation of 
Wilderness Act. April 15, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands and 
Subcommittee on Forests and Forest Health)
    105-14--Oversight field hearing on NWR Maintenance Backlog 
and Fish Interrelationship. April 21, 1997, in Manahawkin, NJ. 
(Subcommittee on Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-15--Oversight hearing on Federal Hydrography Programs. 
April 24, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Fisheries 
Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-16--Hearing on H.R. 856, Puerto Rico Status. March 19, 
1997, in Washington, D.C. (Full Committee)
    105-17--Oversight hearing on CALFED Bay-Delta Program. 
April 17, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Water and 
Power)
    105-18--Hearing on H.J.Res. 59, Polar Bear Trophies 
Importation. April 30, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Full 
Committee)
    105-19--Oversight hearing on Livestock Grazing. April 8, 
1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Forests and Forest 
Health)
    105-20--Oversight hearing on Establishing the Grand 
Staircase-Escalante National Monument. April 29, 1997, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on National Parks and Public 
Lands)
    105-21--Oversight hearing on CVPIA. March 20, 1997, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Water and Power)
    105-22--Hearing on H.R. 588, to amend the National Trails 
System Act to create a new category of long-distance trails to 
be known as National Discovery Trails, and to authorize the 
American Discovery Trail as the first trail in that category; 
and H.R. 1513, to amend the National Trails System Act to 
designate the Lincoln National Historic Trail as a component of 
the National Trails System. June 10, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-23--Hearing on H.R. 741, Migratory Bird Treaty Reform 
Act. May 15, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on 
Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-24--Oversight hearing on Hardrock Mining Operations. 
June 19, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Energy and 
Mineral Resources)
    105-25--Oversight hearing on Narragansett Indian Tribe. May 
1, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Full Committee)
    105-26--Hearing on H.R. 901, American Land Sovereignty 
Protection Act. May 5, 1997, in Tannersville, New York, and 
June 10, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Full Committee)
    105-27--Field hearing on H.R. 856, United States-Puerto 
Rico Political Status Act. April 21, 1997, in Mayaguez, Puerto 
Rico. (Full Committee)
    105-28--Field hearing on H.R. 856, United States-Puerto 
Rico Political Status Act. April 19, 1997, in San Juan, Puerto 
Rico. (Full Committee)
    105-29--Oversight hearings on CITES Meetings. June 3, 1997, 
and July 17, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on 
Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-30--Hearing on H.R. 1051, New Mexico Statehood and 
Enabling Act Amendments of 1997. June 17, 1997, in Washington, 
D.C. (Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-31--Oversight hearing on Bureau of Reclamation Funding 
Options for Water Project Construction, Enhancement, 
Rehabilitation and Mitigation. May 6, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Water and Power)
    105-32--Oversight field hearing on Columbia/Snake River 
Drawdown Proposals. May 31, 1997, in Lewiston, ID. 
(Subcommittee on Water and Power)
    105-33--Hearing on H.R. 1952 and H.R. 1500, to Designate 
certain Federal lands and Bureau of Land Management Lands, in 
the State of Utah as Wilderness. June 24, 1997, in Washington, 
D.C. (Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-34--Hearings on the Decision-Making Processes and 
Interagency Cooperation of the National Marine Fisheries 
Service Northwest Region. July 24, 1997, in Washington, D.C., 
and August 15, 1997, in Boise, ID, (Subcommittee on Fisheries 
Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-35--Hearing on H.R. 1567, the Eastern Wilderness Act. 
