H. Rept. 105-841 - 105th Congress (1997-1998)
January 02, 1999, As Reported by the National Security Committee

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House Report 105-841 - REPORT OF THE ACTIVITIES of the COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY for the ONE HUNDRED FIFTH CONGRESS




[House Report 105-841]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]




                                                 Union Calendar No. 482

105th Congress, 2d Session - - - - - - - - - - - - House Report 105-841


                        REPORT OF THE ACTIVITIES

                                 of the

                     COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY

                                for the

                       ONE HUNDRED FIFTH CONGRESS



 <GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT>



January 2, 1999.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                               --------

                    U.S. GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE                    
69-006                     WASHINGTON : 1999





                  HOUSE COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY

                       One Hundred Fifth Congress

               FLOYD D. SPENCE, South Carolina, Chairman

BOB STUMP, Arizona                   RONALD V. DELLUMS, California \1\
DUNCAN HUNTER, California            IKE SKELTON, Missouri \2\
JOHN R. KASICH, Ohio                 NORMAN SISISKY, Virginia
HERBERT H. BATEMAN, Virginia         JOHN M. SPRATT, Jr., South 
JAMES V. HANSEN, Utah                    Carolina
CURT WELDON, Pennsylvania            SOLOMON P. ORTIZ, Texas
JOEL HEFLEY, Colorado                OWEN PICKETT, Virginia
JIM SAXTON, New Jersey               LANE EVANS, Illinois
STEVE BUYER, Indiana                 GENE TAYLOR, Mississippi
TILLIE K. FOWLER, Florida            NEIL ABERCROMBIE, Hawaii
JOHN M. McHUGH, New York             FRANK TEJEDA, Texas \3\
JAMES TALENT, Missouri               MARTIN T. MEEHAN, Massachusetts
TERRY EVERETT, Alabama               ROBERT A. UNDERWOOD, Guam
ROSCOE G. BARTLETT, Maryland         JANE HARMAN, California
HOWARD ``BUCK'' McKEON, California   PAUL McHALE, Pennsylvania
RON LEWIS, Kentucky                  PATRICK J. KENNEDY, Rhode Island
J.C. WATTS, Jr., Oklahoma            ROD R. BLAGOJEVICH, Illinois
MAC THORNBERRY, Texas                SILVESTRE REYES, Texas
JOHN N. HOSTETTLER, Indiana          TOM ALLEN, Maine
SAXBY CHAMBLISS, Georgia             VIC SNYDER, Arkansas
VAN HILLEARY, Tennessee              JIM TURNER, Texas
JOE SCARBOROUGH, Florida             F. ALLEN BOYD, Jr., Florida
WALTER B. JONES, Jr., North          ADAM SMITH, Washington
    Carolina                         LORETTA SANCHEZ, California
LINDSEY GRAHAM, South Carolina       JAMES H. MALONEY, Connecticut
SONNY BONO, California \4\           MIKE McINTYRE, North Carolina
JIM RYUN, Kansas                     CIRO D. RODRIGUEZ, Texas \5\
MICHAEL PAPPAS, New Jersey           CYNTHIA A. McKINNEY, Georgia \6\
BOB RILEY, Alabama                   ELLEN O. TAUSCHER, California \7\
JIM GIBBONS, Nevada                  ROBERT BRADY, Pennsylvania \8\
BILL REDMOND, New Mexico \9\
KAY GRANGER, Texas \10\
MARY BONO, California \11\

                    Andrew K. Ellis, Staff Director
                 Heather Hescheles, Research Assistant

----------
\1\ Mr. Dellums resigned from the House of Representatives on February 
6, 1998.
\2\ Mr. Skelton was elected Ranking Member on February 9, 1998.
\3\ Mr. Tejeda died January 30, 1997.
\4\ Mr. Bono died January 6, 1998.
\5\ Mr. Rodriguez was elected to the committee on April 17, 1997.
\6\ Ms. McKinney was elected to the committee on May 14, 1997.
\7\ Mrs. Tauscher was elected to the committee on June 24, 1998.
\8\ Mr. Brady was elected to the committee on June 24, 1998.
\9\ Mr. Redmond was elected to the committee on July 23, 1997.
\10\ Ms. Granger was elected to the committee on February 11, 1998.
\11\ Mrs. Bono was elected to the committee on May 13, 1998.



                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                          House of Representatives,
                            Committee on National Security,
                                   Washington, DC, January 2, 1999.
Hon. Jeff Trandahl,
Clerk of the House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Trandahl: Pursuant to House Rule XI 1.(d), there 
is transmitted herewith the report of activities of the 
Committee on National Security for the 105th Congress.
            Sincerely,
                                         Floyd D. Spence, Chairman.

                                 (iii)

                                     


                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page

Powers and Duties, Committee on National Security--105th Congress     1
    Background...................................................     1
    Constitutional Powers and Duties.............................     2
    House Rules on Jurisdiction..................................     3
    Investigative Authority and Legislative Oversight............     3
Committee Rules..................................................     4
    Rules Governing Procedure....................................     4
Composition of the Committee on National Security--105th Congress    13
Subcommittees of the Committee on National Security--105th 
  Congress.......................................................    14
    Military Installations and Facilities Subcommittee...........    14
    Military Personnel Subcommittee..............................    14
    Military Procurement Subcommittee............................    15
    Military Readiness Subcommittee..............................    15
    Military Research and Development Subcommittee...............    16
Full Committee Panels............................................    17
    Special Oversight Panel on Morale, Welfare and Recreation....    17
    Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine...............    17
Committee Staff..................................................    19
Committee Meetings...............................................    21
Legislative Actions..............................................    21
    Legislation Enacted Into Law.................................    21
        Public Law 105-41 (H.R. 1585)............................    21
        Public Law 105-85 (H.R. 1119)............................    21
        Public Law 105-103 (H.R. 2813)...........................    24
        Public Law 105-107 (S. 858)..............................    24
        Public Law 105-129 (S. 1507).............................    25
        Public Law 105-152 (H.R. 2796)...........................    25
        Public Law 105-222 (H.R. 3731)...........................    25
        Public Law 105-261 (H.R. 3616)...........................    26
        Public Law 105-371 (H.R. 2263)...........................    28
    Legislation Reported but Not Enacted.........................    29
        H.R. 695.................................................    29
        H.R. 1778................................................    29
        H.R. 2786................................................    29
Oversight Activities.............................................    31
    Summary of Oversight Plan....................................    31
    Actions and Recommendations..................................    31
    Additional Oversight Activities..............................    35
Other Activities of the Full Committee...........................    47
    Budget Activity..............................................    47
    Full Committee Hearings......................................    47
    Special Oversight Panel on Morale, Welfare and Recreation....    50
    Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine...............    51
Other Activities of Subcommittees................................    53
    Military Installations and Facilities Subcommittee...........    53
    Military Personnel Subcommittee..............................    54
    Military Procurement Subcommittee............................    55
    Military Readiness Subcommittee..............................    56
    Military Research and Development Subcommittee...............    56
Publications.....................................................    59
    Committee Prints of Laws Relating to National Defense........    59
    Committee Prints.............................................    59
    Published Proceedings........................................    59
    House Reports................................................    62
    Public Laws..................................................    63
Press Releases...................................................    65



                                                 Union Calendar No. 482

105th Congress                                                   Report
  2d Session            HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                105-841

=======================================================================


 
 REPORT OF THE ACTIVITIES OF THE COMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY FOR THE 
                             105TH CONGRESS

                                _______
                                

January 2, 1999.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______


  Mr. Spence, from the Committee on National Security, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                                   ON

   POWERS AND DUTIES, COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY--105TH CONGRESS

                               Background

    The House Committee on Armed Services, a standing committee 
of Congress, was established on January 2, 1947, as a part of 
the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946 (60 Stat. 812), by 
merging the Committees on Military Affairs and Naval Affairs. 
The Committees on Military Affairs and Naval Affairs were 
established in 1882. In 1885, jurisdiction over military and 
naval appropriations was taken from the Committee on 
Appropriations and given to the Committees on Military Affairs 
and Naval Affairs, respectively. This policy continued until 
July 1, 1920, when jurisdiction over all appropriations was 
again placed in the Committee on Appropriations.
    In the 93rd Congress, following a study by the House Select 
Committee on Committees, the House passed H. Res. 988, the 
Committee Reform Amendment of 1974, to be effective January 3, 
1975. As a result of those amendments, the jurisdictional areas 
of the Committee on Armed Services remained essentially 
unchanged. However, oversight functions were amended to require 
each standing committee to review and study on a continuing 
basis all laws, programs, and government activities dealing 
with or involving international arms control and disarmament 
and the education of military dependents in school.
    The rules changes adopted by the House (H. Res. 5) on 
January 4, 1977, placed new responsibilities in the atomic 
energy field in the Armed Services Committee. Those 
responsibilities involved the national security aspects of 
atomic energy theretofore under the jurisdiction of the Joint 
Committee on Atomic Energy. Public Law 95-110, effective 
September 20, 1977, abolished the Joint Committee on Atomic 
Energy.
    With the adoption of H. Res. 658 on July 14, 1977, which 
established the House Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence, the jurisdiction of the Armed Service Committee 
over intelligence matters was diminished.
    That resolution gave the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence oversight responsibilities for intelligence and 
intelligence-related activities and programs of the U.S. 
Government. Specifically, the Permanent Select Committee on 
Intelligence has exclusive legislation jurisdiction regarding 
the Central Intelligence Agency and the director of Central 
Intelligence, including authorizations. Also, legislative 
jurisdiction over all intelligence and intelligence-related 
activities and programs was vested in the select committee 
except that other committees with a jurisdictional interest may 
request consideration of any such matters. Accordingly, as a 
matter of practice, the Armed Services Committee shared 
jurisdiction over the authorization process involving 
intelligence-related activities.
    The committee continues to have shared jurisdiction over 
military intelligence activities as set forth in Rule X (10) of 
the Rules of the House of Representatives.
    H. Res. 5, adopted by the House on January 4, 1995, 
established the Committee on National Security as the successor 
committee to the Committee on Armed Services, and granted the 
committee additional legislative and oversight authority over 
merchant marine academies, national security aspects of the 
merchant marine policy and programs, and interoceanic canals. 
H. Res. 5 also codified the existing jurisdiction of the 
committee over tactical intelligence matters and the 
intelligence related activities of the Department of Defense.

                    Constitutional Powers and Duties

    The powers and duties of Congress in relation to national 
defense matters stem from Article I, section 8, of the 
Constitution, which provides, among other things, that the 
Congress shall have power to:
          Raise and support armies;
          Provide and maintain a navy;
          Make rules for the government and regulation of the 
        land and naval forces;
          Provide for calling forth the militia;
          Provide for organizing, arming, and disciplining the 
        militia, and for governing such part of them as may be 
        employed in the service of the United States;
          Exercise exclusive legislation * * * over all places 
        purchased * * * for the erection of forts, magazines, 
        arsenals, dockyards, and other needful buildings; and
          Make all laws which shall be necessary and proper for 
        carrying into execution the foregoing powers.

                      House Rules on Jurisdiction

    Rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives 
established the jurisdiction and related functions for each 
standing committee. Under that rule, all bills, resolutions, 
and other matters relating to subjects within the jurisdiction 
of any standing shall be referred to such committee. The 
jurisdiction of the House Committee on National Security, 
pursuant to clause 2(k) of rule X is as follows:
          (1) Ammunition depots; forts; arsenals; Army, Navy, 
        and Air Force reservations and establishments.
          (2) Common defense generally.
          (3) Conservation, development, and use of naval 
        petroleum and oil shale reserves.
          (4) The Department of Defense generally, including 
        the Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force 
        generally.
          (5) Interoceanic canals generally, including measures 
        relating to the maintenance, operation, and 
        administration of interoceanic canals.
          (6) Merchant Marine Academy, and State Maritime 
        Academies.
          (7) Military applications of nuclear energy.
          (8) Tactical intelligence and intelligence related 
        activities of the Department of the Defense.
          (9) National security aspects of merchant marine, 
        including financial assistance for the construction and 
        operation of vessels, the maintenance of the U.S. 
        shipbuilding and ship repair industrial base, cabotage, 
        cargo preference and merchant marine officers and 
        seamen as these matters relate to the national 
        security.
          (10) Pay, promotion, retirement, and other benefits 
        and privileges of members of the armed forces.
          (11) Scientific research and development in support 
        of the armed services.
          (12) Selective service.
          (13) Size and composition of the Army, Navy, Marine 
        Corps, and Air Force.
          (14) Soldiers' and sailors' homes.
          (15) Strategic and critical materials necessary for 
        the common defense.
    In addition to its legislative jurisdiction and general 
oversight function, the committee has special oversight 
functions with respect to international arms control and 
disarmament and military dependents' education.

           Investigative Authority and Legislative Oversight

    H. Res. 988, 93rd Congress, the Committee Reform Amendments 
of 1974, amended rule XI, clause 1(b), of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, to provide general authority for each 
committee to investigate matters within its jurisdiction. That 
amendment established a permanent investigative authority and 
relieves the committee of the former requirement of obtaining a 
renewal of the investigative authority by a House resolution at 
the beginning of each Congress. H. Res. 988 also amended rule X 
of the Rules of the House of Representatives by requiring, as 
previously indicated, that the standing committees are to 
conduct legislative oversight in the area of their respective 
jurisdiction, and by establishing specific oversight functions 
for the Committee on Armed Services.
    H. Res. 129, approved by the House on May 1, 1997, provided 
funds for oversight responsibilities to be conducted in the 
105th Congress, pursuant to rule X, clause 2(b)(1), of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives (relating to general 
oversight responsibilities), clause 3(a) (relating to special 
oversight functions), and rule XI, clause 1(b) (relating to 
investigations and studies).

                            COMMITTEE RULES

    The committee held its organizational meeting on February 
5, 1997 and adopted the following rules governing procedure and 
rules for investigative hearings conducted by subcommittees.
    (H.N.S.C. No. 105-1)

                       Rules Governing Procedure

                   rule 1. application of house rules

    The Rules of the House of Representatives are the rules of 
the Committee on National Security (hereafter referred to in 
these rules as the ``Committee'') and its subcommittees so far 
as applicable.

                  rule 2. full committee meeting date

    (a) The Committee shall meet every Tuesday at 10:00 a.m., 
and at such other times as may be fixed by the chairman of the 
Committee (hereafter referred to in these rules as the 
``Chairman''), or by written request of members of the 
Committee pursuant to clause 2(b) of rule XI of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives.
    (b) A Tuesday meeting of the Committee may be dispensed 
with by the Chairman, but such action may be reversed by a 
written request of a majority of the members of the Committee.

                   rule 3. subcommittee meeting dates

    Each subcommittee is authorized to meet, hold hearings, 
receive evidence, and report to the Committee on all matters 
referred to it. Insofar as possible, meetings of the Committee 
and its subcommittees shall not conflict. A subcommittee 
chairman shall set meeting dates after consultation with the 
Chairman and the other subcommittee chairmen with a view toward 
avoiding simultaneous scheduling of committee and subcommittee 
meetings or hearings wherever possible.

                         rule 4. subcommittees

    The Committee shall be organized to consist of five 
standing subcommittees with the following jurisdictions:
    Subcommittee on Military Installations and Facilities: 
military construction; real estate acquisitions and disposals; 
housing and support; base closure; and related legislative 
oversight.
    Subcommittee on Military Personnel: military forces and 
authorized strengths; integration of active and reserve 
components; military personnel policy; compensation and other 
benefits; and related legislative oversight.
    Subcommittee on Military Procurement: the annual 
authorization for procurement of military weapon systems and 
components thereof, including full scale development and 
systems transition; military application of nuclear energy; and 
related legislative oversight.
    Subcommittee on Military Readiness: the annual 
authorization for operation and maintenance; the readiness and 
preparedness requirements of the defense establishment; and 
related legislative oversight.
    Subcommittee on Military Research and Development: the 
annual authorization for military research and development and 
related legislative oversight.

                        rule 5. committee panels

    (a) The Chairman may designate a panel of the Committee 
drawn from members of more than one subcommittee to inquire 
into and take testimony on a matter or matters that fall within 
the jurisdiction of more than one subcommittee and to report to 
the Committee.
    (b) No panel so appointed shall continue in existence for 
more than six months. A panel so appointed may, upon the 
expiration of six months, be reappointed by the Chairman.
    (c) No panel so appointed shall have legislative 
jurisdiction.

       rule 6. reference of legislation and subcommittee reports

    (a) The Chairman shall refer legislation and other matters 
to the appropriate subcommittee or to the full Committee.
    (b) Legislation shall be taken up for hearing only when 
called by the Chairman of the Committee or subcommittee, as 
appropriate, or by a majority of the Committee or subcommittee.
    (c) The Chairman, with approval of a majority vote of a 
quorum of the Committee, shall have authority to discharge a 
subcommittee from consideration of any measure or matter 
referred thereto and have such measure or matter considered by 
the Committee.
    (d) Reports and recommendations of a subcommittee may not 
be considered by the Committee until after the intervention of 
3 calendar days from the time the report is approved by the 
subcommittee and printed hearings thereon are available to the 
members of the Committee, except that this rule may be waived 
by a majority vote of a quorum of the Committee.

          rule 7. public announcement of hearings and meetings

    Pursuant to clause 2(g)(3) of rule XI of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Chairman of the Committee or of 
any subcommittee or panel shall make public announcement of the 
date, place, and subject matter of any committee, subcommittee 
or panel hearing at least one week before the commencement of 
the hearing. However, if the Chairman of the Committee or of 
any subcommittee or panel, with the concurrence of the ranking 
minority member of the Committee or of any subcommittee or 
panel, determines that there is good cause to begin the hearing 
sooner, or if the Committee subcommittee or panel so determines 
by majority vote, a quorum being present for the transaction of 
business, such chairman shall make the announcement at the 
earliest possible date. Any announcement made under this rule 
shall be promptly published in the Daily Digest and promptly 
entered into the committee scheduling service of the House 
Information Systems.

        rule 8. broadcasting of committee hearings and meetings

    Clause 3 of rule XI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives shall apply to the Committee.

            rule 9. meetings and hearings open to the public

    (a) Each hearing and meeting for the transaction of 
business, including the markup of legislation, conducted by the 
Committee or a subcommittee shall be open to the public except 
when the Committee or subcommittee, in open session and with a 
majority being present, determines by rollcall vote that all or 
part of the remainder of that hearing or meeting on that day 
shall be closed to the public because disclosure of testimony, 
evidence, or other matters to be considered would endanger the 
national security, would compromise sensitive law enforcement 
information, or would violate any law or rule of the House of 
Representatives. Notwithstanding the requirements of the 
preceding sentence, a majority of those present, there being in 
attendance no less than two members of the committee or 
subcommittee, may vote to close a hearing or meeting for the 
sole purpose of discussing whether testimony or evidence to be 
received would endanger the national security, would compromise 
sensitive law enforcement information, or would violate any law 
or rule of the House of Representatives. If the decision is to 
close, the vote must be by rollcall vote and in open session, 
there being a majority of the Committee or subcommittee 
present.
    (b) Whenever it is asserted that the evidence or testimony 
at a hearing or meeting may tend to defame, degrade, or 
incriminate any person, and notwithstanding the requirements of 
(a) and the provisions of clause 2(g)(2) of rule XI of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, such evidence or 
testimony shall be presented in closed session, if by a 
majority vote of those present, there being in attendance no 
less than two members of the Committee or subcommittee, the 
Committee or subcommittee determines that such evidence may 
tend to defame, degrade orincriminate any person. A majority of 
those present, there being in attendance no less than two members of 
the Committee or subcommittee, may also vote to close the hearing or 
meeting for the sole purpose discussing whether evidence or testimony 
to be received would tend to defame, degrade or incriminate any person. 
The Committee or subcommittee shall proceed to receive such testimony 
in open session only if a majority of the members of the Committee or 
subcommittee, a majority being present, determine that such evidence or 
testimony will not tend to defame, degrade or incriminate any person.
    (c) Notwithstanding the foregoing, and with the approval of 
the Chairman, each member of the Committee may designate by 
letter to the Chairman, a member of that member's personal 
staff with Top Secret security clearance to attend hearings of 
the Committee, or that member's subcommittee(s) which have been 
closed under the provisions of rule 9(a) above for national 
security purposes for the taking of testimony: Provided, That 
such staff member's attendance at such hearings is subject to 
the approval of the Committee or subcommittee as dictated by 
national security requirements at the time: Provided further, 
That this paragraph addresses hearings only and not briefings 
or meetings held under the provisions of paragraph (a) of this 
rule; and Provided further, That the attainment of any security 
clearances involved is the responsibility of individual 
members.
    (d) Pursuant to clause 2(g)(2) of rule XI of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, no member may be excluded from 
nonparticipatory attendance at any hearing of the Committee or 
a subcommittee, unless the House of Representatives shall by 
majority vote authorize the Committee or subcommittee, for 
purposes of a particular series of hearings on a particular 
article of legislation or on a particular subject of 
investigation, to close its hearings to members by the same 
procedures designated in this rule for closing hearings to the 
public: Provided, however, That the Committee or the 
subcommittee may by the same procedure vote to close up to 5 
additional consecutive days of hearings.

