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106th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     106-645

======================================================================



 
  DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND 
               RELATED AGENCIES APPROPRIATION BILL, 2001

                                _______
                                

  June 1, 2000.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

    Mr. Porter, from the Committee on Appropriations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            DISSENTING VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 4577]

    The Committee on Appropriations submits the following 
report in explanation of the accompanying bill making 
appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
Services (except the Food and Drug Administration and the 
Indian Health Service), and Education, Armed Forces Retirement 
Home, Corporation for National and Community Service, 
Corporation for Public Broadcasting, Federal Mediation and 
Conciliation Service, Federal Mine Safety and Health Review 
Commission, Institute of Museum and Library Services, Medicare 
Payment Advisory Commission, National Commission on Libraries 
and Information Science, National Council on Disability, 
National Education Goals Panel, National Labor Relations Board, 
National Mediation Board, Occupational Safety and Health Review 
Commission, Railroad Retirement Board, Social Security 
Administration, and the United States Institute of Peace for 
the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, and for other 
purposes.

                        INDEX TO BILL AND REPORT

_______________________________________________________________________


                                                            Page number

                                                            Bill Report
Title I--Department of Labor...............................     2
                                                                     11
        Employment and Training Administration.............     2
                                                                     11
        Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration........     7
                                                                     19
        Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation...............     7
                                                                     20
        Employment Standards Administration................     8
                                                                     20
        Occupational Safety and Health Administration......    12
                                                                     22
        Mine Safety and Health Administration..............    15
                                                                     23
        Bureau of Labor Statistics.........................    16
                                                                     23
        Departmental Management............................    16
                                                                     24
        Assistant Secretary for Veterans Employment and 
            Training.......................................    18
                                                                     24
        Office of the Inspector General....................    18
                                                                     25
        General Provisions.................................    18
                                                                     26
Title II--Department of Health and Human Services..........    20
                                                                     26
        Health Resources and Services Administration.......    20
                                                                     26
        Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.........    23
                                                                     42
        National Institutes of Health......................    25
                                                                     55
        Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
            Administration.................................    31
                                                                     98
        Agency for Health Care Policy and Research.........    32
                                                                    102
        Health Care Financing Administration...............    32
                                                                    104
        Administration for Children and Families...........    35
                                                                    110
        Administration on Aging............................    40
                                                                    119
        Office of the Secretary............................    41
                                                                    122
        General Provisions.................................    44

Title III--Department of Education.........................    49
                                                                    127
        Education Reform...................................    49
                                                                    128
        Education for the Disadvantaged....................    50
                                                                    132
        Impact Aid.........................................    51
                                                                    136
        School Improvement Programs........................    52
                                                                    138
        Reading Excellence.................................    52
                                                                    146
        Indian Education...................................    53
                                                                    146
        School Renovation..................................
                                                                    147
        Bilingual and Immigrant Education..................    53
                                                                    147
        Special Education..................................    53
                                                                    150
        Rehabilitation Services and Disability Research....    54
                                                                    152
        Special Institutions for Persons with Disabilities.    54
                                                                    156
        Vocational and Adult Education.....................    55
                                                                    157
        Student Financial Assistance.......................    56
                                                                    160
        Federal Family Education Loans.....................    57
                                                                    162
        Higher Education...................................    57
                                                                    162
        Howard University..................................    58
                                                                    169
        College Housing and Academic Facilities Loans......    58
                                                                    169
        Historically Black College and University Capital 
            Financing......................................    58
                                                                    169
        Education Research, Statistics, and Improvement....    59
                                                                    170
        Departmental Management............................    60
                                                                    176
        Office for Civil Rights............................    61
                                                                    177
        Office of the Inspector General....................    61
                                                                    177
        General Provisions.................................    61
                                                                    178
Title IV--Related Agencies.................................    64
                                                                    178
        Armed Forces Retirement Home.......................    64
                                                                    178
        Corporation for National and Community Service.....    65
                                                                    178
        Corporation for Public Broadcasting................    65
                                                                    180
        Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service.........    66
                                                                    180
        Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission...    67
                                                                    180
        Institute of Museum and Library Services...........    67
                                                                    180
        Medicare Payment Advisory Commission...............    67
                                                                    181
        National Commission on Libraries and Information 
            Science........................................    68
                                                                    181
        National Council on Disability.....................    68
                                                                    181
        National Education Goals Panel.....................
                                                                    181
        National Labor Relations Board.....................    68
                                                                    181
        National Mediation Board...........................    69
                                                                    182
        Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission...    69
                                                                    182
        Railroad Retirement Board..........................    69
                                                                    182
        Social Security Administration.....................    71
                                                                    183
        United States Institute of Peace...................    76
                                                                    185
Title V--General Provisions................................    76
                                                                    185
House of Representatives Report Requirements...............
                                                                    186

                Summary of Estimates and Appropriations

    The following table compares on a summary basis the 
appropriations including trust funds for fiscal year 2000, the 
budget estimate for fiscal year 2001 and the Committee 
recommendation for fiscal year 2001 in the accompanying bill.

                                 2001 LABOR, HHS, EDUCATION APPROPRIATIONS BILL
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                   Fiscal year--               2000 committee
                                                        ----------------------------------     compared to--
                                                                                          ----------------------
                                                            2000        2001       2001       2000        2001
                                                         comparable    budget   committee  comparable    budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor....................................     $10,627     11,866     10,164       -$463    -$1,702
Department of Health and Human Services................     203,961    215,482    215,983     +12,022       +501
Department of Education................................      25,496     30,046     27,142      +1,646     -2,904
Related Agencies.......................................      27,860     29,420     29,203      +1,343       -217
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Grand total, current year........................     267,944    286,814    282,492     +14,548     -4,322
      Advances.........................................      61,754     69,368     69,333      +7,579        -35
                                                        ========================================================
Current year total using 302(b) scorekeeping...........     315,719    348,449    339,521     +23,802     -8,928
      Mandatory........................................     230,853    242,321    242,315     +11,462         -6
      Discretionary....................................      84,866    106,128    $97,206     +12,340     -8,922
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

2001 LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES AND EDUCATION APPROPRIATIONS BILL


                                                   DISCRETIONARY
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                   Fiscal year--               2001 committee
                                                        ----------------------------------     compared to--
                                                                                          ----------------------
                                                            2000        2001       2001       2000        2001
                                                         comparable    budget   committee  comparable    budget
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor....................................  \1\ $11,22    $12,404    $10,701       -$526    -$1,703
                                                                  7
Department of Health and Human Services................  \1\ 41,728     45,040     43,867      +2,139     -1,173
Department of Education................................  \1\ 35,605     40,095     37,190      +1,585     -2,905
Related Agencies.......................................       8,045      8,680      8,463        +418       -217
Remove FY 2000 Advance Appropriations..................     -10,126  .........  .........     +10,126          0
Scorekeeping Adjustments...............................      -1,613        -91     -3,015      -1,402     -2,924
                                                        --------------------------------------------------------
      Total Discretionary..............................      84,866    106,128     97,206     +12,340     -8,922
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Adjusted for advance appropriations.

                         Highlights of the Bill

    Funding levels in the fiscal year 2001 appropriation bill 
for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and 
Education and Related Agencies reflect the Committee's attempt 
to establish priorities within the very stringent limitations. 
Mandatory spending continues its inexorable increase, this year 
by $15.9 billion or 6.8%. If the discretionary component of the 
Committee bill were to grow at the same rate, total funding 
would be over $103 billion.
    As in past years, the Committee has increased funding for 
programs that work for people and represent a core Federal 
responsibility. It has rejected the President's hastily 
formulated and thinly justified new program initiatives, 
favoring instead to fund existing programs that will more 
efficiently and effectively address identified needs.
    Bill total.--Total funding, including offsets, for fiscal 
year 2001 in the Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
Services and Education and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 
2001 is $339,461,954,000. For Discretionary accounts for 2001 
the bill provides $97,206,435,000, including offsets.
    Mandatory programs.--The bill provides $248,991,967,000 for 
entitlement programs in fiscal year 2001. Seventy-one percent 
of the funding in the bill is for these mandatory costs. 
Funding requirements for entitlement programs are determined by 
the basic authorizing statutes. Mandatory programs include 
general fund support for the Medicare and Medicaid programs, 
Supplemental Security Income, and Black Lung payments. The 
following chart indicates the funding levels for the major 
mandatory programs in fiscal years 1999 and 2000 and the growth 
in these programs.

                                                    MANDATORY
                                             [Dollars in thousands]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Fiscal year   Fiscal year
                            Program                                 2000          2001         Change    Percent
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor:
    Black Lung Disability Trust Fund..........................    $1,013,633    $1,028,000      $14,367        1
Department of Health and Human Services:
    Health Care Financing Administration:
        Medicaid current law benefits.........................   109,321,600   116,507,700    7,186,100        7
        Medicare Payments to Health Care Trust Fund...........    69,289,100    70,381,600    1,092,500        2
Department of Education:
    Rehabilitation Services...................................     2,338,977     2,399,790       60,813        3
Related Agencies:
    Social Security Administration:
        Special Benefits for Disabled Coal Miners.............       524,638       489,748      -34,890       -7
        Supplemental Security Income..........................    31,420,085    32,681,000    1,260,915        4
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Department of Labor.--The bill appropriates $12,626,598,000 
for the Labor Department, a decrease of $464,086,000 below the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 amount (Adjusted for advance 
appropriations in fiscal year 2000) and $1,702,678,000 below 
the amount requested by the President. This funding level 
includes $5,010,995,000 to carry out the provisions of the 
Workforce Investment Act. The Committee recommends an increase 
in funding for the Job Corps of $42,224,000 over the fiscal 
year 2000 level. Based on the strong economy and low 
unemployment, the bill provides reduced funding for Adult and 
Youth training and Dislocated Worker Assistance. Total funding 
for these programs is $3,239,990,000, $300,000,000 below the 
fiscal year 2000 level and $502,985,000 below the President's 
request. No funding is provided for school-to-work activities 
in the Departments of Labor and Education, completing the 
phase-out of this program.
    Youth Opportunity Grants.--The Committee provides 
$175,000,000 for this program.
    Employment Standards Administration.--The Committee 
recommends $338,770,000 for ESA, a program freeze. This level 
$24,706,000 below the President's request.
    Occupational Safety and Health Administration.--The 
Committee recommends funding for OSHA at $381,620,000, 
$44,363,000 below the request and the same as last year's 
level. Within OSHA, state programs are increased by $1,771,000 
while funding for Federal enforcement is reduced by a like 
amount to fund coverage of New Jersey public employees.
    Department of Health and Human Services.--The bill 
appropriates $257,696,591,000 which is $1,168,354,000 below the 
President's request and $17,306,476,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 level. Funding for discretionary programs of 
$43,866,934,000 is $1,153,354,000 below the President's request 
and $2,743,801,000 above last year's level.
    Health Resources and Services Administration.--Funding for 
HRSA programs is $4,835,258,000, an increase of $181,906,000 
above last year and $32,895,000 above the President's request. 
Within HRSA, the community health centers funding is at 
$1,100,000,000, an increase of $81,300,000 above the fiscal 
year 2000 level. Health professions training is funded at 
$410,987,000, $69,080,000 above last year's level and 
$113,028,000 above the request. Ryan White AIDS Care Act 
programs are funded at $1,725,000,000, $130,450,000 above last 
year and $5,450,000 above the President's request.
    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.--The bill 
provides $3,290,369,000 directly to the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention and an additional $306,040,000 for CDC 
activities funded in the Public Health and Social Services 
Emergency Fund. These activities include bioterrorism, Global 
HIV/AIDS, and activities related to the outbreak of the West 
Nile Virus. As a result, overall funding for the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention is $3,586,409,000, $394,738,000 
above the comparable fiscal year 2000 level and $198,422,000 
above the President's request.
    Increases are provided for high priority activities 
including the prevention centers and research, childhood 
immunization programs, communicable and sexually transmitted 
diseases, chronic and environmental disease prevention and 
breast and cervical cancer screening. The Committee has also 
provided funding for an initiative to employ national media to 
promote healthy behavior among the nation's young people.
    National Institutes of Health.--The Committee would provide 
a $2,700,000,000 increase for biomedical research activities at 
the National Institutes of Health. However, because of the 
limited funding within the allocation, funding increases in the 
bill are constrained to the amount proposed by the President, 
at $18,812,735,000, $1,059,883,000 above last year. The 
Committee has maintained its policy of resisting disease 
specific earmarks in the bill and report, believing that 
decisions as to appropriate levels of funding and appropriate 
avenues of research are best left to the scientific managers at 
NIH. NIH has indicated that its allocation will allow increases 
above the overall NIH level for research related to Parkinson's 
disease, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes and cardiovascular 
disease, among others.
    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration.--The bill provides $2,727,626,000 for the 
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, an 
amount $75,758,000 above fiscal year 2000 and $95,390,000 below 
the request level. The Committee has provided $1,631,000,000 
for the Substance Abuse Block Grant which is essentially 
$31,000,000 above last year's level and the same as the 
President's request.
    Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.--The bill 
provides $223,649,000 for the Agency for Healthcare Research 
and Quality, an amount $24,850,000 above last year and 
$26,294,000 below the President's request. Within these funds, 
the Committee has provided $20,000,000 to support research in 
medical error reduction.
    Medicare and Medicaid.--The bill provides $124,235,254,000 
for Medicaid and $70,381,600,000 in Federal funds for the 
Government's share of payments to Medicare.
    Low Income Home Energy Assistance.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $1,100,000,000 for the Low Income Home 
Energy Assistance Program in fiscal year 2002. An additional 
$300,000,000 is provided in emergency funding for heating and 
cooling emergencies. As is the Committee's normal practice, and 
authorized in statute, funds are advance funded for fiscal year 
2002 and declared an emergency.
    Child Care and Development Block Grant.--The fiscal year 
2000 Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services and 
Education and Related Agencies Act provided $1,182,672,000, for 
fiscal year 2001 funding of the Child Care and Development 
Block Grant. The Committee has provided an additional 
$400,000,000 in fiscal year 2001 funding, bringing total fiscal 
year 2001 funding to $1,582,672,000, $417,328,000 below the 
request level. As this program is normally advance funded, the 
Committee provides $2,000,000,000 for fiscal 2002, the same as 
the President's request.
    Social Services Block Grant.--The Committee recommends 
$1,700,000,000, $75,000,000 below last year and the same as the 
President's request. $1,700,000,000 is the statutory maximum 
for title XX set in the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st 
Century (PL 105-85). The reduced funding level in this act was 
used to offset additional state funding for highways and 
transit.
    Head Start.--The bill includes $5,667,000,000 for Head 
Start, $400,000,000 above last year's level and $600,000,000 
below the President's request.
    Community Services Block Grant.--The bill provides 
$527,700,000 for the community services block grant, the same 
as fiscal year 2000 and $17,700,000 above the President's 
request.
    Funding of Abortions.--The bill includes the revised 
``Hyde'' language which has been carried in the bill for 
several years.
    Human Embryo Research.--The bill includes the same language 
included for the past several years to prohibit the use of 
funds for research involving human embryos. This language also 
has the effect of prohibiting human cloning.
    Needle Exchange.--The bill includes a prohibition on the 
use of Federal funds for needle exchange programs, which is the 
same as last year.
    Title X Family Participation in decisions of minors to seek 
family planning.--The bill includes language requiring 
recipients of title X funding, family planning funding, to 
certify that it encourages family participation in the decision 
of minors to seek family planning services and that it provides 
counseling to minors on how to resist attempts to coerce minors 
into engaging in sexual activities. This language has been 
included in the bill for several years.
    Title X Compliance With State Laws.--The bill includes a 
provision, continued from last year, requiring Title X clinics 
to comply with State laws relating to notification or reporting 
of child abuse, child molestation, sexual abuse, rape or 
incest.
    Department of Education.--The bill funds programmatic and 
support activities in the Department of Education at 
$39,590,049,000, a decrease of $2,904,597,000 below the 
President's request and $1,646,480,000 above last year's level 
(adjusted for advance appropriations in fiscal year 2000).
    Education Reform.--The bill eliminates funding for Goals 
2000, which was repealed last year. The Committee provides no 
additional funding for School-to-Work in both the Departments 
of Labor and Education. For Technology for Education, the bill 
provides $905,000,000, $2,000,000 above the President's request 
and $139,195,000 above last year's level.
    Education for the Disadvantaged.--The bill provides 
$7,941,397,000, for grants to local education agencies under 
title I of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. This 
level is the same as the fiscal year 2000 amount and 
$416,103,000 below the request level. The bill also provides 
$190,000,000, the same level the President's request and 
$20,000,000 above last year, for Comprehensive School Reform.
    Impact Aid.--The bill provides $985,000,000 for school 
districts that are impacted by Federal activities, such as 
military bases or Indian lands. This is an increase of 
$78,548,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level, and $215,000,000 
above the President's request.
    School Improvement Programs.--The bill funds title VI (the 
education block grant) at $365,750,000, the same as the fiscal 
year 2000 amount. The President proposed to terminate the 
program. The bill provides $1,750,000,000 for the Teacher 
Empowerment Act, subject to enactment. This level is 
$1,750,000,000 above both the President's request and the 
fiscal year 2000 amount. The bill provides no funding for the 
existing Class Size Reduction program, funded at $1,300,000,000 
in fiscal year 2000 and for which the President requested 
$1,750,000,000. It also rejected the President's proposal to 
require a 35 percent cash match by local educational agencies 
for all class size reduction funding in excess of the amounts 
received in fiscal year 2000.
    Safe and Drug Free Schools.--The safe and drug free schools 
program is funded at $599,250,000, essentially the same level 
as last year and $50,750,000 below the President's request.
    Reading Excellence Act.--The Committee bill provides 
$260,000,000 for the Reading Excellence Act, $26,000,000 below 
the President's Request and the same as last year's level.
    School Renovation.--The Committee provided no funds for the 
Presidents' new School Renovation initiative. The President 
requested $1,300,000,000 and no funds were provided in fiscal 
year 2000.
    Bilingual and Immigrant Education.--Bilingual and Immigrant 
Education programs are funded at $406,000,000, the same as the 
fiscal year 2000 amount and $54,000,000 below the President's 
request.
    Special Education.--The Committee recommends an overall 
program funding level for special education programs of 
$6,550,161,000, $513,965,000 above last year's level and 
$181,320,000 above the President's request. The bill provides a 
$500,000,000 increase for grants to states under part B of the 
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act while the request 
level would provide only a $210,000,000 increase.
    Vocational and Adult Education.--Vocational education state 
grants are funded at $1,100,000,000 and adult education state 
grants are funded at $470,000,000. Tech Prep is funded at last 
year's level. Overall, the Committee provides $1,718,600,000, 
$36,850,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level and $32,650,000 
below the President's request.
    Student Financial Assistance and Higher Education.--The 
Committee places a high priority on direct assistance to 
students. For Student Financial Aid, the Committee provides 
$10,198,000,000, $823,283,000 above last year and $60,000,000 
below the President. For Higher Education, the Committee 
provides $1,688,081,000. This level is $158,502,000 above last 
year and $107,892,000 below the request. The bill includes 
funding to allow the maximum Pell grant to rise to $3,500--the 
highest in history, $200 above last year and the same as the 
President's request. Federal work-study grants, SEOG's, TRIO 
and institutional development for minority schools are 
increased. TRIO is funded at $760,000,000, an increase of 
$115,000,000 above fiscal year 2000 and $35,000,000 above the 
President's request.
    Education Research and Statistics.--The Committee proposes 
$494,367,000 for education research and statistics. For on-
going activities, this level is $96,714,000 below last year and 
$23,200,000 below the request level.
    Social Security Administrative Costs.--Funding for the cost 
of administering the social security programs is 
$6,978,036,000, $406,000,000 above last year and $155,964,000 
below the President's request. Full funding is provided for 
continuing disability reviews.
    National Labor Relations Board.--Funding for the National 
Labor Relations Board is $205,717,000, the same as last year's 
level and $10,721,000 below the President's request.
    Corporation for Public Broadcasting.--CPB is an advance 
funded account with funds already appropriated through fiscal 
year 2002. Funding proposed by the Committee is $365,000,000 
for 2003, an increase of $15,000,000 above fiscal year 2002 and 
the same as the request.
    State Reimbursement for Supplemental SSI Benefits.--The 
bill advances the monthly deadline for States to reimburse the 
Federal government for state Supplemental Security Income 
payments. States will have to provide funds to SSA the day 
before payments to beneficiaries are issued rather than after 
the payments are made. SSI and State supplementary payment 
beneficiaries will not be affected by this proposal.
    Restoring Benefit Payments to the Appropriate Year.--The 
Committee has included language to restore Supplemental 
Security Income payments to the appropriate year, so that all 
payments are made consistent with the normal rules for making 
SSI payments.
    State TANF Supplemental Grant for Population Increase 
Amounts.--The bill includes a provision, as proposed by the 
President, to constrain Supplemental Grants for Population 
Increase to the FY 1998 amounts. This change will not affect 
any beneficiary payments.

                           Transfer Authority

    The Committee, again this year, has included a general 
transfer authority for several of the Departments and agencies 
funded under this bill. In doing so, it is providing the 
Executive Branch with the ability to respond to emergencies or 
unanticipated needs.
    The Committee has not provided this authority to the 
Department of Health and Human Services with respect to the 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or to the Department 
of Education.
    The Committee first provided this authority in fiscal year 
1996 and in the report accompanying the House bill and from 
time-to-time in following fiscal years included language 
indicating the importance of the achievement of a clean 
financial opinion. Report 104-659 indicated:

          . . . [T]he Committee questions the extent to which 
        agencies can properly exercise . . . [the transfer] 
        authority . . . if they have not made substantial 
        progress towards achieving the CFO Act's financial 
        management reforms. Accordingly, in subsequent years, 
        the Committee will consider . . . progress . . . in 
        obtaining a clean opinion on . . . financial statements 
        . . . in deciding whether to continue, expand or limit 
        transfer and reprogramming authority.

    The Committee notes that the Department of Education did 
not receive an unqualified opinion on its financial statements 
for either fiscal year 1998 or 1999, although in fiscal year 
1999, they made progress toward rectifying the problems raised 
in the 1998 audit.
    With respect to the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention, the Committee received testimony that the agency 
has provided Congress with inaccurate spending data, the result 
of both a culture of disrespect for the role of Congress and a 
breakdown of budgetary and financial management systems. The 
Committee understands that the Director and the Secretary have 
taken aggressive steps to begin to address this situation.
    The Committee believes that the flexibilities it provides 
to the departments and agencies under its jurisdiction can only 
be carried out when proper management controls and systems are 
in place. Its actions reflect the breakdown in financial 
management in the two agencies that have been exempted from the 
overall transfer authority.
    The Committee reiterates that it is not the purpose of the 
transfer authority to provide funding for new policy proposals 
that can, and should, be included in subsequent budget 
proposals. The Congress sets funding levels for programs, 
projects and activities through the annual appropriations act 
and the accompanying tables included in the conference report. 
Absent the need to respond to emergencies or unforeseen 
circumstances discussed above, this authority cannot be used 
simply to increase funding for programs, projects or activities 
because of disagreements over the funding level or the 
difficulty or inconvenience with operating levels set by the 
Congress.

                 Government Performance and Results Act

    As with last year, the Committee believes that the 
Departments and agencies under its jurisdiction have made 
progress toward the establishment of goals and other benchmarks 
as required by the Government Performance and Results Act. 
However, they remain a long way from meeting its overall 
intent. As noted in specific instances throughout this Report, 
the Committee continues to feel that quantifiable and 
measurable individual performance indicators need to be 
developed for each program. Individual indicators need to be 
specific and measurable wherever possible, need to be 
consistent with other measures used in similar programs and 
need to be supported by systems that can provide annual 
information on the progress being made toward achieving the 
stated goals. There are still far too many programs with 
indicators using the terms ``increase,'' or ``decrease,'' or 
``improve'' rather than specific numerical goals.
    In addition, these indicators must increasingly focus on 
the improvements in employment and income, worker safety, 
health status, biomedical discoveries, the quality of life of 
various populations, educational achievement, and the many 
other goals that are the primary purpose of the programs funded 
by this bill. Again, the indicators are far too often related 
to the issuance of program guidance or focus on the number of 
individuals served. The Committee is disappointed that the 
baselines so necessary for measuring progress are not being 
established rapidly enough. These baselines need to indicate 
multi-year trends so that the Committee and the American people 
can judge program effectiveness against long-term trend data.
    The Committee continues to be disappointed that the 
administration is still unable to provide specific improvement 
goals with its budget request with respect to new program 
initiatives. The Committee notes that it is particularly hard 
to justify new programs when the budget request includes no 
empirical statement of the problems they are designed to 
redress, no baseline data and no statement of yearly 
improvements to be achieved if the new program is funded at the 
requested level.
    Finally, the Committee continues to urge the Departments 
and agencies under its jurisdiction to manage themselves based 
on performance and outcomes. They should use outcome and 
performance measures as the primary management tool for 
resource allocation and the evaluation of programs and 
individuals. The Committee expects that each Department and 
office funded in the bill will be prepared to testify during 
the fiscal year 2002 cycle on how performance and outcome 
measures are being used to manage their programs, including:
          How outcome and performance goals are being 
        established for individual offices within departments 
        and how they are held accountable for the achievement 
        of these goals;
          How such data is used to establish individual 
        performance goals; and
          How actual performance is measured against these 
        goals and the kinds of incentives, both positive and 
        negative, that are in place to assure the achievement 
        of overall goals.

                            Operating Plans

    The Committee directs the Departments and agencies 
identified in the report accompanying the fiscal year 1998 bill 
to continue to provide it with operating plans on the dates 
identified in that report. These plans should follow the 
instructions outlined in House Report 106-370.
    The Committee believes that the Departments and agencies 
must make better progress in upgrading their financial 
management systems to determine better the actual flow of 
appropriated dollars to individual programs and identifying 
obligation schedules. However, the Committee is troubled by the 
fact that for many programs, simple formulas are used for 
outlay and obligation patterns rather than a true analysis of 
the likely obligation and spending patterns for the program.

          Extended Availability of Salary and Expense Accounts

    The Committee has, once again, provided that most salary 
and expense accounts funded in this bill remain available for 
obligation through December 31, 2002. The Department of 
Education did not request this flexibility and the Committee 
has not applied this provision to the Department of Education. 
The Committee has also excluded the Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention. In all other respects, the Departments and 
agencies to which this provision applies are directed to follow 
the instructions in House Report 106-370. The Committee 
reiterates that unless otherwise available, no funds covered by 
this provision can be obligated in the ``fifth quarter'' 
without following the notification procedures outlined in House 
Report 106-370.

                      TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF LABOR


                 Employment and Training Administration


                    training and employment services

    The Committee recommends $5,015,495,000 for this account 
which provides funding authorized primarily by the Workforce 
Investment Act (WIA). This is $420,929,000 below the fiscal 
year 2000 level and $1,090,567,000 below the budget request. Of 
the total provided, the committee recommends that 
$2,463,000,000 be made available as of October 1, 2001.
    The Training and Employment Services account is comprised 
of programs that enhance the employment and earnings of those 
in need of such services, operated through a decentralized 
system of skill training and related services. The account is 
mostly forward-funded on a July to June cycle, with funds 
provided for fiscal year 2001 supporting the effort from July 
1, 2001 through June 30, 2002.
    Fiscal year 2000 was the first year under the new Workforce 
Investment Act, beginning July 1, 2000. The new legislation is 
expected to significantly enhance employment and training 
services, consolidating, coordinating, and improving programs 
utilizing a local level one-stop delivery system.
    The Committee notes that the Department is making progress 
in developing objective, measurable standards for achieving the 
goals of the various job training programs pursuant to the 
Government Performance and Results Act. The Committee 
encourages the Department to continue to refine the baseline 
data presented in the budget justification and believes that it 
is essential to develop specific, measurable standards for each 
and every one of these programs. There is a particular need to 
develop more timely performance data. The annual performance 
plan should include the specific, measurable improvements that 
are expected to occur with respect to all measures as a result 
of the proposed funding levels. The annual report on 
performance should link departmental actions to the achievement 
or non-achievement of the goals established in the performance 
plan. The emphasis must be on the programs' mission, that is to 
train and place people in real jobs, with a particular emphasis 
on those people who have the most difficulty in obtaining work.
    Employer-based national training contractors play a unique 
role in helping the Department comply with the Workforce 
Investment Act's requirements for closer ties with industry, 
while fulfilling the skills training and job placement needs of 
this country's most economically disadvantaged youth. 
Recognizing the unique role and outstanding record of employer-
based organizations in training Job Corps students as well as 
disadvantaged youth and placing them with above average 
success, the Committee believes the Department should expand 
its effective working relationships with these organizations. 
The Committee notes in particular the successes achieved by the 
Community Restitution and Apprenticeship-Focused Training 
(CRAFT) program operated by the Home Builders Institute and 
encourages the Department to replicate efforts such as this.
    The Committee encourages the Department to continue to 
provide technical assistance to the Role Models America Academy 
Demonstration Program. The impact of family members on the 
recovery success of substance abusers can be significant. The 
Committee urges the Department to develop partnerships with 
substance abuse centers and include in their curriculum 
literacy, job readiness, and job placement services that makes 
the family an effective collaborator in the recovery process.

Adult employment and training activities

    For adult employment and training activities, the Committee 
recommends $857,000,000. Of this amount, $712,000,000 will 
become available on October 1, 2001. The total recommended is 
$93,000,000 less than the 2000 comparable level and the budget 
request. Given the extremely tight budget constraints under 
which it is operating this year, the Committee was compelled to 
reduce funding for this activity. Furthermore, the Committee 
believes that the economy is sufficiently strong to justify a 
reduction in this program at this time. This program is 
authorized by the Workforce Investment Act. The funds are 
allocated by formula to States and further distributed to local 
workforce investment boards. Services for adults will be 
provided through the One-Stop system and most customers 
receiving training will use their individual training accounts 
to determine which programs and providers fit their needs. The 
Act authorizes core services, which will be available to all 
adults with no eligibility requirements, and intensive 
services, for unemployed individuals who are not able to find 
jobs through core services alone.

Dislocated worker employment and training activities

    For dislocated worker employment and training activities, 
the Committee recommends $1,382,025,000, of which, 
$1,060,000,000 will be made available on October 1, 2001. This 
total is $207,000,000 less than the 2000 comparable level and 
$388,485,000 less than the budget request. Given the extremely 
tight budget constraints under which it is operating this year, 
the Committee was compelled to reduce funding for this 
activity. Furthermore, the Committee believes that the economy 
is sufficiently strong to justify a reduction in this program 
at this time. This activity, authorized by WIA, is a State-
operated program which provides core services, intensive 
services, training, and supportive services to help permanently 
separated workers return to productive, unsubsidized 
employment. In addition, States use these funds for rapid 
response assistance to help workers affected by mass layoffs 
and plant closures. Eighty percent of funding is distributed by 
formula to the States. The remaining twenty percent is 
available to the Secretary for activities specified in WIA, 
primarily to respond to mass layoffs, plant and/or military 
base closings, and natural disasters across the country, which 
cannot be otherwise anticipated, as well as technical 
assistance and training and demonstration projects.

Youth activities

    For youth activities, the bill includes $1,000,965,000. 
This level is the same as fiscal year 2000 funding and 
$21,500,000 less than the budget request. The Workforce 
Investment Act consolidates the Summer Youth Employment and 
Training Program under JTPA Title IIB and Youth Training Grants 
under JTPA Title IIC into a single youth training activity. The 
funds are allocated by formula to States and further 
distributed to local workforce investment boards. The local 
boards decide how much to spend on summer jobs and how much to 
spend on other youth activities. In addition to consolidating 
programs, WIA also requires youth activities to be connected to 
the One-Stop system as one way to link youth to all available 
community resources. The purpose of youth activities is to 
provide eligible youth with assistance in achieving academic 
and employment success through improving educational and skill 
competencies and providing connections to employers. Other 
activities include providing mentoring opportunities, 
opportunities for training, supportive services, summer 
employment opportunities that are directly linked to academic 
and occupational learning, incentives for recognition and 
achievement, and activities related to leadership development, 
citizenship and community service.

Youth opportunity grants

    The bill includes $175,000,000 for Youth Opportunity 
Grants. This is $75,000,000 less than the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation and $200,000,000 below the budget request. Youth 
Opportunity Grants are authorized in the Workforce Investment 
Act. These grants are aimed at increasing the long-term 
employment of youth who live in empowerment zones, enterprise 
communities, and other high-poverty areas. Given the tight 
budget constraints under which it is operating this year, the 
Committee was forced to make difficult choices. Under the 
circumstances, the Committee believes that it is more important 
to fund the core job training programs under which all States 
receive funds than to fund this discretionary grant program at 
its authorized level which would provide funds to only about 35 
areas.

Job Corps

    For Job Corps, the Committee recommends $1,400,000,000. 
This is $42,224,000 more than the 2000 comparable level and 
$6,956,000 higher than the President's request. Of the amount 
provided, $691,000,000 will become available on October 1, 
2001. In addition, $15,000,000 is made available on October 1, 
2000 for use during the 2000 program year. These funds are to 
be used to integrate Job Corps centers in their local 
communities through Business and Community Liaisons as mandated 
by the Workforce Investment Act. The Job Corps, authorized by 
WIA, is a nationwide network of residential facilities 
chartered by Federal law to provide a comprehensive and 
intensive array of training, job placement and support services 
to at-risk young adults. The mission of Job Corps is to attract 
eligible young adults, teach them the skills they need to 
become employable and independent, and place them in meaningful 
jobs or further education. Participation in the program is open 
to economically disadvantaged young people in the 16-24 age 
range who are unemployed and out of school. Most Job Corps 
students come from disruptive or debilitating environments, and 
it is important that they be relocated to residential 
facilities where they can benefit from the highly structured 
and carefully integrated services provided by the Job Corps 
program. A limited number of opportunities are also available 
for non-residential participation. The Committee supports the 
effort of the Workforce Investment Act of 1998 to more fully 
integrate Job Corps centers in their local communities.
    As a national training program, Job Corps is particularly 
well suited to help meet the needs of large, multi-state 
employers for skilled entry level workers. The Committee 
applauds Job Corps for establishing partnerships with nine 
national employers, and encourages Job Corps to continue to 
work with both larger employers and small businesses to ensure 
that student training meets current labor market needs. Job 
Corps should intensify its efforts to upgrade its vocational 
offerings and curricula to reflect industry standards and skill 
shortages.
    The Committee recognizes the continued need to bring 
salaries for key Job Corps program staff, particularly academic 
and vocational instructors, into line with those of instructors 
at comparable institutions, including the public schools. Job 
Corps will be unable to move into high technology vocations, 
such as computer network certification, unless it can offer 
competitive salaries. The Committee has provided additional 
resources to make salaries for teaching staff comparable to 
those of public schools.
    Last year, the Committee provided $5 million to build or 
rehabilitate Head Start centers on Job Corps campuses. The 
Committee requests the Department to provide a detailed report 
on the progress of these Head Start centers, and on the 
progress of the four new Job Corps Centers in Carville, 
Louisiana; Exeter, Rhode Island; Hartford, Connecticut; and 
Wilmington, Delaware. Although the Committee has not provided 
funding for new Job Corps centers this year, the Secretary is 
encouraged to include such funds in its budget request for 
fiscal year 2002. In considering the expansion of Job Corps, 
the Secretary is urged to consider new sites based on a 
competitive process which gives priority to sites within States 
that: are currently serving a small percentage of youths 
eligible to enroll in Job Corps; currently have two or fewer 
Job Corps centers; have not been recently selected for a new 
center; and exhibit strong state, local and employer support 
for Job Corps.

Native Americans

    For Native Americans, the bill includes $55,000,000, the 
amount requested by the President. This is $3,436,000 less than 
the 2000 comparable level. This program, authorized by WIA, is 
designed to improve the economic well-being of Native Americans 
(Indians, Eskimos, Aleuts, and Native Hawaiians) through the 
provision of training, work experience, and other employment-
related services and opportunities that are intended to aid the 
participants to secure permanent, unsubsidized jobs. The 
Department of Labor allocates formula grants to Indian tribes 
and other Native American groups whose eligibility for such 
grants is established in accordance with Department's 
regulations.

Migrant and seasonal farmworkers

    For Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers, the Committee 
recommends $78,000,000, which is $3,805,000 higher than the 
2000 comparable level and $3,555,000 higher than the budget 
request. This program, authorized by WIA, is designed to serve 
members of economically disadvantaged families whose principal 
livelihood is derived from migratory and other forms of 
seasonal farmwork. Through training and other employability 
development services, the program prepares eligible seasonal 
farmworkers and their family members for stable, year-round 
employment, both inside and outside the agricultural industry. 
The program also provides health care, day care and other 
supportive services for farmworkers who choose to stay in 
agriculture. At least 94 percent of each year's appropriation 
is allocated to States according to a population-based formula. 
The remainder of each year's appropriation is set aside for 
technical assistance to grantees and for other special projects 
to benefit seasonal farmworkers such as the Migrant Farmworker 
Housing Program. The Department is expected to continue the 
farmworker housing program at the current year level.

National programs

    For national programs, the Committee recommends 
$67,505,000. This is $33,522,000 less than the 2000 comparable 
level and $398,093,000 less than the budget request. This 
activity includes WIA-authorized programs in support of the 
workforce system including technical assistance and incentive 
grants, evaluations, pilots, demonstrations and research. In 
addition, the activity includes the National Skills Standards 
Board.
    Technical Assistance/Incentive Grants: The Committee 
recommends $5,000,000, the amount provided in 2000, for the 
provision of technical assistance, staff development, and 
replication of programs of demonstrated effectiveness; as well 
as incentive grants to each State that exceeds State adjusted 
levels of performance for WIA State programs.
    Pilots, Demonstrations and Research: The Committee 
recommends $35,000,000 for grants or contracts to conduct 
research, pilots or demonstrations that improve techniques or 
demonstrate the effectiveness of programs. This is $30,095,000 
below 2000 and the same as the budget request.
    Responsible Reintegration of Youthful Offenders: The 
Committee recommends $13,907,000 for this proposed grant 
program under WIA Pilot, Demonstration, and Research authority. 
The budget request was for $75,000,000. The Committee is aware 
that acquiring education and employment skills significantly 
reduces recidivism. The Committee urges the Department to 
support community corrections organizations that provide 
education, mentoring, job-readiness training and job placement 
services to reintegrate ex-offenders into mainstream society.
    Evaluation: The Committee recommends $9,098,000 to provide 
for the continuing evaluation of programs conducted under WIA, 
as well as of federally-funded employment-related activities 
under other provisions of law. This is the same as 2000 and 
$3,000,000 below the budget request.
    National Skills Standards Board: The Committee recommends 
$3,500,000 for the Board to continue the development of 
voluntary partnerships. This is $3,500,000 less than 2000 and 
the same as the budget request.
    Women in Apprenticeship for Non-Traditional Occupations: 
The Committee recommends $1,000,000 to continue training women 
for jobs not traditionally entered into by women. This level is 
essentially the same as 2000, and the budget request included 
no funds for this purpose in this account.

            community service employment for older americans

    The bill includes $440,200,000 for community service 
employment for older Americans. This is the same as the fiscal 
year 2000 level and the President's budget request. The 
Committee notes that this program again this year lacks an 
authorization for appropriations. The program, under title V of 
the Older Americans Act, provides part-time employment in 
community service activities for unemployed, low-income persons 
aged 55 and over. Participants receive the minimum wage. It is 
forward-funded from July to June, and the fiscal year 2001 
appropriation will support the effort from July 1, 2001 through 
June 30, 2002. An estimated 48,000 job slots will be supported 
by the bill.

              federal unemployment benefits and allowances

    The bill includes $406,550,000, the same as the budget 
request and a reduction of $8,600,000 below the fiscal year 
2000 comparable level. The fiscal year 2001 allowance provides 
funding for certain worker adjustment entitlement programs.
    For trade adjustment assistance benefits, as authorized by 
the Trade Act of 1974, as amended, the bill includes 
$248,000,000. This is a reduction of $7,000,000 below the 
fiscal year 2000 level. The bill provides $94,400,000 for 
training, job search and job relocation allowances to workers 
adversely affected by imports. The funding for this activity is 
also authorized under the Trade Act of 1974, as amended. This 
is about the same as the fiscal year 2000 level.
    For NAFTA transitional adjustment assistance benefits, also 
authorized by the Trade Act of 1974, as amended as a result of 
the signing of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), 
the bill includes $27,000,000. This is a reduction of 
$2,000,000 below the fiscal year 2000 level. The bill provides 
$37,150,000 for training, job search and job relocation 
allowances to workers adversely affected by imports due to 
NAFTA. This is the same as the fiscal year 2000 level.

     state unemployment insurance and employment service operations

    The bill includes $3,097,790,000 for this account, a 
reduction of $115,990,000 below the fiscal year 2000 level and 
$291,408,000 below the budget request. Included in the total 
availability is $3,054,338,000 authorized to be drawn from the 
Employment Security Administration Account of the Unemployment 
Trust Fund and $43,452,000 to be provided from the general fund 
of the Treasury. The funds in this account are used to provide 
administrative grants and assistance to State agencies which 
administer Federal and State unemployment compensation laws and 
operate the public employment service.
    The Committee notes that the Department is making progress 
in developing objective, measurable standards for achieving the 
goals of the various job training programs pursuant to the 
Government Performance and Results Act. The Committee 
encourages the Department to continue to refine the baseline 
data presented in the budget justification and believes that it 
is essential to develop specific, measurable standards for 
these programs. There is a particular need to develop more 
timely performance data. The annual performance plan should 
include the specific, measurable improvements that are expected 
to occur with respect to all measures as a result of the 
proposed funding levels. The annual report on performance 
should link departmental actions to the achievement or non-
achievement of the goals established in the performance plan.
    For Unemployment Insurance Services, the bill provides 
$2,266,375,000. This total includes $2,256,375,000 for State 
Operations and $10,000,000 for national activities. The 
recommendation is $92,908,000 below the budget request and the 
same as the fiscal year 2000 level. The Committee implemented 
the proposal to combine funding for contingency into the state 
administration line item.
    For the Employment Service, the bill provides $811,415,000 
which includes $23,452,000 in general funds together with an 
authorization to spend $787,963,000 from the Employment 
Security Administration Account of the Unemployment Trust Fund. 
These amounts are $5,990,000 less than the fiscal year 2000 
level and $44,500,000 less than the budget request. Included in 
the bill for the Employment Service is $761,735,000 for State 
grants, available for the program year of July 1, 2001 through 
June 30, 2002. This is $50,000,000 less than the budget request 
and equal to the fiscal year 2000 level. Because of budget 
constraints, the Committee was unable to provide any funding 
for proposed reemployment service grants for UI recipients.
    The Committee has provided $49,680,000 for ES national 
activities, a decrease of $5,990,000 from the fiscal year 2000 
level and $5,500,000 more than the budget request. The 
Committee does not believe that the Department's new foreign 
labor certification streamlining system will be in place by 
October 1, 2000; therefore, it has restored $5.5 million to 
assure that States have adequate resources to complete the 
backlog reduction plan at the same time the new system is being 
implemented. The bill includes $20,000,000 specifically for 
administration by the States of the Work Opportunities Tax 
Credit and the Welfare-to-Work Tax Credit.
    The bill provides $20,000,000 for Work Incentive Grants 
which is the same level provided in 2000 and the amount in the 
budget request. Fiscal year 2000 is the first year of funding 
for this new program. These grants are competitively awarded to 
local organizations to enhance the employability, employment, 
and career advancement of people with disabilities. Services 
are provided in concert with the one-stop center serving the 
local community.
    The Committee has provided no funding for one-stop centers 
as 2000 was the final year of the State implementation grants 
with all States having received implementation grants. The 
Committee feels it has provided the resources necessary for the 
original one-stop development plan. In House Report 104-209, 
the Committee expressed its doubt that a grant program could 
effectively consolidate the myriad of employment and training 
programs and that legislation should be enacted to reach this 
goal. The recently enacted Workforce Investment Act provides 
such legislation. Under the Workforce Investment Act, one-stop 
service delivery is presumed, and the Committee expects States 
and localities to take responsibility for further system 
development where necessary.

        ADVANCES TO THE UNEMPLOYMENT TRUST FUND AND OTHER FUNDS

    The bill includes $435,000,000, the same as the budget 
request and an increase of $79,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 level. The appropriation is available to provide advances 
to several accounts for purposes authorized under various 
Federal and State unemployment compensation laws and the Black 
Lung Disability Trust Fund, whenever balances in such accounts 
prove insufficient. The bill anticipates that fiscal year 2001 
advances will be made to the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund.
    The separate appropriations provided by the Committee for 
all other accounts eligible to borrow from this account in 
fiscal year 2000 are expected to be sufficient. Should the need 
arise, due to unanticipated changes in the economic situation, 
or for other legitimate reasons, advances will be made to the 
needy accounts to the extent funds are available. Funds 
advanced to the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund are repayable 
with interest to the general fund of the Treasury.

                         PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION

    The bill includes total funding for this account of 
$146,000,000. This is the same as the 2000 level and 
$13,311,000 below the request. This includes $100,944,000 in 
general funds and authority to expend $45,056,000 from the 
Employment Security Administration Account of the Unemployment 
Trust Fund. General funds in this account provide the Federal 
staff to administer employment and training programs under the 
Workforce Investment Act, the Older Americans Act, the welfare-
to-work program, the Trade Act of 1974, and the National 
Apprenticeship Act. Trust funds provide for the Federal 
administration of employment security functions under title III 
of the Social Security Act and the Immigration and Nationality 
Act.

              Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The bill provides $98,934,000 for this account, a reduction 
of $8,898,000 from the budget request and the same as the 
fiscal year 2000 level. The Pension and Welfare Benefits 
Administration (PWBA) is responsible for the enforcement of 
Title I of the Employee Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 
(ERISA) in both civil and criminal areas. This involves ERISA 
fiduciary and reporting/disclosure requirements. PWBA is also 
responsible for enforcement of sections 8477 and 8478 of the 
Federal Employees' Retirement Security Act of 1986 (FERSA). The 
agency was also given new responsibilities under the Health 
Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996.
    The Committee notes that the Department is making progress 
in developing objective, measurable standards for achieving the 
goals of the various job training programs pursuant to the 
Government Performance and Results Act. The Committee 
encourages the Department to continue to refine the baseline 
data presented in the budget justification and believes that it 
is essential to develop specific, measurable standards for this 
program. There is a particular need to develop more timely 
performance data with particular emphasis on baselines. The 
annual performance plan should include the specific, measurable 
improvements that are expected to occur with respect to all 
measures as a result of the proposed funding levels. The annual 
report on performance should link departmental actions to the 
achievement or non-achievement of the goals established in the 
performance plan.

                  Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation

    The Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation is a wholly-owned 
government corporation established by the Employee Retirement 
Income Security Act of 1974. The law places it within the 
Department of Labor and makes the Secretary of Labor the 
chairman of its board of directors. The Corporation receives 
its income from insurance premiums collected from covered 
pension plans, collections of employer liabilities imposed by 
the Act, and investment earnings. It is also authorized to 
borrow up to $100 million from the Treasury. The primary 
purpose of the Corporation is to guarantee the payment of 
pension plan benefits to participants if covered plans fail or 
go out of existence.
    The Corporation's budget for fiscal year 2000 includes 
benefit payments of $987,609,000, multi-employer financial 
assistance of $6,266,000, an administrative expenses limitation 
of $11,148,000, and administrative expenses that are exempt 
from limitation of $164,834,000. Only the administrative 
expenses limitation is subject to the appropriations process. 
The amount in the administrative expense limitation is a 
reduction of $723,000 below the request and the same as fiscal 
year 2000.

                  Employment Standards Administration


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The bill includes $338,770,000 for this agency. This is a 
reduction of $24,706,000 below the budget request and a freeze 
at the fiscal year 2000. The bill includes $337,030,000 in 
general funds for this account and also contains authority to 
expend $1,740,000 from the Special Fund established by the 
Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act. In addition, an 
amount of $30,393,000 is available by transfer from the Black 
Lung Disability Trust Fund. This is the same as the request and 
$1,717,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level.
    The Employment Standards Administration is involved in the 
administration of numerous laws, including the Fair Labor 
Standards Act, the Immigration and Nationality Act, the Migrant 
and Seasonal Agricultural Workers' Protection Act, the Davis-
Bacon Act, the Family and Medical Leave Act, the Federal 
Employees' Compensation Act (FECA), the Longshore and Harbor 
Workers' Compensation Act, and the Federal Mine Safety and 
Health Act (black lung). The agency also administers Executive 
Order 11246 related to affirmative action by Federal 
contractors and the Labor-Management Reporting and Disclosure 
Act.
    With respect to the Government Performance and Results Act, 
the Committee notes that the agency's annual performance plan 
indicates that progress is being made in compiling baseline 
data for some of its performance goals. The agency is 
encouraged to continue to pursue refinements and improvements. 
The performance plan needs to show the specific, measurable 
improvements that are expected to occur with respect to all 
measures as a result of proposed funding levels.
    The Committee recommendation includes $2,000,000 to 
continue the development and implementation of the electronic 
filing of reports required to be filed under the Labor-
Management Reporting and Disclosure Act, and a computer 
database of the information for each submission that is indexed 
and easily searchable by the public via the Internet. The 
Committee urges the Department to complete their efforts to 
make a searchable LM2 filing database accessible to the public 
by the submission of their budget request for fiscal year 2002.

                            Special Benefits

    The bill includes $56,000,000, the same as the budget 
request and a decrease of $23,000,000 below the fiscal year 
2000 appropriation. This appropriation primarily provides 
benefits under the Federal Employees' Compensation Act (FECA). 
The payments are required by law.
    The total amount to be available in fiscal year 2000 for 
FECA payments, including anticipated reimbursements from 
Federal agencies of $1,955,000,000, is expected to be 
$2,086,000,000, an increase of $50,000,000 over the fiscal year 
2000 comparable level.
    The Committee recommends continuation of appropriation 
language to provide authority to deposit into the Special 
Benefits account those funds that the Postal Service, the 
Tennessee Valley Authority, and other entities are required to 
pay to cover their ``fair share'' of the costs of administering 
the claims filed by their employees under FECA. The Committee 
also recommends approval of appropriation language to provide 
that up to $30,510,000 of the funds transferred from the ``fair 
share'' agencies to pay the costs of administration will be 
available to the Secretary of Labor to finance capital 
improvements relating to upgrading and enhancing the Federal 
Employees' Compensation program computer system hardware and 
software and to finance staff costs related to the FECA 
periodic roll management project. The remaining balance of the 
administrative costs paid by the ``fair share'' agencies will 
revert to Treasury as miscellaneous receipts.

                    Black Lung Disability Trust Fund

    The bill includes authority to obligate a total of 
$1,028,000,000 from the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund in 
fiscal year 2001, with $975,343,000 for benefits and interest 
authorized to be made from the Trust Fund. For administrative 
purposes, the total amount available for fiscal year 2001 will 
provide $52,301,000 and $356,000 for administrative expenses 
for the Departments of Labor and Treasury, respectively. In 
fiscal year 2000, comparable obligations for administrative 
expenses for the Departments of Labor and Treasury respectively 
are $49,771,000 and $356,000.
    The Trust Fund pays all black lung compensation/medical and 
survivor benefit expenses when no responsible mine operator can 
be assigned liability for such benefits, or when coal mine 
employment ceased prior to 1970, as well as all administrative 
costs which are incurred in administering the benefits program 
and operating the Trust Fund.
    It is estimated that 59,500 people will be receiving black 
lung benefits financed from the Trust Fund in fiscal year 2001. 
This compares with an estimated 63,200 receiving benefits in 
fiscal year 2000.
    The basic financing for the Trust Fund comes from a coal 
excise tax for underground and surface-mined coal. Additional 
funds come from reimbursement payments from mine operators for 
benefit payments made by the Trust Fund before the mine 
operator is found liable, and advances from the general fund, 
estimated at $435,000,000 in fiscal year 2001. The advances to 
the Fund assure availability of necessary funds when 
liabilities may exceed other income. The Omnibus Budget 
Reconciliation Act of 1987 continues the current tax structure 
until 2014.
    In Conference Report 106-479 for the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation, the Committee directed the Department of Labor 
to provide a recommended solution for the problem of the 
increasing indebtedness of the Trust Fund to the Congress. In 
addition, the House Committee on Education and the Workforce 
has requested that the General Accounting Office conduct a 
review of the impact on the Trust Fund of proposed regulations 
affecting eligibility for benefits under the black lung 
disability program. The Department is encouraged to hold in 
abeyance any provisions of the proposed black lung regulations 
that would significantly impact the solvency of the Trust Fund 
until the completion of the GAO report.

             Occupational Safety and Health Administration


                         salaries and expenses

    The bill includes $381,620,000 for OSHA. This is the same 
level as 2000 and a reduction of $44,363,000 below the budget 
request. This agency is responsible for enforcing the 
Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 in the Nation's 
workplaces.
    The Committee has provided $1,771,000 in OSHA State 
programs to fund the state plan for New Jersey to provide 
safety and health coverage for its public sector employees. 
Because of limited resources, overall funding for OSHA remains 
at the 2000 level. The Committee reduced the 2000 funding level 
for federal enforcement to provide for the New Jersey public 
sector employee coverage in order to keep the funding split 
between OSHA enforcement and compliance activities the same as 
in 2000.
    The Committee notes that the Department is making progress 
in developing objective, measurable standards for achieving the 
goals of the various job training programs pursuant to the 
Government Performance and Results Act. The Committee 
encourages the Department to continue to refine the baseline 
data presented in the budget justification and believes that it 
is essential to develop specific, measurable standards for this 
program. There is a particular need to develop more timely 
performance data. The annual performance plan should include 
the specific, measurable improvements that are expected to 
occur with respect to all measures as a result of the proposed 
funding levels. The annual report on performance should link 
departmental actions to the achievement or non-achievement of 
the goals established in the performance plan.
    The Committee supports OSHA's efforts to expand the 
Voluntary Protection Program and other voluntary cooperative 
programs. The Committee is pleased with OSHA's efforts in 
placing high priority on the Voluntary Protection Program (VPP) 
and other voluntary cooperative programs. The agency's work in 
expanding participation in the programs, and promoting prompt 
review and processing of applications is noteworthy. In FY 2001 
the Committee expects OSHA to continue to place priority on the 
VPP, making an effort to ensure 25% growth in participation by 
sites covered under Federal OSHA jurisdiction. Cooperative 
voluntary programs, especially the VPP, are important to 
employers' ability to assure worker safety.
    The Committee has included language carried in the bill 
since 1976 in one instance and 1979 in the other that restricts 
the use of funds for certain purposes. First, the bill includes 
language that effectively exempts farms employing 10 or fewer 
people from the provisions of the Act except those farms having 
a temporary labor camp. Second, the bill includes language 
exempting businesses employing 10 or fewer in industry 
classifications having a lost workday injury rate less than the 
national average from general schedule safety inspections. The 
Committee is aware that a small percentage of the population 
may have an allergic reaction to natural rubber latex. Latex 
allergy is more likely to develop in infants who have had 
numerous surgical procedures and those people who are atopic, 
yet little is known about its epidemiology. The Committee 
believes that this issue needs to be further researched, and 
urges OSHA to take no further action to regulate latex products 
without a sound, scientific basis.

                 Mine Safety and Health Administration


                         salaries and expenses

    The bill includes $233,000,000 for this agency. This is 
$9,247,000 below the budget request and an increase of 
$4,943,000 over fiscal year 2000. This agency enforces the 
Federal Mine Safety and Health Act in underground and surface 
coal and metal and non-metal mines.
    The Committee notes that the Department is making progress 
in developing objective, measurable standards for achieving the 
goals of the various job training programs pursuant to the 
Government Performance and Results Act. The Committee 
encourages the Department to continue to refine the baseline 
data presented in the budget justification and believes that it 
is essential to develop specific, measurable standards for mine 
safety. There is a particular need to develop more timely 
performance data. The annual performance plan should include 
the specific, measurable improvements that are expected to 
occur with respect to all measures as a result of the proposed 
funding levels. The annual report on performance should link 
departmental actions to the achievement or non-achievement of 
the goals established in the performance plan.

                       Bureau of Labor Statistics


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

    The total funding recommended by the Committee for the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics is $440,000,000. This is a reduction 
of $13,632,000 below the budget request and is an increase of 
$6,123,000 over the 2000 level. The bill includes $372,743,000 
in general funds for this account and authority to spend 
$67,257,000 from the Employment Security Administration Account 
of the Unemployment Trust Fund. The Bureau of Labor Statistics 
is the principal fact-finding agency in the Federal Government 
in the broad field of labor economics. Its principal surveys 
include the Consumer Price Index and the monthly unemployment 
series.

                        Departmental Management


                         salaries and expenses

    The bill includes $244,889,000 for Departmental Management 
activities. This is $192,665,000 below the budget request and 
is a freeze at the 2000 level. The bill includes $244,579,000 
in general funds for this account along with authority to 
transfer $310,000 from the Employment Security Administration 
account of the Unemployment Trust Fund. In addition, an amount 
of $21,590,000 is available by transfer from the Black Lung 
Disability Trust Fund. This is the same as the budget request 
and an increase of $807,000 over the fiscal year 2000 level.
    The Departmental Management appropriation finances staff 
responsible for formulating and overseeing the implementation 
of Departmental policy and management activities. In addition, 
this appropriation includes a variety of operating programs and 
activities that are not involved in Departmental Management 
functions, but for which other salaries and expenses 
appropriations are not suitable.
    The Committee commends the Department for again achieving a 
clean audit under the terms of the Government Management Reform 
Act of 1994. An audited financial statement is like a 
``scorecard'' that reflects a department's progress in 
achieving the significant financial management reforms required 
by the CFO Act, and in providing effective stewardship and 
management of government funds.
    The bill includes $70,000,000 in the Bureau of 
International Labor, which is the same as 2000 and a decrease 
of $97,006 from the amount requested by the President. The bill 
also does not fund the automation request from the Department. 
Given the extremely tight budget constraints under which it is 
operating this year, the Committee was forced to make difficult 
choices. Funding is simply not available for the requested 
increases for these activities.
    The Committee urges the Women's Bureau to continue to 
support effective organizations such as Women Work! that 
provide technical assistance and training on programming for 
women in transition.

        ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR VETERANS EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING

    The bill includes $201,277 for veteran employment and 
training activities, the same level as the 2000 comparable 
level and a decrease of $8,936,000 from the budget request. Two 
activities, homeless veterans reintegration and veterans 
workforce investment programs, have been moved to this account 
from the Training and Employment Services account in ETA. The 
Assistant Secretary for Veterans Employment and Training 
manages these activities and the funding move reflects this 
reality. The bill provides $16,936,000 from general revenues 
for these two activities. The bill also includes $184,341,000 
to be expended from the Employment Security Administration 
account of the Unemployment Trust Fund for the traditional 
State and Federal administration of veterans employment and 
training activities.
    For State grants, the bill provides $80,215,000 for the 
Disabled Veterans Outreach program. This amount is sufficient 
to finance about 1,338 State staff. The bill also provides 
$77,253,000 for the Local Veterans Employment Representative 
program. This amount is sufficient to finance about 1,222 State 
staff. For Federal administration, the bill provides 
$26,873,000, a freeze at the 2000 level.
    For veterans workforce investment programs, the Committee 
recommends $7,300,000. This is the same as the 2000 comparable 
level and the same as the budget request. This budget activity, 
authorized by WIA, supports efforts to provide lifelong 
learning and skills development to veterans who have service-
connected disabilities, who have significant barriers to 
employment, who served on active duty in the armed forces 
during a war or in a campaign or expedition for which a 
campaign badge has been authorized, or who are recently 
separated.
    The Committee recommends $9,636,000 for the homeless 
veterans reintegration program assisting homeless veterans to 
find jobs. This is the same as 2000 and $5,364,000 less than 
the request.
    In regards to program performance, Department of Labor data 
show that about 3 of 4 veterans who register for jobs with 
State Employment Security Agencies (SESAs) do not get jobs 
within 90 days and the number of veterans that SESAs directly 
place is unknown. Further, there is no reward for success and 
no penalty for failure for SESAs in meeting veteran employment 
and training needs. Current administration of veterans' 
employment and training programs focus on processes not on 
outcomes and pre-dates both the Workforce Investment Act's one-
stop service centers and America's Job Bank, among other 
electronically-based labor exchange services.
    The Committee directs the Secretary of Labor to develop and 
implement aggressive, measurable performance standards and 
outcome measures with respect to veterans employment and 
training services (consistent with the GPRA) and to modernize 
its delivery system in light of the Workforce Investment Act 
and electronic-based public employment and training services.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The bill includes $51,925,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General. This is a reduction of $4,222,000 below the budget 
request and the same as the fiscal year 2000 level. This 
includes $48,095,000 in general funds for this account along 
with authority to transfer $3,830,000 from the Employment 
Security Administration account of the Unemployment Trust Fund. 
In addition, an amount of $318,000 is available by transfer 
from the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund.
    The Office of the Inspector General was created by law to 
protect the integrity of Departmental programs as well as the 
welfare of beneficiaries served by those programs. Through a 
program of audits, investigations, inspections, and program 
evaluations, the OIG attempts to reduce the incidence of fraud, 
waste, abuse, and mismanagement, and to promote economy, 
efficiency, and effectiveness throughout the Department.
    The Committee complements the work of the Office of the 
Inspector General of the Department of Labor for their work in 
obtaining information on actual collections, offsets, and funds 
put to better use as required in House Report 105-635. This 
information is of great use to the Committee and the Committee 
understands the difficulty encountered by the OIG in obtaining 
it. The Committee expects that the Office of Inspector General 
will continue to report the information to it.

                           General Provisions

    The bill includes a provision that none of the funds made 
available may be used by the Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration directly or through section 23(g) of the 
Occupational Safety and Health Act for the development, 
promulgation, issuance, implementation, or enforcement of any 
proposed or final standard or guideline regarding ergonomic 
protection.

           TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


              Health Resources and Services Administration


                     health resources and services

    The bill includes $4,684,232,000 for health resources and 
services programs. This is $120,867,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 comparable level for these activities and $2,895,000 above 
the Administration request.
    The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) 
supports programs which provide health services to 
disadvantaged, medically underserved, and special populations; 
improve infant mortality rates; direct the education, supply, 
and distribution of a wide range of health professionals; and 
provide technical assistance regarding the utilization of 
health resources and facilities.

Community health centers

    The Committee provides $1,100,000,000 for community health 
centers, which is $81,300,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $31,300,000 above the Administration 
request.
    The Committee repeats bill language from previous years 
limiting the amount of funds available for the payment of 
claims under the Federal Tort Claims Act to $5,000,000. Without 
such language, the Department of Justice could tap the 
consolidated health centers line item for $30,000,000 for 
claims payment, which is far in excess of historical levels.
    Community Health Centers provide preventive and primary 
health care services to nearly 11 million individuals, many of 
whom are uninsured or Medicaid beneficiaries, in 3,500 
medically underserved communities. The number of uninsured 
Americans continues to grow at a rate of 100,000 per month and 
is expected to exceed 57 million by 2008. These Centers are a 
direct and cost-effective response to this growing national 
concern. In addition, health centers serve as an important 
program in reducing health disparities in minority populations. 
Of the nearly 11 million individuals served by Community Health 
Centers, over two-thirds are individuals of a racial or ethnic 
minority group. HRSA should distribute these resources as 
expeditiously as possible to ensure that financially-pressed 
health centers remain viable in underserved communities.
    When distributing additional funding, the Committee 
encourages HRSA to give priority to stabilizing the existing 
health center safety net and expansion of existing health 
centers to serve the neediest communities without access to 
primary and preventive care. In providing services to new 
communities, HRSA should first determine if the expansion of an 
existing health center through the development of a new site is 
feasible in order to build upon the expertise of centers that 
currently provide service to underserved populations. New 
health center organizations should be established only when 
community needs cannot be met through the expansion of existing 
centers. The Committee is aware of efforts to expand services 
to reach underserved populations in States, such as Illinois, 
and urges HRSA to support these efforts. The Committee also 
encourages HRSA to provide specialized HIV/AIDS training for 
health care professionals working at community health centers.

National Health Service Corps: Field placements

    The Committee provides $39,823,000 for field placement 
activities, which is $1,641,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $1,707,000 above the Administration 
request. These funds are used to support the activities of 
National Health Service Corps (NHSC) obligors and volunteers in 
the field, including travel and transportation costs of 
assignees, training and education, recruitment of volunteers, 
and retention activities. Salary costs of most new assignees 
are paid by the employing entity.
    The Committee is concerned by the decreasing percentage of 
NHSC placements at community, migrant, homeless, and public 
housing health centers. The program is intended to supplement 
efforts of other Federal programs that are targeted to 
underserved communities and vulnerable populations, such as 
health centers, and the Committee is supportive of efforts to 
place practitioners in close coordination with the program.

National Health Service Corps: Recruitment

    The Committee provides $81,524,000 for recruitment 
activities, which is $2,899,000 above both the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and the Administration request. The program 
awards scholarships to health professions students and assists 
graduates in repaying their student loans. In return for every 
year of support, these students are obligated to provide a year 
of service in health professional shortage areas usually 
located in inner cities or rural areas, with a two-year minimum 
obligation. The Committee reiterates its intent that funds 
provided be used to support multi-year, rather than single-year 
commitments.

Health professions

    The Committee provides $410,987,000 for all health 
professions training programs, which is $69,080,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and $113,028,000 above the 
Administration request. The Bureau of Health Professions 
provides both policy leadership and support for health 
professions workforce enhancement and educational 
infrastructure development. The Committee continues to support 
health professions training and urges continued funding for all 
of the programs within the new configuration of health 
professions training. The Committee also urges, as a general 
policy, that funding for specific programs within the new 
configuration should not be disproportionately reduced.

Centers of excellence

    The Committee provides $28,197,000 for centers of 
excellence, which is $2,556,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $2,444,000 below the Administration 
request. The program is designed to strengthen the national 
capacity to educate underrepresented minority (URM) students in 
the health professions by offering special support to those 
institutions which train a significant number of URM 
individuals, including African-Americans, Hispanics and Native 
Americans. Funds are used for the recruitment and retention of 
students and faculty, information resources and curricula, 
faculty and student research, and the development of plans to 
achieve institutional improvements.
    The Committee is pleased that HRSA has re-focused the 
minority centers of excellence program on providing support to 
historically minority health professions institutions. The 
Committee encourages the program to consider applications that 
are responsive to allied health professions which are 
experiencing shortages and high vacancy rates such as 
laboratory personnel.

Health careers opportunity program

    The Committee provides $30,570,000 for the health careers 
opportunity program, which is $2,771,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 comparable level and $2,229,000 below the Administration 
request. This program provides grants and contracts to eligible 
health professions schools for identifying, recruiting, and 
selecting individuals from the various racial and ethnic 
populations who are from disadvantaged backgrounds for 
education and training in a health profession and facilitating 
their entry into, retention and completion of their education 
at a health professions school.
    The Committee is pleased that HRSA has given priority 
consideration for health careers opportunities program (H-COP) 
grants to minority health professions institutions and 
recommends that grant review committees have proportionate 
representation from these institutions. The Committee 
encourages the program to consider applications that are 
responsive to allied health professions which are experiencing 
shortages and high vacancy rates such as laboratory personnel.

Loan repayments and fellowships regarding faculty positions

    The Committee provides $1,210,000 for loan repayments and 
fellowships regarding faculty positions, which is $110,000 
above both the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the 
Administration request. The program provides for the repayment 
of educational loans of individuals from disadvantaged 
backgrounds who are health professions students or graduates, 
and who have agreed to serve for not less than two years as a 
faculty member of an eligible health professions school. The 
school matches the Federal contribution toward loan repayment. 
The program also supports fellowships for URM faculty members.

Scholarships for disadvantaged students

    The Committee provides $41,896,000 for scholarships for 
disadvantaged students, which is $3,797,000 above both the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the Administration 
request. The program provides grants to eligible health 
professions and nursing schools to provide scholarships to 
eligible individuals from disadvantaged backgrounds, including 
students who are members of racial and ethnic minority groups. 
By statute, not less than 16 percent of the funds must go to 
schools of nursing. The Committee continues to intend that all 
health professions disciplines made eligible by statute be able 
to participate in the program.

Training in primary care medicine and dentistry

    The Committee provides $86,068,000 for training in primary 
care medicine and dentistry, which is $7,801,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level. The Administration did not 
request funding for this program. The program is comprised of 
four elements: (1) family medicine programs; (2) general 
internal medicine and general pediatrics (GIM/GP) training; (3) 
physician assistants (PA) training; and (4) general or 
pediatric dentistry training. Family medicine grants and 
contracts promote the predoctoral training of medical students, 
support family medicine residency programs and their trainees, 
train physicians who plan to teach in family medicine programs, 
and assist in establishing or improving family medicine 
academic administrative units. GIM/GP grants and contracts are 
to plan and operate residency programs and to provide financial 
assistance for residents, meet the costs of training programs 
for physicians who plan to teach in GIM/GP, as well as to 
support the faculty trainees, and develop programs to support 
predoctoral activities. PA training grants and contracts are to 
plan, develop, and operate or maintain programs for the 
training of PAs and for the training of individuals who will 
teach in programs to provide such training. General or 
pediatric dentistry training grants and contracts are to meet 
the costs of planning, developing, or operating programs and to 
provide financial assistance to residents in such programs.
    The Committee urges HRSA to expand training of health care 
providers in practice and providers in-training to improve the 
detection, diagnosis, treatment, and management of chronic 
fatigue and immune deficiency syndrome patients. The Committee 
also urges HRSA to support evaluations of its training program 
to assess its effectiveness.

Area health education centers

    The Committee provides $31,436,000 for area health 
education centers (AHEC), which is $2,849,000 above both the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the Administration 
request. The program links university health science centers 
with community health service delivery systems to provide 
community-based training sites for students, faculty, and 
practitioners. The program supports two types of projects: (1) 
basic/core AHEC cooperative agreement projects to plan and 
implement new and developing programs; and (2) model programs 
to extend AHEC cooperative agreement projects, with not less 
than 50 percent of the project costs supported by non-Federal 
contributions in cash.

Health education and training centers

    The Committee provides $4,140,000 for health education and 
training centers, which is $375,000 above both the fiscal year 
2000 comparable level and the Administration request. The 
program funds schools of medicine and osteopathy to conduct 
training and education programs for health professions students 
to improve the access, diversity, and quality of health 
personnel along the border between the United States and 
Mexico, in the State of Florida, and in other urban and rural 
areas with populations with serious unmet health care needs. 
The program also provides educational support to health 
professionals, including nursing, practicing in the area.

Allied health and other disciplines

    The Committee provides $7,076,000 for allied health and 
other disciplines, which is $279,000 below the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $3,238,000 above the Administration 
request. The program is comprised of three elements: (1) allied 
health special projects; (2) podiatric primary care residency 
training; and (3) chiropractic demonstration projects. Allied 
health special projects assist entities in meeting the costs 
associated with expanding or establishing programs that will 
increase the number of individuals trained in allied health 
professions. Activities included are those that: (1) expand 
enrollments; (2) provide rapid transition and career 
advancement training programs; (3) establish community-based 
training programs; (4) expand or establish interdisciplinary 
training programs, demonstration centers, and clinical training 
sites in medically underserved or rural communities; (5) 
provide traineeships to students; and (6) plan, develop, and 
operate or maintain graduate programs in behavioral and mental 
health practice. Podiatric primary care residency training 
grants and contracts are for planning and implementing projects 
in residency programs and providing traineeships to residents 
who plan to specialize in primary care. Chiropractic 
demonstration grants and contracts are to carry out 
demonstration projects in which chiropractors and physicians 
collaborate to identify and provide effective treatment of 
spinal and lower-back conditions.
    The Committee continues to encourage HRSA to give priority 
consideration to those projects for schools training allied 
health professionals experiencing shortages, such as medical 
technologists and cytotechnologists.
    There is growing evidence that the number and mix of allied 
health professionals may be insufficient to meet the current 
and future demands of the Nation's health care system, 
particularly in medically underserved and rural communities. 
There is also concern that the lack of outcomes assessment data 
and the lack of training for allied health professionals to 
perform outcomes research has contributed to the deficiency of 
data to document the benefits of these programs. The Committee 
encourages HRSA to continue to work in partnership with other 
Federal agencies, State governments, and private institutions 
to accomplish the plans recommended by the Implementation Task 
Force of the National Commission on Allied Health.

Geriatric programs

    The Committee provides $11,701,000 for geriatric programs, 
which is $1,061,000 above the fiscal year 2000 comparable 
level. The Administration did not request funding for this 
program. The program provides grants and contracts to eligible 
entities to: (1) establish geriatric education centers to 
provide training for health care professionals who provide 
treatment and for training and retraining of faculty who teach 
geriatrics; (2) provide support for geriatric training projects 
to train physicians, dentists, and behavioral and mental health 
professionals who plan to teach geriatrics; and (3) establish a 
program to provide Geriatric Academic Career Awards to eligible 
individuals to promote the career development of such 
individuals as academic geriatricians.