June 17, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on National 
Parks and Public Lands)
    105-36--Oversight hearing on American Heritage Rivers 
Initiative. July 15, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Full Committee)
    105-37--Hearing on H.R. 1635, National Underground Railroad 
Network to Freedom Act; H.R. 755, Tax Checkoff for Park System; 
H.R. 1718, Wyoming Land Conveyance; and H.R. 708, Grazing at 
Grand Teton National Park. July 22, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-38--Joint oversight hearing on Interior Columbia Basin 
Ecosystem Management Plan. May 15, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Forests and Forest Health and Senate Committee 
on Energy and Natural Resources, Subcommittee on Forests and 
Public Land Management)
    105-39--Oversight hearing on the Management of Fisheries by 
the National Marine Fisheries Service. September 11, 1997, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Fisheries Conservation, 
Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-40--Oversight hearing on New World Mine Proposed 
Buyout. May 20, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on 
Energy and Mineral Resources)
    105-41--Oversight hearing on Royalty-In-Kind for Federal 
Oil and Gas Production. July 31 and September 18, 1997, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources)
    105-42--Oversight hearing on the Reintroduction of the 
Grizzly Bear in the Public Domain National Forests. June 12, 
1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Forests and Forest 
Health)
    105-43--Oversight hearing on Federal versus State 
Management of Parks. July 10, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-44--Joint oversight hearing on S. 569 and H.R. 1082, 
Indian Child Welfare Act. June 18, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Senate Committee on Indian Affairs and House Committee on 
Resources) (Senate Hearing 105-244)
    105-45--Oversight hearing on the Use of Fire as a 
Management Tool and its Risks and Benefits for Forest Health 
and Air Quality. September 30, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Full 
Committee)
    105-46--Oversight hearing on Compliance of Certain 
Departments with the Government Performance and Results Act. 
July 17, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Water and 
Power)
    105-47--Oversight hearing on U.S. Forest Service Strategic 
Plan under the Government Performance and Results Act. July 31, 
1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Forests and Forest 
Health)
    105-48--Joint oversight hearing on Tongass Land Management. 
July 9, and July 10, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Senate 
Committee on Energy and Natural Resources and House Committee 
on Resources)
    105-49--Hearing on H.R. 1787, Conservation of Asian 
Elephants. July 31, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on 
Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-50--Oversight field hearing on Bureau of Land 
Management and U.S. Forest Service Oil and Gas Regulations 
Regarding Access and Permitting Issues. June 30, 1997, in 
Casper, Wyoming. (Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources)
    105-51--Hearing on H.R. 351, to authorize the Secretary of 
the Interior to make appropriate improvements to a county road 
located in the Pictured Rocks National Lakeshore, and to 
prohibit construction of a scenic shoreline drive in the 
National Lakeshore; H.R. 1714, to provide for the acquisition 
of the Plains Railroad Depot at the Jimmy Carter National 
Historic Site; H.R. 2136, to direct the Secretary of the 
Interior to convey, at fair market value, certain properties in 
Clark County, Nevada, to persons who purchased adjacent 
properties in good faith reliance on land surveys that were 
subsequently determined to be inaccurate; and H.R. 2283, to 
expand the boundaries of Arches National Park in the State of 
Utah to include portions of the following drainages, Salt Wash, 
Lost Spring Canyon, Fish Sheep Draw, Clover Canyon, Cordova 
Canyon, Mine Draw, and Cottonwood Wash, which are currently 
under the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Land Management, and to 
include a portion of Fish Sheep Draw, which is currently owned 
by the State of Utah. September 16, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-52--Oversight hearing on grazing Reductions and other 
Issues on BLM Lands. September 30, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-53--Oversight field hearing on Hardrock Mining Issues. 
September 22, 1997, in Elko, NV. (Subcommittee on Energy and 
Mineral Resources)
    105-54--Hearing on H.R. 2376, The National Fish and 
Wildlife Foundation Establishment Act Amendments of 1997. 
