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106th Congress                                                   Report
  1st Session           HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                 106-18

=======================================================================



 
  TO AMEND THE PEACE CORPS ACT TO AUTHORIZE APPROPRIATIONS FOR FISCAL 
             YEARS 2000 THROUGH 2003 TO CARRY OUT THAT ACT

                                _______
                                

 February 16, 1999.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on 
            the State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______


 Mr. Gilman, from the Committee on International Relations, submitted 
                             the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 669]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on International Relations, to whom was 
referred the bill (H.R. 669) to amend the Peace Corps Act to 
authorize appropriations for fiscal years 2000 through 2003 to 
carry out that Act, having considered the same, report 
favorably thereon without amendment and recommend that the bill 
do pass.

                            Committee Action

               Introduction and Consideration of the Bill

    H.R. 669, to reauthorize appropriations for the Peace 
Corps, was introduced on February 10, 1999, by Mr. Campbell, 
Mr. Gilman and Mr. Gejdenson along with 32 additional original 
cosponsors and referred to the Committee on International 
Relations. It was considered by the Committee on February 11, 
1999, and, a quorum being present, was ordered reported to the 
House by voice vote with the recommendation that the bill do 
pass.

            Record Votes on Amendments and Motion to Report

    Clause (3)(b) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires that the results of each record vote 
on an amendment or motion to report, together with the names of 
those voting for or against, be printed in the committee 
report. No record votes were taken during the consideration of 
H.R. 669.

                         Background and Purpose

    The main purpose of the bill is to authorize the expansion 
of the Peace Corps to President Reagan's original goal of 
10,000 volunteers. Under the bill, the 10,000 volunteer target 
would be reached by Fiscal Year 2003. The bill also updates 
several outdated provisions of the Peace Corps Act.

                           Peace Corps Legacy

    The Peace Corps was established by an Executive Order of 
President Kennedy on March 1, 1961 and later affirmed by an Act 
of Congress on September 22, 1962 (P.L. 87-293). Since that 
time, 153,000 Americans have served in 134 countries through 
the Peace Corps. These volunteers have learned 180 languages 
and dialects. Five current Members of the House (Messrs. Farr, 
Hall, Petri, Shays, and Walsh) and one current Senator (Sen. 
Dodd) served in the Peace Corps as well as one member of the 
Cabinet (the Secretary of Health and Human Services, Donna 
Shalala) and seven current U.S. Ambassadors (Algeria, Armenia, 
Guyana, Malawi, Nigeria, Togo, and Senegal).
    In 1985, President Reagan set a policy for the Peace Corps 
to expand to 10,000 volunteers. This goal was later set into 
law by the International Security and Development Cooperation 
Act of 1985 (P.L. 99-83). Despite this target set by both the 
President and Congress, the Peace Corps has not yet reached its 
goal.
    After the establishment of the Peace Corps, volunteer 
numbers peaked at 15,556 in 1966. In adjusted 1992 dollars, 
Congress appropriated $470 million for the operation of the 
Corps. Since1966, the numbers of volunteers declined to a low 
of 4,219 volunteers at the end of Fiscal Year 1987. Since then, Peace 
Corps volunteer numbers expanded to last year's total of 6,700 
volunteers and a Fiscal Year 1999 appropriation of $241 million.
    The Peace Corps has been rated as an effective foreign 
assistance program by many U.S. ambassadors serving in the 
field. For example:
          Ambassador Littrel reported that Tunisia became the 
        first Arab nation to welcome the Peace Corps in 1962. 
        2,382 Americans served the Corps in Tunisia as that 
        country became a key player in the Middle East peace 
        process. During their service, Volunteers planned two 
        major towns, taught 50,000 students, coached the 
        national basketball team and built dozens of water, 
        sanitation and health projects.
          Ambassador Walker reported that the Peace Corps was 
        ``in many respects, the face of this embassy, and of 
        America, to countless small Czech communities.'' When 
        the Peace Corps left the Czech Republic, the government 
        established the ``Bohemia Corps'' to begin Czech 
        overseas volunteer work in the image of the Peace 
        Corps.
          Ambassador Bosworth reported that despite the Peace 
        Corps' departure 18 years ago from South Korea, ``there 
        are a great many Koreans, many in key positions, who 
        vividly and positively remember their experiences 
        working with, or being taught by, Peace Corps 
        volunteers.'' Like the Czech Republic, Korea 
        established its own international volunteer corps in 
        the image of the Peace Corps.
          Ambassador Frank reported from Nepal that ``I know 
        firsthand what a difference the Peace Corps has made to 
        Nepal and even if I did not know it, I would be 
        reminded by every Nepali I meet, from the King and the 
        Prime Minister to ordinary Nepalis at the village 
        level.''