Quentin N. Burdick program for rural interdisciplinary training

    The Committee provides $5,644,000 for the Quentin N. 
Burdick program for rural interdisciplinary training program, 
which is $512,000 above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level 
and $924,000 above the Administration request. The program 
provides grants and contracts to entities for the purpose of 
funding interdisciplinary training projects that are designed 
to train, recruit, and retain teams of interdisciplinary 
professionals to work in underserved areas.

Health professions workforce information and analysis

    The Committee provides $785,000 for health professions 
workforce information and analysis, which is $71,000 above both 
the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the Administration 
request. The program provides grants and contracts to eligible 
entities to provide for the collection and analysis of targeted 
information, research on high priority workforce questions, the 
development of a non-Federal analytic and research 
infrastructure, and the conduct of program evaluation and 
assessment.

Public health, preventive medicine and dental public health programs

    The Committee provides $8,930,000 for public health, 
preventive medicine and dental public health programs, which is 
$809,000 above both the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and 
the Administration request. The program is comprised of three 
elements: (1) public health training centers; (2) public health 
traineeships; and (3) preventive medicine and dental public 
health residencies. Grants or contracts for the operation of 
public health training centers are awarded to an accredited 
school of public health, or another public or nonprofit private 
institution accredited for the provision of graduate or 
specialized training in pubic health, that plans, develops, 
operates, and evaluates projects that are in furtherance of the 
goals for the year 2000 in the areas of preventive medicine, 
health promotion and disease prevention, or improving access to 
and quality of health services in medically underserved 
communities. Public health traineeship grants provide graduate 
or specialized public health training to individuals in the 
fields of epidemiology, environmental health, biostatistics, 
toxicology, nutrition, and maternal and child health. 
Preventive medicine and dental public health residency grants 
and contracts assist schools in developing new residency 
training programs or improving existing programs and in 
providing financial assistance to residency trainees.

Health administration programs

    The Committee provides $1,223,000 for health administration 
programs, which is $111,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level. The Administration did not request funding 
for this program. These programs provide grants to eligible 
entities with an accredited program in health administration, 
hospital administration, or health policy analysis and planning 
to provide traineeships to students and assist accredited 
health administration programs in the development or 
improvement of programs to prepare students for employment with 
public or nonprofit private agencies. Priority in awarding of 
traineeships is given to students who demonstrate a commitment 
to employment with public or non-profit entities in the fields 
with respect to which the traineeships are awarded.

Children's hospitals graduate medical education program

    The Committee provides $80,000,000 for the children's 
hospitals graduate medical education program, which is 
$40,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 comparable bill and the 
same as the Administration request. The program provides a more 
adequate level of support for health professions training in 
children's teaching hospitals that have a separate Medicare 
provider number (``free-standing'' children's hospitals). 
Children's hospitals are statutorily defined under Medicare as 
those whose inpatients are predominantly under the age of 18. 
The funding in this program are intended to make the level of 
Federal Graduate Medical Education support more consistent with 
other teaching hospitals, including children's hospitals which 
share provider numbers with other teaching hospitals. Payments 
are determined by formula, based on a national per-resident 
amount. Payments support training of resident physicians as 
defined by Medicare in both ambulatory and inpatient settings.

Advanced education nursing

    The Committee provides $55,640,000 for advanced education 
nursing, which is $5,043,000 above both the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and the same as the Administration request. 
The program provides grants and contracts to eligible entities 
to meet the costs of: (1) projects that support the enhancement 
of advanced nursing education and practice; and (2) 
traineeships for individuals in advanced nursing education 
programs. The program prepares nurse practitioners, clinical 
nurse specialists, nurse midwives, nurse anesthetists, nurse 
educators, nurse administrators, public health nurses or other 
nurse specialists for advanced practice roles. The type of 
advanced education programs include master's and doctoral 
degree programs, combined registered nurse/master's program, 
post-nursing master's certificate programs, or in the case of 
certificate nurse midwifery programs, those in existence on 
November 12, 1998.

Nursing workforce diversity

    The Committee provides $4,410,000 for nursing workforce 
diversity, which is $400,000 above both the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and the Administration request. The program 
provides grants and contracts to schools of nursing and other 
eligible entities to meet the costs of special projects to 
increase nursing education opportunities for individuals who 
are from disadvantaged backgrounds, including racial and ethnic 
minorities, by providing student scholarships or stipends, pre-
entry preparation, and retention activities. The program also 
contributes to the basic preparation of disadvantaged and 
minority nurses for leadership positions within the nursing and 
health care community.

Basic nurse education and practice

    The Committee provides $12,061,000 for basic nurse 
education and practice, which is $1,093,000 above both the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the Administration 
request. The program provides grants and contracts to schools 
of nursing and other eligible entities for projects to 
strengthen capacity for basic nurse education and practice by 
strengthening programs that provide basic nurse education 
through establishing or expanding nursing practice arrangements 
in non-institutional settings; providing care for underserved 
populations and other high-risk groups, such as the elderly, 
individuals with HIV/AIDS, substance abusers, the homeless, and 
victims of domestic violence; providing managed care, quality 
improvement, and other skills needed to practice in existing 
and emerging health care systems; develop cultural competencies 
among nurses; expand the enrollment in baccalaureate programs; 
promote career mobility and cross training or specialty 
training among diverse population groups; and providing 
education in informatics, including distance learning 
methodologies or other priority areas.

Hansen's disease services

    The Committee provides $17,016,000 for the Hansen's Disease 
program, which is $3,026,000 below the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and the same as the Administration request. 
This program offers Hansen's disease treatment to about 40 long 
term residents who continue to reside at Carville, to patients 
at a Center in Baton Rouge, as well as to patients at other 
contract supported locations in Baton Rouge and in grant 
supported outpatient regional clinics. Other former long term 
residents have been offered and elected to receive a living 
allowance from the program and now live independently. These 
programs provide treatment to about 3,000 of the 6,000 Hansen's 
disease sufferers in the continental United States. Over the 
next few years, a long term facility will be developed in the 
Baton Rouge area and offered to the current long term residents 
remaining at the Carville location as an alternative to 
remaining at the historic facility. The program also conducts 
research focusing on the global elimination of Hansen's 
disease.

Maternal and child health block grant

    The Committee provides $709,130,000 for the Maternal and 
Child Health (MCH) Block Grant, which is the same as both the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the Administration 
request. The MCH block grant provides funds to States to meet a 
broad range of enhanced and wraparound health services, 
including personal health services; general, population-wide 
health services, such as screening; family support services; 
and integrated systems of care. About 17 million women, 
infants, children, adolescents and children with special health 
care needs will be served in fiscal year 2000. The authorizing 
statute provides that, up to a funding level of $600,000,000, 
85 percent of the funds are distributed to the States, with 15 
percent of the funds set-aside by the Secretary for special 
projects of regional and national significance (SPRANS). When 
the appropriation exceeds $600,000,000, 12.75 percent of the 
amount over $600,000,000 is directed to the Community 
Integrated Service Systems set-aside program. The remaining 
87.25 percent is distributed by the same 85/15 percent 
allocation as in the basic block grant formula.
    In addition, the Committee provides $5,000,000 more for 
SPRANS activities than would otherwise be the case under the 
statutory formula to continue the traumatic brain injury health 
services demonstration projects initiated in fiscal year 1997 
under this authority.
    The Committee continues to recognize the critical role of 
hemophilia treatment centers in the prevention and treatment of 
the complications of hemophilia and other bleeding and clotting 
disorders. HRSA is urged to maintain support for these centers 
to sustain their outreach efforts and expand blood safety 
surveillance and patient notification activities in 
collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration.
    The Committee commends HRSA for its support of the Sudden 
Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) program support center and 
encourages the Bureau to continue its efforts in this area of 
service.
    The Committee encourages HRSA to continue programs that 
provide comprehensive care services to chronic patients, such 
as those with thalassemia or sickle cell disease.
    The Committee supports abstinence education for 
adolescents, ages 12 through 18, and supports expansion of 
efforts to present an abstinence-only message to America's 
youth. The preliminary results from these program in states 
such as Oklahoma are promising. It is important, however, to 
ensure that America's youth do not receive mixed message, or 
medically inaccurate information. The legislation directs that 
abstinence messages given to a group of youth by a grantee must 
not be diluted by any instructor or materials from the same 
grantee. Nothing in the legislation is intended to prevent 
these adolescents from seeking health information or services. 
Nothing small preclude entities who are teaching these 
abstinence-only classes and who have a public health mandate 
from discussing other forms of sexual conduct or providing 
services, as long as this is conducted in a different setting 
than where and when the abstinence-only course is being 
conducted. In allocating grant funds, priority should be given 
to those organizations which have a strong record of support of 
abstinence education as defined in sections (a) through (h) of 
title 5, section 510(b)(2) of the Social Security Act.
    The Committee is also committed to studying the 
effectiveness of abstinence education, of sexuality education, 
and of lack of education in these areas. In order to properly 
track the long term effects of these programs, it is necessary 
to conduct longitudinal studies that follow groups of 
adolescents receiving a particular curricula for a number of 
years. Therefore the Committee provides up to 3.5 percent of 
the funding under this legislation to study, track and evaluate 
groups of youth who receive such education, including a 
representative sample of adolescent clients who use Federally 
funded family planning services. If possible, these cohorts 
should be large enough to provide statistically significant 
results in all major population segments of American society, 
including African Americans, Asians, Caucasians, Hispanics, and 
Native Americans. They should also be able to track socio-
economic variables as well. Criteria for success should include 
prevention and reduction of out of wedlock pregnancies and 
sexually transmitted diseases, including both viral and 
bacterial; rates of abortion; age at first sexual activity and 
intercourse; frequency of sexual activity and intercourse, and 
numbers who postpone sexual activity or intercourse through 
adolescence. Progress reports should be submitted to Congress 
annually.

Healthy start

    The Committee provides $90,000,000 for Healthy Start, which 
is the same as both the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and 
the Administration request. Healthy Start began as a five-year 
demonstration program in 1991 to reduce infant mortality in 22 
urban and rural communities. It has never been authorized as a 
separate program and continues to operate under section 301 of 
the Public Health Service Act demonstration authority.
    The Committee understands the authorizing Committee is in 
the process of authorizing this program as a permanent program. 
The Committee continues to believe that these demonstrations 
are duplicative of other Federal programs, such as the Maternal 
and Child Health (MCH) Block Grant, the Supplemental Nutrition 
Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC), and Medicaid, 
which also have the goal of reducing infant mortality as one of 
its missions. The Committee will monitor the actions of the 
authorizing Committee and take further action, if necessary, to 
incorporate the activities of these demonstrations into the MCH 
block grant when the bill goes to conference.

Universal newborn hearing screening

    The Committee provides $8,000,000 for the universal newborn 
hearing screening program, which is $4,625,000 above both the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the Administration 
request. The program provides competitive grants to States for 
the purpose of implementing a national program of universal 
newborn hearing screening by means of physiologic testing prior 
to hospital discharge, audiologic evaluation by three months of 
age, and entry into a program of early intervention by six 
months of age.

Organ transplantation

    The Committee provides $10,000,000 for organ 
transplantation activities, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2000 comparable level and $5,000,000 below the 
Administration request. The program supports a scientific 
registry of organ transplant recipients; the National Organ 
Procurement and Transplantation Network, which matches organ 
donors with potential recipients; and grants and contracts with 
public and private non-profit organizations to promote and 
improve organ donations.
    The Committee urges HRSA to work with States to encourage 
them to enact laws that assume a person will donate their 
organs unless that person specifies in writing that they do not 
wish to do so.
    The Committee encourages the agency to establish links with 
State and Federal transportation officials and hospital-based 
emergency rooms in order to improve coordination of donation 
following automobile accidents.

Health teaching facilities interest subsidies

    The Committee does not provide funding for health teaching 
facilities interest subsidies, the same as the Administration 
request. The program provides interest support on loan 
guarantees for construction of a health professions teaching 
facility under a now discontinued Public Health Service Act 
authority. The remaining Federal commitment on these loans will 
expire in the year 2004. The interest subsidy payment for the 
remaining loan guarantee will be paid from existing carryover 
funds from prior years' appropriations; therefore, no 
appropriation is required to cover these payments.

Bone marrow program

    The Committee provides $22,000,000 for the bone marrow 
program, which is $4,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $4,041,000 above the Administration 
request. In addition to funding from HRSA in fiscal year 2000, 
the National Marrow Donor Program is expected to receive 
$19,000,000 from the U.S. Navy. Funds are used for donor 
medical costs, donor centers, tissue typing, research, minority 
recruitment, and program administration. The registry is run by 
contract.
    The Committee provides additional funds to permit the 
marrow registry program to further diversify Human Leukocyte 
Antigen types available to patients, significantly improving 
post transplant prognosis by shortening the critical time 
between a patient's search of the registry and transplantation.

Rural outreach grants

    The Committee provides $30,867,000 for rural outreach 
grants, which is $5,013,000 below the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $8,025,000 below the Administration 
request. The program supports projects that provide health 
services to rural populations not currently receiving them and 
that enhance access to existing services.

Rural health research

    The Committee provides $11,713,000 for rural health 
research, which is $21,488,000 below the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and the same as the Administration request. 
The activity supports several rural health research centers and 
the Office for Rural Health Policy's advisory committee.
    Telehealth has the potential for improving the delivery of 
quality health care to rural underserved areas and providing 
distance education to health care professionals. The Committee 
supports HRSA's rural telehealth initiatives and encourages the 
agency to work in partnership with medical librarians and other 
health information specialists in the development and 
implementation of its telehealth projects.

Emergency medical services for children

    The Committee provides $19,000,000 for emergency medical 
services for children, which is $2,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2000 comparable level and $4,000,000 above the 
Administration request. The program supports demonstration 
grants for the delivery of emergency medical services to 
acutely ill and seriously injured children.

Poison control centers

    The Committee provides $6,600,000 for poison control 
centers, which is $3,600,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $5,100,000 above the Administration 
request. The amount provided is to support activities 
authorized in the Poison Control Center Enhancement and 
Awareness Act.

Black lung clinics

    The Committee provides $5,943,000 for black lung clinics, 
which is the same as both the fiscal year 2000 comparable level 
and the Administration request. The program supports 14 
grantees that treat a declining population of coal miners with 
respiratory and pulmonary impairments. The clinics presently 
receive more than one-third of their funding from other 
sources, such as Medicaid and Medicare. Of the 14 grantees, 
three actually receive community health center funding as well 
as black lung grants.

Nurse loan repayment for shortage area service

    The Committee provides $2,279,000 for nurse loan repayment 
for shortage area service, which is the same as both the fiscal 
year 2000 comparable level and the Administration request. This 
program offers student loan repayment to nurses in exchange for 
an agreement to serve not less than two years in an Indian 
Health Service health center, Native Hawaiian health center, 
public hospital, community or migrant health center, or rural 
health clinic.

Payment to Hawaii for treatment of Hansen's disease

    The Committee provides $2,045,000 for the treatment of 
persons with Hansen's Disease in the State of Hawaii, which is 
the same as both the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the 
Administration request. The program, which provides a partial 
matching payment to the State of Hawaii, dates to the period of 
Father Damien's facility for sufferers of Hansen's disease 
(leprosy). That facility now has only 47 residents who live 
there by choice, and the grounds have been converted to a 
historical site. Most patients diagnosed with Hansen's disease 
in Hawaii are now treated in the same manner as new patients on 
the mainland; their care is handled on an out-patient basis, 
with the program paying for about 5,200 outpatient visits per 
year.

Ryan White AIDS programs

    The Committee provides $1,725,000,000 for Ryan White AIDS 
programs, which is $130,450,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $5,450,000 above the Administration 
request. The Committee recognizes that each Part of the Ryan 
White CARE Act provides services, which enable individuals to 
adhere to HIV drug treatments and access needed medical care.
    There is concern about the increasing number of inmates in 
Federal correctional facilities with HIV/AIDS, particularly 
women of color, and the lack of access to health care. The 
Committee encourages HRSA to collaborate with the Federal 
Bureau of Prisons, CDC, and other entities of jurisdiction to 
ensure that the prevention, treatment, and management of HIV/
AIDS in correctional facilities are a high priority and that 
the care rendered meets the medical standards for AIDS cases.

Emergency assistance

    The Committee provides $586,500,000 for the Part A, 
emergency assistance program, which is $40,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the same as the 
Administration request. These funds provide grants to 
metropolitan areas with very high numbers of AIDS cases for 
outpatient and ambulatory health and social support services. 
Half of the amount appropriated is allocated by formula and 
half is allocated to eligible areas demonstrating additional 
need through a competitive grant process.

Comprehensive care programs

    The Committee provides $864,000,000 for Part B, 
comprehensive care programs, which is $40,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the same as the 
Administration request. The funds provided support formula 
grants to States for the operation of HIV service delivery 
consortia in the localities most heavily affected, for the 
provision of home and community-based care, for continuation of 
health insurance coverage for infected persons, and for 
purchase of therapeutic drugs.
    The Committee continues to be encouraged by the success of 
new drugs and combination therapies for HIV and AIDS, whose 
purchase is principally financed under Part B, and has included 
bill language identifying $554,000,000 specifically for the 
purchase of AIDS drugs. The fiscal year 2000 bill designated 
$528,000,000 for this purpose.

Early intervention program

    The Committee provides $173,900,000 for Part C, the early 
intervention program, which is $35,500,000 above the fiscal 
year 2000 comparable level and $2,500,000 above the 
Administration request. Funds are used for discretionary grants 
to migrant and community health centers, health care for the 
homeless grantees, family planning grantees, hemophilia centers 
and other private non-profit entities that provide 
comprehensive primary care services to populations with or at 
risk for HIV disease. The grantees provide testing, risk 
reduction counseling, transmission prevention, and clinical 
care; case management, outreach, and eligibility assistance are 
optional services. Approximately 115,000 HIV positive persons 
or persons at high risk for HIV infection are expected to be 
served in fiscal year 2001.

Pediatric demonstrations

    The Committee provides $60,000,000 for Part D, pediatric 
AIDS demonstrations, which is $9,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 comparable level and the same as the Administration 
request. The program supports demonstration grants to foster 
collaboration between clinical research institutions and 
primary community-based medical and social service providers 
for the target population of HIV-infected children, pregnant 
women and their families. The projects are intended to increase 
access to comprehensive care, as well as to voluntary 
participation in NIH and other clinical trials.

AIDS dental services

    The Committee provides $9,000,000 for AIDS dental services, 
which is $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level 
and $500,000 above the Administration request. The program 
provides grants to dental schools and postdoctoral dental 
education programs to assist with the cost of providing 
unreimbursed oral health care to patients with human 
immunodeficiency virus disease. Dental students and residents 
participating in this program receive extensive training in the 
understanding and management of the oral health care needs of 
people living with HIV/AIDS.
    The Committee recognizes the importance of oral health care 
providers in the diagnosis of HIV and in treatment of the 
painful and debilitating oral manifestations of this disease. 
The Committee encourages collaborative efforts between all 
dental education programs and community-based providers in 
order to address the unmet oral health care needs of 
individuals living with HIV/AIDS specifically in States and 
communities without dental education programs.

Education and training centers

    The Committee provides $31,600,000 for AIDS education and 
training centers, which is $4,950,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 comparable level and $2,450,000 above the Administration 
request. The centers train health care personnel who care for 
AIDS patients and develop model education programs.

Family planning

    The Committee provides $238,932,000 for the family planning 
program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2000 comparable 
level and the $35,000,000 below the Administration request. The 
program provides grants to public and private non-profit 
agencies to support projects which provide a range of family 
planning and reproductive services, as well as screening for 
ancillary health problems such as hypertension and diabetes. 
The program also supports training for providers, an 
information and education program, and a research program which 
focuses on family planning service delivery improvements.
    The bill repeats language from the 2000 appropriations bill 
making clear that these funds shall not be expended for 
abortions, that all pregnancy counseling shall be nondirective, 
and that these funds shall not be used to promote public 
opposition to or support of any legislative proposal or 
candidate for public office.

Health care facilities

    The Committee has not included funding for health care 
facilities. A total of $112,408,000 was provided for this 
purpose in fiscal year 1999; no funding was included in the 
Administration request. This expired authority provides funds 
to public and private nonprofit entities for construction or 
modernization of outpatient medical facilities. This activity 
has not been funded by the Committee on a regular annual basis.

Buildings and facilities

    The Committee provides $250,000 for buildings and 
facilities, which is the same as both the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and the Administration request. These funds 
are used to finance the repair and upkeep of buildings at the 
Gillis W. Long Hansen's Disease Center at Carville, Louisiana.

Rural hospital flexibility grants

    The Committee provides $25,000,000 for rural hospital 
flexibility grants, which is the same as both the fiscal year 
2000 comparable level and the Administration request. The 
program provides grants to States to help them improve access 
to health care services in rural communities by: (1) developing 
and implementing a State rural health plan; (2) assisting 
small, at risk rural hospitals that wish to convert to Critical 
Access Hospitals and receive cost-based payments from Medicare; 
and (3) supporting these hospitals and the communities they 
serve in developing networks of care that meet the requirements 
of the law and integrate Critical Access Hospitals with 
emergency services and other sources of health care in the 
communities.

National practitioner data bank

    The Committee does not provide funding for the national 
practitioner data bank for fiscal year 2001, which is the same 
as both the fiscal year 2000 action on appropriations and the 
Administration request. The Committee recommendation and the 
Administration request assume that the data bank will be self-
supporting, with collections of $17,200,000 in user fees. The 
national data bank receives, stores and disseminates 
information on paid medical malpractice judgments and 
settlements, sanctions taken by Boards of Medical Examiners, 
losses of membership in professional societies, and certain 
professional review actions taken by health care entities. 
Insurance companies, State licensure boards and authorities, 
and other health care entities and professional societies are 
required to report information to the data bank within 30 days 
of each action. The coverage of the data bank includes dentists 
and physicians, and, with respect to malpractice settlements 
and judgments, other categories of licensed health 
professionals. Hospitals are required to search the data bank 
when a health care provider applies for employment and once 
every two years thereafter. State licensing boards, other 
health care entities, licensing authorities, and professional 
societies also have access to the data bank. Traditional bill 
language is included to ensure that user fees are collected to 
cover the full costs of the data bank operations.

Healthcare integrity and protection data bank

    The Committee does not provide funding for the healthcare 
integrity and protection data bank (HIPDB) for fiscal year 
2001. The Committee recommendation and the Administration 
request assume that the data bank will be self-supporting, with 
collections of $4,317,000 in user fees. HIPDB receives, stores, 
and disseminates information on final adverse actions taken 
against health care providers, suppliers, and practitioners. 
This information is collected from and made available to 
Government agencies and health plans. In addition, disclosure 
of the information is made available, upon request, to health 
care providers, suppliers, and practitioners who wish to self-
query.

Health care access for the uninsured

    The Committee has not provided funding for a $125,000,000 
initiative requested in the budget to address the question of 
health care access for the uninsured. This proposal has never 
been authorized by law. The fiscal year 2000 appropriations 
bill included $25,000,000 for a demonstration program, but the 
Committee believes that it should be acted upon by the 
authorizing committees of jurisdiction prior to any additional 
appropriation being made for it.

Program management

    The Committee provides $128,123,000 for the cost of Federal 
staff and related activities to coordinate, direct and manage 
the programs of the Health Resources and Services 
Administration. This amount is $3,357,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 comparable level and $3,770,000 above the Administration 
request.
    HRSA uses a multi-faceted approach to eliminate disparities 
in oral health status and assures access to oral health 
services for low-income children. Dental disease is a chronic 
problem among many low-income and vulnerable populations and 
children in these populations have five times more untreated 
dental caries than children in higher-income families. In an 
effort to better coordinate HRSA's oral health activities, such 
as community water fluoridation, sealant programs, education 
and training programs to improve pediatric oral health, and 
grants to states to improve access to oral health care for 
Medicaid and CHIP eligible children, the Committee requests 
HRSA to prepare a report, by February 1, 2001, with a detailed 
plan on how to consolidate these programs and their funding. 
The report should also include what additional funding would be 
needed to sufficiently address improving access to oral health 
care for vulnerable populations.

               Medical Facilities Guarantee and Loan Fund


           FEDERAL INTEREST SUBSIDIES FOR MEDICAL FACILITIES

    The Committee does not provide funding for the Medical 
Facilities Guarantee and Loan Fund, the same as the 
Administration request. Appropriations are used to pay interest 
subsidies on loans made or guaranteed prior to fiscal year 1977 
for hospital construction. There are sufficient carryover funds 
from prior years' appropriations to pay defaults and interest 
subsidy payments; therefore, no appropriation is required to 
cover these payments. In addition, the bill includes language, 
as in prior years, which prohibits commitments for new loans or 
loan guarantees in fiscal year 2001.

               HEALTH EDUCATION ASSISTANCE LOANS PROGRAM

    The Health Education Assistance Loans (HEAL) program 
insured loans provided by non-Federal lenders to students in 
health professions schools. Under the accounting rules 
established in the Budget Enforcement Act of 1990, one account 
is maintained to pay the obligations arising from loans 
guaranteed prior to fiscal year 1992. A second account pays 
obligations and collects income from premiums on loans 
guaranteed in fiscal year 1992 and beyond. Each annual cohort 
of loans is independently tracked in this account. The 
authority for this program expired in fiscal year 1999. Fiscal 
year 1998 was the last year in which loans were obligated to 
previous borrowers under the HEAL authority.
    The Committee provides $10,000,000 to liquidate obligations 
from loans guaranteed prior to 1992, which is $5,000,000 below 
the fiscal year 2000 level and the same as the Administration 
request.
    The Committee provides $3,679,000 for HEAL program 
management, which is $8,000 below the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and the same as the Administration request.

              NATIONAL VACCINE INJURY COMPENSATION PROGRAM

    The Committee makes available the release of $114,355,000 
from the Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund in fiscal year 
2001, which is $52,054,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level and 
the same as the Administration request.
    The National Vaccine Injury Compensation Program provides a 
system of compensation for individuals with vaccine-associated 
injuries or deaths. Funds for claims from vaccines administered 
on or after October 1, 1988 are generated by a per-dose excise 
tax on the sale of selected prescribed vaccines. Revenues 
raised by this tax are maintained in a Vaccine Injury 
Compensation Trust Fund.
    Trust funds made available in the bill will support the 
liability costs of vaccines administered after September 30, 
1988. They will also support the $2,992,000 in costs incurred 
by the agency in the operation of the program, which is $7,000 
below the fiscal year 2000 level and the same as the 
Administration request.

               Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


                 disease control, research and training

    The Committee provides $3,290,369,000 for the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), which is $326,418,000 
above the comparable fiscal year 2000 level and $156,782,000 
above the Administration request. The CDC assists State and 
local health authorities and other health-related organizations 
to control and reduce disease and other health problems.
    The Committee considers the table accompanying this report 
to be determinative of the CDC budget. Funds should be 
apportioned and allocated consistent with the table, and any 
changes in funding are subject to the normal notification 
procedures.

Preventive health services block grant

    The Committee provides $179,250,000 for the preventive 
health services block grant, which is $79,000 below the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 level and the same as the 
Administration request. Of this amount, $135,145,000 is for the 
block grant and $44,105,000 is for rape prevention and 
education activities previously funded through the Crime Trust 
Fund. This program provides grants to States for a wide range 
of public and preventive health activities. This program is not 
authorized for fiscal year 2001.
    The Committee encourages CDC to enhance services provided 
through the violence against women initiative to provide more 
assistance to women in underserved locations; expand evaluation 
research programs; monitor violence against women by improving 
the quality of data at national and state levels; partner with 
local organizations within communities; and develop prevention 
and early intervention programs.

Prevention centers

    The Committee provides $25,000,000 for prevention centers, 
which is $7,248,000 above the comparable fiscal year 2000 level 
and $10,255,000 above the Administration request. This program 
awards grants to academic institutions for centers that conduct 
applied research to promote disease prevention and better 
health.

Childhood immunization

    The Committee provides $504,875,000 for childhood 
immunization, which is $15,000,000 above the comparable fiscal 
year 2000 level and $232,000 above the Administration request. 
This program is not authorized for fiscal year 2001. In 
addition, the Vaccines for Children (VFC) program funded 
through the Medicaid program is expected to provide 
$469,054,000 in vaccine purchases and distribution support in 
fiscal year 2001, a decrease of $75,989,000 below the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 level and the same as the 
Administration request. Immunization project grants are awarded 
to States and local agencies for planning, developing, and 
conducting childhood immunization programs including 
enhancement of the vaccine delivery infrastructure. The CDC 
directly maintains a stockpile of vaccines, supports 
consolidated purchase of vaccines for state and local health 
agencies, and conducts surveillance, investigations, and 
research into the safety and efficacy of new and presently used 
vaccines. The Committee notes that there are other Federal 
programs that provide immunizations to children, including the 
Children's Health Insurance Program (CHIP), the Maternal and 
Child Health Block Grant, and community health centers.
    The bill retains a provision from the fiscal year 2000 
Appropriations Act authorizing the CDC to transfer funds 
available from the sale of surplus vaccine from the vaccine 
stockpile to other activities within the jurisdiction of CDC.
    The Committee intends that the increase provided above the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable appropriation shall be for 
operations/infrastructure grants. State operations/
infrastructure funding has remained level for the past three 
years while the program has increased. The Committee is 
concerned that the infrastructure of State and local health 
departments is not keeping pace with the demands of the program 
as evidenced by the $15,000,000 that is being redirected in 
fiscal year 2000 from domestic vaccine purchase to the global 
polio vaccine purchase. While the Committee is highly 
supportive of the polio eradication activities, these funds are 
available because the infrastructure is not in place to 
increase outreach efforts to adolescents for Hepatitis C, 
chicken pox, and MMR catchup vaccines.
    Since 1994, immunization grantees have received 
approximately $33,000,000 in incentive funds distributed by a 
formula. When the incentive program began, it represented only 
14 percent of all operational grant funding available. It now 
represents nearly 25 percent due to decreases in other 
operational funding. The advantage of awarding funds as 
incentives has declined as total funding has decreased. In 
testimony provided to the Committee, CDC stated it would prefer 
to award the incentives funding as part of the entire 
infrastructure funding to support grantees' cumulative core 
budgets, rather than based on a formula as done presently. This 
approach will allow each grantee to receive an equal percentage 
of the available program incentive funding to support all core 
functions of an immunization program. The Committee understands 
that, as with most formula changes, this could not be 
implemented all at once because of the funding shifts that 
would occur between States. Therefore, the Committee requests 
CDC to develop a plan to implement this change over a 
reasonable period of time and report back to the Committee by 
June 30, 2000.
    The Committee understands that the Advisory Committee on 
Immunization Practices has made a general recommendation that 
pneumococcal conjugate vaccine be given to all children under 
two years of age and to children 24 to 29 months of age who are 
at higher risk of infection, including those with certain 
illnesses or who are African-American, Alaska Native, or Native 
American. The Committee has in past years expressed its concern 
about the inaccuracy of vaccine purchase cost estimates 
provided to Congress as well as its concern that the budget 
request failed to accurately reflect the need for immunization 
program funding. The Committee expects CDC to develop an 
accurate estimate of the cost of implementing the pneumococcal 
conjugate vaccine recommendation that includes a realistic 
forecast of vaccine compliance rates. The Committee will 
consider additional funding for the purchase of this vaccine 
when the Administration submits a supplemental budget request.
    There are concerns that some States are continuing to 
utilize discretionary immunization funds to cover vaccine 
purchase costs that are more appropriately paid for under the 
Vaccine for Children program and that immunization assistance 
to the States, including operations and infrastructure funding, 
is not being allocated on a basis that adequately considers 
relative need for funds. CDC is urged to review the policies 
governing its grants program to address these concerns. The 
Director should be prepared to testify regarding progress made 
in addressing these concerns at the fiscal year 2002 
appropriations hearing.
    The Committee has provided $25,000,000 for global polio 
eradication activities within the Public Health and Social 
Services Emergency Fund. The amount is $5,000,000 above the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 level and the same as the 
Administration request.
    The Committee has provided $18,040,000 for the second year 
of a multifaceted research program on the anthrax vaccine 
within the Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund. 
This amount is the same as the fiscal year 2000 comparable 
level and $18,040,000 above the Administration request. The 
Committee commends CDC for its rapid response and collaborative 
approach to addressing the scientific investigations in this 
important field.

Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)

    The Committee provides $734,403,000 for human 
immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activities, which is $39,652,000 
above the comparable fiscal year 2000 level and the same as the 
Administration request. The CDC HIV programs support HIV 
research, surveillance, epidemiologic and laboratory studies, 
and prevention activities. The CDC provides funds to state and 
local health departments to develop and implement integrated 
community prevention plans.
    The Committee commends CDC for efforts to review and 
evaluate its HIV/AIDS prevention programs, including the 
external review of CDC's HIV prevention budget and the National 
HIV Prevention Planning groups. The Committee also looks 
forward to the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine 
panel addressing these concerns. The Committee is supportive of 
the evidence-based State and local HIV prevention community 
planning process as well as the goal of the National Prevention 
Plan to reduce the number of new infections in half by 2005. 
CDC is encouraged to work aggressively toward this goal. CDC is 
also encouraged to develop a monitoring system to estimate the 
number of new infections occurring each year in the U.S. 
Scientific advances in sampling techniques and new technology 
to assess incident infections hold promise in developing 
sentinel sites or communities to accomplish this goal.
    The Committee also commends CDC for responding to concerns 
regarding disparities in funding for HIV prevention programs 
for communities of color, but remains concerned about 
disparities in funding for risk groups. CDC is urged to provide 
guidance to State and local health departments to address this 
concern.

Tuberculosis

    The Committee provides $127,672,000 for the tuberculosis 
(TB) program, which is $56,000 below the comparable fiscal year 
2000 level and the same as the Administration request. In 
addition to funding provided in this line item, CDC AIDS 
activities support HIV-related tuberculosis control efforts. 
The tuberculosis program provides grants to States and large 
cities for a broad range of tuberculosis control activities. In 
addition, the CDC supports state and local laboratories and 
conducts research, epidemiological investigations, and 
education and training seminars.
    Communicable diseases, such as tuberculosis (TB), do not 
recognize international borders. Increased commerce and travel 
across U.S. borders, both legally and illegally, impact 
American public health. The Committee urges CDC to enhance 
efforts on preventing TB in high migration areas, such the 
Tijuana-San Diego-Los Angeles corridor where the number of TB 
cases is increasing.
    The Committee commends CDC for its continued success in 
regaining control of TB in the U.S., as demonstrated by the 
seventh year of declining TB trends reported for 1999. However, 
there are concerns that, domestically, some health departments 
are having problems in maintaining the necessary 
infrastructures to assure continued success and, 
internationally, until global control efforts are more 
effective and new treatments and effective vaccines are 
developed, the World's TB problem will continue to impact the 
U.S. The Committee urges CDC to continue to work with domestic 
partners to maintain strong prevention and control programs, to 
work with international partners to assure the success of 
control programs, and to encourage and support, when possible, 
the development of new treatments and the development of an 
effective TB vaccine. The Committee also commends CDC's 
proposal to include emerging infectious diseases in its 
National Electronic Disease Surveillance Network Initiative.

Sexually transmitted diseases

    The Committee provides $150,668,000 for the sexually 
transmitted diseases (STDs) program, which is $14,934,000 above 
the comparable fiscal year 2000 level and the same as the 
Administration request. This program awards grants to state and 
local health departments and other nonprofit entities to 
support a wide variety of public health activities to prevent 
and treat STDs. The CDC directly conducts special 
investigations, surveillance and epidemiologic research.
    The Human Papillomavirus (HPV), a common STD, is often 
asymptomatic, however, in some cases, it has been casually 
linked to cervical cancer. The Committee encourages CDC to 
enhance efforts to educate primary care and specialty 
physicians and the public about HPV, its prevalence, and 
prevention; and to provide outreach to women to ensure they 
know to receive annual Pap smear and pelvic examinations for 
detection.

Chronic and environmental disease prevention

    The Committee provides $395,554,000 for chronic and 
environmental disease prevention, which is $20,829,000 above 
the comparable fiscal year 2000 level and $11,000,000 above the 
Administration request. The chronic and environmental disease 
program supports a wide variety of chronic and environmental 
disease research and prevention activities.
    The Committee has provided an increase above last year's 
level for the following priority activities: arthritis, asthma, 
autism epidemiology, birth defects, cancer registries, 
cardiovascular disease, colorectal cancer, DES education, 
diabetes, environmental health lab, folic acid, obesity and 
nutrition and physical activity, oral health, ovarian cancer, 
prostate cancer and universal newborn hearing screening 
activities. This increase in funding does not imply the 
Committee's endorsement of full funding of activities in the 
budget request, rather the Committee requests CDC to develop a 
balanced allocation of funding for all activities identified.
    It is estimated that up to one million people in the United 
States suffer from Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis, 
collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). The 
Committee recognizes the need for enhanced epidemiological 
research in this area, especially in light of recent 
advancements in treatment for these diseases and the increased 
risk that IBD patients have for developing colorectal cancer. 
The Committee encourages CDC to work to further the 
understanding of the prevalence of these diseases through 
appropriate epidemiological and surveillance activities.
    The Committee is pleased that CDC is restoring funding to 
the chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) research program. The 
Committee will continue to monitor the CFS research program to 
ensure that the funds are used in priority areas in CFS 
research and education. CDC is encouraged to enhance its 
efforts in CFS to include such areas as prevalence data 
collection, surveillance activities, identifying risk factors, 
patient registry, and public education programs.
    The Committee is encouraged by CDC's work with State and 
national health organizations to develop an integrated and 
comprehensive national cardiovascular disease program. The 
Committee understands that, in fiscal year 2000, 18 States will 
have received Federal funding to design and/or deliver 
cardiovascular disease prevention and control programs to meet 
local needs. These programs will target reduction of heart 
disease and stroke risk factors through efforts to promote 
physical activity and good nutrition and to prevent or control 
high blood pressure, elevated cholesterol, and obesity. The 
Committee encourages CDC to expand these activities to 
additional states.
    Americans make approximately 500 million dental visits per 
year. Much of the health and economic burden associated with 
oral diseases and conditions could be prevented. The Committee 
urges CDC to further enhance its oral health activities. These 
activities should focus on implementing strategies to help 
eliminate dental decay and reduce tooth loss, expanding 
surveillance activities to help States target their prevention 
efforts as schools, in the community, and in clinical settings, 
and reduce disparities and the health burden from oral cancers, 
gum disease, and oral health conditions that are closely linked 
to chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease.
    Birth defects are the leading cause of infant mortality in 
the United States and also a leading cause of childhood 
disability. CDC funds eight Centers for Birth Defects Research 
and Prevention, which identify cases for inclusion in the 
National Birth Defect Prevention Study. The CDC and the Centers 
also work with State health officials to expand and improve 
State birth defect surveillance systems. The Committee 
encourages CDC to expand this program to allow for the study of 
possible genetic and environmental causes of birth defects and 
to allow for the expansion of activities related to birth 
defects surveillance, research, and prevention programs.
    Neural tube defects (NTD), such as spina bifida, are among 
the most serious, common, and preventable birth defects that 
occur in the United States. Up to 70 percent of NTDs can be 
prevented by consuming 400 micrograms of folic acid every day, 
beginning before pregnancy. The Committee commends CDC for 
initiating a folic acid campaign and encourages CDC to expand 
its efforts to enhance State and local activities to educate 
women about this effective prevention strategy. The Committee 
requests that the Director be prepared to testify on the status 
of this initiative at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations 
hearing.
    The Committee recognizes the effective efforts of CDC and 
the Arthritis Foundation in initial implementation of the 
National Arthritis Plan. This plan provides assistance to 
States, supports prevention research and surveillance 
activities, and mitigates the effects of the disease through 
targeted interventions using voluntary health organizations 
experienced in addressing the needs of the arthritis 
population. The Committee urges CDC to continue to implement 
this Plan.
    The Committee notes the importance of rehabilitative 
information in improving outcomes among persons with limb loss 
and encourages CDC to continue to provide this information. CDC 
is also encouraged to enhance its efforts to improve 
epidemiological research and quality of life assessments among 
persons with skeletal malignancies.
    The Committee encourages CDC, in collaboration with the 
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, to 
examine the underlying causes of the regional disparity of 
stroke in the ``stroke belt'' using all available technologies, 
as appropriate.
    Diabetes remains a leading cause of early death and 
disability. There currently are 16 million Americans with 
diabetes and the incidence of diabetes is projected to 
increase. Obesity and lack of physical activity continue to 
place adults at greater risk of diabetes. Much of the burden of 
this disease can be prevented with early detection, improved 
delivery of proven preventive care, diabetes self-management 
education, and through enhanced linkages with groups 
specializing in the prevention of complications. The Committee 
encourages CDC to enhance efforts to provide funding for State 
comprehensive diabetes control programs as well as enhance 
national efforts of surveillance and education.
    Colorectal cancer is the third most commonly diagnosed 
cancer for both men and women in the U.S. and the second 
leading cause of cancer related deaths. Despite the 
availability of proven screening tests, only 37 percent of 
colorectal cancers are diagnosed while the disease is still in 
a localized stage. The Committee commends the leadership of 
CDC's National Colorectal Cancer Roundtable in promoting the 
availability and advisability of screening to both health care 
providers and the general public. The Committee encourages CDC 
to expand its partnerships with State health departments, 
professional and patient organizations, and private industry to 
provide materials that educate doctors and patients, including 
through Medicare, to combat this disease.
    The Committee remains concerned about the high incidence of 
prostate cancer and its disproportionate impact on African-
American males. The Committee continues to encourage CDC to 
expand its prostate cancer awareness and outreach program 
targeted to high-risk populations through collaborations with 
public and non-profit organizations with expertise in cancer 
education.
    CDC testified to the alarming increase in obesity in the 
U.S. population. Obesity is increasing most rapidly among young 
children, raising concern about their long-term health and 
quality of life. The Committee agrees this is an important 
public health issue because of its correlation with a wide 
range of debilitating and chronic health conditions, including 
cardiovascular disease, diabetes, arthritis, and cancer. The 
Committee urges CDC to continue its efforts to promote healthy 
eating and physical activity and thereby prevent obesity. The 
Committee also urges CDC to continue work on obesity as a 
national public health priority.
    Epilepsy affects over 2.5 million persons in the United 
States, one-third of whom are children. The Committee urges CDC 
to enhance its efforts related to epilepsy with a focus on 
expanding disease surveillance, increasing public awareness 
activities, public and provider education, prevention research, 
and the stigma associated with the disorder. The Committee also 
urges CDC to enhance its voluntary health agency partnerships, 
including increased attention to external public health 
activities focused on children and older Americans living with 
epilepsy.
    The Committee notes the work of CDC, the National Institute 
of Child Health and Human Development, and the Health Resources 
and Services Administration in developing a model guideline for 
a death scene protocol for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). 
The Committee encourages CDC to implement projects to 
demonstrate the effectiveness of the protocol in a variety of 
locales throughout the Nation.
    The Committee understands the need to study environmental 
toxins and their relationship to disease in order to increase 
the understanding of the cause of many chronic diseases and to 
facilitate the development of effective disease prevention and 
management strategies. CDC is encouraged to explore the 
feasibility of developing a coordinated system among all States 
to identify and track disease caused by exposure to 
environmental toxins. The Director should be prepared to 
discuss the development and implementation of such a system at 
the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.
    The Committee is pleased with the work that CDC has done to 
address the increasing prevalence of asthma. However, the 
increase in asthma among children, particularly among inner-
city minorities, remains a concern. The Committee urges CDC to 
expand its outreach aimed at increasing public awareness of 
asthma control and prevention strategies, particularly among at 
risk minority populations in underserved communities. The 
Committee also encourages CDC to work with other Public Health 
Service agencies and the Office of the Surgeon General to 
develop a PHS-wide plan to control asthma.
    Cancer registries monitor trends in cancer by the site of 
the cancer, age and ethnicity of the patient, geographic 
region, and treatment outcome. The Committee urges CDC to 
enhance its support for statewide cancer registries and provide 
national support for quality assurance and reporting standards 
to ensure that critical information on cancer trends and 
outcomes is available. The Committee also urges CDC to work 
with States and national organizations to aggregate State data 
into a national data set to analyze the cancer burden in the 
U.S. on a regional and national level.
    Many chronic and environmental diseases have a higher 
prevalence in ethnic minority populations and the medically 
underserved. The Committee urges CDC to improve its efforts to 
reach these populations through all programs funded under the 
chronic and environmental disease prevention program.
    The Committee encourages CDC to enhance its efforts into 
investigating the potential of environmental, bacterial, and 
viral factors that are associated with the development of 
lymphoma. CDC is also encouraged to continue its collaborative 
research efforts with the National Cancer Institute and other 
NIH Institutes.
    The Committee requests CDC to develop an action plan to 
implement collaborative public health strategies with community 
accountable plans serving Medicaid, S-CHIP, and other program 
beneficiaries, including identification and development of best 
practices in disease prevention and management and patient/
provider education among ethnically diverse, pediatric, and 
environmentally disadvantaged populations.

Breast and cervical cancer screening

    The Committee provides $171,420,000 for the breast and 
cervical cancer screening program, which is $4,925,000 above 
both the comparable fiscal year 2000 level and the same as the 
Administration request. The breast and cervical cancer 
screening program supports screening, education, and follow-up 
services for low-income women, training for health care 
providers, quality assurance activities, national technical 
assistance and support, surveillance and program evaluation.
    The Committee provides continued funding for the WISEWOMAN 
screening demonstration program at last year's level. This 
program uses the framework of CDC's National Breast and 
Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program to screen women for 
heart attack, stroke, and other cardiovascular disease risk 
factors such as high blood pressure, lack of physical activity, 
and obesity.
    There are concerns related to the shortages and high 
vacancy rates of qualified health personnel who work in 
laboratories to prepare and interpret tissue and cell samples. 
The Committee urges CDC to collaborate with the Health 
Resources and Services Administration, through its allied 
health program, to explore the feasibility of developing a 
partnership to support programs at schools that would address 
these concerns.
    The Committee is concerned that only 50 percent of women 
with ovarian cancer live beyond five years from diagnosis and 
the prognosis among minorities with the disease is even more 
bleak. CDC is to be commended for its efforts to initiate 
epidemiological research efforts, in partnership with the 
Ovarian Cancer National Alliance, to enhance understanding of 
the disease. While an effective screening tool has not yet been 
developed to detect ovarian cancer, early detection is the key 
to improving outcomes in women diagnosed with this form of 
gynecological cancer. The Committee urges CDC to enhance 
efforts to improve physician education and recognition of the 
disease as well as enhance efforts to expand public education 
and communications efforts to raise awareness of ovarian cancer 
and its warning signs.

Infectious diseases

    The Committee provides $181,622,000 for the infectious 
diseases program, which is $6,012,000 above the comparable 
fiscal year 2000 level and the same as the Administration 
request. The program supports national surveillance of 
infectious diseases, the development of new or improved 
prevention and control methods and techniques, the acceleration 
of the general application of accepted prevention technologies, 
and strengthening of the capability to respond to outbreaks of 
new and re-emerging infectious diseases. The Committee 
encourages CDC to continue activities related to global 
malaria.
    The Committee continues to be concerned that as many as 
500,000 cases of primary immunodeficiencies remain undiagnosed 
and misdiagnosed. The Committee is aware of a national 
education and awareness campaign created through the 
collaborative efforts of several agencies and the Jeffrey 
Modell Foundation and strongly urges CDC to expand its efforts 
to advance this collaboration. The Committee requests that the 
Director be prepared to provide a status report of these 
efforts at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.
    There are concerns that the Lyme disease surveillance case 
definition, which was developed for national reporting of Lyme 
disease, is being used inappropriately for clinical diagnosis 
and as a standard of care. There are also concerns that the 
surveillance case definition is not accurately capturing the 
true number of cases being diagnosed. The Committee urges CDC 
to pursue efforts to address these concerns. In doing so, CDC 
should include a broad range of scientific viewpoints from the 
many groups who have expertise in CFS, including community-
based clinicians, voluntary agencies, and patient advocates. 
The Committee understands that the General Accounting Office is 
studying the Lyme disease program at CDC. It is expected that 
any problems identified in this study will be addressed as 
quickly and efficiently as possible.
    The Committee is pleased that CDC is working to establish a 
primary immune deficiency diseases national surveillance 
program. Primary immune deficient patients require regular 
infusions of immune globulin intravenous (IGIV) to bolster 
their immune systems and maintain their health. Given the 
serious public health problems caused by the longstanding 
shortage of IGIV in the United Stated, the Committee encourages 
the Center to continue its partnership with the primary immune 
deficiency community and NCHS with respect to surveillance and 
epidemiological activities designed to further the 
understanding of the prevalence of these diseases and the 
difficulties that patients have encountered in receiving 
treatment.
    The Committee encourages CDC to work with the National 
Hemophilia Foundation to enhance efforts to meet the disease 
management, prevention, and outreach needs of persons with 
hemophilia and other bleeding and clotting disorders, and in 
particular, to enhance efforts to address the needs of women 
with bleeding disorders. The Committee requests that the 
Director be prepared to provide a progress report on these 
activities at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.
    Like tuberculosis, infectious diseases do not recognize 
international borders and, with increased commerce and travel 
across U.S. borders, pose a major public health problem. In 
addition, the growing prevalence of infectious bacterial 
conditions that are resistant to antibiotics raises a number of 
difficult public health issues. CDC is urged to place a 
particular focus on preventing infectious disease in high 
migration areas, such as the Tijuana-San Diego-Los Angeles 
corridor.
    The Committee encourages CDC to supplement its existing 
blood safety monitoring system with data collected on 
thalassemia patients, who are among the most frequently 
transfused of all patients. The Committee understands that CDC 
and the Cooley's Anemia Foundation have begun to plan for the 
establishment of a system for monitoring the safety of the 
blood supply and requests that the Director be prepared to 
provide a status report on this initiative at the fiscal year 
2002 appropriations hearing.

Lead poisoning prevention

    The Committee provides $38,226,000 for the childhood lead 
poisoning prevention program, which is $17,000 below the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 level and the same as the 
Administration request. The program provides grants to States 
and communities for screening, surveillance, epidemiology, 
education, laboratory activities and development of better lead 
screening devices.
    It is estimated that more than 400,000 children eligible 
for Federal health care programs have undetected harmful levels 
of lead in their blood. The Committee is aware of the benefits 
of a portable, easy to use lead screening device developed with 
the support and participation of CDC. The Committee continues 
to believe that this device holds great promise for increasing 
childhood screening rates in underserved communities in the 
U.S. and throughout the world and encourages CDC to support its 
further development for application in community public health 
settings.

Injury control

    The Committee provides $90,138,000 for the injury control 
program, which is the same as the comparable fiscal year 2000 
level and $4,957,000 below the Administration request. This 
amount includes $5,863,000 for domestic violence community 
demonstrations previously funded through the Crime Trust Fund. 
The injury control program supports intramural research, injury 
control research centers, extramural research grants, and 
technical assistance to state and local health departments.
    The bill retains a limitation included in previous 
Appropriation Acts to prohibit the National Center for Injury 
Prevention and Control from engaging in any activities to 
advocate or promote gun control. The Committee does not believe 
that CDC should advocate or promote policies to advance gun 
control initiatives, or discourage responsible private gun 
ownership. The Committee expects research on gun violence to be 
objective and grants to be awarded through an impartial peer 
review process.
    The Committee urges CDC to continue the establishment of a 
uniform trauma surveillance data system within available 
resources.
    The Committee commends CDC's brain injury prevention 
efforts and encourages the agency to collaborate, if feasible, 
with the National Institute of Mental Health and the National 
Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke to examine 
hyperbaric oxygen therapy for treatment of chronic brain 
injury.
    There are significant disparities in the numbers of racial 
and ethnic minorities affected by violence. The Committee is 
pleased with the efforts of CDC in the field of violence 
prevention. The Committee encourages CDC to extend the 
development and implementation of Best Practices for the 
Prevention of Youth Violence to include culturally sensitive 
social-cognitive, mentoring, parenting, and nurse home visit 
programs and to identify new Best Practices. CDC should also 
develop and evaluate effective violence prevention programs 
that are designed to improve acceptability of violence 
prevention interventions in the communities they are intended 
to reach including African American, Hispanic American, 
American Indians and Alaska Natives, and Pacific Islanders. 
Culturally responsive interventions and programs should be 
developed through evaluation research and demonstrations to 
address the disparities in morbidity among racial and ethnic 
minorities that is attributable to violence.
    The Committee encourages CDC to enhance services provided 
through the violence against women initiative to provide more 
assistance to women in underserved locations; expand evaluation 
research programs; monitor violence against women by improving 
the quality of data at national and state levels; partner with 
local organizations within communities; and develop prevention 
and early intervention programs.
    There are estimated to be 20 to 30 million unsafe cribs, 
either still in use or in storage in the U.S., which could be 
the cause of one of the more than 9,000 crib injuries that are 
treated annually in hospital emergency rooms. The Committee 
encourages CDC to enhance efforts to inform the public about 
the dangers associated with unsafe cribs.

National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health

    The Committee provides $214,179,000 for the National 
Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), which is 
$473,000 below the comparable fiscal year 2000 level and 
$5,377,000 below the Administration request. NIOSH conducts 
applied research, develops criteria for occupational safety and 
health standards, and provides technical services to 
government, labor and industry, including training for the 
prevention of work-related diseases and injuries. This 
appropriation supports surveillance, health hazard evaluations, 
intramural and extramural research, instrument and methods 
development, dissemination, and training grants.
    The Committee recognizes that occupational illness and 
injuries continue to exact an economic burden comparable to 
cancer and applauds the Institute's use of the National 
Occupational Research Agenda (NORA) to invest research funds 
where they will have the most impact--both for reducing this 
financial burden and for protecting the health and safety of 
U.S. workers. The Committee commends NIOSH on its continuing 
progress on implementing NORA, which has generated new research 
activities and remains responsive to the health and safety 
needs of workers in the rapidly changing workplace. The 
Committee urges NIOSH to continue its efforts to co-sponsor 
NORA extramural research with NIH and other Federal agencies.

Epidemic services

    The Committee provides $210,822,000 for epidemic services, 
which is $124,964,000 above the comparable fiscal year 2000 
level and $125,000,000 above the Administration request. This 
amount includes $125,000,000 for a national campaign to change 
children's health behaviors. The objectives of the program 
include the prevention and control of epidemics, the 
maintenance of surveillance systems, the training of public 
health epidemiologists, and the operation of the quarantine 
program. The program supports the Epidemic Intelligence Service 
program, the publication of the Morbidity and Mortality Weekly 
Report, and a variety of infant and minority health programs.
    The Committee provides $125,000,000 for a National Campaign 
to Change Children's Health Behaviors. The Committee believes 
that, if we are to have a positive impact on the future health 
of the American population, we must change the behaviors of our 
children and young adults by reaching them with important 
health messages. CDC, working in collaboration with the Health 
Resources and Services Administration, the National Center for 
Child Health and Human Development, and the Substance Abuse and 
Mental Health Services Administration, is directed to 
coordinate an effort to plan, implement, and evaluate a 
campaign designed to clearly communicate messages that will 
help kids develop habits that foster good health over a 
lifetime including diet, physical activity, and avoidance of 
illicit drugs, tobacco, and alcohol. The campaign should be 
based on principles that have been shown to enhance success, 
including: designing and testing messages with different 
groups, based in gender and ethnicity; involve young people in 
all aspects of campaign planning and implementation; use the 
same communication tactics that are employed by the best kids 
marketers; and enlist the involvement and support of parents 
and other role models.
    Each year over six million pregnancies occur in the United 
States. About one in five women who deliver will have a serious 
problem before they begin labor and about one in four women 
will have serious complications during labor. The Committee 
supports the continued efforts of CDC to prevent deaths and 
complications during pregnancy through its Safe Motherhood/
Healthy Pregnancies program.
    The Committee commends CDC for its efforts to partner with 
the Landmine Survivors Network to develop a post-traumatic 
intervention delivery model in mine-affected countries abroad.

Office of the Director

    The Committee provides $37,245,000 for the activities of 
the Office of the Director, which is $375,000 below the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 level and $1,681,000 above the 
Administration request. The Committee intends this amount to be 
a ceiling. The Director may transfer these funds to non-
administrative, programmatic activities at his discretion. This 
line item includes amounts previously identified in the report 
for program management activities.
    The Committee encourages CDC to evaluate the barriers to 
access and implementation of effective screening and prevention 
programs and the linkages between detection, treatment, and 
community health organizations for all cancer control programs 
funded through the agency. The Committee also encourages CDC to 
expand the National Health Nutritional and Examination Survey 
to all ethnic minority and medically underserved populations.

National Center for Health Statistics

    The Committee provides a total of $105,000,000 for the 
National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS), which is the same 
as the comparable fiscal year 2000 level and $4,985,000 below 
the Administration request. Of this amount, $71,690,000 is 
derived from the one percent evaluation set-aside. The Center 
is responsible for collecting, interpreting, and disseminating 
data on the health status of the U.S. population and the use of 
health services. NCHS surveys include the National Vital 
Statistics System, the National Health Interview Survey, the 
National Survey of Family Growth, the National Health and 
Nutrition Examination Survey, and the National Health Care 
Survey.
    The Committee is pleased that NCHS is working to establish 
a primary immune deficiency national surveillance program in 
collaboration with the National Center for Infectious Diseases.
    The Committee encourages CDC to work with States to 
standardize a method of reporting the underlying causes of 
death in an effort to better determine the numbers of people 
dying of specific diseases.

Buildings and facilities

    The Committee provides $145,000,000 for buildings and 
facilities, which is $87,869,000 above the comparable fiscal 
year 2000 level and $17,926,000 above the Administration 
request. This line item supports ongoing maintenance projects, 
as well as safety repairs and equipment purchases.

Prevention research

    The Committee provides $16,000,000 for the prevention 
research program, which is $1,000,000 above the comparable 
fiscal year 2000 level and $1,007,000 above the Administration 
request. This program supports extramural research programs.

Health disparities demonstration

    The Committee provides $34,985,000 for the health 
disparities demonstration program, which is $4,985,000 above 
the comparable fiscal year 2000 level and the same as the 
Administration request. This program supports community-based 
demonstrations of prevention and service delivery interventions 
with the goal of eliminating health disparities among racial 
and ethnic populations and to improve the health status at the 
community level.

                     National Institutes of Health

    The Committee provides $18,812,735,000, for the 24 
appropriations, which together fund the programs of the 
National Institutes of Health (NIH). These include 
appropriations for the 18 research Institutes, the National 
Center for Research Resources, the John E. Fogarty 
International Center, the National Library of Medicine, the 
National Center for Complimentary and Alternative Medicine, the 
Office of the Director, and Buildings and Facilities. The total 
in the bill is $1,000,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level, when adjusted for one-time transfers, and the 
same as the Administration request. This funding level provides 
a 5.6 percent increase in total for the research components of 
NIH. Programs funded in this account are not authorized for 
fiscal year 2001.
    The funding levels provided in the bill for each of the 
Institutes and Centers reflect what the Committee would have 
provided if it were able to provide a 15 percent increase for 
NIH, the third year installment of the doubling effort. In real 
terms, the Committee's allocation only allowed for a 5.6 
percent increase, the same as the President's request. The 
Committee has included language in the bill to limit the amount 
NIH can obligate in fiscal year 2001 to the budget request 
level.
    Committee Priorities.--The Committee views NIH as one of 
its very highest priorities and has made difficult resource 
allocation decisions throughout the bill to provide what it 
believes is the necessary funding level for NIH. NIH is the 
world's leading biomedical research institution; its 
investments in research save lives and reduce health care costs 
while creating jobs and economic growth in a global economy. 
This research has produced major advances in the treatment of 
cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and mental illness that have 
helped thousands of American families. NIH research has spawned 
the biotechnology revolution, whose products are projected to 
grow into a $50 billion industry by the turn of the century. 
The U.S.'s ability to translate scientific discoveries into new 
product development has resulted in its lead over Europe and 
Japan in pharmaceutical and biotechnology patents. While the 
Committee is firm in its commitment to budget restraints, it 
believes that funding of biomedical research is an important 
investment in the future health and economic well-being of our 
nation.
    Balance in the Research Portfolio.--The Committee believes 
that NIH should distribute funding on the basis of scientific 
opportunity. As a result, the Committee has allocated the 
Institute appropriations consistent with the distribution 
recommended by NIH and reflecting the Director's judgment of 
scientific opportunity. If NIH believes that adjustments to 
this allocation are necessary as the fiscal year 2001 
appropriations bill moves through the legislative cycle, the 
Committee would be pleased to consider them in later action on 
the bill.
    To enhance NIH's flexibility to allocate funding based on 
scientific opportunity, the Committee has attempted to minimize 
the amount of direction provided in the report accompanying the 
bill. For example, there are no directives to fund particular 
research mechanisms, such as centers or requests for 
applications, or specific amounts of funding for particular 
diseases.
    In stating that scientific opportunity should be the basis 
for allocating research funding, the Committee understands that 
other factors also are relevant to NIH's decisions, including 
such considerations as the infectious nature of a disease, the 
number of cases and deaths associated with a particular 
disease, the Federal and other costs of treating a disease, the 
years of productive life lost due to a particular disease, and 
the estimated proximity to research breakthroughs. The 
Committee does not presume to judge which criteria should take 
precedence or carry the greatest weight in individual funding 
decisions, but urges NIH to consider the full array of relevant 
criteria as it constructs its research portfolio.
    AIDS Funding.--Consistent with the philosophy outlined 
above, the Committee has again chosen not to earmark a specific 
dollar amount for AIDS research. The Committee understands that 
it would be NIH's intent to allocate AIDS funding consistent 
with the Director's recommendations. The Committee understands 
that this allocation may change before the beginning of the 
fiscal year.
    The Committee intends that the funds allocated for AIDS 
should be spent in a manner fully consistent with the AIDS 
research plan developed by the Office of AIDS Research (OAR) 
and expects the Director of NIH to use the full authority of 
his office to ensure that this occurs. The Committee has 
provided the Director of OAR, jointly with the Director of NIH, 
transfer authority to reallocate up to three percent of funds 
designated for AIDS research among Institutes, subject to 
normal reprogramming procedures. The Committee encourages NIH 
to use this authority whenever it believes that an adjustment 
in the allocation of AIDS funding between Institutes is 
appropriate to achieve scientific objectives or to facilitate 
promising research efforts.
    The Committee continues to support OAR, its leadership, and 
its coordinated budget planning process and expects the 
individual institutes, centers and divisions to fully cooperate 
with OAR's work. The Committee has provided funding for the OAR 
within the Office of the Director and intends that the OAR will 
maintain its current structure and responsibilities, including 
the allocation of an emergency discretionary fund.
    Government Performance and Results Act.--The Committee 
recognizes that the development of programmatic indicators for 
NIH under the Government Performance and Results Act is one of 
the most difficult conceptual and methodological problems in 
the Act's implementation. NIH should continue to work with the 
National Academy of Sciences and the other science agencies to 
develop a better conceptual and theoretical framework for such 
measures. The Committee believes that NIH should begin to 
implement the Act where it can. Measures of administrative 
efficiency and effectiveness can and should be adopted and 
tracked. Similarly, indicators of the ability of systems to 
support the research enterprise exist, and should be included. 
Presentation of these measures, including goals for 
improvements, baselines and reporting systems are an initial 
step. Information presented with the President's budget should 
include improvements in these indicators resulting from 
proposed funding levels. In addition, the Committee will expect 
the Director to include a report in the fiscal year 2002 
appropriations hearing next spring on the progress toward 
indicators relating directly to research and the translation of 
basic research findings to medical and other applications.

                       national cancer institute

    The Committee provides $3,793,587,000 for the National 
Cancer Institute (NCI), which is $481,900,000 above the fiscal 
year 2000 comparable level and $288,515,000 above the 
Administration request; however, due to limited funding within 
the allocation, funding increases in the bill are constrained 
to the amount proposed in the Administration request.
    Mission.--The NCI conducts and supports basic and applied 
cancer research in early detection, diagnosis, prevention, 
treatment and rehabilitation. NCI provides training support for 
research scientists, clinicians and educators, and maintains a 
national network of cancer centers, clinical cooperative 
groups, and community clinical oncology programs, along with 
cancer prevention and control initiatives and outreach programs 
to rapidly translate basic research findings into clinical 
practice.
    Bone Disease.--The Committee encourages NCI to study the 
role of angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, in the 
metastasis of breast and prostate cancer to the bone through 
all available mechanism, as appropriate, including the 
development of experimental genetic animal models that 
replicate the process of human cancer metastasis to the bone 
and exploring why bone is a preferential site for metastases.
    Breast Cancer.--The development of advanced imaging 
technologies including medical infrared imaging derived from 
the U.S. military and NASA, and other optical and non-invasive 
modalities which, when converged with emerging treatments such 
as angiogenic therapy, can be incorporated into comprehensive 
systems for the early detection and treatment of breast cancer. 
NCI is encouraged to explore this approach to disease 
management.
    Childhood Skeletal Malignancies.--While mortality rates 
among children with skeletal cancers have improved dramatically 
over the past decade, little remains known about factors that 
contribute toward the development of such tumors. The Committee 
encourages NCI to enhance the level of scientific knowledge of 
Osteosarcoma, Ewings sarcoma, and related malignancies 
affecting connective tissue that often result in limb loss 
through all available mechanisms, as appropriate, including a 
consensus conference to develop a research agenda.
    DES Education.--The Committee understands that a plan for 
expanded DES education activities has been developed by the 
Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Office of 
Women's Health, and groups representing individuals affected by 
DES. The Committee urges NCI to review this plan within a 
reasonable timeframe and collaborate with CDC on its 
implementation. The Committee also urges NCI to ensure that 
public information pamphlets developed by NCI are readily made 
available to consumers.
    Endometrial and Cervical Cancer.--The Committee encourages 
NCI to conduct a programmatic review of the research portfolios 
in endometrial and cervical cancer and enhance research in 
areas of discovery that are not currently being funded through 
all available mechanisms, as appropriate, including requests 
for applications for SPOREs.
    Esophageal and Stomach Cancer.--Approximately 34,000 
Americans will be diagnosed this year with esophageal or 
stomach cancer and approximately 25,000 will die from these 
diseases. Both cancers disproportionately affect minority 
populations, particularly African Americans and Hispanics. The 
Committee encourages NCI, in collaboration with NIDDK, to 
enhance efforts in this area.
    Lung Cancer Screening.--Lung cancer remains one of the most 
common cancers and usually responds poorly to treatment because 
most cases are not found until the tumors are large enough to 
cause symptoms. Current screening and early detection methods 
are limited, but new technologies, such as helical CT scanning, 
are being disseminated and may assist in the ability to save or 
prolong the lives of lung cancer patients. The Committee 
encourages NCI to examine these technologies and their 
usefulness in early diagnosis and patient treatment.
    Lymphoma.--The Committee understands that NCI is committed 
to conducting a progress review group on lymphoma. This will 
give NCI and other Federal agencies the opportunity to evaluate 
current research and determine future needs. The Committee 
requests that the Director of the Institute be prepared to 
provide a progress report at the fiscal year 2002 
appropriations hearing.
    Marine Mammals Research.--Sharks, skates, and rays seem to 
have an unusually low incidence of cancer and the potential for 
bioactive molecules to inhibit disease process in humans. The 
Committee encourages NCI to study the immune systems and 
bioactive cell and tissue molecules of these marine animals to 
understand their resistance to cancer and the potential 
development of more effective therapies to inhibit cancer in 
humans.
    Molecular Markers.--The development of molecular markers 
that are predictive of the presence or likelihood of regional 
metastasis in patients with head and neck cancer would provide 
useful prognostic information as well as identify patients at 
risk who could benefit from early elective treatment to the 
regional lymph nodes. NCI is urged to expand research in this 
area.
    Multiple Myeloma.--Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable 
cancer of the plasma cells of the bone marrow. MM is the second 
fastest growing hematological cancer in the U.S. The Committee 
is pleased that MM was included in an NCI progress review group 
and looks forward to hearing about the Institute's plans for 
the groups findings at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations 
hearing. The Committee continues to urge NCI to support 
epidemiological and other data gathering activities relevant to 
MM and to coordinate efforts with CDC, NIEHS, the Office of 
Rare Diseases, and the Office of Research on Minority Health. 
The Committee encourages the Institute to disseminate and 
educate the public and health professionals about the symptoms 
of and treatment for MM.
    National Occupational Research Agenda.--The Committee 
encourages NCI to work with the National Institute for 
Occupational Safety and Health to enhance research in relevant 
National Occupational Research Agenda priority areas such as 
Cancer Research Methods, Special Populations at Risk, Mixed 
Exposures, Risk Assessment Methods, and Exposure Assessment 
Methods.
    Neurofibromatosis.--The Committee encourages NCI to 
strengthen its NF research portfolio in such areas as further 
development of animal models, natural history studies, and 
therapeutic experimentation and clinical trials. The Committee 
also urges NCI to continue to coordinate its efforts with other 
Institutes engaged in NF research.
    Ovarian Cancer.--The Committee commends NCI for moving 
forward to fully fund two ovarian cancer SPOREs and partially 
fund two other ovarian cancer SPOREs in fiscal year 2000. The 
Committee encourages NCI to fully fund all SPOREs this fiscal 
year and requests that the Director of the Institute be 
prepared to give a progress report at the fiscal year 2002 
appropriations hearing.
    Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases.--The Committee notes 
that NCI held a symposium in March 2000 to investigate the 
relationship between primary immune deficiency diseases and 
cancer. It is hoped that this will lead to the development of a 
research agenda in this field. In addition, the Committee is 
aware of the commitment of NCI to the national education and 
awareness campaign sponsored by the Jeffrey Modell Foundation. 
This commitment will play a significant role in assuring the 
earliest possible diagnosis of primary immunodeficiency and of 
any cancers that may stem from it.
    Prostate Cancer.--Cancer of the prostate is the most 
commonly diagnosed nonskin cancer in America and tends to 
disproportionately affect men who are members of minority 
groups. If detected early, it can be treated successfully with 
no negative impact on the cancer survivor's quality of life. 
However, existing forms of detection are insufficient, and 
available treatments frequently result in erectile dysfunction, 
urinary problems, or other disorders and disruptions that 
negatively impact the patients quality of life. The Committee 
urges NCI to place an increased priority on research, through 
all available mechanisms, as appropriate, including clinical 
trials, that result in earlier, more reliable detection methods 
and more effective and less disfiguring treatment regimes.
    Rural Poor in Health Disparities Research.--While studies 
have shown that certain diseases effect minority groups, 
economic status may also have an impact on health outcomes. For 
example, the rural poor have a high incidence of cancer. The 
Committee urges NCI to include the rural poor population in its 
efforts to eliminate health disparities.
    Urological Cancers.--The Committee is pleased with the new 
initiatives in prostate cancer now underway; however, research 
in other urologic cancers such as kidney and bladder cancer 
needs to be enhanced. The Committee urges NCI to develop a plan 
to expand its research programs for other urologic cancers and 
take advantage of new knowledge that has been acquired about 
cancer diagnosis and treatment.

               national heart, lung, and blood institute

    The Committee provides $2,321,320,000 for the Heart, Lung 
and Blood Institute (NHLBI), which is $294,890,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and $184,563,000 above the 
Administration request; however, due to limited funding within 
the allocation, funding increases in the bill are constrained 
to the amount proposed in the Administration request.
    Mission.--The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 
provides leadership for a national research program in diseases 
of the heart, blood vessels, lungs, and blood, in transfusion 
medicine, and in sleep disorders through support of basic, 
clinical, and population-based and health education research. 
The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) was transferred from the 
Office of the Director to NHLBI. WHI is a large cross-Institute 
initiative to study prevention of conditions responsible for 
deaths, disability and frailty in older women--breast and 
colorectal cancer, heart disease, and osteoporosis. There are 
three components of the study: a randomized clinical trial; an 
observational study; and a community prevention study. The 
clinical trial is being conducted at 40 centers with 46,000 
women participating. It is scheduled for completion in 2004.
    Adherence to Medical and Behavioral Therapies.--Failure to 
follow medical recommendations causes tens of thousands of 
deaths a year, increased hospitalizations, and delayed 
recovery. It is estimated that 50 percent of patients do not 
comply with prescribed treatments. Many life-extending drugs 
for heart attack survivors and heart failure patients are 
underused and not all patients or doctors take advantage of 
information proven to reduce to treat those at risk of heart 
disease or stroke. NHLBI is encouraged to enhance research on 
innovative theories about behavioral, cultural, social, 
psychological, and environmental methods to increase adherence 
to lifestyle and medical regimens.
    Aneurysm.--The Committee notes from the NHLBI Director's 
testimony that the Institute is increasing its research efforts 
in the area of aneurysms. An aneurysm in the brain can result 
in a debilitating stroke and an aneurysm in the abdomen can 
result in rapid bleeding and death. Aneurysms are rarely 
detected until a catastrophic health event occurs in the 
victim. NHLBI is encouraged to continue its focus on this 
condition, particularly on early detection and, in coordination 
with other NIH Institutes, more effective treatments.
    Asthma.--Little is known about the optimal treatment for 
asthma in infants and young children. Many questions remain 
unanswered, such as what is the most effective dose and type of 
medication for different types of asthma, what is the correct 
balance between medical benefits and possible side effects, 
when is the best time to start different types of therapies, 
and whether early therapy can prevent asthma from becoming more 
severe or even eliminate it as a child gets older. The 
Committee urges NHLBI to use the research amassed through the 
Pediatric Asthma Clinical Research Network to provide clearer 
choices for childhood asthma therapy, to encourage the 
development and dissemination of new therapies, and to identify 
optimum asthma management strategies for children.
    The Committee commends the National Asthma Education and 
Prevention Program (NAEPP) for its leadership in helping to 
educate physicians, asthma patients, their families, and the 
general public regarding asthma and its management. The 
Committee urges NAEPP to enhance the role of its Advisory 
Committee in helping to coordinate asthma education throughout 
the United States. The Committee also encourages NHLBI and 
NAEPP to work with other agencies, such as CDC, HRSA, and the 
Office of the Surgeon General to develop a PHS-wide plan to 
control asthma.
    Cardiovascular Diseases.--Cardiovascular diseases remain 
America's number one killer and a major cause of disability. 
Nearly 60 million Americans of all ages suffer from 
cardiovascular diseases. The Committee supports an intensive 
research program on cardiovascular diseases at NHLBI and urges 
the Institute to place a high priority on such research by 
supporting existing heart and stroke-related research and 
investing in promising heart and stroke-related research 
initiatives.
    Cardiovascular Diseases in Women.--Cardiovascular disease 
remains a leading cause of disability and is the number one 
cause of death in women. The clinical course of cardiovascular 
disease is different in men than in women and current 
diagnostic capabilities are less accurate in women than in men 
and are largely unrecognized by women and their physicians. The 
Committee encourages NHLBI to expand its research on 
cardiovascular diseases in women, through all available 
mechanisms, as appropriate, including the development of safe, 
efficient, and cost effective diagnostic approaches for women. 
The Committee is also concerned that information is not 
reaching women and their providers and encourages NHLBI to 
focus on educational information that may be appropriately 
disseminated.
    Cooley's Anemia.--The Committee is pleased with the 
progress that NHLBI has made with regard to the creation of the 
Thalassemia Clinical Research Network and notes that Network 
has now been created among some of the leading researchers in 
Cooley's anemia. The Committee urges the Institute to take the 
necessary steps to encourage investigator-initiated research 
proposals that address key unresolved scientific issues.
    Hemophilia.--The Committee encourages NHLBI to enhance its 
efforts, working with the national hemophilia foundation, to 
address the needs of persons with hemophilia and other bleeding 
and clotting disorders, particularly in the areas of research 
to improve blood and blood product safety and treatment for 
hepatitis C and other complications of bleeding and clotting 
disorders, including women's bleeding disorders. The Committee 
also notes the potential of gene therapy to improve the 
treatment of hemophilia and urges NHLBI to enhance support for 
this critical area. The Committee requests that the Director of 
the Institute be prepared to testify at the fiscal year 2002 
appropriations hearing on the progress of activities in 
hemophilia gene therapy.
    Hypertension and Kidney Disease.--Hypertension is the 
number two cause of kidney disease. The Committee urges NHLBI 
to collaborate with NIDDK on research related to hypertension 
and its relationship to kidney disease through all available 
mechanisms, as appropriate, including sponsoring a workshop to 
define areas of research for potential joint projects. The 
Committee requests that the Director of the Institute be 
prepared to testify on the progress in this area at the fiscal 
year 2002 appropriations hearing.
    Immune System Research Programs for Heart Disease.--Basic 
knowledge about the body's disease fighting system and its 
involvement in the causes and development of heart disease and 
stroke are increasing rapidly. Innovative approaches to 
accelerate the use of this knowledge into clinical applications 
are needed. NHLBI is encouraged to enhance research in such 
areas as inflammatory response to blood vessel injury that 
occurs in atherosclerosis, the cause of heart attacks and 
strokes, healing of damaged heart tissue after a heart attack, 
and chronic rejection following heart transplantation through 
all available mechanisms, as appropriate.
    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis.--The Committee commends NHLBI for 
supporting intramural and extramural research on 
Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM), which is a progressive and 
often fatal lung disease that predominately affects women of 
child bearing age. The Committee notes that significant efforts 
are being made to develop a cell line and an animal model for 
LAM, and hopes that the development of these tools will remain 
an important goal of the Institute. The recent progress on LAM 
research is encouraging. The NHLBI clinical protocol discovery 
that asthma medicines benefit a significant proportion of 
patients with LAM is the first clinical advance in LAM in 
decades. The identification of genetic mutations in the lungs 
of patients with LAM opens new areas in LAM research. The 
Committee encourages NHLBI to enhance research in this area 
through all available mechanisms, as appropriate, including 
sponsoring a state of the science LAM workshop.
    Maintaining Weight Loss.--An estimated 106 million 
Americans age 20 and older are overweight or obese, a condition 
that increases risk of diseases such as heart attack, stroke, 
high blood pressure, and diabetes. Clinical Guidelines on the 
Identification, Evaluation, and Treatment of Overweight and 
Obesity in Adults, supported by NHLBI in collaboration with 
NIDDK, reviews evidence that it is possible for overweight and 
obese people to lose a significant amount of weight over six 
months, but only a few maintain the weight loss. The Committee 
encourages NHLBI to study weight loss maintenance and examine 
behaviors that influence obesity, weight loss, and weight loss 
maintenance.
    National Occupational Research Agenda.--The Committee 
encourages NHLBI to work with the National Institute for 
Occupational Safety and health (NIOSH) to enhance research in 
relevant National Occupational Research Agenda priority areas 
such as Asthma and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, 
Special Populations at Risk, and Organization of Work.
    Neurofibromatosis.--Advances continue to be made in 
research on neurofibromatosis (NF). Recent studies have 
documented the involvement of NF1 in valve formation which may 
open up a new area for future research in congenital heart 
disease. Understanding how NF1 deficiency leads to heart 
disease may help to unravel the molecular pathways affected in 
genetic and environmental caused of heart disease. The 
Committee encourages NHLBI to enhance its NF research 
activities, coordinate its efforts with other Institutes 
engaged in NF research, and be prepared to report on its 
research at its fiscal year 2001 appropriations hearing.
    Primary Pulmonary Hypertension.--Primary Pulmonary 
Hypertension (PPH) is a rare, progressive, and fatal disease 
affecting predominantly women of all races and ages. This 
disease involves deadly deterioration of the heart and lungs 
and is a secondary condition in many other serious and fatal 
conditions such as scleroderma and lupus. The Committee 
commends NHLBI's efforts to promote research of PPH and urges 
the Institute to enhance its support for basic research, gene 
therapy, and clinical trials of promising pharmaceuticals 
through all available mechanisms, as appropriate. NHLBI is also 
urged to take appropriate measures to ensure the submission of 
high quality proposals in this area.
    Sleep Disorders.--The Committee urges the Institute to 
enhance basic research in the neurobiology of sleep and sleep 
mechanisms as well as research to assess the effectiveness of 
therapies for treatment of sleep disorders. The Committee 
recognizes the work of the Institute's National Center on Sleep 
Disorders Research and its ongoing collaboration with other NIH 
Institutes in research and education regarding the impact of 
sleep disorders on health and public safety.
    Stroke.--The Committee recognizes the advances made 
recently in the treatment of stroke with medicines such as TpA, 
a treatment developed and tested through research supported by 
NHLBI. While stroke victims once were expected to never 
improve, early detection and rapid treatment of stroke today 
can often result in little to no loss of brain function. 
Increased awareness of the symptoms of stroke as a brain attack 
requires a rapid and appropriate medical response. The 
Committee encourages NHLBI to develop a research, public health 
and public education strategy to combat this disease.

         national institute of allergy and infectious diseases

    The Committee provides $2,062,126,000 for the National 
Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), which is 
$285,378,000 above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and 
$155,913,000 above the Administration request; however, due to 
limited funding within the allocation, funding increases in the 
bill are constrained to the amount proposed in the 
Administration request.
    Mission.--The NIAID supports and conducts basic and 
clinical research and research training programs in infectious 
diseases caused by, or associated with, disorders of the immune 
system. NIAID supported research includes research on acquired 
immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), asthma and allergies, 
tuberculosis, sexually transmitted diseases, tropical diseases, 
and emerging microbes. The goals of NIAID research are to 
better understand disease pathogenesis, to improve disease 
diagnosis, to develop new and improved drugs to treat diseases, 
and to develop new and improved vaccines to prevent disease, 
many of which significantly affect public health.
    Asthma.--The Committee is pleased with NIAID's leadership 
regarding asthma research and management and recognizes the 
role the Institute has played in the Inner City Asthma Study 
and the importance of this effort concerning morbidity and 
mortality among underserved populations, particularly African 
American children. The Committee urges the Institute to 
continue to improve its focus and effort on asthma management, 
especially as it relates to children.
    Crohn's Disease.--The Committee is aware of NIAID's 
recently published research recommendations for Crohn's disease 
entitled, ``Crohn's Disease--Is there a Microbial Etiology?'' 
and encourages the Institute to continue its efforts to 
determine if there is an infectious cause of the disease.
    Diabetes.--The Committee commends the Institute for its 
work in establishing the Collaborative Network for Clinical 
Research on Immune Tolerance. Research in this area could lead 
to cures for diabetes and other autoimmune diseases. NIAID is 
encouraged to continue efforts in this area. The Committee also 
urges NIAID, in collaboration with NIDDK and NICHD, to enhance 
research to develop a vaccine to prevent juvenile, or Type 1, 
diabetes. The Committee requests that the Director of the 
Institute be prepared to provide a status of this initiative at 
the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.
    Eliminating Infectious Disease.--Acute bacterial sinusitis 
is one of the most common infections in the U.S. and its 
treatment is one of the major contributors to the development 
of antibiotic-resistant organisms. Novel strategies for 
eliminating infectious disease are needed, such as system 
vaccination with specific bacterial out membranes, bacterial 
interference, and mucosal vaccination with bacteria or 
bacterial products.
    Hemophilia.--The Committee is pleased that NIAID, working 
with the national hemophilia foundation, has developed 
recommendations for strategies to improve treatment of HIV and 
associated complications, including hepatitis C, in persons 
with hemophilia. The Committee encourages NIAID to continue to 
work with the hemophilia community to carryout the 
recommendations and requests a report by January 31, 2001 on 
the steps being taken to implement the recommended actions.
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease.--The Committee continues to 
note with interest a scientific research agenda for Crohn's 
disease and ulcerative colitis, collectively known as 
inflammatory bowel disease, entitled ``Challenges in 
Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)''. This report identifies 
linkages between the immune system and IBD. The Committee is 
pleased that NIAID has recently partnered with the IBD 
community on a research proposal and encourages the Institute 
to enhance its support of research focused on the immunology of 
IBD as well as the interaction of genetics and environmental 
factors in the development of the disease.
    Latex Allergy.--The Committee is aware that a small 
percentage of the population may have an allergic reaction to 
natural rubber latex. Latex allergy is more likely to develop 
in infants who have had numerous surgical procedures and those 
people who are atopic, yet little is known about its 
epidemiology. The Committee urges the NIAID to enhance research 
in this area.
    Lyme Disease.--Lyme disease is the nation's leading tick-
borne illness. It affects many systems of the body and can 
require expensive, long-term treatment in some patients unless 
they are diagnosed and treated early. The Committee encourages 
NIAID to conduct broader outreach to the medical, scientific, 
and voluntary organizations involved in Lyme disease research, 
treatment, prevention, and education in order to better 
understand the broad range of views about this illness and the 
plight of the patients affected by the disease.
    Malaria.--The Committee commends NIAID for making malaria 
research and vaccine development a high priority and for 
pursuing collaborative research efforts with private sector 
partners. The Committee encourages NIAID to continue an 
aggressive malaria research agenda, including the pursuit of 
therapeutics for improved treatments.
    Pediatric Kidney Disease.--An estimated 150,000 young 
people currently suffer from kidney diseases for which no cure 
or effective treatment exists. Approximately 10,000 of them 
suffer from chronic kidney failure, are on dialysis or have a 
kidney transplant. NIAID is encouraged to continue research on 
kidney damage caused by vesicoureteral reflux and obstruction, 
and on ways of improving kidney transplant outcomes in children 
and adolescents.
    Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases.--More than 70 primary 
immune deficiency diseases have been identified to date, with 
500 cases diagnosed and estimates of another 500,000 
undiagnosed. These diseases, which impair the body's immune 
system, strike most severely at children, many whom do not 
survive beyond their teens or early twenties. The Committee is 
pleased with NIAID's primary immune deficiencies clinical 
research registry. The Committee encourages NIAID to enhance 
its efforts to address the 500,000 undiagnosed or misdiagnosed 
cases through a national education and awareness campaign. The 
Director should be prepared to provide a status report of this 
issue at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing. The 
Committee also encourages NIAID to work to foster 
collaborations between domestic and international organizations 
with expertise in this area.
    Tropical Medicine Research.--The Committee encourages NIAID 
to continue support of international research collaborations in 
areas endemic for tropical infectious disease. This research 
enhances the understanding of and preparedness for emerging and 
re-emerging tropical health threats.
    Tropical Parasitic Diseases.--There is concern about the 
global health burden of tropical diseases, including helminth 
infections and dengue fever. The Committee urges NIAID to 
pursue improved prevention and treatment protocols as well as 
research to develop environmentally sound insecticides to 
control vector-borne diseases.
    Women's Interagency HIV Study.--The Committee commends the 
ongoing commitment to continue the Women's Interagency HIV 
Study for an additional five years and believes it is important 
to maintain geographical representation and continue the 
study's broad scope in addressing a variety of women's health 
issues.

             national institute of general medical sciences

    The Committee provides $1,548,313,000 for the National 
Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS), which is 
$194,370,000 above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and 
$120,125,000 above the Administration request; however, due to 
limited funding within the allocation, funding increases in the 
bill are constrained to the amount proposed in the 
Administration request.
    Mission.--The NIGMS supports research and research training 
in the basic biomedical sciences. Institute grantees, working 
in such fields as cell biology, biophysics, genetics, 
developmental biology, pharmacology, physiology, and biological 
chemistry, study normal biological processes to better 
understand what goes wrong when disease occurs. In this way, 
NIGMS supports the new knowledge, theories, and technologies 
that can then be applied to the disease-targeted studies 
supported by other NIH components. NIGMS-supported basic 
research advances also find applications in the biotechnology 
and pharmaceutical industries. The Institute's training 
programs help provide the scientists needed by industry and 
academia.
    Minority Scientist Training Programs.--The Committee 
continues to be pleased with the quality of NIGMS's training 
programs, particularly those that have a special focus on 
increasing the number of minority scientists such as Minority 
Access to Research Careers (MARC) and Minority Biomedical 
Research Support (MBRS). The Committee urges NIGMS to continue 
to support these training programs.

    national institute of diabetes and digestive and kidney diseases

    The Committee provides $1,315,530,000 for the National 
Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases 
(NIDDK), which is $174,115,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $106,357,000 above the Administration 
request; however, due to limited funding within the allocation, 
funding increases in the bill are constrained to the amount 
proposed in the Administration request.
    Mission.--The NIDDK supports research in three major 
disease categories: diabetes, endocrinology, and metabolic 
diseases; digestive diseases and nutrition; and kidney, 
urologic, and hematologic diseases. The NIDDK supports a 
coordinated program of fundamental and clinical research and 
demonstration projects relating to the causes, prevention, 
diagnosis, and treatment of diseases within these categories. 
The Institute also supports efforts to transfer the knowledge 
gained from its research program to health professionals, 
patients, and the general public.
    Bone Diseases.--The Committee urges NIDDK to enhance 
research on osteoporosis and other disorders of calcium 
metabolism, including renal osteodystrophy, which occurs in 
patients with chronic kidney disease. NIDDK is also encouraged 
to enhance its efforts in the areas of nutritional and hormonal 
influences on calcium and skeletal status and functional 
genomics in bone. The Committee encourages the Institute to 
work with NCI to focus on cancer that spreads to the bone.
    Cooley's Anemia.--The Committee has long supported research 
in the area of Cooley's anemia. Due to the numerous red blood 
cell transfusions that patients receive, iron accumulates in 
the major organs, particularly the heart and liver. The 
effective removal of this iron by chelating drugs requires an 
accurate assessment of iron levels in the patient. Accuracy is 
impeded by the lack of a high quality, non-invasive test to 
measure iron levels. The Committee understands that a new 
technology has been developed which holds promise in addressing 
this problem and urges NIDDK to test its efficacy with Cooley's 
anemia patients through all available mechanisms, as 
appropriate. The Committee remains interested in the research 
progress being made with regard to the development of safe and 
effective iron chelator drugs that are less troublesome than 
those currently used, as well as the development of drugs for 
the regulation of hemoglobin synthesis.
    Diabetes.--Diabetes remains a leading cause of early death 
and disability and affects approximately 16 million Americans. 
The Committee urges NIDDK to significantly enhance its support 
of diabetes research following the recommendations made in the 
Diabetes Research Working Group report. NIDDK is further urged 
to focus increased resources for research related to juvenile, 
or Type 1, diabetes. A 1999 Institute of Medicine report 
concluded that development of a vaccine to treat or prevent 
Type 1 diabetes would bring exceptionally high health and 
economic benefits to society and the Diabetes Research Working 
Group recommended that a major effort be launched in this area. 
The Committee encourages NIDDK, in collaboration with NIAID and 
NICHD, to enhance research to develop a vaccine to prevent 
juvenile, or Type 1, diabetes. The Committee requests that the 
Director of the Institute be prepared to provide a status of 
this initiative at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing. 
The Committee also urges NIDDK, working with NHGRI and NICHD, 
to enhance its effort to identify the genes associated with 
Type 1 diabetes and requests that the Director of the Institute 
also be prepared to provide a status of this initiative at the 
fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.
    Programs that raise awareness of diabetes and its risk 
factors are important to improving the lives of all people 
affected by diabetes. For example, many people diagnosed with 
type 2 diabetes don't show overt signs of the disease prior to 
diagnosis. Also, African Americans, Hispanics, and Native 
Americans are at an increased risk for the disease. The 
Committee urges the Institute to continue to expand promising 
basic research and clinical trials to improve early detection 
and treatment of diabetes, and to find a cure for the disease.
    Diabetic Neuropathy.--The Committee recognizes the role of 
technology in preventing costly secondary conditions among 
persons with diabetic neuropathy and is supportive of the 
efforts of the Institute in this area, including the efforts 
through the SBIR program.
    Digestive Diseases.--Diseases of the digestive system 
continue to affect more than one-half of all Americans at some 
time in their lives. Serious disorders such as colorectal 
cancer, inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, 
and viral hepatitis take a significant toll in terms of human 
suffering, mortality, and economic burden. The Committee 
continues to encourage NIDDK to strike an appropriate balance 
between conducting basic studies on digestive diseases and 
bringing those research findings to the bedside in the form of 
improved patient care.
    Endoscopic Research.--The Committee is pleased that NIDDK 
is funding the Clinical Outcomes Research Initiative. This 
national network of specialists in gastrointestinal diseases 
utilizes a national endoscopic database to study important 
issues related to gastrointestinal endoscopy which will form 
the basis for a variety of new clinical studies in 
gastroenterology. NIDDK is encouraged to continue to support 
endoscopic research.
    Hepatitis C.--The Committee is pleased that NIDDK has made 
an award for a large scale hepatitis C clinical trial that will 
involve over 1,000 patients and nine states around the country. 
This trial, known as the HALT-C trial, is expected to yield 
important scientific discoveries regarding the relatively low 
response rate to current hepatitis C treatments. The large 
number of individuals involved in this trial offers significant 
opportunities for ancillary studies including the influence of 
genetic factors, the rate and cause of viral mutations, and 
improved scientific knowledge to better understand the wide 
range of reactions of hepatitis C patients to treatment 
protocols. The Committee urges NIDDK enhance efforts to 
research these ancillary research opportunities.
    Hypertension and Kidney Disease.--The Committee urges NIDDK 
to collaborate with NHLBI on research related to hypertension 
and its relationship to kidney disease through all available 
mechanisms, as appropriate, including sponsoring a workshop to 
define areas of research for potential joint projects. The 
Committee requests that the Director of the Institute be 
prepared to testify on the progress in this area at the fiscal 
year 2002 appropriations hearing.
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease.--The Committee is encouraged by 
recent discoveries related to Crohn's disease and ulcerative 
colitis, collectively known as inflammatory bowel disease 
(IBD). These extremely complex disorders represent the major 
cause of morbidity and mortality from intestinal illness. The 
Committee continues to encourage NIDDK to give priority 
consideration to investigation into the cellular, molecular, 
and genetic structure of IBD, identification of the genes that 
determine susceptibility or resistance to IBD in various 
patient subgroups, and coordination and integration of basic 
investigations designed to clarify mechanisms of action and 
disease pathogenesis into clinical trials, as described in the 
recent research agenda developed by the scientific community 
entitled ``Challenges in Inflammatory Bowel Disease''. The 
Committee recognizes the success of the digestive disease 
centers program in addressing a wide range of disorders and 
encourages NIDDK to expand this program with an increased 
emphasis on IBD.
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome.--The Committee remains concerned 
about the increasing frequency of irritable bowel syndrome 
(IBS), a chronic complex of disorders that malign the digestive 
system. These common dysfunctions strike people from all walks 
of life and result in tremendous human suffering and 
disability. The Committee encourages NIDDK to provide adequate 
funding for IBS functional bowel disorders research through all 
available mechanisms, as appropriate, including education/
scientific symposiums.
    Interstitial Cystitis.--The Committee urges NIDDK to 
enhance research on interstitial cystitis (IC) and further 
explore the many promising preliminary research findings on 
this chronic, debilitating disease. The Committee is pleased 
that NIDDK has initiated a study of the epidemiology of IC and 
requests that the Director be prepared to provide a status of 
this initiative at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing. 
The Committee encourages the Institute to expand minority 
enrollment in clinical centers through all available 
mechanisms, as appropriate.
    Kidney Disease Education.--If kidney disease is identified 
early, there are ways to slow its progress. Many of the more 
than 12 million Americans living with chronic renal 
insufficiency are unaware that they suffer from the disease 
until they have already reached end stage renal disease and 
need renal dialysis or a transplant. The Committee urges NIDDK 
to enhance its education efforts to bring advances in medical 
care to the public. The Committee requests that the Director of 
the Institute be prepared to testify on this issue at the 
fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.
    Kidney Genome Anatomy Program.--Recent studies suggest that 
patients with end stage kidney disease are more likely to have 
close family relatives with kidney disease. Also, certain 
ethnic populations have an increased risk of having kidney 
disease. The Committee encourages NIDDK to explore the 
feasibility of creating a kidney genome anatomy program to 
determine which genes are expressed/suppressed in kidney 
disease.
    Liver Transplantation.--The Committee is aware of the 
significant and continuing shortages of livers available for 
transplantation, and therefore urges NIDDK to enhance research 
efforts that would facilitate the success of liver 
transplantation and the number of livers available for 
transplantation. The use of living liver donors may be one of 
the most important surgical and scientific breakthroughs that 
can assist people in the need of liver transplants. The 
Committee urges NIDDK to enhance efforts in this area through 
all available mechanisms, as appropriate, including sponsoring 
a state-of-the-art conference to address the many questions 
surrounding this medical procedure. In addition, the Committee 
is aware that almost 100 percent of individuals, who have liver 
transplants with hepatitis C as the primary indication, become 
re-infected with the hepatitis C virus. While the severity of 
the re-infection typically can be controlled, approximately 10 
percent of the cases develop severe chronic hepatitis C within 
2 years. NIDDK is urged to enhance efforts to minimize the re-
infection rate including the evaluation of therapeutic agents 
that offer the potential for controlling hepatitis C re-
infection.
    Pediatric Digestion and Motility Disorders.--The incidence 
of digestion and motility disorders in children often go 
unrecognized and misdiagnosed and lead, in some cases, to 
extreme debilitation and death. The Committee encourages NIDDK 
to enhance research efforts to prevent, treat, and ultimately 
cure for these disorders in children.
    Pediatric Kidney Disease.--The Committee notes that kidney 
disease remains a persistent problem among infants, children 
and adolescents. An estimated 1.2 million children under the 
age of seven will develop urinary tract infections that may 
permanently damage kidney tissue. Over 100,000 children will be 
treated for diabetes, many of whom will ultimately suffer renal 
failure and require dialysis. Another 76,000 young people will 
have to be treated for hypertension, a precursor for renal 
failure and cardiovascular disease that disproportionately 
affects minorities. Given the extent of these problems and 
their long-term implications when children reach adulthood, the 
Committee encourages NIDDK to enhance its research efforts on 
the prevention and treatment of chronic renal failure and end-
stage renal disease in children from all causes, including 
diabetes, hypertension, genetic kidney disease and disorders of 
renal development through all available mechanisms, as 
appropriate, including convening a scientific meeting to review 
the pediatric liver disease research agenda. NIDDK also is 
urged to focus on new approaches to enhance or accelerate 
recovery from acute renal failure, which commonly occurs in 
hospitalized pediatric patients and accounts for substantial 
sickness and death. The Committee urges NIDDK to enhance 
research to find ways to prevent, treat, and cure pediatric 
liver diseases through all available mechanisms, as 
appropriate, including convening a scientific meeting to review 
the pediatric liver disease research agenda.
    Polycystic Kidney Disease.--The Committee is pleased that 
NIDDK has established four interdisciplinary research centers 
targeting Polycystic Kidney Disease (PKD) and held a major 
state-of-the science conference. Recent breakthroughs in basic 
science are extremely promising, including the recent discovery 
of a drug that virtually stops one form of PKD in laboratory 
animals, and present further evidence that progress toward a 
treatment and ultimate cure is now more likely. The Committee 
urges NIDDK to pursue all of the new avenues of fundamental 
understanding that have come to light and to implement to the 
fullest extent possible the PKD Strategic Planning Workshop 
Report developed by NIDDK in fiscal year 1999.
    Prostatitis.--The Committee is pleased that NIDDK has 
recognized the disease of prostatitis as one of the three major 
diseases of the prostate gland and encourages the Institute to 
continue its efforts to explore the relationship between these 
diseases of the prostate. NIDDK is also encouraged to explore 
the familial possibilities of prostatitis and coordinate 
efforts with similar research being done by other Institutes on 
prostate cancer. The Committee urges the Institute to expand 
involvement in studies of various minority groups through all 
mechanisms available, as appropriate, including the 
solicitation of applications from investigators with diverse 
backgrounds. The Committee also encourages NIDDK to expand 
outreach efforts to include educational materials directed at 
primary care physicians, the urology community, and patients 
and the general public.
    Urological Diseases.--Urological diseases have a 
significant impact on men and women in this country and 
represent a major public health issue that will increase as the 
population ages. The Committee continues to encourage NIDDK to 
enhance its research on the prevention, diagnosis, and 
treatment of urological diseases. The Committee also urges 
NIDDK to evaluate its urology research program to determine if 
it is meeting the public health needs in this area.
    Benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) affects more than 12 
million men over the age of 50. The Committee urges NIDDK to 
increase its research into prostate growth factors and related 
issues toward the goal of improved diagnostic and treatment 
tools for BPH as well as prostate cancer and prostatitis.
    The Institute held a conference two years ago to identify 
research issues and needs related to women's urological health. 
The Committee is concerned with the need for further progress 
and urges the Institute to implement the conference 
recommendations. The Institute should be prepared to testify on 
the progress of this initiative at the fiscal year 2002 
appropriations hearing.
    The Committee remains concerned by the absence of research 
support for several critical areas of urology including male 
infertility and impotence, pediatric urology, especially 
congenital anomalies of the genitourinary tract, and kidney 
stone disease. NIDDK is urged to define the research needs and 
priorities in these areas as part of its overall evaluation of 
the urology research program.

        national institute of neurological disorders and stroke

    The Committee provides $1,185,767,000 for the National 
Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), which 
is $156,024,000 above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and 
$100,939,000 above the Administration request; however, due to 
limited funding within the allocation, funding increases in the 
bill are constrained to the amount proposed in the 
Administration request.
    Mission.--The NINDS supports and conducts basic and 
clinical neurological research and research training to 
increase understanding of the brain and improve the prevention 
and treatment of neurological and neuromuscular disorders. The 
NINDS mission encompasses over 600 disorders, including stroke; 
head and spinal cord injury; epilepsy; multiple sclerosis; and 
neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease.
    Alzheimer's Disease.--NINDS continues to play an integral 
part in advancing science's understanding of Alzheimer's 
disease. Within the past year alone, researchers have made 
several critical discoveries about how Alzheimer's destroys the 
brain, discoveries that may eventually open the way to finding 
a cure or halt the progression on this disease. NINDS recently 
issued two program announcements aimed at increasing the number 
of clinical trials for Alzheimer's disease. The Committee 
encourages the Institute to continue to assign this a high 
priority and to continue its close working relationship with 
NIA, NIMH, and NINR.
    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.--Amyotrophic Lateral 
Sclerosis (ALS) is one of a family of neurodegenerative 
diseases that affect millions of Americans. The Committee 
commends NINDS for its efforts in support of ongoing ALS 
research and its role in catalyzing new research directions, 
for its emphasis on basic research into neurodegeneration, and 
for its leadership in bringing together basic neuroscientists 
with clinical specialists in neurology, neurosurgery, and 
related fields. NINDS is encouraged to build on these 
initiatives to find new and effective treatments for motor 
neuron disease and further efforts to stimulate investigator-
initiated proposals. The Committee also encourages NINDS to 
enhance its research for treatment and cure of ALS.
    Batten's Disease.--The Committee is pleased with the 
progress that has been made with regards to both the infantile 
and juvenile forms of Batten's disease and encourages NINDS to 
continue to focus on Batten's disease research through all 
available mechanisms, as appropriate, including the study of 
gene therapy treatment for the late infantile form of the 
disease.
    Dystonia.--The Committee continues to be pleased with the 
extramural research portfolio of NINDS with respect to dystonia 
and encourages NINDS to continue to expand the study of the 
DYT1 gene. The Committee also encourages NINDS to enhance its 
collaboration with the dystonia research community in 
supporting epidemiological studies on dystonia and enhancing 
public and professional awareness of this disorder.
    Epilepsy.--The Committee is pleased that the Institute 
sponsored a conference in March 2000 on ``Curing Epilepsy: 
Focus on the Future''. NINDS is encouraged to enhance research 
to address research issues related to the impact of seizures on 
young children, women, the elderly and those with intractable 
or uncontrolled epilepsy. NINDS is also encouraged to develop 
research plans and goals for the anti-epileptic drug 
development program and to expand its research efforts in the 
prevention, treatment, and eventual cure of epilepsy. The 
Director should be prepared to testify on its efforts to 
advance these areas of research at the fiscal year 2002 
appropriations hearing.
    Familial Dysautonomia.--Familial Dysautonomia (FD) is a 
genetic disease that affects individuals of Eastern European 
Jewish ancestry, and primarily causes dysfunction of the 
autonomic and sensory nervous systems. Children with FD often 
are unable to regulate their blood pressure or body 
temperature, swallow or digest food normally, or respond to 
physical stress. The Committee encourages NINDS to study this 
disease in order to improve the quality of FD sufferers and 
enable more children to reach adulthood.
    Fragile X.--Fragile X is a single-gene neurological 
disorder affecting 1 in 2000 males and 1 in 4000 females. The 
cause of the disease is the failure of a single gene to produce 
a protein. The Committee urges NINDS to enhance its research 
activities on Fragile X and to include Fragile X patients in 
its studies of related disorders. The Committee also urges 
NINDS to coordinate these efforts with other Institutes working 
on related activities, including NIMH and NICHD.
    Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.--The Committee understands that 
hyperbaric oxygen therapy on coma patients showed the greatest 
reduction in mortality of any treatment for coma. NINDS is 
encouraged to collaborate with NIMH and the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention to research the use of this therapy for 
both stroke and brain injury patients.
    Neurofibromatosis.--Recent advances in Neurofibromatosis 
(NF) research have linked NF to cancer, brain tumors, learning 
disabilities, and heart disease. The Committee encourages NINDS 
to strengthen its NF basic and clinical research portfolio 
through all available mechanisms, as appropriate, including 
clinical trials. The Committee urges the Institute to continue 
to coordinate its efforts with other Institutes engaged in NF 
research and be prepared to report on the status of the NF 
research portfolio at its fiscal year 2002 appropriations 
hearing.
    Parkinson's Disease.--The Committee is encouraged by 
continuing discoveries in the cause, pathophysiology, and 
treatment of Parkinson's disease, and continues to encourage 
NINDS to enhance efforts to speed the development of effective 
therapies for this devastating disorder. The Committee also 
recognizes the benefits of research breakthroughs in this area 
on other disorders within the Institute's scope. The Committee 
is further aware that the NIH has completed a Parkinson's-
focused research agenda including professional judgement 
funding projections for the next five years. The Committee 
urges NINDS to enhance its funding levels for Parkinson's-
focused research to implement the agenda's recommendations. The 
Committee also urges NINDS to collaborate with the Agency for 
Healthcare Research and Quality, the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention, and private sector foundations to 
expand research to provide the groundwork of information and 
intervention strategies for surveillance and control of 
suffering and disability associated with the disease.
    Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy.--Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy 
(RSD), also known as Complex Regional Pain Syndrome (CRPS), is 
a chronic debilitating condition characterized by severe 
burning pain, pathological changes in bone and skin, excessive 
sweating, tissue swelling, and extreme sensitivity to touch. It 
is estimated that between two and five percent of individuals 
with peripheral nerve injury and up to 20 percent of those with 
paralysis on one side of the body will suffer from RSD. The 
Committee encourages NINDS, together with other relevant 
Institutes, to enhance research in this area through all 
available mechanisms, as appropriate, including a State of the 
Science meeting.
    Stroke.--Stroke remains the third leading cause of death, a 
leading cause of permanent disability, and a major contributor 
of late-life dementia. The Committee believes that an intensive 
research program on stroke should be a high priority for NINDS 
and NIH. The Committee urges the Institute to expand its stroke 
education program and to initiate and continue innovative 
approaches to improve stroke diagnosis, treatment, 
rehabilitation, and prevention through all available 
mechanisms, as appropriate, including the development of acute 
stroke treatment centers. In addition, as NINDS continues its 
strategic planning, the Committee encourages NINDS to work 
closely with the research community, clinicians, voluntary 
health organizations, and patient advocacy groups to discuss 
new avenues of basic and clinical stroke research 
opportunities. The Committee requests that the Director of the 
Institute be prepared to discuss plans for stroke research 
during the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing. In 
addition, the Committee encourages NINDS, in collaboration with 
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, to examine the 
underlying causes of the regional disparity of stroke in the 
``stoke belt'' using all available technologies, as 
appropriate.
    Sturge-Weber Syndrome.--Sturge-Weber Syndrome is a 
congenital, non-familial disorder of unknown incidence and 
cause. The Committee commends the efforts of NIH to bring 
together the Office on Rare Diseases, NINDS, and other 
Institutes to examine this syndrome in a 1999 conference. The 
Committee encourages NINDS to pursue research on this syndrome 
through all available mechanisms, as appropriate, including a 
request for applications. The Committee requests that the 
Director be prepared to testify on the progress to improve the 
understanding of this syndrome at the fiscal year 2002 
appropriations hearing.

                  national institute of mental health

    The Committee provides $1,114,638,000 for the National 
Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), which is $139,965,000 above 
the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and $83,285,000 the 
Administration request; however, due to limited funding within 
the allocation, funding increases in the bill are constrained 
to the amount proposed in the Administration request.
    Mission.--The NIMH is responsible for research activities 
that seek to improve diagnosis, treatments, and overall quality 
of care for persons with mental illnesses. Disorders of high 
priority to NIMH include schizophrenia, depression and manic 
depressive illness, obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety 
disorders and other mental and behavioral disorders that occur 
across the lifespan; these include childhood mental disorders 
such as autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder; 
eating disorders; Alzheimer's disease; and other illnesses. 
NIMH supports and conducts fundamental research in 
neuroscience, genetics, and behavioral science. In addition to 
laboratory and controlled clinical studies, the NIMH supports 
research on the mental health needs of special populations and 
health services research.
    Alzheimer's Disease.--NIMH continues to play an important 
role in efforts to learn more about memory formation. While 
still in early development stages, NIMH-supported scientists 
altered a particular gene in mice that resulted in the mice 
learning faster, remembering more, and applying what they 
learned. This development in the biological study of 
intelligence may lead to important advances in the fight 
against Alzheimer's disease and age-related memory loss. The 
Committee encourages NIMH to continue its research in this 
priority area and to continue its collaboration with NIA, 
NINDS, and NINR.
    Eating Disorders.--The Healthy People 2010 Initiative 
includes objectives related to eating disorders. The Committee 
encourages NIMH to coordinate efforts with NICHD and SAMHSA to 
enhance research to reduce the relapse rate, expand educational 
programs, and study the long-term impact of this disease.
    Fragile X.--Fragile X is the most common inherited cause of 
mental retardation and the most common single-gene 
neuropsychiatric disease. Because Fragile X is caused by the 
failure of a single gene to produce a protein, it is a research 
model for other neuropsychiatric disorders such as 
schizophrenia, mood disorders, congnitive defects, and autism. 
The Committee urges NIMH to coordinate efforts with NINDS and 
NICHD to continue to research the functions of the Fragile X 
protein, include Fragile X in neuropsychiatric disorders 
studies, promote scientific study on the effectiveness of 
current treatments, and investigate promising new 
psychopharmacologic interventions.
    Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy.--The Committee understands that 
hyperbaric oxygen therapy on coma patients showed the greatest 
reduction in mortality of any treatment for coma. NIMH is 
encouraged to collaborate with NINDS and the Centers for 
Disease Control and Prevention to research the use of this 
therapy for both stroke and brain injury patients.
    Nursing Interventions for Psychiatric Populations.--There 
is a lack of outcomes research focused on nursing interventions 
for psychiatric populations. The Committee encourages NIMH to 
collaborate with NINR and expand research in this area through 
all available mechanisms, as appropriate.
    Training of Minority Researchers.--The Committee is aware 
of the need to train racial/ethnic minority scientists for 
investigator initiated research projects. The Committee urges 
NIMH and other NIH Institutes to develop appropriate mechanisms 
to support long-term mentoring and technical assistance to 
post-doctoral racial/ethnic minority investigators in all 
scientific fields, but particularly in areas where there is a 
serious disproportion in the impact of the disease on minority 
communities, such as HIV prevention.

        national institute of child health and human development

    The Committee provides $984,300,000 for the National 
Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD), which 
is $125,042,000 above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and 
$79,595,000 above the Administration request; however, due to 
limited funding within the allocation, funding increases in the 
bill are constrained to the amount proposed in the 
Administration request.
    Mission.--The NICHD conducts and supports laboratory and 
clinical research on the reproductive, developmental, and 
behavioral processes that determine and maintain the health and 
well-being of children, adults, families and populations. In 
addition, research in medical rehabilitation is supported. The 
Committee commends NICHD for its innovative program of 
Specialized Centers for Research in Reproductive Medicine in 
Minority Institutions and looks forward to learning about the 
progress of this initiative.
    Chromosome 18.--The Committee commends the Institute for 
its efforts over the past year to encourage new scientific work 
into molecular, genetic, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of 
chromosomal abnormalities. The Committee continues to urge 
NICHD to seek ways to expand and intensify such research, 
especially studies involving the syndromes of chromosome 18.
    Cooley's Anemia.--The Committee is pleased to learn of 
NICHD's expressed interest in expanding its research and 
outreach agenda with regard to Cooley's anemia and looks 
forward to learning more about the progress that has been made 
at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.
    Demographic Research.--The Committee commends NICHD for its 
support for research on the causes of demographic trends and 
their impact on our society. The availability of objective 
information about such topics as declining marriage rates, 
fatherhood, teen childbearing, health disparities, welfare to 
work transitions, and the causes and impact of migration within 
and across our borders remains a priority. The Institute is 
encouraged to enhance efforts in the training and development 
of new demographic scientists and assure continued support for 
research infrastructure. The Committee also commends NICHD for 
its many collaborations with other Federal agencies, including 
the Immigration and Naturalization Service, the National Center 
for Health Statistics, and the Department of Education, which 
have created innovative demographic datasets on topics of 
importance to policymakers.
    Diabetes.--The Committee urges NICHD to enhance its 
research efforts in the area of diabetes, including areas of 
research highlighted in the Diabetes Research Working Group 
Report. The Committee also urges NICHD, in collaboration with 
NIAID and NIDDK, to enhance its efforts to develop a vaccine to 
prevent juvenile, or Type 1, diabetes and in collaboration with 
NIDDK and NHGRI to enhance its effort to identify the genes 
associated with juvenile, or Type 1, diabetes. The Committee 
requests that the Director be prepared to testify at the fiscal 
year 2002 appropriations hearing on the steps being taking to 
increase its support in this area.
    E. coli:0157.--The Committee is pleased that NICHD research 
is yielding and testing a vaccine for the deadly foodborne 
bacterium E. coli:0157. The Committee understands that the 
Institute is now seeking to determine whether the vaccine is 
best administered to livestock or to children and others who 
are most vulnerable to catastrophic food poisoning caused by 
the bacterium. The Committee urges NICHD to continue this 
research.
    Family Literacy Research.--For years the Committee has been 
at the forefront of support for the significant accomplishments 
of the Institute's extensive program of research on the 
development of reading skills, identifying and addressing 
reading difficulties, and strengthening reading instruction, 
especially for children. The success of this work with children 
has focused attention on the importance of the ability of 
parents to assist and support the efforts to teach their 
children to read effectively. Building on NICHD's research 
expertise with children, the Committee urges the Institute to 
work with the National Institute for Literacy to strengthen and 
expand research-based adult literacy instructional activities 
and to assist in the dissemination of this information to adult 
literacy programs across the country.
    Fragile X.--Fragile X is the most common inherited cause of 
mental retardation. Most children with Fragile X require a 
lifetime of special care at immense expense and comprise a 
homogenous study population for advancing understanding of 
these disorders. The Committee encourages NICHD to enhance its 
research efforts on Fragile X through all available mechanisms, 
as appropriate, including a consensus conference. The Committee 
urges NICHD to collaborate its efforts with NINDS and NIMH.
    Literacy Screening Tool.--The Committee commends NICHD for 
its priority on reading development as a means to better 
predict reading difficulties, reading disabilities, and 
learning disabilities in children. The Committee encourages 
NICHD to continue its collaborative work with the National 
Center for Learning Disabilities to develop a research-based, 
literacy-screening tool to identify preschool children at risk 
for reading difficulty.
    Maternal-Fetal Medicine.--The Committee encourages NICHD to 
enhance its research efforts into such areas as pre-maturity, 
pre-term labor, pre-eclampsia, amniotic fluid embolism, in 
utero screening for birth defects, post-partum hemorrhage, and 
other complications related to pregnancy through all available 
mechanisms, as appropriate, including sponsoring a planning 
workshop to define research questions and promote collaboration 
with centers not currently participating cooperative agreements 
with the Institute. The Director should be prepared to testify 
on the progress in this area at the fiscal year 2002 
appropriations hearing.
    Mathematical Skills Improvement.--The Committee is pleased 
to learn that NICHD is developing a research initiative on the 
development of skills needed to learn math, the means to 
address difficulties learning math, as well as the effective 
instruction for math. The Committee encourages NICHD to enhance 
its research efforts in this area.
    Mental Retardation/Developmental Disabilities.--Nearly 
500,000 children are born each year in the United States with 
mental retardation and/or other developmental disabilities. In 
the past, the Committee has highlighted the importance of 
research in specific conditions such as Rett syndrome, autism, 
spina bifida, learning disabilities, and other related 
diseases. As a result of center-based research focusing 
specifically on mental retardation and developmental 
disabilities the knowledge base has been advanced in such areas 
as imaging technology, the role of experience and genes in 
brain development, genetic mapping, low birthweight and 
prematurity, and family functioning. The Committee encourages 
NICHD to enhance the efforts of these centers to continue the 
advancement of both basic and clinical research into the 
causes, diagnosis, early detection, prevention, and treatment 
of mental retardation and developmental disabilities.
    National Center for Medical Rehabilitation Research.--The 
Center is responsible for basic and clinical research dealing 
with the causes of physical disability and medical 
rehabilitation interventions to reduce disability and improve 
the quality of life for persons with disabilities. Congenital 
limb deficiency, vascular disease, childhood skeletal 
malignancy and trauma contribute to the over 1.5 million in the 
U.S. with limb loss. Technological advancements today offer 
considerable opportunity for persons with limb loss to 
effectively resume active, productive lives, but standards of 
care for persons with limb loss have not been developed, nor 
have clinical outcomes research been conducted to determine 
appropriate access to advanced technologies and the importance 
of related physical rehabilitation and therapy to improve 
performance among persons who utilize prosthetic devices. The 
Committee urges NICHD to enhance research efforts in this area 
through all available mechanisms, as appropriate, including a 
consensus conference. The Committee also urges NICHD to support 
the development and distribution of patient oriented 
information and guidance materials in collaboration with CDC.
    The Committee encourages the National Center for Medical 
Rehabilitation Research to continue its work in clinical trials 
to test the efficacy of medical rehabilitation techniques for 
stroke rehabilitation and a clinical trial network for brain 
injury research; regeneration of nerve and skin cells damaged 
from trauma, including ``tissue engineering'' for amputees and 
neuron growth related to stroke or spinal cord injury; and 
medical rehabilitation interventions for the treatment of 
pediatric trauma. The Committee also encourages the Center to 
research and develop assistance technologies that enhance the 
function and independence of persons with mobility and other 
functional limitations.
    Neurofibromatosis.--Learning disabilities occur with high 
frequency in children with Neurofibromatosis (NF). NF1 provides 
an opportunity to uncover a molecular basis for cognitive 
impairment and to identify a marker for brain dysfunction. 
Research in understanding the cognitive deficits of NF1 
patients possesses broad application to learning disabilities 
in the general population. NICHD is encouraged to enhance its 
NF research portfolio, coordinate its efforts with other 
Institutes engaged in NF research, and be prepared to report on 
the status of its NF research at its fiscal year 2002 
appropriations hearing.
    Pediatric Kidney Disease.--Despite scientific advances, 
kidney disease continues to be a major cause of illness and 
death among young people. NICHD is encouraged to enhance 
research on the understanding and treatment of congenital 
diseases and kidney malformations which lead to chronic renal 
failure and end-stage renal disease in children and 
adolescents, as well as the prevention and treatment of the 
adverse effects of chronic renal failure on neurologic and 
physical development in children.
    Pelvic Floor Dysfunction and Incontinence.--The Committee 
commends NICHD on the progress made in establishing a research 
effort/portfolio in pelvic floor dysfunction and incontinence. 
The Committee understands that a workshop has been held in 
clinical terminology and that two request for applications will 
be issued this spring to address translational and clinical 
research, specifically surgical interventions. The Committee 
urges NICHD to continue this research and collaborate with 
NIDDK, NIA, and the Office of Research on Women's Health.
    Primary Immune Deficiency Diseases.--The Committee 
continues to be pleased with the comprehensive commitment that 
NICHD has demonstrated in addressing primary immunodeficiency 
diseases. The combination of peer-reviewed research funded in 
collaboration with non-profit organizations and active 
participation with the Jeffrey Modell Foundation's national 
education and awareness campaign show a serious commitment that 
should be replicated by other Institutes. The Committee 
encourages NICHD to remain committed to this collaboration.
    Reading Development.--The final report of the National 
Reading Panel has made a significant contribution by making 
widely accessible rigorous research-based evidence on reading 
development, reading difficulties, and reading instruction. The 
Committee encourages NICHD to lead the effort to get this 
report disseminated to teachers, school administrators, 
parents, and educational policymakers throughout the Nation.
    The Committee commends NICHD for the leadership 
contributions it has provided to the Interagency Educational 
Research Initiative undertaken with the Office of Educational 
Research, Statistics, and Improvement (OERI) at the Department 
of Education, and the National Science Foundation. The 
Institute is encouraged to continue its participation and 
leadership in this promising joint effort.
    The Committee is pleased to learn of the progress being 
made in the Spanish-to-English Reading Initiative launched by 
NICHD and OERI and looks forward to receiving a status report 
on the research funded by this effort at the fiscal year 2002 
appropriations hearing.
    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.--The Committee is pleased 
with NICHD's continued efforts to extend the reach of its 
extremely successful ``Back to Sleep'' campaign to underserved 
populations and daycare providers. The Committee also commends 
NICHD's attempts to further progress in SIDS research by 
initiating a third SIDS five-year research plan. This third 
five-year plan will continue the efforts of the past two five-
year plans which have been responsible for many of the research 
breakthroughs in the effort to reduce SIDS cases in the United 
States.
    Women's Reproductive Health Research Career Development 
Centers.--The Committee commends NICHD for providing grants to 
establish a number of Women's Reproductive Health Research 
Career Development Centers within ob-gyn departments at various 
universities and hospitals. At these Centers, newly trained ob-
gyn clinicians are provided training and support to assist them 
in pursuing research careers to address problems in women's 
obstetric and gynecologic health. NICHD is encouraged to expand 
the Centers program.

                    national institute on drug abuse

    The Committee provides $788,201,000 for the National 
Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), which is $100,825,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and $62,734,000 above the 
Administration request; however, due to limited funding within 
the allocation, funding increases in the bill are constrained 
to the amount proposed in the Administration request.
    Mission.--NIDA-supported science addresses questions about 
drug abuse and addiction, which range from its causes and 
consequences to its prevention and treatment. NIDA research 
explores how drugs of abuse affect the brain and behavior and 
develops effective prevention and treatment strategies; the 
Institute works to ensure the transfer of scientific data to 
policy makers, practitioners, and the public.
    Centers for Drug Abuse Research and Treatment.--The 
Committee commends NIDA for its strategy of developing and 
establishing centers for drug abuse research and treatment 
around the country. Consideration should be given to locating 
one or more centers in areas where drug trafficking, the 
production of illegal drugs such as methamphetamine, and drug 
abuse is more prevalent.
    Clinical Trials.--The Committee commends NIDA for launching 
the National Drug Abuse Treatment Clinical Trials Network. By 
providing a national research infrastructure to test and 
disseminate new and improved behavioral and pharmacological 
treatments in real-life treatment settings, the Institute is 
improving the quality of drug treatment across the country.
    Neuroimaging and Drug Abuse.--The sophisticated research 
questions now being probed by NIDA-supported researchers 
require advanced state-of-the-art technologies. The Committee 
commends NIDA for applying the rapidly developing neuroimaging 
technologies to research in drug abuse treatment and prevention 
to gain a better understanding of the human brain's underlying 
circuitry and mechanisms. NIDA is encouraged to expand these 
research efforts.

                      national institute on aging

    The Committee provides $790,299,000 for the National 
Institute on Aging (NIA), which is $102,438,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and $64,350,000 above the 
Administration request; however, due to limited funding within 
the allocation, funding increases in the bill are constrained 
to the amount proposed in the Administration request.
    Mission.--The NIA conducts biomedical, behavioral, and 
social research related to the aging process to prevent disease 
and other problems of the aged, and to maintain the health and 
independence of older Americans.
    Alzheimer's Disease.--An estimated four million Americans 
now suffer with Alzheimer's disease and by the time the ``baby 
boomer'' generation reaches the age of greatest risk, as many 
as 14 million persons will be afflicted. The disease has a 
significant impact on the Nation's health care system, which 
will only be exacerbated as the population ages. NIA has 
launched large-scale clinical trials in search of compounds 
that will prevent Alzheimer's disease from taking hold. The 
Committee urges NIA to devote additional resources to this 
effort. The Committee also encourages NIA to enhance research 
into the relationship between Alzheimer's and vascular disease, 
particularly in minority populations and to work in close 
collaboration with NINDS, NIMH, and NINR. The Committee 
encourages NIA to enhance efforts to train and educate health 
care professionals to improve the diagnosis, treatment and 
prevention of Alzheimer's disease.
    Bone Diseases.--The Committee encourages NIA to coordinate 
research with NIAMS on osteoporosis and Paget's disease. The 
Committee also encourages NIA to study the effects of aging on 
people with Osteogenesis Imperfecta.
    Cardiovascular Aging Research.--Heart attack, congestive 
heart failure, stroke, and other cardiovascular diseases remain 
the number one killer of older men and women and a main cause 
of disability. The Committee encourages the Institute to 
support ongoing studies and expand into innovative intramural 
and extramural cardiovascular disease research programs.
    Demographic Research.--The research program on the 
demography and economics of aging provide important insights 
into changing risk factors for chronic disease, including 
socio-economic health inequalities, and disease processes at 
the population level. The Committee understands that ten 
Demography of Aging Centers were competitively renewed last 
year and encourages the Institute to provide an adequate level 
of support for the Centers as well as for the Health and 
Retirement Study.
    Parkinson's Disease.--Parkinson's disease continues to 
exact a costly toll on the nation, both in human and financial 
terms. With the average age of diagnosis at 57 years, the 
demographic surge known as the baby boomers will vastly 
increase this problem. The Committee is encouraged, however, by 
the continued discoveries in the cause, pathophysiology, and 
treatment of the disease and by the growing opportunities for 
collaboration with Alzheimer's disease. Given the age-related 
impact and the potential for development of more effective 
treatments, the Committee urges the Institute to use all 
available mechanisms, as appropriate, to increase funding to 
implement the Parkinson's-focused research agenda 
recommendations.

                 national center for research resources

    The Committee provides $832,027,000 for the National Center 
for Research Resources (NCRR), which is $156,973,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and $117,835,000 above the 
Administration request; however, due to limited funding within 
the allocation, funding increases in the bill are constrained 
to the amount proposed in the Administration request.
    Mission.--The NCRR develops and supports critical research 
technologies and shared resources that underpin biomedical 
research. The NCRR programs develop a variety of research 
resources; provide resources for complex biotechnologies, 
clinical research and specialized primate research; develop 
research capacity in minority institutions; and enhance the 
science education of pre-college students and the general 
public. The Committee places a special emphasis on programs 
such as the Research Centers in Minority Institutions and urges 
their continued support at levels commensurate with the 
importance of their mission.
    Animal Research Facilities.--The Committee encourages NCRR 
to work with minority health professions schools to upgrade 
their animal research facilities in an effort to assist them in 
complying with Federal laws and regulations and receive 
accreditation by the appropriate scientific accreditation 
organization.
    Extramural Facilities.--The Committee has included bill 
language identifying $75,000,000 in extramural biomedical 
facility renovation and construction, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2000 level and $2,500,000 above the Administration 
request. These funds are to be awarded competitively, 
consistent with the requirements of section 481A of the Public 
Health Service Act, which allocates 25 percent of the total 
funding to institutions of emerging excellence. The Committee 
commends NCRR for taking a more proactive role in fulfilling 
this requirement.
    General Clinical Research Centers.--The Committee is 
concerned about the number of physician-scientists leaving 
biomedical research careers. The General Clinical Research 
Centers program provides regional access to clinical research 
patients to foster opportunities for clinical investigators to 
translate basic science discoveries into care for patients. The 
Committee strongly urges NCRR to enhance its support of General 
Clinical Research Centers, through all available mechanisms, as 
appropriate, in such areas as the training of clinical 
investigators, implementing the newly established guidelines 
for Informatics, providing support for Centers to conduct pilot 
studies, and enhancing patient access to clinical research. The 
Committee also strongly urges NCRR to continue progress toward 
funding the Centers at Advisory Council approved levels.
    Institutional Development Awards.--The Institutional 
Development Awards (IDeA) program provides capacity building 
assistance for biomedical research efforts in States which have 
not previously participated fully in the research programs of 
the NIH. It is the Committee's intention to provide 
$100,000,000 for this program, if the conference agreement 
includes a 15 percent increase in total funding for NIH. These 
funds would be used to enhance efforts in this area so that 
States can more fully exploit the opportunities to develop a 
competitive biomedical research base. Included in this amount 
are funds to continue the Centers of Biomedical Research 
Excellence program as well as funds for NIH to work with each 
of the IDeA states to bring together the institutions within 
that State to establish networks which, over a number of years 
of support can identify areas of strength and enhance 
capability of submitting research grant applications in those 
areas as well as to foster collaborations to enhance training 
of the next generation of researchers and to develop areas of 
potential research through staff development, access to 
research resources, and strengthened research management within 
institutions.
    Primate Centers.--The Committee is pleased with the 
addition of an eighth Regional Primate Research Centers during 
fiscal year 1999. The Center will complement existing Centers 
by providing expertise in primate genetics and chronic disease 
research and by strengthening the current programs capabilities 
in infectious disease research. The Committee strongly urges 
NCRR to enhance its funding support for this Center.
    Regional Resource Centers.--The Committee understands that 
NCRR plans to fund regional resource centers for the purpose of 
supplying human islet cells for researchers. The Committee 
commends NCRR for this initiative.

                         national eye institute

    The Committee provides $514,673,000 for the National Eye 
Institute (NEI), which is $64,572,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 comparable level and $40,721 above the Administration 
request; however, due to limited funding within the allocation, 
funding increases in the bill are constrained to the amount 
proposed in the Administration request.
    Mission.--The NEI conducts and supports basic and clinical 
research, research training, and other programs with respect to 
blinding eye diseases, visual disorders, mechanisms of visual 
function, preservation of sight, and the special health 
problems and needs of individuals who are visually-impaired or 
blind. In addition, the NEI is responsible for the 
dissemination of information, specifically public and 
professional education programs aimed at the prevention of 
blindness.
    Diabetic Retinopathy.--The Committee supports the diabetic 
retinopathy research that NEI is sponsoring, including the 
study of molecular pathways involved in the progression of the 
disease, and the use of this information to develop novel 
therapies. The Committee encourages NEI to continue its efforts 
in these areas to decrease the burden of this disease.
    Health Disparities.--The Committee encourages NEI to 
continue its clinical research and health education activities 
aimed at reducing the disproportionate burden of certain eye 
diseases on minority populations. The Committee is pleased that 
NEI is making strides in characterizing eye diseases within the 
Hispanic population. NEI is also conducting a clinical trial to 
help determine whether topical medications that reduce 
intraocular pressure, prevent or delay the onset of glaucoma.
    Low Vision.--The Committee commends the low vision 
initiative developed by the National Eye Health Education 
Program. Through this public awareness program that includes a 
traveling exhibit and information on visual rehabilitation 
services and devices, the NEI is providing important 
information to consumers and health professionals about 
successful interventions for the more than 14 million Americans 
with uncorrectable visual impairments.
    New Pharmaceuticals.--The Committee requests that the 
Director of the Institute be prepared to testify at the fiscal 
year 2002 appropriations hearing on the amount of funding spent 
on research for new pharmaceuticals.
    Ocular Albinism.--Ocular Albinism (OA) is an x-linked 
genetic disorder affecting only male individuals, while females 
may be healthy carriers of the disease. Affected patients show 
nystagmus, strabismus, photophobia, severe reduction of visual 
acuity, and loss of three-dimensional vision due to abnormal 
development of the retina and optic pathways. The Committee 
encourages NEI to enhance research into the function of the OA1 
protein and potential treatments and cure for this genetic 
disease.
    Retinal Degenerative Diseases.--The Committee is encouraged 
by the progress that has been made in understanding retinal 
degenerative diseases, including retinitis pigmentosa and 
macular degeneration. The Committee supports the Institute's 
pursuit of basic research areas including studies of mechanisms 
of cell survival and regeneration, growth factors, and 
immunologic issues related to transplantation. NEI is 
encouraged to work with voluntary organizations that are also 
supporting research in this area to maximize research outcomes 
and hasten the pace of discovery.
    Vision Research.--The Institute's strategic planning 
process has resulted in some very promising recommendations for 
genomics research, including the creation of a visual web-site 
encompassing the full array of databases and resources needed 
by the vision community. The Committee encourages NEI to 
continue to use its planning process and focused workshops to 
stimulate research strategies and to implement them with 
adequate resources to the research community.

          national institute of environmental health sciences

    The Committee provides $506,730,000 for the National 
Institute of Environmental Health Science (NIEHS), which is 
$64,042,000 above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and 
$38,081,000 above the Administration request; however, due to 
limited funding within the allocation, funding increases in the 
bill are constrained to the amount proposed in the 
Administration request.
    Mission.--The NIEHS mission is to reduce the burden of 
environmentally related illness and dysfunction by 
understanding how environmental exposures affect health, how 
individuals differ in their susceptibility to these effects, 
and how these susceptibilities change over time. This mission 
is achieved through multidisciplinary biomedical research 
programs, prevention and intervention efforts, and 
communication strategies that encompass training, education, 
technology transfer, and community outreach.
    Breast Cancer.--Three of four women who are diagnosed with 
breast cancer have no family history of the disease and it is 
not known how factors such as air and water quality, 
pesticides, diet, or electromagnetic fields affect a woman's 
chance of getting the disease. The Committee urges NIEHS to 
enhance its research efforts into the environment's role in the 
development of breast cancer.
    Children's Health.--The Committee is pleased that NIEHS, in 
collaboration with the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 
is supporting eight children's health centers focused on 
environmental aspects of asthma and other respiratory diseases. 
The Committee encourages NIEHS and EPA to support additional 
centers with a focus on disease endpoints in children.
    Environmental Stewardship.--The Committee encourages NIEHS 
to continue its work to advocate environmental stewardship in 
biomedical research laboratories and clinical research 
facilities nationwide. These efforts are important to prevent 
environmental pollution and to improve energy efficiency.
    Health Disparities Outcomes.--Many of the populations 
disproportionately exposed to the impact of environmental 
factors are minority and disadvantaged groups. This exposure 
manifests itself into a variety of health problems such as 
asthma. The environmental justice programs of the NIEHS serve 
as models in addressing this issue. The Committee urges the 
Institute to continue this program and encourages the Institute 
to work closely with minority communities and organizations to 
enhance the participation of special populations in biomedical 
research.
    Lymphoma.--The Committee encourages NIEHS to collaborate 
its research efforts with NCI, through participation in the 
progress review group, to better understand environmental 
factors that may contribute to the cause of the disease.
    Marine Systems.--Marine systems and processes impact public 
health in a variety of ways, including natural disasters, 
waterborne diseases, and toxic algal blooms. The Committee 
encourages NIEHS to collaborate with other relevant agencies 
such as the National Science Foundation to pursue research that 
would lead to a better understanding of the role of oceans in 
human health.
    National Occupational Research Agenda.--The Committee 
encourages NIEHS to work with the National Institute for 
Occupational Safety and Health to enhance research in relevant 
National Occupational Research Agenda Priority areas such as 
Indoor Environment, Fertility and Pregnancy Abnormalities, 
Hearing Loss, Mixed Exposures, Emerging Technologies, Cancer 
Research Methods, exposure Assessment Methods, Risk Assessment 
Methods, and Special Populations at Risk.
    Parkinson's Disease.--The Committee supports the 
Institute's increased emphasis on understanding the cause and 
pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease with the goal of 
prevention, effective treatment, and a cure for this 
devastating disorder. A scientific foundation exists for 
research into the possible link between Parkinson's and 
environmental factors to better understand the cause and 
pathophysiology of the disease. The Committee encourages NIEHS 
to enhance research in this area to implement the Parkinson's-
focused research agenda recommendations.
    Red Tide.--The Committee encourages NIEHS to support 
research on the human effects of accumulation, metabolism, and 
depuration of algal toxins and cynaobacteria toxins in lakes, 
rivers, and estuaries.
    Training of Pediatricians.--The Committee heard testimony 
about the need to train pediatricians about the impact of 
environmental toxins on children's health. The Committee 
believes this is an important recommendation and urges NIH to 
study the feasibility of implementing such a program. NIEHS 
should be prepared to provide a status report on this issue at 
the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.

 NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ARTHRITIS AND MUSCULOSKELETAL AND SKIN DISEASES

    The Committee provides $400,025,000 for the National 
Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases 
(NIAMS), which is $50,545,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $31,313,000 above the Administration 
request; however, due to limited funding within the allocation, 
funding increases in the bill are constrained to the amount 
proposed in the Administration request.
    Mission.--The NIAMS conducts and supports basic and 
clinical research and research training, and the dissemination 
of health information on the more than 100 forms of arthritis; 
osteoporosis and other bone diseases; muscle biology and muscle 
diseases; orthopaedic disorders, such as back pain and sports 
injuries; and numerous skin diseases.
    Childhood Skeletal Malignancies.--There is a need to 
conduct clinical outcome assessments of children with skeletal 
cancers. While mortality rates have improved among children 
with these tumors, little is known of the long-term effects and 
risks associated with various treatment options. The Committee 
encourages NIAMS to enhance research into the effects of 
treatment protocols on the health of persons treated as 
adolescents for skeletal cancers.
    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.--Duchenne muscular dystrophy 
remains the most common childhood form of muscular dystrophy. 
The Committee is encouraged by the recent scientific workshop 
to explore promising research efforts in this field. The 
Committee encourages NIAMS to build on this promising research 
and collaborate with other Institutes to develop an enhanced 
focus on muscle disease research and finding a cure for this 
tragic disease through all available mechanisms, as 
appropriate, including establishing a muscle study section 
whose members would have both knowledge of muscle tissue 
structure and function, and technical expertise on 
pathophysiology, biochemistry, and genetics.
    Heritable Disorders of Connective Tissue.--The Committee 
acknowledges NIAMS for its support of research on heritable 
disorders of connective tissue, for its sponsorship of two 
conferences held on this body of disorders in 1990 and 1995, 
and for the upcoming Scientific Conference. These disorders are 
rare; they involve a variety of organs in the body, are genetic 
in origin, and affect the connective tissue. Because of their 
multi-organ character, the Committee believes a coordinated 
research approach will more quickly lead to development of 
effective therapies and perhaps ultimately a cure for these 
disorders. NIAMS is encouraged to use all available mechanisms, 
as appropriate, to enhance efforts in this area, including 
establishing scientific research centers.
    Lupus.--Lupus is an autoimmune disease that mainly affects 
women of child-bearing age, can lead to severe organ injury, 
and the treatment is often as devastating as the disease. 
African-American women are three times more likely to have 
lupus than Caucasian women. The Committee is encouraged by 
recent NIAMS research success in identifying genes and 
mechanisms which lead to the onset of lupus and urges enhanced 
research to continue this work. Gaining understanding of the 
factors associated with the high prevalence of lupus in women 
and minorities and developing new and innovative treatments 
while protecting the poor and the uninsured from financial 
devastation are important priorities for the Committee. The 
Committee encourages NIAMS, in collaboration with other 
Institutes to enhance research efforts at developing safer and 
more effective treatments, and ultimately, a cure.
    National Occupational Research Agenda.--The Committee 
encourages NIAMS to work with the National Institute for 
Occupational Safety and Health to enhance research in relevant 
National Occupational Research Agenda priority areas such as 
Allergic and Irritant Dermatitis, Low Back Disorders, Traumatic 
Injuries, Musculoskeletal Disorders of the Upper Extremities, 
and Special Populations at Risk.
    Osteoporosis.--The Committee encourages NIAMS to enhance 
research in the area of osteoporosis with a particular emphasis 
on studying osteoporosis in the non-white population. The 
Institute is encouraged to focus on interventions to improve 
quality of life and the relationship between hypertension and 
osteoporosis.
    Paget's Disease.--The Committee is aware of the importance 
of research on the viral and genetic factors that may cause 
Paget's disease and encourages NIAMS to enhance efforts in this 
area.

           national institute on alcohol abuse and alcoholism

    The Committee provides $349,216,000 for the National 
Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), which is 
$55,982,000 above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and 
$40,555,000 above the Administration request; however, due to 
limited funding within the allocation, funding increases in the 
bill are constrained to the amount proposed in the 
Administration request.
    Mission.--The NIAAA supports research to generate new 
knowledge to answer crucial questions about why people drink; 
why some individuals are vulnerable to alcohol dependence or 
alcohol-related diseases and others are not; the relationship 
of genetic and environmental factors involved in alcoholism; 
the mechanisms whereby alcohol produces its disabling effects, 
including organ damage; how to prevent alcohol misuse and 
associated damage and how alcoholism treatment can be improved. 
NIAAA addresses these questions through a program of 
biomedical, behavioral, and epidemiologic research on 
alcoholism, alcohol abuse, and related problems. This program 
includes various areas of special emphasis such as medications 
development, fetal alcohol syndrome, genetics, and moderate 
drinking.
    Alcohol-Induced Liver Disease.--A high percentage of deaths 
from cirrhosis are due to alcohol. The Committee encourages 
NIAAA to continue its work on the role of tumor necrosis 
factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and with gene knockouts which holds 
promise for development of interventions to mitigate or disrupt 
the liver-damaging effects of TNF-alpha.
    Biological Basis for Recovery.--Alcohol researchers have 
the initial data to begin to explore the biology of why some 
patients are able to recover from alcoholism, while others 
fail. The Committee encourages NIAAA to enhance research in 
this area and to apply its findings to develop interventions 
that promote recovery through all available mechanisms, as 
appropriate, including clinical trials.
    Fetal Alcohol Syndrome.--Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) is a 
leading preventable cause of mental retardation and birth 
defects in the United States. Educating women about the danger 
that maternal alcohol consumption poses to unborn children is 
important in the effort to prevent FAS. The Committee is 
pleased with the efforts of NIAAA to begin implementing a plan 
to establish a FAS clearinghouse.
    Minority and Ethnic Groups.--NIAAA is commended for its 
efforts to increase participation of minority-serving 
institutions in alcohol research. The Committee encourages the 
Institute to continue research on the prevention and treatment 
of alcohol-use disorders among minority groups and, 
particularly, to continue research on the genetic differences 
in alcohol dependence among ethnic groups.
    Neuroscience.--Research on the biological mechanisms that 
underlie neuroadaptation may result in the development of 
improved interventions, such as medications, for the treatment 
of alcoholism. The Committee commends NIAAA for laying the 
groundwork to overcome barriers to research on neuroadaptive 
responses to alcohol by establishing the integrative 
neuroscience initiative on alcoholism and will follow its 
progress.

                national human genome research institute

    The Committee provides $386,410,000 for the National Human 
Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), which is $50,548,000 above 
the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and $28,670,000 above the 
Administration request; however, due to limited funding within 
the allocation, funding increases in the bill are constrained 
to the amount proposed in the Administration request.
    Mission.--The NHGRI coordinates extramural research and 
research training for the NIH component of the Human Genome 
Project, an effort to determine the location and sequence of 
the estimated 100,000 genes which constitute the human genome. 
The Division of Extramural Research supports research in 
genetic and physical mapping, DNA sequencing and technology 
development, database management and analysis, and studies of 
the ethical, legal, and social implications of human genome 
research. The Division of Intramural Research focuses on 
applying the tools and technologies of the Human Genome Project 
to understanding the genetic basis of disease and developing 
DNA-based diagnostics and gene therapies.
    Diabetes.--The Committee urges NHGRI, in collaboration with 
NIDDK and NICHD, to enhance research to identify the genes 
associated with juvenile, or Type I, diabetes. The Director of 
the Institute should be prepared to testify on this issue at 
the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.
    Renal Genomics.--The Committee encourages NHGRI, in 
collaboration with NIDDK, to explore the feasibility of 
creating a kidney genome anatomy program.

         national institute of dental and craniofacial research

    The Committee provides $309,007,000 for the National 
Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), which is 
$39,822,000 above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and 
$24,832,000 above the Administration request; however, due to 
limited funding within the allocation, funding increases in the 
bill are constrained to the amount proposed in the 
Administration request.
    Mission.--The NIDCR conducts and supports research and 
research training to improve craniofacial, oral and dental 
health. The Institute's programs reflect the genetic, 
behavioral and environmental factors that result in complex 
human disease and are clustered into the following areas: 
inherited disorders; infection and immunity; oral, pharyngeal 
and laryngeal cancers; chronic and disabling conditions such as 
bone and joint diseases and chronic pain; behavioral science, 
epidemiology and health promotion; and tissue engineering and 
biomimetics research to improve diagnostics and tissue repair 
and regeneration.
    Bone Diseases.--Osteoporosis and related bone diseases 
affect millions of Americans. The Committee encourages the 
Institute to enhance its research efforts to compare bone loss 
in the oral cavity with bone loss elsewhere in the body. With 
over 750 million dental x-rays performed in the U.S. each year, 
there exists a source of information that may be useful to such 
research. The Committee also encourages NIDCR to enhance 
research on dentinogenesis imperfecta and orthodontic 
manipulation in people with osteogenesis imperfecta.
    Osseointegration.--The Committee urges NIDCR to support 
research that would improve the structure of and materials used 
in the production of implants, particularly surfaces and bio-
compatible materials.
    Reducing Oral Health Disparities.--Scientific literature 
shows the importance of craniofacial, oral, and dental health 
in an individual's overall health as well as the 
disproportionate burden on complex oral diseases on certain 
groups of children and adults. The Committee commends NIDCR for 
its collaboration with NICHD, NINR, ORWH, ORMH, OBSSR, HRSA, 
and CDC in developing centers for research to reduce oral 
health disparities and encourages the Institute to implement 
this initiative to the fullest scientific extent possible.

    national institute on deafness and other communication disorders

    The Committee provides $301,787,000 for the National 
Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders 
(NIDCD), which is $38,126,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $23,778,000 above the Administration 
request; however, due to limited funding within the allocation, 
funding increases in the bill are constrained to the amount 
proposed in the Administration request.
    Mission.--The NIDCD funds and conducts research in human 
communication. Included in its program areas are research and 
research training in the normal and disordered mechanisms of 
hearing, balance, smell, taste, voice, speech and language. The 
Institute addresses special biomedical and behavioral problems 
associated with people who have communication impairments or 
disorders. In addition, the NIDCD is actively involved in 
health promotion and disease prevention, dissemination of 
research results, and supports efforts to create devices that 
substitute for lost and impaired sensory and communication 
functions.
    Dysphonia.--The Committee continues to be pleased with 
NIDCD's intramural research with respect to dysphonia and 
encourages NIDCD to enhance its extramural research efforts.
    Hearing Screening Research.--The Committee urges NIDCD to 
enhance research on the efficacy of new screening techniques 
through all available mechanisms, as appropriate, including 
clinical studies on screening methodologies and studies on the 
efficacy of intervention and follow-up and related research.
    Neurofibromatosis.--NF2 accounts for approximately five 
percent of genetic forms of deafness and, unlike other genetic 
forms of deafness, NF2 associated deafness is potential 
preventable or curable if tumor growth is halted before damage 
has been done to the adjacent nerve. Conditional mutant mice 
can be used to test the effectiveness of gene therapy for NF2, 
which could be beneficial for all patients suffering from 
meningiomas and other tumors. The Committee encourages NIDCD to 
enhance its NF research and to coordinate its efforts with 
other Institutes conducting NF research.
    Research Collaborations.--The Committee recognizes the 
benefits that are gained when research is conducted in a 
collaborative effort, not only between Institutes and other 
Federal agencies, but also in private sector partnerships. The 
Committee is aware of the collaborative efforts NIDCD has with 
the National Space Biomedical Research Institute and encourages 
the Institute to continue such collaborations.
    Translating Research to Practice.--NIDCD is encouraged to 
enhance efforts to translate basic science into better human 
health through all available mechanisms, as appropriate, 
including patient-oriented clinical research trials.

                      national library of medicine

    The Committee provides $256,281,000 for the National 
Library of Medicine (NLM), which is $41,082,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and $26,146,000 above the 
Administration request; however, due to limited funding within 
the allocation, funding increases in the bill are constrained 
to the amount proposed in the Administration request.
    Mission.--The National Library of Medicine collects, 
organizes, disseminates, and preserves biomedical literature in 
all forms, regardless of country of origin, language, or 
historical period. The Library's collection is widely 
available; it may be consulted at the NLM facility on the NIH 
campus; items may be requested on interlibrary loan; and the 
extensive NLM bibliographic databases may be searched online by 
health professionals around the world. NLM has a program of 
outreach to acquaint health professions with available NLM 
services. The Library also is mandated to conduct research into 
biomedical communications and biotechnology; to award grants in 
support of health science libraries and medical informatics 
research and training; and to create specialized information 
services in such areas as health services research, 
environmental health, AIDS, hazardous substances, and 
toxicology.
    Outreach.--The Committee continues to note the success of 
the MEDLINE database and the new MEDLINEplus initiative and 
encourages NLM to continue its outreach activities aimed at 
educating health care professionals and the general public 
about the Library's products and services, in coordination with 
medical librarians and other health information specialists.
    PubMed Central.--PubMed Central is an electronic online 
repository for life science articles and holds promise for 
increasing access to health care literature by health 
professions, students, educators, researchers, and the general 
public. The Committee encourages NLM to work with the medical 
library community regarding issues related to copyright, fair 
use, peer-review, and classification of information.

                 national institute of nursing research

    The Committee provides $102,312,000 for the National 
Institute of Nursing Research (NINR), which is $12,773,000 
above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and $9,788,000 
above the Administration request; however, due to limited 
funding within the allocation, funding increases in the bill 
are constrained to the amount proposed in the Administration 
request.
    Mission.--The NINR supports and conducts scientific 
research and research training to reduce the burden of illness 
and disability; improve health-related quality of life; and 
establish better approaches to promote health and prevent 
disease.
    National Occupational Research Agenda.--The Committee 
encourages NINR to work with the National Institute for 
Occupational Safety and Health to enhance research in relevant 
National Occupational Research Agenda priority areas such as 
Health Services Research, Special Populations at Risk, Low Back 
Disorders, Musculoskeletal Disorders of the Upper Extremities, 
and Fertility and Pregnancy Abnormalities.
    Nursing Interventions for Psychiatric Populations.--There 
is a lack of outcomes research focused on nursing interventions 
for psychiatric populations. The Committee encourages NINR to 
collaborate with NIMH and expand research in this area through 
all available mechanisms, as appropriate, including sponsoring 
a workshop to identify areas of research and interventions that 
directly correlate to enhance patient care.
    Pressure Ulcers.--Seventy-three percent of expenditures for 
pressure ulcer treatment are for nursing care. Technology 
developed through the SBIR program offer potential for treating 
and preventing pressure ulcers in long-term care facility 
patients. The Committee encourages NINR to advance research in 
this area through all available mechanisms, as appropriate.
    Web-Based Technology.--The use of computer technology has 
the potential to improve the coordination and delivery of care 
among persons with disabilities and severe chronic conditions 
such as spinal cord injury, diabetes, and arthritis and reduce 
transaction costs associated with traditional care delivery 
mechanisms. The Committee encourages NINR to conduct research 
in this area to demonstrate the effectiveness of an e-health 
tool for nurse case managers.

                  john e. fogarty international center

    The Committee provides $50,299,000 for the Fogarty 
International Center (FIC), which is $6,971,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and $2,288,000 above the 
Administration request; however, due to limited funding within 
the allocation, funding increases in the bill are constrained 
to the amount proposed in the Administration request.
    Mission.--The FIC was established to improve the health of 
the people of the United States and other nations through 
international cooperation in the biomedical sciences. In 
support of this mission, the FIC pursues the following four 
goals: mobilize international research efforts against global 
health threats; advance science through international 
cooperation; develop human resources to meet global research 
challenges; and provide leadership in international science 
policy and research strategies.
    International Cooperative Biodiversity Group.--The 
International Cooperative Biodiversity Group program has become 
a leading model for ethical bioprospecting, promoting high 
quality science in multi-purpose partnerships between U.S. and 
developing country universities, pharmaceutical companies, and 
non-governmental organizations. The Committee encourages FIC to 
continue this program.
    Tuberculosis.--The Committee recognizes the growing 
importance of international research surveillance programs with 
respect to infectious diseases such as tuberculosis (TB). The 
Committee is pleased by the Center's research collaboration 
with international organizations and governments on multi-drug 
resistant TB and encourages the Center to continue these 
studies.

       national center for complementary and alternative medicine

    The Committee provides $78,880,000 for the National Center 
for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), which is 
$9,869,000 above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and 
$6,488,000 above the Administration request; however, due to 
limited funding within the allocation, funding increases in the 
bill are constrained to the amount proposed in the 
Administration request.
    Mission.--The Center was established to stimulate, develop, 
and support rigorous and relevant research of high quality and 
open, objective inquiry into the safety and effectiveness of 
complementary and alternative medicine practices in order to 
provide the American public with reliable information about 
these practices.
    Integrative Medicine Fellowships.--The Committee urges the 
Center to give priority consideration to funding post-graduate 
fellowships that train physicians in integrative medicine, that 
support research on strategies for implementing the teaching of 
integrative medicine in education curricula, and that support 
efforts to design medical school curricula on integrative 
medicine.

                         office of the director

    The Committee provides $342,307,000 for the Office of the 
Director (OD), which is $60,307,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $33,329,000 above the Administration 
request; however, due to limited funding within the allocation, 
funding increases in the bill are constrained to the amount 
proposed in the Administration request. The bill includes 
language proposed by the Administration and included in the 
1998 through 2000 appropriations bill authorizing the 
collection of third party payments for the cost of clinical 
services.
    Mission.--The Office of the Director provides leadership to 
the NIH research enterprise and coordinates and directs 
initiatives which cross-cut the NIH. The OD is responsible for 
the development and management of intramural and extramural 
research and research training policy, the review of program 
quality and effectiveness, the coordination of selected NIH-
wide program activities, and the administration of centralized 
support activities essential to operations of the NIH.
    Minority Health Initiative.--The Minority Health Initiative 
(MHI) is a coordinated set of programs designed to address the 
health needs of minorities across the lifespan and to expand 
the participation of minorities in all phases of biomedical and 
biobehavioral research. The MHI comprises a portfolio of multi-
year research projects as collaborative efforts with NIH 
Institutes, centers and divisions (ICDs) as well as new 
components developed to confront emerging and unaddressed 
health research areas. It is understood that the MHI has an 
interest in supporting the improvement of animal research 
facilities at minority health professions schools through the 
NCRR
    Office of Research on Minority Health.--The Office of 
Research on Minority Health (ORMH) serves as the coordinating 
office for minority health research and research training 
activities at NIH. Through partnerships with the ICDs, and 
other federal agencies and outside organizations, the ORMH 
strives to improve the health status of all minorities and 
increase the numbers of minority scientists. The ORMH provides 
supplemental support to ICD projects, develops programs to 
increase minority participation in clinical trials, and 
initiates and develops programs to increase the competitiveness 
of grant applications submitted by minority researchers.
    Office of Research on Women's Health.--The Office of 
Research on Women's Health (ORWH) works in collaboration with 
the ICDs of the NIH to promote and foster efforts to address 
gaps in knowledge related to women's health through the 
enhancement and expansion of funded research and/or the 
initiation of new investigative studies. The ORWH is 
responsible for ensuring the inclusion of women in clinical 
research funded by the ICDs, including the development of a 
computerized tracking system and the implementation of new 
guidelines on such inclusion. This Office is also involved in 
promoting programs to increase the number of women in 
biomedical science, and in the development of women's health as 
a focus of medical/scientific research.
    ORWH plays a critical role in assuring that women's health 
and gender-based research are addressed in a systematic manner 
throughout the NIH. The Committee urges NIH to continue to 
bring appropriate focus to these issues through all available 
mechanisms, as appropriate, including the BIRCWH program.
    Office of AIDS Research.--The Office of AIDS Research (OAR) 
is responsible for coordination of the scientific, budgetary, 
legislative, and policy elements of the NIH AIDS research 
program. The OAR develops a comprehensive plan for NIH AIDS-
related research activities which is updated annually. The plan 
is the basis for the President's budget distribution of AIDS-
related funds to the Institutes, centers and divisions within 
NIH. The Committee expects the Director of NIH to use this plan 
and the budget developed by OAR to guide his decisions on the 
allocation of AIDS funding among the Institutes. The Director 
of NIH also should use the full authority of his office to 
ensure that the ICDs spend their AIDS research dollars in a 
manner consistent with the plan. In addition, the OAR allocates 
an emergency AIDS discretionary fund to support research that 
was not anticipated when budget allocations were made.
    The Committee has included the same general provisions in 
bill language that was contained in the 2000 appropriations 
bill. This language permits the Director of OAR, jointly with 
the Director of NIH, to transfer between ICDs up to three 
percent of the funding determined by NIH to be related to AIDS 
research. This authority could be exercised throughout the 
fiscal year subject to normal reprogramming procedures, and is 
intended to give NIH flexibility to adjust the AIDS allocations 
among Institutes if research opportunities and needs should 
change. The Committee also repeats language from last year's 
bill making the research funds identified by NIH as being AIDS 
related available to the OAR account for transfer to the 
Institutes. This provision permits the flow of funds through 
the OAR in the spirit of the authorization legislation without 
requiring the Congress to earmark a specific dollar amount for 
AIDS research.
    Office of Dietary Supplements.--The Office of Dietary 
Supplements (ODS) was established in recognition that dietary 
supplements can have an important impact on the prevention and 
management of disease and on the maintenance of health. ODS is 
charged with promoting, conducting, and coordinating scientific 
research within NIH relating to dietary supplements.
    The Office is encouraged, in consultation with NCCAM, AHRQ, 
and FDA to review the current scientific evidence on the safety 
and efficacy of dietary supplements now on the market, which 
could then form a basis for further research, education of 
practitioners and consumers, and whether further regulatory 
requirements are necessary.
    Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research.--The 
Office of Behavioral and Social Sciences Research (OBSSR) 
provides leadership and direction for the development of a 
trans-NIH plan to increase the scope of and support for 
behavioral and social science research and in defining an 
overall strategy for the integration of these disciplines 
across NIH institutes and centers; develops initiatives to 
stimulate research in the behavioral and social sciences arena 
and integrate a biobehavioral perspective across the research 
areas of NIH; and promotes studies to evaluate the 
contributions of behavioral, social and lifestyle determinants 
in the development, course, treatment, and prevention of 
illness and related public health problems.
    Office of Rare Disease Research.--The Office of Rare 
Disease Research (ORDR) was established in recognition of the 
need to provide a focal point of attention and coordination at 
NIH for research on rare diseases. ORDR works with Federal and 
non-Federal national and international organizations concerned 
with rare disease research and orphan products development; 
develops a centralized database on rare diseases research; and 
stimulates rare diseases research by supporting scientific 
workshops and symposia to identify research opportunities.
    Autism.--The Committee is pleased with the expansion that 
has occurred in autism research and with the activities of the 
NIH Autism Coordinating Committee. The Committee is also aware 
of concerns that have been raised about reports of a possible 
association between the measles component of the MMR vaccine 
and a subset of autism termed autistic enterocolitis. The 
Committee urges the NIH Coordinating Committee to give serious 
attention to these reports and pursue appropriate research that 
will permit scientific analysis and evaluation of the concerns 
that have been raised through all available mechanisms, as 
appropriate, including an attempt to replicate the molecular 
evidence of persistent measles virus infection in children with 
autistic entercolitis. This research should be pursued in a way 
that does not cause undue harm to the Nation's efforts to 
protect children against vaccine-preventable diseases.
    Autoimmune Diseases.--The Committee commends the Director 
for establishing a coordinating committee for autoimmune 
disease research. Autoimmunity is at the root of 80 
interrelated diseases affecting at least five percent of the 
population. Autoimmune diseases also disproportionately affect 
women.
    Bioinformatics.--The biomedical community is increasingly 
taking advantage of the power of computing, both to manage and 
analyze data and to model biological processes. The Committee 
commends NIH for pursuing its Biomedical Information Science 
and Technology Initiative. This initiative is developing 
innovative programs that will allow biomedical researchers to 
make optimal use of information technology and develop cross-
disciplinary skills in biology, computation, and mathematics. 
This initiative should take into account the contributions that 
other agencies' programs have made, particularly that of the 
Partnerships for Advanced Computational Infrastructure program.
    Cancer in Ethnic Minorities and the Medically 
Underserved.--The Committee continues to be concerned about the 
disproportionately high incidence and/or mortality rates of 
many cancers in ethnic minorities, rural poor, and other 
medically underserved populations. The Committee encourages the 
NIH to develop a strategic plan to address the recommendations 
in the January 1999 Institute of Medicine study on this issue. 
The Committee also encourages the NIH to enhance funding for 
population, behavioral, socio-cultural, communications, and 
community-based research; recruiting and training efforts to 
attract more candidates from ethnic minority and medically 
underserved populations in all areas of cancer research; cancer 
data collection and management and interagency coordination of 
data collection, and support for the NCI's SEER program.
    Chimpanzees.--The Committee understands that NIH has 
recently taken title to 288 chimpanzees from the Coulston 
Foundation and is in the process of soliciting a contract for 
the operation and maintenance of a chimpanzee long-term holding 
facility located at the Holloman Air Force Base for the care of 
these animals. The Committee strongly encourages NIH to make 
sure that the grantee for this contract will provide adequate, 
long-term care for these animals and is financially stable. 
Further, the Committee hopes that NIH is close to finalizing a 
plan for the long-term care of all chimpanzees used in NIH 
research.
    Chronic Fatigue Syndrome.--The Committee is pleased that 
the Office of the Director has assumed management of Cronic 
Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) activities. The Committee is concerned 
by reported difficulties NIH has had in attracting extramural 
scientists with established track records to the CFS research 
field and urges NIH to continue its outreach efforts to public 
and private scientists in the CFS field. NIH is encouraged to 
focus on promising areas such as efforts to define etiology and 
pathophysiology of the illness, identify diagnostic biomarkers, 
and pediatric CFS.
    Cigarette Smoking and Nicotine Research on Non-Human 
Animals.--The Committee heard testimony that some cigarette 
smoking and nicotine research being conducted on non-human 
animals at NIH is duplicative and unnecessary. The Committee 
understands the NIH must continue to support research on 
smoking and nicotine in order to develop more effective methods 
for preventing or modifying the illnesses from smoking both for 
smokers and non-smokers and to develop better ways of helping 
people eliminate or reduce their dependency on smoking. In 
doing such research, the Committee urges NIH to carefully 
review the use of non-human animals and only use them when 
necessary.
    Diabetes.--Diabetes remains a leading cause of early death 
and disability. Because diabetes impacts so many different 
parts of the body, the Committee urges the Director to work 
with NIDDK to lead a trans-NIH approach to diabetes research, 
including an effort to develop a vaccine to prevent juvenile, 
or Type 1, diabetes. The Committee also urges the Director to 
work with NIDDK, NICHD, and NHGRI to enhance efforts to 
identify the genes associated with juvenile, or Type I, 
diabetes as recommended by the Diabetes Research Working Group 
report. The Committee requests that the Director be prepared to 
provide a status of these efforts at the fiscal year 2002 
appropriations hearing.
    Endometriosis.--The Committee encourages NIH to enhance 
research efforts into the cause and treatment of endometriosis, 
a non-cancerous gynecological condition which affects between 
two and four percent of the female population and causes severe 
pain, infertility, scar tissue formation, and adhesions.
    Facioscapularhumeral Muscular Dystrophy.--The Committee 
commends NIH for initiating a joint research agenda for 
facioscapularhumeral (FSH) muscular dystrophy between NINDS and 
NIAMS. The Committee encourages NIH to enhance research efforts 
in this area to address the recommendations of the FSH research 
community.
    Infectious Etiology of Chronic Diseases.--A number of 
chronic human diseases are suspected to be caused by infectious 
agents in conjunction with various hereditary, environmental, 
or nutritional factors. While the Committee is pleased that a 
number of Institutes are conducting or supporting studies in 
this area to determine the scientific validity of such links, 
the Committee urges the Director to establish trans-NIH 
coordinating activities on infectious etiology of chronic 
diseases to promote further opportunities for successful 
research outcomes.
    Lyme Disease.--The Committee encourages NIH to improve the 
collaborative efforts of all Institutes involved in Lyme 
disease research and outreach activities and to identify 
appropriate NIH advisory committees for Lyme disease 
representation and appoint qualified persons thereon. The 
Committee also encourages NIH to include a broad range of 
scientific viewpoints in the research planning process, 
including those from community-based clinicians, voluntary 
agencies, and patient advocates.
    Microbicide Research.--The Committee urges the Director to 
enhance microbicide research and development and in 
coordination with OAR, NIAID, NICHD, NIMH, NIDA, and ORWH 
expand basic research on the initial mechanisms of STD/HIV 
infection, identify appropriate models for evaluating safety 
and efficacy of microbial products, enhance clinical trials, 
and expand behavioral research on use, acceptability, and 
compliance with microbicides through all available mechanisms, 
as appropriate. The Committee requests that the Director be 
prepared to testify on the progress in this area at the fiscal 
year 2002 appropriations hearing.
    Native American Biomedical Research.--The Committee 
encourages NIH to increase research efforts in the areas of 
Native American biomedical research.
    Parkinson's Disease.--The Committee is aware that NIH has 
recently developed a Parkinson's-focused research agenda and 
urges the Director to enhance research efforts in this area 
through all available mechanisms, as appropriate. As the 
science base develops, the Committee encourages NIH to 
periodically revise and update the agenda, including the 
funding projections, in close consultation with the research 
community, clinicians, and patient advocates. The Committee is 
pleased with the joint initiative of NIEHS and NINDS on 
investigating environmental determinants of Parkinson's disease 
and supports efforts by the Director to encourage further 
collaboration among Institutes.
    Pediatric Research.--The Committee urges NIH to continue to 
strengthen and expand its portfolio of pediatric research 
across all Institutes and establish priorities based on the 
severity and impact of pediatric diseases and on the potential 
for scientific breakthroughs. The Committee urges the Director 
to continue to ensure that the Institutes involved in pediatric 
research coordinate their efforts, with NICHD taking the lead, 
in order to avoid duplication and maximize funding allocations. 
The Committee encourages NIH to enhance research into the 
therapeutic treatments for pediatric illnesses to understand 
the impacts of traditional therapies on children and identify 
new treatments. NIH is also encouraged to enhance research into 
the impact of therapeutic agents on children as compared to 
adults.
    Peer Review Process.--The Committee has heard concerns that 
the initial peer review groups tend to be dominated by 
researchers from institutions and geographic areas that receive 
relatively large shares of NIH funding rather than representing 
the full breadth of the research community. In order to address 
this concern, the Committee requests that the NIH staff who are 
involved in the peer review of grant applications should seek 
broadly, through various sources that, for example, search the 
scientific and medical research literature, to identify 
individuals who might serve on initial peer review groups. 
These individuals could be given opportunities to serve as, and 
be mentored on, the duties of peer reviewers for several review 
cycles and then be appointed for full terms as warranted.
    Regulatory Burden.--The Committee commends NIH and the 
Department for its progress in reducing the regulatory burdens 
imposed on Federally-supported scientists and the institutions 
where they perform their research. The Committee is pleased to 
see that an external advisory committee, reporting directly to 
the NIH Deputy Director for Extramural Research, has been 
formed to address additional areas where regulatory reform may 
be needed. The Committee is also pleased that NIH has begun to 
implement recommendations made in the 1999 report, NIH 
Initiative to Reduce Regulatory Burden.
    The Committee is aware that the research community and 
Federal agencies have commented favorably on proposals to 
dedicate an uncapped portion of indirect costs as reimbursement 
for the costs of complying with Federal regulatory mandates. 
The Committee encourages the Deputy Director for Extramural 
Research to conduct a workshop for representatives of the 
extramural research community, Federal research-supporting 
agencies, and Federal regulatory agencies to examine the 
feasibility of requiring Federal agencies to determine what 
impact proposed regulations would have on scientists and 
institutions prior to implementation. The Committee requests 
that the Director of NIH be prepared to provide a status report 
on this issue at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.
    Religiousness and Health.--Given the religiousness of the 
U.S. population, as well as the increasing amount of research 
demonstrating the importance of religious commitment in 
addressing chronic and serious illnesses, the NIH is encouraged 
to enhance research in this area. This research may prove 
helpful in reducing health care costs, increase longevity, 
improve the quality of life for chronically and seriously ill 
patients, and reduce risky lifestyles. Also, with some evidence 
of the enhancement of longevity for those who regularly attend 
church, synagogue, and mosque, it is useful to understand this 
prevalent population factor in preventing and coping with 
illnesses and improving the quality of life and clinical 
outcomes. The Committee understands that these areas are part 
of the NIH mind-body research agenda.
    Urological Research.--The Committee remains concerned with 
the degree of coordination of urologic research across the 
various Institutes. While the Committee is pleased with the 
creation of a special emphasis panel to review urology grant 
applications, the Director of NIH is encouraged to consider 
further steps to strengthen this research program to better 
address unmet public health needs.
    Women's Health and Gender-Based Biology.--NIH has 
increasingly emphasized the importance of including women in 
clinical trials and analyzing research results for gender-based 
differences. The Committee urges NIH to continue its efforts to 
include women in all aspects of research, including phase III 
clinical trials. The Director should be prepared to provide a 
progress report of its efforts in this area at the fiscal year 
2002 appropriations hearing.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

    The Committee provides $178,700,000 for buildings and 
facilities, which is $53,324,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $29,800,000 above the Administration 
request; however, due to limited funding within the allocation, 
funding increases in the bill are constrained to the amount 
proposed in the Administration request. In addition, the 
Committee provides language to allow NIH to contract for the 
full scope of phase I of the National Neuroscience Research 
Center.
    Mission.--The Buildings and Facilities appropriation 
provides for the design, construction, improvement, and major 
repair of clinical, laboratory, and office buildings and 
supporting facilities essential to the mission of the National 
Institutes of Health. The funds in this appropriation support 
the 77 buildings on the main NIH campus in Bethesda, Maryland; 
the Animal Center in Poolesville, Maryland; the National 
Institute of Environmental Health Sciences facility in Research 
Triangle Park, North Carolina; and other smaller facilities 
throughout the United States.
    Essential Safety and Health Improvement.--This account 
supports continued essential safety and health improvements to 
maintain the clinical center; the continuation of the campus 
infrastructure modernization program as well as programs for 
power plant safety, asbestos abatement, fire protection and 
life safety, the elimination of barriers to persons with 
disabilities, safety and reliability upgrades at the Rocky 
Mountain Laboratory, and indoor air quality improvement.
    Repairs and Improvements.--Support is also provided for the 
continuing program of repairs and improvements required to 
maintain existing buildings and facilities.

       Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration


               substance abuse and mental health services

    The Committee provides a program level of $2,727,626,000 
for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services 
Administration (SAMHSA), which is $75,758,000 above the fiscal 
year 2000 comparable level and $95,390,000 below the 
Administration request. Many programs funded in this account 
are not authorized for fiscal year 2000.
    SAMHSA is responsible for supporting mental health, 
alcoholism, and other drug abuse prevention and treatment 
services nationwide through discretionary knowledge development 
and applied research grants and formula block grants to the 
States. The agency consists of three principal centers: the 
Center for Mental Health Services, the Center for Substance 
Abuse Treatment, and the Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. 
The Office of the Administrator is responsible for overall 
agency management.

Center for Mental Health Services

    The Committee provides a total of $691,298,000 for the 
Center for Mental Health Services (CMHS), which is $59,874,000 
above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and $40,126,000 
below the Administration request.
            Knowledge development and application
    The Committee provides $132,749,000 for the mental health 
knowledge development and application (KDA) program, which is 
$4,126,000 below the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and 
$34,126,000 below the Administration request. The program 
includes multi-state studies and other knowledge development 
activities that identify the most effective service delivery 
practices, knowledge synthesis activities that translate 
program findings into useful products for the field, and 
knowledge application projects that support adoption of 
exemplary service approaches throughout the country. The 
Committee has provided last year's funding level less the 
amount earmarked for projects.
    The Committee recognizes the role that the Minority 
Fellowship program plays in training mental health 
professionals to provide services to individuals who would 
otherwise go untreated and urges SAMHSA to enhance its efforts 
in this program through its three Centers.
    It is estimated that eight to ten percent of men and women 
admitted to jail have a mental illness, many of which have 
committed minor, non-violent offenses directly related to lack 
of service. Local programs to divert people with serious mental 
illness into community-based services, including mental health, 
substance abuse, and case management, have proven effective in 
reducing contacts with criminal justice. The Committee 
encourages SAMHSA to assist local jurisdictions, in 
collaboration with States, to apply current knowledge about 
effective interventions to meet the needs of adults with 
serious mental illness who come in contact with the criminal 
justice system. CMHS is encouraged to work collaboratively with 
the Bureau of Justice Assistance at the Department of Justice.
    Suicide is the third leading cause of death in adolescents. 
There is concern over data indicating that nearly one-in-three 
Latina adolescents has seriously considered suicide, the 
highest rate of any racial or ethnic group of girls and that 
fewer treatment and prevention services reach this population 
than any of their counterparts. The Committee urges CMHS to 
strengthen community-based organizations and other entities 
that provide innovative and culturally sensitive treatment and 
prevention services to address the issue of teen suicide 
through interventions and support services to those individuals 
who are at risk.
            Mental health performance partnerships
    The Committee provides $416,000,000 for mental health 
performance partnership grants, which is $60,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the same as the 
Administration request. The performance partnerships provide 
funds to States to support mental health prevention, treatment, 
and rehabilitation services. Funds are allocated according to 
statutory formula among the States that have submitted approved 
annual plans. The Committee notes that the mental health 
performance partnerships grant funding represents less than 2% 
of total State mental health funding and less than 5% of State 
community-based mental health services.
            Children's mental health
    The Committee provides $86,763,000 for the grant program 
for comprehensive community mental health services for children 
with serious emotional disturbance, which is $4,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the same as the 
Administration request. Funding for this program supports 
grants and technical assistance for community-based services 
for children and adolescents up to age 22 with serious 
emotional, behavioral, or mental disorders. The program assists 
States and local jurisdictions in developing integrated systems 
of community care. Each individual served receives an 
individual service plan developed with the participation of the 
family and the child. Grantees are required to provide 
increasing levels of matching funds over the five-year grant 
period.
            Grants to states for the homeless (PATH)
    The Committee provides $30,883,000 for the grants to States 
for the homeless (PATH) program, which is the same as the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and $5,000,000 below the 
Administration request. PATH grants to States provide 
assistance to individuals suffering from severe mental illness 
and/or substance abuse disorders and who are homeless or at 
imminent risk of becoming homeless. Grants may be used for 
outreach, screening and diagnostic treatment services, 
rehabilitation services, community mental health services, 
alcohol or drug treatment services, training, case management 
services, supportive and supervisory services in residential 
settings, and a limited set of housing services.
            Protection and advocacy
    The Committee provides $24,903,000 for the protection and 
advocacy program, which is the same as the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $1,000,000 below the Administration 
request. This funding is distributed to States according to a 
formula based on population and income to assist State-
designated independent advocates to provide legal assistance to 
mentally ill individuals during their residence in State-
operated facilities and for 90 days following their discharge.

Center for Substance Abuse Treatment

    The Committee provides a total of $1,844,716,000 for the 
Center for Substance Abuse Treatment (CSAT), which is 
$30,150,000 above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and 
$44,704,000 below the Administration request.
            Knowledge development and application
    The Committee provides $213,716,000 for the substance abuse 
treatment knowledge development and application (KDA) program, 
which is $850,000 below the fiscal year 2000 comparable level 
and $44,704,000 below the Administration request. The program 
supports activities of developing and field testing new 
treatment models in order to facilitate the provision of 
quality treatment services and service delivery. These 
activities are undertaken in actual service settings rather 
than laboratories and results are disseminated to State 
agencies and community treatment providers. The goal is to 
promote continuous, positive treatment service delivery change 
for those people who use and abuse alcohol and drugs. The 
Committee does not provide funding for projects that were 
earmarked in the fiscal year 2000 appropriations bill.
    The Committee is concerned that Federal resources may not 
be reaching hard-to-serve populations, like the homeless, and 
therefore has provided $10,000,000 to initiate grants to local 
non-profit and public entities for the purpose of developing 
and expanding substance abuse services for homeless persons.
            Substance abuse performance partnerships
    The Committee provides $1,631,000,000 for the substance 
abuse performance partnership grants, which is $31,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the same as the 
Administration request. The substance abuse performance 
partnerships provide funds to States to support alcohol and 
drug abuse prevention, treatment, and rehabilitation services. 
Funds are allocated among the States according to a statutory 
formula. State applications including comprehensive state plans 
must be approved annually by SAMHSA as a condition of receiving 
funds.
    The Committee has modified bill language that was included 
in the fiscal year 2000 appropriations bill to distribute the 
block grant funding to the States so that no State's funding is 
reduced below the fiscal year 2000 level.

Center for Substance Abuse Prevention

    The Committee provides a total of $132,742,000 for the 
Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, which is $7,082,000 
below the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and $2,487,000 
below the Administration request. The Committee does not 
provide funding for high-risk youth grants.
            Knowledge development and application
    The Committee provides $132,742,000 for the substance abuse 
prevention knowledge development and application (KDA) program, 
which is $7,082,000 below the fiscal year 2000 comparable level 
and $2,487,000 below the Administration request. The program 
identifies effective approaches in preventing substance abuse 
and implements its primary mission in bridging the gap between 
research and practice. The Committee has provided last year's 
funding level less the amount earmarked for projects.

Program management

    The Committee provides $58,870,000 for program management 
activities, which is $184,000 below the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $1,073,000 below the Administration 
request. The appropriation provides funding to coordinate, 
direct, and manage the agency's programs. Funds are used for 
salaries, benefits, space, supplies, equipment, travel and 
overhead. The Committee has provided last year's funding level 
less the amount earmarked for projects.

               Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

    The Committee provides a total of $223,649,000 for the 
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ), which is 
$24,850,000 above the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and 
$26,294,000 below the Administration request. Included in this 
amount is $123,669,000 in general funds and $99,980,000 in one 
percent evaluation funding. The Administration proposed to 
increase the Public Health Service evaluation set-aside from 
one percent to 1.6 percent and fund the agency's request from 
evaluation funding. The Committee did not approve this request.
    The mission of the Agency is to generate and disseminate 
information that improves the delivery of health care. Its 
research goals are to determine what works best in clinical 
practice; improve the cost-effective use of health care 
resources; help consumers make more informed choices; and 
measure and improve the quality of care. The Committee is 
supportive of high quality, peer-reviewed research and supports 
appropriate funding for investigator-initiated research within 
the funding levels provided.
    For Research on Health Costs, Quality, and Outcomes, the 
Committee provides $180,299,000, which is $19,984,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 comparable level and $26,294,000 below the 
Administration request. The Research on Health Costs, Quality, 
and Outcomes program identifies the most effective and 
efficient approaches to organize, deliver, finance, and 
reimburse health care services; determines how the structure of 
the delivery system, financial incentives, market forces, and 
better information affects the use, quality, and cost of health 
services; and facilitates the translation of research findings 
for providers, patients/consumers, plans, purchasers, and 
policymakers. It also funds research that determines what works 
best in medical care by increasing the cost effectiveness and 
appropriateness of clinical practice; supports the development 
of tools to measure and evaluate health outcomes, quality of 
care, and consumer satisfaction with health care system 
performance; and facilitates the translation of information 
into practical uses through the development and dissemination 
of research databases.
    The increase provided is to support the budget request for 
enhancing patient safety. The recent Institute of Medicine 
(IOM) report, To Err Is Human, estimated that between 44,000 
and 98,000 people die each year due to medical errors. The 
report concluded that many errors can be avoided or their 
potentially harmful effects on patients minimized, if we can 
learn enough from the errors that occur to understand how to 
redesign the processes and systems of care to be safer. The 
Committee provides an increase of $19,984,000 to support the 
budget request for enhancing patient safety. The increase will 
be used to initiate research that will further the 
understanding of when, how, and under what circumstances errors 
occur; identify the causes of errors; develop the tools, data, 
and researchers needed to foster a national strategy to improve 
patient safety; and work with public and private partners to 
apply evidence-based approaches to the improvement of patient 
safety. The Committee encourages the agency to take a 
comprehensive approach to improving patient safety and to 
include research into the causes and types of medical errors 
that occur in emergency care settings as well as hospital 
settings.
    For Medical Expenditures Panel Surveys, the Committee 
provides $40,850,000, which is $4,850,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 comparable level and the same as the Administration 
request. The entire amount provided is derived through the one 
percent evaluation set-aside. The Medical Expenditures Panel 
Surveys provide data for timely national estimates of health 
care use and expenditures, private and public health insurance 
coverage, and the availability, costs, and scope of private 
health insurance benefits. This activity also provides data for 
analysis of changes in behavior as a result of market forces or 
policy changes on health care use, expenditures, and insurance 
coverage; develops cost/savings estimates of proposed changes 
in policy; and identifies the impact of changes in policy for 
subgroups of the population.
    For program support, the Committee provides $2,500,000, 
which is $16,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level and the same 
as the Administration request. This activity supports the 
overall direction and management of the agency.
    The Committee is pleased that AHRQ is conducting an 
evidence-based research report on chronic fatigue syndrome 
(CFS). The Committee encourages AHRQ to appoint qualified 
clinicians, researchers, and advocates to its CFS advisory 
committee and to include information from a variety of sources, 
including, but not limited to, peer-reviewed medical 
literature, clinical practice, and patient educational 
materials when compiling evidence for its report.
    As evidenced in the IOM report, fatigue and sleep 
deprivation played a prominent role in the occurrence of 
medical errors. The Committee urges AHRQ to support research on 
fatigue, circadian rhythms, and sleep disorders and their 
impact on human performance as part of its research effort on 
the causes of medical errors and the effectiveness of programs 
to address them.
    The past three decades have seen the introduction of highly 
effective drugs to prevent or treat a wide array of diseases 
and disorders. However, there is growing concern about the 
extent to which drugs and devices are used inappropriately. 
Recent research has shown that adverse drug reactions are the 
fourth leading cause of death in the United States among 
hospitalized patients. The Committee is pleased that the agency 
has initiated the Centers for Education and Research in 
Therapeutics (CERT) and urges AHRQ to provide the necessary 
funds to the CERT program. The agency is encouraged to 
emphasize patient-oriented clinical pharmacology and assure 
that translational research is fostered.
    The agency is encouraged to examine the literature and 
research that has been conducted on the use of hyperbaric 
oxygen therapy as it relates to brain injury and stroke.
    The Committee encourages the agency to examine the use of 
telemedicine to allow critical care specialists to monitor 
intensive care patients and the benefits it may provide to the 
health care system.
    The HIV Data Coordinating Center supports the participation 
of HIV health care providers to create a public-use database 
with information from providers' records for a large and 
diverse sample of HIV-infected patients. This database is the 
only study collecting extensive resource utilization data that 
reflect the current state of HIV care delivery. The agency is 
urged to continue its funding.
    Creating a statewide repository of nurse staffing and 
outcomes data would provide a standardized comparison of 
nursing quality of a hospital against an aggregated benchmark 
and identify best practices and innovative methods to deliver 
nursing care. The agency is encouraged to examine this area, if 
feasible.
    Macular degeneration is the leading cause of age-related 
vision loss in the United States. More than 10 million 
Americans suffer from macular degeneration and millions more 
experience vision impairment due to other age-related chronic 
conditions, including diabetes retinopathy, glaucoma, and 
cataracts. The Committee encourages AHRQ to conduct research 
into models of care, its cost effectiveness, and the impact it 
has on the quality of life for those with low vision 
impairment.
    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a serious public health 
issue resulting in 500,000 hospitalizations and 60,000 deaths 
per year. There are approximately 1000 trauma centers in the 
U.S., which acutely treat TBI and accordingly to recent surveys 
more than two-thirds of these hospitals follow a variable 
quality of care. A more uniform, evidence-based standard of 
care for TBI will assure that optimal care is provided to all 
patients and improve patient outcomes resulting in lowered 
long-term care costs. The Committee encourages AHRQ to conduct 
research to develop a uniform, scientific evidenced-based 
standard of care for TBI patients in all trauma centers to 
provide for a consistent base of care in which research on 
therapeutic advances can be conducted.

                  Health Care Financing Administration


                     grants to states for medicaid

    The bill provides $93,586,251,000 for the Federal share of 
current law State Medicaid costs, which is $6,203,073,000 above 
the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the same as the 
Administration request. This amount does not include 
$30,589,003,000, which was advance funded in the fiscal year 
2000 appropriation. In addition, the bill provides an advance 
appropriation of $36,207,551,000 for program costs in the first 
quarter of fiscal year 2002. The bill also includes indefinite 
budget authority for unanticipated costs in fiscal year 2000.
    Federal Medicaid grants reimburse States for 50 to 83 
percent (depending on per capita income) of their expenditures 
in providing health care for individuals whose income and 
resources fall below specified levels. Subject to certain 
minimum requirements, States have broad authority within the 
law to set eligibility, coverage, and payment levels. It is 
estimated that 33.8 million low-income individuals will receive 
health care services in 2000 under the Medicaid program. State 
costs of administering the program are matched at rates that 
generally range from 50 to 90 percent, depending upon the type 
of cost. Total funding for Medicaid includes $469,054,000 for 
the entitlement Vaccines for Children program. These funds, 
which are transferred to the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention for administration, support the costs of 
immunization for children who are on Medicaid, uninsured or 
underinsured and receiving immunizations at Federally qualified 
health centers or rural health clinics. Indefinite authority is 
provided by statute for the Vaccines for Children program in 
the event that the current estimate is inadequate.
    The Committee is pleased with HCFA's legislative proposal 
to provide demonstration grants to States, through the Medicaid 
program, to test innovative asthma disease management 
techniques for children enrolled in Medicaid.

Payments to health care trust funds

    The bill includes $70,381,600,000 for the Payments to the 
Health Care Trust Funds account, which is $1,092,500,000 above 
the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and the same as the 
Administration request.
    This entitlement account includes the general fund subsidy 
to the Medicare Part B trust fund as well as other 
reimbursements to the Part A trust fund for benefits and 
related administrative costs which have not been financed by 
payroll taxes or premium contributions. The amount provided 
includes $151,600,000 for program management administrative 
expenditures, which is the fiscal year 2001 estimate of the 
general fund share of HCFA program management expenses. This 
general fund share will be transferred to the Federal Hospital 
Insurance Trust Fund to reimburse for the funds drawn down in 
fiscal year 2001 from the trust fund to finance program 
management.
    The bill limits the amount HCFA can collect and spend for 
the Medicare+Choice program to the authorized level of 
$19,300,000, which is $75,700,000 below the fiscal year 2000 
level and the same as the Administration request. The Balanced 
Budget Act of 1997 authorized the collection of user fees from 
managed care organizations to fund the Medicare+Choice 
information campaign. In fiscal year 2000, these collections 
were authorized at $100,000,000 and the appropriations bill 
allowed $95,000,000 to be collected. The Balanced Budget 
Refinement Act of 1999 limited Medicare+Choice user fee 
collections to an amount based on the ratio of the average 
number of beneficiaries enrolled in Medicare+Choice plans to 
the average number of Medicare beneficiaries eligible to 
receive Part A benefits and enrolled in Medicare Part B, which 
is estimated to be $19,300,000. The Committee does not have the 
discretionary funds available to provide additional funding for 
this initiative.

Program management

    The bill makes available $1,866,302,000 in trust funds for 
Federal administration of the Medicare and Medicaid programs, 
which is $127,032,000 below the fiscal year 2000 comparable 
level and $220,000,000 below the Administration request.
            Research, demonstration, and evaluation
    The bill provides $55,000,000 for research, demonstration 
and evaluation, which is $6,786,000 below the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and the same as the Administration request. 
These funds support a variety of studies and demonstrations in 
such areas as monitoring and evaluating health system 
performance; improving health care financing and delivery 
mechanisms; modernization of the Medicare program; the needs of 
vulnerable populations in the areas of health care access, 
delivery systems, and financing; and information to improve 
consumer choice and health status.
    New technology has been developed that would allow 
physician to prescribe medications and transmit prescriptions 
electronically. The Committee encourages HCFA to conduct a 
demonstration project to compare system-related medication 
error rates, system efficiencies, and cost-effectiveness 
between the traditional prescription process involving 
handwritten prescriptions and an automated prescription process 
that employs electronic prescribing and prescription 
transmission technologies.
    Web-based technology has the potential to improve the 
coordination and delivery of care among persons with 
disabilities and severe chronic conditions such as spinal cord 
injury, diabetes, and arthritis while also reducing transaction 
costs associated with traditional care delivery mechanisms. The 
Committee encourages HCFA to demonstrate the effectiveness of 
an e-health tool for managed care nurse case managers in an 
integrated application with online claims adjudication 
capabilities which applies a prescription benefits manager to 
medical equipment, supplies, and related products as currently 
utilized for pharmaceuticals.
    The Committee is concerned that although one in six people 
over the age of 65 has a vision impairment, the Medicare 
program has not been responsive to the needs of visually 
impaired older adults, and coverage of low vision services is 
inconsistent and inadequate. The Committee urges HCFA to study 
the impact of vision loss on beneficiary health status and 
health care costs, including but not limited to increased 
lengths of hospital stay and a higher incidence of medication 
errors in the treatment of visually impaired patients.
    It is estimated that more than 400,000 children eligible 
for Federal health care programs have undetected harmful levels 
of lead in their blood. The Committee understands that HCFA has 
revised its Medicaid screening and reimbursement policy for 
childhood lead poisoning testing. The Committee urges HCFA to 
monitor the impact of these policy changes and to take every 
appropriate step to ensure that screening rates among children 
enrolled in Medicaid are substantially increased. The Committee 
also encourages HCFA to consider the development of new 
screening technologies that have the potential to significantly 
increase screening rates when evaluating its reimbursement 
policy.
    There is concern that brain injured patients, especially 
those who are brain injured after the age of 22, are denied 
access to rehabilitative services because of age rather than by 
an assessment of the disability and projected progress and 
outcome. The Committee encourages HCFA to conduct research in 
an effort to resolve this inequity and provide a proper level 
of services to all brain injured patients.
    Malnutrition is a frequent complication of dialysis 
patients, leading to increased likelihood of hospitalization 
and higher mortality risk. An NIH consensus conference 
recommended that nutrition therapy be made a part of treatment 
for chronic renal disease. The Committee urges HCFA, in 
collaboration with the National Institute of Diabetes and 
Digestive and Kidney Diseases, to explore the feasibility of 
investigating the efficacy of nutritional therapy for dialysis 
patients. The Administrator should be prepared to provide a 
status of this issue at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations 
hearing.
    The Committee encourages HCFA to conduct a demonstration to 
evaluate the use of Medicaid reimbursement to analyze and 
control lead hazards in the homes of lead-poisoned children 
enrolled in Medicaid.
            Medicare contractors
    The bill includes $1,165,287,000 to support Medicare claims 
processing contracts, which is $78,713,000 below the fiscal 
year 2000 comparable level and $136,000,000 below the 
Administration request. In addition, the bill includes language 
limiting the amount from the Health Care Fraud and Abuse 
Control Account to carry out the Medicare Integrity Program to 
$630,000,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 2000 level.
    Medicare contractors are responsible for paying Medicare 
providers promptly and accurately. In addition to processing 
claims, contractors also identify and recover Medicare 
overpayments, as well as review claims for questionable 
utilization patterns and medical necessity. Contractors also 
provide information and technical support both to providers and 
beneficiaries regarding the administration of the Medicare 
program. In 2001, contractors are expected to process 918 
million claims.
    The Committee encourages HCFA to implement effective and 
innovative educational programs for physicians and providers 
through the Medicare Integrity Program (MIP). The Committee 
also encourages HCFA to separate inadvertent billing errors 
from actual fraud. Details concerning the types of billing 
uncovered related to medical specialty, geographic region, and 
particular coding issues are invaluable in designing an 
effective educational program.
    The Committee encourages HCFA to urge carriers to work with 
the State medical societies and national medical specialty 
societies to educate physicians about billing problems and to 
help them understand how to address them in the future. The 
Committee also urges HCFA to implement education efforts for 
individual physicians when the carrier identifies that a 
physician has a billing problem.
    The Committee is aware that HCFA has assembled an internal 
committee, the Physicians Regulatory Initiative Team (PRIT), to 
review the multitude of rules, regulations, and instructions 
with which physicians must comply in order to treat Medicare 
patients. The Committee requests that the Administrator be 
prepared to testify on the status of PRIT and its 
recommendations at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.
    The Committee understands that HCFA will be restoring the 
toll-free telephone lines that allow physicians to call their 
local carrier for answers to billing and coding questions 
regarding Medicare claims submissions. These toll-free lines 
are an important error prevention tool. The Committee request 
that the Administrator be prepared to testify on the status of 
this initiative at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.
            State survey and certification
    The bill includes $171,147,000 for State inspection of 
facilities serving Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries, which 
is $33,527,000 below the fiscal year 2000 comparable level and 
$63,000,000 below the Administration request.
    Survey and certification activities ensure that 
institutions and agencies providing care to Medicare and 
Medicaid beneficiaries meet Federal health, safety and program 
standards. On-site surveys are conducted by State survey 
agencies, with a pool of Federal surveyors performing random 
monitoring surveys. Over 30,000 facilities are expected to be 
reviewed in 2001.
            Federal administration
    The bill includes $474,868,000 to support Federal 
administrative activities related to the Medicare and Medicaid 
programs, which is $8,006,000 below the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $21,000,000 below the Administration 
request.
    The Medicare, Medicaid, and Children's Health Insurance 
programs ensure the health care security of over 70 million 
beneficiaries. The Federal Administration costs budget provides 
funds for the staff and operations of HCFA to administer these 
programs.
    The Committee applauds HCFA's use of auditing of Medicare 
providers as a means of reducing waste, fraud, and abuse in the 
Medicare program. However, the Committee is concerned that some 
provider audits are not resolved for as long as six months, 
which places an undue financial and time burden on these 
providers. The Committee requests that the Administrator be 
prepared to testify as the fiscal year 2002 appropriations 
hearing on the average time span of provider audits, how it can 
expedite the auditing process, and what steps the 
Administration has taken to improve this process.
    There are concerns with recent changes in Medicare policy 
on critical care physician work values. The Committee is aware 
that HCFA and the medical community have made progress in 
resolving the concerns and urges HCFA to continue working with 
the medical community to bring issues surrounding critical care 
to a successful resolution.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about Medicare 
policy with regard to coverage of drugs or biologicals 
administered incident to a physician's service where the drug 
is one that is not usually self-administered by the patient. 
The Committee is aware that, in accordance with the Committee's 
direction, HCFA recently released a program memorandum to 
intermediaries and carriers. The Committee intends to monitor 
the reestablishment of previous policy and expects this change 
will result in coverage of life saving drugs for Medicare 
beneficiaries. The Committee understands that HCFA is in the 
process of implementing the directive to hold at least two 
regional town hall meetings to give interested individuals, 
patients, and organizations the opportunity to engage with HCFA 
officials in a constructive dialogue on this issue.
    In 1994, Congress enacted a statutory definition of the 
term audiologist for the Medicare program, which relies 
primarily on state licensure and registration as the mechanism 
for identifying audiologists who are qualified to participate 
in that program. The Committee urges HCFA to promulgate 
regulations for the Medicaid program using the same definition 
of audiologist that exists in the Medicare program.
    The Committee is concerned about the lack of options 
available to beneficiaries due to the few number of Medicare 
HMO plans in certain areas. The Committee urges HCFA to study 
the disparity of reimbursement rates in Sarasota, Charlotte, 
and Manatee counties in Florida for Medicare HMO and identify 
options to increase Medicare options for beneficiaries in the 
area.
    The Committee understands that HCFA is working to find an 
alternative to the current population-based performance 
measures used to recertify organ procurement organizations. 
HCFA has contracted with the Harvard School of Public Health to 
further validate a model developed by Harvard and the 
Partnership for Organ Donation and plans to propose new 
performance standards after reviewing the Harvard model and 
AOPO's study. The Committee also understands that the Secretary 
has the authority under section 1138(b)(1)(A)(i) of the Social 
Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1320b-8(b)(1)(A)(i)) to extend the 
period for recertification of an organ procurement organization 
from 2 to 4 years. The Committee strongly urges the Secretary 
to extend the recertification period until such time as new 
performance measures are developed and implemented.
    The Committee is aware that HCFA and the State of Arkansas 
are in consultation on a Medicaid waiver granted in 1997 for 
the ARKids First program. The Committee directs HCFA to work 
with the State to resolve all issues related to this waiver and 
provide the Committee with a status report by June 15, 2000. 
The Committee will monitor these negotiations and take further 
action, if necessary, as the bill moves through the 
appropriations process.
    The Committee is aware that in addition to Arkansas, other 
states such as Wisconsin are currently negotiating waiver 
requests with HCFA to extend health care coverage to uninsured 
children and families. The Committee urges HCFA to resolve all 
such requests as expeditiously as possible, without preference 
to individual states, so that all states can move forward to 
implement their programs on an equitable basis.
    A provision was included in the Health Insurance 
Portability and Accountability Act to redesign the specialty 
code system to alpha-numeric; however, implementation of this 
new system could be years away. In the interim, to ensure that 
pregnant women receive risk-appropriate care, the Committee 
urges HCFA to work to create an interim two-digit specialty 
code recognizing maternal-fetal medicine.
    The Committee commends HCFA for issuing its June 1999 
guidance letter to the States on the Program for Assertive 
Community Treatment (PACT) for individuals with severe mental 
illnesses. PACT is a successful evidence-based approach for 
serving the most disabled, treatment resistant adults with 
severe mental illnesses. The Committee encourages HCFA to 
expand assistance to States in initiating PACT programs and 
report back to the Committee on ways that Medicaid could be 
improved to help foster development of such programs at the 
State level.

                Administration for Children and Families


  PAYMENTS TO STATES FOR CHILD SUPPORT ENFORCEMENT AND FAMILY SUPPORT 
                                PROGRAMS

    The Committee recommends $2,473,800,000 for the Child 
Support Enforcement program, the same as the request. The bill 
also provides $1,000,000,000 in advance funding for the first 
quarter of fiscal year 2002 to ensure timely payments for the 
child support enforcement program, the same as the request. The 
bill continues to provide estimated funding of $23,000,000 for 
Payments to Territories, the same as the comparable amount for 
fiscal year 2000 and the budget estimate. The bill provides 
$1,000,000 for the repatriation program, the same as the 
request and the comparable amount provided for fiscal year 
2000.
    The Committee does not agree with the President's 
recommendation to change the match rate for paternity testing 
or to repeal the provision in statute that holds the States 
harmless from receiving less than the fiscal year 1995 State 
share of collections.

                   low-income home energy assistance

    The Committee recommends an advance appropriation of 
$1,100,000,000 for the fiscal year 2002 for the low-income home 
energy assistance program (LIHEAP), the same as the budget 
request and the same as the appropriation for fiscal year 2001 
that was enacted in last year's appropriations act. The bill 
also provides $300,000,000 as requested for LIHEAP for fiscal 
year 2001 subject to Presidential submission to Congress of a 
budget request designating the amount of the request as an 
emergency for the purposes of the Budget Act.
    The LIHEAP program provides assistance to low-income 
households to help pay the costs of home energy. Funds are 
provided through grants to States, Indian Tribes and 
territories, and are used for summer cooling and winter 
heating/crisis assistance programs.

                     refugee and entrant assistance

    The bill provides $433,109,000 for refugee assistance 
programs, an increase of $540,000 above the President's request 
and an increase of $7,218,000 above the comparable fiscal year 
2000 amount.
    In addition, the bill provides the Office of Refugee 
Resettlement (ORR) the authority to carry over unexpended funds 
from fiscal year 2001 to reimburse the costs of services 
provided through September 30, 2003. It is estimated that 
approximately $20,000,000 will be available in fiscal year 2001 
from carryover funds, and the Committee intends that these 
funds be used under social services to increase educational 
support to schools with a significant proportion of refugee 
children and for the development of alternative cash assistance 
programs that involve case management approaches to improve 
resettlement outcomes. Such support should include intensive 
English language training and cultural assimilation programs.

Transitional and medical services

    The bill provides $225,176,000 for transitional and medical 
services, the same as the request and $4,483,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 level. The bill continues the policy of 
providing eight months of assistance to new arrivals. The 
transitional and medical services program provides funding for 
the State-administered cash and medical assistance program that 
assists refugees who are not categorically eligible for AFDC or 
Medicaid, the unaccompanied minors program that reimburses 
States for the cost of foster care, and the voluntary agency 
grant program in which participating national refugee 
resettlement agencies provide resettlement assistance with a 
combination of Federal and matched funds.

Social services

    The bill provides $143,621,000 for social services, the 
same as the fiscal year 2000 appropriation and $305,000 above 
the budget request. Funds are distributed by formula as well as 
through the discretionary grant making process for special 
projects. The Committee agrees that $19,000,000 is available 
for assistance to serve communities affected by the Cuban and 
Haitian entrants and refugees whose arrivals in recent years 
have increased. The Committee has set aside $26,000,000 for 
increased support to communities with large concentrations of 
refugees whose cultural differences make assimilation 
especially difficult justifying a more intense level and longer 
duration of Federal assistance. Finally, the Committee has set 
aside $14,000,000 to address the needs of refugees and 
communities impacted by recent changes in Federal assistance 
programs relating to welfare reform. The Committee urges ORR to 
assist refugees at risk of losing, or who have lost, benefits 
including SSI, TANF and Medicaid, in obtaining citizenship.

Preventive health

    The bill includes $4,835,000 for preventive health 
services, the same as the fiscal year 2000 appropriation and 
the request. These funds are awarded to the States to ensure 
adequate health assessment activities for refugees.

Targeted assistance

    The bill provides $49,477,000 for the targeted assistance 
program, about the same as the fiscal year 2000 amount and the 
request. These grants provide assistance to areas with high 
concentrations of refugees.

Victims of torture

    The bill includes $10,000,000 to provide a comprehensive 
program of support for domestic centers and programs for 
victims of torture. This is $235,000 above the budget request 
and $2,735,000 above last year's level. Funds under this 
program are appropriated to assist victims of foreign 
governmental torture and are distributed to non-governmental 
organizations specifically established to assist victims of 
torture. This assistance should be limited to rehabilitation 
and social services for victims of torture and to support 
training of resettlement and health care workers on how to 
assist torture victims.

                 child care and development block grant

    The bill includes an advance appropriation of 
$2,000,000,000 for the Child Care and Development Block Grant 
program for fiscal year 2002, the same as the budget request. 
The bill also includes an additional $400,000,000 in fiscal 
year 2001 funding which would supplement the $1,182,672,000 
that was advanced in last year's appropriations bill for this 
program. This supplemental fiscal year 2001 funding is 
$417,328,000 below the budget request for fiscal year 2001 
supplemental funding.
    The Child Care and Development Block Grant program was 
originally enacted in the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 
1990 to increase the availability, affordability and quality of 
child care by providing funds to States, Territories and Indian 
Tribes for child care services for low-income families. In the 
1996 Welfare Reform Act, the block grant was reauthorized 
through 2002. In addition, that Act contains additional 
mandatory appropriations for child care in the amounts of 
$2,367,000,000 for fiscal year 2001 and increasing amounts for 
each year through 2002.
    The Committee is concerned that the Department has not 
identified specific, measurable performance standards 
consistent with the requirements of the Government Performance 
and Results Act for the Child Care Block Grant. The Committee 
believes that it is essential for the Department to develop 
specific, measurable outcomes for this program. Such data 
should include meaningful baseline data and specific, 
measurable improvements that are expected to occur as a result 
of proposed increased funding.

                      social services block grant

    The bill provides $1,700,000,000 for the social services 
block grant (SSBG), $75,000,000 below the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation and the same as the President's request, as 
amended. This represents the full funding level that is 
authorized for this program for fiscal year 2001 pursuant to 
the provisions of P.L. 105-85, the Transportation Equity Act 
for the 21st Century.
    SSBGs are designed to encourage States to furnish a variety 
of social services to needy individuals to prevent and reduce 
dependency, help individuals achieve and maintain self-
sufficiency, prevent or reduce inappropriate institutional 
care, secure admission or referral for institutional care when 
other forms of care are not appropriate, and prevent neglect, 
abuse and exploitation of children and adults.
    Funds are distributed to the territories in the same ratio 
such funds were allocated in fiscal year 1981. The remainder of 
the appropriation is distributed to the States and the District 
of Columbia according to population.

                children and families services programs

    The bill includes $7,231,253,000, an increase of 
$402,262,000 over the fiscal year 2000 amount and $574,464,000 
under the budget request. This account finances a number of 
programs aimed at enhancing the well-being of the Nation's 
children and families, particularly those who are disadvantaged 
or troubled.

Head Start

    The bill includes $5,667,000,000 for the Head Start program 
for fiscal year 2001, an increase of $400,000,000 over the 
fiscal year 2000 amount and $600,000,000 below the budget 
request. Of this total, the Committee continues the policy 
begun last year of advancing $1,400,000,000 of this account 
into fiscal year 2002. This is the same as the budget request.
    Head Start provides comprehensive development services for 
children and their families. Intended for preschoolers from 
low-income families, the program seeks to foster the 
development of children and enable them to deal more 
effectively with both their present environment and later 
responsibilities in school and community life. Head Start 
programs emphasize cognitive and language development, 
emotional development, physical and mental health, and parent 
involvement to enable each child to develop and function at his 
or her highest potential. At least ten percent of enrollment 
opportunities in each State are made available to handicapped 
children.
    Grants to carry out Head Start programs are awarded to 
public and private non-profit agencies. Grantees must 
contribute 20 percent of the total cost of the program; this is 
usually an in-kind contribution. The Head Start Act does not 
include a formula for the allotment of funds to local grantees; 
however, it does require that 87 percent of the appropriation 
be distributed among States based on a statutory formula. In 
addition, grants, cooperative agreements and contracts are 
awarded in the areas of research, demonstration, technical 
assistance and evaluation from the remaining 13 percent.
    The Committee is concerned about the effect of sleep apnea 
and snoring and the effect of sleep deprivation on children. 
The Committee encourages the Head Start Bureau to examine 
research focusing on the relationship between sleep apnea in 
children and learning difficulties.

Runaway and homeless youth

    The bill includes $64,155,000 for runaway and homeless 
youth activities, the same as the amount available for fiscal 
year 2000 and $10,000,000 less than the budget request.
    The bill follows the structure of P.L. 106-71, the Missing, 
Exploited, and Runaway Children Protection Act of 1999, which 
consolidates the authorization for the current Runaway and 
Homeless Youth, Transitional Living for Homeless Youth, and the 
Drug Education and Prevention for Runaway and Homeless Youth 
programs into a single funding stream, while retaining the 
formula based allocation for basic center grants and the 
national competitive process for transitional living grants. 
The Runaway and Homeless Youth Program will continue to provide 
grants to local public and private organizations to establish 
and operate local runaway and homeless youth centers to address 
the crisis needs of runaway and homeless youth and their 
families. Grants will continue to be used to develop or 
strengthen community-based centers, which are outside the law 
enforcement, juvenile justice, child welfare, and mental health 
systems. Additionally, home-based, street-based, and drug 
education and prevention activities are all allowable uses of 
funds under the basic center grants. The Runaway and Homeless 
Youth Act continues to require that 90% of the program funds be 
used to establish and operate basic centers and transitional 
living programs which meet the immediate needs of runaway and 
homeless youth. Basic center grants would continue to be 
allotted among the States based on each State's youth 
population under 18 years of age. Applications for basic center 
grants are selected for funding through a competitive review 
process based on each State's allocation of funds under the 
formula.
    The Transitional Living Program would no longer have a 
separate funding stream, but would continue to receive no less 
than 20% and no more than 30% of the appropriation. The 
Transitional Living grants will continue to be awarded by the 
Secretary on a national competitive basis.
    While the Administration has proposed consolidation of 
these two programs in the past, the fiscal year 2001 budget 
request continues to request funding for runaway and homeless 
youth under two separate line-items: the basic program, for 
which $43,652,000 was requested; and the transitional living 
program for homeless youth, for which $20,503,000 was 
requested. The Committee's recommends funding at a level which 
reflects the combination of these two programs.
    The Committee includes no funding for the new initiative 
proposed in the budget request called strengthening parent/
child relationships for which $10,000,000 was requested.

Child abuse

    For child abuse prevention and treatment, the Committee 
recommends $39,054,000, the same as both the fiscal year 2000 
level and the budget request. The total amount recommended 
includes $21,026,000 for State grants, which is the same as 
both last year and the budget request, and $18,028,000 for 
discretionary projects, which is the same as both last year and 
the budget request. The child abuse programs attempt to improve 
and increase activities at all levels of government which 
identify, prevent, and treat child abuse and neglect through 
State grants, technical assistance, research, demonstration, 
and service improvement.

Abandoned infants assistance

    The Committee recommends $12,207,000 for the Abandoned 
Infants Assistance Act, the same as the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation and the budget request. The purpose of this 
program is to provide financial support to public and non-
profit private entities to develop, implement, and operate 
demonstration projects that will prevent the abandonment of 
infants and young children; identify and address their needs, 
especially those infected with HIV; assist such children to 
reside with their natural families or in foster care, as 
appropriate; provide respite care for families and caregivers; 
and recruit and train caregivers. Grantees must establish a 
care plan and case review system for each child.

Child welfare services

    The bill includes $291,986,000 for child welfare services, 
the same as the fiscal year 2000 amount and the budget request. 
This program authorized by title IV-B of the Social Security 
Act provides grants to States to assist public welfare agencies 
establish, extend, and strengthen child welfare services in 
order to enable children to remain in their homes under the 
care of their parents, or, where that is not possible, to 
provide alternative permanent homes for them.
    The bill also includes $7,000,000 for child welfare 
training, the same as the fiscal year 2000 amount and the 
budget request. The Committee recognizes the need for trained, 
skilled and qualified child welfare protection personnel. This 
program provides teaching and traineeship grants to schools of 
social work to train social workers in the specialty of child 
welfare.

Adoption opportunities

    The Committee recommends $27,419,000 for adoption 
opportunities, the same as the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2000 amount. The Adoption Opportunities Program provides 
funding specifically targeted to improving the adoption of 
children with special needs and minority children and for 
providing for innovative services that support families 
involved in adoption. The Committee believes that the 
activities funded by this program should provide the direction, 
leadership, and innovation which are needed to achieve the 
goals and reforms of the Adoption and Safe Families Act.
    Toward that end, the Committee intends that funds available 
for Adoption Opportunities be broadly directed toward 
supporting innovative strategies which can improve practices 
and establish model procedures for organizations and agencies 
serving children and families in every State, including: model 
services that demonstrate reasonable efforts to place children 
for adoption; public education on the adoption of children with 
special needs; the development of models for the removal of 
geographic barriers to adoption; recruiting adoptive parents; 
post-adoption services to families; and the increased use of 
electronic exchange systems to facilitate adoptive placements.

Adoption incentives

    The bill includes $43,000,000 for the adoption incentives 
program, $1,209,000 above the budget request and the 2000 
level. This program was authorized in the Adoption and Safe 
Families Act of 1997. These funds are used to pay bonuses to 
States that increase their number of adoptions; the goal is to 
double the number of children adopted or permanently placed out 
of public child welfare systems by 2002. This funding level 
should make adoption a higher priority at the State level.

Social services and income maintenance research

    The bill includes $27,491,000 for social services and 
income maintenance research, the same as the fiscal year 2000 
amount and $20,991,000 above the budget request. These funds 
support research, demonstration, evaluation and dissemination 
activities. Areas covered include such things as welfare 
reform, child care, and child welfare.
    Recognizing that TANF assigns significant responsibilities 
to states for meeting complex information systems and reporting 
requirements, the Committee two years ago urged ACF to help 
states address those issues. ACF turned to the state 
information technology consortium to determine best practices 
for addressing new TANF requirements. As a result, a knowledge 
base will soon be available that will enable each state to 
review an array of best practices and determine which best suit 
their information system needs. The Committee is especially 
pleased that this knowledge base is built upon the practical 
experiences of states. Focus should now turn to helping states 
implement the lessons learned by others. The Committee 
encourages continuation of this effort at the current level of 
support.

Community-based resource centers

    The bill includes $32,835,000 for community-based resource 
centers; the fiscal year 2000 amount and the budget request 
were the same. The purpose of the program is to assist each 
State in developing and operating a network of community-based, 
prevention-focused family resource and support programs that 
coordinate resources among a broad range of human service 
organizations.

Developmental disabilities

    For programs authorized by the Developmental Disabilities 
Assistance Act, the Committee recommends $122,328,000, an 
increase of $53,000 above the amount available for fiscal year 
2000 and the same as the budget request. The total includes 
$65,803,000 for allotments to the States to fund State 
Councils, the same as the budget request and $53,000 above 
fiscal year 2000. These Councils engage in such activities as 
planning, policy analysis, demonstrations, training, outreach, 
interagency coordination, and public education. They do not 
provide direct services to the developmentally-disabled 
population.
    In addition, $28,110,000 will be available to the States to 
be used for operating an advocacy program to protect the rights 
of the developmentally disabled. This is the same as both the 
fiscal year 2000 level and the budget request.
    The bill includes $10,244,000 for special discretionary 
projects for training, technical assistance and demonstration. 
This is the same as the fiscal year 2000 funding level and the 
budget request.
    The Committee approves a total of $18,171,000 for grants to 
university affiliated facilities and satellite centers to 
support the cost of administering and operating demonstration 
facilities and interdisciplinary training programs. This is the 
same as the fiscal year 2000 level and the budget request. 
These are discretionary grants to public and private non-profit 
agencies affiliated with a university. These grants provide 
basic operational and administrative core support for these 
agencies. In addition, these funds support interdisciplinary 
training, community services, technical assistance to State 
agencies and information dissemination.

Native American programs

    The bill includes $35,420,000, the same as the fiscal year 
2000 level and $9,000,000 below the budget request. The 
Administration for Native Americans assists Indian Tribes and 
Native American organizations in planning and implementing 
their own long-term strategies for social and economic 
development. In promoting social and economic self-sufficiency, 
this organization provides financial assistance through direct 
grants for individual projects, training and technical 
assistance, and research and demonstration programs.

Community Services

    The bill includes $595,376,000 for Community Services 
activities, which is $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
level and $54,876,000 over the budget request.
            State block grant
    For the State Block Grant, the bill includes $527,700,000, 
which is an increase of $17,700,000 over the President's 
request and the same as the fiscal year 2000 level. This 
program provides grants to States for services to meet 
employment, housing, nutrition, energy, emergency services, and 
health needs of low-income people. By law, 90% of these funds 
are passed directly through to local community action agencies 
which have previously received block grant funds. The Committee 
is convinced that this program provides the kind of flexibility 
at the local level necessary to assist people who are in 
temporary need of government assistance to get back on their 
feet.
            Community economic development/rural facilities
    The bill includes $30,040,000 for community economic 
development grants, which is the same as the fiscal year 2000 
level and $24,540,000 above the budget request. These 
activities provide assistance to private, locally-initiated 
community development corporations which sponsor enterprises 
providing employment, training and business development 
opportunities for low-income residents in poor communities. In 
certain instances, projects which have been awarded funding may 
not be able to go forward because of changed circumstances. The 
Secretary may approve the use of the funds for another project 
sponsored by the same community development corporation if the 
project meets the requirements of the law and the goals and 
objectives of the original project for which the grant was 
made. The bill also includes $5,321,000 for rural community 
facilities, the same as the fiscal year 2000 level. The 
President proposed no funding for this. These grants are 
provided to multi-state, private nonprofit organizations to 
provide training and technical assistance to small, rural 
communities in meeting their community facilities needs.
            Individual development account
    The bill includes $10,000,000 for individual development 
accounts, the same as the fiscal year 2000 level and 
$15,000,000 below the budget request. Individual development 
accounts are dedicated savings accounts that can be used by 
families with limited means for purchasing a first home, paying 
for postsecondary education or capitalizing a business. The 
intent of the program is to encourage participants to develop 
and reinforce strong habits for saving money. 501(c)(3) 
organizations are eligible to apply for the funds and 
applicants must match federal funds with non-federal funds.
            National youth sports program
    The bill includes $16,000,000 for the National Youth Sports 
Program, which is $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level. 
The President proposed no funding for this program. These funds 
are made available to a private, non-profit organization to 
provide recreational activities for low-income youth, primarily 
in the summer months. College and university athletic 
facilities are employed in the program.
            Community food and nutrition
    The bill provides $6,315,000 for the Community Food and 
Nutrition program, the same as the fiscal year 2000 level. The 
President did not propose funding for this program. This 
program provides grants to public and private agencies to 
coordinate existing food assistance programs, to identify 
sponsors of child nutrition programs and attempt to initiate 
new programs and to do advocacy work at the State and local 
levels.

Family violence prevention programs

    The bill includes $118,074,000 for programs formerly funded 
from the Violent Crime Trust Fund. That is the same as the 
amount for fiscal year 2000 and $16,000,000 below the request. 
Included is $14,999,000 for a program which is designed to 
reduce the sexual abuse of runaway youth. The fiscal year 2000 
amount and the budget request were the same. The Committee 
recommends $101,118,000 for family violence prevention and 
services and battered women's shelters, which is the same as 
the fiscal year 2000 level and $15,800,000 below the budget 
request. This program is designed to assist States in efforts 
to prevent family violence and to provide immediate shelter and 
related assistance for victims of family violence and their 
dependents, and to provide for technical assistance and 
training relating to family violence programs to State and 
local public agencies (including law enforcement agencies), 
nonprofit private organizations, and persons seeking such 
assistance. The bill also includes $1,957,000 to continue 
funding the National Domestic Violence Hotline. This is the 
same as the fiscal year 2000 level and $200,000 below the 
budget request. The Committee applauds the work of the Domestic 
Violence hotline and encourages their efforts to expand 
services to victims of sexual assault.

Program direction

    The Committee has approved $147,908,000 for program 
direction expenses of the Administration for Children and 
Families, the same as the fiscal year 2000 level and 
$16,540,000 below the budget request.

                    family preservation and support

    The Committee recommends $305,000,000 for the family 
preservation and support account, an increase of $10,000,000 
over the fiscal year 2000 appropriation and the same as the 
budget request. This capped entitlement program provides grants 
to States to develop and expand child welfare services 
including family preservation, family reunification, and 
community-based family support services for families at-risk or 
in crisis.

       payments to states for foster care and adoption assistance

    The bill provides $4,863,100,000 for payments to States for 
foster care and adoption assistance, that in combination with 
$1,538,000,000 in advance fiscal year 2001 appropriations 
provided in the fiscal year 2000 Appropriations Act, makes 
available $6,401,100,000 for foster care and adoption 
activities, $5,000,000 below the budget request and 
$703,800,000 above last year's level. The reduction from the 
request is accounted for by the fact that $5,000,000 of the 
request is based upon proposed legislation which has not been 
enacted. The bill also includes an advance appropriation of 
$1,735,900,000 for the first quarter of fiscal year 2002 to 
ensure timely completion of first quarter grant awards.
    Of the total appropriation, including the advance 
appropriation from the prior year, the bill provides 
$5,063,500,000 for the foster care program to provide 
maintenance payments to States on behalf of children who must 
live outside their homes, the same as the request and 
$526,300,000 above the fiscal year 2000 amount.
    Within the total appropriation, including the advance 
appropriation from the prior year, the bill provides 
$1,197,600,000 for adoption assistance, the same as the budget 
request and an increase of $177,500,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 appropriation. This program provides training for parents 
and State administrative staff as well as payments on behalf of 
categorically eligible children considered difficult to adopt. 
This annually appropriated entitlement is designed to provide 
alternatives to long, inappropriate stays in foster care by 
developing permanent placements with families.
    Within the total appropriation for this account, the bill 
provides $140,000,000 for the independent living program, the 
same as the fiscal year 2000 level and the budget request. The 
program is designed to assist foster children age 16 or older 
to make successful transitions to independence. Funds assist 
children to earn high school diplomas, receive vocational 
training, and obtain training in daily living skills. Funds are 
awarded to States on the basis of the number of children on 
behalf of whom Federal foster care payments are received.

                        Administration on Aging


                        aging services programs

    For programs administered by the Administration on Aging, 
the Committee recommends a total of $925,805,000, which is a 
decrease of $7,043,000 below the fiscal year 2000 level and 
$157,814,000 below the budget request. This account finances 
all programs under the Older Americans Act in this bill, with 
the exception of the Community Services Employment Program 
under title V, which is administered by the Department of 
Labor. The Committee notes that the older Americans programs 
again this year lack an authorization for appropriations.
    The Committee has not recommended funding for a new 
national family caregiver support program proposed in the 
budget request. This proposal has never been specifically 
authorized by law. The Committee believes that it should be 
acted upon by the authorizing committees of jurisdiction prior 
to any appropriations being made for it.
    The Committee remains disappointed that the Department has 
not identified better and more ambitious performance standards 
for the Older Americans Act programs consistent with the 
requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act. The 
Committee believes that it is essential for the Department to 
develop more meaningful outcome measures for these programs, 
rather than simply measuring outputs.

Supportive services and centers

    The Committee has included $325,082,000 for supportive 
services and centers. The amount provided is $15,000,000 over 
the fiscal year 2000 level and $125,000,000 below the budget 
request. This includes funding for in-home services for frail 
elderly persons who are at risk of losing their self-
sufficiency due to physical or mental impairments.
    Funds for supportive services and centers are awarded to 
each State with an approved State plan. The formula under title 
III of the Older Americans Act mandates that no State be 
allotted less than the total amount allotted to it in fiscal 
year 1987. The statute also requires that additional funds be 
distributed on the basis of each State's proportionate share of 
the total age 60 and over population, with no State receiving 
less than one-half of one percent of the funds awarded. The 
funds contained in the bill will support coordinated, 
comprehensive service delivery systems at the local level.
    The States have the ability under the basic law to transfer 
up to 20% of funds appropriated between the senior centers 
program and the nutrition programs; this allows the State to 
concentrate its resources in the program it deems most 
critical. Many States do transfer funds into this program from 
the congregate meals program.
    The Committee is aware that family members provide nearly 
80 percent of all health care to frail elders. The Committee 
encourages the Administration on Aging to support and evaluate 
innovative community-based programs that build on the strengths 
of families to provide cost-effective and high quality care.

Ombudsman/elder abuse

    The bill includes $13,181,000 for the State long-term care 
ombudsman activities, the elder abuse prevention program, State 
elder rights and outreach and counseling authorized by title 
VII of the Older Americans Act. The amount provided is the same 
as the fiscal year 2000 level and the budget request. This 
program provides the assistance needed by vulnerable older 
Americans to protect themselves from abuse and exploitation, to 
exercise control over their environment, and to locate the 
resources they need for care and daily living.

Preventive health

    The bill includes $16,123,000 for preventive health 
services authorized under part F of title III of the Act. This 
is the same as the budget request and the fiscal year 2000 
funding level. These funds are awarded to States by formula to 
allow States and communities the flexibility to meet the health 
promotion and disease prevention needs of older people.

Nutrition programs

    For congregate nutrition services, the Committee includes 
$374,412,000, the same as the fiscal year 2000 level and the 
budget request. For home-delivered nutrition services, the 
Committee provides $147,000,000, the same as the fiscal year 
2000 level and the budget request. These programs are intended 
to address some of the difficulties confronting older 
individuals, namely nutrition deficiencies due to inadequate 
income, lack of adequate facilities to prepare food, and social 
isolation. The States have the ability under the basic law to 
transfer up to 20% of funds appropriated between the senior 
centers program and the nutrition programs; this allows the 
State to concentrate its resources in the program it deems most 
critical.
    The nutrition programs also collect substantial sums each 
year in voluntary contributions from participants; private 
sector funds are also contributed. Volunteers also make a 
significant contribution to these programs.

Grants to Indian tribes

    The bill provides $18,457,000 for grants to Indian tribes. 
This is the same as the fiscal year 2000 amount and $5,000,000 
below the budget request. Funds under this program are awarded 
to tribal organizations to be used to promote opportunities for 
older Indians, to secure and maintain independence and self-
sufficiency, and to provide transportation, nutrition, health 
screening and other services to help meet the needs of this 
population.

Research, training and special projects

    The bill provides $9,119,000 for research, training and 
special projects under title IV of the Older Americans Act, 
$22,043,000 below the fiscal year 2000 funding level and 
$27,043,000 below the President's request. Funds under this 
program are used to support education and training activities 
for personnel working in the field of aging and to finance 
research, development, and demonstration projects.
    The Committee urges continued funding for research into 
Alzheimer's disease care options, best practices and other 
Alzheimer's research priorities as described in last year's 
House report (106-370).

Alzheimer's demonstration grants

    The Committee provides $5,970,000 for Alzheimer's 
demonstration grants, which is the same as the fiscal year 2000 
level and the budget request. The program provides grants to 
States to help them plan and establish programs to provide 
health care services to individuals with Alzheimer's disease. 
Funds are used for respite care and supportive services, 
clearinghouses, training, and administrative costs for State 
offices. By law, States are required to match the Federal 
funding at 45 percent of the cost of the program by the third 
year of the grant.

Program administration

    The bill includes $16,461,000 for program administration 
expenses of the Administration on Aging. This is $771,000 below 
the budget request and the same as the fiscal year 2000 amount. 
This activity provides administrative and management support 
for all Older Americans Act programs administered by the 
Department.

                        Office of the Secretary


                    GENERAL DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT

    The bill includes $212,631,000 for general departmental 
management, which is $1,207,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $3,039,000 above the adjusted 
Administration request. Included in this amount is authority to 
spend $5,851,000 from the Medicare trust funds. The Committee 
provides funding for the health informatics initiative under 
the Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund. The 
Administration requested $20,000,000 for this initiative within 
the Office of the Secretary.
    This appropriation supports those activities that are 
associated with the Secretary's roles as policy officer and 
general manager of the Department. The Office of the Secretary 
also implements Administration and Congressional directives, 
and provides assistance, direction and coordination to the 
headquarters, regions and field organizations of the 
Department. This account also supports several small health 
activities that are centrally administered.
    The Committee encourages the Secretary to allocate 
necessary funds to maintain the Chronic Fatigue Syndrome 
Coordinating Committee (CFSCC). The Committee urges the CFSCC 
to create a yearly action plan focusing attention on expanding 
research on CFS, augmenting health care provider education, and 
executing the CFSCC's charter to provide coordination and 
ensure accountability of the agencies' CFS programs.
    The Committee encourages the Department and the agencies 
represented on the CFSCC to take a leadership role in informing 
health care professionals and the general public about CFS, 
focusing on the prevalent and serious nature of CFS. The 
Committee also encourages the Secretary and the Surgeon General 
to undertake a prominent educational campaign to inform the 
public that CFS is a serious and disabling illness. The 
Committee urges the Secretary to ensure that all of the PHS 
agencies' CFS research programs are effective and ambitious.
    The Committee is pleased that a representative of the 
primary immune deficiency community has been appointed to the 
Department's Advisory Committee on Blood Safety and 
Availability. The Committee encourages the Advisory Committee 
to continue to address the longstanding shortage of intravenous 
immune globulin, a pooled plasma derivative that primary immune 
deficient patients need to maintain their health.
    There is concern over the ability of long term care 
facility's to retain nursing staff. Often, the staff is the 
patients' only family and patients form relationships with 
staff that are integral to caregiving. The Committee requests 
the Secretary to conduct a study on staff retention in long 
term care facilities, including the cost of programs set up by 
long term care facilities to deal with this problem and its 
impact on quality of patient care. The Secretary should provide 
a report to the Committee by June 30, 2001. The report should 
also include what steps can be taken to improve staff 
retention, such as special training to enhance the skill level 
of certified nurse assistants in targeted areas such as 
Alzheimers care and nutrition and hydration.
    The Committee is supportive of the various research efforts 
into the growing use of and the effects of pharmacoepidology 
drugs on the physical, cognitive, and emotional development of 
children. The Committee urges the Secretary to undertake 
increased inter-departmental efforts to publicize the findings 
of these research efforts with an emphasis on education efforts 
of parents and pediatricians on the safe use and potential 
dangers of these drugs.
    There is concern about the increase in lawsuits against 
nursing homes nationwide, the high costs of insurance, and the 
increases in bankruptcies and operating costs associated with 
these lawsuits. The Committee encourages the Secretary to study 
the effects of nursing home lawsuits on the costs to Medicare 
and Medicaid, its effects on the access to care by 
beneficiaries, and its effects on the facility and its ability 
to hire qualified and dedicated worker professionals. The 
Secretary should be prepared to provide a status report on this 
issue at the fiscal year 2002 appropriations hearing.
    The Office of the Surgeon General is to be commended for 
its efforts toward improving the health status of all citizens. 
However, the Committee continues to be concerned about the 
devastating and disproportionate impact that cardiovascular 
disease has on African Americans. African Americans have a 50% 
greater risk of heart disease and a 50% greater risk of fatal 
stroke than Whites. The Office of the Surgeon General plays an 
important role in addressing this critical issue and is 
encouraged to work with health professionals which have 
expertise in this area in order to formulate new strategies 
aimed at improving access to cardiovascular care, as well as 
intervention strategies to reduce cardiovascular morbidity and 
mortality among African Americans. The Secretary is requested 
to provide a progress report as part of the fiscal year 2002 
budget submission.
    The Committee encourages the Secretary to consider moving 
the Lyme Disease Coordinating Council to the Office of the 
Secretary and restructure the Council to include all tick-borne 
disorders in an effort to assure coordination and communication 
regarding all tick-borne diseases across all Departmental 
agencies and with other governmental agencies, the biomedical 
research community, community-based clinicians, voluntary 
organizations, and patient advocates.
    The Committee understands that the Department is succeeding 
in educating immigrant communities about the serious health 
risks associated with female genital mutilation and has 
distributed a manual for health care professionals to assist 
them in dealing with the complications of this procedure. The 
Committee urges the Secretary to continue these activities.
    The Committee is concerned about the more than 30 million 
people living with HIV and AIDS in Africa and in other parts of 
the developing world, most of whom currently receive little, if 
any, health care or support. In some countries, HIV infection 
rates already approach 20 percent of the entire population. In 
the next decade, without international assistance and massive 
prevention efforts, millions of more new cases of HIV infection 
and AIDS-related deaths appear unavoidable, resulting in a 20 
to 30 year drop in overall life expectancy in some countries, 
and a projected explosion of the AIDS orphan population from 4 
million currently to 40 million by 2010. The Committee believes 
that it is important to develop health care and support 
services in addition to prevention and education activities, 
and that agencies with expertise and experience in training 
providers, as well as mobilizing communities for the delivery 
of palliative care, basic treatment, and support services be 
included in these essential activities. The Committee urges the 
Secretary to ensure that CDC, in cooperation with USAID, 
pursues an aggressive response to the epidemic, and draws upon 
the full range of expertise within HHS, including NIH and HRSA, 
to ensure that all support and in-country assistance coming 
from the U.S. government is as fully responsive as possible to 
each nation's needs for HIV/AIDS surveillance, research, 
prevention and treatment services.

Adolescent family life

    The bill provides $24,327,000 for the adolescent family 
life program, which is $5,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $16,700,000 above the Administration 
request. The Committee has included increased funds in an 
effort to fund new care programs for pregnant and parenting 
teens. No new programs for pregnant and parenting teens have 
been funded since 1995, despite consistently high numbers of 
applications for such programs. The additional funding is to be 
used to give renewed and focused support to the primary purpose 
of the program, to provide care programs for pregnant and 
parenting teens.

Physical fitness and sports

    The bill provides $1,091,000 for the President's Council on 
Physical Fitness and Sports, which is the same as the fiscal 
year 2000 comparable appropriation and $61,000 below the 
Administration request. The Council has sought to improve the 
level of physical fitness nationwide through professional 
consultation, technical assistance, and public information 
which is provided to school systems, government agencies, 
employee organizations, private business and industry, and 
professional organizations.

Minority health

    The bill includes $38,638,000 for the Office of Minority 
Health, which is $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable amount and the same as the Administration request. 
According to the budget request, the Office of Minority Health 
works with Public Health Service agencies and other agencies of 
the Department in a ``catalytic, coordinative, advocacy and 
policy development role'' to establish goals and coordinate 
other activities in the Department regarding disease 
prevention, health promotion, service delivery and research 
relating to disadvantaged and minority individuals; concludes 
interagency agreements to stimulate and undertake innovative 
projects; supports research, demonstration, and evaluation 
projects; and coordinates efforts to promote minority health 
programs and policies in the voluntary and corporate sectors.
    The Committee is pleased that the Office of Minority Health 
has taken a leadership role in conducting and coordinating a 
study on managed care and historically minority health 
professions schools, and encourages continued support.
    The Committee urges the Secretary to provide adequate funds 
for minority health professions and research training 
fellowships across all Departmental agencies. These programs 
are critical to increasing the numbers of minority health 
professionals and researchers who are essential to ensuring 
patients' access to culturally competent health care services 
as well as their inclusion in clinical trials.
    The Committee encourages the Secretary to support grants to 
eligible non-governmental agencies for the development of 
outreach programs to inform individuals in medically 
underserved areas how to access managed care organizations in 
their communities and assist physicians and other health care 
professionals who serve in medically underserved areas to 
enroll as providers in managed care organizations in their 
communities.

Office on Women's Health

    The bill includes $16,495,000 for the Office on Women's 
Health, which is $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and the same as the Administration request. 
The Committee notes that each of the Public Health Service 
agencies under its jurisdiction supports an office or program 
which focuses on women's health. The Office on Women's Health 
advises the Secretary and provides Department-wide coordination 
of programs focusing specifically on women's health.
    The Committee is aware of the unique role played by the 
various offices throughout the Department, including NIH, CDC, 
FDA, HRSA, SAMHSA, AHRQ, and HCFA dedicated to women's health 
and women's health research. The Committee believes that these 
offices are essential to the mission of the Department and that 
they need to be adequately supported to accomplish their goals. 
The Committee requests the Secretary to provide a report by 
January 15, 2001 outlining in detail the major programs of each 
of these offices and the Department's plan for the future.

                    OFFICE OF THE INSPECTOR GENERAL

    The bill includes $31,394,000 for the Office of the 
Inspector General, which is the same as the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $2,455,000 below the Administration 
request. A large permanent appropriation for this office is 
contained in the Health Insurance Portability and 
Accountability Act of 1996. Total funds provided between this 
bill and the permanent appropriation would be $151,394,000 in 
FY 2001. The bill includes language limiting the permanent 
appropriation to the fiscal year 2000 funding level.
    The Office of the Inspector General was created by law to 
protect the integrity of Departmental programs as well as the 
health and welfare of beneficiaries served by those programs. 
Through a comprehensive program of audits, investigations, 
inspections and program evaluations, the OIG attempts to reduce 
the incidence of fraud, waste, abuse and mismanagement, and to 
promote economy, efficiency and effectiveness throughout the 
Department.
    The Committee instructs the Inspector General of the 
Department of Health and Human Services to provide the 
Committee with semi-annual reports on the actual deficit 
reduction impact of the Health Insurance Portability and 
Accountability Act of 1996. The Committee has made this request 
in the past and has received some reports from the IG. However, 
the reports have been sporadic.
    The Committee complements the work of the Office of the 
Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human 
Services for their work in obtaining information on actual 
collections, offsets, and funds put to better use as required 
in House Report 105-635. This information is of great use to 
the Committee and the Committee understands the difficulty 
encountered by the OIG in obtaining it. The Committee expects 
that the Office of Inspector General will continue to report 
the information to it.

                        OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS

    The bill includes $22,088,000, the same as the fiscal year 
2000 comparable level and $1,968,000 below the Administration 
request. This includes authority to transfer $3,314,000 from 
the Medicare trust funds.
    The Office for Civil Rights is responsible for enforcing 
civil rights statutes that prohibit discrimination in health 
and human services programs. OCR implements the civil rights 
laws through a compliance program designed to generate 
voluntary compliance among all HHS recipients.

                            POLICY RESEARCH

    The bill includes $16,738,000, which is the same as the 
amount available in fiscal year 2000 and the same as the budget 
request. The Policy Research account, authorized by section 
1110 of the Social Security Act, is the Department's principal 
source of policy-relevant data and research on the income 
sources of low-income populations; the impact, effectiveness, 
and distribution of benefits under existing and proposed 
programs; and other issues that cut across agency lines.

            public health and social services emergency fund

    The Committee provides an emergency allocation of 
$500,640,000 for the Public Health and Social Services 
Emergency Fund, which is $81,563,000 below the fiscal year 2000 
comparable level and $10,140,000 above the Administration 
request, when adjusted for comparable transfers. The 
Administration did not request this funding as an emergency. 
The amount provided includes $182,000,000 for bioterrorism and 
related activities at the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention (CDC), of which $30,000,000 is for the Health Alert 
Network and $2,000,000 is to discover, develop, and transition 
anti-infective agents to combat emerging diseases. Also within 
this total, the Committee has provided funding for the National 
Electronic Disease Surveillance System/Preventing Emerging 
Infectious Diseases and Health Informatics Initiative requested 
under CDC and the Office of the Secretary respectively. The 
Committee does not identify specific amounts for these or other 
activities within the remaining $150,000,000, rather it allows 
the Secretary to prioritize activities and fund them 
accordingly.
    In addition, the amount provided includes $54,600,000 for 
bioterrorism activities of the Office of Emergency 
Preparedness; $100,000,000 for the Ricky Ray Hemophilia Relief 
Fund Act within the Health Resources and Services 
Administration, of which up to $8,000,000 for program 
administration; $61,000,000 for global HIV/AIDS activities at 
CDC; $50,000,000 for minority HIV/AIDS activities within the 
Office of the Secretary; $25,000,000 for polio eradication 
activities at CDC; $18,040,000 for continuation of anthrax 
vaccine research at CDC; and $10,000,000 for activities related 
to West Nile-like virus at CDC.
    Within the funding provided to the National Electronic 
Disease Surveillance System, the Committee encourages the 
Secretary to include a focus on antimocrobial resistance, 
including the development of effective public health strategies 
to combat the many factors contributing to the rise of 
antimicrobial resistance.
    Within the funding provided for minority HIV/AIDS 
activities, the Committee encourages the Secretary to implement 
a media campaign on prevention of AIDS in the black community.
    Within the funding provided to CDC for bioterrorism and 
related activities, the Committee urges CDC to carry out 
research, testing, and related activities aimed at protecting 
workers such as firefighters and emergency medical personnel 
who respond to public health needs in the event of a terrorist 
incident.

                   TITLE III DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

    The bill includes a total of $39,590,049,000 for programs 
in the Department of Education, an increase of $1,646,480,000 
above last year. Overall, the bill provides an increase in 
Elementary and Secondary Education programs of $576,182,000 
above last year. However, there are many education programs 
funded elsewhere in the bill. The following chart indicates the 
major funding sources for education in the bill.

                                                EDUCATION FUNDING
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                      FY 2001     FY 2001, above
                                                                      FY 2000       (Committee    (+) or below (-
                                                                                      Action)        ) FY 2000
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary:
    Department of Education.....................................         $35,605         $37,190          $1,585
    Head Start..................................................           5,267           5,667             400
    NIH Training Grants.........................................             895             935              40
    Health Professions Training.................................             342             411              69
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      Total Discretionary.......................................          42,109          44,203           2,094
                                                                 ===============================================
Mandatory:
    Department of Education.....................................           2,339           2,400              61
    Medicare direct/indirect costs of medical education.........           7,680           8,170             490
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      Total Mandatory...........................................          10,019          10,570             551
                                                                 ===============================================
``Off budget'' spending:
    Direct loan obligations.....................................          14,855          15,613             758
    Federal Family Education Loans..............................          25,540          26,902           1,362
                                                                 -----------------------------------------------
      Total ``Off budget''......................................          40,395          42,515           2,120
Total Education Spending........................................          92,523          97,288           4,765
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Funds for this agency are appropriated under current law. 
The Education and the Workforce Committee is currently 
undertaking a reauthorization of programs within the Elementary 
and Secondary Education Act. The President submitted his budget 
reflecting his proposals for the reauthorization. The Committee 
has chosen to fund activities as defined under current law and 
will address changes in programs as a result of reauthorization 
in conference.
    The Committee is deeply concerned that some secondary 
schools receiving Department of Education funds are denying 
military recruiters the same access to students that is 
provided to postsecondary institutions and prospective 
employers of these students. The Committee strongly urges the 
Department of Education to communicate with secondary schools 
about this matter and to encourage them to provide military 
recruiters the same minimum access to students provided to 
post-secondary institutions and potential employers.

                            EDUCATION REFORM

    The bill includes $1,505,000,000 for Education Reform 
programs. This amount is $601,000,000 less than the budget 
request and $260,182,000 less than the 2000 amount. This 
appropriation account includes Goals 2000 under the Goals 2000: 
Educate America Act, School-to-Work under the School-To-Work 
Opportunities Act, technology programs under the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act, and 21st Century Schools under the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

Goals 2000: Educate America Act: State and local education systematic 
        improvement grants and parental assistance

    The bill does not include funding for programs authorized 
by titles III and IV of the Goals 2000: Educate America Act. 
This amount is $83,000,000 below the budget request and 
$491,000,000 below the fiscal year 2000 appropriation level for 
this activity. The Goals 2000 programs will be repealed on 
September 30, 2000 pursuant to the provisions of P.L. 106-113, 
the fiscal year 2000 appropriations Act.

Recognition and reward

    The bill does not include funding for a new initiative 
proposed in the budget called recognition and reward for which 
$50,000,000 was requested. This program would give financial 
rewards to states that demonstrate significant statewide gains 
in student achievement. However, this program is not currently 
authorized in law. The Committee has chosen to fund activities 
as defined under current law and will address changes in 
programs that occur as a result of reauthorization in 
conference.

School-to-work opportunities

    The bill does not include funding for State grants and 
local partnerships under the School-to-Work Opportunities Act. 
This is the same as the budget request and $55,000,000 below 
the fiscal year 2000 level. The recommended funding level 
reflects the final phase-out of the program as States assume 
full responsibility for institutionalizing their school-to-work 
systems, as outlined in the School-to-Work Opportunities Act.

Education technology

    The bill includes $905,000,000 for Education Technology. 
This amount is $2,000,000 above the Administration's fiscal 
year 2001 request and $139,195,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation. Included in this account are the technology 
literacy challenge fund, technology innovation challenge 
grants, regional technology in education consortia, teacher 
training in technology, community-based technology centers, and 
technology leadership activities. Three demonstration programs 
(star schools, ready to learn TV, and telecommunications 
demonstration projects for mathematics) are also included in 
this account.
    The Committee remains concerned by the rapid increase in 
funding in this program in addition to other funding provided 
in title I, title VI, Special Education, and other programs of 
the Department of Education as well as funding made available 
to elementary and secondary schools from the Telecommunications 
Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-9104). The Committee expects that the 
Department will continue to abide by, and supply the data 
required by, the conference report on P.L. 104-208. In 
addition, the Committee expects the Department to continue 
providing such data for all programs funded in this account 
under the heading ``Education Technology'' and for funding made 
available through the ``E-Rate'' program as part of the 
Telecommunications Act of 1996 (P.L. 104-104) in their annual 
operating plan.

Education technology: technology literacy challenge fund

    The Committee recommends $517,000,000 for the technology 
literacy challenge fund, $67,000,000 above the budget request 
and $92,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level. The fund 
assists States in integrating technology into curriculum. The 
goal of this program is to assure that students become 
technologically literate and possess the academic, 
communications and critical thinking skills essential for 
success in the information age.
    Each State receives a share of funding based on its share 
of funds under part A of title I of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act. Funds are distributed to local 
education agencies on the basis of competitive sub-grants. 
States receive funding on the basis of a State plan describing 
its long-term strategies for financing technology education in 
the State, involving the private sector and assisting school 
districts with the greatest needs.
    The Committee believes that, while the Department has made 
good progress toward developing measurable student achievement 
standards consistent with the requirements of the Government 
Performance and Results Act for the technology literacy 
challenge fund, more work remains. For example, the Department 
should develop data on the percentage of students who are 
currently computer-proficient and how that figure will increase 
as a result of proposed funding increases.

Education technology: technology innovation challenge grants

    The Committee recommends $197,500,000 for technology 
innovation challenge grants, $51,245,000 above fiscal year 2000 
level. The President did not request separate line-item funding 
for this program.
    The technology innovation challenge grants program is 
designed to support partnerships among educators, business, and 
industry, and other community organizations to develop 
innovative applications of technology and plans for fully 
integrating technology into schools. The program provided 99 
new and continuing competitive grants in fiscal year 2000 to 
consortia that include at least one local educational agency 
with a high percentage or number of children living in poverty.
    In past years, the Committee has funded initiatives to 
improve student mathematics and reading skills through the use 
of in-class technology. The Committee continues to support 
interactive, computer learning programs that are being used to 
deliver textbook materials and integrate technology into 
elementary and secondary pre-algebra and algebra classrooms.
    The Committee believes that, while the Department has made 
good progress toward developing measurable student achievement 
standards consistent with the requirements of the Government 
Performance and Results Act for the technology innovation 
challenge grants, more work remains. For example, the 
Department should develop data on the percentage of students 
who are currently computer-proficient and how that figure will 
increase as a result of proposed funding increases.

Education technology: regional technology in education consortia

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for regional 
technology in education consortia, the same as the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2000 level. The regional technology 
in education consortia supports 6 regional programs of 
information and resource dissemination, professional 
development, and technical assistance. The Committee is 
disappointed with the lack of baseline data and outcome-based 
performance indicators for this program.

Next generation technology initiative

    The bill does not provide funding for the new line item 
proposed by the budget called next generation technology 
initiative for which $170,000,000 was requested. This is part 
of the Administration's proposed new structure for education 
technology programs under the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act reauthorization. The Committee has chosen to fund 
activities as defined under current law and will address 
changes in programs that occur as a result of reauthorization 
in conference.

Education technology: national activities

    The Committee recommends $119,500,000 for education 
technology national activities: Teacher training in technology, 
community based technology, and technology leadership 
activities.

Teacher training in technology

    The Committee recommends $85,000,000 for teacher training 
in technology, which is $65,000,000 below the budget request 
and $10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 funding level. This 
program helps prepare teachers to use technology to improve 
instructional practices and to enhance student learning in the 
classroom.

Community-based technology centers

    The Committee recommends $32,500,000 for community-based 
technology centers, which is the same as fiscal year 2000 and 
$67,500,000 below the budget request. This program provides 
access to technology and other services for disadvantaged 
students and adults unable to purchase computers for use at 
home.

Technology leadership activities

    The Committee recommends $2,000,000 for technology 
leadership activities, which is the same as both fiscal year 
2000 and the budget request. Funds under this program will be 
used to strengthen evaluation of the effectiveness of 
technology programs and to bring together public and private 
entities to help schools and communities effectively use all 
available resources in technology.

Educational technology: star schools

    The Committee recommends $45,000,000 for the star schools 
program, $5,550,000 below the fiscal year 2000 amount. The 
President did not request funding for this program through a 
separate line item. Star schools programs use distance learning 
technologies to enhance student learning, especially in rural 
areas.

Educational technology: ready to learn television

    The bill includes $16,000,000 for ready to learn 
television, the same as both the budget request and the 2000 
amount. Program objectives include the development and 
distribution of educational and instructional video programming 
for preschool and elementary school children and their parents.
    The Committee expects that the original program objectives 
of developing, producing and distributing new, high-quality 
televised educational programming for preschool and elementary 
school children and their caregivers will remain a top priority 
in determining specific uses for this funding in fiscal year 
2001.
    The Committee is aware of the educational potential of 
digital television and the nation's local public television 
stations' commitment to establishing partnerships to produce 
high quality education digital content. The Committee 
encourages the Department to support such activities within 
available funds.

Telecommunications demonstration projects for mathematics

    The Committee recommends no funding for this demonstration 
program. This amount is $8,500,000 below the fiscal year 2000 
amount and the same as the budget request. The Committee 
continues to be concerned about the significant delays in 
funding draw-downs in this account and subsequently directs the 
Public Broadcasting Service, in consultation with the 
Department of Education and the Corporation for Public 
Broadcasting, to submit a report to the Committee no later than 
July 1, 2000 on the amounts of funding spent and planned to be 
spent on each specific object classification and activity for 
the past five fiscal years.

21st century community learning centers

    The bill provides $600,000,000 for 21st century community 
learning centers, $400,000,000 below the budget request and 
$146,623,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level. The Committee's 
proposal represents the largest funding level in the program's 
history and is estimated to provide over 1 million children 
with safe environments for them to gain academic enrichment in 
fiscal year 2001.
    Funding for after school centers has increased dramatically 
since fiscal year 1996, at which time these programs were 
funded at less than $1 million. The Committee is aware that the 
Administration has proposed several changes to this program 
including conversion to a formula grant and matching 
requirements for grantees. Until the program structure is 
ultimately agreed upon through the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act reauthorization process, the Committee believes 
that a 30 percent increase in the current program demonstrates 
continued commitment to after school centers.
    The Committee is also aware that H.R. 4141, the Education 
Opportunities to Protect and Invest in Our Nation's Students 
(Education OPTIONS) Act, combines the Safe and Drug-Free 
Schools program and 21st Century Community Learning Centers Act 
and allows schools to use funds for comprehensive drug and 
violence prevention programs, counseling and mentoring, before 
and after school programs and other safety measures, as long as 
these activities are based on research that shows the activity 
will prevent or reduce drug abuse and violence. The Committee 
intends that, if this legislation is enacted, funding for the 
Safe and Drug Free Schools Program and the 21st Century 
Community Learning Centers Program will be consolidated.
    The 21st Century Community Learning Centers program 
supports grants to rural and inner-city public elementary or 
secondary schools, or consortia of such schools, to enable them 
to plan, implement, or expand projects that benefit the 
educational, health, social service, cultural, and recreational 
needs of a rural or inner-city community. Assistance must be 
equitably distributed among the States, among urban and rural 
areas of the United States, and among urban and rural areas of 
a State. Grants must be made for at least $35,000, and priority 
must be given to applications offering a broad selection of 
services that address the needs of the community. Each grantee 
must provide at least four services listed in the authorizing 
legislation. These include: literacy education programs; 
children's day care services; summer and weekend school 
programs in conjunction with recreation programs; expanded 
library service hours to serve community needs; 
telecommunications and technology education programs for 
individuals of all ages; parenting skills education programs; 
employment counseling, training, and placement; services for 
individuals who leave school before graduating from secondary 
school, regardless of the age of such individual; and services 
for individuals with disabilities.
    Funding under the 21st Century Community Learning Centers 
may be used for after-school activities. These funds are to 
support, not supplant, existing programs which are being 
offered by nonprofit organizations in communities of need.
    The Committee is pleased with the progress the Department 
has made in developing measurable indicators for the 21st 
Century Learning Centers program and believes the progress made 
thus far in achieving these targets is promising.

                    EDUCATION FOR THE DISADVANTAGED

    The bill includes $8,816,986,000 for the education for the 
disadvantaged programs. This amount is $332,514,000 less that 
the budget request and $116,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation. This appropriation account includes compensatory 
education programs authorized under title I of the Elementary 
and Secondary Education Act of 1965.

Grants to local educational agencies

    Of the amounts provided for Title I programs, 
$6,783,000,000 is available for basic grants to local education 
agencies and State administration. This is the same as the 
amount for the 2000-2001 school year and $1,255,397,000 above 
the request. Funding for concentration grants, which targets 
funds to local education agencies in counties with high levels 
of disadvantaged children, is $1,158,397,000, the same as last 
year and the request level. The Committee has not provided 
funds under Targeted Grants. The administration requested 
$1,671,500,000 for Targeted Grants.
    Of the total of $7,941,397,000 made available for school 
year 2001-2002 for grants to LEAs, $1,733,134,000 is 
appropriated for fiscal year 2001 for obligation after July 1, 
2001 and $6,204,763,000 is appropriated for fiscal year 2002 
for obligation on, or after, October 1, 2001. A remaining 
$3,500,000 for title I evaluations is made available for 
obligation on October 1, 2000.
    This program is currently undergoing reauthorization. 
Several changes have been proposed by both the Administration 
and the authorizing committees with respect to accountability 
provisions and school choice within that context. Until the 
program's structure is ultimately agreed upon through the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act reauthorization process, 
the Committee is recommending level funding for the program.
    Financial assistance flows to school districts by formula, 
based in part on the number of school-aged children from low-
income families. Within districts, local school officials 
target funds on school attendance areas with the greatest 
number or percentage of children from poor families. Local 
school districts develop and implement their own programs to 
meet the needs of disadvantaged students. About 14,000 local 
school districts participate in the program, which served an 
estimated 6.2 to 6.5 million pupils in 1995.
    Funds under this account will also be used to pay the 
Federal share of State administrative costs for title I 
programs. The maximum State administration grant is equal to 1 
percent of title I local educational agency plus State agency 
grants to the State, or $400,000, whichever is greater. These 
funds are included in the grants to local educational agencies 
account, rather than being a separate line item.
    The Committee believes that the Department has made good 
progress in developing measurable standards for improvement in 
student academic achievement consistent with the requirements 
of the Government Performance and Results Act for education for 
the disadvantaged.
    The Committee does not include a ``100 percent hold 
harmless'' legislative rider for the Title I program for fiscal 
year 2001. The Committee notes that the budget request also 
rejects this provision. The Committee believes that such 
legislative riders unfairly penalize underprivileged and 
immigrant children in growing states, including Arizona, 
Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, 
Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, South 
Carolina, Texas, Virginia and the District of Columbia. These 
states represent over half of the U.S. population of 
underprivileged schoolchildren. The Committee strongly concurs 
with the following statement of the Department of Education 
submitted for the record as part of the fiscal year 1999 budget 
hearings:

          The hold harmless prevented retargeting from taking 
        effect with the use of new poverty data. We strongly 
        believe that special [hold-harmless] appropriations 
        language should not be included, since the authorizing 
        statue for Title I already provides a hold-harmless for 
        Title I Basic Grants in an amount equal to between 85 
        and 95 percent of each district's prior year Title I 
        allocation, depending on the district poverty level. 
        Inserting a 100 percent hold-harmless prevents funds 
        from flowing to districts that are gaining poor 
        children, as documented by the updated data. But the 
        whole purpose of using updated data is to reflect, in 
        the allocations, these population shifts. A basic 
        principle in targeting should be to drive funds to 
        where the poor children are, not to where they were a 
        decade ago.

Demonstrations of comprehensive school reform

    The bill includes $190,000,000 for demonstrations of 
comprehensive school reform; this is the same as the budget 
request and $20,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level. The 
Committee expects that the Department will continue to follow 
the directives in the conference report accompanying the fiscal 
year 1998 bill (House Report 105-390) and in the conference 
report accompanying the fiscal year 1999 bill (House Report 
105-825). The Committee provides these funds to continue the 
wide-scale application of effective approaches to comprehensive 
school reform in title I schools.
    This program provides schools with funds to develop and 
implement school reforms based on reliable research that will 
enable children to meet State academic standards. The Committee 
is pleased with the progress being made on developing specific, 
measurable goals for this program.

Capital expenses for private school students

    The Committee recommends no funding for capital expenses 
grants for private schools. This amount is the same as the 
Administration's request and $12,000,000 below the fiscal year 
2000 amount.
    Capital expenses grants were authorized to pay some of the 
additional costs of providing title I services to children who 
attend nonpublic schools. A 1985 U.S. Supreme Court decision, 
Aguilar v. Felton, determined that public school teachers or 
other employees could not be sent to sectarian nonpublic 
schools for the purpose of providing title I services. The 
capital expenses grants were used for rental of classroom space 
in neutral sites (i.e., locations other than private or public 
schools), rental of mobile vans used for title I instruction, 
or transportation of nonpublic pupils to public schools or 
neutral sites.
    The United States Supreme Court recently reconsidered, and 
reversed, its decision in the Aguilar case and both the budget 
request and the Committee's recommendation implement a policy 
of discontinuing this program. The Committee notes that school 
districts may continue to reserve funds from their annual Title 
I allocations to cover extra expenses involved in providing 
services to private-school students.

Even Start

    The Committee provides $250,000,000 for Even Start, 
$100,000,000 above both last year and the request. Even Start 
provides demonstration grants for model programs of joint 
education of disadvantaged children, aged 1-7 years, who live 
in title I target school attendance areas, plus their parents 
who are eligible to be served under the Adult Education Act. 
These parents are not in school, are above the State's 
compulsory school attendance age limit, and have not earned a 
high school diploma (or equivalent). At appropriations levels 
above $50,000,000, Even Start funds are allocated to the 
States, generally in proportion to title I basic grants.
    The Committee believes that the Department has made good 
progress in developing specific, outcome-based performance 
indicators for the Even Start program. The Committee notes that 
funding under the Reading Excellence Act and the Adult 
Education Act state grants program can also be used to support 
and expand family literacy activities.

State agency programs: migrant

    The bill includes $354,689,000 for the migrant education 
program, $25,311,000 below the budget request and the same as 
the fiscal year 2000 appropriation. This program supports 
formula grants to State agencies for the support of special 
educational and related services to children of migratory 
agricultural workers and fishermen. The purpose of this program 
is to provide supplementary academic education, remedial or 
compensatory instruction, English for limited English 
proficient students, testing, guidance and counseling.

State agency programs: neglected and delinquent

    For the State agency program for neglected and delinquent 
children, the bill includes $42,000,000; this level is the same 
as the budget request and the same as the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation. This formula grant program provides services to 
participants in institutions for juvenile delinquents, adult 
correctional institutions, or institutions for the neglected.
    The Committee believes that the Department must continue to 
work on developing specific, numerical standards for 
improvement in student academic achievement consistent with the 
requirements of the Government Performance and Results Act for 
the State agency program for neglected and delinquent youth. 
The Committee believes that the indicators developed thus far 
do not contain the specific, numerical baseline data or 
expected improvement resulting from the funding request needed 
to adequately meet the requirements of GPRA.

Evaluation

    The Committee provides $8,900,000 for evaluation, the same 
as the 2000 appropriation. The President did not propose 
separate line item funding for this program. Title I evaluation 
supports large scale national evaluations that examine how 
title I is contributing to improved student performance at the 
State, local education agency, and school levels. It also 
supports short-term studies that document promising models and 
other activities to help States and local education agencies 
implement requirements in the title I statute.
    The Committee believes that the Department should allocate 
resources for evaluations such that sufficient funding is 
provided to assure the full implementation of the Government 
Performance and Results Act.

Migrant education, high school equivalency program

    The bill includes $20,000,000 for the high school 
equivalency program. This amount is the same as the budget 
request and $5,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level. The 
high school equivalency program recruits migrant students aged 
16 and over and provides academic and support services to help 
those students obtain a high school equivalency certificate and 
subsequently to gain employment or admission to a postsecondary 
institution or training program.

College assistance migrant programs

    The bill includes $10,000,000 for the college assistance 
migrant programs. This amount is the same as the budget request 
and $3,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level. The college 
assistance migrant program (CAMP) provides tutoring and 
counseling services to first-year, undergraduate migrant 
students and assists those students in obtaining student 
financial aid for their remaining undergraduate years.

                               IMPACT AID

    The bill provides $985,000,000 for Federal impact aid 
programs in fiscal year 2001, an increase of $78,548,000 above 
the comparable fiscal year 2000 appropriation and $215,000,000 
above the budget request. This account supports payments to 
school districts affected by Federal activities and is 
authorized under title VIII of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act. Impact Aid represents a federal responsibility 
to local schools educating children whose families are 
connected with the military or who live on Indian land.
    While military deployments and poverty on Indian 
reservations continue, the Committee is perplexed as to why the 
Administration continues to recommend cuts in the Impact Aid 
program. Impact Aid represents a federal responsibility to 
local schools educating children whose families are connected 
with the military or who live on Indian land. Therefore, the 
Committee bill does not adopt the Budget proposal to amend the 
authorizing statute to reduce the number of school districts 
receiving payments and to reduce the number of children on 
behalf of whom payments are made. The Committee regards impact 
aid as an obligation of the Federal Government and has included 
funds sufficient to adequately reimburse school districts 
impacted by Federal activities. The Committee notes that the 
President proposes to substantially increase funding for 
general Federal assistance to school districts at the same time 
it proposes to dramatically reduce impact aid payments to some 
of the neediest school districts.
    The Committee commends the Department for making Impact Aid 
payments for FY 2000 in a timely manner, following several 
consecutive years of increasingly burdensome delays. The Impact 
Aid payment delays cost the nation's poorest, most isolated 
schools the most, and imposed upon them substantial interest 
payments and other unanticipated costs.

Basic support payments

    The bill includes $780,000,000 for basic support payments 
to local educational agencies, an increase of $42,800,000 above 
the comparable fiscal year 2000 appropriation and $60,000,000 
above the budget request. Basic support payments compensate 
school districts for lost tax revenue and are made on behalf of 
Federally-connected children such as children of members of the 
uniformed services who live on Federal property.

Payments for children with disabilities

    The Committee recommends $50,000,000 for payments on behalf 
of Federally-connected children with disabilities, an increase 
of $10,000,000 above the budget request and the same as the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 appropriation. These payments 
compensate school districts for the increased costs of serving 
Federally-connected children with disabilities.

Payments for heavily impacted districts

    The bill includes $82,000,000 for payments to heavily 
impacted districts, an increase of $9,800,000 above the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 level. The President proposed to 
terminate this program. These payments assist especially 
heavily impacted school districts to raise their per-pupil 
spending to levels comparable to other school districts in 
their States.
    In the past two years, the Committee has included a 
legislative provision that changes the method by which payments 
made under this section are allocated to provide supplemental 
payments for federally connected students only. The Committee 
understands that this provision has resulted in greater budget 
stability for school districts that are heavily impacted by the 
presence of federally connected children. The Committee further 
understands that this provision will be made part of the 
permanent Impact Aid law through the reauthorization process 
this year and therefore it is no longer necessary to carry this 
special provision in the Committee bill.

Facilities maintenance

    The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for facilities 
maintenance, $3,000,000 above both the fiscal year 2000 amount 
and the budget request. These capital payments are authorized 
for maintenance of certain facilities owned by the Department 
of Education.

Construction

    The Committee recommends $25,000,000 for the construction 
program, an increase of $14,948,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation and $20,000,000 above the budget request. This 
program provides formula grants to eligible locally owned 
school districts for building and renovating school facilities.
    The Committee notes that while the President has proposed a 
new, unauthorized school construction program aimed at Indian 
school districts, the budget at the same time cuts funding 
under this more flexible construction program by over 50 
percent.
    The Committee also notes that the Administration's school 
construction proposal omits any benefit to federally impacted 
schools who have reached their maximum bonding capacity, which 
includes many schools serving Native Americans and the military 
in isolated parts of the country. Should additional funds come 
available, the Committee will give consideration to allocating 
sums to improve and replace such dilapidated schools.

Payments for Federal property

    The bill provides $40,000,000 for payments related to 
Federal property, an increase of $8,000,000 above the fiscal 
year 2000 appropriation. The President proposed to terminate 
this program. The Committee does not concur in the budget 
proposal to terminate assistance to all 223 school districts 
currently receiving assistance under this program. Funds are 
awarded to school districts to compensate for lost tax revenue 
as the result of Federal acquisition of real property since 
1938.

                      SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMS

    The bill includes $3,165,334,000 for school improvement 
programs. This amount is $158,450,000 more than the fiscal year 
2000 appropriation and $703,700,000 below the budget request. 
This appropriation account includes programs authorized under 
titles II, IV, V, VI, X, and XIII of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act; title VII of the Stewart B. McKinney 
Homeless Assistance Act; and title IV-A of the Civil Rights 
Act.

Professional development and program innovation: Eisenhower 
        professional development State grants

    The Committee provides no separate line-item funding for 
the Eisenhower professional development state grants, the same 
as the budget request. This program was funded at $335,000,000 
in fiscal year 2000. This program provides funds to state 
educational agencies, local educational agencies, state 
agencies for higher education, institutions of higher education 
and qualified non-profit organizations to support sustained and 
intensive high-quality professional development for educators 
in the core academic subjects.
    Consistent with the Teacher Empowerment Act, the Committee 
has consolidated funding for this program under a new line 
item, subject to the Teacher Empowerment Act's enactment into 
law. The President has proposed a number of new national 
programs related to teachers, as well as consolidations and 
restructuring of existing teacher training programs, including 
the Eisenhower professional development program. The Committee 
is aware that these ideas are currently being considered 
through the reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act. Teacher training program funding will follow the 
structure that is ultimately agreed upon through this 
reauthorization process.

Teaching to high standards

    The bill does not include $690,000,000 for a new program 
called teaching to high standards as proposed in the budget 
request.
    The President has proposed a number of new national 
programs related to teachers, as well as consolidations and 
restructuring of existing teacher training programs. The 
Committee is aware that these ideas are currently being 
considered through the reauthorization of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act. Teacher training program funding will 
follow the structure that is ultimately agreed upon through 
this reauthorization process.

National programs

    The bill does not include funding for several new national 
programs relating to teaching that the budget request proposes. 
These initiatives, along with their proposed funding levels, 
are as follows: School leadership initiative, $40,000,000; 
Improvement of teaching and school leadership, $25,000,000; 
Hometown teachers, $75,000,000; Higher standards/higher pay, 
$50,000,000; Teacher quality incentives, $50,000,000; Troops to 
teachers, $25,000,000; and Early childhood educator 
professional development, $30,000,000.
    The Committee is aware that these ideas are currently being 
considered through the reauthorization of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act. Teacher training program funding will 
follow the structure that is ultimately agreed upon through 
this reauthorization process.

Professional development and program innovation: Innovative Education 
        Program Strategies State Grants. (the title VI education block 
        grant)

    The Committee recommends $365,700,000 for State grants 
under Innovative Education Program Strategies, the same as the 
fiscal year 2000 level. The President proposed to terminate 
this progarm. The Committee supports this program, which 
provides funding, without bureaucratic strings, to State and 
local educational agencies that can be used for:
          (1) obtaining technology and training in technology 
        related to the implementation of school based reform;
          (2) acquiring and using educational materials;
          (3) educational reform projects such as ``effective 
        schools'' and magnet schools;
          (4) improving educational services for disadvantaged 
        students;
          (5) combating illiteracy among children and adults;
          (6) addressing the educational needs of gifted and 
        talented children;
          (7) implementing school reform activities consistent 
        with Goals 2000; and
          (8) implementing school improvement and parental 
        involvement activities under ESEA Title I.
    In several states, districts are allowed to enter into 
``contracts'' that designate them as ``charter districts'', 
similar to the concept of charter schools. These agreements 
promise to streamline bureaucracy and reduce regulations, thus 
enabling districts to put student performance first, not 
compliance with bureaucratic requirements. Therefore school 
districts should be able to use Title VI dollars to implement 
these performance based relationships with their state 
education agencies.

Class-size reduction

    The Committee recommends no funding for the Class Size 
Reduction program, $1,300,000,000 below fiscal year 2000 and 
$1,750,000,000 below the budget request. Consistent with the 
Teacher Empowerment Act, the Committee has consolidated funding 
for this program under a new line item, subject to the Teacher 
Empowerment Act's enactment into law.

Teacher empowerment act

    The Committee recommends $1,750,000,000 for the Teacher 
Empowerment Act, subject to authorization. This funding level 
is $1,750,000,000 above both fiscal year 2000 and the budget 
request. The Teacher Empowerment Act consolidates and 
streamlines multiple teacher training programs and provides 
States and local schools additional flexibility in how to use 
these funds in exchange for increased accountability to parents 
and taxpayers.
    The Teacher Empowerment Act strikes a balance between 
hiring more teachers to reduce class size, and recruiting, 
retaining and retraining quality teachers. It also empowers 
teachers to choose the training that best meets their classroom 
needs and encourages states and localities to implement 
innovative strategies such as tenure reform, merit-based 
performance plans, alternative routes to certification and 
differential and bonus pay for teachers. Ninety-five percent of 
funds would go directly to the local level.

Safe and drug-free schools and communities

    The Committee recommends $599,250,000 for the Safe and Drug 
Free Schools and Communities Act. This funding level is 
$50,750,000 below the budget request and $750,000 below the 
fiscal year 2000 level.
    The Committee is aware that H.R. 4141, the Education 
Opportunities to Protect and Invest in Our Nation's Students 
(Education OPTIONS) Act, combines the Safe and Drug-Free 
Schools program and 21st Century Community Learning Centers Act 
and allows schools to use funds for comprehensive drug and 
violence prevention programs, counseling and mentoring, before 
and after school programs and other safety measures, as long as 
these activities are based on research that shows the activity 
will prevent or reduce drug abuse and violence. The Committee 
intends that, if this legislation is enacted, funding for the 
Safe and Drug Free Schools Program and the 21st Century 
Community Learning Centers Program will be consolidated.
    The Committee is interested in learning more about the 
increased use of pharmacoepidologic drugs by elementary and 
high school aged children and the possible relationship between 
use of these drugs, school violence and the overall learning 
environment of all children. The Committee encourages the 
Department to be prepared to discuss any relevant research on 
this issue at the fiscal year 2002 budget hearings and, when 
educating teachers, parents and doctors about the public health 
and educational impact of the use of these drugs, to coordinate 
efforts with the National Institutes of Health, the Food and 
Drug Administration, the Administration on Children and 
Families and other public health researchers.

Safe and drug-free schools and communities: State grants

    The Committee bill includes $439,250,000 for the State 
grants program of the Safe and Drug-Free Schools and 
Communities Act. This level is the same as the budget request 
and the same as the fiscal year 2000 level. The program 
supports State formula grants for comprehensive, integrated 
approaches to drug and violence prevention. Local educational 
agencies must use their funds to implement a drug and violence 
prevention program for students and employees.
    The Committee continues to be concerned about the general 
lack of evidence of the effectiveness of the Safe and Drug Free 
Schools Program. The Committee believes that the Department 
should focus on disseminating drug and violence prevention 
programs that have been rigorously evaluated and found to be 
promising or exemplary to more school districts.

Safe and drug-free schools and communities: national programs

    For the national programs under the Safe and Drug-Free 
Schools and Communities Act, the bill provides $110,000,000 
which is $750,000 below the fiscal year 2000 amount and 
$40,750,000 below the budget request. Under this program, the 
Secretary of Education administers a variety of activities to 
prevent the illegal use of drugs and violence among, and 
promote safety and discipline for, students at all educational 
levels, preschool through postsecondary.

Safe and drug free schools and communities: coordinator initiative

    The Committee recommends $50,000,000 for the safe and drug 
free schools and communities coordinator initiative, the same 
as the fiscal year 2000 funding level and the budget request.
    This initiative funds discretionary grants for LEAs to 
recruit, hire, and train drug prevention and school safety 
program coordinators in middle schools with significant drug 
and school safety problems.
    The Committee remains disappointed that the only 
performance indicator the Department has identified for this 
program is the number of coordinators who have received 
training. The Department has provided no indicators on the 
expected impact of the program on reduced student drug use and 
school violence. Given the demonstrated interest of the 
Committee in numerical goals focusing of the achievement of 
programmatic goals, such limited effort by the Department is 
particularly disturbing.

Safe and drug free schools and communities: Project SERV

    The Committee recommends no funding for the proposed new 
initiative, Project SERV (School Emergency Response to 
Violence). The Administration requested $10,000,000 for this 
program. The Administration proposed this initiative to provide 
resources to school districts that experience a major crisis.
    This program is not authorized. The Safe and Drug Free 
Schools and Communities Act is currently undergoing 
reauthorization this year and it is in this context that the 
Administration's proposal should be considered.

Inexpensive book distribution (reading is fundamental)

    The bill provides $21,000,000 for the inexpensive book 
distribution program. This is $1,000,000 above both the fiscal 
year 2000 appropriation and the budget request. This program 
makes an award to Reading is Fundamental, Inc., to buy 
inexpensive books, offer them through local community programs 
to children from low-income families, and motivate children to 
read. Federal funds provide for up to 75 percent of the costs 
of the books. This program annually provides an estimated 7.6 
million books to 2.4 million children nationwide.
    The Committee is disappointed that the Department failed to 
provide specific, measurable goals for the inexpensive book 
distribution program in the fiscal year 2001 budget request 
with regard to how participation in this program increases 
student reading achievement.

Arts in education

    The bill provides $16,500,000 for the arts in education 
program. This is $5,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation and $6,500,000 below the budget request. This 
program supports arts programs in elementary and secondary 
education and supports demonstration programs for the 
involvement of disabled persons in the arts.
    Specifically, the Committee bill does not include funding 
for a new $10,000,000 grant competition to be administered in 
collaboration with the National Endowment for the Arts. The 
Committee continues to believe this program should primarily 
support the Very Special Arts organization, which develops 
programs that integrate the arts into the education of children 
with disabilities, and the John F. Kennedy Center for the 
Performing Arts, which supports a variety of arts education 
activities with states and schools. The Committee intends that 
$9,031,000 of the amount recommended be for the Very Special 
Arts and that $7,469,000 be for the Kennedy Center programs.

Magnet schools assistance

    The bill includes $110,000,000 for the magnet schools 
assistance program, the same as the budget request and the same 
as the fiscal year 2000 level. The magnet schools assistance 
program awards competitive grants to local educational agencies 
for use in establishing or operating magnet schools that are 
part of a desegregation plan approved by a court or by the 
Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights. A magnet 
school is defined by the statute as ``a school or education 
center that offers a special curriculum capable of attracting 
substantial numbers of students of different racial 
backgrounds.'' A funding priority is given to local educational 
agencies that have not participated during the most recent 
funding cycle.

Education for homeless children and youth

    For the education of homeless children and youth program, 
authorized by section 722 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless 
Assistance Act, the Committee recommends $32,000,000. This 
level is $300,000 above the budget request and $3,200,000 above 
the fiscal year 2000 appropriation. Grants are allocated to 
States in proportion to the total that each State receives 
under the title I program. For local grants, at least 50 
percent must be used for direct services to homeless children 
and youth, including tutoring or remedial or other educational 
services.
    Homeless children--estimated to number more than one 
million each year--face many barriers in their efforts to 
attend school. The Education for Homeless Children and Youth 
program provides resources to assist these children in having 
the opportunity to enroll, attend and succeed in school. 
Currently, the program is serving substantially fewer children 
than the national demand. In fact, less than 40 percent of 
homeless children identified by states are able to receive 
program services. The Committee has included additional funding 
beyond the Administration request to ensure that local school 
districts have the resources to help these children.

Women's educational equity

    The bill includes $3,000,000 for Women's Educational 
Equity, the same as the fiscal year 2000 and the request level. 
This program supports projects, technical assistance and 
dissemination activities to promote educational equity for 
girls and women including those who suffer multiple 
discrimination based on gender and race, ethnicity, national 
origin, disability, or age. It also provides funds to help 
educational agencies and institutions meet the requirements of 
title IX of the Education amendments of 1972.
    The Committee remains concerned that the Department has not 
identified specific, measurable student achievement standards 
consistent with the requirements of the Government Performance 
and Results Act for Women's Educational Equity. The Committee 
believes that it is essential for the Department to focus its 
primary, if not exclusive, efforts on the development of 
baseline data and indicators of specific, measurable student 
academic achievement for this program and the ability to 
integrate successful techniques developed in this program into 
other federally funded and other education programs.

Training and advisory services

    The bill includes $7,334,000 for training and advisory 
services authorized by title IV-A of the Civil Rights Act. This 
amount is the same as the budget request and the fiscal year 
2000 amount. Title IV-A authorizes technical assistance and 
training services for local educational agencies to address 
problems associated with desegregation on the basis of race, 
sex, or national origin. Competitive awards are made to civil 
rights units within State educational agencies and to regional 
desegregation assistance centers. The Department awards 3-year 
grants to regional equity assistance centers (EACs) (formerly 
known as desegregation assistance centers or DACs) located in 
each of the 10 Department of Education regions. The EACs 
provide services to school districts upon request. Typical 
activities include disseminating information on successful 
education practices and legal requirements related to 
nondiscrimination on the basis of race, sex, and national 
origin in educational programs; training designed to develop 
educators' skills in specific areas, such as the identification 
of race and sex bias in instructional materials; increasing the 
skills of educational personnel in dealing with race-based 
confrontations such as hate crimes; and providing technical 
assistance in the identification and selection of appropriate 
educational programs to meet the needs of limited English 
proficient students.
    The Committee remains concerned that, after three years of 
Committee interest and seven years since the passage of GPRA, 
the Department has not identified specific, measurable 
indicators for the training and advisory services program. In 
fact, the Department presented only one indicator for this 
program in the 1999 Performance Report released in March 2000. 
This indicator had no actual performance data, no performance 
targets, and no baselines set. Therefore, the Committee is 
puzzled by the fact that the report claims that ``progress 
toward target is likely.'' The Committee does not understand 
how progress toward any target can be judged in the absence of 
any data set whatsoever. Accordingly, the Committee expects 
that the Department will substantially revise this indicator in 
the fiscal year 2002 budget submission and include such data as 
is available at that time.

Ellender fellowships/Close-Up

    The bill provides $1,500,000 for Ellender fellowships, the 
same as the fiscal year 2000 level and $1,500,000 above the 
budget request. The Ellender fellowship program makes an award 
to the Close-Up Foundation of Washington D.C. This organization 
provides fellowships to students from low income families and 
their teachers to enable them to participate with other 
students and teachers for a week of seminars on government and 
meetings with representatives of the three branches of the 
Federal government.

Education for Native Hawaiians

    The Committee recommends $23,000,000 for education for 
Native Hawaiians, the same as the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2000 amount. A number of programs limited to Native 
Hawaiians are supported with these funds, including a model 
curriculum project, family-based education centers, 
postsecondary education fellowships, gifted and talented 
education projects, and special education projects for disabled 
pupils.

Alaska native education equity

    The Committee recommends $13,000,000 for the Alaska native 
education equity program, the same as both the budget request 
and the fiscal year 2000 amount. These funds are used to 
develop supplemental educational programs to benefit Alaska 
natives.

Charter schools

    The Committee recommends $175,000,000 for support of 
charter schools, the same as the budget request and $30,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2000 amount. Charter schools are 
developed and administered by individuals or groups of 
individuals, which may include teachers, administrators, and 
parents. These groups enter into charters for operation of 
their schools, which must be granted exemptions from State and 
local rules that limit flexibility in school operation and 
management. Under this program, grants are made to State 
educational agencies in States that have charter school laws; 
the State educational agencies will in turn make sub-grants to 
authorized public chartering agencies in partnerships with 
developers of charter schools.

Opportunities to improve our nation's schools (OPTIONS)

    The Committee bill does not include funding for a new 
program proposed in the budget request called opportunities to 
improve our nation's schools (OPTIONS). The budget requested 
$20,000,000 for this new program which would provide grants to 
states and school districts to implement new approaches to 
public school choice, including interdistrict programs and 
public schools at work sites and on college campuses. This 
program is currently unauthorized; however, the Committee is 
aware that this proposal is being considered by the authorizing 
committees in the context of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act reauthorization. The Committee will consider 
funding for this program upon its authorization.

Technical assistance for improving ESEA programs: comprehensive 
        regional assistance centers/Strengthening technical assistance 
        capacity grants

    The Committee recommends $28,000,000 for comprehensive 
regional assistance centers, the same as the fiscal year 2000 
amount. The President proposed a new program in place of this 
called strengthening technical assistance capacity grants. The 
President proposed $38,000,000 for the new program.
    The existing program supports the consolidation of 7 former 
technical assistance programs that funded 48 technical 
assistance centers into a program of 15 comprehensive regional 
technical assistance centers for improving ESEA programs. The 
proposed new program would replace the current network of 
centers with a demand-based system under which states and 
districts would receive direct formula grants to purchase 
technical assistance that best fits their needs.
    While the Committee is intrigued with this demand-based 
system approach, the bill continues to fund the existing 
centers pending any changes that may be included in the 
reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
    The Committee instructs the Department to continue the 
policy of informing it of any directives or funding earmarks 
that would require the Centers to carry out work not directly 
in response to local or State requests for assistance.

Advanced placement test fee program

    The Committee recommends $20,000,000 for advanced placement 
fees. This recommendation is the same as the budget request and 
$5,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 amount. The advanced 
placement test fee program awards grants to States to enable 
them to cover part or all of the cost of advanced placement 
test fees of low-income students who are enrolled in advanced 
placement classes and plan to take the advanced placement test. 
This program also supports competitive grants to states for 
programs that encourage greater participation by low-income 
students in advanced placement courses.

                         READING EXCELLENCE ACT

    The Committee recommends $260,000,000, the same as the 
fiscal year 2000 funding level and $26,000,000 below the budget 
request.
    The Reading Excellence Act supports competitive, 3-year 
grants to state educational agencies that have established a 
state reading and literacy partnership. States that receive 
funding will make 2-year subgrants, called ``local reading 
improvement grants,'' on a competitive basis to LEAs that have 
at least one school in Title I school improvement status, have 
the highest or second highest percentage of poverty or number 
of poor children in the state. School districts use the funds 
to provide professional development for teachers, operate 
tutoring programs and provide family literacy services. States 
must also award at least one ``tutorial assistance grant'' to 
LEAs most in need of help. The Act also requires $10,000,000 of 
the appropriation to be reserved for the Even Start program.
    The Committee understands that this Act is currently being 
reauthorized in the context of reauthorization of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act. Pending any changes to 
the program that may result from the reauthorization, the 
Committee has chosen to fund the Reading Excellence Act at the 
level fully authorized for the program in fiscal year 2000.
    The Committee expects the Department to continue to develop 
specific, measurable baseline data and performance indicators 
for this program. Specifically, the Committee expects the 
Department to report on how this program has improved student 
reading abilities and improved the instructional practices of 
teachers and other instructional staff.

                            INDIAN EDUCATION

    The bill includes $107,765,000 for Indian education. This 
amount is $30,765,000 above the fiscal year 2000 appropriation 
and $7,735,000 below the budget request. This account supports 
programs authorized by part A of Title IX of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act and section 215 of the Department of 
Education Organization Act.

Grants to local education agencies

    The bill provides $92,765,000 for grants to local education 
agencies, the same as the budget request and $30,765,000 above 
the fiscal year 2000 amount. This program provides assistance 
through formula grants to school districts and schools 
supported or operated by the Bureau of Indian Affairs. The 
purpose of this program is to reform elementary and secondary 
school programs that serve Indian students, including preschool 
children. Grantees must develop a comprehensive plan and assure 
that the programs they carry out will help Indian students 
reach the same challenging standards that apply to all 
students. This program supplements the regular school program 
to help Indian children sharpen their academic skills, bolster 
their self-confidence, and participate in enrichment activities 
that would otherwise be unavailable.

Special programs for Indian children

    The Committee recommends $13,265,000 for special programs 
for Indian children, the same as fiscal year 2000 and 
$6,735,000 below the budget request. These programs make 
competitive awards to improve the quality of education for 
Indian students. Beginning last year, this program also funds a 
new Indian Teacher Corps, which hopes to train over 1,000 
Indian teachers over a five-year period to take positions in 
schools that serve concentrations of Indian children. The 
Committee expects that the funds provided will continue this 
program in fiscal year 2001.

National activities

    The bill provides $1,735,000 for national activities, the 
same as fiscal year 2000 and $1,000,000 below the budget 
request. Funds under this authority support research, 
evaluation and data collection to provide information on the 
status of education for the Indian population and on the 
effectiveness of Indian education programs.

                           SCHOOL RENOVATION

    The bill does not include $1,300,000,000 proposed by the 
Administration for a new school construction initiative. These 
programs are not currently authorized in law.
    The Committee is aware that the existing Qualified Zone 
Academy Bonds program may currently be used for renovating 
school buildings, purchasing educational equipment, developing 
curriculum, or training teachers. The Committee also notes that 
the 106th Congress passed the Taxpayer Refund and Relief Act of 
1999, which included the National Public School Construction 
Initiative. This initiative would have made permanent changes 
to bond rules so that state and local governments issuing 
public school construction bonds could take increased advantage 
of arbitrage rebate rules to help finance school construction 
and renovation. However, the President vetoed this bill. In the 
absence of any authorization, the Committee bill does not 
include funding for the proposed new program.

                   BILINGUAL AND IMMIGRANT EDUCATION

    The bill includes $406,000,000 for bilingual and immigrant 
education programs. This amount is $54,000,000 below the budget 
request and the same as the fiscal year 2000 appropriation. 
This account supports programs authorized by parts A, B, and C 
of title VII of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.

Bilingual education: Instructional services

    The bill provides $162,500,000 for instructional services, 
$17,500,000 below the budget request and the same as the fiscal 
year 2000 amount. Instructional Services programs assist local 
educational agencies (LEAs) in implementing programs for 
limited English proficient (LEP) students.
    There are four types of grants, primarily to LEAs, for 
instructional services to limited English proficient students:
          Three-year Program Development and Implementation 
        Grants for school districts to develop and implement 
        new programs for LEP students;
          Two-year Program Enhancement Grants to enhance or 
        expand existing programs for LEP students;
          Five-year Comprehensive School Grants for school-wide 
        programs for LEP students that reform, restructure, and 
        upgrade all relevant programs and operations within an 
        individual school; and
          Five-year Systemwide Improvement Grants for district-
        wide projects for LEP students to improve, reform, and 
        upgrade relevant programs and operations within an 
        entire LEA.
    Funding for projects that primarily instruct in English and 
emphasize the rapid transition to regular classes (``special 
alternative instruction projects''), is limited to 25 percent 
of the appropriation.
    The Committee notes that the bilingual education programs 
are currently undergoing reauthorization and is recommending 
level funding for such programs pending the outcome of the 
reauthorization process.
    The Committee is pleased that the Department has included 
performance indicators for this program that will examine the 
speed of transition to regular classes by limited English 
proficient students and the levels of academic achievement of 
these students while still in bilingual classes and after the 
transition to regular classes.

Bilingual education: Support services

    The bill provides $14,000,000 for support services. This 
amount is $2,000,000 below the budget request and the same as 
the fiscal year 2000 amount. This program provides 
discretionary grants and contracts in four specific areas: 
research and evaluation; dissemination of effective 
instructional models; data collection and technical assistance; 
and a national clearinghouse to support the collection, 
analysis, and dissemination of information about programs for 
limited-English proficient students.
    The Committee urges the Department to continue to develop 
specific, measurable indicators of the degree to which local 
education agencies and teachers are accessing training and 
technical assistance services, the degree to which these new 
techniques are integrated into school or classroom practices 
and the degree to which the techniques are successful in 
improving the rapid transition to regular classes by limited 
English proficient students and how these techniques have 
improved the success of students that have made the transition 
to regular classes. The primary indicator currently tracked for 
this program appears to be the number of inquiries to the 
national clearinghouse. The Committee believes this is 
insufficient and urges the Department to work on developing 
indicators that will address the issues described above.

Bilingual education: Professional development

    The bill provides $71,500,000 for professional development 
services. This amount is $28,500,000 below the budget request 
and the same as the fiscal year 2000 level.
    The purpose of Professional Development grants is to 
increase the pool of trained teachers and strengthen the skills 
of teachers providing instruction to limited English proficient 
students. Funds are available to support the training and 
retraining of bilingual education teachers and teacher's aides, 
graduate fellowships related to fields of bilingual education, 
and grants to institutions of higher education to improve 
bilingual teacher training programs.
    The Committee notes that funding for the professional 
development component of bilingual education has increased from 
a level of $1.1 million in fiscal year 1996 to $71.5 million in 
fiscal year 2000. This dramatic increase, coupled with the 
increases provided in the Class Size Reduction, Teacher Quality 
Enhancement Grants, Reading Excellence Act and other programs 
focused on hiring, training and retaining highly-qualified 
teachers should be helping to relieve the reported vacancies 
for bilingual and English-as-a-Second Language teachers.

Immigrant education

    The bill includes $150,000,000 for immigrant education, the 
same as both the budget request and the fiscal year 2000 level.
    The Immigrant Education program provides Federal assistance 
to local educational agencies (LEAs) that have large numbers of 
recently arrived immigrant students. LEAs then use those funds 
to enhance instruction for immigrant children and youth or for 
the costs of basic instructional services directly attributable 
to the presence of immigrant children. Eligible LEAs are those 
that enroll at least 500 recent immigrant students or where 
those students represent at least 3 percent of the total 
enrollment. Immigrant students may be counted only if they have 
been enrolled in U.S. schools for less than three complete 
academic years.
    The Department makes grants to State educational agencies, 
which then make subgrants to eligible LEAs within the State. A 
1991 GAO study found that most LEAs use their Immigrant 
Education funds to provide special instruction to limited 
English proficient students.
    The Department has included measures required under the 
Government Performance and Results Act relating to the amount 
of immigrant education funds used for direct services. However, 
in this program, as in most others, the Committee feels that 
indicators of academic achievement must be developed.

Foreign language assistance

    The bill provides $8,000,000 for the foreign language 
assistance program, the same as the fiscal year 2000 amount and 
$6,000,000 below the budget request. This program provides 
competitive grants to State educational agencies (SEAs) and 
local educational agencies (LEAs) to increase the quantity and 
improve the quality of instruction in foreign languages deemed 
critical to the economic and security interests of the United 
States. Under this program, 3-year grants are awarded to SEAs 
to promote systemic improvement of foreign language instruction 
and to LEAs to support model programs of instruction that 
exhibit the capability for continuing beyond the 3-year grant 
period. LEA grants may include a professional development 
component. At least three-quarters of the appropriation must be 
used for the expansion of foreign language education in the 
elementary grades.

                           special education

    The bill includes $6,550,161,000 for programs for children 
with disabilities authorized under the Individuals with 
Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This funding level is 
$181,320,000 above the Administration's fiscal year 2000 budget 
request and $513,965,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation.

State Grants: State grants for special education

    The bill provides $5,489,685,000 for grants to States, 
which is $210,000,000 above the budget request and $500,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2000 level. Out of the total of 
$5,489,685,000 made available for school year 2001-2002, 
$1,747,685,000 is appropriated for fiscal year 2001 for 
obligation after July 1, 2001 and $3,742,000,000 is 
appropriated for fiscal year 2002 for obligation on, or after, 
October 1, 2001.
    This program provides formula grants to assist the States 
in meeting the excess costs of providing special education and 
related services to children with disabilities. In order to be 
eligible for funds, States must make free appropriate public 
education available to all children with disabilities. Funds 
are currently distributed based on the number of children with 
disabilities to whom the States provide a free appropriate 
education.
    The Committee believes that the Department has made good 
progress in developing specific, measurable standards of 
academic achievement and postsecondary attendance or employment 
consistent with the requirements of the Government Performance 
and Results Act for special education State grants.

State grants: Preschool grants

    The bill provides $390,000,000 for preschool grants, the 
same as the fiscal year 2000 level and the budget request. This 
program provides grants to States on the basis of their 
proportionate share of the total number of children in the 3 
through 5 age range. These funds are provided in order to 
assist States to make a free appropriate education available to 
all children with disabilities in the 3 through 5 age range.

State Grants: Grants for infants and families

    The bill provides $375,000,000 for grants for infants and 
families, the same as fiscal year 2000 and $8,567,000 below the 
budget request. This formula grant assists States in developing 
and implementing statewide systems of coordinated, 
comprehensive, multidisciplinary, interagency programs to make 
available early intervention services to all children with 
disabilities, aged birth through 2, and their families.
    The Committee recognizes that there has been confusion 
around the term ``natural environment'' under this program. As 
in all programs under IDEA, the individual needs of the child 
must be the first consideration when determining what services 
to provide and where to provide those services. While the 
Committee recognizes that providing services in the ``natural 
environment'' may not be appropriate for all children, the 
Committee believes that parents must be involved in that 
decision. Under the infants and families program, parents fully 
participate in the development of the Individualized Family 
Service Plan (IFSP) that determines the early intervention 
services their child receives and where such services are 
provided. Such plan is developed by a multidisciplinary team 
and requires the written consent of the parents prior to 
providing any early intervention services. The IFSP must 
include a statement of the natural environment where the 
services will be provided including a justification of the 
extent, if any, to which the services will not be provided in a 
natural environment. The Committee encourages the Secretary to 
ensure that this process takes place so that parents are fully 
participating in the development of the IFSP.

IDEA National Program: State improvement

    The bill includes $45,200,000 for State improvement, which 
is the same as the budget request and $10,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 appropriation. This program supports 
competitive grants to State educational agencies to assist 
them, in partnership with parents, teachers, institutions of 
higher education, interest groups, and others, to improve 
results for children with disabilities by reforming and 
improving their educational, early intervention, and 
transitional service systems. Among these systems are those for 
professional development, technical assistance, and 
dissemination of knowledge about best practices. Awards are 
based on State improvement plans developed by the States.
    The Department has made progress in developing performance 
indicators for this program. The Committee encourages the 
Department to continue to work on indicators which assess the 
degree to which local education agencies and teachers are 
accessing training and technical assistance services, the 
degree to which these new techniques are integrated into school 
or classroom practices and the degree to which the techniques 
are successful in improving the academic achievement and 
successful transition to postsecondary education and 
employment.

IDEA National Program: Research and innovation

    The bill includes $64,433,000 for research and innovation, 
$10,000,000 below the budget request and the same as the fiscal 
year 2000 appropriation. This program supports competitive 
awards to produce and advance the use of knowledge to improve 
services and results for children with disabilities. The 
program focuses on producing new knowledge, integrating 
research and practice and improving the use of knowledge.

IDEA National Program: Technical assistance and dissemination

    The bill includes $45,481,000 for technical assistance and 
dissemination. This funding level is $8,000,000 below the 
budget request and the same as the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation. This program provides technical assistance and 
information through competitive awards that support institutes, 
regional resource centers, clearinghouses, and efforts to build 
State and local capacity to make systemic changes and improve 
results for children with disabilities.

IDEA National Program: Personnel preparation

    The bill includes $81,952,000 for personnel preparation, 
which is the same as the budget request and the fiscal year 
2000 appropriation. This program supports competitive awards to 
help address State-identified needs for qualified personnel to 
work with children with disabilities, and to ensure that those 
personnel have the skills and knowledge they need to serve 
those children. Awards focus on addressing the need for 
personnel to serve low incidence populations and high incidence 
populations, leadership personnel, and projects of national 
significance.

IDEA National Program: Parent information centers

    The bill includes $22,000,000 for parent information 
centers which is $3,465,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level 
and $4,000,000 below the budget request. This program makes 
awards to parent organizations to support parent training and 
information centers, including community parent resource 
centers. These centers provide training and information to meet 
the needs of parents of children with disabilities living in 
the areas served by the centers, particularly underserved 
parents and parents of children who may be inappropriately 
identified. Technical assistance is also provided under this 
program for developing, assisting and coordinating centers 
receiving assistance under this program.

IDEA National Program: Technology and media services

    The bill includes $36,410,000 for technology and media 
services, which is $2,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation and $1,887,000 above the budget request. This 
program makes competitive awards to support the development, 
demonstration, and use of technology and educational media 
activities of educational value to children with disabilities.
    The bill includes $9,500,000 for Recording for the Blind 
and Dyslexic, an increase of $2,000,000 over the amount 
appropriated for 2000. These funds support continued production 
and circulation of recorded textbooks, increased outreach 
activities to print-disabled students and their teachers, and 
an accelerated use of digital technology. The Committee 
believes that the increase recommended will enable RFB&D; to 
significantly expand its outreach activities and to accelerate 
its efforts to digitize its vast storehouse of materials.
    The Committee continues to recognize the importance of very 
small businesses in increasing the quality and cost-
effectiveness of the television captioning program. As this 
program transitions into a mandatory program under the 
Telecommunications Act, the Committee urges the Department to 
give full and fair consideration to the applications of very 
small businesses.

            rehabilitation services and disability research

    The bill includes $2,776,803,000 for rehabilitation 
services and disability research. This amount is $21,848,000 
below the budget request and $69,814,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 appropriation. The programs in this account are authorized 
by the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Helen Keller National 
Center Act, and the Technology-Related Assistance for 
Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1988.

Vocational rehabilitation grants to States

    For vocational rehabilitation State grants, the bill 
includes $2,399,790,000, $60,813,000 above fiscal year 2000 and 
the same as the budget request. This program supports basic 
vocational rehabilitation services through formula grants to 
the States. These grants support a wide range of services 
designed to help persons with physical and mental disabilities 
prepare for and engage in gainful employment to the extent of 
their capabilities. Emphasis is placed on providing vocational 
rehabilitation services to persons with the most severe 
disabilities.

Client assistance

    The bill includes $10,928,000 for the client assistance 
program, $219,000 below the budget request and the same as the 
fiscal year 2000 amount. A client assistance program is 
required in each State as a condition of receipt of a basic 
State grant. State formula grants are used to help persons with 
disabilities overcome problems with the service delivery system 
and improve their understanding of services available to them 
under the Rehabilitation Act.

Training

    For training personnel to provide rehabilitation services 
to persons with disabilities, the bill includes $39,629,000, 
the same as the budget request and the same as the fiscal year 
2000 amount. The program supports long-term and short-term 
training, in-service personnel training, and training of 
interpreters for deaf persons. Projects in a broad array of 
disciplines are funded to ensure that skilled personnel are 
available to serve the vocational needs of persons with 
disabilities.

Demonstration and training programs

    The bill includes $16,492,000 for demonstration and 
training programs, $5,180,000 below both the fiscal year 2000 
level and the budget request. These programs authorize 
discretionary awards on a competitive basis to public and 
private organizations to support demonstrations, direct 
services, and related activities for persons with severe 
disabilities.

Migratory workers

    For programs serving migratory workers, the bill provides 
$2,350,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 2000 amount 
and $500,000 below the budget request. This program provides 
discretionary grants to make comprehensive vocational 
rehabilitation services available to migrant or seasonal 
farmworkers with vocational disabilities. Projects emphasize 
outreach activities, specialized bilingual rehabilitation 
counseling, and coordination of vocational rehabilitation 
services with services from other sources.

Recreational programs

    For recreational programs, the bill provides $2,596,000, 
$925,000 below the fiscal year 2000 amount and the same as the 
budget request. This program provides individuals with 
recreation and related activities to aid in their employment, 
mobility, independence, socialization, and community 
integration. Discretionary grants are made on a competitive 
basis to States, public agencies, and nonprofit private 
organizations, including institutions of higher education.

Protection and advocacy of individual rights

    For protection and advocacy for persons with severe 
disabilities, the bill provides $14,000,000, $1,868,000 above 
the budget request and $2,106,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
level. Grants are awarded to entities that have the authority 
to pursue legal, administrative, and other appropriate remedies 
needed to protect and advocate the rights of persons with 
severe disabilities.

Projects with industry

    For projects with industry, the bill provides $22,071,000, 
the same as both the fiscal year 2000 amount and the budget 
request. This program is the primary Federal vehicle for 
promoting greater participation of business and industry in the 
rehabilitation process. The program provides training and 
experience in realistic work settings to persons with 
disabilities to prepare them for employment in the competitive 
labor market. Awards are made to a variety of agencies and 
organizations, including business and industrial corporations, 
rehabilitation facilities, labor organizations, trade 
associations, and foundations.

Supported employment State grants

    For supported employment State grants, the bill includes 
$38,152,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 2000 amount 
and the budget request. These formula grants assist States in 
developing collaborative programs with public agencies and 
nonprofit agencies for training and post-employment services 
leading to supported employment. In supported employment 
programs, persons with severe disabilities are given special 
supervision and assistance to enable them to perform a job.

Independent living: State grants

    For State grants for independent living, the bill includes 
$22,296,000. This amount is the same as both the fiscal year 
2000 amount and the budget request. This program supports 
formula grants to the States to provide services designed to 
meet the current and future needs of persons whose disabilities 
are so severe that they do not presently have the potential for 
employment, but who may benefit from services to enable them to 
live and function independently.

Independent living: Centers

    For centers for independent living, the bill provides 
$58,000,000, which is the same as the budget request and 
$10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level. Discretionary 
grants support a network of consumer-controlled, 
nonresidential, community-based private nonprofit centers that 
provide a wide range of services to help persons with severe 
disabilities live more independently in family and community 
settings. Centers provide information and referral services, 
independent living skills training, peer counseling, and 
individual and systems advocacy. Discretionary grants are made 
to State vocational rehabilitation agencies or other public 
agencies or private nonprofit organizations.

Independent living: Services for older blind persons

    For independent living services for older blind 
individuals, the bill provides $18,000,000. This amount is 
$3,000,000 above both the fiscal year 2000 amount and the 
budget request. Discretionary grants support services for 
persons 55 years old or over whose severe visual impairment 
makes gainful employment extremely difficult to obtain, but for 
whom independent living goals are feasible.

Program improvement

    For program improvement activities, the bill provides 
$1,900,000, which is the same as the fiscal year 2000 level and 
the budget request. The program: (1) provides technical 
assistance and consultative services to public and non-profit 
private agencies and organizations; (2) provides short-term 
training and technical instruction; (3) conducts special 
demonstrations; (4) collects, prepares, publishes and 
disseminates educational or informational materials, and; (5) 
carries out monitoring and conducts evaluations.

Evaluation

    The bill includes $1,587,000 for program evaluation, the 
same as the fiscal year 2000 amount and the budget request. 
These funds are used to evaluate the impact and effectiveness 
of individual programs authorized under the Rehabilitation Act. 
Contracts are awarded on an annual basis for studies to be 
conducted by persons not immediately involved in the 
administration of the programs authorized by the Act.

Helen Keller National Center

    For the Helen Keller National Center for Deaf-Blind Youth 
and Adults, the bill includes $8,550,000, which is the same as 
the fiscal year 2000 amount and $167,000 below the budget 
request. These funds are used for the operation of the national 
center for intensive services for deaf-blind individuals and 
their families at Sands Point, New York and a network of 10 
regional offices for referral and counseling. In addition to 
support for the national and regional staff, the Helen Keller 
Center provides seed money to State and private nonprofit 
affiliate agencies to assist them in initiating programs for 
deaf-blind persons.

National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research

    The bill includes $86,462,000 for the National Institute on 
Disability and Rehabilitation Research, the same as the fiscal 
year 2000 amount and $13,538,000 below the budget request. The 
Institute supports research, demonstration and training 
activities that are designed to maximize the employment and 
integration into society of individuals with disabilities of 
all ages.

Assistive technology

    For assistive technology activities, the bill provides 
$34,000,000, $7,112,000 below the budget request and the same 
as the fiscal year 2000 amount. Technology assistance 
activities are authorized under the Technology-Related 
Assistance for Individuals with Disabilities Act of 1988, which 
was reauthorized in 1994. This program provides discretionary 
grants to the States to assist them in developing statewide 
programs to facilitate the provision of devices for, and 
services to, persons with disabilities.

           Special Institutions for Persons With Disabilities


                 AMERICAN PRINTING HOUSE FOR THE BLIND

    The bill provides $11,000,000 for the American Printing 
House for the Blind, an increase of $900,000 above the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 appropriation and $735,000 above 
the budget request. This appropriation subsidizes the 
production of educational materials for legally blind persons 
enrolled in pre-college programs. The Printing House, which is 
chartered by the State of Kentucky, manufactures and maintains 
an inventory of special materials that is distributed free of 
charge to schools and States based on the number of blind 
students in each State. The Printing House also conducts 
research and field activities to inform educators about the 
availability of materials and how to use them.

               NATIONAL TECHNICAL INSTITUTE FOR THE DEAF

    The bill provides $54,000,000 for the National Technical 
Institute for the Deaf (NTID), an increase of $5,849,000 above 
the comparable fiscal year 2000 amount and $2,214,000 above the 
request. The bill allows the NTID to transfer a portion of its 
appropriation to the endowment at its discretion. The Committee 
directs the NTID to report to it within 15 days of executing 
such a transfer.
    The bill includes $6,000,000 to remain available until 
expended for construction on dormitory renovations. The 
Committee notes that NTID has voiced concerns in its budget 
hearings for the past two years that the construction funds 
requested by the Department of Education are insufficient for 
dormitory renovations. The Department of Education has 
requested that NTID raise 15 percent of the renovation costs 
through private contributions. NTID has had difficulty in doing 
so and the Committee has therefore provided a slight increase 
above the budget request for the construction account in fiscal 
year 2001 in order to ameliorate this situation to some extent. 
The Committee will continue to monitor this situation and 
encourages NTID to continue to pursue private contributions to 
pay for a portion of the renovation costs to the extent 
practicable.
    The Committee is pleased with the progress NTID has made in 
achieving most of its performance measures.
    The NTID was established by Congress in 1965 to provide a 
residential facility for postsecondary technical training and 
education for deaf persons with the purpose of promoting the 
employment of deaf individuals. The Institute also conducts 
applied research and provides training in various aspects of 
deafness. The Secretary of Education administers these 
activities through a contract with the Rochester Institute of 
Technology in Rochester, New York.

                          GALLAUDET UNIVERSITY

    The bill provides $89,400,000 for Gallaudet University, an 
increase of $3,420,000 above the comparable fiscal year 2000 
appropriation and $1,750,000 above the budget request. The bill 
includes a provision that allows Gallaudet to transfer a 
portion of its appropriation to the endowment at its 
discretion. The Committee directs Gallaudet to report to it 
within 15 days of executing such a transfer. The Committee 
expects $2,500,000 of this total to be used for deferred 
maintenance activities as described in the President's fiscal 
year 2001 budget justification.
    Gallaudet is a private, non-profit educational institution 
Federally-chartered in 1864 providing elementary, secondary, 
college preparatory, undergraduate, and continuing education 
for deaf persons. In addition, the University offers graduate 
programs in fields related to deafness for deaf and hearing 
students, conducts various deafness research, and provides 
public service programs for deaf persons.
    The Committee is pleased with the progress Gallaudet has 
made in achieving most of its performance measures.

                     VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION

    The bill includes $1,718,600,000 for vocational and adult 
education programs. This amount is $36,850,000 above the fiscal 
year 2000 appropriation and $32,650,000 below the budget 
request. This appropriation account includes vocational 
education programs authorized by the Carl D. Perkins Vocational 
and Applied Technology Education Act. The account also includes 
adult education programs originally authorized by the Adult 
Education Act and reauthorized under the Workforce Investment 
Act of 1998.

Vocational education basic grants

    This bill includes $1,100,000,000 for basic grants to 
States under the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied 
Technology Education Act, which is $44,350,000 above the fiscal 
year 2000 amount and $244,350,000 above the budget request. Out 
of the total of $1,100,000,000 made available for school year 
2001-2002, $309,000,000 is appropriated for fiscal year 2001 
for obligation after July 1, 2001 and $791,000,000 is 
appropriated for fiscal year 2002 for obligation on, or after, 
October 1, 2001.
    State grants support a variety of vocational education 
programs developed in accordance with the State plan. The Act 
concentrates federal resources on institutions with high 
concentrations of low-income students. The populations assisted 
by Basic Grants range from secondary students in pre-vocational 
courses to adults who need retraining to adapt to changing 
technological and labor markets.

Tech-prep

    The bill includes $106,000,000 for tech-prep, which is the 
same as fiscal year 2000 and the budget request for fiscal year 
2001. The Committee bill does not include the recommendation 
made in the budget request to advance fund $200,000,000 in this 
account for fiscal year 2002.
    This appropriation includes activities under title III, 
part E of the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology 
Education Act. The tech-prep education program provides 
planning and demonstration grants to consortia of local 
educational agencies and postsecondary institutions to develop 
and operate model technical education programs. These programs 
begin in high school and provide students with the 
mathematical, science, communications and technological skills 
needed to enter a 2-year associate degree or 2-year certificate 
program in a given occupational field, and to make a successful 
transition into further postsecondary education or begin their 
careers. The purpose of tech-prep is to develop structural 
links between secondary and postsecondary institutions that 
integrate academic and vocational education and better prepares 
students to make the transition from school to careers.

Tribally controlled postsecondary vocational institutions

    The bill includes $4,600,000 for grants for tribally 
controlled postsecondary vocational institutions, the same as 
the budget request and the fiscal year 2000 amount. This 
program provides grants for the operation and improvement of 
training programs to ensure continuation and expansion of 
vocational training opportunities for Indian youth.

National programs

    For national programs, the Committee provides $17,500,000, 
which is the same as the fiscal year 2000 amount and the budget 
request. This authority supports the conduct and dissemination 
of research in vocational education, and includes support for 
the National Center for Research in Vocational Education, six 
regional curriculum coordination centers, and other 
discretionary research.
    The Committee notes that one of the key provisions of the 
Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act is the 
development of stronger linkages between education and 
employers. One aspect of this is the development of curricula 
for career clusters. The Committee encourages the Department to 
continue development of this curricula, and, to help address 
the shortage of labor in the construction industry, recommends 
that the design of the construction curriculum receive high 
priority.

National Occupational Information Coordinating Committee

    The bill does not include funding for the National 
Occupational Information Coordinating Committee (NOICC). The 
President's budget did not request funding for it. Last year 
NOICC was funded at $9,000,000. NOICC provides career 
information and guidance services to students and adults 
through a network of state agencies.

State programs for adult education

    For state grants, the Committee recommends $470,000,000, 
which is $20,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 amount, and 
$10,000,000 above the budget request. State formula grants 
support programs to enable all adults to acquire basic literacy 
skills, to enable those who so desire to complete a secondary 
education, and to make available to adults the means to become 
more employable, productive, and responsible citizens.
    Grants are provided on a formula basis to States under the 
new Adult Education and Family Literacy Act. The formula 
provides an initial allotment of $25,000 for each state and 
$100,000 to each outlying area, with additional allotments 
distributed on the basis of population aged 16 or over who are 
without a high school diploma or equivalent who are not 
enrolled in secondary school.
    States may use 12.5% of their allotments for state 
leadership activities and may use an additional 5% or $65,000 
for state administration. States and localities must give 
priority to adult education and literacy activities that are 
built on a strong foundation of research on effective practices 
and that effectively employ technology. Funds are provided on a 
forward-funded basis.
    The Committee notes that over 40 percent of new adult 
education entrants are seeking English as-a-second language 
(ESL) services and that ESL accounts for 51 percent of all 
adults receiving adult education services and 76 percent of the 
hours of instruction received. The Committee expects that the 
funds provided in this program will be used by states with 
large concentrations of students who seek English language 
proficiency training to meet the needs of those individuals. 
The Committee bill retains language similar to that contained 
in last year's bill that guarantees a portion of the funds will 
be used to provide civics education services to new immigrants.

National Programs--National Leadership Activities

    The Committee provides $14,000,000 for national leadership 
activities. This amount is the same as the fiscal year 2000 
level and $75,000,000 below the budget request.
    Through applied research, development, dissemination, 
evaluation, and program improvement activities, this program 
assists State efforts to improve the quality of adult 
education. The funds support such projects as evaluations on 
the status and effectiveness of adult education programs, 
national and international adult literacy surveys, and 
technical assistance on using technology to improve instruction 
and administration that show promise of contributing to the 
improvement and expansion of adult education.
    The Committee has not included funding for a separate, 
competitive grant program proposed by the Administration for 
civics education. The Committee believes that the proposed 
initiative would result in unnecessary duplication, paperwork, 
and cost for states and localities that already operate 
successful ESL programs. The Committee has included language 
similar to that contained in last year's bill that guarantees a 
portion of the funds will be used to provide civics education 
services to new immigrants.
    The Committee notes that $7,000,000 in fiscal year 1999 
funds were used by the Department to support a discretionary 
competition to identify best practices in teaching English-as-
a-Second Language programs. The Committee is hopeful that this 
program will identify successful models for teaching ESL 
programs to new immigrants and that the Department will quickly 
disseminate its findings to all States and to the Committee.

National Institute for Literacy

    For the National Institute for Literacy, the bill provides 
$6,500,000, which is $500,000 above the fiscal year 2000 amount 
and the same as the budget request. The Institute supports 
research and development projects, tracks progress made toward 
national literacy goals, supports research fellowships, 
disseminates information through a national clearinghouse, and 
coordinates literacy information data from national and State 
sources.

State grants for incarcerated youth offenders

    The Committee recommends no funding for state grants for 
incarcerated youth offenders, $12,000,000 below the budget 
request and $19,000,000 below the fiscal year 2000 amount. 
Given the limited Federal discretionary budget, the Committee 
has chosen to focus its resources on higher priority programs 
in this bill.

                      student financial assistance

    The bill provides $10,198,000,000 for student financial 
assistance programs, an increase of $823,283,000 over the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 appropriation and a decrease of 
$60,000,000 below the President's budget request.
    It has come to the Committee's attention that the Higher 
Education Assistance Fund (HEAF) Board recently met and started 
shut-down procedures after dealing with the last claim and 
determining that there would be no further claims to settle 
related to the closure of HEAF. The Committee understands that 
approximately $10,000,000 remains in the HEAF account, which is 
under the control of the Department of Education. These funds 
may not be obligated by the Department of Education prior to 
consultation with the Chairmen and Ranking Members of the 
appropriations and authorizing committees of the House and the 
Senate.
    The Committee strongly encourages the office of Student 
Financial Assistance, through the Office's web site, to include 
links or contact information for all banks and financial 
institutions within the United States who are eligible Federal 
Family Education Loan (FFEL) program lenders and who wish to be 
identified on the Office's website.

Pell grants

    The bill increases the maximum Pell Grant to $3,500, the 
same as the President's request and $200 above the comparable 
fiscal year 2000 amount, providing the highest maximum grant 
ever awarded. This raise in the maximum grant will increase the 
number of students who qualify for Pell Grants to 3,885,000.
    The bill provides $8,356,000,000 in new budget authority 
for the Pell Grant program, the same as the President's request 
and $716,283,000 above the comparable fiscal year 2000 amount. 
The Committee considers this program to be among the highest 
priorities under its jurisdiction. Pell Grants provide portable 
education vouchers to postsecondary students who may use them 
at any of over 6,000 eligible schools.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants

    The bill provides $691,000,000 for federal supplemental 
educational opportunity grants, the same as the request and 
$70,000,000 above the comparable fiscal year 2000 
appropriation. The SEOG program provides grants through 
postsecondary institutions to qualified students who 
demonstrate exceptional financial need. Institutions have broad 
flexibility within the eligibility criteria for awarding these 
grants with the exception that priority must be given to Pell 
Grant recipients.

Work-study

    The bill provides $1,011,000,000 for the work-study 
program, an increase of $77,000,000 over the comparable fiscal 
year 2000 appropriation and the same as the budget request. 
Funding for this program is provided through institutions to 
students who work part-time to meet the cost of education. 
Institutions receive funding according to a statutory formula 
and may allocate it for job location and job development 
centers.
    The administration requires that ``...at least one tutoring 
or family literacy project [must be included] as part of 
...community service activities [under Work Study.]'' The 
Committee believes that, given the priority placed on this 
activity by the Administration, they should include performance 
data on the baseline literacy level of children and adults 
participating in family literacy or tutoring and numerical 
measures of expected improvements. These measures should 
parallel, to the degree possible, the measures used in programs 
such as even start, head start, and other literacy programs.

Perkins loans capital contributions

    The Committee bill provides $100,000,000 in funding for new 
capital contributions to federal perkins revolving loan funds, 
the same as the budget request and the comparable fiscal year 
2000 appropriation.

Perkins loans cancellations

    The bill provides $40,000,000 for federal perkins loans 
cancellations, $20,000,000 below the budget request and 
$10,000,000 above the comparable fiscal year 2000 amount. The 
Federal Government reimburses institutional perkins revolving 
loan funds for loan cancellations permitted under Federal law. 
Loans may be canceled when the borrower pursues a career in one 
of 12 statutorily-designated professions including corrections, 
medical technical work, and peace corps or VISTA service.

Leveraging educational assistance partnership

    The bill does not provide funding for the leveraging 
educational assistance partnership (LEAP) program. The fiscal 
year 2000 Appropriations Act provided $40,000,000 for this 
program and the President requested $40,000,000 for fiscal year 
2001. The Higher Education Amendments of 1998 reauthorized the 
state student incentive grant (SSIG) program as the new 
leveraging educational assistance partnership (LEAP) program. 
LEAP provides dollar-for-dollar matching funds to States as an 
incentive for providing need-based grant and work study 
assistance to eligible postsecondary students. Federally 
supported grants and job earnings are limited to $5,000 per 
award year for full-time students. By law, each State's 
allocation is based on its relative share of the total national 
population of students eligible to participate in the programs, 
except that no state is to receive less than it received in 
1979, when the appropriation was $76,750,000. If LEAP amounts 
are below this level, each State is allocated an amount 
proportional to the amount of funds it received in 1979. If a 
state does not use all of its allocation, the excess funds are 
distributed to other States in the same proportion as the 
original distribution. States must, at a minimum, match LEAP 
grants dollar for dollar with state funds provided through 
direct state appropriations for this purpose.

GPRA Measures

    The Committee is encouraged by the Office of Student 
Financial Aid's focus on the development of performance 
measures. The Office should use these measures as the primary 
management tool for resource allocation and the evaluation of 
programs and individuals. The Committee is very concerned that 
the Office has not consulted with it, and other Committees of 
Congress, on the definition of performance measures, baseline 
development and the development and implementation of regular 
progress reports to Congress. The Office of Student Financial 
Aid is directed to establish a regular consultative process 
with the Committee on Appropriations, the Committee on 
Education and the Workforce and the analogous Committees in the 
Senate. The Committee also instructs the Office regularly to 
brief the Congress on how these tools are being used to manage 
the Student Financial Assistance programs, how such data is 
used to establish program and individual performance goals, how 
actual performance is measured against these goals and the 
kinds of incentives, both positive and negative, that are in 
place to assure the achievement of overall goals.
    The Committee concurs with the Secretary's proposal to 
provide a single set of performance measures. However, it also 
believes that, in addition to various measures of timeliness, 
accuracy and student satisfaction, the Secretary should include 
measures relating to the successful completion of degrees or 
certificates by students assisted through the various student 
financial aid programs.

Federal family education loan program

    The bill provides $48,000,000 for administration of the 
federal family education loan (FFEL) program, the same as 
fiscal year 2000 and the budget request. This discretionary 
administrative funding is provided in the FFEL appropriation 
account rather than under the Department's Salaries and 
Expenses account pursuant to a requirement of the Federal 
Credit Reform Act of 1990. These funds support Federal 
administrative activities including processing payments and 
claims, reducing loan default costs, and program monitoring. 
FFEL loans are financed with private capital and reinsured by 
the Federal Government against borrower default, death, 
disability and bankruptcy. Federal costs include payments for 
such insurance claims as well as support for borrower interest 
benefits. FFEL loans have supported over $150,000,000,000 in 
loans to student and parent borrowers since their inception. 
This account includes discretionary Federal administrative 
costs only. Additional amounts for new FFEL subsidies and 
mandatory administrative expenses for fiscal year 2001 are 
provided under permanent legislative authority.

                            Higher education

    The bill provides $1,688,081,000 for higher education 
programs, an increase of $158,502,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 appropriation and $107,892,000 below the budget request.

Strengthening institutions

    The bill provides $73,000,000 for the regular strengthening 
institutions program, $10,000,000 above the budget request and 
$12,750,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level. This program 
provides general operating subsidies to institutions with low 
average educational and general expenditures per student and 
significant percentages of low-income students. Awards may be 
used for faculty and academic program development, management, 
joint use of libraries and laboratories, acquisition of 
equipment, and student services.

Hispanic serving institutions

    The bill provides $68,500,000 for the Hispanic serving 
institutions (HSI) program, $6,000,000 above the budget request 
and $26,250,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level.
    The HSI program provides operating subsidies to schools 
that serve at least 25 percent Hispanic students of whom at 
least half are low-income, first-generation students and at 
least a quarter of whom are either low-income or first-
generation students.
    The Committee expects the Department to continue to develop 
specific numerical goals for this program. Specifically, the 
Committee expects the Department to focus on performance 
indicators related to student persistence, academic skills, 
endowment building, technology, institutional stability and 
program quality.

Dual degree programs

    The Committee bill does not include funding for the dual 
degree program proposed by the Administration to be funded at 
$40,000,000. This program is not authorized. The proposal would 
provide grants to minority serving institutions to establish 
dual-degree program articulation agreements, provide some 
scholarship funds for participating students and compensate the 
minority serving institutions for revenue losses associated 
with the participating students' accelerated matriculation.

Strengthening historically black colleges and universities

    The bill provides $185,000,000 for strengthening 
historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), 
$36,250,000 above the fiscal year 2000 appropriation and 
$16,000,000 above the budget request.
    This program provides operating subsidies to accredited, 
legally authorized HBCUs established prior to 1964 whose 
principal mission is the education of Black Americans. Funds 
may be used to support both programs and management and are 
distributed through a formula grant based on the enrollment of 
Pell Grant recipients, number of graduates, and the number of 
graduates entering graduate or professional schools in which 
Blacks are underrepresented. The minimum grant is $500,000.
    The Committee expects the Department to continue to develop 
specific numerical goals for this program. Specifically, the 
Committee expects the Department to focus on performance 
indicators related to student persistence, academic skills, 
endowment building, technology, institutional stability and 
program quality.

Strengthening historically black graduate institutions

    The bill provides $45,000,000 for the strengthening 
historically black graduate institutions program, $14,000,000 
above the fiscal year 2000 appropriation and $5,000,000 above 
the budget request.
    The program provides 5-year grants to the following 16 
post-secondary institutions that are specified in section 
326(e)(1) of the Higher Education Act: Morehouse School of 
Medicine, Meharry Medical School, Charles R. Drew Postgraduate 
Medical School, Clark-Atlanta University, Tuskegee University 
School of Veterinary Medicine, Xavier University School of 
Pharmacy, Southern University School of Law, Texas Southern 
University Schools of Law and Pharmacy, Florida A&M; University 
School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, North Carolina Central 
University School of Law, Morgan State University qualified 
graduate program, Hampton University qualified graduate 
program, Alabama A&M; qualified graduate program, University of 
Maryland Eastern Shore qualified graduate program, and Jackson 
State qualified graduate program. No grants may be made to the 
last 11 institutions until the first 5 institutions have 
received at least $12 million. Grants are limited to $500,000 
unless the institution agrees to match the entire grant with 
the exception of a minimum $3,000,000 set-aside for the 
Morehouse School of Medicine. Awards may be used for building 
endowments as well as the same purposes for which the 
strengthening HBCU grants may be used.
    The Committee expects the Department to continue to develop 
specific numerical goals for this program. Specifically, the 
Committee expects the Department to focus on performance 
indicators related to student persistence, academic skills, 
endowment building, technology, institutional stability and 
program quality.

Strengthening Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving institutions

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for strengthening 
Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian-serving institutions, the 
same as both the fiscal year 2000 level and the budget request.
    The Committee expects the Department to continue to develop 
specific numerical goals for this program. Specifically, the 
Committee expects the Department to focus on performance 
indicators related to student persistence, academic skills, 
endowment building, technology, institutional stability and 
program quality.

Strengthening tribally controlled colleges and universities

    The Committee recommends $12,000,000 for the strengthening 
tribally controlled colleges and universities program, 
$3,000,000 above the budget request and $6,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 level.
    The Committee expects the Department to continue to develop 
specific numerical goals for this program. Specifically, the 
Committee expects the Department to focus on performance 
indicators related to student persistence, academic skills, 
endowment building, technology, institutional stability and 
program quality.

Fund for the improvement of postsecondary education

    The Committee recommends $31,200,000 for the fund for the 
improvement of postsecondary education (FIPSE), the same as the 
budget request and $43,049,000 below the fiscal year 2000 
amount. FIPSE awards grants and contracts to a variety of 
postsecondary institutions and other organizations to improve 
the quality and delivery of postsecondary education.

Minority science improvement

    The bill provides $8,500,000 for the minority science 
improvement program (MSIP), $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 appropriation and the same as the budget request.
    The MSIP program awards grants to improve mathematics, 
science, and engineering programs at institutions serving 
primarily minority students and to increase the number of 
minority students who pursue advanced degrees and careers in 
those fields. The Committee encourages the Department to 
develop specific numerical goals and baseline data for this 
program.

International education and foreign languages studies

            Domestic programs
    The bill provides $67,000,000 for the domestic activities 
of the international education and foreign languages studies 
programs, $5,000,000 above both the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation and the budget request. The program assists 
graduate and undergraduate foreign language and area studies 
programs and students at institutions of postsecondary 
education. Programs include national resource centers, foreign 
language and area studies fellowships, undergraduate 
international studies and foreign language programs, 
international research and studies projects, business and 
international education projects, international business 
education centers, language resource centers, and American 
overseas research centers. In general, the Secretary has 
discretion to allocate funding among these various activities.
    The Department has developed some performance indicators 
for this program; however, the Committee believes more work 
needs to be done in developing specific, numeric goals and 
baseline data for these programs.
            Overseas programs
    The bill provides $10,000,000 for the overseas programs in 
international education and foreign language studies authorized 
under the Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, 
popularly known as the Fulbright-Hays Act. The appropriation is 
the same as the budget request and $3,320,000 above the fiscal 
year 2000 appropriation. Funding for these programs supports 
group projects abroad, faculty research abroad, special 
bilateral projects, and doctoral research abroad.
    The Department has developed some performance indicators 
for this program, however, the Committee believes more work 
needs to be done in developing specific, numeric goals and 
baseline data for these programs.

Institute for International Public Policy

    The bill provides $1,022,000 for the Institute for 
International Public Policy, the same as both the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2000 appropriation. This program 
provides a grant to the United Negro College Fund to operate 
the Institute through sub-grantees chosen among minority 
serving institutions.
    The Department has developed some performance indicators 
for this program, however, the Committee believes more work 
needs to be done in developing specific, numeric goals and 
baseline data for these programs.

Interest subsidy grants

    The bill provides $10,000,000 for interest subsidy grants 
authorized under section 702 of the Higher Education Act, the 
same amount requested in the budget and $2,000,000 below the 
fiscal year 2000 appropriation. This program provides loan 
subsidies to higher education institutions for facilities 
acquisition, construction and renovation loans taken prior to 
1974. All loans will terminate by the fiscal year 2013. The 
authority to initiate new loan subsidy commitments was repealed 
in the 1992 amendments to the Higher Education Act. Interest 
subsidies provide institutions the difference between the 
interest they pay on commercially-obtained loans and 3 percent 
of the loan balance. The bill provides funding sufficient to 
meet the Federal Government's commitments on the 241 loans 
expected to be in repayment status in fiscal year 2001.

TRIO

    The bill provides $760,000,000 for the six TRIO programs, 
an increase of $35,000,000 above the budget request and 
$115,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 appropriation.
    The TRIO programs provide a variety of outreach and support 
services to encourage low-income, potential first-generation 
college students to enter and complete college. Discretionary 
grants of up to four or five years are awarded competitively to 
institutions of higher education and other agencies. At least 
two-thirds of the eligible participants in TRIO must be low-
income, first-generation college students.
    The Committee urges the Department to use a funding 
allocation strategy in making awards under TRIO that balances 
the need to fund a larger number of grantees with the need for 
projects to improve the quality of student services and expand 
to serve all eligible students.

GEAR UP

    The Committee recommends $200,000,000 for the GEAR UP 
program, the same as the fiscal year 2000 appropriation and 
$125,000,000 below the budget request.
    GEAR UP provides grants to states and partnerships of low-
income middle and high schools, institutions of higher 
education and community organizations to target entire grades 
of students and give them the skills and encouragement to 
successfully pursue postsecondary education.

Byrd scholarships

    The Committee recommends $39,859,000 for the Byrd 
scholarships program, $1,142,000 below the budget request and 
the same as the fiscal year 2000 appropriation. The Byrd 
scholarship program provides formula grants to States to award 
four-year, $1,500 scholarships to students who demonstrate 
academic excellence in high school.

Javits fellowships

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for the Javits 
fellowship program, the same as the budget request and 
$10,000,000 below the fiscal year 2000 appropriation.
    Under the Javits program, institutions receive Federal 
support to make fellowship awards of up to $14,400 to students 
pursuing doctoral study in the arts, humanities, and social 
sciences.
    The Committee is aware that, due to a contractor error, 39 
students were incorrectly notified in writing that they were 
recipients of a Javits Fellowship for the 2000-2001 school 
year. Because of a provision in the authorizing law 
guaranteeing funding to a student once he or she is notified in 
writing of receipt of such an award, the Department believes it 
is obligated to grant the 39 alternate students awards. 
However, the Department has also informed the Committee that, 
although this error was made by a Department contractor, the 
Department has not terminated the contract nor required the 
contractor to pay for this mistake. Although this situation 
appears to have resolved itself without additional cost, the 
Committee remains deeply concerned that this could have 
resulted in federal taxpayers assuming the responsibility for a 
contractor error while the contractor continued to receive 
payments. Accordingly, the Committee urges the Department to 
carefully review this contractor's performance and take 
appropriate steps, up to and including termination of the 
contract, to ensure that future such errors will not occur.

Graduate assistance in areas of national need program

    The Committee recommends $31,000,000 for the graduate 
assistance in areas of national need (GAANN) program, the same 
as both the budget request and the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation.
    The GAANN program awards grants to institutions of higher 
education to provide fellowships of up to five years and 
$14,400 to economically disadvantaged students who have 
demonstrated academic excellence and who are pursuing graduate 
education in designated areas of national need.

Learning anytime anywhere

    The Committee recommends $10,000,000 for learning anytime 
anywhere partnerships, which is $13,269,000 below the fiscal 
year 2000 appropriation and $20,000,000 below the budget 
request.
    This program supports grants of up to 5 years for regional 
or national partnerships aimed at widening the availability of 
new forms of distance education, as well as improving 
instructional and program quality.

Teacher quality enhancement grants

    The Committee recommends $98,000,000 for teacher quality 
enhancement grants, which is the same as the budget request and 
the fiscal year 2000 appropriation. Teacher quality enhancement 
grants have three components: state grants, partnership grants 
and recruitment grants. By statute, state and partnership 
grants each receive 45 percent of the appropriation, and 
recruitment grants receive 10 percent.
    Under the state grant component, states apply to receive up 
to three years of funding to improve the quality of their 
teaching force through promoting reform activities such as 
teacher licensing and certification, accountability for high 
quality teacher preparation and professional development and 
recruiting teachers for high-need schools. States must match 50 
percent of the federal award.
    Under the partnership component, partnerships apply to 
receive a five-year grant to strengthen the capacity of K-12 
educators in designing and implementing effective teacher 
education programs, and by increasing collaboration among these 
practitioners and departments of arts and sciences and schools 
of education at institutions of higher education. Partnerships 
must match 25 percent of the federal grant in the first year, 
35 percent in the second year, and 50 percent for the remaining 
years.
    The recruitment component supports the efforts to reduce 
shortages of qualified teachers in high-need school districts. 
States or partnerships may apply to receive these grants.

Child care access means parents in school

    The Committee recommends $15,000,000 for child care access 
means parents in school program, which is the same as the 
budget request and $10,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation.
    Under this program, institutions may receive discretionary 
grants of up to four years to support or establish a campus-
based childcare program primarily serving the needs of low-
income students enrolled at the institution. Priority is given 
to childcare programs that leverage significant local or 
institutional resources and utilize a sliding fee scale. Grants 
can only be used to supplement childcare services or start new 
programs.

Demonstration projects to ensure quality higher education for students 
        with disabilities

    The Committee recommends $5,000,000 for demonstration 
projects to ensure quality higher education for students with 
disabilities, the same as both the budget request and the 
fiscal year 2000 level.
    This program provides discretionary grants for three years 
to support model demonstration projects that provide technical 
assistance and professional development activities for faculty 
and administrators in institutions of higher education in order 
to provide students with disabilities a high-quality 
postsecondary education.

Underground railroad program

    The Committee recommends no funding for the underground 
railroad program, which is $1,750,000 below both the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2000 appropriation. The underground 
railroad program is a grant to a non-profit institution to 
research, display, interpret and collect artifacts relating to 
the history of the underground railroad. Because of the limited 
resources available to it this year, the Committee has chosen 
to fund programs that provide direct services to low-income 
students.

Community Scholarship Mobilization

    The Committee bill does not include funding for the 
community scholarship mobilization program. This program was 
funded at $1,000,000 in fiscal year 2000. The President's 
budget did not request funding for it.

GPRA data/HEA program evaluation

    The Committee recommends $3,000,000 for program evaluation 
and development of data required under the Government 
Performance and Results Act for Higher Education programs 
administered by the Department. This is the same as the budget 
request and the fiscal year 2000 appropriation.
    The Committee understands that for many higher education 
programs, baseline and performance indicator data is sparse, 
nonexistent or difficult to collect. Funding under this 
activity will support the Department in developing high-quality 
data as required under the Government Performance and Results 
Act.

                           HOWARD UNIVERSITY

    The bill provides $226,474,000 for Howard University, 
$2,474,000 above the budget request and $7,030,000 above the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 appropriation. Howard University is 
a ``Research I'' university located in the District of 
Columbia. Direct appropriations for Howard University are 
authorized by 20 U.S.C. 123, originally enacted in 1867.
    The budget request earmarks a minimum of $3,530,000 for the 
endowment. The Committee bill increases this amount to 
$3,600,000, which represents an increase of $70,000 above the 
current level.
    Howard University provides undergraduate liberal arts, 
graduate and professional instruction to 10,400 students from 
all 50 States. Masters degrees are offered in over 85 fields 
and Doctor of Philosophy degrees in 24 fields.
    The Committee is pleased with the progress Howard 
University has made in achieving most of its performance 
measures.

         COLLEGE HOUSING AND ACADEMIC FACILITIES LOANS PROGRAM

    The bill provides $737,000 for the Federal administration 
of the college housing and academic facilities loan (CHAFL) 
program, the Higher Educational Facilities Loans program and 
the College Housing Loans program, the same as the budget 
request and the same as the fiscal year 2000 appropriation.

HISTORICALLY BLACK COLLEGE AND UNIVERSITY CAPITAL AND FINANCING PROGRAM

Federal administration

    The bill provides $207,000 for the administration of the 
historically black college and university capital financing 
program authorized under part B of title VII of the Higher 
Education Act, the same as the fiscal year 2000 appropriation 
and $1,000 below the budget request. The program is intended to 
make capital available for repair and renovation of facilities 
at historically black colleges and universities. In exceptional 
circumstances, capital provided under the program can be used 
for construction or acquisition of facilities.

Bond subsidies

    Under the HBCU capital program, a private, for-profit 
``designated bonding authority'' issues construction bonds to 
raise capital for loans to historically black colleges and 
universities for construction projects. The Department provides 
insurance for these bonds, guaranteeing full payment of 
principal and interest to bond holders. Federally insured bonds 
and unpaid interest are limited by statute to $357,000,000. The 
letter of credit limitation establishes the total amount of 
bonds which can be issued by the designated bonding authority. 
The credit limitation must be explicitly stated in an 
appropriation Act according to the authorizing legislation.

            EDUCATION RESEARCH, STATISTICS, AND IMPROVEMENT

    The bill includes $494,367,000 for education research, 
statistics, and improvement programs. This amount is 
$23,200,000 less than the budget request, and $96,714,000 below 
the fiscal year 2000 level. This account supports education 
research authorized under the Educational Research, 
Development, Dissemination, and Improvement Act of 1994; title 
VI of P.L. 103-27; the National Center for Education Statistics 
and the National Assessment of Educational Progress authorized 
by the National Education Statistics Act of 1994, title VI of 
P.L. 103-382; and titles II, X, and XIII of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act.

Research

    This bill includes $103,567,000 for educational research, 
the same as the fiscal year 2000 amount. The President's budget 
did not request separate line item funding for this program. 
The Office of Educational Research and Improvement conducts 
research and development activities, which are authorized under 
the Educational Research, Development, Dissemination, and 
Improvement Act of 1994, title IX of P.L. 103-227. The 1994 Act 
established a National Educational Research Policy and 
Priorities Board within the Office of Educational Research and 
Improvement, and authorizes five new national research 
institutes for the following subject areas: (1) student 
achievement, curriculum, and assessment; (2) education of at-
risk students; (3) educational governance, finance, 
policymaking, and management; (4) early childhood development 
and education; and (5) postsecondary education, libraries, and 
lifelong learning. The Assistant Secretary is authorized to 
support activities to increase the participation of minority 
researchers and institutions as well as research and 
development centers, in order to support the objectives of the 
national research institutes.
    The Committee is very concerned about the Department's 
endorsement of mathematics programs that do not emphasize 
rigorous mathematics education. This nation must have the best 
mathematics education possible to teach the next generation of 
scientists, and to help prepare students for the modern, high 
tech workplace. The Committee urges the Department to 
reevaluate these programs and the process by which they were 
identified as ``promising'' or ``exemplary'' to ensure that 
such programs focus on sound scientific research.

Regional educational laboratories

    The Committee has included $65,000,000 for the regional 
educational laboratories. This amount is the same as the fiscal 
year 2000 level. The President's budget did not request 
separate line item funding for this program.
    The Committee reiterates its intent, expressed in the 
Conference Report on the fiscal year 1996 bill (Report No. 104-
537) that all work of the Regional Education Laboratories be 
based on the priorities established by their regional governing 
boards.
    The Committee notes that the request for proposals for 
regional educational laboratories issued by the Department, 
which would be in effect in fiscal year 2001, would shift part 
of the programmatic control of the individual laboratories' 
governing boards to the Department, and could pull the 
laboratories programs of work away from the needs of educators 
and policymakers in the ten individual laboratory regions. 
Consistent with House Report 104-537, it is the intent of the 
Committee that funds provided to the regional educational 
laboratories shall not be conditioned on meeting performance 
standards that compromise the priorities of the regional 
governing boards of each of the individual laboratories. 
Further, the Committee intends that regional educational 
laboratory funds shall be obligated and distributed on the same 
basis as the fiscal year 2000 allocations not later than 
January 31, 2001.

Statistics

    This bill includes $68,000,000 for the activities of the 
National Center for Education Statistics, exclusive of the 
National Assessment of Educational Progress. This amount is the 
same as the fiscal year 2000 amount. The President's budget did 
not request separate line item funding for this program.
    Statistics activities are authorized under the National 
Education Statistics Act of 1994, title VI of P.L. 103-382. The 
Center collects, analyzes, and reports statistics on all levels 
of education in the United States. Activities are carried out 
directly and through grants and contracts. Major publications 
include ``The Condition of Education'' and ``Digest of 
Education Statistics.'' Other products include projections of 
enrollments, teacher supply and demand, and educational 
expenditures. Technical assistance to state and local education 
agencies and postsecondary institutions is provided. 
International comparisons are authorized.

Research, Development and Dissemination

    The Committee bill does not include funding for a proposed 
research, development and dissemination initiative proposed by 
the Administration for funding at $198,567,000. This represents 
the President's proposal to consolidate existing research 
institutes, educational laboratories and national dissemination 
activities into a single line-item.
    It is the Committee's understanding that these ideas are 
currently being considered by the authorizing committees. 
Education research funding will follow the structure that is 
ultimately agreed upon through this reauthorization process. 
Until this process is complete, the Committee recommends level 
funding through existing education research line items.

Assessment

    This bill includes $40,000,000 for the National Assessment 
of Educational Progress, the same as the fiscal year 2000 
amount, and $2,500,000 below the budget request. The Assessment 
is authorized under section 411 of the National Education 
Statistics Act of 1994, and is the only nationally 
representative survey of educational ability and achievement of 
American students. The primary goal of the Assessment is to 
determine and report the status and trends of the knowledge and 
skills of students, subject by subject. Subject areas assessed 
in the past have included reading, writing, mathematics, 
science, and social studies, as well as citizenship, 
literature, art, and music. The Assessment is operated by 
contractors through competitive awards made by the National 
Center for Education Statistics; a National Assessment 
Governing Board formulates the policy guidelines for the 
program. Within the amounts provided, $4,000,000 is for the 
National Assessment Governing Board.

Fund for the improvement of education

    The bill includes $145,000,000 for the fund for the 
improvement of education, which is $7,850,000 above the budget 
request and $98,864,000 below the fiscal year 2000 amount. The 
fund for the improvement of education has a broad portfolio of 
activities related to the national education goals and systemic 
education reform. Under the fund, the Secretary of Education 
supports activities that identify and disseminate innovative 
educational approaches.
    The Committee has not provided funding for the following 
activities identified in the budget request: National 
Constitution Center, Elementary School Counseling 
Demonstration, and College Test Preparation.
    The Committee remains concerned that major initiatives have 
been established within the fund for the improvement of 
education with no Congressional involvement in the past. It is 
particularly concerned that these major initiatives were not 
disclosed in the Congressional justifications submitted by the 
Department as part of the budget submission. In addition, the 
Committee is concerned that funding levels displayed in the 
Justifications and other submissions to the Committee during 
the consideration of the budget request have been unilaterally 
changed by the Department without notification of the 
Committee.
    The Committee therefore continues the policy of last year 
which directs the Department to treat these changes as 
reprogrammings, and to employ the usual reprogramming rules, 
for any significant change in funding for programs or 
activities within FIE from the levels provided to the Committee 
during the appropriations process. The Committee also directs 
the Department to consider any new activities, not mandated by 
Congress, to be reprogrammings and to follow the usual 
reprogramming rules prior to any public notification or 
obligation of funds for these new activities. The Committee 
further directs the Department to provide a complete and final 
listing of activities within FIE in the annual operating plan 
required by this bill.
    The Committee has included funding for Comprehensive School 
Reform in this account. The Committee expects that the 
Department will continue to follow the directives in the 
Conference Report accompanying the fiscal year 1999 bill (House 
Report 105-390) and in the conference report accompanying the 
fiscal year 1999 bill (House Report 105-825).
    The Committee commends the Office of Educational Research 
and Improvement at the Department of Education for the 
significant contributions it has provided to the Interagency 
Educational Research Initiative undertaken with the National 
Institute of Child Health and Human Development and the 
National Science Foundation. OERI is urged to continue its 
active participation in this promising joint effort.
    The final report of the National Reading Panel has made a 
significant contribution by making widely accessible rigorous 
research-based evidence on reading development, reading 
difficulties, and reading instruction. The Committee is pleased 
with the coordinated efforts of the Department of Education and 
the National Institute on Child Health and Human Development on 
this project.
    The Committee is pleased to learn of the progress being 
made in the Spanish-to-English Reading Initiative launched by 
NICHD and the OERI of the Department of Education, and looks 
forward to receiving a report at next year's hearing on the 
research funded by this important effort.
    The Committee is aware that over 14 million young people in 
this country have been identified as ``at risk'' and in need of 
a positive mentoring relationship. Yet only 4 million adults 
give of their time to participate in mentoring programs. E-
mentoring offers a unique, new avenue to connect young people 
with positive adult role models. The Committee encourages the 
Department to support and build on existing expertise in 
delivering safe, responsible and productive e-mentoring 
opportunities for young people.
    The Committee also recognizes the role of one-to-one 
mentoring programs in providing children with adult support and 
guidance so that they may grow to become competent and caring 
men and women. The Committee supports the establishment and 
expansion of one-to-one mentoring programs into local schools 
in order to reach more children in need of caring adult 
guidance.
    The Committee continues to be aware of a growing body of 
research strongly associating the formal study of music with 
the development of spatial reasoning skills in young children. 
Spatial-temporal ability is required in mathematics, physics, 
engineering, architecture and any subject or task requiring an 
understanding of how objects fit together in time and space. A 
recent study found that children given piano training and time 
playing with specially designed computer software scored nearly 
30 percent higher on proportional math and fractions tests than 
other children, and were performing math skills at the sixth-
grade level. These findings underscore the academic benefits of 
in-school music instruction for children of various 
socioeconomic backgrounds. To the extent possible, the 
Committee encourages the Department of Education to pursue 
further study in this area, with the goal of informing 
citizens, students, music educators and local school districts, 
so that they may consider the future of their own music 
education programs with the benefit of peer-reviewed research.
    The Committee is also aware of several recent research 
studies which clearly substantiate that active participation in 
the arts has a significant effect on a student's success in 
reading and math and is a valuable tool for the enhancement of 
intellectual development overall. The Committee supports 
efforts to bring well-established arts education programs to 
national audiences of students and teachers through distance 
learning.
    The Committee is impressed with vision screening programs 
operating for children in inner-city schools in several states. 
These programs provide refractions by eye doctors and supply 
prescription glasses to students in economically distressed 
school systems. The simple and low cost act of providing 
glasses can improve the educational performance of children who 
have been severely hindered because of their inability to see 
properly. The Committee encourages the Department of 
Education's continued support of this initiative.

International education exchange

    The Committee includes $7,000,000 for the international 
education exchange program which is the same as the fiscal year 
2000 amount and $1,000,000 less than the budget request. 
International education exchange is authorized under title VI 
of the Goals 2000: Educate America Act. The International 
Education Exchange program provides support for education 
exchange activities in civics and government education and 
economic education between the United States and eligible 
countries in Central and Eastern Europe, the Commonwealth of 
Independent States, and any country that was formerly a 
republic of the Soviet Union. Grantees provide for the exchange 
of ideas and experiences among educators and leaders through 
seminars on the basic principles of U.S. constitutional 
democracy and economics, and through visits to school systems, 
institutions of higher education, and nonprofit organizations 
which are conducting exemplary programs in civics and economic 
education.
    The program is designed and implemented in collaboration 
with the United States Information Agency, which is charged 
with ensuring that the assistance provided is not duplicative 
of other efforts. The authorizing statute requires that 50 
percent of the funds be reserved for activities in civics and 
government education activities, and 50 percent for economic 
education.

Civic education

    This bill includes $10,000,000 for the civic education 
program, $150,000 above both the budget request and the fiscal 
year 2000 level. The Civic Education program funds the Center 
for Civic Education to educate students about the history and 
principles of the Constitution of the United States and foster 
civic competence and responsibility. This purpose is 
accomplished primarily through the Center's program ``We the 
People . . . The Citizen and the Constitution.'' In addition to 
a course of instruction made available to public and private 
elementary and secondary schools, the program provides, at 
local request, simulated congressional hearings, and sponsors a 
national competition of such hearings for secondary school 
students. We the People is made available in all 435 
Congressional districts. Funds may also be used for training 
teachers about the Constitution and the political system of the 
United States, and to provide instruction for middle school 
students on the roles of State and local governments in the 
Federal system established by the Constitution.

Eisenhower professional development national activities

    This bill includes $23,300,000 for the Eisenhower 
professional development national activities, which is the same 
as the fiscal year 2000 amount. The President did not propose 
separate line item funding for this program. This program 
supports activities of national significance contributing to 
the development and implementation of high-quality professional 
development in the core subject areas. Examples of authorized 
activities include: providing seed money to agencies and 
organizations to develop their capacity to provide professional 
development; supporting professional development with strong 
academic and pedagogical content for teams of teachers and 
other educators from individual schools; encouraging the 
development of professional networks to allow for interaction 
among teachers of the core academic subjects; encouraging 
development of models for recruiting and retaining new, highly 
qualified teachers; promoting the transferability of 
certification; and disseminating information about emerging 
academic standards and related professional development.
    Support for the National Board for Professional Teaching 
Standards (NBPTS), which has implemented a voluntary system of 
challenging professional certification for teachers, is 
specifically authorized. The President proposes to continue 
funding the Board under a proposed new program in the School 
Improvement account. Funding is also authorized for the 
National Clearinghouse for Mathematics and Science Education. 
Evaluation of activities carried out under both the Federal and 
State Eisenhower programs is also authorized.

Eisenhower regional mathematics and science education consortia

    This bill includes $15,000,000 for the Eisenhower regional 
mathematics and science education consortia, the same as the 
budget request and the same as the fiscal year 2000 amount. 
Regional mathematics and science education consortia (at least 
one in each of the ten regions served by the regional 
educational laboratories) disseminate exemplary mathematics and 
science instructional materials and provide technical 
assistance in the use of improved teaching methods and 
assessment tools. Awards are for up to 5 years. Matching is 
required, with the Federal share set at 80 percent and at least 
10 percent of the 20 percent non-Federal share required to come 
from sources other than State or local government. Eligible 
recipients--State and local educational agencies, elementary or 
secondary schools, institutions of higher education, nonprofit 
organizations, regional educational laboratories, or 
combinations of these entities--must demonstrate their 
expertise in mathematics and science education. Each recipient 
must establish a regional board, representative of 
participating organizations, to oversee administration of the 
project and establish program priorities.

Javits gifted and talented education

    This bill includes $7,500,000 for the Jacob K. Javits 
Gifted and Talented Students Education Act, the same as the 
budget request and $1,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 
amount. The purpose of this program is to build nationwide 
capability to meet the special educational needs of gifted and 
talented students. The program functions through support for 
research, demonstration projects, teacher training, and other 
activities. Competitive grants are awarded to State and local 
educational agencies, institutions of higher education, and 
other public and private agencies and organizations. Not more 
than 30 percent of available funds may be used for research, 
evaluation, and the collection and analysis of information 
related to program purposes. These funds include support for a 
National Center for Research and Development in the Education 
of Gifted and Talented Children and Youth.
    Priority must be given to projects identifying and serving 
gifted and talented students who may not be identified and 
served through traditional assessment methods, and to those 
developing or improving the capacity of schools in an entire 
State or region of the Nation to identify and serve gifted and 
talented students. At least half of the applications approved 
for funding each year must address the priority of serving 
students not identified through traditional means.

America's tests

    The bill does not include $5,000,000 requested by the 
Administration for the implementation of voluntary national 
tests. The Committee notes that the fiscal year 1999 conference 
report included a permanent amendment to the General Education 
Provisions Act which specifically prohibited any pilot testing, 
field testing, administration or distribution of individualized 
national tests that are not specifically and explicitly 
provided for in authorizing legislation enacted into law. The 
Committee notes that, at the present time, there is no specific 
and explicit authority in Federal law for individualized 
national tests. The Committee has therefore provided no funding 
for national testing activities in fiscal year 2001.

National writing project

    The bill provides $10,000,000 for the National Writing 
Project, the same as the budget request and $1,000,000 above 
the fiscal year 2000 level. Funds are provided to the National 
Writing Project (NWP), a nonprofit educational organization 
that supports teacher training programs in the effective 
teaching of writing, and supports classroom-level research on 
teaching writing that documents effectiveness in terms of 
student performance. To provide these services, the National 
Writing Project contracts with numerous institutions of higher 
education and nonprofit education providers to operate small 
($40,000 or less) teacher training programs. Federal funds 
support 50 percent of the costs of these programs, and 
recipients must contribute an equal amount. A National Advisory 
Board provides advice and support and reviews the Project's 
programs and activities.

                        departmental management

    The bill includes $488,134,000 for departmental management 
(salaries and expenses) at the Department of Education. This 
amount is the same as the fiscal year 2000 appropriation and 
$37,550,000 less than the budget request. These activities are 
authorized by the Department of Education Organization Act, 
P.L. 96-88, and include costs associated with the management 
and operations of the Department as well as separate costs 
associated with the Office for Civil Rights and the Office of 
the Inspector General.
    The Committee continues to be pleased with the emphasis the 
Department's senior management team has placed on complying 
with the Government Performance and Results Act. The Committee 
expects the Department to continue to develop and refine GPRA 
measures for all programs, focusing particularly on student 
achievement outcomes.

Program administration

    The bill includes $382,934,000 for program administration. 
This amount is the same as the fiscal year 2000 appropriation 
and $30,250,000 below the budget request. These funds support 
the staff and other costs of administering programs and 
activities at the Department. Items include personnel 
compensation and health, retirement and other benefits as well 
as travel, rent, telephones, utilities, postage fees, data 
processing, printing, equipment, supplies, technology training, 
consultants and other contractual services.
    The Department is instructed to continue to provide 
information on revenues resulting from the actions of the 
inspector general as required in the fiscal year 2000 House 
report (105-635).

Office for Civil Rights

    The bill includes $71,200,000 for the salaries and expenses 
of the Office for Civil Rights. This amount is the same as the 
fiscal year 2000 appropriation and $4,800,000 below the budget 
request. This Office is responsible for enforcing laws that 
prohibit discrimination on the basis of race, color, national 
origin, sex, handicap, and age in all programs and institutions 
that receive funds from the Department. These laws extend to 50 
State educational agencies, 16,000 local educational agencies, 
3,500 institutions of higher education, as well as to 
proprietary schools, State rehabilitation agencies, libraries, 
and other institutions receiving Federal funds.

Office of the Inspector General

    The bill includes $34,000,000 for the Office of the 
Inspector General. This amount is the same as the fiscal year 
2000 appropriation and $2,500,000 below the budget request. 
This Office has authority to inquire into all program and 
administrative activities of the Departments as well as into 
related activities of grant and contract recipients. It 
conducts audits and investigations to determine compliance with 
applicable laws and regulations, to check alleged fraud and 
abuse, efficiency of operations, and effectiveness of results.
    The Committee complements the work of the Office of the 
Inspector General of the Department of Education for their work 
in obtaining information on actual collections, offsets, and 
funds put to better use as required in House Report 105-635. 
This information is of great use to the Committee and the 
Committee understands the difficulty encountered by the OIG in 
obtaining it. The Committee expects that the Office of 
Inspector General will continue to report the information to 
it.

                           General Provisions

    The bill includes a limitation on the use of educational 
technology funds by local school districts unless the district 
has in place, on computers that are accessible to minors and 
during use by such minors, technology which filters or blocks 
material that is obscene, child pornography and material 
harmful to minors.
    The bill includes a limitation on the use of funds for any 
activities related to any federally sponsored national test in 
reading, mathematics, or any other subject that is not 
specifically and explicitly provided for in authorizing 
legislation enacted into law, except for certain international 
comparative assessments.

                       TITLE IV--RELATED AGENCIES


                      Armed Forces Retirement Home

    The bill provides authority to expend $69,832,000 from the 
Armed Forces Retirement Home Trust Fund for operations and 
capital activities at the United States Soldiers' and Airmen's 
Home and the United States Naval Home, an increase of 
$1,537,000 above the comparable fiscal year 2000 authority and 
the same as the budget request.

Operations

    The bill provides authority to expend $60,000,000 from the 
Armed Forces Retirement Home Trust Fund for operations of the 
United States Soldiers' and Airmen's Home and the United States 
Naval Home, an increase of $4,401,000 above the comparable 
fiscal year 2000 authority and the same as the budget request.

Capital outlay

    The bill provides authority to expend $9,832,000 from the 
Armed Forces Retirement Home Trust Fund for capital activities 
at the Soldiers' and Airmen's Home and the United States Naval 
Home, a decrease of $2,864,000 below the comparable fiscal year 
2000 authority and the same as the budget request. The 
Committee supports the capital proposal submitted by the AFRH, 
the largest component of which is construction of a health care 
facility and repair of hurricane damage at the United States 
Naval Home.

             Corporation for National and Community Service


                  domestic volunteer service programs

    The bill provides $294,527,000 for the Domestic Volunteer 
Service Programs that are administered by the Corporation for 
National and Community Service. The recommended amount is 
$6,000 above the comparable fiscal year 2000 appropriation and 
$18,089,000 below the budget request. Appropriations for these 
programs are not authorized in law for fiscal year 2001. 
Funding for the Americorps program that is also administered by 
the Corporation for National and Community Service is provided 
in the VA/HUD and Independent Agencies appropriations bill.
    The Committee directs the Corporation not to reduce funding 
for traditional VISTA and senior volunteer programs below the 
amounts allocated for fiscal year 2000. In addition, the 
Committee directs the Corporation not to reduce the number of 
traditional VISTAs or senior volunteers below fiscal year 2000 
levels.

VISTA

    The bill provides $80,574,000 for the Volunteers in Service 
to America (VISTA) program, the same as fiscal year 2000 and 
$5,426,000 below the budget request. The VISTA program supports 
individuals who recruit volunteers and organize community 
volunteer activities but who do not provide direct volunteer 
services.

National Senior Volunteer Corps

    The bill provides a total of $181,724,000 for the National 
Senior Volunteer Corps, $1,094,000 below fiscal year 2000 and 
$10,792,000 below the budget request.
    The bill provides $95,988,000 for the Foster Grandparents 
program, the same as fiscal year 2000 and $1,794,000 below the 
budget request. This program provides volunteer service 
opportunities for low-income people aged 60 and over.
    The bill provides $39,219,000 for the Senior Companion 
program, the same as the comparable fiscal year 2000 
appropriation and $2,450,000 below the budget request. The 
program provides project grants to private, non-profit 
organizations and State and local public agencies to offer 
volunteer service opportunities to low-income individuals aged 
60 and over. These volunteers assist older adults with 
physical, mental or emotional impairments that put them at risk 
for institutionalization.
    The bill provides $46,117,000 for the Retired Senior 
Volunteer Program (RSVP), the same as the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation and $4,448,000 below the budget request. This 
program provides part-time volunteer service opportunities for 
low-income individuals aged 55 and over to recruit volunteers 
and organize volunteer activities relating to a variety of 
social needs.
    The bill includes $400,000 for senior demonstration 
programs, $1,094,000 below the fiscal year 2000 level and 
$2,100,000 below the budget request. The Committee intends this 
funding to be used to carry out evaluations and to provide 
recruitment, training and technical assistance to local 
projects particularly in the area of outcome-based programming 
as described in the fiscal year 2001 budget justification. The 
Committee is aware that the Corporation is developing a new 
proposal for working with large organizations to mobilize 
senior volunteers in these organizations. It is the Committee's 
understanding that, pursuant to concerns regarding the payment 
of non-taxable stipends or incentives to people who do not meet 
the income guidelines established by Congress for senior 
service programs, this new proposal will not involve the use of 
federal dollars for these purposes.
    The Committee notes that the Domestic Volunteer Service Act 
has been unauthorized since 1996. The Committee believes that 
the proper venue for developing and expanding new ideas such as 
the proposal to work with large organizations and various other 
proposals to provide incentives to encourage a greater time 
commitment per volunteer is through the reauthorization 
process. The Committee therefore has not provided funding for 
any such activities, but will consider funding them at such 
time as senior service activities are reauthorized.

Program administration

    The bill provides $32,229,000 for program administration, 
$1,100,000 above the fiscal year 2000 appropriation and 
$1,871,000 below the budget request.

                  Corporation for Public Broadcasting

    The bill provides $365,000,000 in advance funding for 
fiscal year 2003 for the Corporation for Public Broadcasting 
(CPB), $15,000,000 above the comparable appropriation for 
fiscal year 2002 and the same as the budget request. 
Appropriations for the CPB are not authorized in law for fiscal 
year 2003.
    The bill does not include $20,000,000 requested by the 
Administration for fiscal year 2001 for CPB digital conversion 
activities. Digital activities are currently unauthorized. The 
Committee notes that $10,000,000 in fiscal year 2000 funding is 
currently available for digital activities if such activities 
are authorized by September 30, 2000.

               Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service

    The bill provides $37,500,000 for the Federal Mediation and 
Conciliation Service (FMCS), an increase of $807,000 above 
fiscal year 2000 and a decrease of $1,501,000 below the budget 
request.
    The FMCS attempts to prevent and minimize labor-management 
disputes having a significant impact on interstate commerce or 
national defense, except in the railroad and airline 
industries. The agency convenes boards of inquiry appointed by 
the President in emergency disputes and conducts dispute 
mediation, preventive mediation, and arbitration. In addition, 
the Service offers alternative dispute resolution services and 
training to other Federal agencies to reduce litigation costs 
and speed Federal administrative proceedings.
    The bill also includes provisions first enacted in the 
fiscal year 1996 Appropriations Act granting the agency the 
authority to accept gifts and to charge fees for certain 
services.

            Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission

    The bill provides $6,200,000 for the Federal Mine Safety 
and Health Review Commission, $64,000 above the fiscal year 
2000 level and $120,000 below the budget request. The 
Commission is responsible for reviewing the enforcement 
activities of the Secretary of Labor under the Federal Mine 
Safety and Health Act. The Commission's administrative law 
judges hear and decide cases initiated by the Secretary of 
Labor, mine operators, or miners. The five-member Commission 
hears appeals from administrative law judge decisions, rules on 
petitions for discretionary review, and may direct, of its own 
initiative, review of cases that present unusual questions of 
law.

                Institute of Museum and Library Services

    The Committee recommends $170,000,000 for the Institute of 
Museum and Library Services, $3,749,000 above the comparable 
fiscal year 2000 appropriation and $3,000,000 below the budget 
request. The Institute makes state formula grants for library 
services and discretionary national grants for joint library 
and museum projects.
    The Committee supports programs to expand telephone access 
for the blind to include the distribution of national and local 
newspapers through local dial-in distribution sites maintained 
by a national network.

                  Medicare Payment Advisory Commission

    The Committee recommends $8,000,000 for the Medicare 
Payment Advisory Commission, $985,000 above the comparable 
fiscal year 2000 appropriation and the same as the budget 
request. The Commission advises Congress on matters of 
physician and hospital reimbursement under the Medicare and 
Medicaid programs.

        National Commission on Libraries and Information Science

    The bill provides $1,400,000 for the National Commission on 
Libraries and Information Science, $105,000 above the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 appropriation and $95,000 below the 
budget request. The Commission advises the President and 
Congress on national policy in the library and information 
fields, developing overall plans for meeting national library 
and information needs, and coordinating activities at the 
Federal, State and local levels. Pursuant to the 1996 
reauthorization of Federal library programs, the Commission 
advises the Institute on Museum and Library Services regarding 
implementation of the new library legislation.

                     National Council on Disability

    The bill provides $2,450,000 for the National Council on 
Disability (NCD), $59,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level and 
a decrease of $165,000 below the budget request. The Council 
monitors implementation of the Americans with Disabilities Act 
and makes recommendations to the President, the Congress, the 
Rehabilitation Services Administration, and the National 
Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research on public 
policy issues of concern to individuals with disabilities.
    The Committee continues to encourage NCD to augment its 
appropriation with other sources of Federal and non-Federal 
revenues including grants and contracts.

                     National Education Goals Panel

    The Committee does not recommend funding for the National 
Education Goals Panel. The Panel was funded at $2,241,000 in 
fiscal year 2000 and the budget requested $2,350,000 for it in 
fiscal year 2001. The NEGP was established in 1990 following 
the National Education Summit held in September 1989. The 
Committee notes that the Goals Panel has been repealed in H.R. 
4141, the Education Opportunities to Protect and Invest in Our 
Nation's Students (Education OPTIONS) Act.

                     National Labor Relations Board

    The bill provides $205,717,000 for the National Labor 
Relations Board, the same as fiscal year 2000 and $10,721,000 
below the budget request. The NLRB receives, investigates, and 
prosecutes unfair labor practice charges filed by businesses, 
labor unions, and individuals. It also schedules and conducts 
representation elections. The five-member Board considers cases 
in which administrative law judge decisions are appealed.

                        National Mediation Board

    The bill provides $9,800,000 for the National Mediation 
Board (NMB), $238,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level and 
$600,000 below the budget request. The NMB mediates labor 
disputes between employees and railroad and airline carriers 
subject to the Railway Labor Act. The Board also resolves 
representation disputes involving labor organizations seeking 
to represent railroad or airline employees.

            Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission

    The bill provides $8,600,000 for the Occupational Safety 
and Health Review Commission (OSHRC), $130,000 above the fiscal 
year 2000 level and $120,000 below the budget request. The 
Commission adjudicates contested citations issued by the 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) against 
employers for violations of safety and health standards. The 
Commission's administrative law judges settle and decide cases 
at the initial level of review. The agency's three appointed 
Commissioners also review cases, issue rulings on complicated 
issues, and may direct review of any decision by an 
administrative law judge.

                       Railroad Retirement Board


                         dual benefits account

    The bill provides $160,000,000 for dual benefits, the same 
as the request and a reduction of $13,399,000 below the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 appropriation. These funds are used 
to pay dual benefits to those retirees receiving both railroad 
retirement and social security benefits. The bill includes a 
provision permitting a portion of these funds to be derived 
from income tax receipts on dual benefits as authorized by law. 
The Railroad Retirement Board estimates that approximately 
$10,000,000 may be derived in this manner.

           federal payment to the railroad retirement account

    The bill provides $150,000 for the interest earned on 
unnegotiated checks, the same as the budget request and the 
comparable amount provided for fiscal year 2000.

                      limitation on administration

    The bill provides a consolidated limitation of $95,000,000 
on the expenditure of railroad retirement and railroad 
unemployment trust funds for administrative expenses of the 
Railroad Retirement Board, $2,500,000 above the budget request 
and $4,345,000 above the fiscal year 2000 limitation. The bill 
includes a provision from the fiscal year 1999 Appropriations 
Act prohibiting the transfer of resources formerly identified 
in a Memorandum of Understanding from the RRB to the Inspector 
General.
    The Railroad Retirement Board (RRB) administers 
comprehensive retirement-survivor and unemployment-sickness 
insurance benefit programs for railroad workers and their 
families. This account limits the amount of funds in the 
railroad retirement and railroad unemployment insurance trust 
funds that may be used by the RRB for administrative expenses.
    The Committee is pleased with the management of the Board 
and reiterates its interest in quickly and comprehensively 
implementing the Government Performance and Results Act.

             limitation on the office of inspector general

    The bill provides authority to expend $5,380,000 from the 
railroad retirement and railroad unemployment insurance trust 
funds for the Office of Inspector General, $320,000 below the 
budget request and the same as the comparable fiscal year 2000 
limitation. This account provides funding for the Inspector 
General to conduct and supervise audits and investigations of 
programs and operations of the Board.
    The Committee complements the work of the Office of the 
Inspector General of the Railroad Retirement Board for their 
work in obtaining information on actual collections, offsets, 
and funds put to better use as required in House Report 105-
635. This information is of great use to the Committee and the 
Committee understands the difficulty encountered by the OIG in 
obtaining it. The Committee expects that the Office of 
Inspector General will continue to report the information to 
it.

                     Social Security Administration


                payments to social security trust funds

    The bill provides $20,400,000 for mandatory payments 
necessary to compensate the Old Age and Survivors Insurance 
(OASI) and Disability Insurance (DI) Trust Funds for special 
payments to certain uninsured persons (for which no payroll tax 
is received), costs incurred for administration of pension 
reform activities and interest lost on the value of benefit 
checks issued but not negotiated. This appropriation restores 
the trust funds to the position they would have been in had 
they not borne these costs properly charged to the general 
funds.

               special benefits for disabled coal miners

    The bill provides $365,748,000 for special benefits for 
disabled coal miners, the same as the budget request. This 
amount does not include $114,000,000 in advance funding 
provided in this bill for the first quarter of fiscal year 
2002. It also does not include $124,000,000 in advance funding 
for fiscal year 2001 which was provided in the fiscal year 2000 
Appropriations Act. The appropriation provides cash benefits to 
miners who are disabled because of black lung disease and to 
widows and children of such miners. The Social Security 
Administration was responsible for taking, processing, and 
paying claims for miners' benefits filed from December 30, 1969 
through June 30, 1973. Since that time, SSA has continued to 
take claims but forwards most to the Department of Labor for 
adjudication and payment. The SSA will continue to be 
responsible for paying benefits and maintaining the beneficiary 
roll for the lifetime of all persons who filed during its 
jurisdiction. During fiscal year 2000, SSA expects to provide 
benefits to 87,000 miners, widows, and dependents who will 
receive a basic benefit rate of $505.50.

                  supplemental security income program

    The bill provides $22,791,000,000 for the Supplemental 
Security Income (SSI) program, not including $9,890,000,000 in 
fiscal year 2001 funding provided in the fiscal year 2000 
Appropriations Act and not including $10,470,000,000 in advance 
funding provided in the bill for the first quarter of fiscal 
year 2002. The appropriation is the same as the budget request. 
These funds are used to pay Federal cash benefits to 
approximately 6,441,000 aged, blind, and disabled persons with 
little or no income. The maximum monthly Federal benefit in 
fiscal year 2001 is expected to be $525 for an individual and 
$788 for an eligible couple. In addition to Federal benefits, 
SSA administers a program of supplementary State benefits for 
those States that choose to participate. The funds are also 
used to reimburse the trust funds for the administrative costs 
of the program. The SSI appropriation includes $71,000,000 for 
beneficiary services, the same as the budget request. This 
funding reimburses State vocational rehabilitation services 
agencies for successful rehabilitation of SSI recipients.
    Within the appropriation for SSI, the Committee provides 
$30,000,000 for research and demonstration activities conducted 
under section 1110 of the Social Security Act, the same as the 
request.
    The bill provides an additional $245,000,000 to process 
continuing disability reviews (CDRs) related to the SSI 
caseload as authorized by P.L. 104-121, $35,000,000 above the 
budget request and $45,000,000 above the comparable fiscal year 
2000 appropriation.

                 limitation on administrative expenses

    The bill provides a limitation on administrative expenses 
for the Social Security Administration (SSA) of $6,367,036,000 
to be funded from the Social Security and Medicare trust funds, 
$260,000,000 above the comparable fiscal year 2000 limitation 
and a decrease of $225,964,000 below the budget request. The 
bill provides that not less than $1,800,000 within the 
limitation on administration shall be available for the Social 
Security Advisory Board, the same as the budget request and the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 amount.

User fees

    In addition to other amounts provided in the bill, the 
Committee recommends an additional limitation of $91,000,000 
for administrative activities funded from user fees. This is 
the same as the request and an increase of $11,000,000 over the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 amount.

Continuing disability reviews

    The bill provides $650,000,000 for continuing disability 
reviews (CDRs). This activity is funded both by the regular 
Limitation on Administrative Expenses account and by provisions 
of the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity 
Reconciliation Act of 1996 (P.L. 103-193). The total funding 
level represents an increase of $65,000,000 above the 
comparable fiscal year 2000 appropriation and is the same as 
the budget request. The Committee's funding level provides 
funding under the provisions of P.L. 104-193 of $520,000,000, 
the statutory maximum. This level is $135,000,000 above the 
fiscal year 2000 amount and $70,000,000 above the President's 
request. The Committee has provided this funding with the 
expectation that processing of additional CDRs will reduce 
trust fund liabilities far in excess of the cost of such 
processing.

                      office of inspector general

    The bill provides $14,944,000 for the Office of the 
Inspector General, the same as the comparable fiscal year 2000 
appropriation and $2,056,000 below the budget request. The bill 
also provides authority to expend $50,808,000 from the Social 
Security trust funds for activities conducted by the Inspector 
General, the same as the comparable fiscal year 2000 
appropriation and a decrease of $5,192,000 below the budget 
request.
    The Committee complements the work of the Office of the 
Inspector General of the Social Security Administration for 
their work in obtaining information on actual collections, 
offsets, and funds put to better use as required in House 
Report 105-635. This information is of great use to the 
Committee and the Committee understands the difficulty 
encountered by the OIG in obtaining it. The Committee expects 
that the Office of Inspector General will continue to report 
the information to it.

                    United States Institute of Peace

    The bill provides $15,000,000 for the United States 
Institute of Peace, $2,049,000 above the fiscal year 2000 level 
and $550,000 above the budget request. The Institute was 
created in 1984 to provide education and training, basic and 
applied research, and information services to promote conflict 
resolution.

                      TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The bill includes language to restore Supplemental Security 
Income payments to the appropriate year, so that all payments 
are made consistent with the normal rules for making SSI 
payments which come due on a weekend or non-banking day.
    The bill includes a provision, as proposed by the 
President, to issue Supplemental Grants for Population Increase 
at the FY 1998 amounts. This grant was created over a concern 
that states that had high rates of population growth or had 
very low benefits under the predecessor Aid to Families with 
Dependent Children program might need additional funds beyond 
their base TANF Block Grant. However, each of the states 
eligible for these grants has experienced double digit decline 
in welfare rolls. This change will not affect any beneficiary 
payments.
    The bill includes language advancing the date, each month, 
that states must reimburse the federal government for state 
supplements to Supplemental Security Income payments to 
beneficiaries. Under current law, enacted in the Ticket to Work 
and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999, states have until 
five days after payments are issued to beneficiaries to 
reimburse the federal government for mandatory or optional 
state supplemental payments included in the payments. In 2009, 
states must begin reimbursing the federal government one day 
prior to the issuing of checks. The Committee has included 
language advancing that date to 2001. SSI and State 
supplementary payment beneficiaries will not be affected by 
this proposal.

                        constitutional authority

    Clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives states that:

          Each report of a committee on a public bill or public 
        joint resolution shall contain the following: (1) A 
        statement citing the specific powers granted to 
        Congress in the Constitution to enact the law proposed 
        by the bill or joint resolution.

    The Committee on Appropriations bases its authority to 
report this legislation on Clause 7 of Section 9 of Article I 
of the Constitution of the United States of America which 
states:

          No money shall be drawn from the Treasury but in 
        consequence of Appropriations made by law * * *.

    Appropriations contained in this Act are made pursuant to 
this specific power granted by the Constitution.

                   comparison with budget resolution

    Clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires an explanation of compliance with 
section 308(a)(1)(A) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344), as amended, which requires that the report 
accompanying a bill providing new budget authority contain a 
statement detailing how the authority compares with the report 
submitted under section 302 of the Act for the most recently 
agreed to concurrent resolution on the budget for the fiscal 
year. This information follows:

                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                            Sec. 302(b)                    This bill \*\
                                                 ---------------------------------------------------------------
                                                      Budget                          Budget
                                                     authority        Outlays        authority        Outlays
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Discretionary...................................          95,888          90,433          97,185          92,665
Mandatory.......................................         237,067         237,514         237,067         237,514
      Total.....................................         332,955         327,947         334,252         330,179
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\*\ Excludes scoring of the House-passed FY2000 supplemental appropriations bill, which would increase budget
  authority by $21 million and decrease outlays by $1,532 million.

Note.--Pursuant to Sec. 314 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended, increases to the Committee's
  Sec. 302(a) allocation are mandated for funding in the reported bill for continuing disability reviews under
  the heading ``Limitation on Administrative Expenses'' for the Social Security Administration, for adoption
  incentive payments under the heading ``Children and Families Services Programs'' in the Administration for
  Children and Families, and for amounts provided and designated as emergency requirements under the headings
  ``Low Income Home Energy Assistance'', and ``Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund'', After the
  bill is reported to the House, the Chairman of the Committee on the Budget will provide an increased Sec.
  302(a) allocation consistent with the funding provided in the bill, and the Committee will increase the
  suballocation accordingly.

    In accordance with the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 
(Public Law 93-344), as amended, the following information was 
provided to the Committee by the Congressional Budget Office:

                         Five-Year Projections

    In compliance with section 308(a)(1)(B) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the following table contains five-year projections 
associated with the budget authority provided in the 
accompanying bill:

                        [In millions of dollars]
Budget authority in the bill..........................           277,696
Outlays:
    2001..............................................           222,071
    2002..............................................            38,018
    2003..............................................             9,919
    2004..............................................             1,899
    2005..............................................               943


          financial assistance to state and local governments

    In accordance with section 308(a)(1)(C) of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344), as 
amended, the financial assistance to State and local 
governments is as follows:

                        [In millions of dollars]



Budget authority......................................           135,513
Fiscal year 2000 outlays resulting therefrom..........           115,394


                           transfer of funds

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2), rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the transfers of funds provided in the accompanying 
bill.
    The table shows, by Department and agency, the 
appropriations affected by such transfers.

                                 APPROPRIATION TRANSFERS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                 Account from which transfer is
    Account to which transfer is to be made         Amount                 to be made                 Amount
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Department of Labor:                                            Department of Labor:
    Special Benefits..........................           (\1\)  Postal Service..................           (\1\)
    Employment Standards Administration--          $30,393,000  Black Lung Disability Trust Fund     $30,393,000
     Salaries and Expenses.
Departmental Management:
    Salaries and Expenses.....................      21,590,000  Black Lung Disability Trust Fund      21,590,000
    Office of Inspector General...............         318,000  Black Lung Disability Trust Fund         318,000
Related Agencies:                                               Related Agencies:
    Social Security Administration: Office of       50,808,000    Social Security                     50,808,000
     Inspector General.                                          Administration: Limita-.
                                                                  tion on Administrative
                                                                 Expenses.
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                              rescissions

    Pursuant to clause 3(f)(2), rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following table is submitted 
describing the rescissions recommended in the accompanying 
bill.

                  rescissions recommended in the bill

Department of Health and Human Services: Children and 
    Families Services Programs..........................     $21,000,000

            Compliance With Rule XIII, Cl. 3 (Ramseyer Rule)

    In compliance with clause 3 of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (existing law 
proposed to be omitted is enclosed in black brackets, new 
matter is printed in italic, existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                 SECTION 403 OF THE SOCIAL SECURITY ACT


SEC. 403. GRANTS TO STATES.

    (a) Grants.--
          (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) Supplemental grant for population increases in 
        certain states.--
                  (A) In general.--Each qualifying State shall, 
                subject to subparagraph (F), be entitled to 
                receive from the Secretary--
                          (i) for fiscal year 1998 a grant in 
                        an amount equal to 2.5 percent of the 
                        total amount required to be paid to the 
                        State under former section 403 (as in 
                        effect during fiscal year 1994) for 
                        fiscal year 1994; [and]
                          (ii) for each of fiscal years [1999, 
                        2000, and 2001] 1999 and 2000, a grant 
                        in an amount equal to the sum of--
                                  (I) the amount (if any) 
                                required to be paid to the 
                                State under this paragraph for 
                                the immediately preceding 
                                fiscal year; and
                                  (II) 2.5 percent of the sum 
                                of--
                                          (aa) the total amount 
                                        required to be paid to 
                                        the State under former 
                                        section 403 (as in 
                                        effect during fiscal 
                                        year 1994) for fiscal 
                                        year 1994; and
                                          (bb) the amount (if 
                                        any) required to be 
                                        paid to the State under 
                                        this paragraph for the 
                                        fiscal year preceding 
                                        the fiscal year for 
                                        which the grant is to 
                                        be made[.]; and
                          (iii) for fiscal year 2001, a grant 
                        in an amount equal to the amount of the 
                        grant to the State under clause (i) for 
                        fiscal year 1998.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (5) Welfare-to-work grants.--
                  (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (H) Funding for evaluation of abstinence 
                education programs.--
                          (i) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                          (iii) Deadline for outlays.--Outlays 
                        from funds used pursuant to clause (i) 
                        for evaluation of programs under 
                        section 510 shall not be made after 
                        fiscal year [2001] 2005.
                          (iv) Interim report.--Not later than 
                        January 1, 2002, the Secretary shall 
                        submit to the Congress an interim 
                        report on the evaluations referred to 
                        in clause (i).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                              ----------                              


 SECTION 410 OF THE TICKET TO WORK AND WORK INCENTIVES IMPROVEMENT ACT 
                                OF 1999


SEC. 410. SCHEDULE FOR PAYMENTS UNDER SSI STATE SUPPLEMENTATION 
                    AGREEMENTS.

    (a) * * *
    (b) Effective Date.--The amendments made by a subsection 
(a) shall apply to payments and fees arising under an agreement 
between a State and the Commissioner of Social Security under 
section 1616 of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1382e) or 
under section 212 of Public Law 93-66 (42 U.S.C. 1382 note) 
with respect to monthly benefits paid to individuals under 
title XVI of the Social Security Act for months after September 
[2009] 2001 (October [2009] 2001 in the case of a State with a 
fiscal year that coincides with the Federal fiscal year), 
without regard to whether the agreement has been modified to 
reflect such amendments or the Commissioner has promulgated 
regulations implementing such amendments.
                              ----------                              


SECTION 251 OF THE BALANCED BUDGET AND EMERGENCY DEFICIT CONTROL ACT OF 
                                  1985


SEC. 251. ENFORCING DISCRETIONARY SPENDING LIMITS.

    (a) * * *
    (b) Adjustments to Discretionary Spending Limits.--
          (1) * * *
          (2) Sequestration reports.--When OMB submits a 
        sequestration report under section 254(e), (f), or (g) 
        for a fiscal year, OMB shall calculate, and the 
        sequestration report and subsequent budgets submitted 
        by the President under section 1105(a) of title 31, 
        United States Code, shall include adjustments to 
        discretionary spending limits (and those limits as 
        adjusted) for the fiscal year and each succeeding year 
        through 2002, as follows:
                  (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                  (C) Continuing disability reviews.--(i) * * *
                  (ii) As used in this subparagraph--
                          (I) the term ``continuing disability 
                        reviews'' means reviews or 
                        redeterminations as defined under 
                        section 201(g)(1)(A) of the Social 
                        Security Act and reviews and 
                        redeterminations authorized under 
                        section 211 of the Personal 
                        Responsibility and Work Opportunity 
                        Reconciliation Act of 1996;
                          (II) the term ``additional new budget 
                        authority'' means the amount provided 
                        for a fiscal year, in excess of 
                        [$200,000,000] $130,000,000, in an 
                        appropriations Act and specified to pay 
                        for the costs of continuing disability 
                        reviews under the heading ``Limitation 
                        on Administrative Expenses'' for the 
                        Social Security Administration; and
                          (III) the term ``additional outlays'' 
                        means outlays, in excess of 
                        [$200,000,000] $130,000,000 in a fiscal 
                        year, flowing from the amounts 
                        specified for continuing disability 
                        reviews under the heading ``Limitation 
                        on Administrative Expenses'' for the 
                        Social Security Administration, 
                        including outlays in that fiscal year 
                        flowing from amounts specified in Acts 
                        enacted for prior fiscal years (but not 
                        before 1996).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                 Changes in Application of Existing Law

    Pursuant to clause 3, rule XIII of the Rules of the House 
of Representatives, the following statements are submitted 
describing the effect of provisions in the accompanying bill 
which may directly or indirectly change the application of 
existing law.
    In some instances the bill includes appropriations for 
certain ongoing programs which are not yet authorized for 
fiscal year 2000.
    The bill provides that appropriations shall remain 
available for more than one year for some programs for which 
the basic authorizing legislation does not presently authorize 
such extended availability.
    In various places in the bill, the Committee has earmarked 
funds within appropriation accounts in order to fund specific 
sections of a law. Whether these actions constitute a change in 
the application of existing law is subject to individual 
interpretation, but the Committee felt that this fact should be 
mentioned.
    In several instances, the bill provides advance 
appropriations for fiscal year 2001 for programs for which such 
advances are not authorized by law.

                      TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF LABOR


                    Training and Employment Services

    Language prohibiting the use of funds from any other 
appropriation to provide meal services at or for Job Corps 
centers.

     State Unemployment Insurance and Employment Service Operations

    Language allowing the use of funds for amortization 
payments to States which had independent retirement plans in 
their State employment service agencies prior to 1980.
    Language allowing the Labor Department to withhold from 
State allotments funds available for penalty mail under the 
Wagner-Peyser Act.
    Language providing that funds in this Act for one-stop 
career centers and unemployment insurance national activities 
may be used for contracts, grants or agreements with non-State 
entities.
    Language providing that funds in this Act may be used by 
the States for integrated Employment Service and Unemployment 
Insurance automation efforts.

                  Employment Standards Administration


                         salaries and expenses

    Language authorizing the Secretary of Labor to accept and 
spend all sums of money ordered to be paid to the Secretary, in 
accordance with the terms of a Consent Judgment in U.S. 
District Court for the Northern Mariana Islands.
    Language authorizing the Secretary of Labor to collect user 
fees for processing certain applications and issuing certain 
certificates and registrations under the Fair Labor Standards 
Act and the Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection 
Act.

                            special benefits

    Language providing funds may be used under the Federal 
Employees' Compensation Act in which the Secretary of Labor may 
reimburse an employer, who is not the employer at the time of 
injury, for portions of the salary of a reemployed, disabled 
beneficiary.
    Language allowing the Secretary of Labor to transfer 
certain administrative funds from the Postal Service fund and 
certain other government corporations and agencies related to 
the administration of the Federal Employees' Compensation Act.
    Language allowing the Secretary of Labor to require any 
person filing a claim for benefits under the Federal Employees' 
Compensation Act or the Longshore and Harbor Workers' 
Compensation Act to provide such identifying information as the 
Secretary may require, including a Social Security number.

             Occupational Safety and Health Administration


                         salaries and expenses

    Language establishing a maximum amount available for grants 
to States under the Occupational Safety and Health Act, which 
grants shall be no less than 50 percent of the costs of State 
programs required to be incurred under plans approved by the 
Secretary under section 18 of the Act.
    Language authorizing the Occupational Safety and Health 
Administration to retain and spend up to $750,000 of training 
institute course tuition fees for training and education 
grants.
    Language allowing the Secretary of Labor to collect and 
retain fees for services provided to Nationally Recognized 
Testing Laboratories.

                 Mine Safety and Health Administration


                         salaries and expenses

    Language allowing the Mine Safety and Health Administration 
to collect up to $750,000 at the National Mine Health and 
Safety Academy for room, board, tuition, and the sale of 
training materials, otherwise authorized by law to be 
collected, to be available for mine safety and health education 
and training activities, notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302.
    Language allowing the Mine Safety and Health Administration 
to purchase and bestow certificates and trophies in connection 
with mine rescue and first-aid work; to accept land, buildings, 
equipment, and other contributions from public and private 
sources; to prosecute projects in cooperation with other 
agencies, Federal, State, or private; and to promote health and 
safety education and training in the mining community through 
cooperative programs with States, industry, and safety 
associations.
    Language allowing the Secretary of Labor to use any funds 
available to the Department to provide for the costs of mine 
rescue and survival operations in the event of major disasters.

                        Departmental Management


                         salaries and expenses

    Language providing that no funds made available by this Act 
may be used by the Solicitor of Labor to participate in a 
review in any United States court of appeals of any decision 
made by the Benefits Review Board under section 21 of the 
Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act where such 
participation is precluded by the decision of the Supreme Court 
in Director, Office of Workers' Compensation Programs v. 
Newport News Shipbuilding, 115 S. Ct.1278 (1995), 
notwithstanding any provisions to the contrary contained in 
Rule 15 of the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure.
    Language providing that any decision under the Longshore 
Act pending before the Benefits Review Board for more than one 
year shall be considered affirmed by the Board and shall be 
considered the final order of the Board.

           TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


              Health Resources and Services Administration


                     health resources and services

    Language providing that the Division of Federal 
Occupational Health may utilize personal services contracting 
in certain instances.
    Language providing that $25,000,000 from general revenues, 
notwithstanding Sec. 1820(j) of the Social Security Act, shall 
be available for carrying out the Medicare rural hospital 
flexibility grants program under section 1820 of such Act.
    Language providing that in addition to fees authorized by 
Sec. 427(b) of the Health Care Quality Improvement Act of 1986, 
fees shall be collected for the full disclosure of information 
under the Act sufficient to recover the full costs of operating 
the National Practitioner Data Bank, and shall remain available 
until expended to carry out that Act.
    Language providing that all pregnancy counseling under the 
family planning program shall be nondirective.
    Language identifying a specific amount for maternal and 
child health SPRANS activities, notwithstanding current law.

               Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Language permitting the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention to insure official motor vehicles in foreign 
countries.
    Language providing that collections from user fees may be 
credited to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 
appropriation.
    Language making amounts under Sec. 241 of the Public Health 
Service Act available to carry out the National Center for 
Health Statistics surveys.
    Language allowing the Director of the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention to redirect certain funds appropriated 
under Public Law 101-502.

                     National Institutes of Health


                      national library of medicine

    Language providing that the National Library of Medicine 
may enter into certain personal services contracts.

                         office of the director

    Language providing that the National Institutes of Health 
is authorized to collect third party payments for the cost of 
the clinical services that are incurred in NIH research 
facilities and that such payments shall be credited to the NIH 
Management Fund and shall remain available for one fiscal year 
after they are deposited.
    Language providing the Director of NIH authority to 
transfer funds between appropriation accounts in this or any 
other Act.
    Language permitting funds to be transferred from the 
Foundation for the National Institutes of Health to the 
National Institutes of Health, notwithstanding current law.

               Agency for Health Care Policy and Research

    Language is included to permit the Agency for Health Care 
Policy and Research to retain and expend amounts received from 
Freedom of Information Act fees, reimbursable and interagency 
agreements and the sale of data tapes.

                  Health Care Financing Administration


                     Grants to States for Medicaid

    A provision that in the administration of title XIX of the 
Social Security Act, payments to a state for any quarter may be 
made with respect to a State plan or plan amendment in effect 
during any such quarter, if submitted in, or prior to, such 
quarter and approved in that or any such subsequent quarter.

                           program Management

    A provision that all funds collected in accordance with 
section 353 of the Public Health Service Act, together with 
such sums as may be collected from authorized user fees, 
administrative fees collected relative to Medicare overpayment 
recovery activities, and the sale of data, shall be available 
for expenditure by the Health Care Financing Administration.
    Language allowing fees charged in accordance with 31 U.S.C. 
9701 to be credited to the Health Care Financing Administration 
administrative account.
    Language limiting the amount of funds available from the 
Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Account of the Federal 
Hospital Insurance Trust Fund.

                Administration for Children and Families


  payments to states for child support enforcement and family support 
                                programs

    Language providing that the sum of the amounts available to 
a State with respect to expenditures under title IV-A of the 
Social Security Act in fiscal year 1997 under this 
appropriation and under such title IV-A as amended by the 
Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act 
of 1996 shall not exceed the limitations under Sec. 116(b) of 
such Act.

                children and families services programs

    Language providing that unexpended Community Services Block 
Grant funds may be carried over to the next fiscal year by 
local grantees.
    Language reducing the funds appropriated from mandatory 
accounts for research activities under the Social Security Act.

                        Administration on Aging


                        aging services programs

    Language providing that State administrative costs under 
title III of the Older Americans Act shall not be reduced more 
than 5 percent below the amount that was available to each 
State in fiscal year 1995.
    Language providing that in considering grant applications 
for nutrition services for elder Indian recipients, the 
Assistant Secretary for Aging shall provide maximum flexibility 
to applicants who seek to take into account subsistence, local 
customs, and other characteristics that are appropriate to the 
unique cultural, regional, and geographic needs of the American 
Indian, Alaska and Hawaiian Native communities to be served.

                        Office of the Secretary


                    office of the inspector general

    Language limiting the amount of funds available from the 
Health Care Fraud and Abuse Control Account of the Federal 
Hospital Insurance Trust Fund.

                   TITLE III--DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


                            education reform

    Language setting aside up to one-half of one percent of 
certain technology funds for the outlying areas to be 
distributed by the Secretary; and language stating that if a 
State does not apply for a grant under Sec. 3132 of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the Secretary shall use 
the State's share for grants directly to local educational 
agencies in that State that apply directly for the funds.

                    Education for the Disadvantaged

    The bill includes language providing that funds may be used 
by the Department of Education to obtain certain data from the 
Census Bureau.
    Language providing that certain amounts shall be reserved 
for section 1308 of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
    Language providing that funds shall be available to 
demonstrate effective approaches to comprehensive school reform 
to be allocated and expended in accordance with the 
instructions relating to this activity in the statement of the 
managers on the conference reports accompanying Public Law 105-
78 and Public Law 105-277 and that in carrying out this 
initiative, the Secretary and the States shall support only 
approaches that show the most promise of enabling children 
served by title I to meet challenging State content standards 
and challenging State student performance standards based on 
reliable research and effective practices, and include an 
emphasis on basic academics and parental involvement.

                      School Improvement Programs

    Language providing that certain funding will be available 
for the Teacher Empowerment Act, if such legislation is 
enacted.

                   Bilingual and Immigrant Education

    Language is included waiving Sec. 7103(b) of the Elementary 
and Secondary Education Act of 1965.
    The bill includes language providing that immigrant 
education funds may be allocated by States for competitive 
grants to local school districts.

               National Technical Institute for the Deaf


                          Gallaudet University

    The bill includes language providing that the National 
Technical Institute for the Deaf and Gallaudet University may 
use funds for their endowment programs at their discretion.

                      Student Financial Assistance

    The bill includes language providing that the maximum Pell 
grant a student may receive in the 2001-2002 academic year 
shall be $3,500.
    The bill includes language providing that notwithstanding 
section 401(g) of the Higher Education Act of 1965, if the 
Secretary determines, prior to publication of the payment 
schedule for award year 2001-2002, that the funds included 
within this appropriation for Pell Grant awards for award year 
2001-2002, and any funds available from the FY 2000 
appropriation for Pell Grant awards, are insufficient to 
satisfy fully all such awards for which students are eligible, 
as calculated under section 401(b) of the Act, the amount paid 
for each such award shall be reduced by either a fixed or 
variable percentage, or by a fixed dollar amount, as determined 
in accordance with a schedule of reductions established by the 
Secretary for this purpose.

                            Higher Education

    The bill includes language providing that funds are 
available to fund fellowships for academic year 2002-2003 under 
part A, subpart 1 of title VII of the Higher Education Act of 
1965, under the terms and conditions of part A, subpart 1.

                           Howard University

    The bill includes language providing that Howard University 
shall use not less than $3,600,000 for the endowment program 
pursuant to the Howard University Endowment Act.

            Education Research, Statistics, and Improvement

    The bill includes language providing that a certain amount 
shall be available to demonstrate effective approaches to 
comprehensive school reform to be allocated and expended in 
accordance with the instructions relating to this activity in 
the statement of managers on the conference reports 
accompanying Public Law 105-78 and Public Law 105-277 and that 
in carrying out this initiative, the Secretary and the States 
shall support only approaches that show the most promise of 
enabling children to meet challenging State content standards 
and challenging State student performance standards based on 
reliable research and effective practices, and include an 
emphasis on basic academics and parental involvement.
    Language providing that $30,000,000 of the funds provided 
for the national education research institutes shall be 
allocated notwithstanding Sec. 912(m)(1)(B-F) and subparagraphs 
(B) and (C) of Sec. 931(c)(2) of Public Law 103-227.

                       TITLE IV--RELATED AGENCIES


                      Armed Forces Retirement Home

    Language providing that notwithstanding any other provision 
of law, a single contract or related contracts for development 
and construction, to include construction of a long-term care 
facility at the United States Naval Home, may be employed which 
collectively include the full scope of the project and 
providing that the solicitation and contract shall contain the 
clause ``availability of funds'' found at 48 CFR 52.232-18 and 
252.232-7007, Limitation of Government Obligations.

               Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service


                         Salaries and Expenses

    The bill includes language specifying that notwithstanding 
31 U.S.C. 3302, fees charged by the Federal Mediation and 
Conciliation Service, up to full-cost recovery, for special 
training activities and for arbitration services shall be 
credited to and merged with its administrative account, and 
shall remain available until expended; that fees for 
arbitration services shall be available only for education, 
training, and professional development of the agency workforce; 
and that the Director of the Service is authorized to accept on 
behalf of the United States gifts of services and real, 
personal, or other property in the aid of any projects or 
functions within the Director's jurisdiction.

                     National Labor Relations Board


                         Salaries and Expenses

    The bill includes a provision requiring that appropriations 
to the NLRB shall not be available to organize or assist in 
organizing agricultural laborers or used in connection with 
investigations, hearings, directives, or orders concerning 
bargaining units composed of agricultural laborers as referred 
to in Sec. 2(3) of the Act of July 5, 1935 (29 U.S.C. 152), and 
as amended by the Labor-Management Relations Act, 1947, as 
amended, and as defined in Sec. 3(f) of the Act of June 25, 
1938 (29 U.S.C. 203), and including in said definition 
employees engaged in the maintenance and operation of ditches, 
canals, reservoirs, and waterways, when maintained or operated 
on a mutual non-profit basis and at least 95 per centum of the 
water stored or supplied thereby is used for farming purposes.

                       Railroad Retirement Board


                     Dual Benefits Payments Account

    The bill includes language providing that the total amount 
provided for railroad retirement dual benefits shall be 
credited to the Dual Benefits Payments Account in 12 
approximately equal amounts on the first day of each month in 
the fiscal year.

                      Limitation on Administration

    The bill includes language providing that the Railroad 
Retirement Board shall determine the allocation of its 
administrative budget between the railroad retirement accounts 
and the railroad unemployment insurance administration fund.

                     Social Security Administration


                 Limitation on Administrative Expenses

    Language providing that unobligated balances at the end of 
fiscal year 2001 shall remain available until expended for the 
agency's information technology and telecommunications hardware 
and software infrastructure, including related equipment and 
non-payroll administrative expenses associated solely with the 
infrastructure; language authorizing the use of up to $10,000 
for official reception and representation expenses; and 
language providing that reimbursement to the trust funds under 
this heading for expenditures for official time for employees 
of the Social Security Administration pursuant to Sec. 7131 of 
title 5, United States Code, and for facilities or support 
services for labor organizations pursuant to policies, 
regulations, or procedures referred to in Sec. 7135(b) of such 
title shall be made by the Secretary of the Treasury, with 
interest, from amounts in the general fund not otherwise 
appropriated, as soon as possible after such expenditures are 
made.
    Language providing that funds may be derived from 
administration fees collected pursuant to Sec. 1616(d) of the 
Social Security Act or Sec. 212(b)(3) of Public Law 93-66 and 
that, to the extent that the amounts collected pursuant to such 
sections in fiscal year 2001 exceed $91,000,000, the amounts 
shall be available in fiscal year 2002 only to the extent 
provided in advance in appropriations Acts.
    Language providing that unobligated funds at the end of 
fiscal year 2000 previously appropriated to continue Federal-
State partnerships to evaluate a means to promote Medicare buy-
in programs shall remain available.

                       office of inspector general

    Language permitting the transfer of a certain amount of 
funds into this account from the SSA administrative account 
provided that the Appropriations Committees are promptly 
notified.

                           General Provisions

    Sections 102, 201, 202, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208, 209, 210, 
211, 212, 301, 302, 303, 501, 504, 506, 507, 508, 509, 510, 
511, 513 and 514 of the bill are general provisions, most of 
which have been carried in previous appropriations acts, which 
place limitations on the use of funds in the bill or authorize 
or require certain activities, and which might, under some 
circumstances, be construed as changing the application of 
existing law.

              Definition of program, project, and activity

    During fiscal year 2000 for purposes of the Balanced Budget 
and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 (Public Law 99-177), 
as amended, the following information provides the definition 
of the term ``program, project, and activity'' for departments 
and agencies under the jurisdiction of the Labor, Health and 
Human Services, and Education and Related Agencies 
Subcommittee. The term ``program, project, and activity'' shall 
include the most specific level of budget items identified in 
the Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and 
Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000, the 
accompanying House and Senate Committee reports, the conference 
report and accompanying joint explanatory statement of the 
managers of the committee of conference.

                  Appropriations Not Authorized by Law

    Pursuant to clause 3 of rule XIII of the Rules of the House 
of Representatives, the following table lists the 
appropriations in the accompanying bill which are not 
authorized by law:

                          DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

Employment and Training Administration
        Training and Employment Services
                Skills Standards
                School-to-work
        Community Service Employment for Older Americans

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Health Resources and Services Administration
        Health Resources and Services
                National Health Service Corps:
                        Field placements
                        Recruitment
                Other HRSA Programs:
                        Organ Transplantation
                        Health Teaching Facilities Interest 
                        Subsidies
                        Nursing loan repayment for shortage 
                        area service
                Ryan White AIDS Programs
                        Emergency Assistance
                        Comprehensive Care Programs
                                AIDS Drug Assistance Program 
                                (ADAP)
                        Early Intervention Program
                        Pediatric Demonstrations
                        AIDS Dental Services
                        Education and Training Centers
                Family Planning
Centers for Disease Control
        Preventive Health Services Block Grant
                Program
                Salaries and Expenses
        Sexually Transmitted Diseases
                Program
                Salaries and Expenses
        Injury Control
                Program
                Salaries and Expenses
        Crime: Trust funds
                Rape Prevention and Education
National Institutes of Health
        National Cancer Institute
        ``National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute''
        National Institute of Dental Research
        Nat. Inst. Of Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases
        National Inst. of Neurological Disorders and Stroke
        National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
        National Institute of General Medical Sciences
        National Institute of Child Health and Human 
        Development
        National Eye Institute
        National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
        National Institute on Aging
        National Institute on Arthritis & Musculoskeletal & 
        Skin Diseases
        National Institute on Deafness & Other Comm. Disorders
        National Institute of Nursing Research
        National Institute on Alcohol Abuse & Alcoholism
        National Institute on Drug Abuse
        National Institute of Mental Health
        National Human Genome Research Institute
        National Center for Research Resources
        National Library of Medicine
Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
        Mental Health
                Knowledge Development and Application
                Mental Health Performance Partnership
                Children's Mental Health
                Grants to States for the homeless (PATH)
                Protection and Advocacy
        Substance Abuse Treatment:
                Knowledge Development and Application
                Substance abuse performance partnership
Administration for Children and Families
        Developmental Disabilities Program
        Domestic Violence Hotline
        Battered Women's Shelters
Administration on Aging: Aging Services Programs
Office of the Secretary
        General Departmental Management
        Adolescent family life (Title XX)

                        DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

Education Reform
        Educational Technology
        21st Century Community Learning Centers
School Improvement Programs
        Teacher Empowerment Act
        Innovative Education (Education Block Grant)
        Safe and Drug Free Schools:
        Inexpensive Book Distribution (RIF)
        Arts in Education
        Magnet Schools Assistance
        Education for Homeless Children & Youth
        Women's Educational Equity
        Ellender Fellowships/Close Up
        Education for Native Hawaiians
        Alaska Native Education Equity
        Comprehensive Regional Assistance Centers
Education for the Disadvantaged
        Grants to Local Educational Agencies (LEAs)
        Capital Expenses for Private School Children
        Even Start
        State Agency Programs
        Evaluation
        Comprehensive School Reform Demonstration
Impact Aid
Reading Excellence Act
Indian Education
Bilingual and Immigrant Education
Education Research, Statistics, and Improvement
        Research and Statistics
        Fund for the Improvement of Education
        International Education Exchange
        Civic Education
        Eisenhower Professional Dvp. Federal Activities
        Eisenhower Regional Math & Science Ed. Consortia
        Javits Gifted and Talented Education
        National Writing Project

                            RELATED AGENCIES

Corporation for National and Community Service:
        Domestic Volunteer Service Programs, Operating Expenses
Cooperation for Public Broadcasting:
        FY 2003 Regular Appropriation

                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, the results 
of each rollcall vote on an amendment or on the motion to 
report, together with the names of those voting for and those 
voting against, are printed below:

                             rollcall no. 1

    Date: May 24, 2000.
    Measure: Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.
    Motion by: Mr. Obey.
    Description of motion: To strike language appropriating 
funds for the Teacher Empowerment Act, to provide funding for 
various professional development grants to be determined by the 
Secretary of Education, and to provide funds to reduce class 
size.
    Results: Rejected 22 yeas to 31 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Aderholt
Mr. Cramer                          Mr. Bonilla
Ms. DeLauro                         Mr. Callahan
Mr. Dicks                           Mr. Cunningham
Mr. Dixon                           Mr. Dickey
Mr. Edwards                         Mrs. Emerson
Mr. Farr                            Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Forbes                          Ms. Granger
Mr. Hinchey                         Mr. Hobson
Mr. Hoyer                           Mr. Istook
Mr. Jackson                         Mr. Kingston
Ms. Kilpatrick                      Mr. Knollenberg
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Mollohan                        Mr. Latham
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Lewis
Mr. Olver                           Mr. Miller
Mr. Pastor                          Mr. Nethercutt
Mr. Price                           Mrs. Northup
Ms. Roybal-Allard                   Mr. Packard
Mr. Sabo                            Mr. Peterson
Mr. Serrano                         Mr. Porter
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Regula
                                    Mr. Rogers
                                    Mr. Skeen
                                    Mr. Sununu
                                    Mr. Tiahrt
                                    Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wamp
                                    Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Wolf
                                    Mr. Young

                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, 
together with the names of those voting for and those voting 
against, are printed below:

                             rollcall no. 2

    Date: May 24, 2000.
    Measure: Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.
    Motion by: Mrs. Lowey.
    Description of motion: To provide for grants and loans to 
carry out school renovation subject to such terms and 
conditions as the Secretary of Education shall establish.
    Results: Rejected 21 yeas to 29 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Cramer                          Mr. Cunningham
Ms. DeLauro                         Mr. DeLay
Mr. Dixon                           Mr. Dickey
Mr. Edwards                         Mrs. Emerson
Mr. Farr                            Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Forbes                          Mr. Goode
Mr. Hoyer                           Ms. Granger
Mr. Jackson                         Mr. Hobson
Ms. Kaptur                          Mr. Istook
Ms. Kilpatrick                      Mr. Kingston
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Knollenberg
Mrs. Meek                           Mr. Latham
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Lewis
Mr. Olver                           Mr. Miller
Mr. Pastor                          Mr. Nethercutt
Ms. Pelosi                          Mrs. Northup
Mr. Price                           Mr. Packard
Ms. Roybal-Allard                   Mr. Peterson
Mr. Serrano                         Mr. Porter
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Regula
                                    Mr. Rogers
                                    Mr. Skeen
                                    Mr. Sununu
                                    Mr. Tiahrt
                                    Mr. Wamp
                                    Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Wolf
                                    Mr. Young

                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, 
together with the names of those voting for and those voting 
against, are printed below:

                             rollcall no. 3

    Date: May 24, 2000.
    Measure: Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.
    Motion by: Mr. Hoyer.
    Description of motion: To add funds for Title I grants to 
Local Educational Agencies, Head Start, 21st Century Community 
Learning Centers and the Child Care and Development Block 
Grant.
    Results: Rejected 23 yeas to 30 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Aderholt                        Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Cunningham
Mr. Cramer                          Mr. Dickey
Ms. DeLauro                         Mrs. Emerson
Mr. Edwards                         Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Farr                            Mr. Goode
Mr. Forbes                          Ms. Granger
Mr. Hoyer                           Mr. Hobson
Mr. Jackson                         Mr. Istook
Ms. Kaptur                          Mr. Kingston
Ms. Kilpatrick                      Mr. Knollenberg
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Kolbe
Mrs. Meek                           Mr. Latham
Mr. Mollohan                        Mr. Lewis
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Miller
Mr. Olver                           Mr. Nethercutt
Mr. Pastor                          Mrs. Northup
Ms. Pelosi                          Mr. Packard
Mr. Price                           Mr. Peterson
Ms. Roybal-Allard                   Mr. Porter
Mr. Sabo                            Mr. Regula
Mr. Serrano                         Mr. Rogers
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Skeen
                                    Mr. Sununu
                                    Mr. Tiahrt
                                    Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wamp
                                    Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Wolf
                                    Mr. Young

                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall on an amendment or on the motion to report, together 
with the names of those voting for and those voting against, 
are printed below:

                             rollcall no. 4

    Date: May 24, 2000.
    Measure: Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.
    Motion by: Mrs. Northup.
    Description of motion: To add language prohibiting the use 
of funds by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration 
to promulgate, issue, implement, administer, or enforce any 
proposed, temporary, or final standard or final standard on 
ergonomic protection.
    Results: Adopted 32 yeas to 22 nays.


  Members Voting     Members Voting
       Yea                Nay               Members Voting Present

Mr. Aderholt       Mr. Cramer         Mr. Lewis
Mr. Bonilla        Ms. DeLauro        Mr. Porter
Mr. Callahan       Mr. Lextra         Mr. Dixon
Mr. Cunningham     Mr. Edwards
Mr. DeLay          Mr. Farr
Mr. Dickey         Mr. Forbes
Mrs. Emerson       Mr. Hinchey
Mr. Frelinghuysen  Mr. Hoyer
Mr. Goode          Mr. Jackson
Mr. Granger        Ms. Kaptur
Mr. Hobson         Ms. Kilpatrick
Mr. Istook         Mrs. Lowey
Mr. Kingston       Mrs. Meek
Mr. Knollenberg    Mr. Mollenhan
Mr. Kolbe          Mr. Obey
Mr. Latham         Mr. Olver
Mr. Miller         Mr. Pastor
Mr. Nerthercutt    Ms. Pelosi
Mrs. Northup       Ms. Roybal-Allard
Mr. Packard        Mr. Sabo
Mr. Peterson       Mr. Serrano
Mr. Regula         Mr. Visclosky
Mr. Rogers
Mr. Skeen
Mr. Sununu
Mr. Taylor
Mr. Tiahrt
Mr. Walsh
Mr. Wamp
Mr. Wicker
Mr. Wolf
Mr. Young.


                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall on an amendment or on the motion to report, together 
with the names of those voting for and those voting against, 
are printed below:

                             Rollcall No. 5

    Date: May 24, 2000.
    Measure: Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.
    Motion by: Ms. Pelosi.
    Description of motion: To strike a provision limiting the 
amount of National Institutes of Health obligations to the 
President's budget request.
    Results: Rejected 23 yeas to 29 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Aderholt
Mr. Cramer                          Mr. Bonilla
Ms. DeLauro                         Mr. Callahan
Mr. Dixon                           Mr. Cunningham
Mr. Edwards                         Mr. Dickey
Mr. Farr                            Mrs. Emerson
Mr. Forbes                          Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Hinchey                         Mr. Goode
Mr. Hoyer                           Ms. Granger
Mr. Jackson                         Mr. Istook
Ms. Kaptur                          Mr. Kingston
Ms. Kilpatrick                      Mr. Knollenberg
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Latham
Mr. Mollohan                        Mr. Lewis
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Miller
Mr. Olver                           Mr. Nethercutt
Mr. Pastor                          Mr. Northup
Ms. Pelosi                          Mr. Packard
Mr. Price                           Mr. Peterson
Ms. Roybal-Allard                   Mr. Porter
Mr. Sabo                            Mr. Regula
Mr. Serrano                         Mr. Rogers
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Skeen
                                    Mr. Taylor
                                    Mr. Tiart
                                    Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wamp
                                    Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Young
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall on an amendment or on the motion to report, together 
with the names of those voting for and those voting against, 
are printed below:

                             Rollcall No. 6

    Date: May 24, 2000.
    Measure: Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.
    Motion by: Ms. Pelosi.
    Description of motion: To add funds for activities related 
to substance abuse treatment and prevention services and 
designate these funds as emergency spending.
    Results: Rejected 22 yeas to 30 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Aderholt
Mr. Cramer                          Mr. Cunningham
Ms. DeLauro                         Mr. DeLay
Mr. Dicks                           Mr. Dickey
Mr. Edwards                         Mrs. Emerson
Mr. Farr                            Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Forbes                          Mr. Goode
Mr. Hinchey                         Ms. Granger
Mr. Jackson                         Mr. Hobson
Ms. Kilpatrick                      Mr. Istook
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Kingston
Mrs. Meeks                          Mr. Knollenberg
Mr. Mollohan                        Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Moran                           Mr. Latham
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Lewis
Mr. Olver                           Mr. Miller
Mr. Pastor                          Mr. Nethercutt
Ms. Pelosi                          Mrs. Northup
Ms. Roybal-Allard                   Mr. Packard
Mr. Sabo                            Mr. Peterson
Mr. Serrano                         Mr. Porter
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Regula
                                    Mr. Rogers
                                    Mr. Skeen
                                    Mr. Sununu
                                    Mr. Taylor
                                    Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wamp
                                    Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Young
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, 
together with the names of those voting for and those voting 
against, are printed below:

                             rollcall no. 7

    Date: May 24, 2000.
    Measure: Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.
    Motion by: Mrs. Lowey.
    Description of Motion: To provide a maximum Pell grant of 
$3,800.
    Results: Rejected 18 yeas to 30 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Aderholt                        Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Callahan
Mr. Cramer                          Mr. Dickey
Mr. Dicks                           Mrs. Emerson
Mr. Edwards                         Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Forbes                          Mr. Goode
Mr. Hinchey                         Ms. Granger
Mr. Jackson                         Mr. Hobson
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Istook
Mrs. Meek                           Mr. Kingston
Mr. Mollohan                        Mr. Knollenberg
Mr. Moran                           Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Lewis
Mr. Olver                           Mr. Miller
Mr. Price                           Mr. Nethercutt
Ms. Roybal-Allard                   Mrs. Northup
Mr. Serrano                         Mr. Packard
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Peterson
                                    Mr. Porter
                                    Mr. Regula
                                    Mr. Rogers
                                    Mr. Skeen
                                    Mr. Sununu
                                    Mr. Taylor
                                    Mr. Tiahrt
                                    Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wamp
                                    Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Wolf
                                    Mr. Young
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, 
together with the names of those voting for and those voting 
against, are printed below:

                             rollcall no. 8

    Date: May 24, 2000.
    Measure: Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.
    Motion by: Mr. Jackson.
    Description of Motion: To add funds for skills training 
programs at the Department of Labor and to authorize the use of 
training grants on new entrants in the workforce and incumbent 
workers.
    Results: Rejected 19 yeas to 30 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Aderholt
Mr. Cramer                          Mr. Bonilla
Ms. DeLauro                         Mr. Callahan
Mr. Dixon                           Mr. Cunningham
Mr. Edwards                         Mr. Dickey
Mr. Farr                            Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Forbes                          Mr. Goode
Mr. Hinchey                         Ms. Granger
Mr. Jackson                         Mr. Hobson
Ms. Kilpatrick                      Mr. Istook
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Knollenberg
Mrs. Meek                           Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Moran                           Mr. Latham
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Lewis
Mr. Olver                           Mr. Miller
Mr. Pastor                          Mr. Nethercutt
Ms. Roybal-Allard                   Mrs. Northup
Mr. Sabo                            Mr. Packard
Mr. Serrano                         Mr. Peterson
                                    Mr. Porter
                                    Mr. Regula
                                    Mr. Rogers
                                    Mr. Skeen
                                    Mr. Sununu
                                    Mr. Taylor
                                    Mr. Tiahrt
                                    Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wamp
                                    Mr. Wicker
                                    Mr. Wolf
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, 
together with the names of those voting for and those voting 
against, are printed below:

                             rollcall no. 9

    Date: May 24, 2000.
    Measure: Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.
    Motion by: Ms. DeLauro.
    Description of Motion: To add funds for part B grants to 
states under the special education account.
    Results: Rejected 20 yeas to 28 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Aderholt
Mr. Cramer                          Mr. Bonilla
Ms. DeLauro                         Mr. Callahan
Mr. Dixon                           Mr. Cunningham
Mr. Edwards                         Mr. DeLay
Mr. Farr                            Mr. Dickey
Mr. Forbes                          Mrs. Emerson
Mr. Frelinghuysen                   Mr. Goode
Mr. Hinchey                         Ms. Granger
Mr. Jackson                         Mr. Hobson
Ms. Kilpatrick                      Mr. Kingston
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Knollenberg
Mrs. Meek                           Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Mollohan                        Mr. Latham
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Miller
Mr. Olver                           Mr. Nethercutt
Mr. Pastor                          Mrs. Northup
Ms. Roybal-Allard                   Mr. Packard
Mr. Sabo                            Mr. Peterson
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Porter
                                    Mr. Regula
                                    Mr. Rogers
                                    Mr. Skeen
                                    Mr. Sununu
                                    Mr. Taylor
                                    Mr. Tiahrt
                                    Mr. Wamp
                                    Mr. Wicker
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, 
together with the names of those voting for and those voting 
against, are printed below:

                            rollcall no. 10

    Date: May 24, 2000.
    Measure: Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.
    Motion by: Ms. DeLauro.
    Description of motion: To add funds to the Health Resources 
and Services Administration, the Health Care Financing 
Administration, the Administration on Aging, and the Social 
Security Administration supplemental security income program 
and administrative expenses. In addition, to strike a provision 
limiting the funding for the Medicare Integrity Program to last 
year's level.
    Results: Rejected 24 yeas to 26 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Aderholt                        Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Callahan
Ms. DeLauro                         Mr. Cunningham
Mr. Dickey                          Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Dixon                           Mr. Goode
Mr. Edwards                         Ms. Granger
Mrs. Emerson                        Mr. Hobson
Mr. Farr                            Mr. Istook
Mr. Forbes                          Mr. Kingston
Mr. Hinchey                         Mr. Knollenberg
Mr. Hoyer                           Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Jackson                         Mr. Latham
Ms. Kilpatrick                      Mr. Miller
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Nethercutt
Mrs. Meek                           Mr. Packard
Mr. Mollohan                        Mr. Peterson
Mr. Moran                           Mr. Porter
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Regula
Mr. Olver                           Mr. Rogers
Mr. Price                           Mr. Skeen
Ms. Roybal-Allard                   Mr. Sununu
Mr. Sabo                            Mr. Taylor
Mr. Serrano                         Mr. Tiahrt
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wamp
                                    Mr. Wicker
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, 
together with the names of those voting for and those voting 
against, are printed below:

                            rollcall no. 11

    Date: May 24, 2000.
    Measure: Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.
    Motion by: Mr. Obey.
    Description of motion: To add funds for the Department of 
Labor, Departmental Management.
    Results: Rejected 23 yeas to 30 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Aderholt
Mr. Cramer                          Mr. Bonilla
Ms. DeLauro                         Mr. Callahan
Mr. Dixon                           Mr. Cunningham
Mr. Edwards                         Mr. Dickey
Mr. Farr                            Mrs. Emerson
Mr. Forbes                          Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Hinchey                         Mr. Goode
Mr. Hoyer                           Ms. Granger
Mr. Jackson                         Mr. Hobson
Ms. Kilpatrick                      Mr. Istook
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Kingston
Mrs. Meek                           Mr. Knollenberg
Mr. Mollohan                        Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Moran                           Mr. Latham
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Miller
Mr. Olver                           Mr. Nethercutt
Mr. Pastor                          Mrs. Northup
Mr. Price                           Mr. Packard
Ms. Roybal-Allard                   Mr. Peterson
Mr. Sabo                            Mr. Porter
Mr. Serrano                         Mr. Regula
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Rogers
                                    Mr. Skeen
                                    Mr. Sununu
                                    Mr. Taylor
                                    Mr. Tiahrt
                                    Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wamp
                                    Mr. Wicker
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, 
together with the names of those voting for and those voting 
against, are printed below:

                            rollcall No. 12

    Date: May 24, 2000.
    Measure: Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.
    Motion by: Mr. Obey.
    Description of motion: To add a Sense of the House 
provision that tax cuts for taxpayers in the top one percent 
income levels should not be enacted until Congress enacts a 
universal voluntary prescription drug benefit for all Americans 
under Medicare.
    Results: Rejected 22 yeas to 28 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Boyd                            Mr. Bonilla
Mr. Cramer                          Mr. Callahan
Ms. DeLauro                         Mr. Cunningham
Mr. Dixon                           Mr. Dickey
Mr. Edwards                         Mrs. Emerson
Mr. Farr                            Mr. Frelinghuysen
Mr. Forbes                          Mr. Goode
Mr. Hinchey                         Mr. Hobson
Mr. Hoyer                           Mr. Istook
Ms. Kilpatrick                      Mr. Kingston
Mrs. Lowey                          Mr. Knollenberg
Mrs. Meek                           Mr. Kolbe
Mr. Mollohan                        Mr. Latham
Mr. Moran                           Mr. Miller
Mr. Obey                            Mr. Nethercutt
Mr. Olver                           Mrs. Northup
Mr. Pastor                          Mr. Packard
Mr. Price                           Mr. Peterson
Ms. Roybal-Allard                   Mr. Porter
Mr. Sabo                            Mr. Regula
Mr. Serrano                         Mr. Rogers
Mr. Visclosky                       Mr. Skeen
                                    Mr. Sununu
                                    Mr. Taylor
                                    Mr. Tiahrt
                                    Mr. Walsh
                                    Mr. Wamp
                                    Mr. Wicker
                          Full Committee Votes

    Pursuant to the provisions of clause 3(a)(1)(b) of rule 
XIII of the House of Representatives, the results of each 
rollcall vote on an amendment or on the motion to report, 
together with the names of those voting for and those voting 
against, are printed below:

                            rollcall No. 13

    Date: May 24, 2000.
    Measure: Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, 
and Related Agencies Appropriations Bill, FY 2001.
    Motion by: Mr. Rogers.
    Description of motion: To report the bill, to authorize the 
chairman to seek a rule for consideration of the bill, and to 
authorize the chairman to move that the House disagree to the 
amendments of the Senate and agree to a conference requested by 
the Senate.
    Results: Adopted 29 yeas to 22 nays.
        Members Voting Yea            Members Voting Nay
Mr. Aderholt                        Mr. Boyd
Mr. Bonilla                         Mr.Cramer
Mr. Callahan                        Ms. DeLauro
Mr. Cunningham                      Mr. Dixon
Mr. Dickey                          Mr. Edwards
Mrs. Emerson                        Mr. Farr
Mr. Frelinghuysen                   Mr. Forbes
Mr. Goode                           Mr. Hinchey
Mr. Hobson                          Mr. Hoyer
Mr. Istook                          Ms. Kilpatrick
Mr. Kingston                        Mrs. Lowey
Mr. Knollenberg                     Mrs. Meek
Mr. Kolbe                           Mr. Mollohan
Mr. Latham                          Mr. Moran
Mr. Miller                          Mr. Obey
Mr. Nethercutt                      Mr. Olver
Mrs. Northup                        Mr. Pastor
Mr. Packard                         Mr. Price
Mr. Peterson                        Ms. Roybal-Allard
Mr. Porter                          Mr. Sabo
Mr. Regula                          Mr. Serrano
Mr. Rogers                          Mr. Visclosky
Mr. Skeen
Mr. Sununu
Mr. Taylor
Mr. Tiahrt
Mr. Walsh
Mr. Wamp
Mr. Wicker



   DISSENTING VIEWS OF HON. DAVID OBEY, HON. STENY HOYER, HON. NANCY 
PELOSI, HON. NITA LOWEY, HON. ROSA DeLAURO, AND HON. JESSE JACKSON, JR.

    For the third year in a row, the Majority has produced a 
fictional Labor, Health, and Human Services-Education 
Appropriations bill that is going nowhere. We have gone up and 
down this hill so many fruitless times. This bill contains 
major reductions in the President's Budget for education, 
healthcare, and training; and overall it is $6 billion below 
his request. It declines to step up to the plate on problem 
after problem in this country, all for purposes of providing a 
large tax cut aimed primarily at high income individuals. That 
is why this bill is
     $2.9 billion below the President's request for the 
Department of Education
     $1.7 billion below the President's request for the 
Department of Labor, and
     $1.1 billion below the President's request for the 
Department of Health and Human Services
    This bill is completely inadequate for the needs of the 
country, and we know it is not going to survive. It fails to 
respond to the needs of all Americans so that they will be 
prepared for the high skill jobs of the 21st Century and 
equipped to function productively in a global economy. Our 
nation is growing and our efforts to address the changing needs 
of Americans must grow as well. By 2010, our population will 
increase by approximately 23 million people to nearly 300 
million people, an 8 percent increase over today.
    We must address the needs of an increasing number of 
students and prepare them for the future. More than 53 million 
children are in school today--7.3 million or 16% more than 10 
years ago. And, in the next 10 years, that number will grow by 
nearly 1 million children, with the greatest growth occurring 
in grades 9-12. College enrollment also rose by nearly 10 
percent between 1989 and 1999, and is expected to grow by 
nearly 1.5 million students--another 10% increase--over the 
next 10 years. By 2009, more than 16 million students will be 
enrolled in some type of postsecondary institution.
    A few decades ago, employers were looking for typists, 
keypunchers and elevator operators. Today, they are looking for 
webmasters and telecommunications specialists. And, even if 
future labor markets are not as tight as they are today, it is 
likely that tomorrow's workers will have to be even more highly 
skilled. Occupational groups that require the most education 
are projected to be among the fastest growing in the future. 
Technology, combined with increasing globalization, presents 
immense challenges for the unskilled workers of today and also 
working Americans who will face the need for supplementary 
skills training to remain competitive in their jobs.
    In addition to addressing the needs of the young and our 
workforce, we must begin to prepare for an aging population as 
well. The 76 million Americans who make up the Baby Boom 
generation will begin reaching retirement age in just eight 
years. The population of those over age 85 who often present 
the most urgent needs is expected to grow 33% in the next ten 
years alone. To adequately prepare, we should be making 
investments now to help seniors secure their futures and 
maintain their independence.
    This bill does not help prepare us to be the kind of 
country that we are going to be. That is why we are opposed to 
this bill in its present form, and that is why the President 
has said that he would veto it.
    That is why Democrats decided to offer several amendments 
adding $10.9 billion to the bill for our country's highest 
priority needs that were fully paid for under the Democratic 
version of the Budget Resolution. These amendments do not 
correct all of the bill's flaws, but would address the bill's 
most serious deficiencies. The Democratic amendments include:
     Obey Amendment: to restore $1.025 billion to 
improve teacher quality and strike the block grant language 
that prevents Congress from assuring adequate and dedicated 
funding for class size reduction and teacher quality. Rejected 
22:31
     Lowey Amendment: to restore $1.3 billion to 
leverage up to $7.0 billion for urgent safety and health school 
facility repairs. Rejected 21:29
     Hoyer Amendment: to restore $1.833 billion to 
improve the education, care and well-being of at-risk children 
through early childhood education, child care and after school 
initiatives. Rejected 23:30
     Pelosi Amendment: to strike provisions that reduce 
NIH research funding in the bill by $1.7 billion. Rejected 
23:29
     Pelosi Amendment: to add $600 million for 
substance abuse demand reduction and to increase substance 
abuse treatment capacity. Rejected 22:30
     Lowey Amendment: to add $938 million for a $300 
increase in maximum Pell grant to low-income college students 
(from $3,500 to $3,800). Rejected 18:30
     Jackson Amendment: to restore $1.25 billion to 
sustain and expand skills and job training for disadvantaged 
youth and adults, and dislocated workers. Rejected 19:30
     DeLauro Amendment: to add $1.510 billion to 
provide $7.0 billion in total for IDEA Part B state grants for 
children with disabilities, putting IDEA on a path toward full 
funding. Rejected 20:28
     DeLauro Amendment: to add $661 million to protect 
the health and welfare of senior citizens, through better 
nursing home care, increased meals on wheels, assistance for 
family caregivers, and more accessible health care. Rejected 
24:26
     Obey Amendment: to restore $97 million for Clinton 
initiatives to attack the problem of weak international labor 
standards, including international child labor standards. 
Rejected 23:30
     Obey Amendment: to add a Sense of the House of 
Representatives provision that tax cuts for taxpayers in top 1% 
of income levels should not be enacted until Congress enacts a 
universal voluntary prescription drug benefit for all Americans 
under Medicare. Rejected 22:28
    None of the Democratic amendments were adopted in the 
Committee. The only major change the Majority approved in 
Committee was to break a previous commitment and adopt the 
Northup amendment to weaken worker protection through yet 
another appropriations rider that blocks issuance of the OSHA 
ergonomics regulation.
    The cuts in this bill are a direct result of the decisions 
made by the Majority to provide massive tax cuts mostly to our 
wealthier citizens. Two key tax cut bills, the minimum wage 
bill and the Budget Resolution, are reflective of those 
decisions and have made it impossible to meet our obligations 
in education, health care, and workforce development in this 
bill.
    The Republicans attached to the minimum wage bill $122 
billion in tax cuts over 10 years. When combined with the 
impact on the debt service, the bill would reduce surpluses by 
$154 billion over 10 years. In FY 2001 alone, the tax cuts 
passed in the minimum wage bill would cut revenues by $2.4 
billion. According to the Citizens for Tax Justice, 73% of 
these tax cuts would go to the top 1% of all taxpayers--those 
making over $319,000 a year. The average income for these 
citizens is about $915,000 a year. Yet, the bottom 60% of all 
taxpayers would get only 2.8% of the tax cuts under that bill. 
So those in the top 1% get a tax cut of $6,128, and the bottom 
60% get a $4 tax cut.
    The Republican Budget Resolution calls for $175 billion in 
tax cuts over 5 years, including a $150 billion reconciliation 
directive and a $25 billion reserve fund for additional tax 
cuts. These cuts exceed the projected budget surplus and 
require deep cuts in non-defense discretionary appropriations. 
The Democratic alternative to the Budget Resolution would cut 
taxes $50 billion over 5 years.
    In FY 2001, under the Republican Budget Resolution, 
revenues would be cut by $12.6 billion. The Democratic 
alternative cut taxes $2.6 billion in FY 2001. That is a $10 
billion difference in FY 2001 alone.
    To make room for their massive tax package, the Republican 
Budget Resolution calls for a dramatic cut to appropriations. 
In FY 2001, the Budget Resolution provides $289 billion for 
non-defense discretionary, which is a cut of $7 billion or 6% 
below 2000 enacted, and $19 billion below what is needed to 
keep up with inflation.
    With a more modest tax cut, the Democratic alternative 
would have provided $309 billion for non-defense discretionary 
programs in FY 2001, $20 billion more than the Republican 
Budget Resolution. That $20 billion would have provided the 
room we need to live up to our responsibilities in this 
appropriations bill. And we could have done so without touching 
Social Security or returning to deficit spending.
    While the budgetary cost of the Republican tax plan is 
significant and serious, the real cost is not what it will do 
to the fiscal balance this country experiences in the short 
term, but what it does to schools and the quality of the 
American workforce in the coming decades. If this country is 
going to have the kind of economic health and vitality in 
future decades that we are enjoying today, it will be because 
we have found new ways to grow through new technologies and new 
and better work skills.
    The House should reject this bill. The country deserves, 
and needs a better bill.
                              ----------                              

    Attached to these Dissenting Views is additional supporting 
information, including:
     Tables listing key Administration education 
requests that are cut in the bill.
     A copy of the President's statement on the bill.
     A copy of Secretary Riley's statement on the bill.
     A copy of Secretary Herman's statement on the 
bill.
     A copy of Commissioner Apfel's statement on the 
bill.
     A letter from the OMB Director stating the 
Administration's views on the bill.
    Following the OMB letter is more specific information about 
some of our urgent national problems, the deficiencies in this 
bill, and Democratic efforts to provide alternative funding 
levels. State tables showing cuts in selected programs on a 
state-by-state basis conclude this section.



      DESCRIPTION OF NATIONAL PROBLEMS AND THE DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE

                              ----------                              


                               EDUCATION

    Including Head Start, the President's education budget 
request contains a $5.5 billion increase in education 
spending--and the largest proposed increase--in dollar and 
percentage terms--for the Department of Education since it was 
established in 1980.
    The bill reported by the Majority turns a cold shoulder to 
education and cuts $3.5 billion out of the Administration's 
request. This bill particularly undermines the President's 
request for $2.9 billion to provide more and better teachers in 
the classroom, by cutting more than $1.0 billion for teacher 
quality. In the last two years, Democrats and Republicans have 
had a disagreement about whether smaller classes or quality 
teachers are more important in raising student achievement. 
Democrats believe that both are important: we need high quality 
teachers in every classroom and enough teachers to give every 
student the attention they need. We need to take the best of 
the Majority's ideas and our ideas, and provide enough money in 
this bill to make a real difference on both fronts.
    We face a crisis in this country with respect to who will 
be standing in front of our classrooms in America by the end of 
the current decade. Twenty-five percent of our veteran teachers 
are 50 years or older and will be retiring soon. We will have 
to replace these teachers in a tight labor market and when the 
private sector is paying increasingly higher salaries for 
college graduates, particularly in mathematics and the 
sciences. More than half of our young graduates are women who 
do not face the same barriers to employment in other 
professions that they did a generation ago.
    This is coming at a time when we are faced with increasing 
enrollments, a higher proportion of low-income and limited 
English speaking students, the realization that cutting class 
size is even more important to improved learning than 
previously understood and the demands that a technologically 
driven economy place on the next generation of workers.
    This bill will disappoint most Americans. The American 
people understand the federal role in education and believe 
that the federal government should help shoulder part of the 
financial burden of educating our children. Education is their 
highest priority for additional federal funding and is more 
important to them than health care, tax cuts or paying down the 
debt. A large majority (61%) believes that the federal 
government spends too little on education.
    Our nation is prosperous, our economy is booming and our 
debt is lower than nearly all other industrialized nations. 
What better time to strengthen our national investment in our 
schools than now?
Problem #1: The Need To Invest in High Quality Teaching and More 
        Teachers
    Perhaps more than any other area, Americans want to ensure 
that their children have good teachers in small classes where 
their children can get the personal attention they need. We 
face unprecedented need and demand for high quality teaching at 
a time when we also face a potential crisis in teacher quality 
and supply.
    More than 53 million children are in school today--7.3 
million or 16% more than 10 years ago. And, over the next 10 
years, that number will grow by another 1 million children, 
with the greatest growth occurring in grades 9-12.
    Schools will need to hire an estimated 2.2 to 2.5 million 
public school teachers over the next 10 years to replace a 
projected 765,000 teachers who are expected to retire, address 
enrollment growth, and accommodate smaller classes. More of 
these new hires will be brand new teachers who lack experience 
and solid training. And, we will have to work harder to attract 
and retain the 30% of new teachers who leave the profession 
after five years.
    In addition to meeting the demand for more teachers, our 
schools need more highly skilled teachers. These teachers must 
bring new knowledge and skills to the classroom, but too many 
teachers are providing instruction in subjects in which they 
have little or no preparation and academic background and are 
not well prepared for the classroom. For example,
     One of every 10 teachers is teaching a subject for 
which they were not trained to teach, and the problem of 
teaching out of field is most acute at the secondary level 
where most of the enrollment growth will occur over the next 
few years.
     More than one of every three new teachers is not 
fully licensed to teach.
     Nearly two-thirds of teachers do not feel very 
well prepared to implement state or district curriculum and 
performance standards.
     Four out of five teachers do not feel very well 
prepared to integrate educational technology into the 
curriculum.
     Four out of five teachers do not feel very well 
prepared to address the needs of students with disabilities.
    Americans want a Marshall Plan now to help schools deal 
with pressing teacher recruitment, retention and quality 
issues, and to cut the size of classes. This bill provides no 
plan at all.
    DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: Democrats offered an amendment to 
restore $1.025 billion to improve teacher quality and strike 
the block grant language that prevents Congress from assuring 
adequate and dedicated funding for class size reduction and 
teacher quality, but it was rejected by the Majority by a vote 
of 22:31. (Obey amendment, Roll Number 1 located in this report 
immediately preceding the table). This amendment would have 
restored:
     $690 million for high-quality professional 
development that is content-focused, embedded in the life of 
the classroom, provided to teams of teachers in the same grade 
or subject area, and of sufficient duration to be effective 
under the Teaching to High Standards State Grants program.
     $25 million for an expanded Transition to Teaching 
program to help schools hire 4,000 mid-career professionals who 
promise to teach in high-poverty school districts.
     $75 million for the Hometown Teachers program to 
help about 100 high-poverty school districts to develop a 
``grow your own'' approach to teacher recruitment which has 
been effective in addressing teacher shortages in hard-to-serve 
communities.
     $50 million for the Higher Standards, Higher Pay 
program to help high-poverty school districts (with an average 
of about 800 teachers per school district) attract and retain 
high-quality teachers and principals through better pay linked 
to (1) regular, rigorous peer evaluations of every teacher that 
include student performance as one measure; (2) professional 
development and intensive support to help all teachers and 
principals succeed; and (3) streamlined, but fair, systems to 
improve or remove teachers identified as low-performing through 
their peer evaluation.
     $50 million for the Teacher Quality Incentives 
program to reward about 200 high-poverty school districts for 
demonstrating significant progress in improving teacher quality 
by increasing the percentage of certified teachers and 
decreasing the percentage of secondary teachers who are 
teaching out-of-field.
     $40 million for the School Leadership Initiative 
to provide leadership training to 10,000 superintendents, 
principals, and prospective principals and to address shortages 
of skilled district- and school-level administrators.
     $30 million for the Early Childhood Professional 
Development program to improve the knowledge and skills of 
early childhood educators and caregivers who work in 
communities with high concentrations of young children living 
in poverty.
     $65 million for Teacher Technology Training to 
help train teachers to use computers and the Internet for 
classroom instruction, when 80% of teachers report that they 
are not well prepared to use these technologies.
    This bill repeals last year's bipartisan plan to hire 
100,000 additional teachers for smaller classes.
    This bill block grants the $1.75 billion requested by the 
President for the third installment of a plan to make classes 
smaller by hiring 100,000 teachers over 7 years. School 
districts have already hired 29,000 teachers to reduce class 
size, and the budget requested funds for those teachers and to 
hire another 20,000 teachers. Instead, the bill provides these 
funds for the Teacher Empowerment Act, subject to enactment.
    Providing high quality teachers goes hand in hand with 
smaller classes, but we must provide the necessary funds to 
make a difference. The Majority's bill would provide $1.0 
billion less than the $2.9 billion requested by the President 
for enhancing teacher quality and hiring more teachers.
    Moreover, the block grant provisions in the bill would do 
little more than provide another form of general revenue 
sharing to states--many of which have produced little in the 
way of educational results. On the other hand, we know that 
reducing class size is a research-tested and proven method of 
raising student achievement. Small classes allow teachers to 
spend more time on instruction and less on classroom 
management. Teachers are better able to identify students with 
learning problems and to provide help to those children. 
Reducing class size also reduces the need to refer students to 
costly special education programs.
    We all know what happens with block grants--eventually they 
get cut. Already, the Teacher Empowerment Act (TEA) block grant 
proposed in this bill is $250 million below the level 
authorized in the TEA bill last year--a 12.5% cut. One also 
need look no further than the Title XX Social Services Block 
Grant to see what eventually happens with block grants. In 
1998, Title XX was cut from $2.38 billion to $1.7 billion to 
pay for roads and highways in TEA21, and is cut another 65% to 
$600 million in the FY2001 Labor-HHS-Education appropriations 
bill reported by the Senate Appropriations Committee.
    The Majority argues that under its approach, schools will 
have the option of using the $1.75 billion block grant funding 
to hire new teachers or to support teacher training activities. 
But, that is a Hobson's choice. We shouldn't have to force 
schools to choose between hiring new teachers or training those 
teachers already in the school.
    School districts have already hired 29,000 teachers who are 
on the payroll, teaching classes. If schools do not fire these 
teachers, then approximately $1.3 billion of the $1.75 billion 
provided in the bill for the block grant would be need to pay 
those 29,000 teachers, leaving only $450 million for teacher 
training and professional development--a cut of $650 million 
below the President's request for teacher training, recruitment 
and retention initiatives.
    Alternatively, under the Majority's approach, if schools 
use more of the block grant for teacher training, as many as 
2.9 million children could be denied the benefits of getting a 
better education in smaller classes.

Problem #2: The Need To Invest in Modern Schools

    Studies show that the physical condition of our schools 
makes a difference in student learning. A classroom of 5th 
graders will tune out even the best teacher when they have to 
wear coats in class to ward off cold, or when water is pouring 
into the classroom due to a leak in the roof.
    We can't control all the influences that affect a child's 
learning. We must take each child as he or she comes to us. 
But, we can control the condition of learning facilities to 
which we send our young people.
    Our schools are old, overcrowded, and outmoded. Not only 
are they not ready for state-of-the-art instruction in the 21st 
century, they cannot even meet 20th century standards for 
security, safety, and sanitation.
     One-third of the nation's 80,000 schools, serving 
about 14 million students nationwide, report needing extensive 
repair or replacement of one or more school buildings. About 7 
million children are in schools that fail to meet local health 
and safety codes.
     Three-fifths of schools, serving 25 million 
students nationwide, need extensive repair, overhaul or 
replacement of at least one major building feature, such as 
roofs, windows, plumbing and heating, electrical power, and 
life safety codes.
     Nearly 60% of all schools have at least one major 
building feature in disrepair, such as a leaky roof or 
crumbling walls.
     More than half of all schools have unsatisfactory 
environmental conditions, such as poor ventilation, heating or 
lighting problems or poor physical security.
    This bill fails to provide the $1.3 billion requested to 
leverage up to $7 billion to fix a backlog of leaky roofs, 
outmoded plumbing, and other needed repairs to bring school 
buildings into compliance with local safety codes.
    We know that local communities can't foot the bill alone, 
and historically the federal government has stepped up to the 
plate, particularly to help the neediest communities provide a 
quality education for all students. The federal government 
stepped in to help build over 5,200 new schools and to upgrade 
1,000 school buildings back in the 1930's when the need for 
school buildings outstripped the capacity of local communities 
to pay for them. We should provide similar help now.
    DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: Democrats offered an amendment to 
restore $1.3 billion for urgent safety and health repairs at 
5,000 schools, but it was rejected by the Majority by a vote of 
21:29. (Lowey amendment, Roll Number 2 located in this report 
immediately preceding the table.)

Problem #3: The Need To Invest in Early Childhood Education, Child Care 
        and After School Programs for At-Risk Children

    Amidst unprecedented prosperity in our country, 13.5 
million children are poor. One in five American children live 
in poverty, representing almost 30% of school enrollment. More 
than half of these children are in single parent homes and are 
more likely to experience academic problems in their early 
school years; 74% of poor children live in working families who 
cannot make enough to escape poverty.
    The achievement gap between disadvantaged children and 
other children has been reduced over the past twenty years, but 
a sizable gap remains. Too many disadvantaged children are 
still denied a quality education, leading to a greater 
likelihood of dropping out and a lifetime of diminished 
success. For these reasons, providing consistent support for 
education success from the earliest ages has critically 
important benefits.
    A national review of 36 studies on the long-term impact of 
early childhood education programs (including a number of Head 
Start programs) found that low-income children who participated 
in such programs were less likely to be held back in school or 
to be placed in special education classes, more likely to 
succeed in school and to graduate, and more likely to be rated 
as behaving well in class and being better adjusted in school.
    Historically, the federal government has played a 
significant role in helping to provide a quality education for 
the most disadvantaged students in the poorest communities. 
But,this bill cuts out key investments in early childhood 
education and child care, extra reading and math education, and before 
and after school programs for those families.
    DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: Democrats offered an amendment to add 
$1.833 billion to restore the President's budget request for 
key programs for at-risk children and youth, but it was 
rejected by the Majority by a vote of 23:30. (Hoyer amendment, 
Roll Number 3 located in this report immediately preceding the 
table.) This amendment would have restored:
     $600 million for Head Start in order to fund the 
President's request for a $1 billion increase for Head Start. 
Head Start is a comprehensive program that helps at-risk 
children, 3 through 5 years, prepare for school and stay 
healthy by providing education, immunizations, health checkups 
and nutritious meals. Without the increase provided by this 
amendment, 50,000 children would be denied a better start in 
life under the Head Start program, and an additional 3,000 
infants and toddlers would be denied access to early, 
continuous and comprehensive services under Early Head Start.
     $416 million to the Title 1 program to fully fund 
the President's request of $8.4 billion for Title 1 grants to 
school districts. Title 1 helps over 11 million disadvantaged 
school children to gain skills in core academic subjects, 
including reading and math, and helps them to achieve to high 
academic standards. However, the resources provided for Title 1 
have not kept pace with the increase in school children in 
poverty and current Title 1 funding supports only about one-
third of the basic authorization. Without the increase 
requested by the President, extra academic help for as many as 
an additional 650,000 disadvantaged children and targeted 
assistance to up to 7,000 schools identified by states as 
needing improvement would be denied.
     $400 million for the 21st Century Community 
Learning Centers to fully fund the President's request of $1 
billion for before and after school centers. The 21st Century 
Community Learning Centers program enables schools to stay open 
longer, providing a safe place for homework centers, intensive 
mentoring in basic skills, drug and violence prevention 
counseling, helping middle school students to prepare to take 
college prep courses in high school, enrichment in the core 
academic subjects as well as opportunities to participate in 
recreational activities, chorus, band and the arts, technology 
education programs and services for children and youth with 
disabilities. While the bill provides a modest increase for 
this program over last year, without the $400 million increase 
provided by the Hoyer amendment, approximately 1.6 children 
would be denied the opportunity to receive fun, rich learning 
opportunities before and after school.
     $417 million for the Child Care and Development 
Block Grant program to fully fund (in addition to the $400 
million increase in the bill) the President's request for a 
$817 million increase. This program is the major source of 
Federal child care assistance for low- and moderate-income 
families, and provides funding to states for subsidizing care 
of the parent's choice and improving the quality of care. 
Nationally, only one out of ten children who is eligible for 
child care assistance under federal law receives assistance, 
and no state is currently serving all eligible families. While 
research has repeatedly shown that quality care plays a key 
role in children's development and school readiness, a study 
found that only one in seven child care centers received a 
rating of good quality care. Adding the $417 million requested 
in the President's request would result in 80,000 more children 
being served next year.

Problem #4: Making College More Affordable for Needy Students

Pell Grants

    One of the greatest economic challenges facing America in 
the 21st century will be to support the highly-skilled 
workforce necessary to thrive in an increasingly complex and 
technology-driven workplace.
    The importance of postsecondary education in meeting this 
challenge should not be understated. In terms of earning power, 
there is a vast difference between those with college degrees 
and those without. In 1997, the median annual income for adult 
men and women with college degrees (full-time workers 25 years 
and older) was 56 and 60% more, respectively, than that of men 
and women with only high school diplomas.
    Further, the unemployment rate for adults with high school 
diplomas is twice that of adults with bachelor's degrees or 
higher. There is no doubt that American workers who have 
difficulty adapting to the demands of a changing workplace will 
continue to experience a falling standard of living.
    Since the 1944 G.I. Bill, the Federal government has 
embraced the ideal that all qualified students should be able 
to attend college, regardless of their financial means. A 
college education benefits not only the individual, but society 
as a whole. A highly educated work force has become an 
essential component of economic growth and competitiveness--it 
is estimated that increases in national educational attainment 
have accounted for almost 30% of the growth in national income 
this century. There is no better way to ensure the long-term 
solvency of Social Security than to increase the earning 
capacity of American workers through education which will allow 
them to increase their contributions to the trust funds. When 
the federal government helps students attend college, it truly 
invests in our nation's future.
    In the next 10 years, the number of undergraduate students 
enrolled in the nation's colleges and universities will 
increase by 11% to more than 14 million students. Many of these 
students will be the first in their families to attend college. 
One out of five of these students will be from families with 
incomes below the poverty level. The continuedinvestment in 
federal grant programs is essential if college is to remain an 
achievable part of the American dream.
    The Pell Grant program is the cornerstone of federal 
student financial aid, providing aid to nearly 3.8 million 
needy students in FY 1999. Pell Grants are targeted to the 
neediest students. Approximately 90% of Pell Grants assistance 
goes to students from families with annual incomes below 
$30,000 and 41% goes to students from families with incomes 
below $12,000. The grants are the foundation of a low-income 
student's aid package. Without them, millions of students could 
not go to college. In fact, since the inception of the Pell 
Grant program in 1973-74, over 75 million grants have helped 
low-income students go to college, enrich their lives, and 
become productive members of society.
    Unfortunately, the increases in the maximum Pell Grant 
award have not kept pace with the growing cost of postsecondary 
education. According to the College Board, between the 1988-89 
and 1998-99 academic years, the average cost of attending a 
public university rose 75%. Costs at private schools during the 
same period increased 81%. This significant increase in college 
costs has reduced the relative value of the Pell Grant. In 
1976, the maximum Pell Grant of $1,400 covered 72% of the 
$1,935 average annual cost (i.e. tuition, fees, room and board) 
at a public, four-year school. In 1998, the maximum Pell Grant 
of $3,000 covered only 39% of the $7,769 average annual cost at 
a public, four-year school.
    The House bill fully funds the President's request to 
increase the maximum Pell grant for the 2001-02 school year 
from $3,300 to $3,500. That is a good start. But, we need to do 
more.
    DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: Democrats offered an amendment to 
provide a $3,800 maximum Pell grant, but it was rejected by the 
Majority 18-30. (Lowey amendment, Roll Call Number 7 located in 
this report immediately preceding the table).

Problem #5: Meeting our Commitments To Help Educate Children with 
        Disabilities

    Americans also want more help for special needs children. 
And, in this area, both Democrats and Republicans can agree 
that more federal support is warranted so that the 6.2 million 
students with disabilities receive the education they deserve. 
However, even measured by the Majority's own yardstick, this 
bill fails to address the need.
    Although States have the responsibility to provide a free 
public education, the Individuals With Disabilities Act (IDEA) 
helps them to pay for the additional costs associated with 
providing a quality education for children with disabilities. 
IDEA funds support the costs of providing smaller classes, 
related professional services, equipment and staff related to 
serving disabled children.
    The bill provides $6.6 billion for IDEA, an increase of 
$514 million over last year. This includes $5.5 billion for the 
Part B State Grants, an increase of $500 million for Part B 
grants over last year. In contrast, the Majority's budget 
resolution called for at least a $2 billion increase for 
Special Education over last year. Further, on May 3rd, the 
House passed by an overwhelming bipartisan vote of 421:3 a bill 
(H.R. 4055) calling for a $2 billion increase in 2001 and full 
funding for IDEA by 2010. This bill fails to meet the 2001 
funding target by $1.5 billion.
    Democrats offered an amendment to add $1.5 billion to put 
IDEA on a path toward full funding, but it was rejected by the 
Majority by a vote of 20:28. (DeLauro amendment, Roll Number 9 
located in this report immediately preceding the table.)

Other Key Education Programs Cut in This Bill

    Small Schools. The bill freezes funding for Small, Safe and 
Successful Schools at $45 million, a cut of $75 million from 
the President's request of $120 million. The Small, Safe and 
Successful Schools initiative is designed to help school 
districts reorganize their large high schools into smaller, 
more personalized learning communities. Over time, high schools 
have become larger places and, as a result, students feel 
increasingly disconnected from adults. In 1997, almost half of 
the Nation's high school students attended schools that 
enrolled more than 1,500 students and 70% of high school 
students attended schools that enrolled more than 1,000 
students.
    We know that an effective way to prevent school violence is 
to help students feel more connected to their teachers, schools 
and communities. Research demonstrates that, on a wide range of 
measures, when students are part of a smaller, more intimate 
learning community, they are more successful academically and 
socially. Yet, as many as 400 large high schools enrolling more 
than 400,000 students would not get assistance because of the 
cut in this bill for the Small Schools initiative.
    School Counselors. The bill eliminates the Elementary 
School Counseling Demonstration Program funded in 2000 at $20 
million. Over 100,000 elementary school students would be 
denied counseling services--services that are needed to help 
troubled students overcome problems--and that will contribute 
to better mental health and, in turn, help to make our schools 
safer and more successful. The bill ignores the calls from 
hundreds of communities for additional intervention services to 
help troubled youth before they harm themselves or others.
    Safe Schools/Healthy Students. The bill cuts $51 million 
from the President's request of $650 million for the Safe and 
Drug Free Schools program. Of the $51 million inadditional 
funds requested in the budget, $41 million in new funding would be used 
to expand the successful Safe School/Healthy Students school violence 
prevention initiative to an additional 40 school districts. These 
grants help schools implement comprehensive solutions to preventing 
school violence before it occurs, in collaboration with law enforcement 
and mental health providers.
    In 1999, the agencies received 447 applications under the 
Safe Schools/Healthy Students competition, but only had enough 
funds to award 54 grants. An additional $100 million would have 
been required to fund all of the high-scoring applications 
received for projects to provide students, schools, and 
communities the benefit of enhanced comprehensive educational, 
mental health, social service, law enforcement, and, as 
appropriate, juvenile justice services to promote healthy 
childhood development, and address the problems of school 
violence and alcohol and other drug abuse. This bill does not 
provide that additional assistance.
    School Emergency Assistance. In addition, the bill provides 
no funding for Project SERV, the School Emergency Response to 
Violence. The President requested $10 million for this new 
initiative under which the Department of Education, in 
collaboration with the Departments of Justice and Health and 
Human Services and the Federal Emergency Management 
Administration, would provide education-related services to 
local educational agencies where the learning environment has 
been disrupted due to a violent or traumatic crisis, such as a 
shooting or major accident. Such services would include 
assessing the crisis situation, and developing and implementing 
a crisis intervention plan; providing mental health crisis 
counseling to students and their families, teachers, and others 
in need of such services; and increasing--at least 
temporarily--school security.
    Reading Excellence Act. The bill provides $260 million for 
Reading and Literacy Grants, which is level funding compared to 
2000, but a cut of $26 million, or 9%, below the President's 
request for $286 million. Level funding for the Reading and 
Literacy Grants program would deny critical reading 
instructional services to approximately 100,000 children in 
about 200 schools who would be served by the increase of $26 
million requested by the President.
    The Reading and Literacy Grants program is the first 
comprehensive, nationwide effort to implement the features of 
high-quality scientifically based reading research in school 
reading instruction. Far too many young people are struggling 
through school without having mastered reading, the most 
essential and basic skill. On the 1998 National Assessment of 
Educational Progress (NAEP), 68% of all fourth graders in high 
poverty schools scored below the ``basic'' reading level.
    Goals 2000 Parental Centers. The bill eliminates all 
funding for the Parental Information Resource Centers, for 
which the President requested to continue at the 2000 level of 
$33 million. These centers, authorized under Title IV of the 
Goals 2000 Act, provide parents with training, information, and 
support to better understand their children's educational needs 
and how to help their children achieve to high academic 
standards. Each center services an entire State or region, and 
they are required to use at least half of their funding to 
serve areas with high concentrations of low-income families.
    Bilingual Education. The bill provides $248 million for 
Bilingual Education, the same as the fiscal year 2000 
appropriation, but a cut of $48 million or 16% below the 
President's request of $296 million. Approximately 3.4 million 
students--about 6% of total school enrollments--have difficulty 
speaking English. This number has grown by 57% between 1990 and 
1997 and will continue to grow as the number of Hispanic 
children entering school increases. Based on historical 
patterns, an additional 2.5-2.9 million Hispanic children may 
enter school over the next 20 years with limited ability to 
speak English.
    These children arrive at schools often with little or no 
prior formal schooling. Twelve percent of limited English 
proficient (LEP) students in middle school and 20% in high 
school have missed more than 2 years of schooling since age 6. 
Over 1 in 5 may have limited skills in their own native 
language.
    The bill would deny grants to more than 100 school 
districts and instructional services to 143,000 limited English 
proficient students who desperately need to learn English. The 
affected school districts would primarily be smaller districts 
with little prior experience serving limited English proficient 
students. More than 130 school districts and institutions of 
higher education would not receive professional development 
grants, further aggravating the already critical shortage of 
trained bilingual and English as a second language teachers.
    GEAR UP. The bill freezes funding for GEAR UP at $200 
million, a cut of $125 million or 38% below the President's 
request. At this funding level, more than 644,000 low-income 
middle and high school students would be denied early college 
preparation and awareness activities designed to ensure they 
are prepared for and pursue postsecondary education. These 
students would be denied the benefits of systemic academic 
reforms and the linking of early intervention to college 
scholarships, which are benefits unique to GEAR UP. In 
addition, these students would be denied comprehensive support 
services including mentoring, tutoring, academic and career 
counseling, exposure to college campuses, and financial aid 
information.
    The bill would deny new grants to 6 States and 75 
partnerships of high poverty middle and high schools, colleges, 
and community organizations. In the 1999 competition, although 
more than 670 applications were received from 41 States and 1 
out of 5 colleges in the Nation, the Department of Education 
was able to fund only 21 States and 1 out of 4 partnerships. 
The bill also would prevent existing partnerships from adding 
new cohorts of low-income 7th grade students. Partnerships 
would be denied funds to reach out to these students in the 
early grades and would be forced to provide services only to 
existing cohorts of students in later grades.
    Community-based Technology Centers. The bill provides $32.5 
million for Community-based Technology Centers, a decrease of 
$67.5 million or 67.5% below the President's request for $100 
million. At this level, an additional 700 new centers in 
280communities would not be funded.
    The Department of Commerce's 1999 report Falling through 
the Net: Defining the Digital Divide, found that, although the 
number of Americans connected to the Nation's information 
infrastructure is soaring, a digital divide still exists, and, 
in many cases, is actually widening over time. Minorities, low-
income persons, the less educated, and children of single-
parent households, particularly when they reside in rural areas 
or central cities, are among the groups that lack access to 
information resources. Establishing and supporting community 
access centers, among other steps, would help ensure that all 
Americans can access new technologies. This bill fails to 
provide that additional help.
    Tech Prep. The bill also freezes funding for Tech-Prep 
Education at $106 million, a cut of $200 million, or 65%, below 
the President's request. Tech-Prep is making a critical 
contribution to the new vision for vocational education, by 
helping prepare students in high-tech career fields that 
promise high-skill, high-wage jobs. Tech Prep is designed to 
incorporate the same academic content as college prep 
curriculum, and it provides internships that link classroom 
work to experiences outside the classroom. Tech-Prep has 
contributed to reduced student dropout rates, higher test 
scores, increased enrollments in post-secondary education, and 
high employer satisfaction. Without additional funding, States 
cannot expand the number of Tech-Prep consortia, and they will 
be denied the additional resources they need to improve 
connections to 4-year post-secondary institutions and courses 
of study, make effective use of educational technology and 
distance learning, and integrate work-based learning 
opportunities into local Tech-Prep programs.
    Leveraging Educational Assistance Program (LEAP). The bill 
eliminates funding for LEAP, a cut of $40 million below last 
year and the President's request. This would result in a cut of 
at least $90 million in aid available to needy students, and 
one of the primary means of securing additional State funding 
for need-based grant programs. LEAP is designed to encourage 
individual states to create and sustain need-based aid 
programs. LEAP leverages State funding by providing a one-for-
one match of Federal dollars for State dollars. Due to LEAP 
maintenance of effort provisions, even a minimum Federal 
investment requires States to maintain funding support for 
their need-based programs. The elimination of the Federal 
funding would allow States to reduce or eliminate funding for 
these programs.
    Dual Degree Programs for Minority-Serving Institutions. The 
bill rejects the President's request of $40 million for a new 
initiative to help students at Hispanic-Serving Institutions, 
Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Tribally 
Controlled Colleges and Universities to earn dual degrees in 
five years. Participants would earn one degree from their home 
institution, and the other from a partner institution. Funds 
would help establish consortia, provide scholarships to 
students, and compensate the minority-serving institutions for 
tuition revenue losses.
    Learning Anytime Anywhere Partnerships. The bill includes 
only $10 million for Learning Anytime Anywhere Partnerships, a 
cut of $20 million or 67% below the President's request of $30 
million. This program supports access to quality post-secondary 
education for underserved individuals through the use of 
technology. The bill would eliminate funding for 45 new 
partnership awards as well as reduce the average size of 
continuation projects that improve technology-based learning 
opportunities for the disabled, dislocated workers, those 
making the transition from welfare to work, and others who do 
not have easy access to traditional campus-based post-secondary 
education.
    Recognition and Reward Grants. The bill rejects the 
President's request of $50 million for a new Recognition and 
Reward program that would give grants to States that (1) 
demonstrate significant statewide gains in student achievement, 
and (2) reduce the achievement gap between high- and low-
performing students as measured by the National Assessment of 
Educational Progress.
    OPTIONS. The bill rejects the President's request of $20 
million for a new program, Opportunities to Improve our 
Nation's Schools (OPTIONS), which would support 40 grants to 
States and school districts to implement and test new 
approaches to public school choice, including inter-district 
programs and public schools at work sites and on college 
campuses.
    Research, Development and Dissemination. The bill includes 
$169 million for education research, development and 
dissemination, a cut of $30 million or 15% below the 
President's request of $199 million. Investments in education 
research and development create a knowledge base for future 
improvements in educational practice. At a time when educators 
are looking toward the most effective and proven methods to 
raise student achievement, it is pennywise and pound foolish to 
reduce funding aimed at increasing our understanding of what 
works and designing more effective practices for schools and 
classrooms.
    This bill would cut support for critical research 
activities, including interagency initiatives with NICHD and 
NSF, designed to provide high quality, research based 
information to improve student learning in reading, math, 
science and identify the critical factors that lead to English-
language literacy for students whose first language is Spanish.
    Research on Disabilities and Rehabilitation for Individuals 
with Disabilities. The bill denies $14 million of the 
President's request of $100 million for the National Institute 
on Disability and Rehabilitation Research (NIDRR). NIDRR plays 
an important role in generating new knowledge and applications 
to maximize the full inclusion and integration into society and 
employment individuals of all ages with disabilities. The 
increase of $14 million in the request would have been used to 
help schools evaluation and procure education technology for 
children with disabilities, and to accelerate the use of 
technology by disabled individuals in the workplace and in 
their communities to facilitate independent living. NIDRR will 
not be able to undertake these worthwhile projects with the 
constrained funding in the bill.

1999 Audit of the Department of Education's Financial Statements

    This bill takes punitive action against the Department of 
Education by taking away limited authority to transfer funds 
across accounts because of the results of the 1999 audit of the 
Department of Education's financial statements. The Department 
of Education, like all federal agencies, must have an 
independent audit of its financial statements each year. 
Relatively few federal agencies have been able to achieve an 
unqualified or ``clean'' audit each year--the best possible 
audit outcome.
    In 1997, the Department received such a clean audit. In 
1998, the Department received a disclaimer of opinion by Ernst 
and Young on its audit largely because the Department was 
bringing a new accounting system on line--the old accounting 
system had to be replaced because the contractor stopped 
supporting the system.
    The Majority's action is punitive because the Department's 
1999 audit actually showed improvement over the previous year, 
according to testimony presented by the Department of Education 
Inspector General before the Labor-HHS-Education Subcommittee.
    The Department of Education achieved the 1999 audit 
deadline by completing the financial statement process almost 
eight months ahead of last year. While the Department did not 
get a clean opinion on the 1999 financial statements, it showed 
improvement by moving to a qualified opinion on four of the 
five required statements. Further improvement is likely in 
2000, because the Department has taken corrective actions in 
many areas.
     Out of 139 recommendations for improvement made in 
the annual audits of the Department's financial statements, 
final actions on 72, or 52%, have now been completed including 
45 since December, 1999. More corrective actions are planned to 
get at long-standing weaknesses in financial management and 
student financial aid administration.
     Consultants from the Treasury Department and 
private accounting firms have been retained to provide staff 
training and augment existing resources in addressing short-
term issues.
     Regular reconciliation of the Department's cash 
accounts with Treasury has been greatly improved. A new 
automated system has eliminated over 90% of the manual matching 
effort and allows ED to reconcile faster and more effectively.
     Education has awarded a contract to implement a 
new Department-wide general ledger system that will make it 
easier to produce accurate and timely financial statements by 
integrating data from a variety of other systems. An interim 
process will automate the production of all statements for 
2000.
    One reason why the Department of Education has not made 
faster progress is that the Majority has insisted on cutting 
its program administration budget requests that would have 
provided the Department with additional funds to improve its 
financial systems. Last year, the FY2000 Labor-HHS-Education 
Appropriations bill produced by the Majority would have cut the 
Department's program management funds by $24 million. The final 
reduction was $3 million only after Democrats and the White 
House insisted that funds be restored. Again, this year, the 
Majority has included a cut of $30 million from the President's 
request of $413 million for Departmental management. Such cuts 
will only slow the Department's efforts to improve its 
accounting systems.

                                 LABOR


Problem #6: The Need to Invest in a Skilled Workforce

    The Majority states at the beginning of this Committee 
report that job training programs are reduced in response to 
the strong economy and low unemployment. Their approach could 
not be more misguided.
    It is true that the unemployment rate is at 3.9%--its 
lowest level in 30 years--and that over 21 million new jobs 
have been created since 1993. Yet many Americans are being left 
behind in this economy, and the fact that all are not well 
trained is obvious to every employer in the country.
    Now is precisely the time to invest in skills training that 
our workers need to compete and succeed. Businesses are so 
desperate for skilled workers that they are seeking an increase 
in the H1B visa program to bring in more foreign workers for 
good paying jobs that Americans could hold. The workers we need 
to keep our economy growing are right here--in our cities and 
in our rural areas. They simply need us to invest in the skills 
they need to compete and succeed in the 21st Century economy. 
The lack of skilled workers has even lead to wage inflation 
that recently prompted the Federal Reserve Board to raise 
interest rates by half a percentage point in order to slow down 
economy.
    In commenting on the skills shortage, Federal Reserve Board 
Chairman Alan Greenspan, has said:

          The rapidity of innovation and the unpredictability 
        of the directions it may take imply a need for 
        considerable investment in human capital. Workers in 
        many occupations are being asked to strengthen their 
        cognitive skills; basic credentials, by themselves, are 
        not enough to ensure success in the workplace. Workers 
        must be equipped not simply with technical know-how but 
        also with the ability to create, analyze, and transform 
        information and to interact effectively with others. 
        Moreover, that learning will increasingly be a lifelong 
        activity.
          (And) . . . it is not enough to create a job market 
        that has enabled those with few skills to finally be 
        able to grasp the first rung of the ladder of 
        achievement. More generally, we must ensure that our 
        whole population receives an education that will allow 
        full and continuing participation in this dynamic 
        period of American economic history.

    Economist Robert Kuttner added, ``. . . what's holding back 
even faster economic growth is the low skill level of millions 
of potential work.''
    Our strong economy also gives us the rare opportunity to 
bring skills and jobs to individuals and communities that have 
been left behind for too long. The demand for skilled workers 
means that millions of Americans in the untapped pools of 
potential--young people who have dropped out of school, ex-
offenders, displaced workers, individuals with disabilities, 
veterans and people who were on welfare--have a chance to join 
to get and keep good, family-supporting jobs. But only if we 
use this opportunity to provide them the skills and 
opportunities needed to gain a foothold in the new economy.
     In April 2000, there existed 13 million untapped 
and underutilized Americans: 5.2 million who are unemployed, 
4.4 million who are out of the labor force but want to work, 
and 3.0 million who work part-time, but want full-time work.
     The unemployment rate for teenagers was 12.7% in 
April 2000. The unemployment rate for black teenage men was 
22.0% and the unemployment rate for black teenage women was 
22.4%.
     Last October, 37.0% of the High School Graduate 
Class of 1999 did not enroll in college. Their unemployment 
rate was 17.5%.
     The unemployment rate for those who dropped out of 
high school between October 1998 and October 1999 was 26.1%.
     The labor force activity of persons with a severe 
disability ranges from a low of 17.3% for those with less than 
a high school degree to 52.4% for college graduates. Comparable 
labor force activity for persons with no disability ranges from 
75.2% to 90.0%.
     In March 2000, there were 22 metropolitan areas 
with unemployment rates in excess of 7%. One-half of these 
areas were in California.
    Even in today's prosperity, American workers are not immune 
to the effects of structural change ushered in by technological 
advancements or globalization. In 1999, 33% of workers surveyed 
were frequently concerned about being laid off. This figure 
exceeds comparable figures of 17% and 21% in 1979 and 1989 at 
similar points in the business cycle and even exceeds the rate 
during the 1981-1982 recession. Their fears are not unfounded. 
Despite the strong economy, 2 million American workers were 
laid off from their jobs last year.
    It is also sad that less than two years after the President 
signed the bipartisan Workforce Investment Act, the House 
Appropriations Committee has chosen to make deep cuts in the 
very system that businesses said they want in order to get the 
workers they so desperately need. For example, under this new 
system, Congress envisioned one-stop career centers as the 
cornerstone of the new workforce system, yet the House 
Committee has eliminated funding for the centers and the 
quality information needed by job seekers, and has made deep 
cuts in the programs that provide the services at these 
centers. Again, it makes no sense to gut this critical new 
system on the eve of its implementation.
    It is also ironic that on the same day that the House 
passed the China Permanent Normal Trade Relations bill, and 
debated the potential loss of American jobs, the House 
Appropriations Committee was meeting to gut the President's 
universal reemployment initiative which would help to ensure 
that any dislocated worker who wants and needs retraining can 
get it, and rejected the President's expansion to raise 
international labor standards that will protect American 
workers.

Cuts the President's Universal Reemployment Initiative

    The House bill not only ignores the $275 million requested 
increase for the second year of the five year plan to provide 
universal re-employment services to all Americans, but cuts 
$593 million (30%) below the President's request, and a 19% cut 
below the FY 2000 level. As part of the initiative, the House 
bill:
     Eliminates all funding for the One-Stop Career 
Center/America's Labor Market Information System. The House 
bill eliminates the existing $110 million investment in the 
One-Stop Career Center system, undermining the foundation of 
the new workforce investment system, intended to ensure access 
to the information and services of One-Stop Career Centers, for 
all Americans. The House bill also ignores the President's FY 
2001 $44 million enhancement designed to improve access to 
these services for millions of Americans, through improvements 
in America 's Job Bank, mobile vans for one-stop access to 
rural areas, a toll-free 1-800 number for the workforce 
investment system, and improvements in basic labor market 
information. The One-Stop system is also the system that 
provides job assistance services to veterans and individuals 
with disabilities, and these essential initiatives will be 
impacted by the de-funding of this national One-Stop system.
     Cuts assistance to 215,800 dislocated workers. The 
House bill cuts the dislocated worker program by $207 million 
below 2000, and $389 million below the Request. The House bill 
means that 215,800 fewer dislocated workers will be served 
compared to the President, and 68,500 fewer than FY 2000, 
reversing investments that Congress has made over the past four 
years. For employers, this means more difficulty in finding 
skilled workers for vacant positions. For dislocated workers, 
this cut means even fewer of the 3.3 million dislocated each 
year will be able to get the skills they need to compete and 
succeed in the 21st century economy. The House bill rejects the 
President's goal of providing every dislocated worker who needs 
and wants reemployment services and training by 2004.
     Eliminates assistance for 222,200 unemployment 
insurance claimants. In addition to cuts in the Dislocated 
Worker program, the bill zeros out the President's $50 million 
Reemployment Services component which means anestimated 222,200 
unemployment insurance claimants will not be able to get the customized 
re-employment services they need to speed their reentry into 
employment.
    In addition to the re-employment initiative, the House bill 
cuts other investments aimed at succeeding in getting employers 
the workers they need and getting employees the skills they 
need in the 21st Century economy:
     Cuts Adult job training for 37,200 adults. The 
House cuts adult employment and training services by $93 
million, or 10%, below the request and 2000 levels. This 
reduction undermines Congress's commitment through the 
Workforce Investment Act to provide universal access to 
employment-related information and services.
     Eliminates the President's proposal to assist 
80,000 non-custodial parents and low-income parents. The House 
bill zeros out the President's $255 million initiative building 
on the Welfare-to-Work program, which promotes responsible 
fatherhood and supports working families. These grants are 
aimed at helping noncustodial fathers get a job and pay child 
support, and to help low income parents upgrade their skills so 
they can move up career ladders into family-supporting jobs.
     Eliminates the President's proposal to assist 
20,000 Incumbent Workers. The bill zeros out the President's 
$30 million initiative to address major job losses in the 
manufacturing industry where one half million jobs have been 
lost since March, 1998.
     Cuts employment assistance to 3,100 homeless 
veterans. There are an estimated one-quarter of a million 
homeless veterans, yet the House mark provides only $9.6 
million for job assistance to homeless veterans, a reduction of 
$5 million below the President's request. This reduction means 
that 3,100 fewer homeless veterans will obtain meaningful 
employment with the economic security and independence that go 
along with a job.
     Eliminates the President's proposal to establish a 
new Office of Disability Policy aimed at providing leadership 
in helping people with disabilities enter, re-enter, and remain 
in the workforce. At a time when the economy is booming, 
America cannot afford to waste the talents of millions of 
individuals with disabilities. Currently, people with moderate 
disabilities are nearly twice as likely to be looking for work 
or on layoff as persons without disability, and those with 
severe disabilities were nearly three times as likely.
     Cuts unemployment insurance administrative costs 
to levels that could delay payments to workers trying to 
reconnect with the workforce. The House bill cuts funding for 
state operations of the unemployment insurance system by $93 
million or almost 4% below the request. Administration of State 
UI programs require an infrastructure to support the many 
complex activities necessary to process and pay the estimated 2 
million UI weekly claims. This program is a vital part of 
America's commitment to workers who lose their jobs through no 
fault of their own.
     Rejects Improving National Economic Indicators. 
The House bill cuts $14 million from the President's request 
for the Bureau of Labor Statistics, which is responsible for 
the production of some of the Nation 's most sensitive and 
important economic data series. With an increase of less than 
half of what is needed to cover inflation, cuts in current 
statistical programs will have to be made. In addition, BLS 
will not be able to implement the President's proposed 
enhancements to expand price, output and productivity measures 
for service industries, improve local and state employment and 
unemployment projections, and conduct a new time use survey 
about how Americans spend their time in market and non-market 
activities. Economic statistics produced by BLS are closely 
followed by business, labor, and government. In addition, 
millions of in-school youth, young workers, and other entering 
the labor market seeking statistical information from BLS about 
future employment growth and job opportunities.

Cuts investments in at-risk youth

    Although the Nation's unemployment rate has fallen from 
7.3% in 1993 to 3.9%, many teenagers have not been able to 
seize the opportunities of our strong economy. Teens faced an 
unemployment rate of 13.8% while African American teens faced a 
rate of 27.5%. Large cities face high youth unemployment rates. 
For example, using the most recent data available, Los Angeles 
has rates of over 15%, Baltimore exceeds 26%, and Philadelphia 
central city experiences youth unemployment rates of 31%. The 
Department of Labor has developed effective programs to help 
disadvantaged youth find jobs and get the critical first 
foothold in the world of work.
    In addition to facing dramatically high levels of 
unemployment, too many of our young people have found 
themselves in the court-house instead of the workplace. One-
half of black male high school dropouts under age 25 and three-
quarters of black male high school dropouts ages 25 to 34 are 
under some form of criminal justice supervision.
    Youth that do not share in our prosperity further foster 
pockets of poverty. Widespread joblessness among young males is 
the principle underlying cause of a variety of our inner 
cities' worst problems, including poverty, crime, youth gangs, 
welfare dependency, illegal drugs and the breakdown of the two-
parent family. Every time a youth fails to complete high 
school, the government and society bear huge costs. Each year 
the U.S. spends roughly $20 billion for income maintenance, 
health care, and nutrition to support families begun by 
teenagers. In addition, one estimate suggests that crime costs 
society about 2% of national income, or about $130 billion per 
year.
    Many youth in employment programs have never worked before. 
Many of these youth, including youth with disabilities, come 
from families with no strong attachment to the labor force and 
from neighborhoods where poverty, unemployment, and crime are 
widespread. Youth employment programs teach participants 
valuable work skills andhabits, and instill a positive work 
ethic. Because these young people are at a critical time in their 
lives, such programs offer them a valuable experience to develop 
responsible behavior.
    The Administration has made an array of strategic 
investments in youth initiatives to insure that they are 
prepared for the jobs of the 21st Century and can share in the 
benefits of our growing economy. However, the House bill cuts 
$322 million out of the President's request for youth programs, 
serving 72,000 fewer at-risk youth. Compared to the FY 2000 
level, the House cuts a net $75 million, serving 34,000 fewer 
youth. As a result, efforts to insure that today's youth have 
21st Century skills for 21st Century jobs and can compete 
successfully in the growing economy will be thwarted.
     Slashes the Youth Opportunities Initiative by over 
50%. Congress provided funds for the first 2 years of a 5-year 
commitment by the President to increase the long-term 
employment and educational attainment of youth living in 36 of 
the Nation's poorest urban neighborhoods and rural areas. The 
House bill cuts $200 million out of the President's $375 
million request, eliminating the proposed expansion to 20 new 
communities and reducing third year grants to the existing 36 
communities by $75 million--a 30% cut. This will deny 40,000 of 
some of the most disadvantaged youth a bridge to the skills and 
opportunities of our strong economy and alternatives to welfare 
and crime-including 15,000 youth in the existing projects. The 
demand for these funds is high--over 160 communities sought 
these limited resources and developed the broad partnerships 
and comprehensive plans as part of last year's grant process. 
These deserving communities and their young people will not get 
a second chance.
     Cuts summer jobs and year-round training for 
12,575 disadvantaged youth. For Youth Activities (the program 
that combines Summer Jobs and Year-Round Youth), the House bill 
provides only $1,001 million, a decrease of $21 million, or 2% 
below the President's request level. This action reduces the 
estimated number of low income youth for FY 2001 in this 
program by 12,575 below the request. In light of the 
difficulties communities are experiencing this summer due to 
the structural changes in the program required by the Workforce 
Investment Act, the impacts on next summer's program will be 
even more severe. Congress should be increasing rather than 
decreasing funding for this important program which provides 
the first work experience for many at-risk youth, offering an 
important first step that can lead to a life of self-
sufficiency and independence. Over half of these jobs go to 14-
15 year olds who generally are not employed by the private 
sector.
     Eliminates funding for the President's proposed 
reintegration services for 19,000 young offenders. The House 
bill zeros out the President's $75 million initiative to bring 
young offenders into the workplace through job training, 
placement, and support services, and by creating new 
partnerships between the criminal justice system and the WIA 
workforce development system. With the approximately 500,000 
people leaving prison each year, the Nation needs to provide 
positive alternatives and opportunities for employment of these 
individuals, which will also strengthen the future of our 
communities. With the strong economy, this is an excellent time 
to address their re-entry into the job market. Raising their 
employment rates can decrease recidivism, reduce long-term 
costs to society, and increase the pool of available workers.
     Rejects expansion of the Safe Schools/Healthy 
Students Initiative. The House zeros out the President's 
request to provide $40 million to enable DOL to join the 
existing DOJ, ED, HHS partnership in supporting community-wide 
programs to prevent youth violence and drug abuse, and to 
expand the effort to address out-of-school youth. Without these 
funds, no new communities can join this very successful effort.
    DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: Democrats offered an amendment that 
would have added $1.25 billion to restore the President's 
budget request for most of these job training programs and 
provide a $254 million increase over 2000 for the Summer Jobs 
program. The Democratic amendment would have added resources to 
train and assist over 700,000 individuals, but it was rejected 
by the Majority 19-30. (Jackson amendment, Roll Number 8 
located in this report immediately preceding the table). The 
amendment would have restored:
     $154 million for One-Stop Career Centers to 
provide efficient, comprehensive workforce development services 
for workers and employers in centers, by phone and over the 
Internet.
     $254 million to restore cuts in the Summer Jobs 
program resulting from implementation of the Workforce 
Investment Act.
     $389 million for Dislocated Worker Assistance to 
sustain the Administration's goal of reaching every dislocated 
worker with reemployment services and training.
     $200 million for Youth Opportunity grants to 
increase long-term employment of youth in high need areas.
     $50 million to provide Unemployment Insurance 
claimants assessment, referral, placement and other services to 
speed their return to the workplace and reduce the length of 
unemployment insurance claims.
     $93 million for Adult Job Training to develop the 
skills of American workers.
     $30 million for Incumbent Workers to partner with 
states to upgrade the skills of unemployed and low-wage workers 
displaced by an evolving economy.
     $5 million for Homeless Veterans to ensure this 
population receives the supportive services they need to 
reenter the job market.
     $14 million for the Disability Initiative to help 
eliminate barriers disabled workers face in maintaining 
employment.
     $61 million for the Reintegration of young 
offenders to help these youth find productive employment in the 
mainstream economy.

Problem #7: The Need To Protect Workers

    The House bill cuts worker protection programs at the 
Department of Labor by $190 million (-14%) below the request. 
By freezing most worker protection agencies at the FY 2000 
level, the House bill would reduce Department of Labor worker 
protection programs by $190 million from the President's FY 
2001 request, or 14%. Of this reduction-about half of it is in 
the Department's worker protection agencies, and the other half 
is in the international labor protection initiatives. A freeze 
at last year's level will result in a 4% reduction in the level 
of services provided this year. This will result in a cut of 
approximately 212 worker protection staff below current levels 
and 433 staff below the President's request. At a time when 
national efforts to reduce workplace injuries and illnesses are 
working well, the impact of operating under these curtailed 
levels would disrupt the programs designed to improve the 
safety and health of workers and their benefits, as well as 
efforts Congress has sought to encourage efforts to assist 
employers comply with workplace laws and regulations.
     OSHA is hit with a cut of 12% below the 
President's request, 4% below last year's level of effort. 
Despite gains in workplace safety, there are still more than 6 
million job-related injuries and illnesses each year, and over 
6,000 fatalities. With only 2,200 inspectors nationwide, and 
more than 7 million worksites, the average worksite is 
inspected every 109 years. Even among the 12,500 most dangerous 
non-construction worksites, OSHA only has resources to inspect 
3,000. Yet the bill eliminates OSHA's request for additional 
resources for enforcement and enhanced compliance assistance 
for employers, including expansion of the state consultation 
grants which provide free consultation visits to small 
businesses. This will cut approximately 1,000 inspections of 
serious workplace hazards, fatal worksite accidents, and 
targeted inspections of high-hazard workplaces.
     Rider blocks ergonomics rule that would prevent 
300,000 injuries per year. Despite a previous commitment to 
never delay the ergonomics regulation after FY 1998, the 
Majority on the Committee agreed to the Northup amendment 32-22 
(rollcall number 4, located in this report immediately 
preceding the table) Section 103 of the House bill prohibits 
OSHA from promulgating, issuing, implementing, administering or 
enforcing a temporary or final ergonomics regulation. This is a 
rulemaking begun by the Bush Administration in 1992.
    Each year, 1.8 million U.S. workers experience a work-
related musculoskeletal disorder, such as injuries from 
overexertion or repetitive motion. About \1/3\ of these 
injuries, or over 600,000 incidents, are serious enough to 
require time off from work, and cost businesses $15-$20 billion 
in workers comp. According to BLS, 34% of all lost workday 
injuries are related to ergonomic injuries.
    The Department of Labor estimates that the ergonomics rule 
would prevent about 300,000 injuries per year, and save $9 
billion in workers comp and related costs. About one-third of 
general industry worksites would be covered by the rule, 
protecting 27 million workers. Fewer than 30% of general 
industry employers currently have effective ergonomics 
programs.
    The Majority has attempted to block this rule in almost 
every year since the Republicans took control of Congress in 
1995. There were limitation riders on the Labor HHS bill 1995, 
1996, and 1998 to stop the regulation. The 1997 rider was 
stricken from the House Committee bill by Floor amendment.
    In FY 1998, in return for a rider that year, the Majority 
agreed to House report language that stated, ``The Committee 
will refrain from any further restrictions with regard to the 
development, promulgation or issuance of an ergonomic standard 
following fiscal year 1998.'' (House Report 105-205, p. 24) 
This agreement is still binding, but the Northup amendment in 
this bill breaks that agreement.
    In 1999 there was no rider, but a National Academy of 
Sciences study was funded with the clear understanding that it 
would not be used to justify a delay. As part of that 
appropriations agreement, the Chairman and Ranking Member of 
the House Appropriations Committee sent a letter to the 
Secretary of Labor on October 19, 1998 that stated by funding 
the National Academy of Sciences study on ergonomics, ``it is 
in no way our intent to block or delay issuance by OSHA of a 
proposed rule on ergonomics''. Despite that agreement, last 
summer, the House passed the H.R. 987 which would have had the 
effect of forcing OSHA to wait another two years for completion 
of a second, unnecessary National Academy of Sciences study.
    Therefore, five years of Congressional interference in this 
regulation has cost business billions of dollars and allowed 
hundreds of thousands of painful and disabling injuries that 
could have been prevented.
    Another National Academy of Sciences study is unlikely to 
dispute the findings of all the previous research. The National 
Institute of Occupational Safety and Health evaluated 600 
studies in 1997, and 27 peer reviewers confirmed the NIOSH 
finding linking physical stress on the job to ergonomic 
injuries. TheNational Academy of Science concluded in 1998 
that: (1) ergonomic injuries are directly related to work; (2) higher 
on the job physical stress leads to more ergonomic injuries; (3) most 
people face their greatest exposure to physical stress at work; and (4) 
interventions that reduce physical stress on the job reduce the risk of 
injury. Finally OSHA has included 1,400 studies in the ergonomics 
rulemaking record.
    The ergonomics rulemaking has been an 8-year effort. More 
than 1,000 witnesses have testified, 7,000 written comments 
have been submitted, and the post-hearing comment period has 
just begun. OSHA should be allowed to consider all the evidence 
and construct a final rule based on the record. In the interest 
of protecting millions of workers from debilitating injuries, 
it is time for Congress to let the rulemaking conclude.
     Cuts pension and health care plan protections. The 
House bill rejects the President's proposed $9 million increase 
for the Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration, targeted 
to protect the rights and benefits of participants when an 
employee benefit plan is in jeopardy. These cuts will mean 
25,000 requests for assistance will go unanswered, and $64 
million will not be restored to employee benefit plan assets. 
The Department of Labor protects the pension and health 
benefits of over 150 million individuals who participate in 
ERISA covered plans, holding more than $4.3 trillion in assets.
     Denies expansion of domestic child labor efforts. 
The House bill denies the President's requested increase of $11 
million for Wage and Hour, which included expanded efforts to 
address sweatshops in the garment industry and domestic child 
labor abuses.
     Denies information technology investment of $54 
million, needed to enhance the Department's ability to 
implement its worker protection responsibilities and expand its 
Internet capacity to better serve employers and the public.
     Denies investment in occupational health and 
safety research. The National Institute on Occupational Safety 
and Health at CDC has developed an outstanding agenda for 
critically needed research investments in occupational safety 
and health based on broad stakeholder input. However, support 
for the National Occupational Research Agenda has lagged well 
behind the scientific community's capacity to address priority 
areas, with success rates for extramural grants far below those 
of NIH. Despite a professional judgement budget that an 
additional $40 million could be well used immediately by 
researchers, the House bill freezes funding for NIOSH.
     Cuts NLRB $11 million below the President's 
request. The bill freezes NLRB, and will curtail efforts to 
rebuild the agency after five years of budget cuts. This 
amounts to a 4% cut in real terms, requiring a reduction of 80 
FTE's below current levels, and delaying in cases involving 
unfair labor practices and union representation.
     Denies enhancement of several international labor 
activities to improve working conditions in developing 
countries around the world.
     International Child Labor Efforts Stalled. The 
House bill stops the momentum created by the recent 
International Labor Organization convention to ban the worst 
forms of child labor, which was agreed to by 175 countries, 
supported by Congress and signed by the President in December. 
According to the ILO, there are about 250 million children 
between the ages 5 and 14 who are working in developing nations 
with approximately half of them working full time but not going 
to school. The President wants to expand the successful efforts 
of the ILO, Department of Labor and USAID to develop education 
infrastructure, increase public awareness, and build data and 
monitoring systems to take kids out of factories and put them 
in schools. To move closer to making global abolition of the 
worst forms of child labor a reality, the President called for 
a comprehensive initiative on international child labor, but 
the bill denies the entire $70 million increase to implement 
it.
     Core Labor Standards Stalled. The House bill also 
rejects the proposed expansion of $10 million to provide 
technical assistance to developing countries who are committed 
to improving workplace safety, strengthening collective 
bargaining, preventing discrimination against women in the 
workplace, and other basic worker rights. It is also directly 
in our interest to foster these efforts that will help level 
the playing field so that American businesses are not at a 
competitive disadvantage in the global marketplace because they 
are providing their workers decent wages and benefits.
     Eliminates New Global HIV/AIDS Initiative. The 
bill also eliminates $10 million requested by the President to 
help Sub Saharan African countries deal with the devastation of 
HIV/AIDS. More than 12 million have already died from AIDS in 
these countries, and another 22 million are living with the 
disease. AIDS infection rates are as high as 10-20% of the 
entire population in some of these countries, and many people 
who don't know they are infected are spreading the disease. 
Since many, if not most, individuals don't go to doctors, this 
approach would reach workers with a public health education and 
prevention message through their employers and unions where 
they have daily contact.
    DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: Democrats offered an amendment to add 
$97 million to restore the President's Budget request for these 
international activities, but it was rejected by the 
Majority23-30. (Obey amendment, Roll Number 11 located in this report 
immediately preceding the table). As mentioned previously, it is ironic 
the Majority on the Committee would deny this funding that has a direct 
impact on protecting U.S. workers from low-wage foreign competition, 
including child labor, on the same day that the House passed the China 
Permanent Normal Trade Relations bill.

                       HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


Problem #8: The Need To Protect the Health and Welfare of Seniors and 
        Vulnerable Populations

    Some of the bill's most serious deficiencies relate to the 
health and welfare of seniors and uninsured working families. 
The Committee Bill pursues a risky strategy of failing to 
invest in the infrastructure the Nation needs to prepare for 
the aging of our population. The 76 million Americans who make 
up the baby boom generation will begin reaching retirement age 
in just eight years. The population of those over the age of 85 
who often present the most urgent needs is expected to grow 33% 
in the next ten years alone. To adequately prepare for the 
aging of our population, we should be making investments now to 
help seniors secure their futures and maintain their 
independence.
    The Committee Bill also cuts critical health programs that 
touch every segment of our society. We rely on access to health 
care for ourselves and our families, critical treatment 
services during times of crisis, and advancements in prevention 
and treatment in the battle against disease. The bill reported 
by the Majority makes inadequate investments in health care 
access, mental health and substance abuse treatment, and 
biomedical research that threaten to hamper our productivity 
and drive up health care costs in the long term.
    At a time when the number of uninsured continues to drive 
upward, we are faced with a bill that cuts health services for 
uninsured workers. At a time when over half of all high school 
seniors are still using illicit drugs, we have a bill that cuts 
support for substance abuse prevention and treatment. Advances 
in biomedical research and the exploration of the human genome 
are showing promise to unlock the mysteries of the most dreaded 
diseases. And yet, the bill fails to maintain a path of 
investment needed to ensure that promise is translated into 
medical breakthroughs and advances in treatments.

Eliminates the Nursing Home Initiative

    The bill eliminates $36 million, or 95% of the funding, in 
the Health Care Financing Administration's budget for the 
Nursing Home Initiative to improve the quality of care, 
primarily through state survey and certification reviews.
    Almost weekly, poor conditions are uncovered in nursing 
homes across the country. Just last summer a GAO report found 
that one in four of all nursing homes have ``serious 
deficiencies that harm residents or place them at risk of death 
or serious injury.'' This report also found that out of a 
sample of 107 poor performing nursing homes that have been 
cited for patterns of actual harm to one or more residents 
that:
           23% failed to prevent or treat pressure 
        sores;
           14% failed to prevent accidents;
           8% failed to ensure adequate nutrition;
           6% failed to provide acceptable quality of 
        care; and
           4% failed to prevent mistreatment, neglect 
        or abuse.
    The GAO report also found that two-thirds of the 107 homes 
surveyed had been cited for repeat violations and their 
findings ``suggest that HCFA's enhanced enforcement of homes 
found to repeat these serious care problems has merit.'' An 
example of a ``serious deficiency'' or G-level deficiency where 
harm was done to a resident cited in the report was:

          The nursing home failed to provide supervision and 
        assistance to prevent accidents for 14 residents. Six 
        residents hit other residents, two left the building 
        without the staff's knowledge, and eight were found on 
        the floor of their rooms from falls of unknown origin. 
        Four residents sustained multiple falls, and one other 
        resident sustained a broken hip.

    Furthermore, HCFA reported that ``a recent survey of 
seriously ill hospitalized adults'' found that 37% ``were 
unwilling to live permanently in a nursing home; (and) 
alarmingly, 30% indicated that they would `rather die.' '' 
Despite, these findings, this bill eliminates $37.8 million for 
improving conditions for our nation's elderly and disabled 
nursing home residents--institutions that will house 
approximately 43% of American seniors over 65 at sometime 
before they die, according to the Agency for Healthcare 
Research and Quality.
    The Administration has recognized the importance of 
improving nursing home conditions, and starting in 1995 began 
enforcing tough regulations designed to meet this goal. In 
1998, the President's Nursing Home Initiative was launched to 
increase the quality of care for nursing home residents. With 
funding from this initiative, HCFA has been able to begin to 
turn the tide on negative conditions and make some marked 
improvements.
    While the President's initiative is designed to help curb 
poor nursing home conditions, loss of funding for this 
initiative will hinder progress that is beginning to be made to 
improve the living conditions and medical care received by 
residents. Critical funding is being curtailed which could be 
used to help states improve their nursing home inspections, 
punish homes that repeatedly violate the rules, publish ratings 
on the quality of nursing homes on the internet, and increase 
the quality of care received by residents.
    Since the nursing home initiative has been underway, HCFA 
has been able to establish new protocols for nursing home 
surveys to address problems with dehydration, nutrition, and 
pressure sores; identify facilities that require more frequent 
inspections and monitoring based upon the outcomes of annual 
inspections; work with the states on avariety of efforts 
including training on use of quality indicators during surveys, and 
require states to conduct surveys during off-hours. HCFA, for instance, 
is stepping up its effort to meet their goal of having 10% of nursing 
home surveys done off-hours (weekends & evenings) in order to a gain a 
more complete picture of nursing home conditions. HCFA has seen an 
increase in off-hour surveys up from 4.1% in the 3rd quarter of 1999 to 
8.6% in the 4th quarter of 1999. Funding cuts however, will severely 
impede the progress they have made to ensure nursing homes are safe, 
high quality care facilities for their residents.

Cuts the Medicare Integrity Program

    The bill makes a number of cuts that harm the 
Administration's efforts to protect the integrity of the 
Medicare program. The bill cuts $50 million from the current 
authorization and appropriation for the Medicare Integrity 
Program under the Health Insurance Portability and 
Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA). This program provides 
essential payment safeguards to prevent and detect fraud, 
waste, and abuse and has produced billions in savings. By 
reducing these important activities, the cut could result in an 
$850 million loss to the Medicare Trust Funds.
    The bill also cuts the Office of the Inspector General's 
(OIG's) by $10 million from the Health Care Fraud and Abuse 
Control (HCFAC) account. This program has been instrumental in 
investigating and bringing to settlement a number of abusive 
health care providers resulting in hundreds of millions of 
dollars to the Trust Funds. The bill also reduces funding for 
Medicare Contractors and Federal Administration under HCFA 
Program Management that will result in the elimination of the 
Administration's new Medicare Contractor Oversight Initiative. 
Under this new initiative, the President's budget funded new 
financial management analysts located at contractors to ensure 
financial integrity. The reduction to the Medicare Contractor 
and Federal Administration budgets will also halt work 
implementing provisions of HIPAA and the Balanced Budget Act of 
1997.

Cuts Social Security administrative expenses

    As the baby boom generation begins to reach retirement age 
in a few years, the Social Security Administration (SSA) must 
be prepared for their arrival. It is critically important that 
SSA have resources to meet this monumental challenge and at the 
same time, maintain superior service for today's beneficiaries.
    The House bill cuts the President's Budget request for 
operating the Social Security Administration by $156 million, 
and this level is $378 million below what the Commissioner's 
believes is needed to appropriately operate the agency. 
According to the Commissioner, this level of funding will 
seriously undermine stable staffing and performance for the 
agency. It will require SSA to leave positions vacant at a time 
when the agency desperately needs to hire and train new 
employees in preparation for its own retirement wave.
    This staffing reduction will mean unavoidable declines in 
service to current Social Security beneficiaries. For the 26 
million individuals who visit SSA offices each year, waiting 
times will increase significantly. About two million calls to 
SSA's 800 number will not get through. In addition, tens of 
thousands fewer claims for disability benefits will be 
processed. Finally, SSA will significantly reduce continued 
eligibility reviews that help ensure the integrity of the 
Supplemental Security Income program. Fewer income reviews 
could result in an increase in general fund outlays by as much 
as $150 million, so the Treasury will lose as much in SSI 
payments alone as this cut attempts to save, but the added 
price will be a significant decline in services to the public.

Eliminates the President's National Family Caregiver Support Program

    The Committee fails to provide $125 million requested by 
the President for a new program supporting the 7 million 
informal caregivers who enable their friends and relatives with 
long term care needs to remain at home. Over 5 million 
Americans, 3 to 4 million seniors, remain in their homes 
because of services provided by caregivers. These services 
would cost between $45 billion and $75 billion annually, if 
provided by home care aides.
    The role of the caregiver is difficult. Half of them are 
over the age of 65, the majority are women, and one third have 
full time jobs. The new National Family Caregiver Support 
Program would provide essential services to approximately 
250,000 families caring for older relatives. These services 
include information on available resources; assistance with 
locating services; caregiver training, counseling and support; 
and respite care to give the caregiver ``time off''. These 
services improve the caregiver's ability to provide care, help 
preserve the family unit, prevent abuse and neglect, and 
minimize out-of-home placements. The House Committee on 
Education and Workforce recently authorized the Caregivers 
Program at the $125 million requested level. However, funding 
for the President's initiative does not require final passage 
of the authorization of the Older Americans Act. States can 
provide services to family caregivers under existing provisions 
of Title III-D of the Older Americans Act.

Eliminates the Community Access Program to improve health care access 
        for uninsured workers

    The Committee eliminates $125 million requested by the 
President to address the growing number of uninsured Americans. 
In 1998, 44.5 million Americans--24.6 million of these working 
people--did not have health insurance. Nearly one in five 
working age adults lack health insurance and half of working 
Americans with incomes less than $20,000 could not pay their 
medical bills last year. This program is designed to increase 
the capacity and effectiveness of the Nation's community health 
care institutions and providers that serve patients regardless 
of their ability to pay. Funds will enable public and private 
entities to assist safety-net providers to develop and expand 
integrated systems of care and address service gaps within such 
integrated systems with a focus on primary care, mental health 
services and substance abuse services. The Committee 
recommendation eliminates grants for up to 20 communities in 
their first year of fundingand denies grants to an additional 
40 to 60 communities. A recently released report of the Institute of 
Medicine found the Nation's health care safety net is in a state of 
crisis and called the first year of the Community Access Program a good 
first step. The IOM concluded increased funding for this program is 
greatly needed.
    DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: Democrats offered an amendment to add 
$661 million to restore the President's request in key seniors 
programs and provide additional assistance to the uninsured. 
The amendment was rejected by the Majority 24-26. (DeLauro 
amendment, Roll Number 10 located in this report immediately 
preceding the table). The amendment would have provided:
     $36 million to restore the Administration's 
Nursing Home Initiative to ensure 1.6 million elderly and 
disabled receive quality nursing care.
     $50 million for the Medicare Integrity Program to 
provide essential oversight of Medicare contractors to detect 
fraud, waste, and abuse. Every $1 invested in the program saves 
$17 in Medicare Trust Funds.
     $125 million for the Family Caregivers initiative 
to provide essential services to caregivers, including 
information on available resources; assistance with locating 
services; caregiver training, counseling and support; and 
respite care.
     $50 million for the Meals on Wheels Program to 
serve additional 75,700 seniors and reduce the waiting lists 
for this basic service among a growing population. The program 
provides vital nutrition to low-income seniors to help them 
stay healthy and remain in their homes and communities.
     $156 million to restore the Social Security 
Administration's request for Administrative expenses to reduce 
waiting times, improve services, and accelerate disability and 
other claims. The amendment would restore the Administration's 
request to ensure the bill does not threaten the economic 
security of our Nation's seniors.
     $119 million increase for Community Health Centers 
to provide affordable care to the uninsured and underinsured. 
The amendment would help Community Health Centers cope with the 
rising numbers of uninsured and the erosion of funding from 
Medicaid and other sources.
     $125 million for Health Care Access for Uninsured 
Workers to strengthen the safety net by helping communities 
develop integrated health systems to improve and expand health 
care services for the uninsured and underinsured.

Other Key Health Programs Cut in This Bill

Eliminates funding to recover Medicare expenses from tobacco companies

    The costs of preventing and treating tobacco-related 
disease exceeds $50 billion per year, and the Department of 
Health and Human Services pays a substantial portion of those 
costs through Medicare, Medicaid, and the Indian Health 
Service.
    Last year, Members of the Majority party lead the efforts 
to insert a rider in the FY 1999 Supplemental Appropriations 
bill to permanently block the Federal government from 
recovering its share of the tobacco settlement funds from the 
states under Medicaid, arguing in part that the Federal 
government should pursue its own litigation. Last September, 
the Justice Department filed suit to recover from tobacco 
companies these costs borne by American taxpayers.
    This litigation will be complex, and require the 
compilation of an immense evidentiary record. The Federal 
government should be prepared to pursue this litigation with 
the appropriate resources to match those of the tobacco 
companies that are defending the case. The amount of the 
potential award returned to the Medicare trust funds exceeds 
the cost of litigation many times over. HHS has entered into an 
agreement to provide financial support for the Justice 
Department's efforts, and has requested $4 million for this 
purpose. But the bill denies this critical funding to recover 
these taxpayer expenditures, and handicaps the Federal 
Governments efforts that could bring in billions of dollars to 
extend the solvency of the Medicare trust funds.

Cuts Mental Health Treatment

    The Committee cuts $4.1 million below the FY 2000 level and 
$34.1 million below the President's request for SAMHSA's Mental 
Health Knowledge Development and Application (KDA). The 
Committee's recommendation denies the President's request to 
provide awards to 45 communities to improve early 
identification and treatment of mental illness in community 
health centers and other non-mental health settings. The bill 
cuts $5 million, or 16%, from the Administration's request for 
mental health services for the homeless. Every night, 
approximately 200,000 Americans with a major mental illness 
have nowhere to sleep. By denying the President's request, the 
Committee is denying the opportunity to reach out to an 
additional 118,000 homeless individuals and provide them with 
essential mental health services. The Committee also cuts $1 
million from the President's request for the Protection and 
Advocacy Program, which would block an additional 1,500 
investigations into complaints of abuse and neglect of 
residents in mental health facilities.
    This recommendation could also severely impact the $40 
million School Violence ``Safe Schools/Healthy Students'' 
initiative. Research indicates that between 1989 and 1995, 
students felt increasingly unsafe in, and traveling to, school. 
A 1996 Children's Institute International Poll of American 
Adolescents found that 47% of all teens felt that their schools 
were becoming more violent. These perceptions mirror the 
reality of school violence. During the 1996-97 academic year 
alone, 21% of all public high schools and19% of all public 
middle schools reported at least one serious violent crime--such as 
murder, rape, other types of sexual battery, physical attack with a 
weapon--to law enforcement agencies. The President's request would 
ensure that the 54 school districts funded under the ``Safe Schools/
Healthy Students'' initiative begun in FY 1999 receive their third year 
of funding.

Cuts Family Planning Services

    The bill cuts $35 million below the President's request and 
denies health services to an additional 500,000 clients who are 
neither Medicaid eligible nor have health insurance. Title X 
funds support a wide range of preventive reproductive health 
services beyond contraceptive services, including pelvic and 
breast examinations, blood pressure checks, Pap smears, and 
testing and treatment for sexually transmitted diseases.

Cuts Minority AIDS Programs

    The bill includes only an $8 million increase for the 
Minority AIDS Initiative, and fails to respond to the 
Congressional Black and Hispanic Caucuses' request for an 
additional $280 million for critical health programs through 
the Public Health Service that respond to this epidemic. 
Despite earlier efforts to address the special needs of 
communities of color, particularly African American and Latino 
communities, rates of HIV infection among African Americans and 
Latinos continue to climb dramatically.
    The FY 2001 CBC and CHC request is targeted to be more 
inclusive to other communities of color impacted 
disproportionately by HIV/AIDS, particularly Native Americans, 
Native Alaskans, Asian/Pacific Islanders. Due to new 
epidemiological data, there is a greater need to target 
enhanced funding to at-risk populations within communities of 
color who continue to be impacted disproportionately by HIV/
AIDS--especially women, children, and youth.

Problem #9: The Need To Invest in Biomedical Research

Cuts NIH below current services

    The federal government, primarily through NIH, funds 
approximately 36% of all U.S. medical research. Improvements in 
health bring about increased longevity and reductions in the 
economic costs of treating illness. Science is changing at a 
revolutionary pace, demanding a far greater investment in 
emerging new technologies, research training programs, and 
developing new skills among scientific investigators. NIH-
funded research has contributed to dramatic decreases in heart 
disease and stroke mortality rates, increases in cancer 
survival rates, new medications for mental illness, vaccines to 
protect against infectious diseases, and many other advances in 
medicine.
    According to a report by the Joint Economic Committee 
released earlier this week, of the 21 most important drugs 
introduced between 1965 and 1992, 15 were developed using 
knowledge and techniques from federally funded research. Of 
these, NIH research led to the development of 7 drugs used to 
treat patients with cancer, AIDS, hypertension, depression, 
herpes, and anemia. Research sponsored by the NIH is 
responsible for the identification of genetic mutations 
relating to nearly 100 diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, 
cystic fibrosis, Huntington's disease, osteoporosis, many forms 
of cancer, and immune deficiency disorders.
    The House bill language in the NIH appropriation accounts 
provides a total increase of $2.7 billion over 2000, however 
section 213 of the bill caps the NIH appropriation at the $1.0 
billion increase requested by the President. This was done to 
demonstrate how a 15% increase would be allocated if resources 
allowed, even though the bill only contains funding for an 
actual 5.6% increase. That actual appropriation level is $439 
million below the amount needed to maintain current services, 
and would force a reduction in the number of new and competing 
grants from 8,950 in FY 2000, to only 7,641 in 2001. This is a 
reduction of 1,309 or 15% fewer new research grants on cancer, 
diabetes, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and other diseases.
    DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: Democrats offered an amendment to 
delete section 213 and provide a real $2.7 billion increase for 
NIH, but it was rejected by the Majority 23-29. (Pelosi 
amendment, Roll Number 5 located in this report immediately 
preceding the table).

Problem #10: The Need To Fight Substance Abuse in Our Communities

Cuts Funding for Effective Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment

    The bill cuts $7 million below the 2000 funding level for 
proven prevention services through the Knowledge Development 
and Application and the Targeted Capacity Expansion programs, 
cutting proven prevention services to over 44,000 youth. While 
rates of drug use among teens have leveled off after a rapid 
increase since 1992, over half of all high schools seniors are 
still using illicit drugs. And rates among young adults ages 
18-25 have continued to rise. The Committee's recommendation 
denies State Incentive Grants to up to 9 states to coordinate 
and leverage different prevention funding streams and build a 
statewide substance abuse prevention program. States must pass 
85% of these funds on to community-based organizations, 
coalitions, local governments and school districts to carry out 
science-based prevention projects. Effective prevention 
programs engage youth interactively, involve parents and 
families, and build skills by starting at a young age and 
reinforcing messages over an extended period. The bill also 
eliminates the High Risk Youth program, which prevents 
substance abuse in high risk youth through mentoring programs, 
after school curricula and community service.
    The bill cuts $45 million from the Administration's request 
for substance abuse treatment programs through the Knowledge 
Development and Application and the Targeted Capacity Expansion 
programs. The President's request would have provided an 
additional 24,000 treatment slots for addicted individuals 
through the Targeted Capacity Program. This program responds to 
the changing landscape of our Nation's drug epidemics by 
focusing treatment services to areas of highest need. This bill 
also cuts existing treatment slots for up to 4,000 individuals. 
Currently nationwide, we have the capacity to serve a mere 37%, 
or just 2 million, of the 5.3 million Americans who are in 
severe need of substance abuse treatment.
    A RAND Corporation study on reducing cocaine consumption, 
sponsored by the U.S. Army and the Office of National Drug 
Control Policy, found that achieving a one percent reduction 
would cost $783 million for source-country control, or $366 
million for interdiction, or $246 million for domestic 
enforcement, or $34 million for treatment. In other words, 
funds spent on domestic drug treatment were 23 times more 
effective than source-country control, 11 times more effective 
than interdiction, and 7 times more effective than law 
enforcement. Further, the California Drug and Alcohol Treatment 
Assessment (CALDATA) study found that every $1 spent on 
substance abuse treatment results in $7 in taxpayer savings--
these savings result from reduced health care costs, less 
crime, an increase in worker productivity, and decreased death 
expenses.
    DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: The Democrats offered an amendment to 
provide $600 million for domestic substance abuse treatment and 
prevention, but it was rejected by the Majority 22-30. The 
amendment would have provided treatment for an additional 
158,000 addicted individuals and proven prevention services to 
690,000 youth. For the third consecutive time this year, the 
Majority on the Committee rejected attempts by Democrats to 
provide proven services to reduce drug abuse in our 
communities, our schools, and our places of work. During 
consideration of the FY 2000 Emergency Supplemental 
Appropriations bill, Ms. Pelosi offered an amendment that would 
have invested $1.3 billion for domestic drug demand reduction 
services. At a level of funding equal to the Supplemental 
Appropriations bill's investment for drug interdiction in 
Colombia, the amendment recognized that our national illegal 
drug control strategy must focus on demand reduction, as well 
as supply reduction. The Majority voted down that amendment on 
a party line vote in Committee.
    In an attempt to compromise, Ms. Pelosi then scaled back 
the amendment to provide $600 million to domestic demand 
reduction, but the Rules Committee blocked consideration of 
that amendment on the Floor. During the debate on those 
amendments, the Majority offered to address the issue during 
the regular appropriations process. Now that we have come to 
the regular appropriations process, the Majority again has 
refused to support an increase to domestic drug abuse treatment 
and prevention. That refusal ignores the reality that domestic 
treatment and prevention are the most effective means to reduce 
the burden of drug abuse on our society.

Problem #11: The Need for a Voluntary Medicare Prescription Drug 
        Benefit

    Currently, Medicare does not fund a prescription drug 
benefit and seniors are faced with expensive out of pocket 
costs to cover their much-needed prescriptions. As our 
population grows increasingly elderly and the baby boomer 
population approaches retirement, more Americans will require 
costly prescription drugs. According to the Kaiser Family 
Foundation, 31% or 37.2 million Medicare beneficiaries were 
without prescription drug coverage in 1996.
    Seniors living on fixed incomes are well aware that drug 
prices are increasing faster than the annual increase in their 
Social Security check. In fact, one study found that over the 
past six years, the prices for the most commonly prescribed 
drugs for seniors have risen, on average, at twice the rate of 
inflation.
    Just as the Majority's tax cut package is a misplaced 
priority that gives too much to the wealthiest individuals in 
this country at the expense of much needed discretionary 
spending, so too does it divert needed resources from a much 
needed prescription drug benefit.
    DEMOCRATIC RESPONSE: Democrats offered an amendment to 
include a Sense of the House that tax cuts for taxpayers in the 
top 1% income levels should not be enacted until Congress 
enacts a universal voluntary prescription drug benefit for all 
Americans under Medicare, but it was rejected by the Majority 
22-28. (Obey amendment, Roll Number 12 located in this report 
immediately preceding the table).

                               CONCLUSION

    It is ironic that this bill was voted on in Committee the 
same day Congress voted to provide permanent Most-Favored-
Nation trading status for China. Some of us voted for it and 
some didn't, but if Congress is going to proceed down that 
road, it needs to be taking action to help the sector of 
society that will be hurt as the economy becomes more and more 
globalized.
    Capitalist economies cannot by definition produce equal 
income for all people. Each society needs risk takers who can 
amass wealth so that accumulated wealth can be invested to 
produce economic growth for the entire society. That is bound 
to produce income inequality. But as Pope John Paul once 
observed, there are certain ``norms of decency'' that must be 
respected in order to produce economic justice and the social 
cohesion that is necessary for any economic system to function. 
The last two decades have produced just the opposite--the 
widest gap between the wealthiest 1% of our people and the 
least wealthy 20% of any time since the birth of the 20th 
Century.
    In our society the gap in income--in education, in housing, 
and in medical care--has grown disgracefully worse. Those who 
in this economy suffer most from that fact--largely 
manufacturing workers in industries with declining employment 
or workers with less than average skills--cannot be expected to 
roll over and say, in the words that Walter Cronkite used to 
sign off his CBS news broadcast, ``That's the way it is.''
    The issue is whether those in this society--the investing 
class, the managing elite, the venture capitalists, the 
multinational corporations who have so much to gain by further 
globalization of the economy will be willing to see a tiny 
fraction of that increased wealth used to help those who will 
otherwise be caught in the prop wash of their incredible 
prosperity.
    We need a balance of decency between the needs of the 
corporate-based market economy and the needs of a family-based 
society.
    If Congress is going to vote for a trade bill like this, 
then it has an obligation to support the job training, worker 
safety, health, and education programs needed to ensure those 
sectors are not left further behind. This appropriations bill 
fails to do that.
    When this Congress votes for a minimum wage bill that 
provides $90 billion in tax relief for the wealthiest 1% of 
citizens, but declines to meet needs for education, protection 
for seniors in nursing homes, teacher quality, prescription 
drug benefits for Medicare and other priorities, it sums up the 
misplaced sense of priorities in this Congress.


                                   David Obey.
                                   Steny Hoyer.
                                   Nancy Pelosi.
                                   Nita M. Lowey.
                                   Rosa L. DeLauro.
                                   Jesse L. Jackson, Jr.