                            rule 10. quorum

    (a) For purposes of taking testimony and receiving 
evidence, two Members shall constitute a quorum.
    (b) One-third of the Members of the Committee or 
subcommittee shall constitute a quorum for taking any action, 
with the following exceptions, in which case a majority of the 
Committee or subcommittee shall constitute a quorum:
          (1) Reporting a measure or recommendation;
          (2) Closing committee or subcommittee meetings and 
        hearings to the public; and
          (3) Authorizing the issuance of subpoenas.
    (c) No measure or recommendation shall be reported to the 
House of Representatives unless a majority of the Committee is 
actually present.

                     rule 11. the five-minute rule

    (a) The time any one member may address the Committee or 
subcommittee on any measure or matter under consideration shall 
not exceed 5 minutes and then only when the member has been 
recognized by the Chairman or subcommittee chairman, as 
appropriate, except that this time limit may be exceeded by 
unanimous consent. Any member, upon request, shall be 
recognized for not to exceed 5 minutes to address the Committee 
or subcommittee on behalf of an amendment which the member has 
offered to any pending bill or resolution.
    (b) Members present at a meeting of the Committee or 
subcommittee when a meeting is originally convened will be 
recognized by the Chairman or subcommittee chairman, as 
appropriate, in order of seniority. Those members arriving 
subsequently will be recognized in order of their arrival. 
Notwithstanding the foregoing, the Chairman and the ranking 
minority member will take precedence upon their arrival. In 
recognizing members to question witnesses in this fashion, the 
Chairman shall take into consideration the ratio of the 
majority to minority members present and shall establish the 
order of recognition for questioning in such a manner as not to 
disadvantage the members of the majority.

                      rule 12. subpoena authority

    (a) For the purpose of carrying out any of its functions 
and duties under rules X and XI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives, the Committee and any subcommittee is 
authorized (subject to subparagraph (b)(1) of this paragraph):
          (1) to sit and act at such times and places within 
        the United States, whether the House is in session, has 
        recessed, or has adjourned, and to hold hearings, and
          (2) to require by subpoena, or otherwise, the 
        attendance and testimony of such witnesses and the 
        production of such books, records, correspondence, 
        memorandums, papers and documents as it deems 
        necessary. The Chairman of the Committee, or any member 
        designated by the Chairman, may administer oaths to any 
        witness.
    (b)(1) A subpoena may be authorized and issued by the 
Committee, or any subcommittee with the concurrence of the full 
Committee Chairman, under subparagraph (a)(2) in the conduct of 
any investigation, or series of investigations or activities, 
only when authorized by a majority of the members voting, a 
majority of the Committee or subcommittee being present. 
Authorized subpoenas shall be signed only by the Chairman, or 
by any member designated by the Chairman.
    (2) Pursuant to clause 2(m) of rule XI of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, compliance with any subpoena issued 
by the Committee or any subcommittee under subparagraph (a)(2) 
may be enforced only as authorized or directed by the House.
    (c) No witness served with a subpoena by the Committee 
shall be required against his or her will to be photographed at 
any hearing or to give evidence or testimony while the 
broadcasting of that hearing, by radio or television, is being 
conducted. At the request of any such witness who does not wish 
to be subjected to radio, television, or still photography 
coverage, all lenses shall be covered and all microphones used 
for coverage turned off. This subparagraph is supplementary to 
clause 2(k)(5) of rule XI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives, relating to the protection of the rights of 
witnesses.

                      rule 13. witness statements

    (a) Any prepared statement to be presented by a witness to 
the Committee or a subcommittee shall be submitted to the 
Committee or subcommittee at least 48 hours in advance of 
presentation and shall be distributed to all members of the 
Committee or subcommittee at least 24 hours in advance of 
delivery. If a prepared statement contains security information 
bearing a classification of secret or higher, the statement 
shall be made available in the Committee rooms to all members 
of the Committee or subcommittee at least 24 hours in advance 
of delivery; however, no such statement shall be removed from 
the Committee offices. The requirement of this rule may be 
waived by a majority vote of a quorum of the Committee or 
subcommittee, as appropriate.
    (b) The Committee and each subcommittee shall require each 
witness who is to appear before it to file with the Committee 
in advance of his or her appearance a written statement of the 
proposed testimony and to limit the oral presentation at such 
appearance to a brief summary of his or her argument.

               rule 14. administering oaths to witnesses

    (a) The Chairman, or any member designated by the Chairman, 
may administer oaths to any witness.
    (b) Witnesses, when sworn, shall subscribe to the following 
oath:

    Do you solemnly swear (or affirm) that the testimony you 
will give before this Committee (or subcommittee) in the 
matters now under consideration will be the truth, the whole 
truth, and nothing but the truth, so help you God?

                   rule 15. questioning of witnesses

    (a) When a witness is before the Committee or a 
subcommittee, members of the Committee or subcommittee may put 
questions to the witness only when they have been recognized by 
the Chairman or subcommittee chairman, as appropriate, for that 
purpose.
    (b) Members of the Committee or subcommittee who so desire 
shall have not to exceed 5 minutes to interrogate each witness 
until such time as each member has had an opportunity to 
interrogate such witness; thereafter, additional time for 
questioning witnesses by members is discretionary with the 
Chairman or subcommittee chairman, as appropriate.
    (c) Questions put to witnesses before the Committee or 
subcommittee shall be pertinent to the measure or matter that 
may be before the Committee or subcommittee for consideration.

         rule 16. publication of committee hearings and markups

    The transcripts of those hearings and markups conducted by 
the Committee or a subcommittee which are decided to be 
officially published will be published in verbatim form, with 
the material requested for the record inserted at that place 
requested, or at the end of the record, as appropriate. Any 
requests to correct any errors, other than those in 
transcription, or disputed errors in transcription, will be 
appended to the record, and the appropriate place where the 
change is requested will be footnoted.

                     rule 17. voting and rollcalls

    (a) Voting on a measure or matter may be by rollcall vote, 
division vote, voice vote, or unanimous consent.
    (b) A rollcall of the members may be had upon the request 
of one-fifth of a quorum present.
    (c) No vote by any member of the Committee or a 
subcommittee with respect to any measure or matter may be cast 
by proxy.
    (d) In the event of a vote or votes, when a member is in 
attendance at any other Committee, subcommittee, or conference 
committee meeting during that time, the necessary absence of 
that member shall be so recorded in the rollcall record, upon 
timely notification to the Chairman by that member.

                         rule 18. private bills

    No private bill may be reported by the Committee if there 
are two or more dissenting votes. Private bills so rejected by 
the Committee may not be reconsidered during the same Congress 
unless new evidence sufficient to justify a new hearing has 
been presented to the Congress.

                       rule 19. committee reports

    (a) If, at the time of approval of any measure or matter by 
the Committee, any member of the Committee gives timely notice 
of intention to file supplemental, minority, additional or 
dissenting views, that member shall be entitled to not less 
than 3 calendar days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal 
holidays) in which to file such views, in writing and signed by 
that member, with the staff director of the Committee. All such 
views so filed by one or more members of the Committee shall be 
included within, and shall be a part of, the report filed by 
the Committee with respect to that measure or matter.
    (b) With respect to each rollcall vote on a motion to 
report any measure or matter, and on any amendment offered to 
the measure or matter, the total number of votes cast for and 
against, the names of those voting for and against, and a brief 
description of the question, shall be included in the committee 
report on the measure or matter.

                        rule 20. points of order

    No point of order shall lie with respect to any measure 
reported by the Committee or any subcommittee on the ground 
that hearings on such measure were not conducted in accordance 
with the provisions of the rules of the Committee; except that 
a point of order on that ground may be made by any member of 
the Committee or subcommittee which reported the measure if, in 
the Committee or subcommittee, such point of order was (a) 
timely made and (b) improperly overruled or not properly 
considered.

           rule 21. public inspection of committee rollcalls

    The result of each rollcall in any meeting of the Committee 
shall be made available by the Committee for inspection by the 
public at reasonable times in the offices of the Committee. 
Information so available for public inspection shall include a 
description of the amendment, motion, order, or other 
proposition and the name of each member voting for and each 
member voting against such amendment, motion, order, or 
proposition and the names of those members present but not 
voting.

          rule 22. protection of national security information

    (a) All national security information bearing a 
classification of secret or higher which has been received by 
the Committee or a subcommittee shall be deemed to have been 
received in executive session and shall be given appropriate 
safekeeping.
    (b) The Chairman of the Committee shall, with the approval 
of a majority of the Committee, establish such procedures as in 
his judgment may be necessary to prevent the unauthorized 
disclosure of any national security information received 
classified as secret or higher. Such procedures shall, however, 
ensure access to this information by any member of the 
Committee or any other Member of the House of Representatives 
who has requested the opportunity to review such material.

                      rule 23. committee staffing

    The staffing of the Committee and the standing 
subcommittees shall be subject to the rules of the House of 
Representatives.

                       rule 24. committee records

    The records of the Committee at the National Archives and 
Records Administration shall be made available for public use 
in accordance with rule XXXVI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives. The Chairman shall notify the ranking minority 
member of any decision, pursuant to clause 3(b)(3) or clause 
4(b) of rule XXXVI, to withhold a record otherwise available, 
and the matter shall be presented to the Committee for a 
determination on the written request of any member of the 
Committee.

               rule 25. investigative hearing procedures

    Clause 2(k) of rule XI of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives shall apply to the Committee.



   COMPOSITION OF THE COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY--105TH CONGRESS

    Pursuant to H. Res. 12, election of majority members, and 
H. Res. 13, election of minority members (both adopted January 
7, 1997), the following members served on the Committee on 
National Security in the 105th Congress:

               FLOYD D. SPENCE, South Carolina, Chairman               

BOB STUMP, Arizona, Vice Chairman  RONALD DELLUMS, California \1\      
DUNCAN HUNTER, California          IKE SKELTON, Missouri \2\           
JOHN R. KASICH, Ohio               NORMAN SISISKY, Virginia            
HERBERT H. BATEMAN, Virginia       JOHN M. SPRATT, Jr., South Carolina 
JAMES V. HANSEN, Utah              SOLOMON P. ORTIZ, Texas             
CURT WELDON, Pennsylvania          OWEN PICKETT, Virginia              
JOEL HEFLEY, Colorado              LANE EVANS, Illinois                
JIM SAXTON, New Jersey             GENE TAYLOR, Mississippi            
STEVE BUYER, Indiana               NEIL ABERCROMBIE, Hawaii            
TILLIE K. FOWLER, Florida          FRANK TEJEDA, Texas \3\             
JOHN M. McHUGH, New York           MARTIN T. MEEHAN, Massachusetts     
JAMES TALENT, Missouri             ROBERT A. UNDERWOOD, Guam           
TERRY EVERETT, Alabama             JANE HARMAN, California             
ROSCOE G. BARTLETT, Maryland       PAUL McHALE, Pennsylvania           
HOWARD ``BUCK'' McKEON, California PATRICK J. KENNEDY, Rhode Island    
RON LEWIS, Kentucky                ROD R. BLAGOJEVICH, Illinois        
J.C. WATTS, Jr., Oklahoma          SILVESTRE REYES, Texas              
MAC THORNBERRY, Texas              TOM ALLEN, Maine                    
JOHN N. HOSTETTLER, Indiana        VIC SNYDER, Arkansas                
SAXBY CHAMBLISS, Georgia           JIM TURNER, Texas                   
VAN HILLEARY, Tennessee            F. ALLEN BOYD, Jr., Florida         
JOE SCARBOROUGH, Florida           ADAM SMITH, Washington              
WALTER B. JONES, Jr., North        LORETTA SANCHEZ, California         
Carolina                           JAMES H. MALONEY, Connecticut       
LINDSEY GRAHAM, South Carolina     MIKE McINTYRE, North Carolina       
SONNY BONO, California \4\         CIRO D. RODRIGUEZ, Texas \5\        
JIM RYUN, Kansas                   CYNTHIA A. McKINNEY, Georgia \6\    
MICHAEL PAPPAS, New Jersey         ELLEN O. TAUSCHER, California \7\   
BOB RILEY, Alabama                 ROBERT BRADY, Pennsylvania \8\      
JIM GIBBONS, Nevada                                                    
BILL REDMOND, New Mexico \9\                                           
KAY GRANGER, Texas \10\                                                
MARY BONO, California \11\                                             


----------
\1\ Mr. Dellums resigned from the House of Representatives on February 
6, 1998.
\2\ Mr. Skelton was elected as Ranking Member on February 9, 1998.
\3\ Mr. Tejeda died January 30, 1997.
\4\ Mr. Bono died January 6, 1998.
\5\ Mr. Rodriguez was elected to the committee on April 17, 1997.
\6\ Ms. McKinney was elected to the committee on May 14, 1997.
\7\ Mrs. Tauscher was elected to the committee on June 24, 1998.
\8\ Mr. Brady was elected to the committee on June 24, 1998.
\9\ Mr. Redmond was elected to the committee on July 23, 1997.
\10\ Ms. Granger was elected to the committee on February 11, 1998.
\11\ Mrs. Bono was elected to the committee on May 13, 1998.


  SUBCOMMITTEES OF THE COMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY--105TH CONGRESS

    The following subcommittees were established at the 
committee's organizational meeting on February 5, 1997:

           Military Installations and Facilities Subcommittee

    Jurisdiction pursuant to Committee Rule 4--Military 
construction; real estate acquisitions and disposals; housing 
and support; base closure; and related legislative oversight.

                         Mr. HEFLEY, Chairman                          

Mr. McHUGH                        Mr. ABERCROMBIE                      
Mr. HOSTETTLER                    Mr. SISISKY                          
Mr. HILLEARY, Vice Chairman       Mr. ORTIZ                            
Mr. SCARBOROUGH                   Mr. UNDERWOOD                        
Mr. STUMP                         Mr. REYES                            
Mr. SAXTON                        Mr. SNYDER                           
Mr. BUYER                         Mr. BOYD                             
Mrs. FOWLER                       Mr. SMITH                            
Mr. EVERETT                                                            

                    Military Personnel Subcommittee

    Jurisdiction pursuant to Committee Rule 4--Military forces 
and authorized strengths; integration of active and reserve 
components; military personnel policy; compensation and other 
benefits; and related legislative oversight.

                         Mr. BUYER, Chairman                           

Mr. TALENT                        Mr. TAYLOR                           
Mr. BARTLETT                      Mr. SKELTON \1\                      
Mr. LEWIS                         Mr. PICKETT                          
Mr. WATTS, Vice Chairman          Mr. MEEHAN \2\                       
Mr. THORNBERRY                    Mr. UNDERWOOD                        
Mr. GRAHAM                        Ms. HARMAN                           
Mr. BONO \3\                      Mr. KENNEDY                          
Mr. RYUN                          Mr. MALONEY                          
Ms. GRANGER \4\                   Mr. BRADY \5\                        
Mrs. BONO \6\                                                          

----------
\1\ Mr. Skelton resigned from the Military Personnel Subcommittee on 
March 17, 1998.
\2\ Mr. Meehan was elected to the Military Personnel Subcommittee on 
March 17, 1998.
\3\ Mr. Bono died January 6, 1998.
\4\ Ms. Granger was elected to the Military Readiness Subcommittee on 
March 17, 1998.
\5\ Mr. Brady was elected to the Military Personnel Subcommittee on 
July 7, 1998.
\6\ Mrs. Bono was elected to the Military Personnel Subcommittee on 
June 24, 1998.

                   Military Procurement Subcommittee

    Jurisdiction pursuant to Committee Rule 4--Annual 
authorization for procurement of military weapon systems and 
components thereof, including full-scale development and 
systems transition; military application of nuclear energy; and 
related legislative oversight.

                         Mr. HUNTER, Chairman

Mr. SPENCE                        Mr. SISISKY                          
Mr. STUMP                         Mr. SKELTON                          
Mr. HANSEN                        Mr. DELLUMS \1\                      
Mr. SAXTON                        Mr. SPRATT                           
Mr. TALENT                        Mr. EVANS                            
Mr. EVERETT                       Mr. BLAGOJEVICH                      
Mr. McKEON                        Mr. ALLEN                            
Mr. LEWIS, Vice Chairman          Mr. SNYDER                           
Mr. WATTS                         Mr. TURNER                           
Mr. THORNBERRY                    Mr. BOYD                             
Mr. GRAHAM                        Mr. SMITH                            
Mr. BONO \2\                      Mr. MALONEY                          
Mr. RYUN                          Mr. McINTYRE                         
Mr. PAPPAS                                                             
Mr. GIBBONS \3\                                                        

----------
\1\ Mr. Dellums resigned from the House of Representatives on February 
6, 1998.
\2\ Mr. Bono died January 6, 1998.
\3\ Mr. Gibbons was elected to the Military Readiness Subcommittee on 
March 17, 1998.

                    Military Readiness Subcommittee

    Jurisdiction pursuant to Committee Rule 4--Annual 
authorization for operation and maintenance; the readiness and 
preparedness requirements of the defense establishment; and 
related legislative oversight.