                     Expansion to 10,000 Volunteers

    President Clinton renewed President Reagan's call for 
increasing the size of the Peace Corps last year. Originally, 
the Administration planned to expand the Corps to ``10,000 by 
2000.'' The Committee held a hearing on this goal on March 18, 
1998. Given the funding restraints of the appropriations bill, 
this plan was amended this year to expand the Corps more 
slowly--reaching 10,000 volunteers three years later than 
originally planned, in Fiscal Year 2003. Last year, Congress 
increased funding for the Corps from $222 million to $241 
million. In the President's budget request for Fiscal Year 
2000, he requested $270 million for the Peace Corps.
    The President's Fiscal Year 2000 request would allow the 
Corps to expand to 8,000 volunteers, expanding in South Africa, 
Jordan, China, Bangladesh and Mozambique. Primary growth areas 
will be the Caucasus, Central Asia and Africa. Additional 
volunteers will be sent for hurricane relief missions in 
Central America. Programs in North Africa, the Middle East, 
Asia Central and Eastern Europe, South America and the Pacific 
will receive smaller increases. The Corps will also expand the 
work of the ``Crisis Corps,'' a cadre of experienced Peace 
Corps volunteers who have the language skills and background to 
make major contributions to very difficult emergencies such as 
in Central America or West Africa.
    The growth of the Corps has been moderated by management, 
income and safety concerns. Since Fiscal Year 1992, the Corps 
closed 15 missions (Cook Islands, Nigeria, Seychelles, Comoros, 
Marshall Islands, Sao Tome and Principe, Tunisia, Czech 
Republic, Hungary, Swaziland, Uruguay, Chile, Botswana, Fiji 
and Tuvalu). Safety concerns also mandated the closure of 
missions in seven countries including the Central African 
Republic, Albania, the Republic of Congo, Sri Lanka, Eritrea, 
Chad and Guinea-Bissau. The Corps has also established new 
safety and security protocols for volunteers and retained a new 
Coordinator for Volunteer Safety and Overseas Security.
    The Peace Corps has also reduced headquarters staffing by 
13% since 1993, and closed five of sixteen domestic recruiting 
offices. Support costs per volunteer in constant dollars have 
dropped 14% from FY93 to FY98.
    In sum, the bill would authorize the appropriation of $270 
million in Fiscal Year 2000 (the President's request) and 
amounts through Fiscal Year 2003 to reach the 10,000 volunteer 
goal by the end of FY03. These amounts would remain subject to 
appropriation and would therefore fall under the budget caps 
and subcommittee allocations of the budget and appropriations 
process.

                             Other Matters

                      Committee Oversight Findings

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee reports the 
findings and recommendations of the Committee, based on 
oversight activities under clause 2(b)(1) of rule X of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, are incorporated in the 
descriptive portions of this report.

                Committee on Government Reform Findings

    Clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires each committee report to contain a 
summary of the oversight findings and recommendations made by 
the Government Reform Committee pursuant to clause 4(c)(2) of 
rule X of those Rules. The Committee on International Relations 
has received no such findings or recommendations from the 
Committee onGovernment Reform.

                      Advisory Committee Statement

    No advisory committees within the meaning of section 5(b) 
of the Federal Advisory Committee Act were created by this 
legislation.