September 25, 1997 in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on 
Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-55--Hearing on H.R. 1849, The Oklahoma City National 
Memorial. September 9, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee 
on National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-56--Joint oversight hearing on the Sierra Club's 
Proposal to Drain Lake Powell or Reduce its Water Storage 
Capability. September 24, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands and 
Subcommittee on Water and Power)
    105-57--Oversight hearing on the U.S.-Canada Pacific Salmon 
Treaty. September 18, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee 
on Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-58--Oversight hearing on the Water Management 
Implications of the 1997/98 El Nino. October 30, 1997 in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Water and Power)
    105-59--Hearing on H.R. 2098, National Cave and Karst 
Research Institute Act of 1997, and H.R. 2989, Land Conveyance 
to the St. Jude's Ranch for Children. February 5, 1998, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on National Parks and Public 
Lands)---
    105-60--Oversight field hearing on Salton Sea Stabilization 
and Water Quality Improvement. October 3, 1997, in Palm Desert, 
CA. (Subcommittee on Water and Power)
    105-61--Hearing on H. Con. Res. 151, to Maximize Management 
of Public Domain Forests to Achieve the Greatest Greenhouse Gas 
Reductions. September 18, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Forests and Forest Health)
    105-62--Hearing on H.R. 2458, the Community Protection and 
Hazardous Fuels Reduction Act of 1997. September 23, 1997, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Forests and Forest Health)
    105-63--Oversight Hearing on Pfiesteria and its Impact on 
our Fishery Resources. October 9, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-64--Hearing on H.R. 2401, CBRA Technical Corrections; 
and H.R. 2556, to Reauthorize the North American Wetlands 
Conservation Act of 1989. October 23, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-65--Oversight hearing on the Everglades National Park. 
September 25, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on 
National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-66--Hearing held on H.R. 1522, to Extend the 
Authorization for the National Historic Preservation Fund. 
October 21, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on National 
Parks and Public Lands)
    105-67--Joint oversight field hearing on National Park 
Overflights. November 17, 1997, in St. George, Utah 
(Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands and the 
Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, Subcommittee on 
Aviation)
    105-68--Oversight hearing on the U.S.S. MONITOR National 
Marine Sanctuary. November 6, 1997, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-69--Hearing on H.R. 2807, Rhino and Tiger Labeling Act; 
and H.R. 3113, Rhino and Tiger Conservation Act. February 5, 
1998, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Fisheries 
Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-70--Hearing on H.R. 1842, The American Heritage Rivers 
Initiative. September 24, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Full 
Committee)
    105-71--Hearing on H.R. 2223, the Education Land Grant Act; 
H.R. 2993, To Provide for the Collection of Commercial Filming 
Fees on National Park System and National Wildlife Refuge 
System Units; and H.R. 1728, The National Park Service 
Administrative Amendment of 1997. February 24, 1998, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on National Parks and Public 
Lands)
    105-72--Oversight hearings on Clinton-Gore Administration's 
Forest Service Roadless Area Moratorium. February 25 and March 
17, 1998, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Forests and 
Forest Health)
    105-73--Oversight hearing on Fee Demonstration Programs-
Successes and Failures. February 26, 1998, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-74--Oversight hearing on the President's Fiscal Year 
1999 Budget Request for Agencies. February 26, 1998, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources)
    105-75--Hearing on S. 1213, The Oceans Act of 1997; H.R. 
2547, to Develop National Policy with Respect to Oceans and 
Coastal Activities; and H.R. 3445, The Ocean Commission Act. 
March 19, 1998, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Fisheries 
Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-76--Hearing held on H.R. 2438, to Encourage the 
Establishment of Appropriate Trails on Abandoned Railroad 
Rights-of-Way, while Ensuring the Protection of Certain 
Reversionary Property Rights; and H.R. 1995, to Provide for the 
Protection of Farmland at the Point Reyes National Seashore. 
October 30, 1997, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on National 
Parks and Public Lands)
    105-77--Hearing on H.R. 3267, the Sonny Bono Memorial 
Salton Sea Reclamation Act. March 12, 1998, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Water and Power)
    105-78--Hearing on H.R. 100, Guam Commonwealth Act; H.R. 
2370, Guam Judicial Empowerment Act; and S. 210, to Amend the 
Organic Act of Guam, the Revised Organic Act of the Virgin 
Islands, and the Compact of Free Association Act. October 29, 
1997, in Washington, D.C. (Full Committee)
    105-79--Oversight hearing on the Impact and Status of the 
Northern Spotted Owl on National Forests. March 19, 1998, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Forests and Forest Health)
    105-80--Oversight hearing on the Implementation of the 
Endangered Species Act of 1973. March 5, 1998, in Washington, 
D.C. (Full Committee)
    105-81--Oversight hearing on Arctic Snow Geese. April 23, 
1998, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Fisheries 
Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-82--Joint hearing on the Management of the United 
States Forest Service. March 26, 1998, in Washington, D.C. 