                          Mr. BATEMAN, Chairman

Mr. KASICH                        Mr. ORTIZ                            
Mrs. FOWLER, Vice Chairman        Mr. SISISKY                          
Mr. CHAMBLISS                     Mr. PICKETT                          
Mr. JONES                         Mr. EVANS                            
Mr. RILEY                         Mr. TAYLOR                           
Mr. GIBBONS                       Mr. MEEHAN \1\                       
Mr. HUNTER                        Mr. UNDERWOOD                        
Mr. HANSEN                        Mr. McHALE                           
Mr. WELDON                        Mr. RODRIGUEZ \2\                    
Mr. McKEON                        Ms. McKINNEY \3\                     
Mr. REDMOND \4\                   Mrs. TAUSCHER \5\                    

----------
\1\ Mr. Meehan resigned from the Military Readiness Subcommittee on 
March 17, 1998.
\2\ Mr. Rodriguez was elected to the Military Readiness Subcommittee on 
May 21, 1997.
\3\ Ms. McKinney was elected to the Military Readiness Subcommittee on 
September 9, 1997.
\4\ Mr. Redmond was elected to the Military Readiness Subcommittee on 
September 9, 1997.
\5\ Mrs. Tauscher was elected to the Military Readiness Subcommittee on 
September 9, 1997.

             Military Research and Development Subcommittee

    Jurisdiction pursuant to Committee Rule 4--Annual 
authorization for military research and development and related 
legislative oversight.

                          Mr. WELDON, Chairman                         

Mr. BARTLETT                      Mr. PICKETT                          
Mr. KASICH                        Mr. ABERCROMBIE                      
Mr. BATEMAN                       Mr. MEEHAN                           
Mr. HEFLEY                        Ms. HARMAN                           
Mr. McHUGH                        Mr. McHALE                           
Mr. HOSTETTLER                    Mr. KENNEDY                          
Mr. CHAMBLISS                     Mr. BLAGOJEVICH                      
Mr. HILLEARY                      Mr. REYES                            
Mr. SCARBOROUGH                   Mr. ALLEN                            
Mr. JONES, Vice Chairman          Mr. TURNER                           
Mr. PAPPAS                        Ms. SANCHEZ                          
Mr. RILEY                         Mr. RODRIGUEZ \1\                    
Mr. GIBBONS \2\                                                        
Mr. REDMOND \3\                                                        
Ms. GRANGER \4\                                                        

----------
\1\ Mr. Rodriguez was elected to the Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee on September 9, 1997.
\2\ Ms. Gibbons resigned from the Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee on March 17, 1998.
\3\ Mr. Redmond was elected to the Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee on September 9, 1997.
\4\ Ms. Granger was elected to the Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee on March 17, 1998.

                         FULL COMMITTEE PANELS

    The following full committee panels were appointed February 
4, 1997:

       Special Oversight Panel on Morale, Welfare and Recreation

    Purpose--Oversight responsibility for all aspects of 
nonappropriated fund activities, including appropriated funding 
in support of those activities, within the Department of 
Defense, including commissaries, exchanges, clubs and related 
activities.

                          Mr. McHUGH, Chairman

Mr. STUMP                         Mr. MEEHAN                           
Mr. BATEMAN                       Mr. SISISKY                          
Mr. BARLETT                       Mr. ORTIZ                            
Mr. WATTS                         Mr. PICKETT                          
Mr. CHAMBLISS, Vice Chairman      Mr. UNDERWOOD                        
Mr. SCARBOROUGH                   Ms. SANCHEZ \1\                      
Mr. JONES                                                              

----------
\1\ Ms. Sanchez was elected to the Special Oversight Panel on Morale, 
Welfare and Recreation on February 27, 1998.

             Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine

    Purpose--Oversight responsibility for all issues, including 
funding, related to the national security aspects of the 
Merchant Marine.

                         Mr. BATEMAN, Chairman

Mr. HUNTER                        Mr. UNDERWOOD                        
Mr. WELDON                        Mr. TAYLOR                           
Mr. SAXTON                        Mr. ABERCROMBIE                      
Mrs. FOWLER                       Ms. HARMAN                           
Mr. SCARBOROUGH, Vice Chairman    Mr. KENNEDY                          
  (vacancy)                       Mr. ALLEN                            
  (vacancy)                       Mr. SMITH                            


                            COMMITTEE STAFF

    By committee resolution adopted at the organizational 
meeting on February 5, 1997, or by authority of the Chairman, 
the following persons were appointed to the staff of the 
committee during the 105th Congress:

Andrew K. Ellis, Staff Director
Robert S. Rangel, Deputy Staff Director
Henry J. Schweiter, General Counsel (resigned January 6, 1998)
Rita D. Thompson, Professional Staff Member
Brenda J. Wright, Professional Staff Member
Kathleen A. Lipovac, Professional Staff Member
Frank A. Barnes, Staff Assistant
Betty B. Gray, Staff Assistant
Peggy Cosseboom, Staff Assistant
Marilyn A. Elrod, Professional Staff Member (resigned August 31, 1998)
Peter M. Steffes, Professional Staff Member
Ernest B. Warrington, Jr., Staff Assistant
Diane W. Bowman, Staff Assistant
Steven A. Thompson, Professional Staff Member
Michael R. Higgins, Professional Staff Member
Tracy A. Walter, Staff Assistant (resigned July 31, 1998)
Jean D. Reed, Professional Staff Member
Douglas C. Roach, Professional Staff Member (resigned January 10, 1997)
Christopher A. Williams, Professional Staff Member (resigned 
  February 2, 1997)
George O. Withers, Professional Staff Member
Sheila A. McDowell, Staff  Assistant (resigned September 2, 1998)
Karen V. Steube, Staff Assistant (resigned April 10, 1998)
Jeffrey M. Schwartz, Professional Staff Member (resigned October 6, 1997)
Philip W. Grone, Professional Staff Member
Andrea K. Aquino, Professional Staff Member (resigned July 17, 1998)
H. Lee Halterman, Counsel (resigned December 31, 1997)
Dudley L. Tademy, Professional Staff Member
John D. Chapla, Professional Staff Member
Hugh N. (Rusty) Johnston, Jr., Counsel (resigned February 22, 1998)
Stephen P. Ansley, Professional Staff Member
Donna L. Hoffmeier, Professional Staff Member (resigned
  November 30, 1998)
Douglas H. Necessary, Professional Staff Member
Dionel M. Aviles, Professional Staff Member
Peter V. Pry, Professional Staff Member
David J. Trachtenberg, Professional Staff Member
Jason E. Bruzdzinski, Professional Staff Member (resigned March 6, 1998)
Thomas M. Donnelly, Professional Staff Member
Rebecca J. Anfinson, Staff Assistant
William M. Marsh, Staff Assistant (resigned August 3, 1997)
Maureen P. Cragin, Press Secretary
Laura R. Haas, Executive Assistant to the Staff Director (resigned 
  June 19, 1998)
Heather L. Hescheles, Research Assistant
R. Christian Barger, Staff Assistant (resigned July 28, 1998)
Roger M. Smith, Professional Staff Member
B. Ryan Vaart, Press Assistant
Laura M. Billings, Staff Assistant (resigned July 11, 1997)
Bridget M. Keator, Staff Assistant (resigned March 19, 1998)
Peter J. Berry, Professional Staff Member
Mieke Y. Eoyang, Professional Staff Member
Subrata Ghoshroy, Professional Staff Member (resigned March 31, 1998)
Robert W. Lautrup, Professional Staff Member
Joseph F. Boessen, Professional Staff Member (appointed January 3, 1997)
Christian P. Zur, Professional Staff Member (appointed January 31, 1997)
John F. Sullivan, Professional Staff Member (appointed February 1, 1997)
Nancy M. Warner, Staff Assistant (appointed February 2, 1997)
Aaron M. McKay, Staff Assistant (appointed February 19, 1977; 
  resigned May 9, 1997)
Lara L. Roholt, Professional Staff Member (appointed February 24, 1997;
  resigned December 18, 1998)
Brian R. Green, Professional Staff Member (appointed March 31, 1997)
Noah L. Simon, Staff Assistant (appointed June 2, 1997)
Michael A. Khatchadurian, Staff Assistant (appointed June 9, 1997)
Thomas E. Hawley, Professional Staff Member (appointed July 1, 1997)
Thomas P. Glakas, Professional Staff Member (appointed January 5, 1998)
Michelle L. Spencer, Research Assistant (appointed January 12, 1998)
Christopher T. Peace, Professional Staff Member (appointed
  March 5, 1998)
William H. Natter, Professional Staff Member (appointed April 1, 1998)
Monica M. Barron, Executive Assistant to the Staff Director (appointed
  April 9, 1998)
Jeremy D. Wagner, Staff Assistant (appointed June 8, 1998)
Sheila A. Dearybury, Counsel (appointed July 20, 1998)
Erica A. Striebel, Staff Assistant (appointed July 20, 1998)
Ashley D. Godwin, Staff Assistant (appointed July 27, 1998)
Elizabeth A. Sharp, Staff Assistant (appointed August 19, 1998)
John J. Pollard III, Professional Staff Member (appointed
  September 1, 1998)

                           COMMITTEE MEETINGS

    A total of 155 meetings were held by the Committee on 
National Security, its subcommittees and panels during the 
105th Congress. The Committee held 18 joint meetings. A 
breakdown of the meetings and briefings follows:

Full Committee................................................        37
Subcommittees.................................................
    Military Installations and Facilities.....................        14
    Military Personnel........................................        19
    Military Procurement......................................        27
    Military Readiness........................................        19
    Military Research and Development.........................        29
Full Committee Panels.........................................
    Special Oversight Panel on Morale, Welfare and Recreation.         6
    Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine............         4

                          LEGISLATIVE ACTIONS

                      Legislation Enacted Into Law

                     PUBLIC LAW 105-41 (H.R. 1585)

  To allow postal patrons to contribute to funding for breast cancer 
  research through the voluntary purchase of certain specially issued 
          United States postage stamps, and for other purposes

    Referred to as the Stamp Out Breast Cancer Act, H.R. 1585 
requires the U.S. Postal Service to establish a special rate of 
postage for first-class mail to be offered as an alternative 
that patrons may use voluntarily to contribute to funding for 
breast cancer research. This measure was referred to the 
Committee on Government Reform and Oversight, as well as 
Committees on Commerce, and National Security. H.R. 1585 passed 
the House by recorded vote on July 22, 1997 under suspension of 
the rules and passed the Senate July 24, 1997 by unanimous 
consent. H.R. 1585 was signed by the President and became law 
on August 13, 1997.
    Date of enactment: August 13, 1997.

                     PUBLIC LAW 105-85 (H.R. 1119)

To authorize appropriations for fiscal years 1998 and 1999 for military 
    activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military 
   personnel strengths for fiscal years 1998 and 1999, and for other 
                                purposes

    Public Law 105-85 authorizes funds totaling 
$268,301,837,000 for national defense functions fiscal year 
1998 and provides a budget authority level of $268,196,880,000.

Division A

    Division A of Public Law 105-85 authorizes funds for fiscal 
year 1998 for the Department of Defense.
    Subtitle A of Title I authorizes $45,773,761,000 for 
procurement of aircraft, missiles, weapons and tracked combat 
vehicles, ammunition, and other procurement for the armed 
forces, Defense Agencies and reserve components of the armed 
forces.
    Subtitles B through E of Title I establish additional 
program requirements, restrictions, and limitations, authorize 
transfer of or earmark funds for specified programs for the 
armed forces, including Army helicopter modernization and M113 
vehicle modifications; Navy new attack submarine, and CVN-77 
nuclear aircraft carrier ship programs; Air Force B-2 bomber 
and ALR radar warning receiver programs, as well as NATO joint 
surveillance/target attack radar system (JSTARS).
    Subtitle A of Title II authorizes $36,536,952,000 for 
research, development, test and evaluation for the armed forces 
and the defense agencies, including amounts for basic research 
and development-related matters.
    Subtitle B of Title II establishes certain program 
requirements, restrictions, and limitations on 7 separate 
research and development-related matters.
    Subtitles C through F of Title II address ballistic missile 
defense programs, miscellaneous reviews, studies, reports and 
other matters.
    Subtitle A of Title III authorizes $93,794,227,000 for 
operation and maintenance (O&M) and $2,031,900,000 for working 
capital funds for the armed forces and defense agencies, Armed 
Forces Retirement Home; and for the transfer from National 
Defense Stockpile Transaction Fund.
    Subtitles B through G of Title III address military 
readiness issues; environmental provisions, depot-level 
activities, commissaries and nonappropriated fund 
instrumentalities, as well as other matters such as the program 
to investigate fraud, waste and abuse within the Department of 
Defense.
    Title IV provides military personnel authorizations for the 
active and reserve forces and for military training student 
loans for fiscal year 1998 and authorizes appropriations of 
$69,470,505,000 for military personnel for fiscal year 1998. 
The end strengths for active duty personnel for fiscal year 
1998 are as follows:
          Army, 495,000
          Navy, 390,802
          Marine Corps, 174,000
          Air Force, 371,577
    The Selected Reserve end strengths for fiscal year 1998 are 
as follows:
          Army National Guard, 361,516,000
          Army Reserve, 208,000
          Naval Reserve, 94,294
          Marine Corps Reserve, 42,000
          Air National Guard, 108,002
          Air Force Reserve, 73,447
          Coast Guard Reserve, 8,000
    The end strengths for reserves on active duty in support of 
the reserve components for fiscal year 1998 are as follows:
          Army National Guard, 23,310
          Army Reserve, 11,500
          Naval Reserve, 16,136
          Marine Corps Reserve, 2,559
          Air National Guard, 10,671
          Air Force Reserve, 867
    Title V sets military personnel policy, including 
provisions that address officer personnel policy; the reserve 
components; military technicians; improving recruit quality and 
reducing recruit attrition; military education and training; 
commission on military training and gender-related issues; 
decorations and awards; military justice matters and other 
matters such as sexual harassment investigations and reports.
    Title VI addresses compensation and other personnel 
benefits, including pay and allowances; bonuses and special and 
incentive pays; travel and transportation allowances; retired 
pay, survivor benefits and related matters.
    Title VII contains military health care provisions, 
including health care services; the TRICARE program; uniformed 
services treatment facilities; changes to existing laws 
regarding health care management and other matters.
    Title VIII addresses acquisition policy, acquisition reform 
and other matters such as the use of major range and test 
facility installations by commercial entities.
    Title IX contains Department of Defense organization and 
management provisions, including Department of Defense 
personnel management, schools and centers and intelligence-
related matters.
    Title X addresses general provisions relating to financial 
matters; naval vessels and shipyards; counter-drug activities; 
miscellaneous report requirements and repeals; matters relating 
to terrorism, matters relating to defense, and other matters.
    Title XI addresses Department of Defense civilian 
personnel.
    Title XII concerns matters relating to other nations 
including United States armed forces in Bosnia and Herzegovina; 
export controls on high performance computers, and other 
matters such as defense burdensharing.
    Title XIII addresses arms control and related matters.
    Title XIV concerns Cooperative Threat Reduction with states 
of Former Soviet Union.
    Title XV addresses Federal Charter for the Air Force 
Sergeants Association.

Division B

    Division B of Public Law 105-85 authorizes appropriations 
in the amount of $9,173,748,000 for military construction and 
family housing in support of the active forces, the reserve 
components and the NATO security investment program for fiscal 
year 1998. In addition Division B contains military 
construction program and military family housing changes; real 
property and facilities administration; defense base closure 
and realignment; as well as land conveyances and Sikes Act 
improvement.

Division C

    Division C of Public Law 105-85 authorizes appropriations 
in the amount of $11,520,344,000 for Department of Energy 
national security programs for fiscal year 1998. Division C 
includes an authorization for the Defense Nuclear Facilities 
Safety Board; the National Defense Stockpile; Naval Petroleum 
Reserves; the Panama Canal Commission, and the Maritime 
Administration.
    The Committee on National Security reported H.R. 1119, 
amended, to the House on June 16, 1997. The measure passed the 
House, amended, on June 25, 1997, and the Senate on July 11, 
1997. After the House agreed to a conference report on October 
28, 1997, and the Senate on November 6, 1997, H.R. 1119 was 
signed by the President and became law on November 18, 1997.
    (H. Rept. 105-132; S. Rept. 105-29; H. Rept. 105-340; 
H.N.S.C. 105-2; H.N.S.C. 105-3; H.N.S.C. 105-4; H.N.S.C. 105-5; 
H.N.S.C. 105-6; H.N.S.C. 105-7; H.N.S.C. 105-8; H.N.S.C. 105-
12; H.N.S.C. 105-13)
    Date of enactment: November 18, 1997.

                     PUBLIC LAW 105-103 (H.R. 2813)

To waive time limitations specified by law in order to allow the Medal 
 of Honor to be awarded to Robert R. Ingram of Jacksonville, Florida, 
  for acts of valor while a Navy Hospital Corpsman in the Republic of 
                  Vietnam during the Vietnam conflict

    H.R. 2813 was referred to the Committee on National 
Security November 4, 1997. The measure was considered under 
suspension of the rules and passed the House by recorded vote 
on November 8, 1997. H.R. 2813 passed the Senate by unanimous 
consent on November 10, 1997 and was signed by the President 
and became law on November 20, 1997.
    Date of enactment: November 20, 1997.

                      PUBLIC LAW 105-107 (S. 858)

 To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1998 for intelligence and 
 intelligence-related activities of the United States Government, the 
   community Management Account, and the Central Intelligence Agency 
        Retirement and Disability System, and for other purposes

    Public Law 105-107 authorizes appropriations for fiscal 
year 1998 for intelligence and intelligence related activities 
of the United States Government, including Department of 
Defense intelligence-related activities within the jurisdiction 
shared by the Committee on National Security and the Permanent 
Select Committee on Intelligence.
    Public Law 105-107 addresses the Community Management 
Account and the Central Intelligence Agency Retirement and 
Disability System. Within the General Provisions is an 
amendment to the National Security Act of 1947 to authorize the 
detail of employees within the intelligence community to 
positions in the Intelligence Community Assignment Program, for 
a maximum of three years with an additional one-year extension 
in the public interest.
    S. 858 passed the Senate June 19, 1997. A similar bill, 
H.R. 1775, which the Committee on National Security was 
discharged from consideration on July 1, 1997, passed the 
House, amended, on July 9, 1997. The House struck all after the 
enacting clause of S. 858, and inserted in lieu thereof the 
provisions of H.R. 1775 as passed by the House. A conference 
between the House and the Senate began on July 21, 1997 where 
the speaker appointed conferees from the Committee on National 
Security. A conference report was agreed to and passed the 
Senate by unanimous consent on November 6, 1997 and passed the 
House on November 7, 1997. S. 858 was signed by the President 
and became law on November 20, 1997.
    (S. Rept. 105-24; H. Rept. 105-350 (H.R. 1775)
    Date of enactment: November 20, 1997.

                      PUBLIC LAW 105-129 (S. 1507)

To amend the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 1998 to 
                   make certain technical corrections

    Public Law 105-129 makes technical corrections to the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998. S. 
1507 passed the Senate by unanimous consent November 9, 1997 
and passed the House by voice vote under suspension of the 
rules November 12, 1997. The measure was signed by the 
President and became law on December 1, 1997.
    Date of enactment: December 1, 1997.

                     PUBLIC LAW 105-152 (H.R. 2796)

   To authorize the reimbursement of members of the Army deployed to 
  Europe in support of operations in Bosnia for certain out-of-pocket 
expenses incurred by members during the period beginning on October 1, 
                    1996, and ending on May 31, 1997

    Referred to as the Army Reserve-National Guard Equity 
Reimbursement Act, Public Law 105-152 authorizes the Secretary 
of the Army to reimburse members of the Army who were deployed 
to or from Europe between October 1, 1996, and May 31, 1997, in 
support of operations in Bosnia, for expenses incurred in the 
shipment of personal property that would have otherwise been 
covered by a temporary change authorized by the Department of 
the Army. H.R. 2796 was referred to the Committee on National 
Security on November 4, 1997. The measure passed both the 
House, under suspension of the rules, and the Senate, by 
unanimous consent, on November 13, 1997. H.R. 2796 was signed 
by the President and became law on December 17, 1997.
    Date of enactment: December 17, 1997.

                     PUBLIC LAW 105-222 (H.R. 3731)

   To designate the auditorium located within the Sandia Technology 
   Transfer Center in Albequerque, New Mexico, as the ``Steve Schiff 
                              Auditorium''

    The National Security Committee was discharged from 
consideration of H.R. 3731 by unanimous consent on July 15, 
1998. The measure passed the House by recorded vote on July 16, 
1998 and the Senate by unanimous consent on July 30, 1998. H.R. 
3731 was signed by the President and became law on August 7, 
1998.
    Date of enactment: August 7, 1998.

                     PUBLIC LAW 105-261 (H.R. 3616)

     To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1999 for military 
    activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military 
    personnel strengths for fiscal year 1999, and for other purposes

    Public Law 105-261 authorizes funds totaling 
$271,547,636,000 for national defense functions fiscal year 
1999 and provides a budget authority level of $270,496,915,000.

Division A

    Division A of Public Law 105-261 authorizes funds for 
fiscal year 1999 for the Department of Defense.
    Subtitle A of Title I authorizes $49,898,362,000 for 
procurement of aircraft, missiles, weapons and tracked combat 
vehicles, ammunition, and other procurement for the armed 
forces, defense agencies and reserve components of the armed 
forces.
    Subtitles B through E of Title I establish additional 
program requirements, restrictions, and limitations, and 
authorize transfer of or earmark funds for specified programs 
for the armed forces including Army Longbow Hellfire Missile 
and armored system modernization; Navy CVN-77 nuclear aircraft 
carrier and seawolf submarine program; Air Force F-22 and C-
130Jaircraft programs, and other matters such as the chemical 
stockpile emergency preparedness program.
    Subtitle A of Title II authorizes $36,007,938,000 for 
research, development, test and evaluation for the armed forces 
and the defense agencies, including amounts for basic and 
applied research.
    Subtitle B of Title II establishes certain program 
requirements, restrictions, and limitations on 8 separate 
research and development-related matters.
    Subtitles C through E of Title II address Ballistic Missile 
Defense and other matters such as NATO alliance ground 
surveillance concept definition.
    Subtitle A of Title III authorizes $92,891,511,000 for 
operation and maintenance (O&M) and $1,746,137,000 for working 
capital funds for the armed forces and defense agencies, 
including the Armed Forces Retirement Home, and transfer from 
National Defense Stockpile Transaction Fund.
    Subtitles B through F of Title III address program 
requirements, restrictions and limitations; environmental 
provisions; information technology; defense infrastructure 
support improvement; commissaries and nonappropriated fund 
instrumentalities, and other matters such as the Department of 
Defense readiness reporting system.
    Title IV provides military personnel authorizations for the 
active and reserve forces for fiscal year 1999 and authorizes 
appropriations of $70,592,286,000 for military personnel for 
fiscal year 1999. The end strengths for active duty personnel 
for fiscal year 1999 are as follows:
          Army, 480,000
          Navy, 372,696
          Marine Corps, 172,200
          Air Force, 370,882
    The Selected Reserve end strengths for fiscal year 1999 are 
as follows:
          Army National Guard, 3657,223
          Army Reserve, 208,003
          Naval Reserve, 90,843
          Marine Corps Reserve, 40,018
          Air National Guard, 106,992
          Air Force Reserve, 72,243
          Coast Guard Reserve, 8,000
    The end strengths for reserves on active duty in support of 
the reserve components for fiscal year 1999 are as follows:
          Army National Guard, 21,986
          Army Reserve, 12,807
          Naval Reserve, 15,590
          Marine Corps Reserve, 2,362
          Air National Guard, 10,931
          Air Force Reserve, 992
    Title V sets military personnel policy, including 
provisions that address officer personnel policy; reserve 
component matters; military education and training; 
decorations, awards and commendations; administration of 
agencies responsible for review and correction of military 
records; reports and other matters.
    Title VI addresses compensation and other personnel 
benefits, including pay and allowances; travel and 
transportation allowances; retired pay, survivor benefits and 
related matters.
    Title VII contains military health care provisions, 
including health care services; the TRICARE program; health 
care services for medicare-eligible Department of Defense 
beneficiaries; other changes to existing laws regarding health 
care management and other matters such as Department of Defense 
Organ and Tissue Donor program.
    Title VIII addresses acquisition policy, acquisition 
management and related matters; amendments to general 
contracting authorities, procedures, and limitations.
    Title IX contains Department of Defense organization and 
management provisions, including Department of Defense Officers 
and Organization; Department of Defense Financial Management; 
joint warfighting experimentation, and other matters.
    Title X contains general provisions relating to financial 
matters; naval vessels and shipyards; counter-drug activities 
and other assistance for civilian law enforcement, 
miscellaneous report requirements and repeals; armed forces 
retirement home; matters relating to defense property and other 
matters such as aviation accident investigations.
    Title XI addresses Department of Defense civilian 
personnel.
    Title XII addresses matters relating to other nations 
including United States armed forces in Bosnia and Herzegovina; 
matters relating to contingency operations; matters relating to 
NATO and Europe and other matters such as the transfer of 
excess UH-1 Huey and AH-1 Cobra helicopters to foreign 
countries.
    Title XIII concerns Cooperative Threat Reduction with 
states of the Former Soviet Union.
    Title XIV addresses domestic preparedness for defense 
against weapons of mass destruction.
    Title XV concerns matters relating to arms control, export 
controls and counterproliferation including arms control 
matters; satellite export controls; other export control 
matters, and counterproliferation matters.

Division B

    Division B of Public Law 105-261 authorizes appropriations 
in the amount of $8,443,742,000 for military construction and 
family housing in support of the active forces, the reserve 
components, the NATO security investment program and Juniper 
Butte Range withdrawal. In addition, Division B contains 
miscellaneous and general provisions that concern military 
construction program and military family housing changes; real 
property and facilities administration; defense base closure 
and realignment; land conveyances; and other matters.

Division C

    Division C of Public Law 105-261 authorizes appropriations 
in the amount of $11,967,660,000 for Department of Energy 
national security programs for fiscal year 1999. Division C 
includes authorization for the Defense Nuclear Facilities 
Safety Board; National Defense Stockpile; Naval Petroleum 
Reserves; Panama Canal Commission; Maritime Administration; 
increased monitoring of products made with forced labor; fair 
trade in automotive parts and Radio Free Asia.
    The Committee on National Security reported H.R. 3616, 
amended, to the House on May 12, 1998. The measure passed the 
House, amended, by recorded vote on May 21, 1998 and passed the 
Senate, amended, on June 25, 1998 by unanimous consent. The 
House agreed to a conference report on September 24, 1998, and 
the Senate on October 1, 1998, both by recorded vote. H.R. 3616 
was signed by the President and became law on October 17, 1998.
    (H. Rept. 105-532; S. Rept. 105-189; H. Rept. 105-736; 
H.N.S.C. 105-27; H.N.S.C. 105-28; H.N.S.C. 105-30; H.N.S.C. 
105-31; H.N.S.C. 105-32; H.N.S.C. 105-33; H.N.S.C. 105-34; 
H.N.S.C. 105-41;)
    Date of enactment: October 17, 1998.

                     PUBLIC LAW 105-371 (H.R. 2263)

To authorize and request the President to award the congressional Medal 
of Honor posthumously to Theodore Roosevelt for his gallant and heroic 
  actions in the attack on San Juan Heights, Cuba, during the Spanish-
                              American War

    H.R. 2263 was referred to the House National Security 
Committee on July 25, 1998. The measure passed the House under 
suspension of the rules by voice vote on October 8, 1998, and 
passed the Senate by unanimous consent on October 21, 1998. 
H.R. 2263 was signed by the President and became law on 
November 12, 1998.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-44)
    Date of enactment: November 12, 1998.

                  LEGISLATION REPORTED BUT NOT ENACTED

                                H.R. 695

 To amend title 18, United States Code, to affirm the rights of United 
States persons to use and sell encryption and to relax export controls 
                             on encryption

    H.R. 695, reported to the House as the Security and Freedom 
through Encryption (SAFE) Act of 1997, was referred to the 
National Security Committee, as well as the Committees on 
Judiciary, International Relations, Commerce and the Select 
Committee on Intelligence on February 12, 1997. H.R. 695, as 
reported, amended, by the Committee on National Security would 
have recognized the potential threat to national security posed 
by relaxed export controls and provided measures to ensure that 
the federal government retain the ability to review encryption 
exports. At the same time the resolution would have provided 
flexibility to permit the government policy to stay current 
with the rapid pace of technological advances in this area.
    H.R. 695 was reported, amended, to the House by the 
Committee on September 12, 1997. It was placed on the union 
calendar on September 29, 1997. No further action was taken.
    (H. Rept. 105-108, Part III; H.N.S.C. 105-23).

                               H.R. 1778

                  To reform the Department of Defense

    H.R. 1778, introduced as the Defense Reform Act of 1997, 
was referred to the Committee on National Security as well as 
the Committees on Commerce, Transportation and Infrastructure, 
and Government Reform and Oversight. The measure was reported 
to the House, amended, on June 17, 1997. H.R. 1778 was placed 
on the Union Calendar on June 4, 1998. No further action was 
taken. However, provisions of the Defense Reform Act were 
included in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 1998 (Public Law 105-85).
    (H. Rept. 105-133, Part I.; H.N.S.C. 105-16).

                               H.R. 2786

To authorize additional appropriations of the Department of Defense for 
 ballistic missile defenses and other measures to counter the emerging 
threat posed to the United States and its allies in the Middle East and 
  Persian Gulf region by the development and deployment of ballistic 
                            missiles by Iran

    H.R. 2786 would have authorized appropriations for the 
Department of Defense for fiscal year 1998 for defense-wide 
research, development, test, and evaluation, for specific 
programs to counter the threat posed by the development and 
deployment of ballistic missiles by Iran. The measure was 
reported to the House by the National Security Committee, 
amended, as the Theater Missile Defense Improvement Act of 1998 
on March 26, 1998. H.R. 2786 passed the House by voice vote on 
March 30, 1998. It was received in the Senate and referred to 
the Senate Armed Services Committee on March 31, 1998. No 
further action was taken.
    (H. Rept. 105-468, Part I.).
                          OVERSIGHT ACTIVITIES

    The oversight responsibilities of the Committee on National 
Security were conducted primarily within the context of the 
committee's consideration of the annual defense authorization 
bill, which covers the breadth of the operations of the 
Department of Defense (DOD) as well as a significant portion of 
the annual operating budget of the Department of Energy. The 
roughly $270 billion annual National Defense function budget 
involves millions of military and civilian personnel, thousands 
of facilities, and hundreds of agencies, departments, and 
commands located throughout the world.

                       SUMMARY OF OVERSIGHT PLAN

    The committee continued its oversight and assessment of 
threats to U.S. national security and U.S. interests and the 
preparedness of the U.S. armed forces to address these threats. 
Throughout the 105th Congress, the committee received 
classified and unclassified briefings on the international 
threat environment. In consideration of the fiscal years 1998 
and 1999 defense budget requests, the committee conducted 
appropriate oversight hearings with the Secretary of Defense, 
the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the individual 
service Secretaries and Chiefs of Staff, regional Commanders-
in-Chief, other officials of the Department of Defense and the 
military departments, officials of the Central Intelligence 
Agency and other defense-related intelligence agencies, and 
officials of the Department of Energy.
    While most of the committee's oversight agenda was designed 
to serve primarily in support of the annual authorization bill, 
much of the committee's most demanding oversight activity was 
event-driven and not subject to prior planning.

                      ACTIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS

    The following specific areas and subjects were designated 
for special attention during the 105th Congress:

                     READINESS AND QUALITY OF LIFE

    The committee continued to focus on the readiness and 
quality of life of the armed services and the adequacy of the 
Administration's defense spending priorities to support 
sustained readiness and modernization of our military during 
the 105th Congress. The committee also continued the 
comprehensive review of both short and long-term readiness 
problems begun in the 104th Congress. These reviews revealed 
contradictions between official reports of military readiness 
and the reality confronting military personnel out in the 
field. Where official reports and testimony before the 
committee portrayed the overall readiness of U.S. armed forces 
as high, soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines increasingly 
admitted that their units are continuing to slip below 
standards. In an effort to assess current levels of readiness, 
the committee conducted a series of hearings--both in 
Washington and at various military installations throughout the 
United States--to hear the views of operational unit commanders 
and senior non-commissioned officers from all of the military 
services on this issue. The testimony confirmed the committee's 
concerns that personnel are working harder and longer than ever 
before and that the readiness of U.S. military forces is 
declining. To address these problems, the committee applied 
additional funding to several critical readiness accounts while 
protecting core readiness accounts from the diversion of funds 
to pay for continued unbudgeted contingency operations. 
Specific attention was paid to readiness areas such as 
operating forces, mobilization and training, recruiting, base 
operations, spare parts and real property maintenance, 
maintenance of operational equipment, and quality of life 
programs supporting military personnel and their families.
    Additional attention was given to the following: an 
examination of the current state of readiness and training of 
the armed services; revising the current methods of measuring 
the readiness of military units to provide an accurate 
reflection of unit readiness; a major revision to the depot-
level maintenance procedures of the Department of Defense; a 
continuing examination of the training required for the 
maintenance of a high state of readiness and whether training 
requirements are properly funded; examination of the impact of 
the high pace of deployments on service personnel and their 
families; a major review of logistics, supply operations, and 
the privatization of military functions; officer and enlisted 
recruiting, accessions, promotions, separations, and 
retirements; assessment of pay, compensation, and other 
benefits of military service; assessment of the current quality 
of military health care; examination of family support 
programs, including child care and dependent education; review 
of the current quality and adequacy of the military family 
housing supply; review of the current quality and adequacy of 
barracks, bachelor enlisted quarters, and dormitories; and 
examination of the backlog in the repair and maintenance of the 
military housing supply.
    Particular attention was also given to the oversight of 
Morale, Welfare and Recreation (MWR) programs including the 
examination of military exchanges and commissaries and 
oversight of nonappropriated fund construction programs and 
other nonappropriated fund instrumentalities. This active 
oversight resulted in a number of initiatives contained in the 
National Defense Authorization Acts for Fiscal Years 1998 and 
1999 (Public Laws 105-85 and 105-261). These included 
protecting the funding of the Defense Commissary Agency by 
requiring the Department to manage and fund the agency, 
establishing the pricing policy of tobacco products in 
commissaries; expanding reserve commissary privileges from 12 
to 24 visits per year; and requiring the Department to allow 
authorized patrons unfettered access to exchange and commissary 
items overseas. Other initiatives included expanding the types 
of merchandise that military exchanges may sell and prohibiting 
further closure of libraries on military installations.

                         MILITARY MODERNIZATION

    Despite the fact that the 104th Congress added over $11 
billion to DOD procurement budget requests for fiscal years 
1996 and 1997--a 15 percent increase for each of those years--
DOD officials testified at the beginning of the 105th Congress 
that the most serious shortcoming in future budget requests was 
in the area of modernization. Based on numerous hearings, 
extensive testimony, and a concerted effort to identify 
unfunded requirements, the committee continued to increase the 
procurement accounts in the 105th Congress in an attempt to 
move them significantly closer to the $60 billion annual goal 
established by the immediate past Chairman of the Joint Chiefs 
of Staff (JCS). This goal was also endorsed by the current 
Secretary of Defense. The committee applied these additional 
funds toward major weapon systems and on the less-glamorous, 
yet mission-essential items that are critical for the day-to-
day readiness of the troops in the field. Similarly, in 
addition to increasing funding for the active forces, the 
committee also continued its commitment to the total force by 
adding aircraft, vehicles, and various upgrades to existing 
equipment for the national guard and reserve components.
    The committee addressed the Department's modernization 
needs by conducting numerous broad-based hearings with the 
Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition and Technology, the 
Service Acquisition Executives, the Service Chiefs, and the 
senior requirements oversight officials of the JCS. The 
committee also held more focused hearings in the following 
areas: shipbuilding requirements to maintain a 300-ship Navy 
into the next century; near- and long-term tactical aircraft 
modernization; long-range aircraft/deep attack weapons 
modernization; new attack submarine program; critical 
infrastructure protection/information assurance; and airborne 
reconnaissance/unmanned aerial vehicles.

             NATIONAL MILITARY STRATEGY AND FORCE STRUCTURE

    During the 105th Congress, the committee gave particular 
attention to the central issues of national military strategy 
and U.S. military force structure raised by the Quadrennial 
Defense Review (QDR) and National Defense Panel (NDP), the two 
congressionally-mandated strategic reviews conducted in 1997. 
In three full committee hearings, a briefing by members of the 
NDP and extensive briefings by the Department of Defense and 
NDP members and staff on the process and substance of the QDR 
and NDP reports, the committee thoroughly analyzed the 
budgetary, strategic and tactical assumptions underlying the 
two reviews and the force structure designed to support the 
national military strategy of the United States. Particular 
attention was devoted to understanding the range of U.S. 
national security interests, threats to those interests, and 
strategic methods for responding to those threats as outlined 
in the QDR and NDP. Moreover, the committee undertook extensive 
analysis of the force structure requirements and levels of 
operational readiness required and assumed by both reviews. 
Finally, the committee closely scrutinized the proposed defense 
budgets and programs forecast by the QDR and the NDP, both for 
their adequacy in support of the national security and national 
military strategies and their fiscal soundness. These 
activities formed the basis of committee legislative actions on 
the fiscal year 1998 and 1999 defense authorization bills.

                          MANPOWER REDUCTIONS

    Throughout both sessions of the 105th Congress, the 
committee perceived a growing propensity of the Department of 
Defense to accelerate manpower reductions in order to achieve 
savings that could be reapplied to modernization and current 
operations funding requirements. Believing that such 
accelerated personnel reductions exacerbated readiness and 
other problems created by significantly increased operations 
tempo, the committee fought successfully against the 
Department's efforts to repeal mandated floors on military 
personnel end strength.

                       BALLISTIC MISSILE DEFENSE

    The committee placed a high priority on ensuring that the 
U.S. ballistic missile defense (BMD) program is well funded, 
well managed, and directed toward deployment of modern, highly 
capable systems to protect the American people and our troops 
abroad. Throughout the 105th Congress the committee devoted 
particular oversight attention on plans for conductingresearch 
and development on missile defense systems; plans for deployment of 
national missile defenses and advanced theater missile defenses for 
forward deployed U.S. military forces and friendly forces and allies; 
and examining the rapid evolution of serious theater and long-range 
ballistic missile threats--including the report of the Commission to 
Assess the Ballistic Missile Threat to the United States, a.k.a. the 
``Rumsfeld Commission'' (see ``Additional Oversight Activities''). The 
committee also received numerous briefings on ballistic missile 
developments in North Korea and Iran.
    The committee also reported, and the House approved, the 
Theater Missile Defense Improvement Act of 1998, H.R. 2786, 
which provided additional funding to meet rapidly evolving 
theater ballistic missile threats. Much of this funding was 
incorporated in the fiscal year 1998 emergency supplemental 
appropriations act. The National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 1999 (Public Law 105-261) also restructured the 
Theater High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD) program to allow 
program managers to proceed with the successful radar and 
battle management portions of the program while using 
appropriate technical and price competition to advance the 
THAAD missile. Substantial funding was also added to the Navy 
Theater Wide missile defense program to accelerate that 
important effort.

                  BASE CLOSURE AND REALIGNMENT (BRAC)

    Particular attention was given to the examination of the 
management of the drawdown in defense infrastructure under the 
base closure and realignment process and an assessment of the 
adequacy of estimates provided to Congress on the costs and 
savings associated with base closures and realignments in 1988, 
1991, 1993, and 1995.

                MILITARY APPLICATIONS OF NUCLEAR ENERGY

    Particular attention was given to the following: the health 
and stability of the nuclear weapons production complex, the 
viability of science based stockpile stewardship, the 
Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative (ASCI), national 
laboratory cooperation with the Ballistic Missile Defense 
Organization (BMDO), tritium requirements and production 
technology, and Department of Energy (DOE) budgeting practices. 
Highlights of the Defense Authorization Acts for Fiscal Years 
1998 (Public Law 105-85) and 1999 (Public Law 105-261) 
included: additional funding for the production complex; a 
provision requiring that the Department of Energy identify 
clear criteria by which to judge the success of science-based 
stockpile stewardship; a modest decrease to funding requested 
for the ASCI program, intended to allow that effort to proceed 
at an aggressive and reasonable pace; provisions requiring a 
memorandum of understanding to facilitate the use of DOE labs 
by BMDO and designating DOE funds for ballistic missile defense 
research; additional funding for tritium production and a 
requirement that the Department sustain two tritium production 
technology options through fiscal year 1999; and a provision 
requiring that the Department submit a report assessing how it 
might revise its budgeting practices.

        ORGANIZATION AND MANAGEMENT OF THE DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE

    The committee continued its aggressive examination of the 
organization and management of the Department of Defense, the 
military departments, and the defense agencies with a view to 
improving efficiency and reducing costs. The committee believed 
that the failure to reprioritize scarce defense resources from 
administrative ``overhead'' accounts into modernization, 
readiness, and quality of life programs will threaten the 
future viability of the U.S. military. Highlights of the fiscal 
year 1998 and 1999 defense authorization bills' organizational 
and managerial reforms included: mandated reductions in the 
acquisition workforce and in the Office of the Secretary of 
Defense; reduced the number of assistant secretaries of defense 
from 10 to 9; reduced the Advisory and Assistance Services 
(AAS) accounts and prohibited the Department from classifying 
more than 30 percent of its AAS expenses as ``miscellaneous'' 
in its fiscal year 2000 budget request, and no more than 15 
percent in following years; required the Secretary of Defense 
to report annually to Congress on the personnel and budgetary 
resources dedicated to non-mission activities as compared to 
mission related activities; and terminated the Patent Advisory 
Board and transferred its functions to the Defense Technology 
Security Administration. The committee also performed detailed 
oversight of Secretary Cohen's 1997 Defense Reform Initiative 
to include holding a hearing with testimony from the Deputy 
Secretary of Defense.

                    Additional Oversight Activities

                        BALLISTIC MISSILE THREAT

    For the past four years, the committee has been concerned 
with the vulnerability of the United States to ballistic 
missile attack, the ability of the U.S. intelligence community 
to foresee the emergence of ballistic missile threats in 
sufficient time to allow deployment of an effective defense, 
and the Administration's disinclination to move forward more 
aggressively with the rapid development of technologies that 
would defend the American people against such threats. This 
concern led the committee to increase funding for ballistic 
missile defense programs beyond requested amounts.
    During the 104th Congress, the committee legislated 
creation of an independent Commission to Assess the Ballistic 
Missile Threat to the United States (a.k.a. the ``Rumsfeld 
Commission'') as part of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 1997 (Public Law 104-201). However, because of 
delays in the appointments process, the commission's charter 
was re-authorized in the 105th Congress in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998 (Public Law 105-85).
    The committee held an open hearing and a closed briefing to 
receive the report of the commission. The commission reported 
its unanimous conclusions that ballistic missiles armed with 
nuclear or biological weapons not only ``pose a growing 
threat'' to the United States, its forces abroad, and U.S. 
allies, but that the threat ``is broader, more mature and 
evolving more rapidly than has been reported in estimates and 
reports by the intelligence community.'' The commission also 
found that the global proliferation of technical information 
and advanced technologies, the relaxation of U.S. export 
controls, and the increased ability of other states to conceal 
their ballistic missile development programs may leave the 
United States with ``little or no warning'' prior to the 
emergence of a ballistic missile threat to the United States.

                         SUPERCOMPUTER EXPORTS

    Concerned that the Administration was decontrolling 
supercomputer exports for commercial reasons, while 
disregarding the risk of potential adversaries using 
supercomputers in the development and maintenance of nuclear 
weapons, the committee continued its monitoring effort begun in 
the 104th Congress. The committee's concerns were borne out 
early in the 105th Congress when, on January 13, 1997, the 
Russian Minister of Atomic Energy, Victor Mikhailov, announced 
that Russia had obtained U.S. manufactured supercomputers for 
its nuclear weapons labs, Arzamas-16 and Chelyabinsk-70. 
Mikhailov said the computers would be used to help Russia 
maintain the reliability of its nuclear weapons stockpile.
    While exports to such weapons programs were prohibited by 
federal regulation, the exports were made possible by the 
Administration's relaxation of supercomputer export controls in 
1996. The new export policy put U.S. exporters, instead of the 
government, in the role of determining whether a potential 
supercomputer recipient in a country of national security or 
proliferation concern was a benign civil end-user, or an end-
user involved in the development of nuclear weapons or other 
military systems. This was a particular problem when dealing 
with closed societies or countries that secretly develop 
weapons of mass destruction.
    The committee held two hearings on supercomputers in the 
105th Congress and received testimony from the General 
Accounting Office, the Department of Defense, the Department of 
Commerce, and non-governmental experts on the military 
application of supercomputers. The testimony on recent 
supercomputer exports revealed that the Administration's new 
export process did not work, and had resulted in a number of 
exports to entities of national security or proliferation 
concern.
    Therefore, the committee included in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998 (Public Law 105-85) a 
provision that required that 10 days before the export of a 
supercomputer to a country of proliferation concern, the 
exporter identify to the U.S. government the intended foreign 
recipient. If the government has concerns about the prospective 
end-use or end-user of the computer, the government can then 
require the exporter to apply for an export license before the 
computer is shipped. This will allow the intelligence community 
and other agencies of the government to more carefully examine 
the potential end-user and determine whether they are involved 
in military operations or the development of weapons of mass 
destruction. If the government finds this to be the case, they 
can block the export by denying an export license.

                       ENCRYPTION CONTROL POLICY

    The U.S. military has made information warfare a key 
element of U.S. military strategy. It is a tenet of this 
element of U.S. strategy that the United States must be able to 
protect its own communications from interception while 
exploiting the weaknesses in the information systems and 
communications of potential adversaries. The explosive growth 
of the Internet and the rise in electronic commerce in recent 
years have led to increased concerns over information security. 
A growing number of individuals and businesses now have access 
to the information superhighway and the capability to transmit 
volumes of personal and proprietary data from one user to 
another nearly instantaneously. As technology advances, the 
risk that the secure transmission of this information may be 
compromised by computer ``hackers'' is increasing. This risk 
has resulted in calls for greater encryption capabilities.
    During the First Session of the 105th Congress, H.R. 695, 
the ``Security and Freedom Through Encryption (SAFE) Act of 
1997'' was introduced and sequentially referred to the National 
Security Committee for its consideration. The committee was 
concerned that this legislation would significantly liberalize 
U.S. encryption policy by allowing commercially-available 
encryption software--along with any computers containing such 
software (including supercomputers)--to be exported without a 
government-issued export license. The committee was also 
concerned that this legislation would potentially nullify the 
supercomputer provisions of National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 1998 (Public Law 105-85). The committee held a 
hearing on the national security implications of the 
legislation on July 30, 1998. The Deputy Director of the 
National Security Agency (NSA) testified that ``the passage of 
H.R. 695 would negatively impact NSA's missions . . . the 
immediate decontrol of strong encryption products without 
restriction would make our signals intelligence mission much 
more difficult and ultimately result in the loss of 
intelligence . . . This would greatly complicate our 
exploitation of foreign targets, including military targets.'' 
The Deputy Director concluded that H.R. 695 ``will do 
irreparable harm to national security . . .'' Based in part on 
such testimony, the committee amended H.R. 695 to preserve 
encryption software export controls by a vote of 45-1.

                EXPORT OF SATELLITES FOR LAUNCH IN CHINA

    In April 1998 press accounts began to emerge about a 
federal grand jury investigation of allegedly illicit 
technology transfers to China by U.S. satellite manufacturers 
Space Systems/Loral and Hughes Electronics. According to the 
press accounts and subsequent Administration briefings and 
testimony, the two satellite firms provided the Chinese 
government with technical assistance to correct launch vehicle 
flaws after a 1996 launch failure involving a Loral satellite. 
The Department of Defense reportedly concluded that ``United 
States national security has been harmed'' by this technology 
transfer. The technical assistance was provided without a 
Department of State-approved technical assistance agreement as 
required by federal regulation.
    Earlier in 1998, while the Loral/Hughes investigation was 
on-going, the President approved another Loral satellite launch 
from China over the objections of the Department of Justice. 
Justice Department officials were reportedly concerned that 
such an approval would appear to sanction the transfer of the 
same technology that Loral and Hughes were accused of illicitly 
transferring. Further claims surfaced in the press that the 
President had ignored national security concerns of officials 
from the Department of Defense and the Department of State in 
1996 prior to transferring the export licensing jurisdiction 
for satellites from the more stringent Department of State 
regime to the Department of Commerce, which takes industry's 
economic goals into consideration when making export licensing 
decisions. In addition, because satellites were transferred out 
of the Department of State regime, proliferation sanctions 
against the Chinese could be avoided, and Chinese launch of 
U.S. satellites could go forward. The wisdom of allowing and 
assisting in the launch of U.S. manufactured satellites on 
rockets in China was eventually questioned because the launch 
of a satellite involves the same technologies that are used to 
launch warheads on ballistic missiles.
    To address these questions, the committee received a number 
of briefings and documents from the Department of Defense, the 
Department of State, the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency, 
and the Department of Commerce. Committee staff was also 
briefed repeatedly by various agencies on issues related to the 
launch of U.S. satellites on Chinese boosters. The committee's 
oversight review of Chinese satellite launch issues culminated 
on June 17, June 18, and June 23, 1998 with joint hearings 
between the House Committee on National Security and the House 
Committee on International Relations. During the hearings the 
committees received testimony from non-governmental 
nonproliferation organizations, the Department of Defense, the 
Department of State, and the Department of Commerce.
    Due to the sensitivity of technologies involved in 
satellite launch that could be used in the development and 
refinement of ballistic missiles, the committee included a 
number of provisions on the control of satellite exports in the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 (Public 
Law 105-261):
          (1) Requirements that before a U.S. satellite is 
        exported for launch in China, the President must 
        certify that the launch will not measurably improve 
        Chinese missile or space launch capabilities, or be 
        detrimental to the U.S. space launch industry;
          (2) A reversion of satellite export licensing 
        jurisdiction to the Department of State from the 
        Department of Commerce; and
          (3) Requirements for technology transfer control 
        plans, monitoring of foreign launches of U.S. 
        satellites, intelligence community involvement, and 
        congressional notification.

                           TACTICAL AVIATION

    The committee is concerned that the DOD procurement budget 
for the three major tactical aircraft programs--the Navy F/A-
18E/F, the Air Force F-22, and the Joint Strike Fighter (JSF)--
is inadequate and that the production schedules for these three 
programs, as approved by the Department, will result in a huge 
bow wave of annual costs and annual aircraft production numbers 
during the years when these programs will simultaneously be in 
full rate production. To address this issue, the committee held 
briefings and hearings on the procurement budget's ability to 
provide for the more than $300 billion for the three major 
tactical aircraft programs already in development. The 
committee also requested the Congressional Budget Office to 
study these three next-generation aircraft based on the most 
current DOD program schedules.

DEFENSE AIRBORNE RECONNAISSANCE OFFICE--UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLES (UAVs)

    The committee carefully examined the growth in the Defense 
Airborne Reconnaissance Office (DARO) and the lack of 
successful completion of any of the critically needed UAVs for 
which the office was responsible. The committee initiated 
activities during the fiscal year 1998 budget cycle to 
eliminate the DARO and return program control and funding 
responsibilities of the various UAV programs back to the 
military services. These actions were successfully enacted in 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998 
(Public Law 105-85).

                          LONG RANGE AIR POWER

    The committee devoted significant effort to understanding 
the requirements of the long range bomber force, the role this 
force will play in the mix of deep attack weapons, the future 
of the B-2 bomber, and conventional weapons upgrades for the 
bomber force. In April 1998, the committee held a hearing on 
the Report of the Panel to Review Long Range Air Power. The 
Panel concluded that additional funding for the B-2 should be 
used to maximize the effectiveness of the current fleet, 
advocated upgrades to the B-1 and B-52 fleets, recommended that 
additional procurement of bombers should be deferred, and 
determined that a long-range plan to sustain the bomber force 
is needed. The committee required such a plan in its fiscal 
year 1999 Defense authorization bill. The committee also led 
the effort to add substantial funds to improve B-2 performance 
in both the National Defense Authorization Acts for Fiscal Year 
1998 (Public Law 105-85) and 1999 (Public Law 105-261).

                    MERCHANT MARINE AND PANAMA CANAL

    Particular attention was given to the following: 
examination of programs to maintain the U.S. flag merchant 
fleet and its role in strategic and sustainment sealift; the 
condition of the National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF) and its 
capability to meet surge requirements, and oversight of the 
implementation of Public Law 104-239, the Maritime Security Act 
of 1996 by the United States Maritime Administration and the 
United States Transportation Command. The committee also 
continued its oversight of the Panama Canal Commission and the 
scheduled transfer of its functions and assets to the Republic 
of Panama as specified by treaty on December 31, 1999.

              DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY FOREIGN VISITOR PROGRAM

    During the 104th Congress, the committee expressed its 
concern in the committee report on H.R. 3230, the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1997 (H. Rept. 104-
563) regarding the increasing number of foreign nationals that 
visited the Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear weapons 
laboratories. In that report, the committee directed the 
General Accounting Office to determine how well the Department 
of Energy controls foreign visits to the weapons labs, and 
whether these visits raise any security or nonproliferation 
concerns.
    The General Accounting Office reported to the committee 
during the 105th Congress (GAO/RCED-97-229, September 25, 
1997). The report concluded that security procedures were not 
being effectively implemented, even though the nuclear weapons 
labs were being visited by an increasing number of foreign 
nationals from countries of national security and proliferation 
concern. As a result, individuals had been admitted to the 
weapons labs without the Department's knowledge that some of 
the individuals had suspected foreign intelligence backgrounds. 
In 1998 the committee was also informed that in response to 
counterintelligence concerns within the Administration, the 
Department of Energy had established an Office of 
Counterintelligence reporting directly to the Secretary of 
Energy. Committee staff received briefings on the justification 
for the new office, and how it will be organized and operate.
    The committee also held a hearing on October 6, 1998, where 
the General Accounting Office testified on their 1997 
recommendations and whether the DOE labs were acting to 
implement those recommendations. The committee also received 
testimony from the Deputy Secretary of Energy and the directors 
of the Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Sandia National 
Laboratories. These officials testified on actions they are 
taking to deal with the increasing number of foreign nationals 
that visit their labs each year. In closed session, the 
committee also received testimony from the director of DOE's 
Office of Counterintelligence, and from the Department's 
Special Advisor for Intelligence Activities. These officials 
provided testimony on counterintelligence matters.

                  MILITARY RETIREMENT AND COMPENSATION

    The committee examined a wide range of compensation issues 
in preparation for the defense authorization bill for fiscal 
year 1998. During hearings, the committee pursued concerns 
about the adequacy of the military pay raise, the process for 
increasing the elements of military pay, the reform of 
allowances for quarters and subsistence, the adequacy of 
special and incentive pays, the adequacy of family separation 
pay, and the adequacy of pay during deployments. The 
committee's review resulted in legislation to increase basic 
pay, family separation pay, and certain special and incentive 
pays being incorporated in the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 1998 (Public Law 105-85). The Act also 
included major reforms of both housing and subsistence 
allowance systems, a provision to protect total income level 
during deployments, and the authority to restructure 
compensation during deployments.
    During consideration of the defense authorization bill for 
fiscal year 1999, the committee continued to explore evidence 
that the reduction in military retirement benefits, growth of 
the gap in basic pay increase rates between military members 
and private sector workers, and erosion of special pays and 
bonuses were hampering the ability of the services to recruit 
and retain quality personnel. During calendar year 1998, the 
testimony of DOD civilian and military leaders established that 
retirement benefits and compensation were issues of growing 
concern. Accordingly, the committee included a 3.6 percent 
military pay raise to keep pace with private sector pay 
increases, a pay raise for cadets and midshipmen at the service 
academies, a requirement for the Secretary of Defense to review 
the adequacy of military retirement benefits and submit a 
legislative proposal to reform the system, and several 
legislative provisions to extend, reform, and increase special 
pays and bonuses, especially for officer and enlisted aircrews.

                        RECRUITING AND RETENTION

    The committee added $100 million to recruiting advertising 
and administrative support budgets within the military services 
during fiscal years 1995 and 1996 to counter rapidly developing 
recruiting problems. When confronted with increasing accession 
requirements and flat recruiting budgets, recruiting continued 
to suffer during fiscal year 1997. The committee conducted a 
hearing March 13, 1997 to assess the decision by the Secretary 
of the Army to reduce recruit quality objectives and the 
initiatives within the other services to overcome increased 
recruiting difficulty. During fiscal year 1998, the committee 
again dedicated a hearing to examine the response of the 
services to recruiting challenges that grew worse as the year 
progressed. In a disturbing development during fiscal year 
1998, both the Navy and the Army failed to meet the numerical 
objectives for new accessions--the Navy by almost 12 per cent--
and all the services suffered reductions in recruit quality. 
The committee again enhanced recruiting programs and added 
funding to recruiting accounts in both the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998 (Public Law 105-85) and 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 
(Public Law 105-261).
    During the drawdown, enlisted retention was difficult to 
assess because the military services implemented a variety of 
incentive programs to encourage separations and de-emphasized 
the need for retention. Now, in the wake of the drawdown, the 
committee observed negative retention trends that became 
increasingly alarming during fiscal years 1997 and 1998. The 
committee responded with a wide range of compensation and 
quality of life initiatives in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998 (Public Law 105-85) and 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 
(Public Law 105-261) as a hedge against further erosion of 
retention with its potentially serious implications for force 
readiness.
    While officer retention remained generally good, the Navy, 
Marine Corps, and the Air Force have experienced decreasing 
retention among aviators as the airline industry has increased 
hiring. A similar long-term retention problem also exists with 
nuclear qualified officers in the Navy. During fiscal year 
1998, the committee also became aware of significant negative 
trends in retention among Navy surface warfare and special 
operations officers. In these cases, the committee acted to 
authorize major increases to retention bonuses and special duty 
pay in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
1998 (Public Law 105-85) and the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 1999 (Public Law 105-261), and to encourage 
the services to examine the issues and propose legislative 
solutions for future consideration.

           BOARDS FOR CORRECTION OF MILITARY RECORDS (BCMRs)

    The committee identified a series of problems associated 
with the processes for correcting military records within each 
of the services. A committee review revealed major management 
problems within the boards for correction of military records 
operated by each military department that affected the 
timeliness, equity, and impartiality of board decisions.
    The committee included provisions in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 (Public Law 105-261) 
that prevented the military departments from reducing board 
manpower levels, required the assignment of certain 
professional staff, limited ex parte communications by the 
boards, imposed timeliness standards on board decisions, and 
set clear limits on cases that fall under board jurisdiction.

                  MILITARY FUNERAL HONORS FOR VETERANS

    The committee observed that military veterans were being 
laid to rest without even the most fundamental rendering of 
military honors. The committee sought to find a national 
solution to ensure that no family is disappointed and that no 
veteran is overlooked.
    Accordingly, the National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 1999 (Public Law 105-261) included a provision that 
directed the Secretary of Defense, in consultation with the 
Secretary of Veterans Affairs, to jointly develop alternative 
methods to improve and increase the availability of military 
funeral honors for veterans.

                           RESERVE COMPONENTS

    The committee paid particular attention and focus on the 
Department's increasing the reliance upon and readiness of the 
reserve components. As a result, the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998 (Public Law 105-85), 
provided new authority for the President, without Congressional 
approval, to mobilize up to 30,000 members of the individual 
ready reserve as part of a Presidential Selective Reserve Call-
up. This measure corrected an unresolved issue from the Desert 
Shield/Desert Storm experience. Then, because the President had 
no authority to quickly call-up members of the individual ready 
reserve, the Department of Defense was forced to call up 
elements of later-deploying units in order to provide 
individual fillers for early deploying reserve component units. 
When the later deploying units were, in turn, called up, it 
took far longer than necessary to rebuild them.
    In addition, during both of the authorization cycles for 
fiscal year 1998 and 1999, the committee turned its attention 
to reforming and expanding the full-time support force so 
critical not only to the long-term readiness of the reserve 
components, but also to the ability of the reserves to fully 
participate in peacetime contingency operations. As a result, 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998 
(Public Law 105-85), directed the Department to reform and 
revitalize the military technician (dual status) program. In 
the subsequent authorization act, the committee provided 
additional funding to enable the Army National Guard to retain 
nearly 800 military technicians (dual status), and to increase 
by 1,000 the numbers of Army reservists on active duty in 
support of the reserves.
    The committee reviewed the Ready Reserve Mobilization 
Income Insurance Program for reserve members involuntarily 
called to active duty and concluded that the program was 
ineffective as a result of poor design and implementation. In 
order to limit the ultimate cost of the program, the committee 
determined that the program could not be salvaged and directed 
the program be terminated in the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 1998 (Public Law 105-85).
    The committee has also been concerned about pay equity 
between reserve and active duty members when they are serving 
under identical or similar conditions. The committee recognized 
an unjustified disparity in the payment of imminent danger pay 
and included a provision in the National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 1999 (Public Law 105-261) that corrected 
the inequity.
    Finally, in recognition of the growing threat to the nation 
from the employment by terrorists of weapons of mass 
destruction, and the unique capabilities in the reserve 
components to respond to such missions, the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 (Public Law 105-261), 
provided authority to organize regional response teams from the 
reserve components, and to permit full-time national guard and 
reserve personnel to train for and conduct operational 
missions.

             SEXUAL MISCONDUCT AND MILITARY BASIC TRAINING

    In response to allegations of widespread sexual misconduct 
involving drill sergeants and cadre members at the U.S. Army 
Ordnance Center and School in Aberdeen, Maryland, as well as at 
other Army training centers, the committee conducted a 
comprehensive, bi-partisan investigation of sexual misconduct 
in the training centers of each of the military services.
    The committee's effort focused on examining how our 
nation's military is being prepared to fight and win America's 
wars, and on whether the military services have established 
value systems that cut across race and gender. Specifically, 
the effort focused on assessing whether the services are 
instilling rigor and warrior spirit into the training 
environment, and whether the training programs are producing 
graduates who are, first and foremost, soldiers, sailors, 
airmen or marines.
    Committee members visited basic and advanced training 
centers of each of the military services; received numerous 
briefings on issues ranging from military criminal 
investigativeprocedures to the military justice system; visited 
several other military installations around the world; conducted a 
hearing to review the Army's investigations into sexual misconduct in 
the service; issued an interim report on the committee's investigation 
that highlighted emerging issues of concern and summarized actions 
taken in the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998 
(Public Law 105-85), to address many of these concerns; and conducted a 
hearing to review the findings and recommendations of the Federal 
Advisory Committee on Gender-Integrated Training and Related Issues, an 
independent panel appointed by Defense Secretary William S. Cohen.
    Specific actions taken by the committee in the National 
Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998 (Public Law 105-
85), included a requirement for an independent review of the 
ability of the military criminal investigative services to 
investigate crimes of sexual misconduct; a series of reforms to 
drill sergeant selection and training; and the establishment of 
a commission on basic training and gender-related issues. The 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 (Public 
Law 105-261), directed the service secretaries to provide 
physically-separated and secure housing for male and female 
recruits during basic training; and to restrict after-hours 
access to recruit housing areas to drill sergeants and training 
personnel who are of the same gender as the recruits housed in 
the area, or to opposite-gender superiors in the chain of 
command of the recruits who are accompanied by a member of the 
same gender (not a recruit) as the recruits housed in the area.

                         MILITARY HEALTH SYSTEM

    Military service members consistently list health care as a 
top quality of life issue. The committee took numerous actions 
to ensure that military members, retirees and their families 
have access to quality health care. The committee continued to 
urge the Administration to provide adequate funding for the 
Defense Health Program, and it restored $274 million to an 
underfunded Defense Health Program in fiscal year 1998.
    Additionally, the committee directed numerous improvements 
to the new TRICARE program to ensure that the program provides 
a quality, uniform health benefit for all military 
beneficiaries. The National Defense Authorization Acts for 
Fiscal Years 1998 and 1999 (Public Law 105-85 and Public Law 
105-261), included several initiatives to improve the program: 
a requirement for the Secretary of Defense to prepare a plan 
for expanding the HMO option of the program--TRICARE Prime--
into areas outside the 40-mile radius of military medical 
treatment facilities (MTFs) to provide military beneficiaries 
with greater access to less expensive health care coverage; a 
requirement for the Secretary of Defense to establish a system 
to measure the performance of MTFs and TRICARE contractors in 
meeting the standards for timely access to care; and authority 
for the Secretary of Defense to improve claims-processing 
procedures in an effort to minimize collection actions against 
military beneficiaries.
    The committee also aggressively sought ways to improve 
health care coverage for military retirees and their families, 
particularly those retirees who are over age 65 and are 
Medicare eligible. Specifically, the committee worked closely 
with the Committee on Ways and Means and the Committee on 
Commerce to establish a three-year demonstration program to 
allow Medicare-eligible military retirees to receive 
comprehensive health care at military facilities that would be 
reimbursed by Medicare; established a three-year demonstration 
program to allow up to 66,000 Medicare-eligible retirees and 
their families to enroll in the Federal Employees Health 
Benefits Program beginning January 1, 2000, under the same 
cost-sharing arrangements as other federal employees; directed 
the Department to plan a complete redesign of its pharmacy 
system to ensure that all military beneficiaries, including 
retirees, have access to a universal, uniform pharmacy benefit; 
established a demonstration program to test the feasibility of 
providing TRICARE coverage as a supplement to Medicare for 
eligible retirees and their families; and expanded eligibility 
for the retiree dental insurance program established in the 
104th Congress.

                         PERSIAN GULF ILLNESSES

    The Committee is concerned about the illnesses from which 
many Gulf War veterans have suffered since the end of the 
Persian Gulf War. Department of Defense disclosures reveal that 
many veterans may have been exposed to low levels of chemical 
agents. Criticisms by the General Accounting Office and the 
Presidential Advisory Committee on Gulf War Veterans' Illnesses 
on the Department's handling of issues surrounding these 
illnesses and exposures have also served to fuel widespread 
concerns. As a result, the committee conducted a hearing on the 
status of the investigations into Persian Gulf illnesses. 
Furthermore, the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 1998 (Public Law 105-85), included several provisions that 
addressed concerns relating to Persian Gulf illnesses. 
Specifically, it provided funds to evaluate treatments to 
relieve the symptoms of Gulf War illnesses; required the 
Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to 
develop a comprehensive plan for providing health care to all 
veterans, active-duty members and reservists suffering from 
symptoms of Gulf War illnesses; and directed the Secretary of 
Defense and the Secretary of Veterans Affairs to develop 
measures for monitoring the effectiveness and quality of 
follow-up health care services provided to Persian Gulf 
veterans experiencing symptoms of Gulf War illnesses. It also 
required the Secretary of Defense to establish a medical 
tracking system to be used during all overseas contingency or 
wartime operations, including humanitarian operations, for all 
deployed military members, including reservists, and required 
the Secretary of Defense to provide clear notification to 
service members that a drug being administered is an 
investigational new drug.
    The National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 
(Public Law 105-261), included a requirement for prior consent 
to be obtained from members of the armed forces before an 
investigational new drug can be administered by the services. 
However, the provision allowed the Secretary of Defense to 
request that the President waive the requirement for prior 
consent if the Secretary determines that obtaining prior 
consent is not feasible, is contrary to the best interests of 
the member involved, or is not in the best interests of 
national security. The National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 1999 (Public Law 105-261), also included a 
provision that provides the Secretary of Defense with authority 
to establish a center devoted to a longitudinal study to 
evaluate information on the health conditions of members of the 
armed forces upon their return from deployment on military 
operations in order to rapidly identify trends in illnesses or 
injuries among these members.

                                POW-MIA

    As an enhancement to reform measures passed during the 
104th Congress, the committee sponsored a comprehensive package 
of legislation that improved the ability of the nation to 
ensure the fullest possible accounting of POW/MIAs. The 
provisions, which were included in the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998 (Public Law 105-85), 
will better protect U.S. citizens who become missing during war 
or operations other than war and provide for increased 
involvement of the next of kin in the accounting process. The 
committee continued its oversight of DOD's implementation of 
these changes during a comprehensive hearing held near the 
conclusion of the 105th Congress.
                 OTHER ACTIVITIES OF THE FULL COMMITTEE

                            Budget Activity

    On March 20, 1997, the committee forwarded its views and 
estimates regarding the budget for National Defense (function 
050) for fiscal year 1998 to the Committee on the Budget. The 
committee noted that the President's Budget continued to 
provide inadequate resources for National Defense and, when 
adjusted for inflation, represented a reduction of over two 
percent from fiscal year 1997 spending levels. The committee 
also expressed its concern over the Administration's 
underestimation of defense outlays in the President's Budget in 
order to avoid domestic program reductions. The committee 
reemphasized its dedication to the priorities established in 
the 104th Congress to restore and preserve military readiness, 
to ensure technological superiority through timely 
modernization, to enhance the quality of life for military 
personnel and families, and to reform inefficient Department of 
Defense bureaucracies and processes. The committee further 
recommended National Defense (function 050) authorization 
levels of $268.2 billion in budget authority and $267.5 billion 
in outlays.
    On March 16, 1998, the committee forwarded its views and 
estimates regarding the budget for National Defense (function 
050) for fiscal year 1999 to the Committee on the Budget. The 
committee noted that although the defense spending level in the 
President's Budget was generally consistent with the defense 
spending budget authority cap set forth in the Balanced Budget 
Act of 1997, it represented a decline of one percent when 
adjusted for inflation. The committee noted that the 
Administration's estimate for defense outlays in the 
President's Budget was $3.6 billion lower than that of the 
Congressional Budget Office. The committee expressed its 
growing concern over the continuing inability of the White 
House's Office of Management and Budget and the Congressional 
Budget Office to achieve concensus on these annual estimates. 
The committee did not recommend specific National Defense 
(function 050) authorization levels for budget authority or 
outlays, but instead urged renegotiating the Balanced Budget 
Act of 1997 to increase the defense spending cap in order to 
permit sufficient funding of critical readiness, modernization 
and quality of life requirements of the military services.

                        Full Committee Hearings

    During the 105th Congress, the Committee on National 
Security held numerous hearings in accordance with its 
legislative and oversight roles. An examination of existing and 
emerging threats to U.S. national security interests provided 
the thematic overlay for the committee's consideration of the 
fiscal years 1998 and 1999 defense budget requests. Other full 
committee hearings focused on the deployment and employment of 
U.S. military forces abroad in places like Bosnia and the 
Persian Gulf, defense reform, the Quadrennial Defense Review 
(QDR), and technology transfers.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-1; H.N.S.C. 105-2; H.N.S.C. 105-11; H.N.S.C. 
105-14; H.N.S.C. 105-15; H.N.S.C. 105-16; H.N.S.C. 105-23; 
H.N.S.C. 105-24; H.N.S.C. 105-25; H.N.S.C. 105-27; H.N.S.C. 
105-39; H.N.S.C. 105-40; H.N.S.C. 105-42; H.N.S.C. 105-43; 
H.N.S.C. 105-45; H.N.S.C. 105-50; H.N.S.C. 105-51; H.N.S.C. 
105-52).

                            POSTURE HEARINGS

    Early in each session of the 105th Congress, the committee 
sought and received testimony from Administration officials 
with respect to the Administration's overall national security 
policy, plans, and programs, and the budget proposals requested 
to implement them. As part of its oversight obligations, the 
committee requested and received posture statements from the 
Secretary of Defense, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, the uniformed service chiefs, and the service 
Secretaries.
    In the first session, during deliberations on the Fiscal 
Year 1998 Defense Authorization Bill (H.R. 1119), the committee 
received testimony from Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen 
and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff General John 
Shalikashvili on February 12, 1997. Subsequently, the committee 
received testimony from the uniformed service chiefs; Gen. 
Dennis J. Reimer, Chief of Staff of the Army; Adm. Jay L. 
Johnson, Chief of Naval Operations; Gen. Charles C. Krulak, 
Commandant of the Marine Corps; and Gen. Ronald R. Fogleman, 
Chief of Staff of the Air Force, on March 5, 1997. The 
committee received testimony from the service secretaries; Togo 
D. West, Jr., Secretary of the Army; John H. Dalton, Secretary 
of the Navy; and Sheila E. Widnall, Secretary of the Air Force, 
on March 12, 1997.
    In addition, the committee heard from regional commanders-
in-chief. On March 6, 1997 the committee met to receive 
testimony from Gen. John H. Tilelli, USA, Commander in Chief, 
U.S. Forces Korea (USFK); Adm. Joseph W. Prueher, USN, 
Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific Command (PACOM); and Gen. John 
J. Sheehan, USMC, Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command 
(ACOM); and on March 19, 1997 from Gen. J.H. Binford Peay, III, 
USA, Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Central Command (CENTCOM); Gen. 
George A. Joulwan, USA, Commander-in-Chief, U.S. European 
Command (EUCOM); and Gen. Wesley K. Clark, USA, Commander-in-
Chief, U.S. Southern Command (SOCOM).
    During the second session, the committee began its 
consideration of the Fiscal Year 1999 Defense Authorization 
Bill (H.R. 3616) with its first posture hearing on February 5, 
1998, receiving testimony from Secretary Cohen and Chairman of 
the Joint Chiefs of Staff General Shelton. This was followed by 
a closed hearing on February 25, 1998 with Gen. John A. Gordon, 
Deputy Director Central Intelligence and Lt. Gen. Patrick M. 
Hughes, USA, Director of the Defense Intelligence Agency. 
Subsequently, the committee received testimony from regional 
commanders-in-chief. On March 4, 1998 the committee received 
testimony from Adm. Joseph W. Prueher, USN, Commander in Chief, 
U.S. Pacific Command; Gen. John H. Tilelli, USA, Commander in 
Chief, U.S. Forces Korea; and Adm. Harold W. Gehman, Jr., USN, 
Commander in Chief, U.S. Atlantic Command; and on March 5, 1998 
from Gen. Wesley K. Clark, USA, Commander in Chief, U.S. 
European Command; and Gen. Anthony C. Zinni, USMC, Commander in 
Chief, U.S. Central Command. On March 12, 1998 the committee 
heard from the uniformed service chiefs; General Dennis J. 
Reimer, Chief of Staff, Department of the Army; Admiral Jay L. 
Johnson, Chief of Naval Operations, Department of the Navy; 
General Michael E. Ryan, Chief of Staff, Department of the Air 
Force; and General Charles C. Krulak, Commandant, U.S. Marine 
Corps. The committee concluded its posture hearings on March 
26, 1998, receiving testimony from the service secretaries; 
Robert M. Walker, Acting Secretary of the Army; John H. Dalton, 
Secretary of the Navy, and F. Whitten Peters, Acting Secretary 
of the Air Force.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-2; H.N.S.C. 105-27).

                   THREATS TO U.S. NATIONAL SECURITY

    On February 13, 1997, the committee heard from former 
Directors of Central Intelligence, James Woolsey, William 
Webster, and James Schlesinger, to review the current and 
prospective threats to U.S. national security. This hearing, 
following the appearance of the Secretary of Defense and 
Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, provided additional 
context early in the budget cycle for consideration of the 
Administration's fiscal year 1998 budget request. This approach 
was repeated during the committee's consideration of the fiscal 
year 1999 budget request, as former Directors of Central 
Intelligence James Woolsey and John Deutch appeared before the 
committee on February 12, 1998 to offer their views on existing 
and emerging threats facing the United States.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-11; H.N.S.C. 105-40).

                       U.S. POLICY TOWARD BOSNIA

    During the 105th Congress, the committee continued its 
oversight of U.S. policy toward Bosnia and the Balkans region. 
Through hearings and numerous classified intelligence and 
operations briefings, the committee intensified its activities 
as the Administration lifted its deadline for the withdrawal of 
U.S. forces in the region and additional units were rotated 
through Bosnia, Macedonia and elsewhere in the region. The 
committee participated in a number of Congressional fact-
finding delegations to the region, and prepared a series of 
reports outlining and analyzing U.S. policy toward Bosnia and 
the Balkans, focusing especially on the operational and 
readiness strains caused by the extended presence of U.S. and 
NATO forces. These activities covered every aspect of that 
policy, from broad issues of political reconstruction in Bosnia 
and the former Yugoslavia to issues of NATO military 
burdensharing and the cost and preparedness of U.S. forces for 
an open-ended mission in the region. As the crisis in Kosovo 
developed, the committee hosted a series of classified 
briefings for all Members of the House of Representatives on 
these issues.
    As part of its efforts to gain a thorough understanding of 
U.S. policy toward Bosnia and to provide comprehensive 
oversight of U.S. military deployments to the former 
Yugoslavia, the committee also received testimony from the 
Secretary of Defense, the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of 
Staff, the Secretary of State, Department of Defense officials, 
the intelligence community and non-governmental experts 
familiar with the region.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-43).

                        U.S. POLICY TOWARD IRAQ

    During the 105th Congress, the committee's oversight role 
with respect to military deployments in the Persian Gulf region 
peaked as relations between Iraq and the United States worsened 
and strong U.S. military actions were contemplated. As the 
crisis continued throughout 1997 and 1998, the committee 
received a series of Administration operational and 
intelligence briefings on the situation regarding Iraq. In 
addition, a series of informal committee meetings were held 
with Middle East experts, former U.S. government officials, and 
former UN weapons inspectors. In response to the worsening 
overall situation, the committee held a hearing on September 
16, 1998, to explore U.S. policy toward Iraq and the long-term 
viability of the weapons inspections regime. In both the fiscal 
year 1998 and fiscal year 1999 defense authorization bills, the 
committee extended the Department of Defense's authority to 
provide UN weapons inspectors in Iraq with expertise, 
equipment, and materiel in support of the UN-mandated weapons 
inspection mission.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-51).

       Special Oversight Panel on Morale, Welfare and Recreation

    The Special Oversight Panel on Morale, Welfare and 
Recreation was appointed for the 105th Congress on February 4, 
1997.
    The panel conducted four hearings under its jurisdiction 
during the 105th Congress. Reviews of the fiscal year 1998 
budget request for morale, welfare and recreation (MWR) 
programs were conducted on March 20, 1997 and April 10, 1997, 
while reviews of the fiscal year 1999 budget request were 
conducted on March 3, 1998 and March 12, 1998. The panel 
continued its oversight of the military services' MWR programs 
and operations of the Defense Commissary Agency (DeCA) and the 
military exchanges. Issues examined included the adequacy of 
military service MWR capitalization programs; examination of 
the pricing policy for tobacco products; the importance of the 
military resale system as a non pay benefit; and efforts to 
improve the efficiency of the operation of the commissaries, 
exchanges, and MWR activities.
    This active oversight resulted in a number of initiatives 
contained in National Defense Authorization Acts for Fiscal 
Years 1998 and 1999 (Public Laws 105-85 and 105-261). These 
included protecting the funding of the Defense Commissary 
Agency by requiring the Department of Defense to manage and 
fund the agency, establishing the pricing policy of tobacco 
products in commissaries; expanding reserve commissary 
privileges from 12 to 24 visits per year; and requiring the 
Department of Defense to allow authorized patrons unfettered 
access to exchange and commissary items overseas.
    Other panel initiatives included expanding of types of 
merchandise that military exchanges may sell, and prohibiting 
further closure of libraries on military installations. The 
panel also continued its annual review of the commissary 
surcharge and nonappropriated fund construction program.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-8; H.N.S.C. 105-33)

             Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine

    The Special Oversight Panel on the Merchant Marine was 
appointed for the 105th Congress on February 4, 1997. On March 
19, 1997, the panel held a hearing to receive testimony on the 
budget request for fiscal year 1998 for the Panama Canal 
Commission and on legislative proposals to ease the transition 
of the canal to the government of Panama on December 31, 1999. 
Representatives of the Panama Canal Commission testified on 
these matters. On June 4, 1997, the panel recommended 
authorization levels for the Panama Canal Commission for fiscal 
year 1998. The panel also provided recommendations for 
additional changes to the Commission's organic statute to ease 
the transition. These recommendations were adopted by the 
committee on June 11, 1998, by unanimous voice vote, and were 
subsequently included in title XXXV of Division C of the 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1998 (Public 
Law 105-85).
    During the March 19, 1997 hearing, the panel also received 
testimony on the budget request for the Maritime Administration 
for fiscal year 1998. On June 4, 1997, the panel provided 
recommendations to the committee on authorization levels for 
the Maritime Administration. These recommendations were adopted 
by the committee on June 11, 1997 by unanimous voice vote. 
These recommendations were included in title XXXVI of Division 
C of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
1998 (Public Law 105-85).
    On March 10, 1998, the panel held a hearing to receive 
testimony on the budget request for fiscal year 1999 for the 
Panama Canal Commission and on legislative proposals to ease 
the transition of the canal to the government of Panama on 
December 31, 1999. The Honorable Togo D. West, Chairman of the 
Board of Directors of the Panama Canal Commission, and Alberto 
Aleman, Administrator of the Panama Canal Commission testified 
on these matters. On April 29, 1998, the panel recommended 
authorization levels for the Panama Canal Commission for fiscal 
year 1999. The panel also provided recommendations for the 
final legislation to facilitate the smooth transition of 
control of the canal to the government of Panama on December 
31, 1999. These recommendations were adopted by the committee 
on May 6, 1998, by unanimous voice vote, and were subsequently 
included in title XXXV of Division C of the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 (Public Law 105-261).
    During the March 10, 1998 hearing, the panel also received 
testimony on the budget request for the Maritime Administration 
for fiscal year 1999. On April 29, 1998, the panel provided 
recommendations to the committee on authorization levels for 
the Maritime Administration. These recommendations were adopted 
by the committee on May 6, 1998 by unanimous voice vote. These 
recommendations were included in title XXXVI of Division C of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 
(Public Law 105-261).
    (H.N.S.C. 105-13; H.N.S.C. 105-34).
                   OTHER ACTIVITIES OF SUBCOMMITTEES

           Military Installations and Facilities Subcommittee

    The Military Installations and Facilities Subcommittee held 
several hearings in support of its consideration of the fiscal 
year 1998 and fiscal year 1999 budget request for the military 
construction, military family housing, and other related 
programs of the Department of Defense and the military 
services. In addition to its consideration of the annual budget 
request, the subcommittee considered and reported legislation 
in each session of the 105th Congress which was included in 
division B of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal 
Year 1998 (Public Law 105-85) and the National Defense 
Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1999 (Public Law 105-261). In 
both instances, the legislation included alterations to the 
management of the military construction program and the 
military family housing program, modifications of the defense 
base closure and realignment process, and provisions affecting 
the conveyance, exchange, transfer of jurisdiction, or 
modification to existing statutory authority on the disposition 
of real property. The subcommittee reported legislation to 
reauthorize the Sikes Act.
    The subcommittee took testimony from senior officials of 
the Department of Defense and senior officials and active and 
reserve component officers of the Department of Defense, the 
Department of the Army, the Department of the Navy, including 
the Marine Corps, the Department of the Air Force, the 
Congressional Budget Office, the General Accounting Office, the 
Air Force Sergeants Association, the Fleet Reserve Association, 
the National Military Family Association, the Non-Commissioned 
Officers Association, the Reserve Officers Association and 
members of Congress.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-7; H.N.S.C. 105-32)

    IMPLEMENTATION OF THE MILITARY HOUSING PRIVATIZATION INITIATIVE

    During the 105th Congress, the subcommittee met on March 
13, 1997, and March 10, 1998, to conduct oversight hearings on 
the implementation by the Department of Defense and the 
military departments of the Military Housing Privatization 
Initiative (subchapter IV, chapter 169 of title 10, United 
States Code). The subcommittee took testimony from senior 
officials of the Department of Defense and the military 
services.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-7; H.N.S.C. 105-32)

 CURRENT IMPLEMENTATION ISSUES IN BASE REALIGNMENT AND CLOSURE ACTIONS

    The subcommittee met on March 18, 1997 to conduct an 
oversight hearing on the current implementation issues in base 
realignment and closure actions. The subcommittee took 
testimony from senior officials of the Department of Defense 
and Congressional Budget Office.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-7)

                OVERSEAS QUALITY OF LIFE INFRASTRUCTURE

    The subcommittee met on April 8, 1997 to conduct an 
oversight hearing on the overseas quality of life 
infrastructure. The subcommittee took testimony from senior 
officers of the military services.
    (H.N.S.C 105-7)

              LONG-TERM PLANNING FOR MILITARY CONSTRUCTION

    The subcommittee met on April 10, 1997 to conduct an 
oversight hearing to assess the military construction component 
of the Future Years Defense Plan (FYDP) and the adequacy of the 
FYDP in addressing future facilities recapitalization and 
modernization requirements. The subcommittee took testimony 
from a senior official of the Department of Defense.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-7)

      INFRASTRUCTURE IMPLICATIONS OF THE DEFENSE REFORM INITATIVE

     The subcommittee met on March 18, 1998, to conduct an 
oversight hearing on the infrastructure implications of the 
Defense Reform Initiative. The subcommittee took testimony from 
senior officials of the Department of Defense and the General 
Accounting Office.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-32)

                    Military Personnel Subcommittee

    The Military Personnel Subcommittee held a series hearings 
to review the manpower portion of the fiscal years 1998 and 
1999 defense budget requests: February 11, 1997, on the status 
of the investigation into Persian Gulf War illnesses; February 
27, 1997, on the Department of Defense health care alternatives 
for military Medicare-eligible beneficiaries; March 4, 1997 
(joint hearing with Military Readiness Subcommittee), readiness 
and personnel: views from the field; March 13, 1997, military 
compensation reform and recruiting/retention issues; April 8, 
1997, review of general and flag officer authorizations; May 8, 
1997, the status of the ready reserve mobilization income 
insurance program; July 29, 1997, reserve component issues from 
the Quadrennial Defense Review; October 1, 1997, Department of 
the Army reports on and corrective actions related to recent 
cases of sexual misconduct and related matters; January 29, 
1998, the Quadrennial Defense Review and National Defense Panel 
recommendations--how new perspectives of force structure, 
mission, and resource allocation impact manpower resources and 
personnel policy; February 26, 1998, status of the TRICARE 
program; March 12, 1998, military recruiting, retention and 
related personnel programs and policies; March 17, 1998, 
findings of the Federal Advisory Committee on Gender-Integrated 
Training and Related Issues and Department of Defense response; 
March 20, 1998 (joint hearing with Military Readiness 
Subcommittee), assess readiness of Army follow-on forces and 
review Army-National Guard integrated divisions; September 24, 
1998, adequacy of the fiscal year 1999 Defense Health Program 
budget; September 25, 1998 (joint hearing with Readiness and 
Military Installations Subcommittees), readiness realities; 
September 28, 1998, awarding of the Medal of Honor to Theodore 
Roosevelt; and October 2, 1998, POW/MIA oversight. Briefings 
held: March 6, 1997, reserve component personnel; March 18, 
1997, the link between strategy and force structure; April 8, 
1997, military criminal investigative procedures; April 23, 
1997, military criminal investigative procedures. Meetings held 
with POW/MIA groups: May 1, 1997, and October 29, 1997. Staff 
briefings: November 7, 1997, on General Accounting Office 
report on April 15, 1994, shootdown of Black Hawk helicopters; 
April 1, 1998, Surgeons General on the promotion process.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-6; H.N.S.C. 105-9; H.N.S.C. 105-10; H.N.S.C. 
105-19, H.N.S.C. 105-31; H.N.S.C. 105-44, H.N.S.C. 105-46; 
H.N.S.C. 105-47)

                   Military Procurement Subcommittee

    The Subcommittee on Military Procurement conducted numerous 
oversight hearings and briefings during the 105th Congress in 
its consideration of the fiscal years 1998 and 1999 Department 
of Defense and Department of Energy (DOE) budget requests: 
February 25, 1997 and February 25, 1998 (joint briefings with 
Military Research and Development Subcommittee), intelligence 
community assessments; February 26, 1997 (joint hearing with 
the Military Research and Development Subcommittee), Navy 
shipbuilding; March 5, 1997 (joint hearing with the Military 
Research and Development Subcommittee), tactical fighter 
aircraft modernization; March 11, 1997, destruction of the U.S. 
chemical weapons stockpile; March 11, 1997 and March 5, 1998 
(joint hearings with Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee), Army modernization; March 12, 1997, B-2 bomber 
production; March 18, 1997, new attack submarine program; March 
19, 1997 and May 15, 1997 (joint hearings with Military 
Research and Development Subcommittee), ballistic missile 
defense issues; March 20, 1997 (joint hearing with Military 
Research and Development Subcommittee), information assurance; 
April 8, 1997, acquisition workforce; April 9, 1997 (joint 
hearing with Military Research and Development Subcommittee), 
airborne reconnaissance/unmanned aerial vehicle programs; April 
10, 1997 and March 19, 1998, Department of Energy programs; 
November 6, 1997, February 26, 1998, and October 8, 1998 (joint 
hearings with Military Research and Development Subcommittee), 
defense-wide modernization issues; March 4, 1998 (joint hearing 
with Military Research and Development Subcommittee), Navy and 
Marine Corps modernization issues; March 10, 1998 (joint 
hearing with Military Research and Development Subcommittee), 
Air Force modernization issues; April 1, 1998, long range 
airpower; and June 11, 1998 (joint hearing with Military 
Research and Development Subcommittee), critical infrastructure 
protection.
    In addition, the subcommittee held other hearings on other 
matters: April 15, 1997, sale or transfer of supercomputers to 
foreign entities or governments engaged in nuclear weapons 
research and the impact of such transfer on U.S. national 
security interests; September 29, 1998 (joint hearing with 
Military Research and Development Subcommittee and with Space 
and Aeronautics Subcommittee, Committee on Science), U.S. space 
power in the 21st century; October 6, 1998, DOE foreign visitor 
control program; and October 8, 1998, procedures for the 
donation of naval vessels stricken from the register.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-3; H.N.S.C. 105-12; H.N.S.C. 105-26; H.N.S.C. 
105-28; H.N.S.C. 105-41; H.N.S.C. 105-48; H.N.S.C. 105-49; 
H.N.S.C. 105-53)

                    Military Readiness Subcommittee

    The Military Readiness Subcommittee conducted a review of 
the operations and maintenance portion of the fiscal years 1998 
and 1999 Department off Defense authorization requests and held 
a series of hearings within its jurisdiction. Major areas of 
the subcommittee's examinations included: military readiness 
trends and perspectives; defense reform initiatives; DOD 
efforts in measuring readiness; depot-level maintenance issues; 
DOD acquisition workforce; operation and maintenance financial 
management issues; mission capability rates; improving 
readiness capabilities; military training issues; quarterly 
readiness reports; assessing the readiness of Army follow-on 
forces and Army National Guard integrated divisions; and issues 
concerning the Naval Petroleum Reserves and the National 
Defense Stockpile of strategic and critical materials. In 
addition, the subcommittee conducted a series of field hearings 
at the following locations: Langley Air Force Base, Virginia; 
North Island Naval Air Station, Fort Monroe, Virginia; and Fort 
Riley, Kansas.
    The subcommittee undertook a detailed and extensive 
examination of issues concerning the outsourcing of DOD 
activities to the private sector which culminated in a major 
legislative initiative in this area. In addition, the 
subcommittee conducted an in-depth review of the financial 
management practices of the Department of Defense with a 
special emphasis on the Defense Working Capital Fund 
activities.
    In the first session of the 105th Congress, the 
subcommittee developed a legislative package to permit the 
leasing of Naval Oil Shale Reserves numbered 1 and 3 and 
required the revenue from any leases be applied towards 
environmental remediation of these reserves; and in the second 
session, developed a legislative package that provided for the 
transfer of the remaining reserves contained in the Naval 
Petroleum Reserves to the Department of the Interior.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-5; H.N.S.C. 105-17; H.N.S.C. 105-30; H.N.S.C. 
105-54).

             Military Research and Development Subcommittee

    The Subcommittee on Military Research and Development 
conducted numerous oversight hearings to review programs 
included in the DOD research and development budget requests 
for fiscal years 1998 and 1999 during the 105th Congress. In 
addition to traditional budget oversight reviews, the 
subcommittee conducted a number of hearings jointly with the 
Subcommittee on Military Procurement to address specific areas 
of concern to both subcommittees. Issues addressed during these 
hearings included proliferation of ballistic missiles in North 
Korea, Iran, and China; recent developments in security and 
control of Russian nuclear weapons; threats to the U.S. 
national and military critical information infrastructure; and 
Federal response to domestic terrorism involving weapons of 
mass destruction.
    The subcommittee also conducted hearings and briefings 
during the 105th Congress to address concerns over inadequate 
future year funding for the Department's tactical aviation 
programs and to conclude efforts initiated during the 104th 
Congress to streamline the Department's ineffective Defense 
Airborne Reconnaissance Office and revitalize the military 
service unmanned aerial vehicles programs. The subcommittee 
also received testimony on the Administration's program for 
critical infrastructure protection, information superiority for 
the 21st century battlefield, and the status of the defense 
science and technology base.
    (H.N.S.C. 105-04; H.N.S.C. 105-12; H.N.S.C. 105-18; 
H.N.S.C. 105-20; H.N.S.C. 105-21; H.N.S.C.105-22; H.N.S.C. 105-
28; H.N.S.C. 105-36; H.N.S.C. 105-37; H.N.S.C. 105-38; H.N.S.C. 
105-48)
                              PUBLICATIONS

         Committee Prints of Laws Relating to National Defense

                            Committee Prints

    1. Committee rules, adopted February 5, 1997.
    2. A Ceremony Unveiling the Portrait of The Honorable 
Ronald V. Dellums, September 24, 1997.