                Applicability to the Legislative Branch

    The Committee finds that the legislation does not relate to 
the terms and conditions of employment or access to public 
services or accommodations within the meaning of section 
102(b)(3) of the Congressional Accountability Act.

                   Constitutional Authority Statement

    In compliance with clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee cites the 
following specific powers granted to the Congress in the 
Constitution as authority for enactment of H.R. 669 as reported 
by the Committee: Article I, section 8, clause 1 (relating to 
providing for the common defense and general welfare of the 
United States); Article I, section 8, clause 3 (relating to the 
regulation of commerce with foreign nations); and Article I, 
section 8, clause 18 (relating to making all laws necessary and 
proper for carrying into execution powers vested by the 
Constitution in the government of the United States).

                        Preemption Clarification

    Section 423 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 
requires the report of any committee on a bill or joint 
resolution to include a committee statement on the extent to 
which the bill or joint resolution is intended to preempt state 
or local law. The Committee states that H.R. 669 is not 
intended to preempt any state or local law.

New Budget Authority and Tax Expenditures, Congressional Budget Office 
             Cost Estimate, and Federal Mandates Statements

    Clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires each committee report that accompanies 
a measure providing new budget authority, new spending 
authority, or new credit authority or changing revenues or tax 
expenditures to contain a cost estimate, as required by section 
308(a)(1) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended, 
and, when practicable with respect to estimates of new budget 
authority, a comparison of the estimated funding level for the 
relevant program (or programs) to the appropriate levels under 
current law.
    Clause 3(d) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires committees to include their own cost 
estimates in certain committee reports, which include, when 
practicable, a comparison of the total estimated funding level 
for the relevant program (or programs) with the appropriate 
levels under current law.
    Clause 3(c)(3) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires the report of any committee on a 
measure which has been approved by the Committee to include a 
cost estimate prepared by the Director of the Congressional 
Budget Office, pursuant to section 403 of the Congressional 
Budget Act of 1974, if the cost estimate is timely submitted.
    Section 423 of the Congressional Budget Act requires the 
report of any committee on a bill or joint resolution that 
includes any Federal mandate to include specific information 
about such mandates. The Committee states that H.R. 669 does 
not include any Federal mandate.
    The Committee adopts the cost estimate of the Congressional 
Budget Office as its own submission of any new required 
information with respect to H.R. 669 on new budget authority, 
new spending authority, new credit authority, or an increase or 
decrease in the national debt. It also adopts the estimate of 
Federal mandates prepared by the Director of the Congressional 
Budget Office pursuant to section 423 of the Unfunded Mandates 
Reform Act. The estimate and report which has been received is 
set out below.

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                 Washington, DC, February 16, 1999.
Hon. Benjamin A. Gilman,
Chairman, Committee on International Relations,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office (CBO) 
has prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 669, a bill to 
amend the Peace Corps Act to authorize appropriations for 
fiscal years 2000 through 2003 to carry out that act, and for 
other purposes.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Joseph C. 
Whitehall.
            Sincerely,
                                          Barry B. Anderson
                                    (For Dan L. Crippen, Director).
    Enclosure.

               congressional budget office cost estimate

H.R. 669--A bill to amend the Peace Corps Act to authorize 
        appropriations for fiscal years 2000 through 2003 to carry out 
        that act, and for other purposes

    Summary: H.R. 669 would authorize appropriations for the 
Peace Corps for fiscal years 2000 through 2003. CBO estimates 
that appropriation of the authorized amounts would result in 
additional outlays of $1.23 billion over the next five years.
    Because H.R. 669 would not affect direct spending or 
receipts, pay-as-you-go procedures would not apply. The bill 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) and would 
not affect the budgets of state, local, or tribal governments.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of H.R. 669 is shown in the table below. The 
costs of this legislation fall within budget function 150 
(international affairs).
    Basis of estimate: The estimate assumes enactment of the 
bill and subsequent appropriation of the authorized amounts by 
the beginning of fiscal year 2000. CBO used historical spending 
rates to estimate outlays.