(Full Committee, Committee on the Budget, and Subcommittee on 
Interior of the Committee on Appropriations)
    105-83--Oversight hearing on the Future Water Needs of 
California under CALFED, CALFED Financing, the Monitoring and 
Performance Standards of CALFED, and CALFED Public 
Participation. May 12, 1998, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee 
on Water and Power)
    105-84--Hearing on H.R. 2760, Disabled Sportsmen's Access 
Act. May 14, 1998, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on 
Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-85--Hearing on H.R. 3625, the San Rafael Swell National 
Conservation Area. April 23, 1998, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-86--Oversight hearing on Bureau of Land Management 
Realty and Appraisal Issues. March 24, 1998, in Washington, 
D.C. (Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-87--Oversight hearing on Outer Continental Shelf Oil 
and Gas Leasing. May 14, 1998, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources)
    105-88--Oversight hearings on the Interior Columbia Basin 
Ecosystem Management Project. March 10, 1998, in Washington, 
D.C. and April 14, 1998, in Nampa, ID (Subcommittee on Forests 
and Forest Health)
    105-89--Hearing on H.R. 3830, to provide for the exchange 
of certain lands within the State of Utah. May 19, 1998, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on National Parks and Public 
Lands)
    105-90--Oversight hearing on Impact of Federal Land Use 
Policies on Rural Communities. June 9, 1998, in Washington, 
D.C. (Full Committee)
    105-91--Hearing on H.R. 3705, to provide for the sale of 
certain public lands in the Ivanpah Valley, Nevada, to the 
Clark County Department of Aviation. June 23, 1998, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on National Parks and Public 
Lands)
    105-92--Hearing held on H.R. 3334, The Royalty Enhancement 
Act of 1998. March 19 and May 21, 1998 in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources)
    105-93--Oversight field hearing on Proposed Modifications 
of Folsom Dam. May 27, 1998, in Sacramento, CA. (Subcommittee 
on Water and Power)
    105-94--Oversight hearing on Forest Service Law 
Enforcement. June 23, 1998, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee 
on Forests and Forest Health)
    105-95--Hearing held on H.R. 3981, to modify the boundaries 
of the George Washington Birthplace National Monument; H.R. 
4109, Gateway Visitor Center Authorization Act of 1998; H.R. 
4141, to amend the Act authorizing the establishment of the 
Chattahoochee River National Recreation Area to modify the 
boundaries of the Area, and to provide for the protection of 
lands, waters, and natural cultural, and scenic resources 
within the national recreation area; and H.R. 4158, National 
Park Enhancement and Protection Act. July 16, 1998, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on National Parks and Public 
Lands)
    105-96--Oversight hearing on Implementation of the 
Endangered Species Act in the Southwest. July 15, 1998, in 
Washington, D.C. (Full Committee)
    105-97--Oversight hearing on pilot program to control 
nutria at the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge in Maryland. 