                         Published Proceedings

    H.N.S.C. 105-1--Full committee organization. February 5, 
1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-2--Full committee hearing on the National 
Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 1998 H.R. 1119 
Authorization and Oversight. February 12, March 5, 6, 12, and 
19, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-3--Military Procurement Subcommittee hearings 
on Title I--Procurement of H.R. 1119, to authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 1998 for military activities of 
the Department of Defense, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for fiscal year 1998, and for other purposes. March 
11, 12, and 18, April 8, 10, and 15, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-4--Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee hearings on Title II--Research, Development, Test, 
and Evaluation of H.R. 1119, to authorize appropriations for 
fiscal year 1998 for military activities of the Department of 
Defense, to prescribe military personnel strengths for fiscal 
year 1998, and for other purposes. February 27, 28, March 6, 
13, and May 7, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-5--Military Readiness Subcommittee hearings on 
Title III--Operation and Maintenance of H.R. 1119, to authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 1998 for military activities of 
the Department of Defense, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for fiscal year 1998, and for other purposes. March 
3, 4, 11, 12, 18, and May 7, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-6--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearings on 
Title IV--Personnel Authorizations, Title V--Military Personnel 
Policy, Title VI--Compensation and Other Personnel Benefits, 
and Title VII--Health Care Provisions of H.R. 1119, to 
authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1998 for military 
activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military 
personnel strengths for fiscal year 1998, and for other 
purposes. February 27, March 13, April 8, and May 8, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-7--Military Installations and Facilities 
Subcommittee hearings on Division B--Military Construction 
Authorizations (H.R. 909) of H.R. 1119, to authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 1998 for military activities of 
the Department of Defense, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for fiscal year 1998, and for other purposes. 
February 27, March 4, 13, 18, April 8, 10, and May 8, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-8--Morale, Welfare and Recreation Special 
Oversight Panel hearings on morale, welfare and recreation and 
commissary issues. March 20 and April 10, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-9--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearing on 
the Department of the Army reports on and corrective actions 
related to recent cases of sexual misconduct and related 
matters. October 1, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-10--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearing on 
the status of the investigation into Persian Gulf War 
Illnesses. February 11, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-11--Full committee hearing on threats to U.S. 
National Security. February 13, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-12--Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee hearings on Title II--Research, Development, Test 
and Evaluation jointly meeting with Military Procurement 
Subcommittee hearings on Title I--Procurement of H.R. 1119, to 
authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1998 for military 
activities of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military 
personnel strengths for fiscal year 1998, and for other 
purposes. February 26, March 5, 11, 19, 20, April 9, and May 
15, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-13--Merchant Marine Special Oversight Panel 
hearing on annual authorization of the Panama Canal Commission 
and the annual authorization for the United States Maritime 
Administration. March 19, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-14--Full committee hearings on the Quadrennial 
Defense Review. April 16, May 21 and 22, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-15--Full committee hearing on the United 
States Policy regarding NATO Expansion. July 17, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-16--Full committee hearings on the Defense 
Reform Act of 1997. February 26 and June 17, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-17--Military Readiness Subcommittee hearing on 
Operation and Maintenance financial management practices. July 
22, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-18--Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee hearing on the threat posed by electromagnetic 
pulse (EMP) to U.S. military systems and civil infrastructure. 
July 16, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-19--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearing on 
the reserve component issues from the Quadrennial Defense 
Review. July 29, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-20--Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee hearing on Ballistic Missile Threat Posed by Iran. 
November 5, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-21--Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee hearing on the federal response to domestic 
terrorism involving weapons of mass destruction and the status 
of the Department of Defense support program. November 4, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-22--Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee hearings on nuclear terrorism and countermeasures. 
October 1 and 2, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-23--Full committee hearing on H.R. 695, The 
Security and Freedom Through Encryption Act. July 30, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-24--Full committee hearing on the President's 
Line-Item Veto Action on fiscal year 1998 Defense And Military 
Construction Appropriations Bills. October 22, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-25--Full committee hearing on U.S. 
supercomputer export control. November 13, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-26--Military Procurement Subcommittee hearing 
on Department of Defense modernization plans. November 6, 1997.
    H.N.S.C. 105-27--Full committee hearing on the National 
Defense Authorization Act For fiscal year 1999, H.R. 3616 
Authorization and Oversight. February 5, March 4, 5, 12 and 26, 
1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-28--Military Procurement and Military Research 
and Development Subcommittee hearings on the National Defense 
Authorization Act for fiscal year 1999, H.R. 3616 Authorization 
and Oversight for Titles I and II, Procurement and Research, 
Development, Test and Evaluation. February 26, March 4, 5, 10, 
April 1, June 11, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-30--Military Readiness Subcommittee hearings 
on the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 1999, 
H.R. 3616 Authorization and Oversight for Title III--Operation 
and Maintenance. February 24, 25, March 6, 11, 13, 16, 18, and 
20.
    H.N.S.C. 105-31--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearings 
on the National Defense Authorization Act for fiscal year 1999 
H.R. 3616 Authorization and Oversight for Title IV--Personnel 
Authorizations, Title V--Military Personnel Policy, Title VI--
Compensation and Other Personnel Benefits, Title VII--Health 
Care Provisions. January 29, February 26, March 12 and 17, 
1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-32--Military Installations and Facilities 
Subcommittee hearings on Division B--Military Construction 
Authorizations (H.R. 3695) of H.R. 3616, to authorize 
appropriations for fiscal year 1999 for military activities of 
the Department of Defense, to prescribe military personnel 
strengths for fiscal year 1999, and for other purposes. 
February 26, March 3, 10, and 18, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-33--Morale, Welfare and Recreation Special 
Oversight Panel hearings on morale, welfare and recreation and 
commissary issues. March 3 and 12, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-34--Merchant Marine Special Oversight Panel 
hearing on annual authorization of the Panama Canal Commission 
and the annual authorization for the United States Maritime 
Administration. March 10, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-35--Full committee hearing on consideration of 
resolution honoring The Honorable Ronald V. Dellums. February 
4, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-36--Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee hearing on Russian National Security Issues. March 
19, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-37--Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee hearing on federal response to domestic terrorism 
involving weapons of mass destruction training for first 
responders. March 21, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-38--Military Research and Development 
Subcommittee hearing on U.S./Russian national security issues. 
August 4, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-39--Full committee hearing on the Defense 
Reform Initiative. March 11, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-40--Full committee hearing on threats to 
United States national security. February 12, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-41--Military Procurement Subcommittee hearing 
on the Department of Energy budget request for fiscal year 1999 
and related matters. March 19, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-42--Full committee hearing on competition for 
depot maintenance workload. June 4, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-43--Full committee hearing on U.S. policy on 
Bosnia. March 18, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-44--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearing on 
the awarding of the Medal of Honor to Theodore Roosevelt. 
September 28, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-45--Full committee hearing on the finding and 
conclusions of the Commission to Assess Ballistic Missile 
Threat to the United States. July 16, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-46--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearing on 
adequacy of the fiscal year 1999 Defense health program budget. 
September 24, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-47--Military Personnel Subcommittee hearing on 
POW/MIA oversight. October 2, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-48--Military Procurement Subcommittee hearing 
on the Department of Defense modernization plan. October 8, 
1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-49--Military Procurement Subcommittee hearing 
on the navy ship donation procedures. October 8, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-50--Full committee hearing on the U.S. Policy 
regarding the export of satellites to China. June 17, 18 and 
23, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-51--Full committee hearing on the U.S. policy 
towards Iraq. September 16, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-52--Full committee hearing on the state of 
U.S. military forces and their ability to execute the national 
military strategy. October 7, 1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-53--Military Procurement Subcommittee hearing 
on Department of Energy foreign visitors program. October 6, 
1998.
    H.N.S.C. 105-54--Military Readiness Subcommittee hearing on 
readiness realities. September 25, 1998.

                             House Reports

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Report number              Date filed              Bill number                        Title
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
105-108, part 3.........  Sep. 12, 1997..........  H.R. 695...............  To amend title 18, United States
                                                                             Code, to affirm the rights of
                                                                             United States persons to use and
                                                                             sell encryption and to relax export
                                                                             controls on encryption.
105-132.................  June 16, 1997..........  H.R. 1119..............  To authorize appropriations for
                                                                             fiscal years 1998 and 1999 for
                                                                             military activities of the
                                                                             Department of Defense, to prescribe
                                                                             troop strengths for fiscal years
                                                                             1998 and 1999, and for other
                                                                             purposes.
105-133, part 1.........  June 17, 1997..........  H.R. 1778..............  To reform the Department of Defense.
105-340.................  Oct. 23, 1997..........  H.R. 1119 Conf. Rept...  To authorize appropriations for
                                                                             fiscal years 1998 and 1999 for
                                                                             military activities of the
                                                                             Department of Defense, to prescribe
                                                                             troop strengths for fiscal years
                                                                             1998 and 1999, and for other
                                                                             purposes.
105-468, part 1.........  Mar. 26, 1998..........  H.R. 2786..............  To authorize additional
                                                                             appropriations for the Department
                                                                             of Defense for ballistic missile
                                                                             defenses and other measures to
                                                                             counter the emerging threat posed
                                                                             to the United States and its allies
                                                                             in the Middle East and Persian Gulf
                                                                             region by the development and
                                                                             deployment of ballistic missiles by
                                                                             Iran.
105-532.................  May 12, 1998...........  H.R. 3616 Conf. Rept...  To authorize appropriations for
                                                                             fiscal year 1999 for military
                                                                             activities of the Department of
                                                                             Defense, to prescribe military
                                                                             personnel strengths for fiscal year
                                                                             1999, and for other purposes.
105-736.................  Sep. 22, 1998..........  H.R. 3616..............  To authorize appropriations for
                                                                             fiscal year 1999 for military
                                                                             activities of the Department of
                                                                             Defense, to prescribe military
                                                                             personnel strengths for fiscal year
                                                                             1999, and for other purposes.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              Public Laws

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
       Law number              Date approved             Bill number                        Title
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
105-41..................  Aug. 13, 1997..........  H.R. 1585..............  To allow postal patrons to
                                                                             contribute to funding for breast
                                                                             cancer research through the
                                                                             voluntary purchase of certain
                                                                             specially issued United States
                                                                             postage stamps, and for other
                                                                             purposes.
105-85..................  Nov. 18, 1997..........  H.R. 1119..............  To authorize appropriations for
                                                                             fiscal years 1998 and 1999 for
                                                                             military activities of the
                                                                             Department of Defense, to prescribe
                                                                             troop strengths for fiscal years
                                                                             1998 and 1999, and for other
                                                                             purposes.
105-103.................  Nov. 20, 1997..........  H.R. 2813..............  To waive time limitations specified
                                                                             by law in order to allow the Medal
                                                                             of of Honor to be awarded to Robert
                                                                             R. Ingram of Jacksonville, Florida,
                                                                             for acts of valor while a Navy
                                                                             Hospital Corpsman in the Republic
                                                                             of Vietnam during the Vietnam
                                                                             conflict.
105-129.................  Dec. 1, 1997...........  S. 1507................  To amend the National Defense
                                                                             Authorization Act for fiscal year
                                                                             1998 to make certain technical
                                                                             corrections.
105-152.................  Dec. 17, 1997..........  H.R. 2796..............  To authorize the reimbursement of
                                                                             members of the Army deployed to
                                                                             Europe in support of operations in
                                                                             Bosnia for certain out-of-pocket
                                                                             expenses incurred by the members
                                                                             during the period beginning on
                                                                             October 1, 1996 and ending on May
                                                                             31, 1997.
105-222.................  Aug. 7, 1998...........  H.R. 3731..............  To designate the auditorium located
                                                                             within the Sandia Technology
                                                                             Transfer Center in Albuquerque, New
                                                                             Mexico, as the ``Steve Schiff
                                                                             Auditorium''.
105-261.................  Oct. 17, 1998..........  H.R. 3616..............  To authorize appropriations for
                                                                             fiscal year 1999 for military
                                                                             activities of the Department of
                                                                             Defense, to prescribe military
                                                                             personnel strengths for fiscal year
                                                                             1999, and for other purposes.
105-371.................  Nov. 12, 1998..........  H.R. 2263..............  To authorize and request the
                                                                             President to award the
                                                                             Congressional Medal of Honor
                                                                             posthumously to Theodore Roosevelt
                                                                             for his gallant and heroic actions
                                                                             in the attack on San Juan Heights,
                                                                             Cuba, during the Spanish-American
                                                                             War.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                             PRESS RELEASES

                             First Session

    January 7, 1997--Chairman Spence Announces Leadership of 
House National Security Committee.
    February 6, 1997--Chairman Spence's Reaction to the Clinton 
Defense Budget.
    February 6, 1997--Subcommittee Chairman Hefley Reacts to 
the Clinton Defense Budget.
    February 6, 1997--Subcommittee Chairman Weldon Reacts to 
the Clinton Defense Budget.
    February 10, 1997--Chairman Spence Announces 105th Congress 
Subcommittee Assignments.
    February 12, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at FY 1998 
SecDef/CJCS Posture Hearing.
    February 13, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at Hearing 
on Threats to U.S. National Security Interests.
    February 14, 1997--Chairman Spence Announces 105th Congress 
HNSC Panel Assignments.
    February 26, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full 
Committee Hearing on Defense Reform.
    February 26, 1997--Press Advisory: HNSC Subcommittee on 
Military Readiness to Hold Field Hearing at Langley AFB.
    March 3, 1997--Press Advisory: HNSC Readiness and Personnel 
Subcommittees to Continue Evaluation of U.S. Force Readiness.
    March 5, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at the Military 
Chiefs' Hearing.
    March 5, 1997--Spence Criticizes Defense Budget.
    March 6, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at the Hearing 
on U.S. Defense Posture with Regional U.S. Commanders in Chief.
    March 12, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at the Military 
Service Secretaries' Hearing.
    March 13, 1997--Subcommittee Chairman Buyer Outlines Plans 
for Congressional Oversight of Sexual Misconduct in the 
Military.
    March 14, 1997--Chairman Spence Appoints HNSC Vice-Chairs.
    March 19, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at Hearing with 
EUCOM, CENTCOM, and SOUTHCOM CINCS.
    March 20, 1997--Chairman Spence Calls for Withdrawl of U.S. 
Troops from Bosnia.
    April 8, 1997--Chairman Spence--China: U.S. Obstacle to 
Superpower Status.
    April 8, 1997--Selected Military Capabilities of the 
People's Republic of China.
    April 9, 1997--Chairman Spence Warns of Worsening Military 
Readiness.
    April 9, 1997--Military Readiness 1997: Rhetoric and 
Reality.
    April 16, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full 
Committee Hearing on the Quadrennial Defense Review and 
National Defense Panel.
    April 29, 1997--Military Personnel Chairman Buyer, and 
Reps. Fowler and Harman Following the Court Martial Verdict of 
Staff Sergeant Delmar G. Simpson.
    May 6, 1997--Chairman Spence Responds to Reports of 
Administration Funding Shortfalls for National Missile Defense.
    May 6, 1997--Chairman Spence Responds to Cohen's Call for 
BRAC.
    May 7, 1997--Members of the House National Security 
Committee to Visit Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri.
    May 19, 1997--The QDR: ``Deja Vu All Over Again''.
    May 21, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at the Full 
Committee Hearing on the QDR.
    May 22, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at the Military 
Service Chiefs Hearing on the QDR.
    June 4, 1997--Chairman Spence: Monitoring Exports to Hong 
Kong Critical for National Security, Nonproliferation Reasons.
    June 5, 1997--House National Security Committee Leadership 
Introduce H.R. 1778, The Defense Reform Act of 1997.
    June 11, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at the Full 
Committee Hearing Mark-Up of H.R. 1119, The FY 1998 Defense 
Authorization Act.
    June 11, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at the Full 
Committee Mark-Up of H.R. 1778, The Defense Reform Act of 1997.
    June 11, 1997--Chairman Spence Upon Committee Approval of 
H.R. 1778--The Defense Reform Act of 1997.
    June 12, 1997--H.R. 1119: Chairman Spence upon Committee 
Approval of H.R. 1119, Summary of Major Provisions, and Chart 
Indicating Actions on Major Programs in the bill.
    June 12, 1997--H.R. 1119: Summary of Major Provisions as 
Reported by the House National Security Committee.
    June 17, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at the Hearing 
on H.R. 1778, The Defense Reform Act of 1997.
    June 23, 1997--Chairman Spence Applauds House B-2 Decision.
    June 25, 1997--House Votes to Balance Defense Priorities.
    June 26, 1997--Subcommittee Chairman Buyer Releases Interim 
Report on Sexual Misconduct in the Military.
    June 26, 1997--Buyer, Fowler, Harman Release Report on 
Sexual Misconduct Investigation.
    June 26, 1997--Sexual Misconduct in the Military: A 
Congressional Review (Interim Report).
    July 17, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at Hearing on 
NATO Expansion.
    July 30, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at Hearing on 
Encryption.
    September 9, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at Mark-Up 
of H.R. 695--The Security and Freedom through Encryption (SAFE) 
Act.
    September 10, 1997--Chairman Spence and Ranking Member 
Dellums Release Report Declaring Administration Supercomputer 
Policy ``Inadequate for National Security Purposes.''
    September 11, 1997--Statement of Subcommittee Chairman 
Buyer, and Representatives Fowler and Harman on the Army's 
Release of Sexual Misconduct Investigation Findings.
    October 6, 1997--Chairman Spence Reacts to Line Item Veto 
of Military Construction Bill.
    October 22, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at Hearing on 
the President's Line Item Vetoes of the FY 1998 Defense and 
Military Construction Appropriations Bills.
    October 23, 1997--Chairman Spence: Conferees Reach 
Agreement on FY 98 Defense Authorization Bill (H.R. 1119), 
Summary of Major Provisions, and Chart on Major Programs in the 
bill.
    October 31, 1997--Chairman Spence: DOE Lax on Background 
Checks of Foreign Visitors to Nuclear Weapons Labs.
    November 10, 1997--Chairman Spence: Secretary Cohen's 
Release of DOD Reform Task Force Recommendations.
    November 13, 1997--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full 
Committee Hearing on Supercomputer Export Controls.

                             Second Session

    January 6, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement on The Death 
of Representative Sonny Bono.
    January 30, 1998--Spence, Dellums Make Appointments to 
Commission on Military Training and Gender Relations.
    February 5, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full 
Committee Hearing on the FY 1999 Defense Budget.
    February 12, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full 
Committee Hearing on Threats to United States National 
Security.
    March 2, 1998--Press Advisory: National Security 
Subcommittee on Readiness to Conduct Field Hearing in San 
Diego.
    March 4, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full 
Committee Hearing with Regional Commanders-In-Chief (I).
    March 5, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full 
Committee Hearing with Regional Commanders-In-Chief (II).
    March 11, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full 
Committee Hearing on the Defense Reform Initiative.
    March 11, 1998--Press Advisory: National Security 
Subcommittee on Readiness to Conduct Field Hearing at Fort 
Monroe, Virginia.
    March 12, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full 
Committee Hearing with Service Chiefs.
    March 16, 1998--Press Advisory: National Security 
Subcommittees to Conduct Field Hearing at Fort Riley, Kansas.
    March 17, 1998--Chairman Spence Calls for Renegotiation of 
Balanced Budget Agreement, Increased Defense Spending.
    March 17, 1998--Press Advisory: National Security 
Subcommittee on Research and Development to Conduct Field 
Hearing on Federal Response to Domestic Terrorism in 
Indianapolis, Indiana.
    March 17, 1998--Media Advisory: Former Secretary of the 
Russian Security Council to Testify Before National Security 
Committee.
    March 17, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at National 
Security Committee Markup of H.R. 2786.
    March 17, 1998--National Security Committee Approves H.R. 
2786, The Theater Missile Defense Improvement Act of 1998.
    March 18, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full 
Committee Hearing on Bosnia Policy.
    March 26, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full 
Committee Hearing with Service Secretaries.
    March 30, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement during the 
Floor Debate on H.R. 2786, The Theater Missile Defense 
Improvement Act of 1998.
    April 21, 1998--Dear Colleague from Chairman Spence on 
Supercomputer Export Controls.
    April 21, 1998--National Security Report: Sales or 
Security: Supercomputers and Export Controls.
    April 23, 1998--National Security Committee Bipartisan 
Leadership Call for Increased Defense Spending.
    May 6, 1998--National Security Committee Reports Defense 
Bill Out of Committee.
    May 6, 1998--National Security Committee to Investigate 
Competition of Depot Maintenance Work.
    May 6, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full Committee 
Markup of H.R. 3616, the FY 1999 National Defense Authorization 
Act.
    March 21, 1998--House Endorses Defense Authorization Bill.
    June 4, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full Committee 
Hearing on Competition for Depot Maintenance Workload.
    June 10, 1998--Two House Committees to Hold Joint Hearings 
on Administration's Policy on U.S. Satellite Launches in China.
    June 17, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at Joint House 
National Security Committee & House International Relations 
Committee Hearing on U.S. Satellite Export Policy to China.
    July 15, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement on Bipartisan 
Commission On Ballistic Missile Threat: ``Wake Up Call For All 
Americans''
    July 15, 1998--Executive Summary of the Report of the 
Commission To Assess The Ballistic Missile Threat To The United 
States.
    July 16, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full 
Committee Hearing on the Report of The Commission On The 
Ballistic Missile Threat to the United States.
    July 22, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement on Motion to 
Instruct Conferees On H.R. 3616, FY 99 Defense Authorization 
Bill.
    September 16, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full 
Committee Hearing on U.S. Policy in Iraq.
    September 18, 1998--Conferees Reach Agreement on H.R. 3616: 
The FY 99 National Defense Authorization Act.
    September 23, 1998--Chairman Spence Welcomes President's 
Recognition of the Need to Increase Defense Budget to Address 
Serious Shortfalls.
    September 24, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement on the 
Conference Report on H.R. 3616, the FY99 National Defense 
Authorization Act.
    October 6, 1998--Chairman Spence Remarks Upon the 
Enrollment of the FY 1999 Defense Authorization and 
Appropriations Bills.
    October 7, 1998--Chairman Spence's Statement at Full 
Committee Hearing with Former Chiefs and Vice Chiefs.
    October 23, 1998--Release of National Security 
Accomplishments of the 104th and 105th Congresses.