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                               by fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                     -----------------------------------------------------------
                                                        1999      2000      2001      2002      2003      2004
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                        SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Spending under current law:
    Budget authority \1\............................       240         0         0         0         0         0
    Estimated outlays...............................       235        49         6         1         0         0
Proposed changes:
    Authorization level.............................         0       270       298       327       365         0
    Estimated outlays...............................         0       211       281       314       351        73
Spending under H.R. 669:
    Authorization level \1\.........................       240       270       298       327       365         0
    Estimated outlays...............................       235       260       287       315       351       73
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ The 1999 level is the amount appropriated for that year.

    Pay-as-you-go considerations: None.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: The bill 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA and would not affect the budgets of state, 
local, or tribal governments.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Joseph C. Whitehall. 
Impact on State, Local, and Tribal Governments: Leo Lex. Impact 
on the Private Sector: Leslie Frymier.
    Estimate approved by: Robert A. Sunshine, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                      Section-by-Section Analysis

 Sec. 1. Authorization of Appropriations for Fiscal years 2000 through 
                 2003 to Carry Out the Peace corps Act

    This section amends the Peace Corps Act to provide the 
following authorizations of appropriations: Fiscal Year 2000--
$270 million, Fiscal Year 2001--$298 million, Fiscal Year 
2002--$327 million, Fiscal Year 2003--$365 million. The 
Committee understands that these amounts are consistent with 
Office of Management & Budget and Peace Corps estimates of 
amounts required to meet the 10,000 volunteer target by the end 
of Fiscal Year 2003. The Committee also understands that these 
amounts are already part of the Administration's outyear 
projections for Fiscal Years 2001-2003.