July 16, 1998, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Fisheries 
Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-98--Oversight hearing on United States Ownership of 
Fishing Vessels. June 4, 1998, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-99--Hearings on West Coast Groundfish and Dungeness 
Crab Conservation (H.R. 3498). April 30 and May 7, 1998, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Fisheries Conservation, 
Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-100--Oversight hearing on Regional Haze. July 16, 1998, 
in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Forests and Forest Health)
    105-101--Hearing held on H.R. 3972, to amend the Outer 
Continental Shelf Lands Act to prohibit the Secretary of the 
Interior from charging state and local Government Agencies for 
certain uses of the sand, gravel, and shell resources of the 
Outer Continental Shelf; H.R. 3878, to subject certain reserved 
mineral interests of the operation of the Mineral Leasing Act; 
and H.R. 1467, to provide for the continuance of oil and gas 
operations pursuant to certain existing leases in the Wayne 
National Forest. July 21, 1998, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Energy and Mineral Resources)
    105-102--Oversight hearing on Problems and Issues with the 
National Environmental Policy Act of 1969. March 18, 1998, in 
Washington, D.C. (Full Committee)
    105-103--Hearing held on H.R. 3478, Colorado Ute Settlement 
Act Amendments of 1998; and H.R. 745, Deauthorize the Animas-La 
Plata Federal Reclamation Project. July 28, 1998, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Water and Power)
    105-104--Hearing held on H.R. 3963, to establish terms and 
conditions under which the Secretary of the Interior shall 
convey leaseholds in certain properties around Canyon Ferry 
Reservoir, Montana; H.R. 2125, to authorize appropriations for 
the Coastal Heritage Trail Route in New Jersey, and for other 
purposes; H.R. 3950, to designate a portion of the Otay 
Mountain region of California as wilderness; H.R. 4144, to 
ensure the protection of natural, cultural, and historical 
resources in Cumberland Island National Seashore and Cumberland 
Island Wilderness in the State of Georgia; H.R. 4211, to 
establish the Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site, in 
association with the Tuskegee University, in the State of 
Alabama, and for other purposes; H.R. 4230, to provide for a 
land exchange involving the El Portal Administrative Site of 
the Department of the Interior in the State of California; and 
H.R. 4287, to make technical corrections and minor adjustments 
to the boundaries of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National 
Monument in the State of Utah. July 28, 1998, in Washington, 
D.C. (Subcommittee on National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-105--Oversight field hearing on Range Issues and 
Problems with the Wild Horse and Burro Act and its 
Implementation. July 13, 1998, in Reno, Nevada. (Subcommittee 
on National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-106--Oversight hearing on Ocean Observing Systems. July 
30, 1998, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Fisheries 
Conservation, Wildlife and Oceans)
    105-107--Oversight field hearing on the Forest Service 
Management of the National Forests in Northern New Mexico. 
August 15, 1998, in Espanola, New Mexico. (Subcommittee on 
Forests and Forest Health)
    105-108--Oversight hearing on GAO Study on Forest Health. 
September 28, 1998, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on 
Forests and Forest Health)
    105-109--Oversight hearing on the Grand Canyon National 
Park. September 28, 1998, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on 
National Parks and Public Lands)
    105-110--Oversight hearings on National Environmental 
Policy Act. July 30 and August 4, 1998, in Washington, D.C. 
(Subcommittee on Forests and Forest Health)
    105-111--Field hearings on Endangered Species Act. 
September 2, 1998, in Pasco, WA, and September 3, 1998, in 
Boise, ID. (Full Committee)
    105-112--Hearing on H.R. 3658, to provide for the 
settlement on the water rights claims of the Chippewa Cree 
Tribe of the Rocky Boy's Reservation. September 23, 1998, in 
Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Water and Power)
    105-113--Oversight hearing on Research conducted in 
National Marine Sanctuaries. September 29, 1998, in Washington, 
D.C. (Subcommittee on Fisheries Conservation, Wildlife and 
Oceans)
    105-114--Oversight hearing on Garrison Unit Reformulation. 
September 29, 1998, in Washington, D.C. (Subcommittee on Water 
and Power)
    105-115--Oversight field hearing on future maintenance and 
repair of the Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park. 
September 21, 1998, in Kalispell, MT. (Subcommittee on National 
Parks and Public Lands)
    105-116--Hearing on H.R. 2822, Swan Creek Black River 
Tribe. October 7, 1998, in Washington, D.C. (Full Committee)
    105-117--Oversight hearing on Compacts of Free Association 
with the Marshall Islands, Federated States of Micronesia, and 
Palau. October 1, 1998, in Washington, D.C. (Full Committee)
    105-118--Oversight field hearing on Endangered Species Act. 
October 26, 1998, in Clovis, NM. (Full Committee)
    105-119--Joint hearing on S. 1770, to Elevate the Director 
of the Indian Health Service to Assistant Secretary for Health 
and Human Services; and H.R. 3782, Tribal Trust Fund Account. 
July 22, 1998, in Washington, D.C. (Full Committee and Senate 
Committee on Indian Affairs)

                          List of Public Laws

First Session:
    Public Law 105-9....................................        H.R. 412
    Public Law 105-12...................................       H.R. 1003
    Public Law 105-21...................................    H.J. Res. 32
    Public Law 105-29...................................    S.J. Res. 29
    Public Law 105-36...................................        H.R. 709
    Public Law 105-37-..................................          S. 430
    Public Law 105-39...................................       H.R. 1198
    Public Law 105-40...................................       H.R. 1944
    Public Law 105-42...................................        H.R. 408
    Public Law 105-44...................................         H.R. 63
    Public Law 105-47-..................................          S. 910
    Public Law 105-57...................................       H.R. 1420
    Public Law 105-58-..................................          S. 871
    Public Law 105-60...................................       H.R. 1948
    Public Law 105-74-..................................          S. 587
    Public Law 105-75-..................................          S. 588
    Public Law 105-76-..................................          S. 589
    Public Law 105-77-..................................          S. 591
    Public Law 105-79...................................         H.R. 79
    Public Law 105-81...................................        H.R. 708
    Public Law 105-82-..................................          S. 931
    Public Law 105-83...................................      H.R. 2107*
                                                                H.R. 822
                                                               H.R. 1476
                                                               H.R. 2136
    Public Law 105-85...................................      H.R. 1119*
                                                                H.R. 374
                                                               H.R. 1163
    Public Law 105-96...................................       H.R. 1787
    Public Law 105-106-.................................          S. 669
    Public Law 105-119..................................      H.R. 2267*
                                                               H.R. 1855
    Public Law 105-132-.................................          S. 156
    Public Law 105-138-.................................         S. 1559
    Public Law 105-143..................................       H.R. 1604
    Public Law 105-146..................................       H.R. 1658
Second Session:
    Public Law 105-156..................................       H.R. 3042
    Public Law 105-160-.................................          S. 927
    Public Law 105-167-.................................          S. 750
    Public Law 105-174..................................      H.R. 3579*
                                                               H.R. 1424
                                                               H.R. 2355
                                                               H.R. 3544
    Public Law 105-178..................................      H.R. 2400*
                                                               H.R. 1739
                                                               H.R. 2973
    Public Law 105-182-.................................          S. 423
    Public Law 105-188-.................................         S. 2069
    Public Law 105-195..................................        H.R. 960
    Public Law 105-199..................................       H.R. 3035
    Public Law 105-201..................................   H.J. Res. 113
    Public Law 105-202-.................................          S. 731
    Public Law 105-203..................................       H.R. 1635
    Public Law 105-208..................................       H.R. 1439
    Public Law 105-209..................................       H.R. 1460
    Public Law 105-210..................................       H.R. 1779
    Public Law 105-217..................................         H.R. 39
    Public Law 105-224..................................        H.R. 434
    Public Law 105-229..................................        H.R. 765
    Public Law 105-238-.................................         S. 1683
    Public Law 105-239-.................................         S. 1883
    Public Law 105-242..................................       H.R. 1856
    Public Law 105-243-.................................         S. 1695
    Public Law 105-256..................................       H.R. 4068
    Public Law 105-261..................................      H.R. 3616*
                                                               H.R. 2760
    Public Law 105-263..................................        H.R. 449
    Public Law 105-265..................................       H.R. 1481
    Public Law 105-267..................................       H.R. 3381
    Public Law 105-269..................................       H.R. 4248
    Public Law 105-277..................................      H.R. 4328*
                                       H. Con. Res. 332/S. Con. Res. 123
                                                                H.R. 796
                                                                H.R. 858
                                                                 S. 1104
                                                               H.R. 1994
                                                       H.R. 2259/S. 1092
                                                               H.R. 2401
                                                               H.R. 3647
                                                               H.R. 3689
                                                               H.R. 3878
                                                               H.R. 3957
                                                               H.R. 3962
                                                               H.R. 3963
                                                               H.R. 4021
                                                               H.R. 4180
                                                               H.R. 4548
                                                               H.R. 4575
                                                               H.R. 4671
                                                               H.R. 4816
                                                               H.R. 4867
    Public Law 105-279..................................       H.R. 1659
    Public Law 105-280..................................       H.R. 2411
    Public Law 105-281..................................       H.R. 2886
    Public Law 105-282..................................       H.R. 3796
    Public Law 105-284..................................       H.R. 4284
    Public Law 105-288..................................       H.R. 1021
    Public Law 105-290..................................       H.R. 2186
    Public Law 105-291..................................       H.R. 2370
    Public Law 105-293..................................       H.R. 2795
    Public Law 105-294..................................       H.R. 3069
    Public Law 105-295..................................       H.R. 4079
    Public Law 105-296..................................       H.R. 4166
    Public Law 105-307-.................................         S. 2468
    Public Law 105-308..................................        H.R. 700
    Public Law 105-312..................................       H.R. 2807
                                                                H.R. 741
                                                                 S. 2317
                                                       H.R. 2556/S. 1677
                                                               H.R. 2863
                                                               H.R. 3113
                                                               H.R. 4634
    Public Law 105-313..................................       H.R. 3055
    Public Law 105-316..................................       H.R. 3687
    Public Law 105-317..................................       H.R. 3903
    Public Law 105-321..................................       H.R. 4326
                                                                 S. 2513
                                                               H.R. 3186
                                                               H.R. 3542
                                                       H.R. 3569/S. 1807
                                                       H.R. 3964/S. 2041
    Public Law 105-322..................................       H.R. 4337
    Public Law 105-325-.................................          S. 231
    Public Law 105-326-.................................          S. 890
    Public Law 105-327-.................................         S. 1333
    Public Law 105-328-.................................         S. 2094
    Public Law 105-329-.................................         S. 2106
    Public Law 105-333..................................       H.R. 2000
    Public Law 105-335..................................       H.R. 3830
    Public Law 105-341-.................................         S. 2285
    Public Law 105-342-.................................         S. 2240
    Public Law 105-343-.................................         S. 2246
    Public Law 105-344-.................................         S. 2413
    Public Law 105-345-.................................         S. 2427
    Public Law 105-346-.................................         S. 2505
    Public Law 105-351-.................................          S. 538
    Public Law 105-352-.................................          S. 744
    Public Law 105-355..................................       H.R. 3910
                                                                H.R. 576
                                                               H.R. 1042
                                                       H.R. 1894/S. 1175
                                                                 S. 2086
                                                               H.R. 2776
                                                       H.R. 2958/S. 1665
                                                       H.R. 3047/S. 1990
                                                               H.R. 3220
                                                               H.R. 3499
                                                               H.R. 3522
                                                               H.R. 3883
                                                               H.R. 4211
                                                               H.R. 4287
                                                               H.R. 4320
                                                               H.R. 4483
    Public Law 105-356-.................................         S. 2232
    Public Law 105-359..................................       H.R. 4501
    Public Law 105-363-.................................         S. 1718
                                                               H.R. 4289
                                                               H.R. 4230
    Public Law 105-364-.................................         S. 2241
    Public Law 105-365-.................................         S. 2272
    Public Law 105-367-.................................         S. 2500
    Public Law 105-372..................................       H.R. 3267
    Public Law 105-376-.................................         S. 1132
    Public Law 105-378-.................................         S. 1408
                                                                 H.R. 60
                                                                H.R. 351
                                                               H.R. 2201
                                                               H.R. 4004
    Public Law 105-380-.................................         S. 2129
    Public Law 105-383-.................................        S. 2204*
                                                               H.R. 4235
    Public Law 105-384..................................       H.R. 3461
                                                               H.R. 3164
                                                               H.R. 3460
                                                               H.R. 3498
                                                               H.R. 4585
    Public Law 105-387-.................................          S. 391
    Public Law 105-391-.................................         S. 1693

*These bills were not referred to the Committee on Resources, but 
contain legislation that was referred to the Committee on Resources.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
                              ----------                              


                           Committee Prints -

    105-A--Compilation of Selected Laws concerning National 
Forests and Related Matters Text. January 1997.-
    105-B--Compilation of Selected Laws concerning National 
Parks and Related Matters Text. January 1997.
    105-C--Endangered Species Act of 1973 (as amended through 
December 1996) Text. January 1997. -
    105-D--Behind Closed Doors: The Abuse of Trust and 
Discretion in the Establishment of the Grand Staircase-
Escalante National Monument. November 1997.