        Sec. 2. Miscellaneous Amendments to the Peace Corps Act

    Section 2(a) adds a new paragraph (13) to subsection 
15(d).1 The new paragraph would exempt the Peace 
Corps from 49 U.S.C. 40118 with respect to flights between two 
points abroad to the same extent other foreign service agencies 
are exempt from that section.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\ 22 U.S.C. subsection 2214(d).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Under 49 U.S.C. subsection 40118(d), the Department of 
State and the Agency for International Development (AID) are 
exempt from the requirements of 49 U.S.C. 40118 for travel 
between two places outside the United States by employees and 
their dependents. Determining which carriers overseas are U.S. 
certified or have agreements with the U.S. that qualify them 
under section 40118 is a complex undertaking. Posts and 
individuals must make decisions in this area at the risk of 
having their travel costs disallowed. The Committee believes 
that administrative provisions affecting foreign service 
agencies should be as consistent as possible. For instance, a 
Peace Corps employee who is flying with an AID employee to 
attend a meeting should be able to fly on the same plane 
without fear of being penalized under section 40118. This 
provision would extend to Peace Corps employees and Volunteers 
the same treatment now available to other foreign service 
agency employees.
    Section 2(b) makes technical changes to sections 5, 10 and 
15 of the Peace Corps Act (hereinafter the Act) to reflect 
changes in statutory citations that have occurred since 
enactment of the Act.
    Section 2(b)(1) strikes out ``Civil Service Commission'' in 
section 5(f)(1)(B) and inserts in lieu thereof ``Office of 
Personnel Management.'' The Civil Service Commission was 
replaced by the Office of Personnel Management in 1966.
    Section 2(b)(2) amends section 5(h) of the Act (22 U.S.C. 
2504(h)) in several respects. It strikes out references to the 
Federal Voting Assistance Act of 1955 (5 U.S.C. 2171 et seq.), 
the Act of June 4, 1954, chapter 264, section 4 (5 U.S.C. 73b-
5, the Act of December 23, 1944, chapter 716, section 1, as 
amended (31 U.S.C. 492a) and inserts references to 5 U.S.C. 
5732 and 31 U.S.C. 3342. The Federal Voting Assistance Act has 
been repealed and replaced by a provision (42 U.S.C. 1973cc et 
seq.) which is available to all American citizens overseas. It 
is unnecessary, therefore, to consider Volunteers federal 
employees to provide them with the benefits of the Act; 
therefore, the reference to voter assistance in this provision 
can be deleted. The replacement of references to sections of 
titles 5 and 31 with references to 5 U.S.C. 5732 and 31 U.S.C. 
3342 reflect recodification of provisions relating to 
reimbursement for the cost of transportation of baggage and 
effects, and check cashing privileges in those titles. No 
substantive change is involved.
    Section 2(b)(3) replaces the reference to ``section 1757 of 
the Revised Statutes of the United States, as amended (5 U.S.C. 
16)'' with ``section 3331 of title 5, United States Code,'' 
reflecting the codification of the statutory oath for employees 
in 1966.
    Section 2(b)(4) replaces the reference to 31 U.S.C. 665(b) 
with ``31 U.S.C. 1342,'' reflecting the 1982 revision of title 
31.
    Section 2(b)(5) amends section 15(c) 2 by 
striking out ``Public Law 84-918 (7 U.S.C. 1881 et seq.)'' and 
inserting in lieu thereof ``subchapter VI of chapter 33, title 
5, United States Code (5 U.S.C. 3371 et seq.).'' Section 15(c) 
of the Peace Corps Act authorizes training for employees at 
private and public agencies. The statutory provisions relating 
to employee training were transferred from title 7 to title 5 
in 1970.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\ 22 U.S.C. subsection 2514(c).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Section 2(b)(6) amends paragraph 15(d)(2) 3 by 
striking out ``section 9 of Public Law 60-328 (31 U.S.C. 673)'' 
and inserts in lieu thereof ``31 U.S.C. 1346.'' This section of 
the Peace Corps Act authorizes the payment of expenses to 
attend meetings related to the Peace Corps Act. No substantive 
change is intended. It is another change required by the 1982 
revision of title 31.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \3\ 22 U.S.C. subsection 2514(d)(2).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Section 2(b)(7) strikes out ``without regard to section 
3561 of the Revised Statutes (31 U.S.C. 543)''. This statute, 
which contained a restriction on currency exchanges, has been 
repealed and apparently was not replaced.
    Section 2(b)(8) strikes out ``Foreign Service Act of 1946, 
as amended (22 U.S.C. 801 et seq.)'' and inserts in lieu 
thereof: ``Foreign Service Act of 1980, as amended (22 U.S.C. 
3901 et seq.)''. The Foreign Service Act was rewritten and 
renamed in 1980.

         Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

  In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

                            PEACE CORPS ACT

TITLE I--THE PEACE CORPS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                             authorization

  Sec. 3. (a) * * *
  [(b) Authorizations of Appropriations.--There are authorized 
to be appropriated to carry out the purposes of this Act 
$218,146,000 for fiscal year 1993, which are authorized to 
remain available until September 30, 1994.]
  (b)(1) There are authorized to be appropriated to carry out 
the purposes of this Act $270,000,000 for fiscal year 2000, 
$298,000,000 for fiscal year 2001, $327,000,000 for fiscal year 
2002, and $365,000,000 for fiscal year 2003.
  (2) Amounts authorized to be appropriated under paragraph (1) 
for a fiscal year are authorized to remain available for that 
fiscal year and the subsequent fiscal year.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                         peace corps volunteers

  Sec. 5. (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (f)(1) Any period of satisfactory service of a volunteer 
under this Act shall be credited in connection with subsequent 
employment in the same manner as a like period of civilian 
employment by the United States Government--
          (A)  * * *
          (B) except as otherwise determined by the President, 
        for the purposes of determining seniority, reduction in 
        force, and layoff rights, leave entitlement, and other 
        rights and privileges based upon length of service 
        under the laws administered by the [Civil Service 
        Commission] Office of Personnel Management, the Foreign 
        Service Act of 1980, and every other Act establishing 
        or governing terms and conditions of service of 
        civilian employees of the United States Government: 
        Provided, That service of a volunteer shall not be 
        credited toward completion of any probationary or trial 
        period or completion of any service requirement for 
        career appointment.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (h) Volunteers shall be deemed employees of the United States 
Government for the purposes of the Federal Tort Claims Act and 
any other Federal tort liability statute, [the Federal Voting 
Assistance Act of 1955 (5 U.S.C. 2171 et seq.), the Act of June 
4, 1954, chapter 264, section 4 (5 U.S.C. 73b-75), the Act of 
December 23, 1944, chapter 716, section 1, as amended (31 
U.S.C. 492a),] section 3342 of title 31, United States Code, 
section 5732 and section 5584 of title 5, United States Code 
(and readjustment allowances paid under this Act shall be 
considered as pay for purposes of such section, and section 1 
of the Act of June 4, 1920 (41 Stat. 750), as amended (22 
U.S.C. 214).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (j) Upon enrollment in the Peace Corps, every volunteer shall 
take the oath prescribed for persons appointed to any office of 
honor or profit by [section 1757 of the Revised Statutes of the 
United States, as amended (5 U.S.C. 16) and shall swear (or 
affirm) that he does not advocate the overthrow of our 
constitutional form of government in the United States, and 
that he is not a member of an organization that advocates the 
overthrow of our constitutional form of government in the 
United States, knowing that such organization so advocates.] 
section 3331 of title 5, United States Code.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                     general powers and authorities

  Sec. 10. (a) In the furtherance of the purposes of this Act, 
the President may--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (4) accept in the name of the Peace Corps and employ 
        or transfer in furtherance of the purposes of this Act 
        (A) voluntary services notwithstanding the provisions 
        of [31 U.S.C. 665(b)] section 1342 of title 31, United 
        States Code, and (B) any money or property (real, 
        personal or mixed, tangible or intangible) received by 
        gift, devise, bequest, or otherwise; and

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                          utilization of funds

  Sec. 15. (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

  (c) Funds available under this Act may be used to pay costs 
of training employees employed or assigned pursuant to section 
7(a)(2) of this Act (through interchange or otherwise) at any 
State or local unit of government, public or private nonprofit 
institution, trade, labor, agricultural, or scientific 
association or organization, or commercial firms; and the 
provisions of [Public Law 84-918 (7 U.S.C. 1881 et seq.)] 
subchapter VI of chapter 33 of title 5, United States Code may 
be used to carry out the foregoing authority notwithstanding 
that interchange of personnel may not be involved or that the 
training may not take place at the institutions specified in 
that Act. Any payments or contributions in connection therewith 
may, as deemed appropriate by the head of the agency of the 
United States Government authorizing such training, be made by 
private or public sources and be accepted by any trainee, or 
may be accepted by and credited to the current applicable 
appropriation of such agency: Provided, however, That any such 
payments to an employee in the nature of compensation shall be 
in lieu, or in reduction, of compensation received from the 
United States Government.
  (d) Funds available for the purposes of this Act shall be 
available for--
          (1) * * *
          (2) expenses of attendence at meetings concerned with 
        the purposes of this Act, including (notwithstanding 
        the provisions of [section 9 of Public Law 60-328 (31 
        U.S.C. 673)] section 1346 of title 31, United States 
        Code) expenses in connection with meetings of persons 
        whose employment is authorized by section 13(a) of this 
        Act;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (6) exchange of funds [without regard to section 3561 
        of the Revised Statutes (31 U.S.C. 543)] and loss by 
        exchange;

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (11) use in accordance with authorities of the 
        [Foreign Service Act of 1946, as amended (22 U.S.C. 801 
        et seq.)] Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3901 
        et seq.) not otherwise provided for; [and]
          (12) ice and drinking water for use abroad[.]; and
          (13) the transportation of Peace Corps employees, 
        Peace Corps volunteers, dependents of such employees 
        and volunteers, and accompanying baggage, by a foreign 
        air carrier when the transportation is between two 
        places outside the United States without regard to 
        section 40118 of title 49, United States Code.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *