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106th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     106-988

======================================================================



 
MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE DEPARTMENTS OF VETERANS AFFAIRS AND 
  HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, AND FOR SUNDRY INDEPENDENT AGENCIES, 
  BOARDS, COMMISSIONS, CORPORATIONS, AND OFFICES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 
  ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2001, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES

                                _______
                                

                October 18, 2000.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Walsh, from the committee of conference, submitted the following

                           CONFERENCE REPORT

                        [To accompany H.R. 4635]

      The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of 
the two Houses on the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 
4635) ``making appropriations for the Departments of Veterans 
Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and for sundry 
independent agencies, boards, commissions, corporations, and 
offices for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, and for 
other purposes'', having met, after full and free conference, 
have agreed to recommend and do recommend to their respective 
Houses as follows:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate, and agree to the same with an 
amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment, insert:
      Section 1. (a) The provisions of the following bills of 
the 106th Congress are hereby enacted into law:
            (1) H.R. 5482, as introduced on October 18, 2000.
            (2) H.R. 5483, as introduced on October 18, 2000.
      (b) In publishing this Act in slip form and in the United 
States Statutes at Large pursuant to section 112 of title 1, 
United States Code, the Archivist of the United States shall 
include after the date of approval at the end appendixes 
setting forth the texts of the bills referred to in subsection 
(a) of this section.
; And the Senate agree to the same.
                                   James T. Walsh,
                                   Tom DeLay,
                                   Dave Hobson,
                                   Joe Knollenberg,
                                   Rodney Frelinghuysen,
                                   Anne M. Northup,
                                   John E. Sununu,
                                   Virgil Goode, Jr.,
                                   Bill Young,
                                   Alan B. Mollohan,
                                   Marcy Kaptur,
                                   Carrie P. Meek,
                                   David E. Price,
                                   Bud Cramer,
                                   Dave Obey,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Christopher S. Bond,
                                   Conrad Burns,
                                   Richard C. Shelby,
                                   Larry E. Craig,
                                   Kay Bailey Hutchison,
                                   Ted Stevens,
                                   Pete V. Domenici,
                                   Barbara A. Mikulski,
                                   Patrick Leahy,
                                   Frank R. Lautenberg,
                                   Tom Harkin,
                                   Robert C. Byrd,
                                   Harry Reid,
                                   Daniel K. Inouye,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.

       JOINT EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE COMMITTEE OF CONFERENCE

      The managers on the part of the House and the Senate at 
the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on 
the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 4635) making 
appropriations for the Departments of Veterans Affairs and 
Housing and Urban Development, and for sundry independent 
agencies, boards, commissions, corporations, and offices for 
the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, and for other 
purposes, submit the following joint statement to the House and 
the Senate in explanation of the effect of the action agreed 
upon by the managers and recommended in the accompanying 
report.
      This conference agreement includes more than the 
Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban 
Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 2001. 
The conference agreement has been expanded to include the 
Energy and Water Development Appropriations Act, 2001, as well 
as the Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban 
Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 2001. 
Both of these Acts have been enacted into law by reference in 
this conference report; however, a copy of the referenced 
legislation has been included in this statement for 
convenience.

DEPARTMENTS OF VETERANS AFFAIRS AND HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, AND 
                  INDEPENDENT AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS

      The conference agreement would enact the provisions of 
H.R. 5482 as introduced on October 18, 2000. The text of that 
bill follows:

 A BILL Making appropriations for the Departments of Veterans Affairs 
and Housing and Urban Development, and for sundry independent agencies, 
  boards, commissions, corporations, and offices for the fiscal year 
           ending September 30, 2001, and for other purposes.

      Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives 
of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the 
following sums are appropriated, out of any money in the 
Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the Departments of 
Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and for 
sundry independent agencies, boards, commissions, corporations, 
and offices for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, and 
for other purposes, namely:

                TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS

                    Veterans Benefits Administration


                       compensation and pensions


                     (including transfers of funds)


      For the payment of compensation benefits to or on behalf 
of veterans and a pilot program for disability examinations as 
authorized by law (38 U.S.C. 107, chapters 11, 13, 18, 51, 53, 
55, and 61); pension benefits to or on behalf of veterans as 
authorized by law (38 U.S.C. chapters 15, 51, 53, 55, and 61; 
92 Stat. 2508); and burial benefits, emergency and other 
officers' retirement pay, adjusted-service credits and 
certificates, payment of premiums due on commercial life 
insurance policies guaranteed under the provisions of Article 
IV of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act of 1940, as 
amended, and for other benefits as authorized by law (38 U.S.C. 
107, 1312, 1977, and 2106, chapters 23, 51, 53, 55, and 61; 50 
U.S.C. App. 540-548; 43 Stat. 122, 123; 45 Stat. 735; 76 Stat. 
1198), $22,766,276,000, to remain available until expended: 
Provided, That not to exceed $17,419,000 of the amount 
appropriated shall be reimbursed to ``General operating 
expenses'' and ``Medical care'' for necessary expenses in 
implementing those provisions authorized in the Omnibus Budget 
Reconciliation Act of 1990, and in the Veterans' Benefits Act 
of 1992 (38 U.S.C. chapters 51, 53, and 55), the funding source 
for which is specifically provided as the ``Compensation and 
pensions'' appropriation: Provided further, That such sums as 
may be earned on an actual qualifying patient basis, shall be 
reimbursed to ``Medical facilities revolving fund'' to augment 
the funding of individual medical facilities for nursing home 
care provided to pensioners as authorized.


                         readjustment benefits


      For the payment of readjustment and rehabilitation 
benefits to or on behalf of veterans as authorized by 38 U.S.C. 
chapters 21, 30, 31, 34, 35, 36, 39, 51, 53, 55, and 61, 
$1,634,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
That expenses for rehabilitation program services and 
assistance which the Secretary is authorized to provide under 
section 3104(a) of title 38, United States Code, other than 
under subsection (a)(1), (2), (5) and (11) of that section, 
shall be charged to the account: Provided further, That funds 
shall be available to pay any court order, court award or any 
compromise settlement arising from litigation involving the 
vocational training program authorized by section 18 of Public 
Law 98-77, as amended.


                   veterans insurance and indemnities


    For military and naval insurance, national service life 
insurance, servicemen's indemnities, service-disabled veterans 
insurance, and veterans mortgage life insurance as authorized 
by 38 U.S.C. chapter 19; 70 Stat. 887; 72 Stat. 487, 
$19,850,000, to remain available until expended.


         veterans housing benefit program fund program account


                     (including transfer of funds)


      For the cost of direct and guaranteed loans, such sums as 
may be necessary to carry out the program, as authorized by 38 
U.S.C. chapter 37, as amended: Provided, That such costs, 
including the cost of modifying such loans, shall be as defined 
in section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as 
amended: Provided further, That during fiscal year 2001, within 
the resources available, not to exceed $300,000 in gross 
obligations for direct loans are authorized for specially 
adapted housing loans.
      In addition, for administrative expenses to carry out the 
direct and guaranteed loan programs, $162,000,000, which may be 
transferred to and merged with the appropriation for ``General 
operating expenses''.


                  education loan fund program account


                     (including transfer of funds)


      For the cost of direct loans, $1,000, as authorized by 38 
U.S.C. 3698, as amended: Provided, That such costs, including 
the cost of modifying such loans, shall be as defined in 
section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as 
amended: Provided further, That these funds are available to 
subsidize gross obligations for the principal amount of direct 
loans not to exceed $3,400.
      In addition, for administrative expenses necessary to 
carry out the direct loan program, $220,000, which may be 
transferred to and merged with the appropriation for ``General 
operating expenses''.


            vocational rehabilitation loans program account


                     (including transfer of funds)


      For the cost of direct loans, $52,000, as authorized by 
38 U.S.C. chapter 31, as amended: Provided, That such costs, 
including the cost of modifying such loans, shall be as defined 
in section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as 
amended: Provided further, That these funds are available to 
subsidize gross obligations for the principal amount of direct 
loans not to exceed $2,726,000.
      In addition, for administrative expenses necessary to 
carry out the direct loan program, $432,000, which may be 
transferred to and merged with the appropriation for ``General 
operating expenses''.


          native american veteran housing loan program account


                     (including transfer of funds)


      For administrative expenses to carry out the direct loan 
program authorized by 38 U.S.C. chapter 37, subchapter V, as 
amended, $532,000, which may be transferred to and merged with 
the appropriation for ``General operating expenses''.


  guaranteed transitional housing loans for homeless veterans program 
                                account


                     (including transfer of funds)


      Not to exceed $750,000 of the amounts appropriated by 
this Act for ``General operating expenses'' and ``Medical 
care'' may be expended for the administrative expenses to carry 
out the guaranteed loan program authorized by 38 U.S.C. chapter 
37, subchapter VI.

                     Veterans Health Administration


                              medical care


                     (including transfer of funds)


      For necessary expenses for the maintenance and operation 
of hospitals, nursing homes, and domiciliary facilities; for 
furnishing, as authorized by law, inpatient and outpatient care 
and treatment to beneficiaries of the Department of Veterans 
Affairs, including care and treatment in facilities not under 
the jurisdiction of the department; and furnishing recreational 
facilities, supplies, and equipment; funeral, burial, and other 
expenses incidental thereto for beneficiaries receiving care in 
the department; administrative expenses in support of planning, 
design, project management, real property acquisition and 
disposition, construction and renovation of any facility under 
the jurisdiction or for the use of the department; oversight, 
engineering and architectural activities not charged to project 
cost; repairing, altering, improving or providing facilities in 
the several hospitals and homes under the jurisdiction of the 
department, not otherwise provided for, either by contract or 
by the hire of temporary employees and purchase of materials; 
uniforms or allowances therefor, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 
5901-5902; aid to State homes as authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1741; 
administrative and legal expenses of the department for 
collecting and recovering amounts owed the department as 
authorized under 38 U.S.C. chapter 17, and the Federal Medical 
Care Recovery Act, 42 U.S.C. 2651 et seq., $20,281,587,000, 
plus reimbursements: Provided, That of the funds made available 
under this heading, $900,000,000 is for the equipment and land 
and structures object classifications only, which amount shall 
not become available for obligation until August 1, 2001, and 
shall remain available until September 30, 2002: Provided 
further, That of the funds made available under this heading, 
not to exceed $500,000,000 shall be available until September 
30, 2002: Provided further, That of the funds made available 
under this heading, not to exceed $28,134,000 may be 
transferred to and merged with the appropriation for ``General 
operating expenses'': Provided further, That the Secretary of 
Veterans Affairs shall conduct by contract a program of 
recovery audits for the fee basis and other medical services 
contracts with respect to payments for hospital care; and, 
notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302(b), amounts collected, by setoff 
or otherwise, as the result of such audits shall be available, 
without fiscal year limitation, for the purposes for which 
funds are appropriated under this heading and the purposes of 
paying a contractor a percent of the amount collected as a 
result of an audit carried out by the contractor: Provided 
further, That all amounts so collected under the preceding 
proviso with respect to a designated health care region (as 
that term is defined in 38 U.S.C. 1729A(d)(2)) shall be 
allocated, net of payments to the contractor, to that region.
      In addition, in conformance with Public Law 105-33 
establishing the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Care 
Collections Fund, such sums as may be deposited to such Fund 
pursuant to 38 U.S.C. 1729A may be transferred to this account, 
to remain available until expended for the purposes of this 
account.
      None of the foregoing funds may be transferred to the 
Department of Justice for the purposes of supporting tobacco 
litigation.


                    medical and prosthetic research


    For necessary expenses in carrying out programs of medical 
and prosthetic research and development as authorized by 38 
U.S.C. chapter 73, to remain available until September 30, 
2002, $351,000,000, plus reimbursements.


      medical administration and miscellaneous operating expenses


    For necessary expenses in the administration of the 
medical, hospital, nursing home, domiciliary, construction, 
supply, and research activities, as authorized by law; 
administrative expenses in support of capital policy 
activities, $62,000,000 plus reimbursements: Provided, That 
technical and consulting services offered by the Facilities 
Management Field Service, including project management and real 
property administration (including leases, site acquisition and 
disposal activities directly supporting projects), shall be 
provided to Department of Veterans Affairs components only on a 
reimbursable basis, and such amounts will remain available 
until September 30, 2001.

                      Departmental Administration


                       general operating expenses


    For necessary operating expenses of the Department of 
Veterans Affairs, not otherwise provided for, including 
uniforms or allowances therefor; not to exceed $25,000 for 
official reception and representation expenses; hire of 
passenger motor vehicles; and reimbursement of the General 
Services Administration for security guard services, and the 
Department of Defense for the cost of overseas employee mail, 
$1,050,000,000: Provided, That expenses for services and 
assistance authorized under 38 U.S.C. 3104(a) (1), (2), (5) and 
(11) that the Secretary determines are necessary to enable 
entitled veterans (1) to the maximum extent feasible, to become 
employable and to obtain and maintain suitable employment; or 
(2) to achieve maximum independence in daily living, shall be 
charged to this account: Provided further, That of the funds 
made available under this heading, not to exceed $45,000,000 
shall be available until September 30, 2002: Provided further, 
That funds under this heading shall be available to administer 
the Service Members Occupational Conversion and Training Act.

                    national cemetery administration


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For necessary expenses for the maintenance and operation of 
the National Cemetery Administration, not otherwise provided 
for, including uniforms or allowances therefor; cemeterial 
expenses as authorized by law; purchase of two passenger motor 
vehicles for use in cemeterial operations; and hire of 
passenger motor vehicles, $109,889,000: Provided, That travel 
expenses shall not exceed $1,125,000: Provided further, That of 
the amount made available under this heading, not to exceed 
$125,000 may be transferred to and merged with the 
appropriation for ``General operating expenses''.

                      office of inspector general


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 
$46,464,000: Provided, That of the amount made available under 
this heading, not to exceed $28,000 may be transferred to and 
merged with the appropriation for ``General operating 
expenses''.


                      construction, major projects


    For constructing, altering, extending and improving any of 
the facilities under the jurisdiction or for the use of the 
Department of Veterans Affairs, or for any of the purposes set 
forth in sections 316, 2404, 2406, 8102, 8103, 8106, 8108, 
8109, 8110, and 8122 of title 38, United States Code, including 
planning, architectural and engineering services, maintenance 
or guarantee period services costs associated with equipment 
guarantees provided under the project, services of claims 
analysts, offsite utility and storm drainage system 
construction costs, and site acquisition, where the estimated 
cost of a project is $4,000,000 or more or where funds for a 
project were made available in a previous major project 
appropriation, $66,040,000, to remain available until expended: 
Provided, That except for advance planning of projects 
(including market-based assessments of health care needs which 
may or may not lead to capital investments) funded through the 
advance planning fund and the design of projects funded through 
the design fund, none of these funds shall be used for any 
project which has not been considered and approved by the 
Congress in the budgetary process: Provided further, That funds 
provided in this appropriation for fiscal year 2001, for each 
approved project shall be obligated: (1) by the awarding of a 
construction documents contract by September 30, 2001; and (2) 
by the awarding of a construction contract by September 30, 
2002: Provided further, That the Secretary shall promptly 
report in writing to the Committees on Appropriations any 
approved major construction project in which obligations are 
not incurred within the time limitations established above: 
Provided further, That no funds from any other account except 
the ``Parking revolving fund'', may be obligated for 
constructing, altering, extending, or improving a project which 
was approved in the budget process and funded in this account 
until one year after substantial completion and beneficial 
occupancy by the Department of Veterans Affairs of the project 
or any part thereof with respect to that part only.


                      construction, minor projects


    For constructing, altering, extending, and improving any of 
the facilities under the jurisdiction or for the use of the 
Department of Veterans Affairs, including planning, 
architectural and engineering services, maintenance or 
guarantee period services costs associated with equipment 
guarantees provided under the project, services of claims 
analysts, offsite utility and storm drainage system 
construction costs, and site acquisition, or for any of the 
purposes set forth in sections 316, 2404, 2406, 8102, 8103, 
8106, 8108, 8109, 8110, 8122, and 8162 of title 38, United 
States Code, where the estimated cost of a project is less than 
$4,000,000, $162,000,000, to remain available until expended, 
along with unobligated balances of previous ``Construction, 
minor projects'' appropriations which are hereby made available 
for any project where the estimated cost is less than 
$4,000,000: Provided, That funds in this account shall be 
available for: (1) repairs to any of the nonmedical facilities 
under the jurisdiction or for the use of the department which 
are necessary because of loss or damage caused by any natural 
disaster or catastrophe; and (2) temporary measures necessary 
to prevent or to minimize further loss by such causes.


                         parking revolving fund


    For the parking revolving fund as authorized by 38 U.S.C. 
8109, income from fees collected, to remain available until 
expended, which shall be available for all authorized expenses 
except operations and maintenance costs, which will be funded 
from ``Medical care''.


       grants for construction of state extended care facilities


    For grants to assist States to acquire or construct State 
nursing home and domiciliary facilities and to remodel, modify 
or alter existing hospital, nursing home and domiciliary 
facilities in State homes, for furnishing care to veterans as 
authorized by 38 U.S.C. 8131-8137, $100,000,000, to remain 
available until expended.


        grants for the construction of state veterans cemeteries


    For grants to aid States in establishing, expanding, or 
improving State veterans cemeteries as authorized by 38 U.S.C. 
2408, $25,000,000, to remain available until expended.


                       administrative provisions


                     (including transfer of funds)


    Sec. 101. Any appropriation for fiscal year 2001 for 
``Compensation and pensions'', ``Readjustment benefits'', and 
``Veterans insurance and indemnities'' may be transferred to 
any other of the mentioned appropriations.
    Sec. 102. Appropriations available to the Department of 
Veterans Affairs for fiscal year 2001 for salaries and expenses 
shall be available for services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109.
    Sec. 103. No appropriations in this Act for the Department 
of Veterans Affairs (except the appropriations for 
``Construction, major projects'', ``Construction, minor 
projects'', and the ``Parking revolving fund'') shall be 
available for the purchase of any site for or toward the 
construction of any new hospital or home.
    Sec. 104. No appropriations in this Act for the Department 
of Veterans Affairs shall be available for hospitalization or 
examination of any persons (except beneficiaries entitled under 
the laws bestowing such benefits to veterans, and persons 
receiving such treatment under 5 U.S.C. 7901-7904 or 42 U.S.C. 
5141-5204), unless reimbursement of cost is made to the 
``Medical care'' account at such rates as may be fixed by the 
Secretary of Veterans Affairs.
    Sec. 105. Appropriations available to the Department of 
Veterans Affairs for fiscal year 2001 for ``Compensation and 
pensions'', ``Readjustment benefits'', and ``Veterans insurance 
and indemnities'' shall be available for payment of prior year 
accrued obligations required to be recorded by law against the 
corresponding prior year accounts within the last quarter of 
fiscal year 2000.
    Sec. 106. Appropriations accounts available to the 
Department of Veterans Affairs for fiscal year 2001 shall be 
available to pay prior year obligations of corresponding prior 
year appropriations accounts resulting from title X of the 
Competitive Equality Banking Act, Public Law 100-86, except 
that if such obligations are from trust fund accounts they 
shall be payable from ``Compensation and pensions''.
    Sec. 107. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
during fiscal year 2001, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs 
shall, from the National Service Life Insurance Fund (38 U.S.C. 
1920), the Veterans' Special Life Insurance Fund (38 U.S.C. 
1923), and the United States Government Life Insurance Fund (38 
U.S.C. 1955), reimburse the ``General operating expenses'' 
account for the cost of administration of the insurance 
programs financed through those accounts: Provided, That 
reimbursement shall be made only from the surplus earnings 
accumulated in an insurance program in fiscal year 2001, that 
are available for dividends in that program after claims have 
been paid and actuarially determined reserves have been set 
aside: Provided further, That if the cost of administration of 
an insurance program exceeds the amount of surplus earnings 
accumulated in that program, reimbursement shall be made only 
to the extent of such surplus earnings: Provided further, That 
the Secretary shall determine the cost of administration for 
fiscal year 2001, which is properly allocable to the provision 
of each insurance program and to the provision of any total 
disability income insurance included in such insurance program.
    Sec. 108. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
collections authorized by the Veterans Millennium Health Care 
and Benefits Act (Public Law 106-117) and credited to the 
appropriate Department of Veterans Affairs accounts in fiscal 
year 2001, shall not be available for obligation or expenditure 
unless appropriation language making such funds available is 
enacted.
    Sec. 109. In accordance with section 1557 of title 31, 
United States Code, the following obligated balance shall be 
exempt from subchapter IV of chapter 15 of such title and shall 
remain available for expenditure until September 30, 2003: 
funds obligated by the Department of Veterans Affairs for a 
contract with the Institute for Clinical Research to study the 
application of artificial neural networks to the diagnosis and 
treatment of prostate cancer through the Cooperative DoD/VA 
Medical Research program from funds made available to the 
Department of Veterans Affairs by the Department of Defense 
Appropriations Act, 1995 (Public Law 103-335) under the heading 
``Research, Development, Test and Evaluation, Defense-Wide''.
    Sec. 110. As HR LINK$ will not be part of the Franchise 
Fund in fiscal year 2001, funds budgeted in customer accounts 
to purchase HR LINK$ services from the Franchise Fund shall be 
transferred to the General Administration portion of the 
``General operating expenses'' appropriation in the following 
amounts: $78,000 from the ``Office of Inspector General'', 
$358,000 from the ``National cemetery administration'', 
$1,106,000 from ``Medical care'', $84,000 from ``Medical 
administration and miscellaneous operating expenses'', and 
$38,000 shall be reprogrammed within the ``General operating 
expenses'' appropriation from the Veterans Benefits 
Administration to General Administration for the same purpose.
    Sec. 111. Not to exceed $1,600,000 from the ``Medical 
care'' appropriation shall be transferred to the ``General 
operating expenses'' appropriation to fund personnel services 
costs of employees providing legal services and administrative 
support for the Office of General Counsel.
    Sec. 112. Not to exceed $1,200,000 may be transferred from 
the ``Medical care'' appropriation to the ``General operating 
expenses'' appropriation to fund contracts and services in 
support of the Veterans Benefits Administration's Benefits 
Delivery Center, Systems Development Center, and Finance 
Center, located at the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical 
Center, Hines, Illinois.
    Sec. 113. Not to exceed $4,500,000 from the ``Construction, 
minor projects'' appropriation and not to exceed $2,000,000 
from the ``Medical care'' appropriation may be transferred to 
and merged with the Parking Revolving Fund for surface parking 
lot projects.
    Sec. 114. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, 
none of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available in 
this Act for ``Medical care'' appropriations of the Department 
of Veterans Affairs may be obligated for the realignment of the 
health care delivery system in Veterans Integrated Service 
Network 12 (VISN 12) until 60 days after the Secretary of 
Veterans Affairs certifies that the Department has: (1) 
consulted with veterans organizations, medical school 
affiliates, employee representatives, State veterans and health 
associations, and other interested parties with respect to the 
realignment plan to be implemented; and (2) made available to 
the Congress and the public information from the consultations 
regarding possible impacts on the accessibility of veterans 
health care services to affected veterans.

         TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

                       Public and Indian Housing


                        housing certificate fund


                     (including transfers of funds)


    For activities and assistance to prevent the involuntary 
displacement of low-income families, the elderly and the 
disabled because of the loss of affordable housing stock, 
expiration of subsidy contracts (other than contracts for which 
amounts are provided under another heading in this Act) or 
expiration of use restrictions, or other changes in housing 
assistance arrangements, and for other purposes, 
$13,940,907,000 and amounts that are recaptured in this account 
to remain available until expended: Provided, That of the total 
amount provided under this heading, $13,430,000,000, of which 
$9,230,000,000 shall be available on October 1, 2000 and 
$4,200,000,000 shall be available on October 1, 2001, shall be 
for assistance under the United States Housing Act of 1937 
(``the Act'' herein) (42 U.S.C. 1437): Provided further, That 
the foregoing amounts shall shall be for use in connection with 
expiring or terminating section 8 subsidy contracts, for 
amendments to section 8 subsidy contracts, for enhanced 
vouchers (including amendments and renewals) under any 
provision of law authorizing such assistance under section 8(t) 
of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (47 U.S.C. 1437f(t)), 
contract administrators, and contracts entered into pursuant to 
section 441 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act: 
Provided further, That amounts available under the first 
proviso under this heading shall be available for section 8 
rental assistance under the Act: (1) for the relocation and 
replacement of housing units that are demolished or disposed of 
pursuant to section 24 of the United States Housing Act of 1937 
or to other authority for the revitalization of severely 
distressed public housing, as set forth in the Appropriations 
Acts for the Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and 
Urban Development, and Independent Agencies for fiscal years 
1993, 1994, 1995, and 1997, and in the Omnibus Consolidated 
Rescissions and Appropriations Act of 1996; (2) for the 
conversion of section 23 projects to assistance under section 
8; (3) for funds to carry out the family unification program; 
(4) for the relocation of witnesses in connection with efforts 
to combat crime in public and assisted housing pursuant to a 
request from a law enforcement or prosecution agency; (5) for 
tenant protection assistance, including replacement and 
relocation assistance; and (6) for the 1-year renewal of 
section 8 contracts for units in a project that is subject to 
an approved plan of action under the Emergency Low Income 
Housing Preservation Act of 1987 or the Low-Income Housing 
Preservation and Resident Homeownership Act of 1990: Provided 
further, That of the total amount provided under this heading, 
$11,000,000 shall be transferred to the Working Capital Fund 
for the development and maintenance of information technology 
systems: Provided further, That of the total amount provided 
under this heading, $40,000,000 shall be made available to 
nonelderly disabled families affected by the designation of a 
public housing development under section 7 of the Act, the 
establishment of preferences in accordance with section 651 of 
the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 (42 U.S.C. 
1361l), or the restriction of occupancy to elderly families in 
accordance with section 658 of such Act, and to the extent the 
Secretary determines that such amount is not needed to fund 
applications for such affected families, to other nonelderly 
disabled families: Provided further, That of the total amount 
provided under this heading, $452,907,000 shall be made 
available for incremental vouchers under section 8 of the 
United States Housing Act of 1937 on a fair share basis and 
administered by public housing agencies:
      Provided further, That of the total amount provided under 
this heading, up to $7,000,000 shall be made available for the 
completion of the Jobs Plus Demonstration: Provided further, 
That amounts available under this heading may be made available 
for administrative fees and other expenses to cover the cost of 
administering rental assistance programs under section 8 of the 
United States Housing Act of 1937: Provided further, That the 
fee otherwise authorized under section 8(q) of such Act shall 
be determined in accordance with section 8(q), as in effect 
immediately before the enactment of the Quality Housing and 
Work Responsibility Act of 1998: Provided further, That 
$1,833,000,000 is rescinded from unobligated balances remaining 
from funds appropriated to the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development under this heading or the heading ``Annual 
Contributions for Assisted Housing'' or any other heading for 
fiscal year 2000 and prior years: Provided further, That any 
such balances governed by reallocation provisions under the 
statute authorizing the program for which the funds were 
originally appropriated shall not be available for this 
rescission: Provided further, That the Secretary shall have 
until September 30, 2001, to meet the rescission in the proviso 
preceding the immediately preceding proviso: Provided further, 
That any obligated balances of contract authority that have 
been terminated shall be canceled.


                      public housing capital fund


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the Public Housing Capital Fund Program to carry out 
capital and management activities for public housing agencies, 
as authorized under section 9 of the United States Housing Act 
of 1937, as amended (42 U.S.C. 1437), $3,000,000,000, to remain 
available until expended, of which up to $50,000,000 shall be 
for carrying out activities under section 9(h) of such Act, for 
lease adjustments to section 23 projects and $43,000,000 shall 
be transferred to the Working Capital Fund for the development 
and maintenance of information technology systems: Provided, 
That no funds may be used under this heading for the purposes 
specified in section 9(k) of the United States Housing Act of 
1937: Provided further, That of the total amount, up to 
$75,000,000 shall be available for the Secretary of Housing and 
Urban Development to make grants to public housing agencies for 
emergency capital needs resulting from emergencies and natural 
disasters in fiscal year 2001.


                     public housing operating fund


    For payments to public housing agencies for the operation 
and management of public housing, as authorized by section 9(e) 
of the United States Housing Act of 1937, as amended (42 U.S.C. 
1437g), $3,242,000,000, to remain available until expended: 
Provided, That no funds may be used under this heading for the 
purposes specified in section 9(k) of the United States Housing 
Act of 1937.


             drug elimination grants for low-income housing


                     (including transfers of funds)


    For grants to public housing agencies and Indian tribes and 
their tribally designated housing entities for use in 
eliminating crime in public housing projects authorized by 42 
U.S.C. 11901-11908, for grants for federally assisted low-
income housing authorized by 42 U.S.C. 11909, and for drug 
information clearinghouse services authorized by 42 U.S.C. 
11921-11925, $310,000,000, to remain available until expended: 
Provided, That of the total amount provided under this heading, 
up to $3,000,000 shall be solely for technical assistance, 
technical assistance grants, training, and program assessment 
for or on behalf of public housing agencies, resident 
organizations, and Indian tribes and their tribally designated 
housing entities (including up to $150,000 for the cost of 
necessary travel for participants in such training) for 
oversight, training and improved management of this program, 
$2,000,000 shall be available to the Boys and Girls Clubs of 
America for the operating and start-up costs of clubs located 
in or near, and primarily serving residents of, public housing 
and housing assisted under the Native American Housing 
Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996, and $10,000,000 
shall be used in connection with efforts to combat violent 
crime in public and assisted housing under the Operation Safe 
Home Program administered by the Inspector General of the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development: Provided further, 
That of the amount under this heading, $10,000,000 shall be 
provided to the Office of Inspector General for Operation Safe 
Home: Provided further, That of the amount under this heading, 
$20,000,000 shall be available for the New Approach Anti-Drug 
program which will provide competitive grants to entities 
managing or operating public housing developments, federally 
assisted multifamily housing developments, or other multifamily 
housing developments for low-income families supported by non-
Federal governmental entities or similar housing developments 
supported by nonprofit private sources in order to provide or 
augment security (including personnel costs), to assist in the 
investigation and/or prosecution of drug-related criminal 
activity in and around such developments, and to provide 
assistance for the development of capital improvements at such 
developments directly relating to the security of such 
developments: Provided further, That grants for the New 
Approach Anti-Drug program shall be made on a competitive basis 
as specified in section 102 of the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development Reform Act of 1989.


     revitalization of severely distressed public housing (hope vi)


    For grants to public housing agencies for demolition, site 
revitalization, replacement housing, and tenant-based 
assistance grants to projects as authorized by section 24 of 
the United States Housing Act of 1937, $575,000,000 to remain 
available until expended, of which the Secretary may use up to 
$10,000,000 for technical assistance and contract expertise, to 
be provided directly or indirectly by grants, contracts or 
cooperative agreements, including training and cost of 
necessary travel for participants in such training, by or to 
officials and employees of the department and of public housing 
agencies and to residents: Provided, That none of such funds 
shall be used directly or indirectly by granting competitive 
advantage in awards to settle litigation or pay judgments, 
unless expressly permitted herein.


                  native american housing block grants


                     (including transfers of funds)


    For the Native American Housing Block Grants program, as 
authorized under title I of the Native American Housing 
Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996 (NAHASDA) (Public 
Law 104-330), $650,000,000, to remain available until expended, 
of which $6,000,000 shall be to support the inspection of 
Indian housing units, contract expertise, training, and 
technical assistance in the training, oversight, and management 
of Indian housing and tenant-based assistance, including up to 
$300,000 for related travel: Provided, That of the amount 
provided under this heading, $6,000,000 shall be made available 
for the cost of guaranteed notes and other obligations, as 
authorized by title VI of NAHASDA: Provided further, That such 
costs, including the costs of modifying such notes and other 
obligations, shall be as defined in section 502 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended: Provided further, 
That these funds are available to subsidize the total principal 
amount of any notes and other obligations, any part of which is 
to be guaranteed, not to exceed $54,600,000: Provided further, 
That for administrative expenses to carry out the guaranteed 
loan program, up to $150,000 from amounts in the first proviso, 
which shall be transferred to and merged with the appropriation 
for ``Salaries and expenses'', to be used only for the 
administrative costs of these guarantees: Provided further, 
That of the amount provided in this heading, $2,000,000 shall 
be transferred to the Working Capital Fund for developing and 
maintaining information technology systems.


           indian housing loan guarantee fund program account


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the cost of guaranteed loans, as authorized by section 
184 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 (106 
Stat. 3739), $6,000,000, to remain available until expended: 
Provided, That such costs, including the costs of modifying 
such loans, shall be as defined in section 502 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended: Provided further, 
That these funds are available to subsidize total loan 
principal, any part of which is to be guaranteed, not to exceed 
$71,956,000.
    In addition, for administrative expenses to carry out the 
guaranteed loan program, up to $200,000 from amounts in the 
first paragraph, which shall be transferred to and merged with 
the appropriation for ``Salaries and expenses'', to be used 
only for the administrative costs of these guarantees.

                   Community Planning and Development


              housing opportunities for persons with aids


    For carrying out the Housing Opportunities for Persons with 
AIDS program, as authorized by the AIDS Housing Opportunity Act 
(42 U.S.C. 12901), $258,000,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That the Secretary shall renew all expiring 
contracts that were funded under section 854(c)(3) of such Act 
that meet all program requirements before awarding funds for 
new contracts and activities authorized under this section: 
Provided further, That the Secretary may use up to 1 percent of 
the funds under this heading for training, oversight, and 
technical assistance activities.


                 rural housing and economic development


    For the Office of Rural Housing and Economic Development in 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development, $25,000,000 to 
remain available until expended, which amount shall be awarded 
by June 1, 2001, to Indian tribes, State housing finance 
agencies, State community and/or economic development agencies, 
local rural nonprofits and community development corporations 
to support innovative housing and economic development 
activities in rural areas: Provided, That all grants shall be 
awarded on a competitive basis as specified in section 102 of 
the HUD Reform Act.


                empowerment zones/enterprise communities


    For grants in connection with a second round of empowerment 
zones and enterprise communities, $90,000,000, to remain 
available until expended: Provided, That $75,000,000 shall be 
available for the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development 
for ``Urban Empowerment Zones'', as authorized in the Taxpayer 
Relief Act of 1997, including $5,000,000 for each empowerment 
zone for use in conjunction with economic development 
activities consistent with the strategic plan of each 
empowerment zone: Provided further, That $15,000,000 shall be 
available to the Secretary of Agriculture for grants for 
designated empowerment zones in rural areas and for grants for 
designated rural enterprise communities.


                       community development fund


                     (including transfers of funds)


    For assistance to units of State and local government, and 
to other entities, for economic and community development 
activities, and for other purposes, $5,057,550,000: Provided, 
That of the amount provided, $4,409,000,000 is for carrying out 
the community development block grant program under title I of 
the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended 
(the ``Act'' herein) (42 U.S.C. 5301), to remain available 
until September 30, 2003: Provided further, That $71,000,000 
shall be for grants to Indian tribes notwithstanding section 
106(a)(1) of such Act, $3,000,000 shall be available as a grant 
to the Housing Assistance Council, $2,600,000 shall be 
available as a grant to the National American Indian Housing 
Council, $10,000,000 shall be available as a grant to the 
National Housing Development Corporation, for operating 
expenses not to exceed $2,000,000 and for a program of 
affordable housing acquisition and rehabilitation, and 
$45,500,000 shall be for grants pursuant to section 107 of the 
Act of which $3,000,000 shall be made available to support 
Alaska Native serving institutions and native Hawaiian serving 
institutions, as defined under the Higher Education Act, as 
amended, and of which $3,000,000 shall be made available to 
tribal colleges and universities to build, expand, renovate, 
and equip their facilities: Provided further, That not to 
exceed 20 percent of any grant made with funds appropriated 
herein (other than a grant made available in this paragraph to 
the Housing Assistance Council or the National American Indian 
Housing Council, or a grant using funds under section 107(b)(3) 
of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as 
amended) shall be expended for ``Planning and Management 
Development'' and ``Administration'' as defined in regulations 
promulgated by the department: Provided further, That 
$15,000,000 shall be transferred to the Working Capital Fund 
for the development and maintenance of information technology 
systems: Provided further, That $20,000,000 shall be for grants 
pursuant to the Self Help Housing Opportunity Program.
    Of the amount made available under this heading, 
$28,450,000 shall be made available for capacity building, of 
which $25,000,000 shall be made available for ``Capacity 
Building for Community Development and Affordable Housing'', 
for LISC and the Enterprise Foundation for activities as 
authorized by section 4 of the HUD Demonstration Act of 1993 
(Public Law 103-120), as in effect immediately before June 12, 
1997, of which not less than $5,000,000 of the funding shall be 
used in rural areas, including tribal areas, and of which 
$3,450,000 shall be made available for capacity building 
activities administered by Habitat for Humanity International.
    Of the amount made available under this heading, the 
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development may use up to 
$55,000,000 for supportive services for public housing 
residents, as authorized by section 34 of the United States 
Housing Act of 1937, as amended, and for residents of housing 
assisted under the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-
Determination Act of 1996 (NAHASDA) and for grants for service 
coordinators and congregate services for the elderly and 
disabled residents of public and assisted housing and housing 
assisted under NAHASDA.
    Of the amount made available under this heading, 
$44,000,000 shall be available for neighborhood initiatives 
that are utilized to improve the conditions of distressed and 
blighted areas and neighborhoods, to stimulate investment, 
economic diversification, and community revitalization in areas 
with population outmigration or a stagnating or declining 
economic base, or to determine whether housing benefits can be 
integrated more effectively with welfare reform initiatives: 
Provided, That any unobligated balances of amounts set aside 
for neighborhood initiatives in fiscal years 1998, 1999, and 
2000 may be utilized for any of the foregoing purposes: 
Provided further, That these grants shall be provided in accord 
with the terms and conditions specified in the statement of 
managers accompanying this conference report.
    Of the amount made available under this heading, 
notwithstanding any other provision of law, $60,000,000 shall 
be available for YouthBuild program activities authorized by 
subtitle D of title IV of the Cranston-Gonzalez National 
Affordable Housing Act, as amended, and such activities shall 
be an eligible activity with respect to any funds made 
available under this heading: Provided, That local YouthBuild 
programs that demonstrate an ability to leverage private and 
nonprofit funding shall be given a priority for YouthBuild 
funding: Provided further, That no more than ten percent of any 
grant award may be used for administrative costs: Provided 
further, That not less than $10,000,000 shall be available for 
grants to establish YouthBuild programs in underserved and 
rural areas: Provided further, That of the amount provided 
under this paragraph, $4,000,000 shall be set aside and made 
available for a grant to Youthbuild USA for capacity building 
for community development and affordable housing activities as 
specified in section 4 of the HUD Demonstration Act of 1993, as 
amended.
    Of the amounts made available under this heading, 
$2,000,000 shall be available to the Utah Housing Finance 
Agency for the temporary use of relocatable housing during the 
2002 Winter Olympic Games provided such housing is targeted to 
the housing needs of low-income families after the Games.
    Of the amount made available under this heading, 
$292,000,000 shall be available for grants for the Economic 
Development Initiative (EDI) to finance a variety of targeted 
economic investments in accordance with the terms and 
conditions specified in the statement of managers accompanying 
this conference report.
    For the cost of guaranteed loans, $29,000,000, as 
authorized by section 108 of the Housing and Community 
Development Act of 1974: Provided, That such costs, including 
the cost of modifying such loans, shall be as defined in 
section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as 
amended: Provided further, That these funds are available to 
subsidize total loan principal, any part of which is to be 
guaranteed, not to exceed $1,261,000,000, notwithstanding any 
aggregate limitation on outstanding obligations guaranteed in 
section 108(k) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 
1974: Provided further, That in addition, for administrative 
expenses to carry out the guaranteed loan program, $1,000,000, 
which shall be transferred to and merged with the appropriation 
for ``Salaries and expenses''.


                       brownfields redevelopment


    For Economic Development Grants, as authorized by section 
108(q) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as 
amended, for Brownfields redevelopment projects, $25,000,000, 
to remain available until expended: Provided, That the 
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development shall make these 
grants available on a competitive basis as specified in section 
102 of the Department of Housing and Urban Development Reform 
Act of 1989.


                  home investment partnerships program


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the HOME investment partnerships program, as authorized 
under title II of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable 
Housing Act, as amended, $1,800,000,000 to remain available 
until expended: Provided, That up to $20,000,000 of these funds 
shall be available for Housing Counseling under section 106 of 
the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968: Provided 
further, That $17,000,000 shall be transferred to the Working 
Capital Fund for the development and maintenance of information 
technology systems.


                       homeless assistance grants


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the emergency shelter grants program (as authorized 
under subtitle B of title IV of the Stewart B. McKinney 
Homeless Assistance Act, as amended); the supportive housing 
program (as authorized under subtitle C of title IV of such 
Act); the section 8 moderate rehabilitation single room 
occupancy program (as authorized under the United States 
Housing Act of 1937, as amended) to assist homeless individuals 
pursuant to section 441 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless 
Assistance Act; and the shelter plus care program (as 
authorized under subtitle F of title IV of such Act), 
$1,025,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
That not less than 30 percent of these funds shall be used for 
permanent housing, and all funding for services must be matched 
by 25 percent in funding by each grantee: Provided further, 
That all awards of assistance under this heading shall be 
required to coordinate and integrate homeless programs with 
other mainstream health, social services, and employment 
programs for which homeless populations may be eligible, 
including Medicaid, State Children's Health Insurance Program, 
Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, Food Stamps, and 
services funding through the Mental Health and Substance Abuse 
Block Grant, Workforce Investment Act, and the Welfare-to-Work 
grant program: Provided further, That up to 1.5 percent of the 
funds appropriated under this heading is transferred to the 
Working Capital Fund to be used for technical assistance for 
management information systems and to develop an automated, 
client-level Annual Performance Report System: Provided 
further, That $500,000 shall be made available to the 
Interagency Council on the Homeless for administrative needs.


                       shelter plus care renewals


    For the renewal on an annual basis of contracts expiring 
during fiscal years 2001 and 2002 under the Shelter Plus Care 
program, as authorized under subtitle F of title IV of the 
Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act, as amended, 
$100,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
That each Shelter Plus Care project with an expiring contract 
shall be eligible for renewal only if the project is determined 
to be needed under the applicable continuum of care and meets 
appropriate program requirements and financial standards, as 
determined by the Secretary.

                            Housing Programs


                    housing for special populations


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For assistance for the purchase, construction, acquisition, 
or development of additional public and subsidized housing 
units for low income families not otherwise provided for, 
$996,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
That $779,000,000 shall be for capital advances, including 
amendments to capital advance contracts, for housing for the 
elderly, as authorized by section 202 of the Housing Act of 
1959, as amended, and for project rental assistance, and 
amendments to contracts for project rental assistance, for the 
elderly under such section 202(c)(2), and for supportive 
services associated with the housing, of which amount 
$50,000,000 shall be for service coordinators and the 
continuation of existing congregate service grants for 
residents of assisted housing projects and of which amount 
$50,000,000 shall be for grants under section 202b of the 
Housing Act of 1959 (12 U.S.C. 1701q-2) for conversion of 
eligible projects under such section to assisted living or 
related use: Provided further, That of the amount under this 
heading, $217,000,000 shall be for capital advances, including 
amendments to capital advance contracts, for supportive housing 
for persons with disabilities, as authorized by section 811 of 
the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act, for 
project rental assistance, for amendments to contracts for 
project rental assistance, and supportive services associated 
with the housing for persons with disabilities as authorized by 
section 811 of such Act: Provided further, That $1,000,000, to 
be divided evenly between the appropriations for the section 
202 and section 811 programs, shall be transferred to the 
Working Capital Fund for the development and maintenance of 
information technology systems: Provided further, That the 
Secretary may designate up to 25 percent of the amounts 
earmarked under this paragraph for section 811 of such Act for 
tenant-based assistance, as authorized under that section, 
including such authority as may be waived under the next 
proviso, which assistance is 5 years in duration: Provided 
further, That the Secretary may waive any provision of such 
section 202 and such section 811 (including the provisions 
governing the terms and conditions of project rental assistance 
and tenant-based assistance) that the Secretary determines is 
not necessary to achieve the objectives of these programs, or 
that otherwise impedes the ability to develop, operate, or 
administer projects assisted under these programs, and may make 
provision for alternative conditions or terms where 
appropriate.


                         flexible subsidy fund


                          (transfer of funds)


    From the Rental Housing Assistance Fund, all uncommitted 
balances of excess rental charges as of September 30, 2000, and 
any collections made during fiscal year 2001, shall be 
transferred to the Flexible Subsidy Fund, as authorized by 
section 236(g) of the National Housing Act, as amended.

                     Federal Housing Administration


             fha--mutual mortgage insurance program account


                     (including transfers of funds)


    During fiscal year 2001, commitments to guarantee loans to 
carry out the purposes of section 203(b) of the National 
Housing Act, as amended, shall not exceed a loan principal of 
$160,000,000,000.
    During fiscal year 2001, obligations to make direct loans 
to carry out the purposes of section 204(g) of the National 
Housing Act, as amended, shall not exceed $250,000,000: 
Provided, That the foregoing amount shall be for loans to 
nonprofit and governmental entities in connection with sales of 
single family real properties owned by the Secretary and 
formerly insured under the Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund.
    For administrative expenses necessary to carry out the 
guaranteed and direct loan program, $330,888,000, of which not 
to exceed $324,866,000 shall be transferred to the 
appropriation for ``Salaries and expenses''; and not to exceed 
$4,022,000 shall be transferred to the appropriation for 
``Office of Inspector General''. In addition, for 
administrative contract expenses, $160,000,000, of which 
$96,500,000 shall be transferred to the Working Capital Fund 
for the development and maintenance of information technology 
systems: Provided, That to the extent guaranteed loan 
commitments exceed $65,500,000,000 on or before April 1, 2001 
an additional $1,400 for administrative contract expenses shall 
be available for each $1,000,000 in additional guaranteed loan 
commitments (including a pro rata amount for any amount below 
$1,000,000), but in no case shall funds made available by this 
proviso exceed $16,000,000.


             fha--general and special risk program account


                     (including transfers of funds)


    For the cost of guaranteed loans, as authorized by sections 
238 and 519 of the National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715z-3 and 
1735c), including the cost of loan guarantee modifications (as 
that term is defined in section 502 of the Congressional Budget 
Act of 1974, as amended), $101,000,000, to remain available 
until expended: Provided, That these funds are available to 
subsidize total loan principal, any part of which is to be 
guaranteed, of up to $21,000,000,000: Provided further, That 
any amounts made available in any prior appropriations Act for 
the cost (as such term is defined in section 502 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974) of guaranteed loans that are 
obligations of the funds established under section 238 or 519 
of the National Housing Act that have not been obligated or 
that are deobligated shall be available to the Secretary of 
Housing and Urban Development in connection with the making of 
such guarantees and shall remain available until expended, 
notwithstanding the expiration of any period of availability 
otherwise applicable to such amounts.
    Gross obligations for the principal amount of direct loans, 
as authorized by sections 204(g), 207(l), 238, and 519(a) of 
the National Housing Act, shall not exceed $50,000,000; of 
which not to exceed $30,000,000 shall be for bridge financing 
in connection with the sale of multifamily real properties 
owned by the Secretary and formerly insured under such Act; and 
of which not to exceed $20,000,000 shall be for loans to 
nonprofit and governmental entities in connection with the sale 
of single-family real properties owned by the Secretary and 
formerly insured under such Act.
    In addition, for administrative expenses necessary to carry 
out the guaranteed and direct loan programs, $211,455,000, of 
which $193,134,000, shall be transferred to the appropriation 
for ``Salaries and expenses''; and of which $18,321,000 shall 
be transferred to the appropriation for ``Office of Inspector 
General''. In addition, for administrative contract expenses 
necessary to carry out the guaranteed and direct loan programs, 
$144,000,000, of which $33,500,000 shall be transferred to the 
Working Capital Fund for the development and maintenance of 
information technology systems: Provided, That to the extent 
guaranteed loan commitments exceed $8,426,000,000 on or before 
April 1, 2001, an additional $19,800,000 for administrative 
contract expenses shall be available for each $1,000,000 in 
additional guaranteed loan commitments over $8,426,000,000 
(including a pro rata amount for any increment below 
$1,000,000), but in no case shall funds made available by this 
proviso exceed $14,400,000.

                Government National Mortgage Association


guarantees of mortgage-backed securities loan guarantee program account


                     (including transfer of funds)


    New commitments to issue guarantees to carry out the 
purposes of section 306 of the National Housing Act, as amended 
(12 U.S.C. 1721(g)), shall not exceed $200,000,000,000, to 
remain available until September 30, 2002.
    For administrative expenses necessary to carry out the 
guaranteed mortgage-backed securities program, $9,383,000 to be 
derived from the GNMA guarantees of mortgage-backed securities 
guaranteed loan receipt account, of which not to exceed 
$9,383,000 shall be transferred to the appropriation for 
``Salaries and expenses''.

                    Policy Development and Research


                        research and technology


    For contracts, grants, and necessary expenses of programs 
of research and studies relating to housing and urban problems, 
not otherwise provided for, as authorized by title V of the 
Housing and Urban Development Act of 1970, as amended (12 
U.S.C. 1701z-1 et seq.), including carrying out the functions 
of the Secretary under section 1(a)(1)(i) of Reorganization 
Plan No. 2 of 1968, $53,500,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2002: Provided, That of the amount provided under 
this heading, $10,000,000 shall be for the Partnership for 
Advancing Technology in Housing (PATH) Initiative: Provided 
further, That $3,000,000 shall be for program evaluation to 
support strategic planning, performance measurement, and their 
coordination with the Department's budget process: Provided 
further, That $500,000, to remain available until expended, 
shall be for a commission as established under section 525 of 
Preserving Affordable Housing for Senior Citizens and Families 
into the 21st Century Act.

                   Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity


                        fair housing activities


    For contracts, grants, and other assistance, not otherwise 
provided for, as authorized by title VIII of the Civil Rights 
Act of 1968, as amended by the Fair Housing Amendments Act of 
1988, and section 561 of the Housing and Community Development 
Act of 1987, as amended, $46,000,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2002, of which $24,000,000 shall be to carry out 
activities pursuant to such section 561: Provided, That no 
funds made available under this heading shall be used to lobby 
the executive or legislative branches of the Federal Government 
in connection with a specific contract, grant or loan.

                     Office of Lead Hazard Control


                         lead hazard reduction


    For the Lead Hazard Reduction Program, as authorized by 
sections 1011 and 1053 of the Residential Lead-Based Hazard 
Reduction Act of 1992, $100,000,000 to remain available until 
expended, of which $1,000,000 shall be for CLEARCorps and 
$10,000,000 shall be for the Healthy Homes Initiative, pursuant 
to sections 501 and 502 of the Housing and Urban Development 
Act of 1970 that shall include research, studies, testing, and 
demonstration efforts, including education and outreach 
concerning lead-based paint poisoning and other housing-related 
environmental diseases and hazards.

                     Management and Administration


                         salaries and expenses


                     (including transfers of funds)


    For necessary administrative and non-administrative 
expenses of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, 
not otherwise provided for, including not to exceed $7,000 for 
official reception and representation expenses, $1,072,000,000, 
of which $518,000,000 shall be provided from the various funds 
of the Federal Housing Administration, $9,383,000 shall be 
provided from funds of the Government National Mortgage 
Association, $1,000,000 shall be provided from the ``Community 
development fund'' account, $150,000 shall be provided by 
transfer from the ``Title VI Indian federal guarantees 
program'' account, and $200,000 shall be provided by transfer 
from the ``Indian housing loan guarantee fund program'' 
account: Provided, That the Secretary is prohibited from using 
any funds under this heading or any other heading in this Act 
from employing more than 77 schedule C and 20 noncareer Senior 
Executive Service employees: Provided further, That not more 
than $758,000,000 shall be made available to the personal 
services object class: Provided further, That no less than 
$100,000,000 shall be transferred to the Working Capital Fund 
for the development and maintenance of Information Technology 
Systems: Provided further, That the Secretary shall fill 7 out 
of 10 vacancies at the GS-14 and GS-15 levels until the total 
number of GS-14 and GS-15 positions in the Department has been 
reduced from the number of GS-14 and GS-15 positions on the 
date of enactment of this provision by two and one-half 
percent: Provided further, That the Secretary shall submit a 
staffing plan for the Department by May 15, 2001: Provided 
further, That the Secretary is prohibited from using funds 
under this heading or any other heading in this Act to employ 
more than 14 employees in the Office of Public Affairs or in 
any position in the Department where the employee reports to an 
employee of the Office of Public Affairs.


                      office of inspector general


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 
$85,000,000, of which $22,343,000 shall be provided from the 
various funds of the Federal Housing Administration and 
$10,000,000 shall be provided from the amount earmarked for 
Operation Safe Home in the appropriation for ``Drug elimination 
grants for low-income housing'': Provided, That the Inspector 
General shall have independent authority over all personnel 
issues within the Office of Inspector General.

             Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight


                         salaries and expenses


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For carrying out the Federal Housing Enterprise Financial 
Safety and Soundness Act of 1992, including not to exceed $500 
for official reception and representation expenses, 
$22,000,000, to remain available until expended, to be derived 
from the Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight Fund: Provided, 
That not to exceed such amount shall be available from the 
General Fund of the Treasury to the extent necessary to incur 
obligations and make expenditures pending the receipt of 
collections to the Fund: Provided further, That the General 
Fund amount shall be reduced as collections are received during 
the fiscal year so as to result in a final appropriation from 
the General Fund estimated at not more than $0.

                       Administrative Provisions

                      financing adjustment factors

    Sec. 201. Fifty percent of the amounts of budget authority, 
or in lieu thereof 50 percent of the cash amounts associated 
with such budget authority, that are recaptured from projects 
described in section 1012(a) of the Stewart B. McKinney 
Homeless Assistance Amendments Act of 1988 (Public Law 100-628; 
102 Stat. 3224, 3268) shall be rescinded, or in the case of 
cash, shall be remitted to the Treasury, and such amounts of 
budget authority or cash recaptured and not rescinded or 
remitted to the Treasury shall be used by State housing finance 
agencies or local governments or local housing agencies with 
projects approved by the Secretary of Housing and Urban 
Development for which settlement occurred after January 1, 
1992, in accordance with such section. Notwithstanding the 
previous sentence, the Secretary may award up to 15 percent of 
the budget authority or cash recaptured and not rescinded or 
remitted to the Treasury to provide project owners with 
incentives to refinance their project at a lower interest rate.


                      fair housing and free speech


    Sec. 202. None of the amounts made available under this Act 
may be used during fiscal year 2001 to investigate or prosecute 
under the Fair Housing Act any otherwise lawful activity 
engaged in by one or more persons, including the filing or 
maintaining of a non-frivolous legal action, that is engaged in 
solely for the purpose of achieving or preventing action by a 
Government official or entity, or a court of competent 
jurisdiction.


           housing opportunities for persons with aids grants


    Sec. 203. (a) Eligibility.--Notwithstanding section 
854(c)(1)(A) of the AIDS Housing Opportunity Act (42 U.S.C. 
12903(c)(1)(A)), from any amounts made available under this 
title for fiscal year 2001 that are allocated under such 
section, the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development shall 
allocate and make a grant, in the amount determined under 
subsection (b), for any State that--
            (1) received an allocation in a prior fiscal year 
        under clause (ii) of such section; and
            (2) is not otherwise eligible for an allocation for 
        fiscal year 2001 under such clause (ii) because the 
        areas in the State outside of the metropolitan 
        statistical areas that qualify under clause (i) in 
        fiscal year 2001 do not have the number of cases of 
        acquired immunodeficiency syndrome required under such 
        clause.
    (b) Amount.--The amount of the allocation and grant for any 
State described in subsection (a) shall be an amount based on 
the cumulative number of AIDS cases in the areas of that State 
that are outside of metropolitan statistical areas that qualify 
under clause (i) of such section 854(c)(1)(A) in fiscal year 
2001, in proportion to AIDS cases among cities and States that 
qualify under clauses (i) and (ii) of such section and States 
deemed eligible under subsection (a).
    (c) Environmental Review.--Section 856 of the Act is 
amended by adding the following new subsection at the end:
    ``(h) Environmental Review.--For purposes of environmental 
review, a grant under this subtitle shall be treated as 
assistance for a special project that is subject to section 
305(c) of the Multifamily Housing Property Disposition Reform 
Act of 1994, and shall be subject to the regulations issued by 
the Secretary to implement such section.''.

                     enhanced disposition authority

    Sec. 204. Section 204 of the Departments of Veterans 
Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and Independent 
Agencies Appropriations Act, 1997, is amended by striking ``and 
2000'' and inserting ``2000, and thereafter''.


             maximum payment standard for enhanced vouchers


    Sec. 205. Section 8(t)(1)(B) of the United States Housing 
Act of 1937 is amended by inserting ``and any other reasonable 
limit prescribed by the Secretary'' immediately before the 
semicolon.


                  due process for homeless assistance


    Sec. 206. None of the funds appropriated under this or any 
other Act may be used by the Secretary of Housing and Urban 
Development to prohibit or debar or in any way diminish the 
responsibilities of any entity (and the individuals comprising 
that entity) that is responsible for convening and managing a 
continuum of care process (convenor) in a community for 
purposes of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act 
from participating in that capacity unless the Secretary has 
published in the Federal Register a description of all 
circumstances that would be grounds for prohibiting or 
debarring a convenor from administering a continuum of care 
process and the procedures for a prohibition or debarment: 
Provided, That these procedures shall include a requirement 
that a convenor shall be provided with timely notice of a 
proposed prohibition or debarment, an identification of the 
circumstances that could result in the prohibition or 
debarment, an opportunity to respond to or remedy these 
circumstances, and the right for judicial review of any 
decision of the Secretary that results in a prohibition or 
debarment.


                       hud reform act compliance


    Sec. 207. Except as explicitly provided in legislation, any 
grant or assistance made pursuant to Title II of this Act shall 
be made in accordance with section 102 of the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development Reform Act of 1989 on a 
competitive basis.


expansion of environmental assumption authority for homeless assistance 
                                programs


    Sec. 208. Section 443 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless 
Assistance Act is amended to read as follows:

``SEC. 443. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW.

    ``For purposes of environmental review, assistance and 
projects under this title shall be treated as assistance for 
special projects that are subject to section 305(c) of the 
Multifamily Housing Property Disposition Reform Act of 1994, 
and shall be subject to the regulations issued by the Secretary 
to implement such section.''.


    technical amendments and corrections to the national housing act


    Sec. 209. (a) Section 203 Subsection Designations.--Section 
203 of the National Housing Act is amended by--
            (1) redesignating subsection (t) as subsection (u);
            (2) redesignating subsection (s), as added by 
        section 329 of the Cranston-Gonzalez National 
        Affordable Housing Act, as subsection (t); and
            (3) redesignating subsection (v), as added by 
        section 504 of the Housing and Community Development 
        Act of 1992, as subsection (w).
    (b) Mortgage Auctions.--The first sentence of section 
221(g)(4)(C)(viii) of the National Housing Act is amended by 
inserting after ``December 31, 2002'' the following: ``, except 
that this subparagraph shall continue to apply if the Secretary 
receives a mortgagee's written notice of intent to assign its 
mortgage to the Secretary on or before such date''.
    (c) Mortgagee Review Board.--Section 202(c)(2) of the 
National Housing Act is amended--
            (1) in subparagraph (E), by striking ``and'';
            (2) in subparagraph (F), by striking ``or their 
        designees.'' and inserting ``and'';
            (3) by adding the following new subparagraph at the 
        end:
                    ``(G) the Director of the Enforcement 
                Center; or their designees.''.


                   indian housing block grant program


    Sec. 210. Section 201(b) of the Native American Housing 
Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996 is amended--
            (1) by redesignating paragraphs (4) and (5) as 
        paragraphs (5) and (6) respectively; and
            (2) by inserting after paragraph (3) the following 
        new paragraph:
            ``(4) Law enforcement officers.--Notwithstanding 
        paragraph (1), a recipient may provide housing or 
        housing assistance provided through affordable housing 
        activities assisted with grant amounts under this Act 
        to a law enforcement officer on the reservation or 
        other Indian area, who is employed full-time by a 
        Federal, state, county or tribal government, and in 
        implementing such full-time employment is sworn to 
        uphold, and make arrests for violations of Federal, 
        state, county or tribal law, if the recipient 
        determines that the presence of the law enforcement 
        officer on the Indian reservation or other Indian area 
        may deter crime.''.


prohibition on the use of federal assistance in support of the sale of 
                            tobacco products


    Sec. 211. None of the funds appropriated in this or any 
other Act may be used by the Secretary of Housing and Urban 
Development to provide any grant or other assistance to 
construct, operate, or otherwise benefit a facility, or 
facility with a designated portion of that facility, which 
sells, or intends to sell, predominantly cigarettes or other 
tobacco products. For the purposes of this provision, 
predominant sale of cigarettes or other tobacco products means 
cigarette or tobacco sales representing more than 35 percent of 
the annual total in-store, non-fuel, sales.


      prohibition on implementation of puerto rico public housing 
                  administration settlement agreement


    Sec. 212. No funds may be used to implement the agreement 
between the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, the Puerto Rico Public 
Housing Administration, and the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development, dated June 7, 2000, related to the allocation of 
operating subsidies for the Puerto Rico Public Housing 
Administration unless the Puerto Rico Public Housing 
Administration and the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development submit by December 31, 2000 a schedule of 
benchmarks and measurable goals to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations designed to address issues of 
mismanagement and safeguards against fraud and abuse.


                   hope vi grant for hollander ridge


    Sec. 213. The Housing Authority of Baltimore City may use 
the grant award of $20,000,000 made to such authority for 
development efforts at Hollander Ridge in Baltimore, Maryland 
with funds appropriated for fiscal year 1996 under the heading 
``Public Housing Demolition, Site Revitalization, and 
Replacement Housing Grants'' for use, as approved by the 
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development--
            (1) for activities related to the revitalization of 
        the Hollander Ridge site; and
            (2) in accordance with section 24 of the United 
        States Housing Act of 1937.


              computer access for public housing residents


    Sec. 214. (a) Use of Public Housing Capital and Operating 
Funds.--Section 9 of the United States Housing Act of 1937 is 
amended--
            (1) in subsection (d)(1)(E), by inserting before 
        the semicolon the following: ``, including the 
        establishment and initial operation of computer centers 
        in and around public housing through a Neighborhood 
        Networks initiative, for the purpose of enhancing the 
        self-sufficiency, employability, and economic self-
        reliance of public housing residents by providing them 
        with onsite computer access and training resources'';
            (2) in subsection (e)(1)--
                    (A) in subparagraph (I), by striking the 
                word ``and'' at the end;
                    (B) in subparagraph (J), by striking the 
                period and inserting ``; and''; and
                    (C) by adding after subparagraph (J) the 
                following:
                    ``(K) the costs of operating computer 
                centers in public housing through a 
                Neighborhood Networks initiative described in 
                subsection (d)(1)(E), and of activities related 
                to that initiative.''; and
            (3) in subsection (h)--
                    (A) in paragraph (6), by striking the word 
                ``and'' at the end;
                    (B) in paragraph (7), by striking the 
                period and inserting ``; and''; and
                    (C) by inserting after paragraph (7) the 
                following:
            ``(8) assistance in connection with the 
        establishment and operation of computer centers in 
        public housing through a Neighborhood Networks 
        initiative described in subsection (d)(1)(E).''.
    (b) Demolition, Site Revitalization, Replacement Housing, 
and Tenant-Based Assistance Grants for Projects.--Section 24 of 
the United States Housing Act of 1937 is amended--
            (1) in subsection (d)(1)(G), by inserting before 
        the semicolon the following: ``, including a 
        Neighborhood Networks initiative for the establishment 
        and operation of computer centers in public housing for 
        the purpose of enhancing the self-sufficiency, 
        employability, an economic self-reliance of public 
        housing residents by providing them with onsite 
        computer access and training resources''; and
            (2) in subsection (m)(2), in the first sentence, by 
        inserting before the period the following ``, including 
        assistance in connection with the establishment and 
        operation of computer centers in public housing through 
        the Neighborhoods Networks initiative described in 
        subsection (d)(1)(G)''.


                         mark-to-market reform


    Sec. 215. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
properties known as the Hawthornes in Independence, Missouri 
shall be considered eligible multifamily housing projects for 
purposes of participating in the multifamily housing 
restructuring program pursuant to title V of the Departments of 
Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and 
Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 1998 (Public Law 105-
65).


                       section 236 excess income


    Sec. 216. Section 236(g)(3)(A) of the National Housing Act 
is amended by striking out ``fiscal year 2000'' and inserting 
in lieu thereof ``fiscal years 2000 and 2001''.


                            cdbg eligibility


    Sec. 217. Section 102(a)(6)(D) of the Housing and Community 
Development Act of 1974 is amended by--
            (1) in clause (v), striking out the ``or'' at the 
        end;
            (2) in clause (vi), striking the period at the end; 
        and
            (3) adding at the end the following new clause:
    ``(vii)(I) has consolidated its government with one or more 
municipal governments, such that within the county boundaries 
there are no unincorporated areas, (II) has a population of not 
less than 650,000, (III) for more than 10 years, has been 
classified as a metropolitan city for purposes of allocating 
and distributing funds under section 106, and (IV) as of the 
date of enactment of this clause, has over 90 percent of the 
county's population within the jurisdiction of the consolidated 
government; or
    ``(viii) notwithstanding any other provision of this 
section, any county that was classified as an urban county 
pursuant to subparagraph (A) for fiscal year 1999, at the 
option of the county, may hereafter remain classified as an 
urban county for purposes of this Act.''.


 exemption for alaska and mississippi from requirement of resident on 
                              board of pha


    Sec. 218. Public housing agencies in the States of Alaska 
and Mississippi shall not be required to comply with section 
2(b) of the United States Housing Act of 1937, as amended, 
during fiscal year 2001.


             use of moderate rehabilitation funds for home


    Sec. 219. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development shall make the funds 
available under contracts NY36K113004 and NY36K113005 of the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development available for use 
under the HOME Investment Partnerships Act and shall allocate 
such funds to the City of New Rochelle, New York.


                        loma linda reprogramming


    Sec. 220. Of the amounts made available under the sixth 
undesignated paragraph under the heading ``Community Planning 
and Development--Community Development Block Grants'' in title 
II of the Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban 
Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 1999 
(Public Law 105-276) for the Economic Development Initiative 
(EDI) for grants for targeted economic investments, the 
$1,000,000 to be made available (pursuant to the related 
provisions of the joint explanatory statement in the conference 
report to accompany such Act (House Report 105-769)) to the 
City of Loma Linda, California, for infrastructure improvements 
at Redlands Boulevard and California Streets shall, 
notwithstanding such provisions, be made available to the City 
for infrastructure improvements related to the Mountain View 
Bridge.


            native american eligibility for the ross program


    Sec. 221. (a) Section 34 of the United States Housing Act 
of 1937 is amended--
            (1) in the heading, by striking ``PUBLIC HOUSING'' 
        and inserting ``PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING'';
            (2) in subsection (a)--
                    (A) by inserting after ``residents,'' the 
                following: ``recipients under the Native 
                American Housing Assistance and Self-
                Determination Act of 1996 (notwithstanding 
                section 502 of such Act) on behalf of residents 
                of housing assisted under such Act,'' and
                    (B) by inserting after ``public housing 
                residents'' the second place it appears the 
                following: ``and residents of housing assisted 
                under such Act'',
            (3) in subsection (b)--
                    (A) by inserting after ``project'' the 
                first place it appears the following: ``or the 
                property of a recipient under such Act or 
                housing assisted under such Act'';
                    (B) by inserting after ``public housing 
                residents'' the following: ``or residents of 
                housing assisted under such Act''; and
                    (C) in subsection (b)(1), by inserting 
                after ``public housing project'' the following: 
                ``or residents of housing assisted under such 
                Act''; and
            (4) in subsection (d)(2), by striking ``State or 
        local'' and inserting ``State, local, or tribal''.
    (b) Assessment and Report.--Section 538(b)(1) of the 
Quality Housing and Work Responsibility Act of 1998 is amended 
by inserting after ``public housing'' the following: ``and 
housing assisted under the Native American Housing Assistance 
and Self-Determination Act of 1996''.


      treatment of expiring economic development initiative grants


    Sec. 222. (a) Availability.--Section 220(a) of the 
Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban 
Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000 
(Public Law 106-74; 113 Stat. 1075) is amended by striking 
``September 30, 2000'' and inserting ``September 30, 2001''.
    (b) Applicability.--The Secretary of the Treasury and the 
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development shall take such 
actions as may be necessary to carry out such section 220 (as 
amended by this subsection (a) of this section) notwithstanding 
any actions taken previously pursuant to section 1552 of title 
31, United States Code.


           home program disaster funding for elderly housing


    Sec. 223. Of the amounts made available under Chapter IX of 
the Supplemental Appropriations Act of 1993 for assistance 
under the HOME investment partnerships program to the city of 
Homestead, Florida (Public Law 103-50; 107 Stat. 262), up to 
$583,926.70 shall be made available to Dade County, Florida, 
for use only for rehabilitating housing for low-income elderly 
persons, and such amount shall not be subject to the 
requirements of such program, except for section 288 of the 
HOME Investment Partnerships Act (42 U.S.C. 12838).


                        cdbg public services cap


    Sec. 224. Section 105(a)(8) of the Housing and Community 
Development Act of 1974 is amended by striking ``1993'' and all 
that follows through ``City of Los Angeles'' and inserting 
``1993 through 2001 to the City of Los Angeles''.


  extension of applicability of downpayment simplification provisions


      Sec. 225. Subparagraph (A) of section 203(b)(10) of the 
National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1709(b)(10)(A)) is amended, in 
the matter that precedes clause (i), by striking ``mortgage'' 
and all that follows through ``involving'' and inserting 
``mortgage closed on or before December 31, 2002, involving''.


    use of supportive housing program funds for information systems


    Sec. 226. Section 423 of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless 
Assistance Act is amended under subsection (a) by adding the 
following paragraph:
            ``(7) Management information system.--A grant for 
        the costs of implementing and operating management 
        information systems for purposes of collecting 
        unduplicated counts of homeless people and analyzing 
        patterns of use of assistance funded under this Act.''.


                  indian housing loan guarantee reform


    Sec. 227. Section 184 of the Housing and Community 
Development Act of 1992 is amended--
            (1) in subsection (a), by striking ``or as a result 
        of a lack of access to private financial markets''; and
            (2) in subsection (b)(2), by inserting 
        ``refinance,'' after ``acquire,''.


                 use of section 8 vouchers for opt-outs


    Sec. 228. Section 8(t)(2) of the United States Housing Act 
of 1937 is amended by inserting after ``contract for rental 
assistance under section 8 of the United States Housing Act of 
1937 for such housing project'' the following: ``(including any 
such termination or expiration during fiscal years after fiscal 
year 1996 prior to the effective date of the Departments of 
Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and 
Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 2001)''.


                 homeless discharge coordination policy


    Sec. 229. (a) Discharge Coordination Policy.--Subtitle A of 
title IV of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act is 
amended by adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 402. DISCHARGE COORDINATION POLICY.

    ``The Secretary may not provide a grant under this title 
for any governmental entity serving as an applicant unless the 
applicant agrees to develop and implement, to the maximum 
extent practicable and where appropriate, policies and 
protocols for the discharge of persons from publicly funded 
institutions or systems of care (such as health care 
facilities, foster care or other youth facilities, or 
correction programs and institutions) in order to prevent such 
discharge from immediately resulting in homelessness for such 
persons.''.
    (b) Assistance Under Emergency Shelter Grants Program.--
Section 414(a)(4) of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless 
Assistance Act is amended--
            (1) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A), by 
        inserting a comma after ``homelessness'';
            (2) by striking ``Not'' and inserting the 
        following: ``Activities that are eligible for 
        assistance under this paragraph shall include 
        assistance to very low-income families who are 
        discharged from publicly funded institutions or systems 
        of care (such as health care facilities, foster care or 
        other youth facilities, or correction programs and 
        institutions). Not''.


             technical change to seniors housing commission


    Sec. 230. Section 525 of the Preserving Affordable Housing 
for Senior Citizens and Families into the 21st Century Act'' 
(42 U.S.C. 12701 note) is amended in subsection (a) by striking 
``Commission on Affordable Housing and Health Care Facility 
Needs in the 21st Century'' and inserting ``Commission on 
Affordable Housing and Health Facility Needs for Seniors in the 
21st Century''.


              interagency council on the homeless reforms


    Sec. 231. Title II of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless 
Assistance Act is amended--
            (1) in section 202, under subsection (b) by 
        inserting after the period the following:
                    ``The positions of Chairperson and Vice 
                Chairperson shall rotate among its members on 
                an annual basis.''; and
            (2) in section 209 by striking ``1994'' and 
        inserting ``2005''.


                 section 8 pha project-based assistance


    Sec. 232. (a) In General.--Paragraph (13) of section 8(o) 
of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 
1437f(o)(13)) is amended to read as follows:
            ``(13) PHA project-based assistance.--
                    ``(A) In general.--A public housing agency 
                may use amounts provided under an annual 
                contributions contract under this subsection to 
                enter into a housing assistance payment 
                contract with respect to an existing, newly 
                constructed, or rehabilitated structure, that 
                is attached to the structure, subject to the 
                limitations and requirements of this paragraph.
                    ``(B) Percentage limitation.--Not more than 
                20 percent of the funding available for tenant-
                based assistance under this section that is 
                administered by the agency may be attached to 
                structures pursuant to this paragraph.
                    ``(C) Consistency with pha plan and other 
                goals.--A public housing agency may approve a 
                housing assistance payment contract pursuant to 
                this paragraph only if the contract is 
                consistent with--
                            ``(i) the public housing agency 
                        plan for the agency approved under 
                        section 5A; and
                            ``(ii) the goal of deconcentrating 
                        poverty and expanding housing and 
                        economic opportunities.
                    ``(D) Income mixing requirement.--
                            ``(i) In general.--Not more than 25 
                        percent of the dwelling units in any 
                        building may be assisted under a 
                        housing assistance payment contract for 
                        project-based assistance pursuant to 
                        this paragraph.
                            ``(ii) Exceptions.--The limitation 
                        under clause (i) shall not apply in the 
                        case of assistance under a contract for 
                        housing consisting of single family 
                        properties or for dwelling units that 
                        are specifically made available for 
                        households comprised of elderly 
                        families, disabled families, and 
                        families receiving supportive services.
                    ``(E) Resident choice requirement.--A 
                housing assistance payment contract pursuant to 
                this paragraph shall provide as follows:
                            ``(i) Mobility.--Each low-income 
                        family occupying a dwelling unit 
                        assisted under the contract may move 
                        from the housing at any time after the 
                        family has occupied the dwelling unit 
                        for 12 months.
                            ``(ii) Continued assistance.--Upon 
                        such a move, the public housing agency 
                        shall provide the low-income family 
                        with tenant-based rental assistance 
                        under this section or such other 
                        tenant-based rental assistance that is 
                        subject to comparable income, 
                        assistance, rent contribution, 
                        affordability, and other requirements, 
                        as the Secretary shall provide by 
                        regulation. If such rental assistance 
                        is not immediately available to fulfill 
                        the requirement under the preceding 
                        sentence with respect to a low-income 
                        family, such requirement may be met by 
                        providing the family priority to 
                        receive the next voucher or other 
                        tenant-based rental assistance amounts 
                        that become available under the program 
                        used to fulfill such requirement.
                    ``(F) Contract term.--A housing assistance 
                payment contract pursuant to this paragraph 
                between a public housing agency and the owner 
                of a structure may have a term of up to 10 
                years, subject to the availability of 
                sufficient appropriated funds for the purpose 
                of renewing expiring contracts for assistance 
                payments, as provided in appropriations Acts 
                and in the agency's annual contributions 
                contract with the Secretary, and to annual 
                compliance with the inspection requirements 
                under paragraph (8), except that the agency 
                shall not be required to make annual 
                inspections of each assisted unit in the 
                development. The contract may specify 
                additional conditions for its continuation. If 
                the units covered by the contract are owned by 
                the agency, the term of the contract shall be 
                agreed upon by the agency and the unit of 
                general local government or other entity 
                approved by the Secretary in the manner 
                provided under paragraph (11).
                    ``(G) Extension of contract term.--A public 
                housing agency may enter into a contract with 
                the owner of a structure assisted under a 
                housing assistance payment contract pursuant to 
                this paragraph to extend the term of the 
                underlying housing assistance payment contract 
                for such period as the agency determines to be 
                appropriate to achieve long-term affordability 
                of the housing or to expand housing 
                opportunities. Such a contract shall provide 
                that the extension of such term shall be 
                contingent upon the future availability of 
                appropriated funds for the purpose of renewing 
                expiring contracts for assistance payments, as 
                provided in appropriations Acts, and may 
                obligate the owner to have such extensions of 
                the underlying housing assistance payment 
                contract accepted by the owner and the 
                successors in interest of the owner.
                    ``(H) Rent calculation.--A housing 
                assistance payment contract pursuant to this 
                paragraph shall establish rents for each unit 
                assisted in an amount that does not exceed 110 
                percent of the applicable fair market rental 
                (or any exception payment standard approved by 
                the Secretary pursuant to paragraph (1)(D)), 
                except that if a contract covers a dwelling 
                unit that has been allocated low-income housing 
                tax credits pursuant to section 42 of the 
                Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (26 U.S.C. 42) 
                and is not located in a qualified census tract 
                (as such term is defined in subsection (d) of 
                such section 42), the rent for such unit may be 
                established at any level that does not exceed 
                the rent charged for comparable units in the 
                building that also receive the low-income 
                housing tax credit but do not have additional 
                rental assistance. The rents established by 
                housing assistance payment contracts pursuant 
                to this paragraph may vary from the payment 
                standards established by the public housing 
                agency pursuant to paragraph (1)(B), but shall 
                be subject to paragraph (10)(A).
                    ``(I) Rent adjustments.--A housing 
                assistance payments contract pursuant to this 
                paragraph shall provide for rent adjustments, 
                except that--
                            ``(i) the adjusted rent for any 
                        unit assisted shall be reasonable in 
                        comparison with rents charged for 
                        comparable dwelling units in the 
                        private, unassisted, local market and 
                        may not exceed the maximum rent 
                        permitted under subparagraph (H); and
                            ``(ii) the provisions of subsection 
                        (c)(2)(C) shall not apply.
                    ``(J) Tenant selection.--A public housing 
                agency shall select families to receive 
                project-based assistance pursuant to this 
                paragraph from its waiting list for assistance 
                under this subsection. Eligibility for such 
                project-based assistance shall be subject to 
                the provisions of section 16(b) that apply to 
                tenant-based assistance. The agency may 
                establish preferences or criteria for selection 
                for a unit assisted under this paragraph that 
                are consistent with the public housing agency 
                plan for the agency approved under section 5A. 
                Any family that rejects an offer of project-
                based assistance under this paragraph or that 
                is rejected for admission to a structure by the 
                owner or manager of a structure assisted under 
                this paragraph shall retain its place on the 
                waiting list as if the offer had not been made. 
                The owner or manager of a structure assisted 
                under this paragraph shall not admit any family 
                to a dwelling unit assisted under a contract 
                pursuant to this paragraph other than a family 
                referred by the public housing agency from its 
                waiting list. Subject to its waiting list 
                policies and selection preferences, a public 
                housing agency may place on its waiting list a 
                family referred by the owner or manager of a 
                structure and may maintain a separate waiting 
                list for assistance under this paragraph, but 
                only if all families on the agency's waiting 
                list for assistance under this subsection are 
                permitted to place their names on the separate 
                list.
                    ``(K) Vacated units.--Notwithstanding 
                paragraph (9), a housing assistance payment 
                contract pursuant to this paragraph may provide 
                as follows:
                            ``(i) Payment for vacant units.--
                        That the public housing agency may, in 
                        its discretion, continue to provide 
                        assistance under the contract, for a 
                        reasonable period not exceeding 60 
                        days, for a dwelling unit that becomes 
                        vacant, but only (I) if the vacancy was 
                        not the fault of the owner of the 
                        dwelling unit, and (II) the agency and 
                        the owner take every reasonable action 
                        to minimize the likelihood and extent 
                        of any such vacancy. Rental assistance 
                        may not be provided for a vacant unit 
                        after the expiration of such period.
                            ``(ii) Reduction of contract.--
                        That, if despite reasonable efforts of 
                        the agency and the owner to fill a 
                        vacant unit, no eligible family has 
                        agreed to rent the unit within 120 days 
                        after the owner has notified the agency 
                        of the vacancy, the agency may reduce 
                        its housing assistance payments 
                        contract with the owner by the amount 
                        equivalent to the remaining months of 
                        subsidy attributable to the vacant 
                        unit. Amounts deobligated pursuant to 
                        such a contract provision shall be 
                        available to the agency to provide 
                        assistance under this subsection.
                Eligible applicants for assistance under this 
                subsection may enforce provisions authorized by 
                this subparagraph.''.
    (b) Applicability.--In the case of any dwelling unit that, 
upon the date of the enactment of this Act, is assisted under a 
housing assistance payment contract under section 8(o)(13) of 
the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f(o)(13)) 
as in effect before such enactment, such assistance may be 
extended or renewed notwithstanding the requirements under 
subparagraphs (C), (D), and (E) of such section 8(o)(13), as 
amended by subsection (a).


  disposition of hud-held and hud-owned multifamily projects for the 
                          elderly or disabled


    Sec. 233. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, in 
managing and disposing of any multifamily property that is 
owned or held by the Secretary and is occupied primarily by 
elderly or disabled families, the Secretary of Housing and 
Urban Development shall maintain any rental assistance payments 
under section 8 of the United States Housing Act of 1937 that 
are attached to any dwelling units in the property. To the 
extent the Secretary determines that such a multifamily 
property owned or held by the Secretary is not feasible for 
continued rental assistance payments under such section 8, the 
Secretary may, in consultation with the tenants of that 
property, contract for project-based rental assistance payments 
with an owner or owners of other existing housing properties or 
provide other rental assistance.


                       family unification program


    Sec. 234. Section 8(x)(2) of the United States Housing Act 
of 1937 (42 U.S.C 1437f(x)(2)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``any family (A) who is otherwise 
        eligible for such assistance, and (B)'' and inserting 
        ``(A) any family (i) who is otherwise eligible for such 
        assistance, and (ii)''; and
            (2) by inserting before the period at the end the 
        following: ``and (B) for a period not to exceed 18 
        months, otherwise eligible youths who have attained at 
        least 18 years of age and not more than 21 years of age 
        and who have left foster care at age 16 or older''.


 permanent extension of fha multifamily mortgage credit demonstrations


    Sec. 235. Section 542 of the Housing and Community 
Development Act of 1992 (12 U.S.C. 1707 note) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (a)--
                    (A) in the first sentence, by striking 
                ``demonstrate the effectiveness of providing'' 
                and inserting ``provide''; and
                    (B) in the second sentence, by striking 
                ``demonstration'' and inserting ``the'';
            (2) in subsection (b)--
                    (A) in paragraph (1), by striking 
                ``determine the effectiveness of'' and 
                inserting ``provide''; and
                    (B) by striking paragraph (5), and 
                inserting the following new paragraph:
            ``(5) Insurance authority.--Using any authority 
        provided in appropriation Acts to insure mortgages 
        under the National Housing Act, the Secretary may enter 
        into commitments under this subsection for risk-sharing 
        units.'';
            (3) in subsection (c)--
                    (A) in paragraph (1), by striking ``test 
                the effectiveness of'' and inserting 
                ``provide''; and
                    (B) by striking paragraph (4) and inserting 
                the following new paragraph:
            ``(4) Insurance authority.--Using any authority 
        provided in appropriation Acts to insure mortgages 
        under the National Housing Act, the Secretary may enter 
        into commitments under this subsection for risk-sharing 
        units.'';
            (4) by striking subsection (d);
            (5) by striking ``pilot'' and ``Pilot'' each place 
        such terms appear; and
            (6) in the section heading, by striking 
        ``demonstrations'' and inserting ``programs''.

                    TITLE III--INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

                  American Battle Monuments Commission

                         salaries and expenses

    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, of the 
American Battle Monuments Commission, including the acquisition 
of land or interest in land in foreign countries; purchases and 
repair of uniforms for caretakers of national cemeteries and 
monuments outside of the United States and its territories and 
possessions; rent of office and garage space in foreign 
countries; purchase (one for replacement only) and hire of 
passenger motor vehicles; and insurance of official motor 
vehicles in foreign countries, when required by law of such 
countries, $28,000,000, to remain available until expended.

             Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses in carrying out activities pursuant 
to section 112(r)(6) of the Clean Air Act, including hire of 
passenger vehicles, and for services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 
3109, but at rates for individuals not to exceed the per diem 
equivalent to the maximum rate payable for senior level 
positions under 5 U.S.C. 5376, $7,500,000, $5,000,000 of which 
to remain available until September 30, 2001 and $2,500,000 of 
which to remain available until September 30, 2002: Provided, 
That the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board shall 
have not more than three career Senior Executive Service 
positions: Provided further, That there shall be an Inspector 
General at the Board who shall have the duties, 
responsibilities, and authorities specified in the Inspector 
General Act of 1978, as amended: Provided further, That an 
individual appointed to the position of Inspector General of 
the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) shall, by virtue 
of such appointment, also hold the position of Inspector 
General of the Board: Provided further, That the Inspector 
General of the Board shall utilize personnel of the Office of 
Inspector General of FEMA in performing the duties of the 
Inspector General of the Board, and shall not appoint any 
individuals to positions within the Board.

                       Department of the Treasury

              Community Development Financial Institutions


              community development financial institutions


                          fund program account


    To carry out the Community Development Banking and 
Financial Institutions Act of 1994, including services 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, but at rates for individuals not 
to exceed the per diem rate equivalent to the rate for ES-3, 
$118,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2002, of 
which $5,000,000 shall be for technical assistance and training 
programs designed to benefit Native American Communities, and 
up to $8,750,000 may be used for administrative expenses, up to 
$19,750,000 may be used for the cost of direct loans, and up to 
$1,000,000 may be used for administrative expenses to carry out 
the direct loan program: Provided, That the cost of direct 
loans, including the cost of modifying such loans, shall be as 
defined in section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974: 
Provided further, That these funds are available to subsidize 
gross obligations for the principal amount of direct loans not 
to exceed $53,000,000.

                   Consumer Product Safety Commission


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses of the Consumer Product Safety 
Commission, including hire of passenger motor vehicles, 
services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, but at rates for 
individuals not to exceed the per diem rate equivalent to the 
maximum rate payable under 5 U.S.C. 5376, purchase of nominal 
awards to recognize non-Federal officials' contributions to 
Commission activities, and not to exceed $500 for official 
reception and representation expenses, $52,500,000.

             Corporation for National and Community Service


                national and community service programs


                           operating expenses


              (including transfer and rescission of funds)


    For necessary expenses for the Corporation for National and 
Community Service (referred to in the matter under this heading 
as the ``Corporation'') in carrying out programs, activities, 
and initiatives under the National and Community Service Act of 
1990 (referred to in the matter under this heading as the 
``Act'') (42 U.S.C. 12501 et seq.), $458,500,000, to remain 
available until September 30, 2002: Provided, That not more 
than $31,000,000 shall be available for administrative expenses 
authorized under section 501(a)(4) of the Act (42 U.S.C. 
12671(a)(4)) with not less than $2,000,000 targeted for the 
acquisition of a cost accounting system for the Corporation's 
financial management system, an integrated grants management 
system that provides comprehensive financial management 
information for all Corporation grants and cooperative 
agreements, and the establishment, operation and maintenance of 
a central archives serving as the repository for all grant, 
cooperative agreement, and related documents, without regard to 
the provisions of section 501(a)(4)(B) of the Act: Provided 
further, That not more than $2,500 shall be for official 
reception and representation expenses: Provided further, That 
not more than $70,000,000, to remain available without fiscal 
year limitation, shall be transferred to the National Service 
Trust account for educational awards authorized under subtitle 
D of title I of the Act (42 U.S.C. 12601 et seq.), of which not 
to exceed $5,000,000 shall be available for national service 
scholarships for high school students performing community 
service: Provided further, That not more than $231,000,000 of 
the amount provided under this heading shall be available for 
grants under the National Service Trust program authorized 
under subtitle C of title I of the Act (42 U.S.C. 12571 et 
seq.) (relating to activities including the AmeriCorps 
program), of which not more than $45,000,000 may be used to 
administer, reimburse, or support any national service program 
authorized under section 121(d)(2) of such Act (42 U.S.C. 
12581(d)(2)); and not more than $25,000,000 may be made 
available to activities dedicated to developing computer and 
information technology skills for students and teachers in low-
income communities: Provided further, That not more than 
$10,000,000 of the funds made available under this heading 
shall be made available for the Points of Light Foundation for 
activities authorized under title III of the Act (42 U.S.C. 
12661 et seq.): Provided further, That no funds shall be 
available for national service programs run by Federal agencies 
authorized under section 121(b) of such Act (42 U.S.C. 
12571(b)): Provided further, That to the maximum extent 
feasible, funds appropriated under subtitle C of title I of the 
Act shall be provided in a manner that is consistent with the 
recommendations of peer review panels in order to ensure that 
priority is given to programs that demonstrate quality, 
innovation, replicability, and sustainability: Provided 
further, That not more than $21,000,000 of the funds made 
available under this heading shall be available for the 
Civilian Community Corps authorized under subtitle E of title I 
of the Act (42 U.S.C. 12611 et seq.): Provided further, That 
not more than $43,000,000 shall be available for school-based 
and community-based service-learning programs authorized under 
subtitle B of title I of the Act (42 U.S.C. 12521 et seq.): 
Provided further, That not more than $28,500,000 shall be 
available for quality and innovation activities authorized 
under subtitle H of title I of the Act (42 U.S.C. 12853 et 
seq.): Provided further, That not more than $5,000,000 shall be 
available for audits and other evaluations authorized under 
section 179 of the Act (42 U.S.C. 12639): Provided further, 
That to the maximum extent practicable, the Corporation shall 
increase significantly the level of matching funds and in-kind 
contributions provided by the private sector, shall expand 
significantly the number of educational awards provided under 
subtitle D of title I, and shall reduce the total Federal costs 
per participant in all programs: Provided further, That of 
amounts available in the National Service Trust account from 
previous appropriations Acts, $30,000,000 shall be rescinded: 
Provided further, That not more than $7,500,000 of the funds 
made available under this heading shall be made available to 
America's Promise--The Alliance for Youth, Inc. only to support 
efforts to mobilize individuals, groups, and organizations to 
build and strengthen the character and competence of the 
Nation's youth: Provided further, That not more than $5,000,000 
of the funds made available under this heading shall be made 
available to the Communities In Schools, Inc. to support 
dropout prevention activities: Provided further, That not more 
than $2,500,000 of the funds made available under this heading 
shall be made available to the Parents as Teachers National 
Center, Inc. to support childhood parent education and family 
support activities: Provided further, That not more than 
$2,500,000 of the funds made available under this heading shall 
be made available to the Boys and Girls Clubs of America to 
establish an innovative outreach program designed to meet the 
special needs of youth in public and Native American housing 
communities: Provided further, That not more than $1,500,000 of 
the funds made available under this heading shall be made 
available to the Youth Life Foundation to meet the needs of 
children living in insecure environments.


                      office of inspector general


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 
$5,000,000, which shall be available for obligation through 
September 30, 2002.


                        administrative provision


    The Department of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban 
Development, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000 
(Public Law 106-74) is amended under the heading ``Corporation 
for National and Community Service, National and Community 
Service Programs Operating Expenses'' in title III by reducing 
to $229,000,000 the amount available for grants under the 
National Service Trust program authorized under subtitle C of 
title I of the National and Community Service Act of 1990 (the 
``Act'') (with a corresponding reduction to $40,000,000 in the 
amount that may be used to administer, reimburse, or support 
any national service program authorized under section 121(d)(2) 
of the Act), and by increasing to $33,500,000 the amount 
available for quality and innovation activities authorized 
under subtitle H of title I of the Act, with the increase in 
subtitle H funds made available to provide a grant covering a 
period of three years to support the ``P.A.V.E. the Way'' 
project described in House Report 106-379.

                  Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses for the operation of the United 
States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims as authorized by 38 
U.S.C. 7251-7298, $12,445,000, of which $895,000 shall be 
available for the purpose of providing financial assistance as 
described, and in accordance with the process and reporting 
procedures set forth, under this heading in Public Law 102-229.

                      Department of Defense--Civil

                       Cemeterial Expenses, Army

                         salaries and expenses

    For necessary expenses, as authorized by law, for 
maintenance, operation, and improvement of Arlington National 
Cemetery and Soldiers' and Airmen's Home National Cemetery, 
including the purchase of two passenger motor vehicles for 
replacement only, and not to exceed $1,000 for official 
reception and representation expenses, $17,949,000, to remain 
available until expended.

                Department of Health and Human Services

                     National Institutes of Health


          national institute of environmental health sciences


    For necessary expenses for the National Institute of 
Environmental Health Sciences in carrying out activities set 
forth in section 311(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental 
Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, 
$63,000,000.

            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses for the Agency for Toxic Substances 
and Disease Registry (ATSDR) in carrying out activities set 
forth in sections 104(i), 111(c)(4), and 111(c)(14) of the 
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended; section 118(f) of 
the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 
(SARA), as amended; and section 3019 of the Solid Waste 
Disposal Act, as amended, $75,000,000, to be derived from the 
Hazardous Substance Superfund Trust Fund pursuant to section 
517(a) of SARA (26 U.S.C. 9507): Provided, That not 
withstanding any other provision of law, in lieu of performing 
a health assessment under section 104(i)(6) of CERCLA, the 
Administrator of ATSDR may conduct other appropriate health 
studies, evaluations, or activities, including, without 
limitation, biomedical testing, clinical evaluations, medical 
monitoring, and referral to accredited health care providers: 
Provided further, That in performing any such health assessment 
or health study, evaluation, or activity, the Administrator of 
ATSDR shall not be bound by the deadlines in section 
104(i)(6)(A) of CERCLA: Provided further, That none of the 
funds appropriated under this heading shall be available for 
the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry to issue 
in excess of 40 toxicological profiles pursuant to section 
104(i) of CERCLA during fiscal year 2001, and existing profiles 
may be updated as necessary.

                    Environmental Protection Agency

                         science and technology

    For science and technology, including research and 
development activities, which shall include research and 
development activities under the Comprehensive Environmental 
Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended; 
necessary expenses for personnel and related costs and travel 
expenses, including uniforms, or allowances therefore, as 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; services as authorized by 5 
U.S.C. 3109, but at rates for individuals not to exceed the per 
diem rate equivalent to the maximum rate payable for senior 
level positions under 5 U.S.C. 5376; procurement of laboratory 
equipment and supplies; other operating expenses in support of 
research and development; construction, alteration, repair, 
rehabilitation, and renovation of facilities, not to exceed 
$75,000 per project, $696,000,000, which shall remain available 
until September 30, 2002.


                 environmental programs and management


    For environmental programs and management, including 
necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, for personnel 
and related costs and travel expenses, including uniforms, or 
allowances therefore, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; 
services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, but at rates for 
individuals not to exceed the per diem rate equivalent to the 
maximum rate payable for senior level positions under 5 U.S.C. 
5376; hire of passenger motor vehicles; hire, maintenance, and 
operation of aircraft; purchase of reprints; library 
memberships in societies or associations which issue 
publications to members only or at a price to members lower 
than to subscribers who are not members; construction, 
alteration, repair, rehabilitation, and renovation of 
facilities, not to exceed $75,000 per project; and not to 
exceed $6,000 for official reception and representation 
expenses, $2,087,990,000, which shall remain available until 
September 30, 2002: Provided, That none of the funds 
appropriated by this Act shall be used to propose or issue 
rules, regulations, decrees, or orders for the purpose of 
implementation, or in preparation for implementation, of the 
Kyoto Protocol which was adopted on December 11, 1997, in 
Kyoto, Japan at the Third Conference of the Parties to the 
United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, which 
has not been submitted to the Senate for advice and consent to 
ratification pursuant to article II, section 2, clause 2, of 
the United States Constitution, and which has not entered into 
force pursuant to article 25 of the Protocol: Provided further, 
That none of the funds made available in this Act may be used 
to implement or administer the interim guidance issued on 
February 5, 1998, by the Environmental Protection Agency 
relating to title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and 
designated as the ``Interim Guidance for Investigating Title VI 
Administrative Complaints Challenging Permits'' with respect to 
complaints filed under such title after October 21, 1998, and 
until guidance is finalized. Nothing in this proviso may be 
construed to restrict the Environmental Protection Agency from 
developing or issuing final guidance relating to title VI of 
the Civil Rights Act of 1964: Provided further, That 
notwithstanding section 1412(b)(12)(A)(v) of the Safe Drinking 
Water Act, as amended, the Administrator shall promulgate a 
national primary drinking water regulation for arsenic not 
later than June 22, 2001.


                      office of inspector general


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act of 
1978, as amended, and for construction, alteration, repair, 
rehabilitation, and renovation of facilities, not to exceed 
$75,000 per project, $34,094,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2002.


                        buildings and facilities


    For construction, repair, improvement, extension, 
alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities of, 
or for use by, the Environmental Protection Agency, 
$23,931,000, to remain available until expended.

                     hazardous substance superfund


                     (including transfers of funds)


    For necessary expenses to carry out the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 
(CERCLA), as amended, including sections 111(c)(3), (c)(5), 
(c)(6), and (e)(4) (42 U.S.C. 9611), and for construction, 
alteration, repair, rehabilitation, and renovation of 
facilities, not to exceed $75,000 per project; $1,270,000,000 
(of which $100,000,000 shall not become available until 
September 1, 2001), to remain available until expended, 
consisting of $635,000,000, as authorized by section 517(a) of 
the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 
(SARA), as amended by Public Law 101-508, and $635,000,000 as a 
payment from general revenues to the Hazardous Substance 
Superfund for purposes as authorized by section 517(b) of SARA, 
as amended: Provided, That funds appropriated under this 
heading may be allocated to other Federal agencies in 
accordance with section 111(a) of CERCLA: Provided further, 
That of the funds appropriated under this heading, $11,500,000 
shall be transferred to the ``Office of Inspector General'' 
appropriation to remain available until September 30, 2002, and 
$36,500,000 shall be transferred to the ``Science and 
technology'' appropriation to remain available until September 
30, 2002.


                leaking underground storage tank program


    For necessary expenses to carry out leaking underground 
storage tank cleanup activities authorized by section 205 of 
the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and 
for construction, alteration, repair, rehabilitation, and 
renovation of facilities, not to exceed $75,000 per project, 
$72,096,000, to remain available until expended.


                           oil spill response


    For expenses necessary to carry out the Environmental 
Protection Agency's responsibilities under the Oil Pollution 
Act of 1990, $15,000,000, to be derived from the Oil Spill 
Liability trust fund, to remain available until expended.


                   state and tribal assistance grants


    For environmental programs and infrastructure assistance, 
including capitalization grants for State revolving funds and 
performance partnership grants, $3,628,740,000, to remain 
available until expended, of which $1,350,000,000 shall be for 
making capitalization grants for the Clean Water State 
Revolving Funds under title VI of the Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act, as amended; $825,000,000 shall be for 
capitalization grants for the Drinking Water State Revolving 
Funds under section 1452 of the Safe Drinking Water Act, as 
amended, except that, notwithstanding section 1452(n) of the 
Safe Drinking Water Act, as amended, none of the funds made 
available under this heading in this Act, or in previous 
appropriations Acts, shall be reserved by the Administrator for 
health effects studies on drinking water contaminants; 
$75,000,000 shall be for architectural, engineering, planning, 
design, construction and related activities in connection with 
the construction of high priority water and wastewater 
facilities in the area of the United States-Mexico Border, 
after consultation with the appropriate border commission; 
$35,000,000 shall be for grants to the State of Alaska to 
address drinking water and wastewater infrastructure needs of 
rural and Alaska Native Villages; $335,740,000 shall be for 
making grants for the construction of wastewater and water 
treatment facilities and groundwater protection infrastructure 
in accordance with the terms and conditions specified for such 
grants in the conference report and joint explanatory statement 
of the committee of conference accompanying this Act, except 
that, notwithstanding any other provision of law, of the funds 
herein and hereafter appropriated under this heading for such 
special needs infrastructure grants, the Administrator may use 
up to 3 percent of the amount of each project appropriated to 
administer the management and oversight of construction of such 
projects through contracts, allocation to the Corps of 
Engineers, or grants to States; and $1,008,000,000 shall be for 
grants, including associated program support costs, to States, 
federally recognized tribes, interstate agencies, tribal 
consortia, and air pollution control agencies for multi-media 
or single media pollution prevention, control and abatement and 
related activities, including activities pursuant to the 
provisions set forth under this heading in Public Law 104-134, 
and for making grants under section 103 of the Clean Air Act 
for particulate matter monitoring and data collection 
activities: Provided, That notwithstanding section 603(d)(7) of 
the Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended, the 
limitation on the amounts in a State water pollution control 
revolving fund that may be used by a State to administer the 
fund shall not apply to amounts included as principal in loans 
made by such fund in fiscal year 2001 and prior years where 
such amounts represent costs of administering the fund to the 
extent that such amounts are or were deemed reasonable by the 
Administrator, accounted for separately from other assets in 
the fund, and used for eligible purposes of the fund, including 
administration: Provided further, That for fiscal year 2001, 
and notwithstanding section 518(f) of the Federal Water 
Pollution Control Act, as amended, the Administrator is 
authorized to use the amounts appropriated for any fiscal year 
under section 319 of that Act to make grants to Indian tribes 
pursuant to section 319(h) and 518(e) of that Act: Provided 
further, That for fiscal year 2001, notwithstanding the 
limitation on amounts in section 518(c) of the Federal Water 
Pollution Control Act, as amended, up to a total of 1\1/2\ 
percent of the funds appropriated for State Revolving Funds 
under Title VI of that Act may be reserved by the Administrator 
for grants under section 518(c) of such Act: Provided further, 
That no funds provided by this legislation to address the 
water, wastewater and other critical infrastructure needs of 
the colonias in the United States along the United States-
Mexico border shall be made available after June 1, 2001 to a 
county or municipal government unless that government has 
established an enforceable local ordinance, or other zoning 
rule, which prevents in that jurisdiction the development or 
construction of any additional colonia areas, or the 
development within an existing colonia the construction of any 
new home, business, or other structure which lacks water, 
wastewater, or other necessary infrastructure: Provided 
further, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, all 
claims for principal and interest registered through any 
current grant dispute or any other such dispute hereafter filed 
by the Environmental Protection Agency relative to construction 
grants numbers C-180840-01, C-180840-04, C-470319-03, and C-
470319-04, are hereby resolved in favor of the grantee: 
Provided further, That EPA, in considering the local match for 
the $5,000,000 appropriated in fiscal year 1999 for the City of 
Cumberland, Maryland, to separate and relocate the city's 
combined sewer and stormwater system, shall take into account 
non-federal money spent by the City of Cumberland for combined 
sewer, stormwater and wastewater treatment infrastructure on or 
after October 1, 1999, and that the fiscal year 1999 and any 
subsequent funds may be used for any required non-federal share 
of the costs of projects funded by the federal government under 
Section 580 of Public Law 106-53.


                       administrative provisions


    For fiscal year 2001 and thereafter, the obligated balances 
of sums available in multiple-year appropriations accounts 
shall remain available through the seventh fiscal year after 
their period of availability has expired for liquidating 
obligations made during the period of availability.
    For fiscal year 2001, notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 6303(1) and 
6305(1), the Administrator of the Environmental Protection 
Agency, in carrying out the Agency's function to implement 
directly Federal environmental programs required or authorized 
by law in the absence of an acceptable tribal program, may 
award cooperative agreements to federally-recognized Indian 
Tribes or Intertribal consortia, if authorized by their member 
Tribes, to assist the Administrator in implementing Federal 
environmental programs for Indian Tribes required or authorized 
by law, except that no such cooperative agreements may be 
awarded from funds designated for State financial assistance 
agreements.
    Section 176(c) of the Clean Air Act, as amended, is amended 
by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
            ``(6) Notwithstanding paragraph 5, this subsection 
        shall not apply with respect to an area designated 
        nonattainment under section 107(d)(1) until one year 
        after that area is first designated nonattainment for a 
        specific national ambient air quality standard. This 
        paragraph only applies with respect to the national 
        ambient air quality standard for which an area is newly 
        designated nonattainment and does not affect the area's 
        requirements with respect to all other national ambient 
        air quality standards for which the area is designated 
        nonattainment or has been redesignated from 
        nonattainment to attainment with a maintenance plan 
        pursuant to section 175(A) (including any pre-existing 
        national ambient air quality standard for a pollutant 
        for which a new or revised standard has been 
        issued).''.

                   Executive Office of the President


                office of science and technology policy


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy, in carrying out the purposes of the National 
Science and Technology Policy, Organization, and Priorities Act 
of 1976 (42 U.S.C. 6601 and 6671), hire of passenger motor 
vehicles, and services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, not to 
exceed $2,500 for official reception and representation 
expenses, and rental of conference rooms in the District of 
Columbia, $5,201,000.


  council on environmental quality and office of environmental quality


    For necessary expenses to continue functions assigned to 
the Council on Environmental Quality and Office of 
Environmental Quality pursuant to the National Environmental 
Policy Act of 1969, the Environmental Quality Improvement Act 
of 1970, and Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1977, $2,900,000: 
Provided, That, notwithstanding any other provision of law, no 
funds other than those appropriated under this heading shall be 
used for or by the Council on Environmental Quality and Office 
of Environmental Quality: Provided further, That 
notwithstanding section 202 of the National Environmental 
Policy Act of 1970, the Council shall consist of one member, 
appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent 
of the Senate, serving as chairman and exercising all powers, 
functions, and duties of the Council.

                 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

                      office of inspector general


                          (transfer of funds)


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act of 
1978, as amended, $33,660,000, to be derived from the Bank 
Insurance Fund, the Savings Association Insurance Fund, and the 
FSLIC Resolution Fund.

                  Federal Emergency Management Agency


                            disaster relief


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For necessary expenses in carrying out the Robert T. 
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 
U.S.C. 5121 et seq.), $300,000,000, and, notwithstanding 42 
U.S.C. 5203, to remain available until expended, of which not 
to exceed $2,900,000 may be transferred to ``Emergency 
management planning and assistance'' for the consolidated 
emergency management performance grant program; and up to 
$15,000,000 may be obligated for flood map modernization 
activities following disaster declarations: Provided, That of 
the funds made available under this heading in this and prior 
Appropriations Acts and under section 404 of the Robert T. 
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act to the 
State of Florida, $3,000,000 shall be for a hurricane 
mitigation initiative in Miami-Dade County.
    For an additional amount for ``Disaster relief'', 
$1,300,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
That the entire amount is designated by the Congress as an 
emergency requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of the 
Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as 
amended: Provided further, That the entire amount shall be 
available only to the extent that an official budget request 
for a specific dollar amount, that includes designation of the 
entire amount of the request as an emergency requirement as 
defined in the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control 
Act of 1985, as amended, is transmitted by the President to the 
Congress.


            disaster assistance direct loan program account


    For the cost of direct loans, $1,678,000, as authorized by 
section 319 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
Emergency Assistance Act: Provided, That such costs, including 
the cost of modifying such loans, shall be as defined in 
section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as 
amended: Provided further, That these funds are available to 
subsidize gross obligations for the principal amount of direct 
loans not to exceed $25,000,000.
    In addition, for administrative expenses to carry out the 
direct loan program, $427,000.


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, 
including hire and purchase of motor vehicles as authorized by 
31 U.S.C. 1343; uniforms, or allowances therefor, as authorized 
by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, 
but at rates for individuals not to exceed the per diem rate 
equivalent to the maximum rate payable for senior level 
positions under 5 U.S.C. 5376; expenses of attendance of 
cooperating officials and individuals at meetings concerned 
with the work of emergency preparedness; transportation in 
connection with the continuity of Government programs to the 
same extent and in the same manner as permitted the Secretary 
of a Military Department under 10 U.S.C. 2632; and not to 
exceed $2,500 for official reception and representation 
expenses, $215,000,000.


                      office of inspector general


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 
$10,000,000: Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision 
of law, the Inspector General of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency shall also serve as the Inspector General of 
the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.


              emergency management planning and assistance


    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, to 
carry out activities under the National Flood Insurance Act of 
1968, as amended, and the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 
1973, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4001 et seq.), the Robert T. 
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 
U.S.C. 5121 et seq.), the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 
1977, as amended (42 U.S.C. 7701 et seq.), the Federal Fire 
Prevention and Control Act of 1974, as amended (15 U.S.C. 2201 
et seq.), the Defense Production Act of 1950, as amended (50 
U.S.C. App. 2061 et seq.), sections 107 and 303 of the National 
Security Act of 1947, as amended (50 U.S.C. 404-405), and 
Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, $269,652,000: Provided, That 
for purposes of pre-disaster mitigation pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 
5131(b) and (c) and 42 U.S.C. 5196(e) and (i), $25,000,000 of 
the funds made available under this heading shall be available 
until expended for project grants.


                radiological emergency preparedness fund


    The aggregate charges assessed during fiscal year 2001, as 
authorized by Public Law 106-74, shall not be less than 100 
percent of the amounts anticipated by FEMA necessary for its 
radiological emergency preparedness program for the next fiscal 
year. The methodology for assessment and collection of fees 
shall be fair and equitable; and shall reflect costs of 
providing such services, including administrative costs of 
collecting such fees. Fees received pursuant to this section 
shall be deposited in the Fund as offsetting collections and 
will become available for authorized purposes on October 1, 
2001, and remain available until expended.


                   emergency food and shelter program


    To carry out an emergency food and shelter program pursuant 
to title III of Public Law 100-77, as amended, $140,000,000, to 
remain available until expended: Provided, That total 
administrative costs shall not exceed 3\1/2\ percent of the 
total appropriation.

                     national flood insurance fund


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For activities under the National Flood Insurance Act of 
1968, the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973, as amended, 
not to exceed $25,736,000 for salaries and expenses associated 
with flood mitigation and flood insurance operations, and not 
to exceed $77,307,000 for flood mitigation, including up to 
$20,000,000 for expenses under section 1366 of the National 
Flood Insurance Act, which amount shall be available for 
transfer to the National Flood Mitigation Fund until September 
30, 2002. In fiscal year 2001, no funds in excess of: (1) 
$55,000,000 for operating expenses; (2) $455,627,000 for 
agents' commissions and taxes; and (3) $40,000,000 for interest 
on Treasury borrowings shall be available from the National 
Flood Insurance Fund without prior notice to the Committees on 
Appropriations.
    In addition, up to $17,730,000 in fees collected but 
unexpended during fiscal years 1994 through 1998 shall be 
transferred to the Flood Map Modernization Fund and available 
for expenditure in fiscal year 2001.
    Section 1309(a)(2) of the National Flood Insurance Act of 
1968 (42 U.S.C. 4016(a)(2)), as amended by Public Law 104-208, 
is further amended by striking ``September 30, 2000'' and 
inserting ``December 31, 2001''.
    The first sentence of section 1376(c) of the National Flood 
Insurance Act of 1968, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4127(c)), is 
amended by striking ``September 30, 2000'' and inserting 
``December 31, 2001''.

                     national flood mitigation fund


                     (including transfer of funds)


    Notwithstanding sections 1366(b)(3)(B)-(C) and 1366(f) of 
the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968, as amended, 
$20,000,000 to remain available until September 30, 2002, for 
activities designed to reduce the risk of flood damage to 
structures pursuant to such Act, of which $20,000,000 shall be 
derived from the National Flood Insurance Fund.

                    General Services Administration


                federal consumer information center fund


    For necessary expenses of the Federal Consumer Information 
Center, including services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, 
$7,122,000, to be deposited into the Federal Consumer 
Information Center Fund: Provided, That the appropriations, 
revenues, and collections deposited into the Fund shall be 
available for necessary expenses of Federal Consumer 
Information Center activities in the aggregate amount of 
$12,000,000. Appropriations, revenues, and collections accruing 
to this Fund during fiscal year 2001 in excess of $12,000,000 
shall remain in the Fund and shall not be available for 
expenditure except as authorized in appropriations Acts.

             National Aeronautics and Space Administration

                           human space flight

    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the 
conduct and support of human space flight research and 
development activities, including research, development, 
operations, and services; maintenance; construction of 
facilities including revitalization and modification of 
facilities, construction of new facilities and additions to 
existing facilities, facility planning and design, and 
acquisition or condemnation of real property, as authorized by 
law; space flight, spacecraft control and communications 
activities including operations, production, and services; and 
purchase, lease, charter, maintenance and operation of mission 
and administrative aircraft, $5,462,900,000, to remain 
available until September 30, 2002.

                  science, aeronautics and technology

    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the 
conduct and support of science, aeronautics and technology 
research and development activities, including research, 
development, operations, and services; maintenance; 
construction of facilities including revitalization, and 
modification of facilities, construction of new facilities and 
additions to existing facilities, facility planning and design, 
and acquisition or condemnation of real property, as authorized 
by law; space flight, spacecraft control and communications 
activities including operations, production, and services; and 
purchase, lease, charter, maintenance and operation of mission 
and administrative aircraft, $6,190,700,000, to remain 
available until September 30, 2002.

                            mission support

    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in 
carrying out mission support for human space flight programs 
and science, aeronautical, and technology programs, including 
research operations and support; maintenance; construction of 
facilities including revitalization and modification of 
facilities, construction of new facilities and additions to 
existing facilities, facility planning and design, 
environmental compliance and restoration, and acquisition or 
condemnation of real property, as authorized by law; program 
management; personnel and related costs, including uniforms or 
allowances therefor, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; 
travel expenses; purchase, lease, charter, maintenance, and 
operation of mission and administrative aircraft; not to exceed 
$40,000 for official reception and representation expenses; and 
purchase (not to exceed 33 for replacement only) and hire of 
passenger motor vehicles, $2,608,700,000 to remain available 
until September 30, 2002.


                      office of inspector general


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 
$23,000,000.

                       administrative provisions

    Notwithstanding the limitation on the availability of funds 
appropriated for ``Human space flight'', ``Science, aeronautics 
and technology'', or ``Mission support'' by this appropriations 
Act, when any activity has been initiated by the incurrence of 
obligations for construction of facilities as authorized by 
law, such amount available for such activity shall remain 
available until expended. This provision does not apply to the 
amounts appropriated in ``Mission support'' pursuant to the 
authorization for minor revitalization and construction of 
facilities, and facility planning and design.
    Notwithstanding the limitation on the availability of funds 
appropriated for ``Human space flight'', ``Science, aeronautics 
and technology'', or ``Mission support'' by this appropriations 
Act, the amounts appropriated for construction of facilities 
shall remain available until September 30, 2003.
    Notwithstanding the limitation on the availability of funds 
appropriated for ``Mission support'' and ``Office of Inspector 
General'', amounts made available by this Act for personnel and 
related costs and travel expenses of the National Aeronautics 
and Space Administration shall remain available until September 
30, 2001 and may be used to enter into contracts for training, 
investigations, costs associated with personnel relocation, and 
for other services, to be provided during the next fiscal year. 
Funds for announced prizes otherwise authorized shall remain 
available, without fiscal year limitation, until the prize is 
claimed or the offer is withdrawn.
    Unless otherwise provided for in this Act or in the joint 
explanatory statement of the committee of conference 
accompanying this Act, no part of the funds appropriated for 
``Human space flight'' may be used for the development of the 
International Space Station in excess of the amounts set forth 
in the budget estimates submitted as part of the budget request 
for fiscal year 2001.
    No funds in this or any other Appropriations Act may be 
used to finalize an agreement prior to December 1, 2001 between 
NASA and a nongovernment organization to conduct research 
utilization and commercialization management activities of the 
International Space Station.

                  National Credit Union Administration

                       central liquidity facility


                     (including transfer of funds)


    During fiscal year 2001, gross obligations of the Central 
Liquidity Facility for the principal amount of new direct loans 
to member credit unions, as authorized by 12 U.S.C. 1795 et 
seq., shall not exceed $1,500,000,000: Provided, That 
administrative expenses of the Central Liquidity Facility shall 
not exceed $296,303: Provided further, That $1,000,000 shall be 
transferred to the Community Development Revolving Loan Fund, 
of which $650,000, together with amounts of principal and 
interest on loans repaid, shall be available until expended for 
loans to community development credit unions, and $350,000 
shall be available until expended for technical assistance to 
low-income and community development credit unions.

                      National Science Foundation


                    research and related activities


    For necessary expenses in carrying out the National Science 
Foundation Act of 1950, as amended (42 U.S.C. 1861-1875), and 
the Act to establish a National Medal of Science (42 U.S.C. 
1880-1881); services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109; authorized 
travel; maintenance and operation of aircraft and purchase of 
flight services for research support; acquisition of aircraft; 
$3,350,000,000, of which not to exceed $275,592,000 shall 
remain available until expended for Polar research and 
operations support, and for reimbursement to other Federal 
agencies for operational and science support and logistical and 
other related activities for the United States Antarctic 
program; the balance to remain available until September 30, 
2002: Provided, That receipts for scientific support services 
and materials furnished by the National Research Centers and 
other National Science Foundation supported research facilities 
may be credited to this appropriation: Provided further, That 
to the extent that the amount appropriated is less than the 
total amount authorized to be appropriated for included program 
activities, all amounts, including floors and ceilings, 
specified in the authorizing Act for those program activities 
or their subactivities shall be reduced proportionally: 
Provided further, That $65,000,000 of the funds available under 
this heading shall be made available for a comprehensive 
research initiative on plant genomes for economically 
significant crops: Provided further, That no funds in this or 
any other Act shall be used to acquire or lease a research 
vessel with ice-breaking capability built or retrofitted by a 
shipyard located in a foreign country if such a vessel of 
United States origin can be obtained at a cost no more than 50 
per centum above that of the least expensive technically 
acceptable foreign vessel bid: Provided further, That, in 
determining the cost of such a vessel, such cost be increased 
by the amount of any subsidies or financing provided by a 
foreign government (or instrumentality thereof ) to such 
vessel's construction: Provided further, That if the vessel 
contracted for pursuant to the foregoing is not available for 
the 2002-2003 austral summer Antarctic season, a vessel of any 
origin may be leased for a period of not to exceed 120 days for 
that season and each season thereafter until delivery of the 
new vessel.


                        major research equipment


    For necessary expenses of major construction projects 
pursuant to the National Science Foundation Act of 1950, as 
amended, including authorized travel, $121,600,000, to remain 
available until expended.


                     education and human resources


    For necessary expenses in carrying out science and 
engineering education and human resources programs and 
activities pursuant to the National Science Foundation Act of 
1950, as amended (42 U.S.C. 1861-1875), including services as 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, authorized travel, and rental of 
conference rooms in the District of Columbia, $787,352,000, to 
remain available until September 30, 2002: Provided, That to 
the extent that the amount of this appropriation is less than 
the total amount authorized to be appropriated for included 
program activities, all amounts, including floors and ceilings, 
specified in the authorizing Act for those program activities 
or their subactivities shall be reduced proportionally: 
Provided further, That $10,000,000 shall be available for the 
Office of Innovation Partnerships.


                         salaries and expenses


    For salaries and expenses necessary in carrying out the 
National Science Foundation Act of 1950, as amended (42 U.S.C. 
1861-1875); services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109; hire of 
passenger motor vehicles; not to exceed $9,000 for official 
reception and representation expenses; uniforms or allowances 
therefor, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; rental of 
conference rooms in the District of Columbia; reimbursement of 
the General Services Administration for security guard 
services; $160,890,000: Provided, That contracts may be entered 
into under ``Salaries and expenses'' in fiscal year 2001 for 
maintenance and operation of facilities, and for other 
services, to be provided during the next fiscal year.


                      office of inspector general


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
as authorized by the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 
$6,280,000, to remain available until September 30, 2002.

                 Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation

          payment to the neighborhood reinvestment corporation

    For payment to the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation 
for use in neighborhood reinvestment activities, as authorized 
by the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation Act (42 U.S.C. 
8101-8107), $90,000,000, of which $5,000,000 shall be for a 
homeownership program that is used in conjunction with section 
8 assistance under the United States Housing Act of 1937: 
Provided, That of the amount made available, $2,500,000 shall 
be for an endowment to establish the George Knight Scholarship 
Fund for the Neighborhood Reinvestment Training Institute.

                        Selective Service System


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses of the Selective Service System, 
including expenses of attendance at meetings and of training 
for uniformed personnel assigned to the Selective Service 
System, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 4101-4118 for civilian 
employees; and not to exceed $1,000 for official reception and 
representation expenses; $24,480,000: Provided, That during the 
current fiscal year, the President may exempt this 
appropriation from the provisions of 31 U.S.C. 1341, whenever 
he deems such action to be necessary in the interest of 
national defense: Provided further, That none of the funds 
appropriated by this Act may be expended for or in connection 
with the induction of any person into the Armed Forces of the 
United States.

                      TITLE IV--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 401. Where appropriations in titles I, II, and III of 
this Act are expendable for travel expenses and no specific 
limitation has been placed thereon, the expenditures for such 
travel expenses may not exceed the amounts set forth therefore 
in the budget estimates submitted for the appropriations: 
Provided, That this provision does not apply to accounts that 
do not contain an object classification for travel: Provided 
further, That this section shall not apply to travel performed 
by uncompensated officials of local boards and appeal boards of 
the Selective Service System; to travel performed directly in 
connection with care and treatment of medical beneficiaries of 
the Department of Veterans Affairs; to travel performed in 
connection with major disasters or emergencies declared or 
determined by the President under the provisions of the Robert 
T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act; to 
travel performed by the Offices of Inspector General in 
connection with audits and investigations; or to payments to 
interagency motor pools where separately set forth in the 
budget schedules: Provided further, That if appropriations in 
titles I, II, and III exceed the amounts set forth in budget 
estimates initially submitted for such appropriations, the 
expenditures for travel may correspondingly exceed the amounts 
therefore set forth in the estimates in the same proportion.
    Sec. 402. Appropriations and funds available for the 
administrative expenses of the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development and the Selective Service System shall be available 
in the current fiscal year for purchase of uniforms, or 
allowances therefor, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; hire 
of passenger motor vehicles; and services as authorized by 5 
U.S.C. 3109.
    Sec. 403. Funds of the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development subject to the Government Corporation Control Act 
or section 402 of the Housing Act of 1950 shall be available, 
without regard to the limitations on administrative expenses, 
for legal services on a contract or fee basis, and for 
utilizing and making payment for services and facilities of 
Federal National Mortgage Association, Government National 
Mortgage Association, Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, 
Federal Financing Bank, Federal Reserve banks or any member 
thereof, Federal Home Loan banks, and any insured bank within 
the meaning of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Act, 
as amended (12 U.S.C. 1811-1831).
    Sec. 404. No part of any appropriation contained in this 
Act shall remain available for obligation beyond the current 
fiscal year unless expressly so provided herein.
    Sec. 405. No funds appropriated by this Act may be 
expended--
            (1) pursuant to a certification of an officer or 
        employee of the United States unless--
                    (A) such certification is accompanied by, 
                or is part of, a voucher or abstract which 
                describes the payee or payees and the items or 
                services for which such expenditure is being 
                made; or
                    (B) the expenditure of funds pursuant to 
                such certification, and without such a voucher 
                or abstract, is specifically authorized by law; 
                and
            (2) unless such expenditure is subject to audit by 
        the General Accounting Office or is specifically exempt 
        by law from such audit.
    Sec. 406. None of the funds provided in this Act to any 
department or agency may be expended for the transportation of 
any officer or employee of such department or agency between 
their domicile and their place of employment, with the 
exception of any officer or employee authorized such 
transportation under 31 U.S.C. 1344 or 5 U.S.C. 7905.
    Sec. 407. None of the funds provided in this Act may be 
used for payment, through grants or contracts, to recipients 
that do not share in the cost of conducting research resulting 
from proposals not specifically solicited by the Government: 
Provided, That the extent of cost sharing by the recipient 
shall reflect the mutuality of interest of the grantee or 
contractor and the Government in the research.
    Sec. 408. None of the funds in this Act may be used, 
directly or through grants, to pay or to provide reimbursement 
for payment of the salary of a consultant (whether retained by 
the Federal Government or a grantee) at more than the daily 
equivalent of the rate paid for level IV of the Executive 
Schedule, unless specifically authorized by law.
    Sec. 409. None of the funds provided in this Act shall be 
used to pay the expenses of, or otherwise compensate, non-
Federal parties intervening in regulatory or adjudicatory 
proceedings. Nothing herein affects the authority of the 
Consumer Product Safety Commission pursuant to section 7 of the 
Consumer Product Safety Act (15 U.S.C. 2056 et seq.).
    Sec. 410. Except as otherwise provided under existing law, 
or under an existing Executive Order issued pursuant to an 
existing law, the obligation or expenditure of any 
appropriation under this Act for contracts for any consulting 
service shall be limited to contracts which are: (1) a matter 
of public record and available for public inspection; and (2) 
thereafter included in a publicly available list of all 
contracts entered into within 24 months prior to the date on 
which the list is made available to the public and of all 
contracts on which performance has not been completed by such 
date. The list required by the preceding sentence shall be 
updated quarterly and shall include a narrative description of 
the work to be performed under each such contract.
    Sec. 411. Except as otherwise provided by law, no part of 
any appropriation contained in this Act shall be obligated or 
expended by any executive agency, as referred to in the Office 
of Federal Procurement Policy Act (41 U.S.C. 401 et seq.), for 
a contract for services unless such executive agency: (1) has 
awarded and entered into such contract in full compliance with 
such Act and the regulations promulgated thereunder; and (2) 
requires any report prepared pursuant to such contract, 
including plans, evaluations, studies, analyses and manuals, 
and any report prepared by the agency which is substantially 
derived from or substantially includes any report prepared 
pursuant to such contract, to contain information concerning: 
(A) the contract pursuant to which the report was prepared; and 
(B) the contractor who prepared the report pursuant to such 
contract.
    Sec. 412. Except as otherwise provided in section 406, none 
of the funds provided in this Act to any department or agency 
shall be obligated or expended to provide a personal cook, 
chauffeur, or other personal servants to any officer or 
employee of such department or agency.
    Sec. 413. None of the funds provided in this Act to any 
department or agency shall be obligated or expended to procure 
passenger automobiles as defined in 15 U.S.C. 2001 with an EPA 
estimated miles per gallon average of less than 22 miles per 
gallon.
    Sec. 414. None of the funds appropriated in title I of this 
Act shall be used to enter into any new lease of real property 
if the estimated annual rental is more than $300,000 unless the 
Secretary submits, in writing, a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the Congress and a period of 30 days has 
expired following the date on which the report is received by 
the Committees on Appropriations.
    Sec. 415. (a) It is the sense of the Congress that, to the 
greatest extent practicable, all equipment and products 
purchased with funds made available in this Act should be 
American-made.
    (b) In providing financial assistance to, or entering into 
any contract with, any entity using funds made available in 
this Act, the head of each Federal agency, to the greatest 
extent practicable, shall provide to such entity a notice 
describing the statement made in subsection (a) by the 
Congress.
    Sec. 416. None of the funds appropriated in this Act may be 
used to implement any cap on reimbursements to grantees for 
indirect costs, except as published in Office of Management and 
Budget Circular A-21.
    Sec. 417. Such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 
2001 pay raises for programs funded by this Act shall be 
absorbed within the levels appropriated in this Act.
    Sec. 418. None of the funds made available in this Act may 
be used for any program, project, or activity, when it is made 
known to the Federal entity or official to which the funds are 
made available that the program, project, or activity is not in 
compliance with any Federal law relating to risk assessment, 
the protection of private property rights, or unfunded 
mandates.
    Sec. 419. Corporations and agencies of the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development which are subject to the 
Government Corporation Control Act, as amended, are hereby 
authorized to make such expenditures, within the limits of 
funds and borrowing authority available to each such 
corporation or agency and in accord with law, and to make such 
contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year 
limitations as provided by section 104 of the Act as may be 
necessary in carrying out the programs set forth in the budget 
for 2001 for such corporation or agency except as hereinafter 
provided: Provided, That collections of these corporations and 
agencies may be used for new loan or mortgage purchase 
commitments only to the extent expressly provided for in this 
Act (unless such loans are in support of other forms of 
assistance provided for in this or prior appropriations Acts), 
except that this proviso shall not apply to the mortgage 
insurance or guaranty operations of these corporations, or 
where loans or mortgage purchases are necessary to protect the 
financial interest of the United States Government.
    Sec. 420. Notwithstanding section 320(g) of the Federal 
Water Pollution Control Act (33 U.S.C. 1330(g)), funds made 
available pursuant to authorization under such section for 
fiscal year 2001 may be used for implementing comprehensive 
conservation and management plans.
    Sec. 421. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
term ``qualified student loan'' with respect to national 
service education awards shall mean any loan made directly to a 
student by the Alaska Commission on Postsecondary Education, in 
addition to other meanings under section 148(b)(7) of the 
National and Community Service Act.
    Sec. 422. Unless otherwise provided for in this Act, no 
part of any appropriation for the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development shall be available for any activity in excess 
of amounts set forth in the budget estimates submitted to the 
Congress.
    Sec. 423. None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available by this Act shall be used to promulgate a final 
regulation to implement changes in the payment of pesticide 
tolerance processing fees as proposed at 64 Fed. Reg. 31040, or 
any similar proposals. The Environmental Protection Agency may 
proceed with the development of such a rule.
    Sec. 424. Except in the case of entities that are funded 
solely with Federal funds or any natural persons that are 
funded under this Act, none of the funds in this Act shall be 
used for the planning or execution of any program to pay the 
expenses of, or otherwise compensate, non-Federal parties to 
lobby or litigate in respect to adjudicatory proceedings funded 
in this Act. A chief executive officer of any entity receiving 
funds under this Act shall certify that none of these funds 
have been used to engage in the lobbying of the Federal 
Government or in litigation against the United States unless 
authorized under existing law.
    Sec. 425. No part of any funds appropriated in this Act 
shall be used by an agency of the executive branch, other than 
for normal and recognized executive-legislative relationships, 
for publicity or propaganda purposes, and for the preparation, 
distribution or use of any kit, pamphlet, booklet, publication, 
radio, television or film presentation designed to support or 
defeat legislation pending before the Congress, except in 
presentation to the Congress itself.
    Sec. 426. None of the funds provided in title II for 
technical assistance, training, or management improvements may 
be obligated or expended unless HUD provides to the Committees 
on Appropriations a description of each proposed activity and a 
detailed budget estimate of the costs associated with each 
activity as part of the Budget Justifications. For fiscal year 
2001, HUD shall transmit this information to the Committees by 
December 1, 2000, for 30 days of review.
    Sec. 427. None of the funds made available in this Act may 
be used for the designation, or approval of the designation, of 
any area as an ozone nonattainment area under the Clean Air Act 
pursuant to the 8-hour national ambient air quality standard 
for ozone that was promulgated by the Environmental Protection 
Agency on July 18, 1997 (62 Fed. Reg. 38,356, p. 38855) and 
remanded by the District of Columbia Court of Appeals on May 
14, 1999, in the case, American Trucking Ass'ns. v. EPA (No. 
97-1440, 1999 Westlaw 300618) prior to June 15, 2001 or final 
adjudication of this case by the Supreme Court of the United 
States, whichever occurs first.
    Sec. 428. Section 432 of Public Law 104-204 (110 Stat. 
2874) is amended--
            (a) in subsection (c) by inserting ``or to 
        restructure and improve the efficiency of the 
        workforce'' after ``the National Aeronautics and Space 
        Administration'' and before ``the Administrator'';
            (b) by deleting paragraph (4) of subsection (h) and 
        inserting in lieu thereof--
                    ``(4) The provisions of subsections (1) and 
                (3) of this section may be waived upon a 
                determination by the Administrator that use of 
                the incentive satisfactorily demonstrates 
                downsizing or other restructuring within the 
                Agency that would improve the efficiency of 
                agency operations or contribute directly to 
                evolving mission requirements.''
            (c) by deleting subsection (i) and inserting in 
        lieu thereof--
    ``(i) Reports.--The Administrator shall submit a report on 
NASA's restructuring activities to the Committee on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
Committee on Appropriations of the Senate not later than 
September 30, 2001. This report shall include--
            ``(1) an outline of a timetable for restructuring 
        the workforce at NASA Headquarters and field Centers;
            ``(2) annual Full Time Equivalent (FTE) targets by 
        broad occupational categories and a summary of how 
        these targets reflect the respective missions of 
        Headquarters and the field Centers;
            ``(3) a description of personnel initiatives, such 
        as relocation assistance, early retirement incentives, 
        and career transition assistance, which NASA will use 
        to achieve personnel reductions or to rebalance the 
        workforce; and
            ``(4) a description of efficiencies in operations 
        achieved through the use of the voluntary separation 
        incentive.''; and
    (d) in subsection (j), by deleting ``September 30, 2000'' 
and inserting in lieu thereof ``September 30, 2002''.
    Sec. 429. Section 70113(f) of title 49, United States Code, 
is amended by striking ``December 31, 2000'', and inserting 
``December 31, 2001''.
    Sec. 430. All Departments and agencies funded under this 
Act are encouraged, within the limits of the existing statutory 
authorities and funding, to expand their use of ``E-Commerce'' 
technologies and procedures in the conduct of their business 
practices and public service activities.
    Sec. 431. Title III of the National Aeronautics and Space 
Act of 1958, Public Law 85-568, is amended by adding the 
following new section at the end:
    ``Sec. 312. (a) Appropriations for the Administration for 
fiscal year 2002 and thereafter shall be made in three 
accounts, `Human space flight', `Science, aeronautics and 
technology', and an account for amounts appropriated for the 
necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General. 
Appropriations shall remain available for 2 fiscal years. Each 
account shall include the planned full costs of the 
Administration's related activities.
    ``(b) To ensure the safe, timely, and successful 
accomplishment of Administration missions, the Administration 
may transfer amounts for Federal salaries and benefits; 
training, travel and awards; facility and related costs; 
information technology services; publishing services; science, 
engineering, fabricating and testing services; and other 
administrative services among accounts, as necessary.
    ``(c) The Administrator, in consultation with the Director 
of the Office of Management and Budget, shall determine what 
balances from the `Mission support' account are to be 
transferred to the `Human space flight' and `Science, 
aeronautics and technology' accounts. Such balances shall be 
transferred and merged with the `Human space flight' and 
`Science, aeronautics and technology' accounts, and remain 
available for the period of which originally appropriated.''.

           TITLE V--FILIPINO VETERANS' BENEFITS IMPROVEMENTS

    Sec. 501. (a) Rate of Compensation Payments for Filipino 
Veterans Residing in the United States.--(1) Section 107 of 
title 38, United States Code, is amended--
            (A) by striking ``Payments'' in the second sentence 
        of subsection (a) and inserting ``Except as provided in 
        subsection (c), payments''; and
            (B) by adding at the end the following new 
        subsection:
    ``(c) In the case of benefits under subchapters II and IV 
of chapter 11 of this title paid by reason of service described 
in subsection (a) to an individual residing in the United 
States who is a citizen of, or an alien lawfully admitted for 
permanent residence in, the United States, the second sentence 
of subsection (a) shall not apply.''.
    (2) The amendments made by paragraph (1) shall take effect 
on the date of the enactment of this Act and shall apply to 
benefits paid for months beginning on or after that date.
    (b) Eligibility for Health Care of Disabled Filipino 
Veterans Residing in the United States.--Section 1734 of such 
title is amended--
            (1) by inserting ``(a)'' before ``The Secretary,''; 
        and
            (2) by adding at the end the following:
    ``(b) An individual who is in receipt of benefits under 
subchapter II or IV of chapter 11 of this title paid by reason 
of service described in section 107(a) of this title who is 
residing in the United States and who is a citizen of, or an 
alien lawfully admitted for permanent residence in, the United 
States shall be eligible for hospital and nursing home care and 
medical services in the same manner as a veteran, and the 
disease or disability for which such benefits are paid shall be 
considered to be a service-connected disability for purposes of 
this chapter.''.
    (c) Health Care for Veterans Residing in the Philippines.--
Section 1724 of such title is amended by adding at the end the 
following new subsection:
    ``(e) Within the limits of an outpatient clinic in the 
Republic of the Philippines that is under the direct 
jurisdiction of the Secretary, the Secretary may furnish a 
veteran who has a service-connected disability with such 
medical services as the Secretary determines to be needed.''.

                        TITLE VI--DEBT REDUCTION

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

                       Bureau of the Public Debt


      gifts to the united states for reduction of the public debt


    For deposit of an additional amount for fiscal year 2001 
into the account established under section 3113(d) of title 31, 
United States Code, to reduce the public debt, 
$5,172,730,916.14.
    Titles I-VI of this Act may be cited as the ``Departments 
of Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and 
Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, 2001''.

DEPARTMENTS OF VETERANS AFFAIRS AND HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, AND 
                  INDEPENDENT AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS

      Following is explanatory language on H.R. 5482, as 
introduced on October 18, 2000.
      The conferees on H.R. 4635 agree with the matter included 
in H.R. 5482 and enacted in this conference report by reference 
and the following description of it. This bill was developed 
through negotiations by the conferees on the differences in the 
House and Senate versions of H.R. 4635. References in the 
following description to the ``conference agreement'' mean the 
matter included in the introduced bill enacted by this 
conference report. References to the House bill mean the House 
passed version of H.R. 4635. References to the Senate bill or 
Senate reported bill mean the Senate reported version of H.R. 
4635, not the Senate passed version of H.R. 4635, unless 
otherwise stated.
      The language and allocations set forth in House Report 
106-674 and Senate Report 106-410 should be complied with 
unless specifically addressed to the contrary in the conference 
report and statement of the managers. Report language included 
by the House which is not changed by the report of the Senate 
or the conference, and Senate report language which is not 
changed by the conference is approved by the committee of 
conference. The statement of the managers, while repeating some 
report language for emphasis, does not intend to negate the 
language referred to above unless expressly provided herein. In 
cases in which the House or Senate have directed the submission 
of a report, such report is to be submitted to both House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations.
      Unless specifically addressed in this report, the 
conferees agree to retain the reprogramming thresholds for each 
department or agency at the level established by the fiscal 
year 2000 conference agreement.

                TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS

                    veterans benefits administration

                         readjustment benefits

      Appropriates the budget request of $1,634,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate instead of $1,664,000,000 as proposed by 
the House. The conferees retain bill language as proposed by 
the Senate ensuring that all administrative services are 
charged to the general operating expenses appropriation.

         veterans housing benefit program fund program account

                     (including transfer of funds)

      Appropriates $162,000,000 as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $161,484,000 as proposed by the House.

                     VETERANS HEALTH ADMINISTRATION

                              medical care

                     (including transfer of funds)

      Retains the transfer of $28,134,000 as proposed by the 
House instead of $27,907,000 as proposed by the Senate from 
medical care to the general operating expenses appropriation 
for expenses of the Office of Resolution Management and the 
Office of Employment Discrimination Complaint Adjudication.
      Retains bill language delaying the availability of 
$900,000,000 for equipment and land and structures until August 
1, 2001 and remaining available until September 30, 2002 as 
proposed by the Senate instead of $927,000,000 as proposed by 
the House.
      Retains bill language making $500,000,000 available until 
September 30, 2002 as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$900,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      Deletes bill language limiting $3,000,000,000 for 
maintenance and operations expenses. The conferees strongly 
support the redirection of medical resources from the 
maintenance and operations of unneeded buildings to support 
direct patient care. The conferees understand that for fiscal 
year 2001 VA is anticipating spending less than $3,000,000,000 
in this area. The conferees direct that VA carefully monitor 
maintenance and operation expenditures and that significant 
efforts to reduce those expenditures be undertaken prior to and 
in conjunction with full CARES evaluation and implementation 
over the next several years. A report that identifies these 
fiscal year 2001 costs by network and the efforts to reduce 
these costs this year should be submitted by March 31, 2001.
      Retains bill language proposed by the House prohibiting 
the transfer of medical care funds to the Department of Justice 
for the purpose of pursuing tobacco litigation.
      The conferees direct the Department to submit one report 
within four months of enactment of this Act addressing the 
concerns regarding hepatitis C expenditures, testing and 
treatment contained in House Report 106-674 and Senate Report 
106-410.
      The House report contained language directing the VA to 
reimburse hepatitis C treatment as a complex care component 
starting in fiscal year 2001. The conferees recognize VA for 
releasing $20,000,000 from the National Reserve in June 2000 to 
address the growing need for treatment and the geographic 
differences in prevalence of the disease. The conferees also 
note the action by the Department in August 2000 to amend the 
VERA policy to reimburse hepatitis C treatment as a complex 
care component effective fiscal year 2001. The conferees direct 
the Department to continue adjusting testing and treatment 
funds as more is learned about the prevalence of the disease 
and keep the Committees on Appropriations informed about 
funding levels and decisions.
      The conferees urge the Department to establish up to five 
centers of excellence for motor-neuron diseases such as 
Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis.
      The conferees urge the implementation of the telemedicine 
project in Huntsville, Alabama.
      The conferees direct that the Department include in the 
fiscal year 2002 budget justification estimates for all 
national programs, projects and initiatives totaling $5,000,000 
or more. The conferees further direct that the Department 
include in the fiscal year 2001 operating plan its efforts to 
implement management efficiencies, including instituting best 
practices on a national basis.
      The conferees direct the Department to continue the 
demonstration project involving the Clarksburg VAMC and the 
Ruby Memorial Hospital at West Virginia University.
      The conferees direct that of the amounts provided, not to 
exceed $250,000 may be used to host The Sixth International 
Paralympic Committee Scientific Congress on ``Sport and Human 
Performance Beyond Disability.'' The conferees believe this 
conference is within the mission of VA considering the 
Department's current programs, which support disabled athletes.
      The conferees support the expansion of the Joslin Vision 
Network to additional pilot sites in fiscal year 2001. 
Estimated costs for fiscal year 2001 are $5,000,000.
      The conferees encourage VA to initiate a national 
demonstration project of excellence in the care of aging 
veterans with rehabilitative needs involving a collaborative 
effort between the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 
Emory Healthcare, and its affiliated network of community-based 
services, Atlanta Senior Care.
      The conferees are aware that the VA undertakes numerous 
pilot projects in hospitals and VISNs across the country in 
hopes of providing better access to medical care more 
efficiently to our nation's veterans. The conferees trust that 
the Department's leadership carefully reviews the costs and 
benefits of pilot projects to determine the project's 
feasibility and value for standard operation prior to inclusion 
in the Department's budget justification. No funds may be 
obligated for new pilot projects authorized by law in fiscal 
year 2001 exceeding $10,000,000 in cost until a reprogramming 
request is submitted by the Department and approved by the 
Committees on Appropriations.
      The conferees are concerned with the issues raised in the 
GAO report ``Disabled Veterans' Care, Better Data and More 
Accountability Needed to Adequately Assess Care'' regarding 
VA's ability to measure compliance with maintaining a certain 
level of care for special disability programs such as spinal 
cord injury and mental illness. The conferees urge the VA to 
re-examine GAO's recommendation to establish a work group to 
monitor these programs. In addition, the conferees direct VA to 
develop outcome measures applicable to each VISN to evaluate 
the Department's performance in these areas.

                    medical and prosthetic research

      Appropriates $351,000,000 for medical and prosthetic 
research as proposed by the House instead of $321,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees are aware of the impact that drug addiction 
has on the veterans population and are pleased with the VA's 
leadership role in pursuing and developing new treatments for 
addiction. The conferees strongly encourage the VA to increase 
its support for addiction research efforts in this area, and 
note that an effective research program must include large 
clinical trials, as well as, biochemical and neuro-
pharmacological basic research.
      The conferees are encouraged by the progress made by the 
VA and the National Technology Transfer Center (NTTC) during 
the past year in identifying promising VA technological 
advances that offer the potential for commercial applications. 
The conferees direct that this partnership should be continued 
at the current level of effort and that a targeted partnership 
identification process is essential to the successful marketing 
and licensing process.

                      DEPARTMENTAL ADMINISTRATION

                       general operating expenses

      Appropriates $1,050,000,000 for general operating 
expenses as proposed by the Senate instead of $1,006,000,000 as 
proposed by the House. Retains bill language proposed by the 
Senate making $45,000,000 available until September 30, 2002, 
instead of $50,050,000 as proposed by the House.
      Deletes without prejudice the provision proposed by the 
House regarding transfers. The conferees have no objection to 
fund transfers authorized by law.
      Retains bill language as proposed by the Senate allowing 
administrative services provided for rehabilitation services to 
be charged to the general operating expenses account.
      The conferees direct that of the amount provided, 
$826,488,000 is for the Veterans Benefits Administration. 
Funding priority should be given to hiring additional FTEs for 
improving claims processing time and accuracy.
      The conferees are aware that there is a pressing need for 
renovating the Lafayette Building at 811 Vermont Avenue to the 
benefit of both the VA and the Export-Import Bank. The House 
report included language requesting a feasibility study to be 
conducted on the potential utilization of enhanced-use leasing 
authority by the VA as a means of renovating the Lafayette 
Building. In lieu of the feasibility study recommended by the 
House, the conferees direct the General Services Administration 
to work with the VA and the Export-Import Bank on an expedited 
basis to develop a renovation plan considering all alternatives 
authorized by law for the Lafayette Building which would ensure 
the continued ability of both agencies to collocate in the 
building and submit a joint report to the Committee by June 1, 
2001.
      The conferees have provided funds for the coreFLS and HR 
LINK$ projects and expects VA to implement these initiatives as 
top priorities. The conferees direct VA to submit a report by 
December 1, 2000 on the milestones and funding commitments for 
the projects through fiscal year 2002.

                    national cemetery administration

                     (including transfer of funds)

      Appropriates $109,889,000 for the National Cemetery 
Administration as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$106,889,000 as proposed by the House.
      Retains House language transferring not to exceed 
$125,000 from the national cemetery administration 
appropriation to the general operating expenses appropriation 
for expenses of the Office of Resolution Management and the 
Office of Employment Discrimination Complaint Adjudication 
instead of $117,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Retains language proposed by the House and stricken by 
the Senate providing a travel limitation of $1,125,000 for the 
National Cemetery Administration.
      The conferees are aware of the provision in the Veterans 
Millennium Heath Care and Benefits Act (P.L. 106-117) requiring 
VA to conduct a national cemetery needs survey. The conferees 
direct the National Cemetery Administration to complete this 
survey expeditiously and include in a report to the Committees 
on Appropriations the geographic areas in need of a cemetery 
within 75 miles of veterans populations, when the currently-
available cemeteries will close, and a priority ranking for 
establishing new cemeteries. The survey should include the 
Albuquerque area of New Mexico.

                      office of inspector general

                     (including transfer of funds)

      Retains House language transferring not to exceed $28,000 
from the Office of Inspector General appropriation to the 
general operating expenses appropriation for expenses of the 
Office of Resolution Management and the Office of Employment 
Discrimination Complaint Adjudication instead of $30,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.

                      construction, major projects

      Appropriates $66,040,000 for construction, major projects 
instead of $62,140,000 as proposed by the House and $48,540,000 
as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes the following changes 
from the budget estimate:
            +$1,000,000 for advanced planning of a national 
        cemetery in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
            +$2,500,000 for advanced planning of a national 
        cemetery in Atlanta, Georgia.
            +$15,000,000 for land acquisition for a national 
        cemetery in South Florida.
            +$12,000,000 for cemetery construction in Oklahoma 
        City, Oklahoma.
            +$1,000,000 for design of a nursing home at the 
        Beckley, West Virginia VAMC.
            -$26,600,000 from Palo Alto NHCU.
            -$0 for the medical design fund.
            +$1,400,000 for National Cemetery Administration 
        advance planning.
            -$1,735,000 from the working reserve.
      The conferees encourage the Department to begin planning 
efforts for a national cemetery in New Mexico.

                      construction, minor projects

      Appropriates $162,000,000 for construction, minor 
projects as proposed by the Senate instead of $100,000,000 as 
proposed by the House.
      The conferees reiterate the expectation that VA will 
review and approve all minor construction projects in a manner 
that is consistent with the process applied by the Capital 
Investment Board which reviews major projects, and consistent 
with the Capital Asset Realignment for Enhanced Services 
(CARES) initiative. A central office work group, consisting of 
both VHA and other Department officials, is to review all minor 
projects using criteria consistent with those developed for 
CARES. If the total costs of projects being initiated at any 
facility or integrated health care system exceeds $4,000,000, 
the recommendations of the work group must be approved by the 
Deputy Secretary.
      The conferees urge the Department to give highest 
priority to projects improving female patient privacy in VA 
health facilities.
      The conferees recommend $150,000 for construction of a 
sunscreen structure for the National Memorial Cemetery of the 
Pacific.

                         parking revolving fund

      Retains language proposed by the Senate permitting 
operation and maintenance costs of parking facilities to be 
funded from the medical care appropriation.

       grants for construction of state extended care facilities

      Appropriates $100,000,000 for grants for construction of 
state extended care facilities as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $90,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      The conferees note that the VA has not yet promulgated 
regulations for the state grant program as directed in the 
Veterans Millennium Health Care and Benefits Act (P.L. 106-
117). Until those regulations are issued, many state and local 
governments which seek to obtain these grants are severely 
disadvantaged by the lack of criteria available to determine 
eligibility. The conferees direct the VA to move expeditiously 
to issue the regulations mandated by P.L. 106-117.

        grants for the construction of state veterans cemeteries

      The conferees encourage the Department to work with 
California as the state applies for a state cemetery grant.

                       administrative provisions

      Retains language proposed by the Senate requiring 
receipts collected under the Veterans Millennium Health Care 
and Benefits Act (P.L. 106-117) to be maintained in the 
collections fund subject to appropriation.
      Retains language proposed by the House extending the 
availability of previously appropriated funds for artificial 
neural networks research with the Department of Defense until 
September 30, 2003.
      Retains language proposed by the House transferring funds 
from the Office of Inspector General ($78,000), national 
cemetery administration ($358,000), medical care ($1,106,000), 
and medical administration and miscellaneous operating expenses 
($84,000) accounts, and reprogrammed within the general 
operating expenses account ($38,000) to general operating 
expenses for HR LINK$ services.
      Retains language proposed by the House transferring 
$1,600,000 from medical care to general operating expenses for 
general counsel services.
      Deletes language proposed by the House directing Capital 
Investment Board pre-approval for large procurement actions and 
a report on the establishment of mental illness, education and 
clinical centers.
      Retains language proposed by the Senate transferring up 
to $1,200,000 from medical care to general operating expenses 
for Hines Data Center services.
      Retains language proposed by the Senate transferring up 
to $4,500,000 from minor construction and up to $2,000,000 from 
medical care to the parking revolving fund for surface parking 
lot projects.
      Retains language proposed by the Senate establishing a 
60-day wait period for any action related to VISN 12 
realignment after the Secretary makes a recommendation and 
consults all pertinent stakeholders.

         TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

                       PUBLIC AND INDIAN HOUSING

                        HOUSING CERTIFICATE FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $13,940,907,000 for the housing certificate 
fund, instead of $13,275,388,000 as proposed by the House and 
$13,171,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conference 
agreement includes:
            $12,972,000,000 for expiring section 8 housing 
        assistance contracts, section 8 amendments, and 
        contracts entered into pursuant to section 441 of the 
        Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act;
            $452,907,000 to provide 79,000 ``incremental'' 
        section 8 housing assistance vouchers, to increase the 
        number of low-income individuals and families receiving 
        assistance. The conferees note that HUD took more than 
        12 months awarding new vouchers despite the fact that a 
        formula dictates their distribution. The delay can be 
        attributed, in large part, to including the voucher 
        Notice of Funding Availability (NOFA) with the ``Super 
        NOFA,'' which is rarely published until March--six 
        months into the fiscal year. HUD is encouraged to issue 
        the NOFA earlier, so that vouchers can be awarded 
        within eight months of enactment of this appropriations 
        measure. The Committees will be following HUD's 
        progress making these awards, and will act 
        appropriately if the funds are not awarded with 
        alacrity.
            $40,000,000 to provide section 8 housing vouchers 
        to non-elderly, disabled residents who are affected by 
        the designation of public and assisted housing as 
        ``elderly-only'' developments as proposed by the Senate 
        instead of $25,000,000 as proposed by the House;
            $192,000,000 is for section 8 contract 
        administrators as proposed by the House. The Senate did 
        not provide a specific appropriation for this activity; 
        and
            $266,000,000 is for tenant protection vouchers, 
        including for relocating residents impacted by a HOPE 
        VI project.
      Deletes language proposed by the House providing 
$37,000,000 for Shelter Plus Care renewals. A new account 
called ``Shelter Plus Care'' was created for this purpose.
      Deletes language proposed by the House providing 
$66,000,000 for low-income tax credit vouchers. The Senate did 
not include a similar provision.
      Deletes language proposed by the House providing $660,000 
for systems needed to monitor PHAs that increase the payment 
standard of vouchers. The Senate did not include a similar 
provision.
      Includes language proposed by the House transferring 
$11,000,000 to the Working Capital Fund for developing and 
maintaining information technology systems. The Senate did not 
include a similar provision.
      Includes language proposed by the House to cancel 
obligated balances of terminated contract authority. The Senate 
did not include a similar provision.
      Deletes language proposed by the Senate providing that 
funds for administrative fees may be used to cover costs of 
administering section 8 programs. The House did not include a 
similar provision.
      Inserts new language appropriating $7,000,000 to complete 
the funding required for the Jobs-Plus Demonstration program.
      Rescinds $1,833,000,000 in excess section 8 recaptures.

                      PUBLIC HOUSING CAPITAL FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $3,000,000,000 for the public housing 
capital fund instead of $2,955,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate and $2,800,000,000 as proposed by the House. Like last 
year, the conferees recommend increasing this account above the 
request, and above levels provided in the House and Senate 
bills, recognizing the serious unmet needs for capital 
improvements to the nation's public housing.
      Transfers $43,000,000 from this account to the Working 
Capital Fund for the development and maintenance of information 
technology systems.
      Recognizing that public housing for the elderly serves 
the poorest, the most racially and ethnically diverse, the 
oldest, and the largest number of seniors of the assisted 
housing programs, the conferees reiterate the House report 
regarding the potential importance of the Elderly Plus 
demonstration which proposes to retrofit these buildings.

                     PUBLIC HOUSING OPERATING FUND

      Appropriates $3,242,000,000 for the public housing 
operating fund instead of $3,139,000,000 as proposed by the 
House and $3,192,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Like the 
increase to the public housing capital fund, this increase 
reflects the conferees' commitment to providing adequate 
resources to public housing--in this case for basic costs like 
water, gas and electric utilities, security, and routine 
maintenance.
      The conferees remain troubled by the Department's 
implementation of the ``Public Housing Assessment System'' 
(PHAS). The system has had problems with the reliability of the 
inspections, the training and skills of some contract 
inspectors, and the effectiveness of quality assurance 
measures. Accordingly, the conferees direct HUD to continue to 
assess the accuracy and effectiveness of the PHAS system and to 
take whatever remedial steps may be needed, including 
implementing the recommendations made by GAO in its July 2000 
report. Specifically, the conferees direct HUD to revise its 
April 2000 quality assurance plan to ensure that quality 
assurance activities it contains will provide HUD with the 
information it needs to evaluate (1) inspection contractors' 
compliance with provisions in their contracts and quality 
control program, (2) inspectors' performance in applying HUD's 
inspection protocol, (3) the accuracy of the inspections and 
resulting scores, and (4) the performance of the program as 
indicated by the precision and replicability of the inspection 
protocol. Further, the conferees direct HUD to perform a 
statistically valid test of PHAS, conduct a thorough analysis 
of the results, and have the methodology and results reviewed 
by an independent expert. The Department should provide a 
report to the Committees on Appropriations by March 1, 2001, 
that describes the results of these reviews and the steps taken 
to improve the accuracy and reliability of PHAS. In the 
interim, HUD should not take any adverse actions against 
housing authorities solely on the basis of PHAS scores.

            DRUG ELIMINATION GRANTS FOR LOW--INCOME HOUSING

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $310,000,000 for drug elimination grants as 
proposed by the Senate instead of $300,000,000 as proposed by 
the House.
      Includes $20,000,000 for the New Approach Anti-Drug 
program as proposed by the Senate instead of no funding as 
proposed by the House.
      Includes $3,000,000 for technical assistance grants 
instead of $5,000,000 as proposed by the House and Senate. This 
account was reduced from the requested level of $10,000,000, 
and the House and Senate proposed levels of $5,000,000. The 
conferees are displeased about HUD's refusal to provide 
information in a timely way about the amount of funds expended 
and/or obligated on HUD's gun buy-back program--an unauthorized 
activity according to a legal opinion by the Comptroller 
General of the United States. Even if HUD's attorneys interpret 
existing legal authority differently from the Comptroller 
General, refusing to provide information to the Committees, 
especially about matters clearly within their purview, is 
unacceptable and will be dealt with accordingly.
      Includes $2,000,000 for the Boys and Girls Clubs of 
America for operating expenses and start up costs of clubs 
operating in or near public housing, or in housing assisted 
under the Native American housing block grant program.

          REVITALIZATION OF SEVERELY DISTRESSED PUBLIC HOUSING

                               (HOPE VI)

      Appropriates $575,000,000 for the revitalization of 
severely distressed public housing program as proposed by the 
Senate instead of $565,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      Recognizing the importance of affordable basic financial 
services in low-income neighborhoods, the conferees urge 
grantees to encourage and facilitate the establishment of 
community credit unions as part of HOPE VI housing 
revitalization projects. The conferees further direct HUD to 
provide technical assistance in meeting this goal, working in 
cooperation with appropriate staff of the National Credit Union 
Administration (NCUA).
      The conferees commend HUD's decision to continue support 
for the Campus Affiliates Program, a unique partnership of HUD, 
the Housing Authority of New Orleans, higher education, and the 
private sector. This program has begun to meet the needs of 
public housing residents in New Orleans by providing assistance 
and activities that foster self-sufficiency. The conferees 
expect HUD to continue to participate in this activity.

                  NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANTS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $650,000,000 for Native American Housing 
Block Grants as proposed by the Senate instead of $620,000,000 
as proposed by the House.
      Appropriates $6,000,000 for technical assistance grants 
as proposed by the House instead of $4,000,000 as proposed by 
the Senate. The conferees agree not to provide $2,000,000 to 
the National American Indian Housing Council (NAIHC) as 
proposed by the House or $4,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Transfers $2,000,000 to the Working Capital Fund for the 
development and maintenance of information technology systems 
as proposed by the House. Similar language was not included by 
the Senate.

           INDIAN HOUSING LOAN GUARANTEE FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Historically, Native Americans have had limited access to 
private mortgage capital because much of the land in Indian 
country is held in trust by the Federal government. As such, 
the land cannot be encumbered or alienated. The Indian Home 
Loan Guarantee Program was created to address the lack of 
mortgage capital by authorizing HUD to guarantee loans made by 
private lenders. Getting a loan, however, depends on the 
borrower securing a leasehold on tribally-held lands. This 
leasehold, which is used as security for the mortgage, can only 
be obtained after the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) conducts a 
title status report (TSR). HUD cannot endorse the guarantee 
until a final TSR is completed and is part of the financial 
package.
      Fortunately, HUD and BIA have made considerable progress 
making their program requirements more compatible with one 
another; however, if the loan guarantee program is to be used 
to its greatest potential, additional progress needs to be 
made, especially on the length of time it takes to complete a 
TSR. HUD and BIA should continue their dialogue on removing any 
impediments to this process.

                   COMMUNITY PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT

              HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH AIDS

      Appropriates $258,000,000 for housing opportunities for 
persons with AIDS instead of $250,000,000 as proposed by the 
House and $232,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Of the 
amount, one percent is appropriated for technical assistance as 
proposed by the House instead of .75 percent as proposed by the 
Senate.
      Includes language that requires HUD to renew all expiring 
HOPWA contracts funded under the non-formula component of the 
HOPWA program so long as the project meets all other program 
requirements. The conferees believe that it is critical to 
maintain the federal investment in existing projects to the 
maximum extent feasible.

                 RURAL HOUSING AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

      Appropriates $25,000,000 for rural housing and economic 
development instead of $27,000,000 as proposed by the Senate, 
and $20,000,000 as proposed by the House.

         AMERICA'S PRIVATE INVESTMENT COMPANIES PROGRAM ACCOUNT

      The conferees are aware that the President and the 
Speaker of the House of Representatives have agreed to a 
framework for a ``New Markets Initiative'' that includes 
providing $37,000,000 in credit subsidy for APIC. As part of 
this conference agreement, the conferees agree, when the 
initiative is enacted, to provide these funds through a 
supplemental appropriation measure, or through another 
appropriate vehicle.

                EMPOWERMENT ZONES/ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES

      Inserts new language providing $75,000,000 for grants to 
urban empowerment zones to be used in conjunction with economic 
development activities detailed in the strategic plans of each 
empowerment zone. Neither the House nor the Senate included a 
similar provision.
      Inserts new language providing $15,000,000 to the 
Secretary of Agriculture for grants to designated empowerment 
zones. Neither the House nor the Senate included a similar 
provision.
      As with APIC, the conferees agree to provide an 
additional $110,000,000 for EZ/ECs when the New Markets 
Initiative is enacted.

                       COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $5,057,550,000 for the community development 
fund instead of $4,505,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$4,800,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Inserts language proposed by the House creating the 
Community Development Fund (CDF) and identifying the various 
set-asides in the account. The conferees agree to the following 
earmarks;
      $4,409,000,000 for formula grants under the community 
development block grant program;
      $71,000,000 for grants to Indian tribes instead of 
$67,000,000 as proposed by the House and Senate;
      $45,500,000 for section 107 grants. The House provided 
$39,500,000 for section 107 grants and the Senate provided 
$41,500,000 for section 107 grants. The conference agreement 
provides the following earmarks within section 107:
            $3,000,000 is for community development work study;
            $10,000,000 is for historically black colleges and 
        universities;
            $8,000,000 is for the Community Outreach 
        Partnerships program;
            $7,000,000 is for insular areas;
            $3,000,000 for tribal colleges and universities;
            $3,000,000 for Alaska Native-Serving Institutions 
        and native Hawaiian-serving institutions;
            $6,500,000 is for Hispanic-Serving Institutions; 
        and
            $5,000,000 is for management information systems;
      $2,600,000 for the National American Indian Housing 
Council instead of $3,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$2,200,000 as proposed by the Senate;
      $10,000,000 for the National Housing Development 
Corporation (NHDC), for continuation of its program of 
acquisition, rehabilitation, and preservation of at-risk 
affordable housing. The conferees direct NHDC to establish 
benchmarks for performance (addressing matters such as the 
amount of capital and loan funds raised, the degree to which 
federal investment is leveraged through non-federal sources, 
and the number of units of housing acquired and transferred to 
new owners who will continue and protect the housing's 
affordability for low-income residents), and to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations regarding performance and progress 
in meeting those benchmarks;
      $28,450,000 for the Capacity Building for Community 
Development and Affordable Housing program, authorized by 
section 4 of P.L. 103-120, as in effect before June 12, 1997, 
instead of $23,450,000 proposed by the House and $25,000,000 
proposed by the Senate. Of the amount provided, at least 
$5,000,000 shall be for capacity building activities in rural 
areas as proposed by the Senate instead of $4,000,000 as 
proposed by the House. Additionally, $3,450,000 is for Habitat 
for Humanity International as proposed by the House. The Senate 
did not provide funds for this program;
      $60,000,000 for Youthbuild as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $45,000,000 as proposed by the House. This amount 
includes $4,000,000 for capacity building activities and 
$10,000,000 for underserved and rural areas as proposed by the 
Senate. The House did not include similar language;
      $20,000,000 for grants to eligible grantees under section 
11 of the Self-Help Housing Opportunity Program Extension Act 
of 1996, as proposed by the House. The Senate did not include 
funds for this item;
      $44,000,000 for the Neighborhood Initiatives program 
instead of $10,000,000 as proposed by the House and no funding 
as proposed by the Senate, of which:
      $5,000,000 is for the Institute for Software Research for 
construction related to a high-technology diversification 
initiative;
      $10,000,000 is for the City of Syracuse for the 
Neighborhood Initiative Program;
      $2,000,000 is for the Louisville Community Development 
Bank for the Louisville Neighborhood Initiative;
      $5,000,000 to the Vandalia Heritage Foundation, Inc. for 
community and neighborhood revitalization and economic 
diversification initiatives;
      $2,500,000 for the Omaha Housing Initiative to create 
affordable housing and encourage homeownership in Omaha, 
Nebraska;
      $2,000,000 for the Community Development Corporation of 
Kansas City and Health Midwest Partners for Change in Kansas 
City, Missouri for the revitalization initiative on the 
northwest corner of 63rd Street and Prospect Avenue;
      $2,850,000 for the Missouri Botanical Gardens in St. 
Louis, Missouri for development and revitalization activities 
associated with McRee Town;
      $2,500,000 for Downtown Now for revitalization efforts of 
the Old Post Office District in St. Louis Missouri;
      $2,000,000 for the Kansas City Neighborhood Alliance in 
Kansas City, Missouri for the Neighborhood Preservation 
Initiative in the Blue Hills and Vineyard neighborhoods;
      $1,500,000 for the City of South Bend, Indiana for the 
redevelopment of the Studebaker Corridor;
      $1,500,000 for the Midtown Development Corporation in 
Kansas City, Missouri for the redevelopment of the Mount 
Cleveland Community;
      $850,000 for the City of Spartanburg, South Carolina for 
Arkwright/Forest Park revitalization;
      $300,000 for the City of Beloit, Wisconsin for the Beloit 
urban renewal project;
      $500,000 for the City of Waterloo, Iowa for the 
redevelopment of blighted portions of the downtown area;
      $500,000 for Patterson Park Development Corporation for 
the purchase and rehabilitation of homes in the Patterson Park 
neighborhood in Baltimore, Maryland;
      $1,000,000 for the City of Des Moines, Iowa for planning 
of the redevelopment of the Riverpoint area;
      $1,200,000 for City of Milwaukee, Wisconsin for 
revitalization of the Menomonee Valley industrial area;
      $500,000 for the City of Woodbury, New Jersey for 
downtown economic development activities;
      $1,000,000 for the City of Wildwood, New Jersey for 
revitalization of the Pacific Avenue Business District;
      $500,000 for the City of Gardena, California for planning 
of downtown redevelopment;
      $300,000 for the City of Chicago, Illinois for the South 
Chicago Housing Initiative;
      $500,000 for the city of Detroit, Michigan for the 
Detroit River Promenade Project.
      $29,000,000 is appropriated separately for credit subsidy 
for section 108 loan guarantees as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $28,000,000 as proposed by the House. Limits loan 
guarantees to $1,261,000,000 as proposed by the Senate instead 
of $1,217,000,000 as proposed by the House;
      $2,000,000 is for the Utah Housing Finance Agency for 
temporary housing necessary for the 2002 Olympic Games to be 
held in Salt Lake City, Utah, as proposed by the Senate. The 
House did not have similar language;
      $15,000,000 is to be transferred to the Working Capital 
Fund for the development of information technology systems;
      $292,000,000 for economic development initiatives. The 
targeted grants shall be made as follows:
      $500,000 for The Palace Theater for its renovation in 
Manchester, New Hampshire;
      $300,000 for the Manchester Historic Association for the 
restoration of the Millyard Museum in Manchester, New 
Hampshire;
      $700,000 for Lewis and Clark College in Portland, Oregon 
for construction and program activities at Bicentennial Hall in 
Portland, Oregon;
      $1,000,000 for the Omaha Housing Initiative to create 
affordable housing and encourage homeownership in Omaha, 
Nebraska;
      $1,000,000 for the LOVE Social Services Center in 
Fairbanks, Alaska for a facility to serve disadvantaged youth 
and provide other services;
      $250,000 for the Portland Oregon Visitors Association for 
the Pioneer Courthouse Square Lobby Renovation project in 
Portland, Oregon;
      $250,000 for Portland State University for the Portland 
State Engineering Building and Central City Streetcar;
      $1,100,000 for the Field Museum in Chicago, Illinois for 
the development of the ``Sue'' exhibit, a showcase of a 67 
million-year-old T-Rex;
      $1,000,000 for the Community Action Agency of Southern 
New Mexico, Inc., for construction of a regional food bank and 
supporting offices;
      $700,000 for the City of Santa Fe, New Mexico, to 
construct a permanent site for the Santa Fe Area Farmers Market 
at the historic Santa Fe rail yard;
      $250,000 for the Boys and Girls Club of Las Cruces, New 
Mexico to upgrade existing facilities;
      $500,000 for Tatum, New Mexico to replace its community 
center;
      $150,000 for the Bataan Death March Memorial renovations 
in Las Cruces, New Mexico;
      $1,000,000 for Granite Falls, Minnesota to aid in 
recovery efforts from a tornado and severe thunder storms;
      $1,020,000 for the University of Idaho for the 
construction of the Center for Science and Technology in Idaho 
Falls, Idaho;
      $200,000 for Elmore County, Idaho for meeting water 
system needs in the town of Atlanta;
      $1,000,000 for the City of Salmon, Idaho for land 
acquisition, construction, and alteration for the Sacajawea 
Interpretive, Cultural, and Education Center;
      $500,000 for the Clearwater Economic Development 
Association in Northern Idaho, for implementation of the Lewis 
and Clark Bicentennial Plan;
      $500,000 for Lewis-Clark State College for start-up 
activities associated with the Idaho Virtual Incubator;
      $1,200,000 for MSU-Billings for the acquisition of a 
College of Business facility to house economic development 
activities;
      $1,000,000 for Billings, Montana for the completion of 
the Billings depot project;
      $100,000 for Miles Community College in Miles City, 
Montana for a feasibility study regarding the conveyance of a 
VA medical facility;
      $500,000 for the Jefferson County Local Development 
Corporation in Whitehall, Montana for economic development 
activities;
      $350,000 for the Human Resources Development Council in 
Bozeman, Montana for the restoration of a historic property for 
community services offices;
      $300,000 for the City of Columbia Falls, Montana for the 
restructuring of the Old Main Veterans Facility;
      $1,500,000 for the City of Memphis for the construction 
of the Stax Museum of American Soul Music in Memphis, 
Tennessee;
      $500,000 for the City of Chattanooga, Tennessee, 
Department of Parks Recreation, Arts, and Culture for 
revitalization efforts in Alton Park;
      $700,000 for Winston-Salem-Forsyth County, North Carolina 
for the development of the Science Center and Environment Park 
of Forsyth County, North Carolina;
      $700,000 for the redevelopment of Midwest City, Oklahoma 
from damage from a tornado;
      $250,000 for the Allen County Historical Society for the 
redevelopment of the Funston Museum complex in Iola, Allen 
County, Kansas;
      $1,000,000 for the Detroit Rescue Mission Ministries for 
the purchase and renovation of a building;
      $500,000 for Northern Initiatives to capitalize an Upper 
Peninsula Michigan Equity Fund to assist in the development of 
small businesses;
      $250,000 for the City of Jackson, Michigan for downtown 
redevelopment;
      $250,000 for William Tyndale College in Tyndale, Michigan 
for a learning resource center;
      $500,000 for the University of Utah for the planning and 
design of the Museum of Science and Nature;
      $700,000 for the Covenant House Michigan for the 
construction costs of a permanent Rights of Passage facility;
      $1,000,000 for West Valley City, Utah for the 
construction of the West Valley City Multi-Cultural Community 
Center.
      $500,000 for the Heart Mountain Wyoming Foundation for an 
interactive learning center in Powell, Wyoming;
      $500,000 for the Vermont Rural Fire Protection Task Force 
of Randolph, Vermont for the purchase of equipment;
      $500,000 for the Southern Vermont Recreation Center 
Foundation in Springfield, Vermont;
      $500,000 for the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board 
for the development of affordable housing in Northern Vermont;
      $500,000 for Marlboro College for a technology incubator 
facility in downtown Brattleboro, Vermont;
      $500,000 for the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board 
for the development of affordable housing in Williston, 
Vermont;
      $500,000 for the Town of Hartford, Vermont for the 
development of the Railroad Row Historic District in downtown 
White River Junction, Vermont;
      $500,000 for Vermont Technical College for economic 
development in Randolph, Vermont;
      $250,000 for the Town of Fairfield, Vermont for the 
development of the President Chester A. Arthur visitor 
facility;
      $800,000 for the City of Montrose, Colorado for the 
development of affordable low-income housing;
      $900,000 for the Trinity Repertory Company in Providence, 
Rhode Island for the conversion of an abandoned banking 
building;
      $300,000 for Upper Darby Township, Pennsylvania to assist 
residents with homes that are sinking due to soil subsidence;
      $150,000 for the Urban Redevelopment Authority of 
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for economic development on 
Pittsburgh's North Shore;
      $100,000 for the City of Hazleton, Pennsylvania for 
economic development and revitalization activities;
      $750,000 for the City of Johnstown, Pennsylvania for 
downtown economic development;
      $300,000 for the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to 
assist in the relocation of families in the Logan neighborhood 
whose homes were built on an improperly filled creek bed;
      $500,000 for Ford City, Pennsylvania for brownfield 
revitalization;
      $300,000 for the City of Chester, Pennsylvania for the 
redevelopment of DeShong Park;
      $250,000 for Erie, Pennsylvania for the Discovery Square 
museum expansion;
      $500,000 for the Please Touch Museum in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania for relocation costs;
      $200,000 for the Boys and Girls Club of Allentown, 
Pennsylvania for the Northern Lehigh Community Center;
      $400,000 for Allegheny County, Pennsylvania for the 
redevelopment of the Braddock-Swissvale-Rankin industrial site;
      $500,000 for the National Museum for American Jewish 
History in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for expansion efforts;
      $500,000 for the Reading Berks Emergency Shelter in 
Reading, Pennsylvania for the construction of a transitional 
housing facility for the homeless;
      $250,000 for the City of Lancaster, Pennsylvania for the 
development of the Lancaster Square project;
      $100,000 for Clarion County, Pennsylvania for continued 
development of Liberty Towers Senior Activities Facility;
      $250,000 for the Nueva Esperanza Community Development 
Corporation in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for economic 
revitalization of commercial and industrial facilities;
      $200,000 for Light of Life Ministries in Allegheny 
County, Pennsylvania for infrastructure improvements at the 
Serenity Village homeless program;
      $250,000 for Universal Community Homes for economic 
development activities in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;
      $250,000 for the City of Philadelphia to address the 
safety concerns related to abandoned and structurally impaired 
homes
      $600,000 for the City of East Providence, Rhode Island to 
develop recreational facilities at Crescent Park;
      $300,000 for the City of State Line, Mississippi for 
downtown infrastructure and economic revitalization;
      $1,000,000 for the City of Madison, Mississippi for the 
renovation of the historic downtown of Madison, Mississippi;
      $500,000 for Mississippi State University for the 
renovation and expansion of facilities for the Stoneville, 
Mississippi Research and Education Complex;
      $500,000 for the City of Canton, Mississippi for the 
establishment of a State film complex;
      $2,000,000 for the rehabilitation and restoration of Cain 
Hall on the campus of Hinds Community College in Raymond, 
Mississippi;
      $400,000 for Nashua, New Hampshire for the redevelopment 
of the Mines Fall Park;
      $1,000,000 for the City of Bangor, Maine for the 
installation of steel bulkheading on the Penobscot River;
      $1,000,000 for the City of Portland, Maine for funding 
the Bayside Development Project;
      $550,000 for Vinalhaven Elder Care Services, Inc. in 
Maine for the development of an elder care facility;
      $500,000 for the City of Dayton, Ohio for the restoration 
of the Main Street historic district;
      $500,000 for Cleveland Tomorrow in Cleveland, Ohio for 
the restoration of the Euclid Beach Carousel;
      $700,000 for the City of Xenia, Ohio for the 
redevelopment of the area from damage due to a tornado.
      $700,000 for the Cleveland Botanical garden for the 
development of a glass house conservatory;
      $500,000 for Skagit County for the preservation of 
farmland in Skagit County, Washington;
      $1,000,000 for the Pacific Science Center in Seattle, 
Washington to complete the Mercer Island Slough Environmental 
Education Center;
      $500,000 for the Seattle Art Museum in Seattle, 
Washington for site development;
      $1,000,000 for the City of Lincoln, Nebraska for the 
construction of the Northbridge Center for Children and Youth;
      $500,000 for the Southwest Border Region Partnership for 
an assessment of the border region's future economic health;
      $250,000 for the Centro de Salud familiar La Fe in El 
Paso, Texas for community outreach activities to assist low-
income families;
      $1,000,000 for the City of Houston for redevelopment 
activities within Freedman's Town;
      $250,000 for the Boys and Girls Club of Brownsville, 
Texas for building repairs and community services;
      $250,000 for the George Gervin Youth center in San 
Antonio for the construction of a youth center;
      $500,000 for the City of Beaumont, Texas to revitalize 
the Charlton-Pollard neighborhood;
      $500,000 for the Bayfront Arts and Science Park in Corpus 
Christi, Texas for the expansion of the park;
      $250,000 for West Texas A&M; University to develop an 
integrated services center in Amarillo, Texas;
      $250,000 for Sam Houston State University for the 
redevelopment of the Sam Houston Memorial Museum;
      $7,000,000 for the University of Louisville for the 
expansion of the university's main library;
      $1,000,000 for Oklahoma City, Oklahoma for the Oklahoma 
City Murrah Revitalization project;
      $1,000,000 for the National Council on Agricultural Life 
and Labor in Dover, Delaware for a variety of housing 
assistance programs;
      $1,000,000 for the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, 
Alabama for the Gorgas House Renovation Project;
      $100,000 for the Hammoundville Armory in the Town of 
Valley Head, Alabama for the renovation of a historic facility 
to enhance economic development and tourist activity;
      $500,000 for Monroeville, Alabama for the Monroe County 
Courthouse Restoration Project;
      $1,000,000 for the Mobile Public Library, Mobile, Alabama 
for the renovation of facilities as part of a neighborhood 
redevelopment project;
      $500,000 for the City of LaFayette, (Chambers County) 
Alabama for the Chambers County Courthouse Restoration Project;
      $100,000 for Union Springs, Alabama for the 
rehabilitation of facilities for downtown restoration/
revitalization;
      $250,000 for the Mobile Historic Development Commission 
for the Oakleigh District Revitalization Project;
      $250,000 for the National Community College for the Deaf 
and Blind in Talladega, Alabama for the renovation of 
facilities for development of economic education program;
      $500,000 for Tuscaloosa, Alabama for the Tuscaloosa 
Alberta City Project;
      $500,000 for the City of Brundidge, Alabama for the 
completion of Pike County Covered Arena;
      $500,000 for the City of Mobile, Alabama for the 
Battlehouse Restoration Project;
      $700,000 for Kansas State Historical Society, Topeka, 
Kansas for the restoration of the home of William Allen White;
      $1,000,000 for the development of the Life Center at 
Franklin Pierce College in Ridge, New Hampshire;
      $100,000 for the Housing Partnership in Portsmouth, New 
Hampshire to provide below market rents and to rehabilitate 
deteriorated buildings;
      $400,000 for the Northern Forest Heritage Park in Berlin, 
New Hampshire to develop facilities;
      $2,600,000 for the City of Meridian, Mississippi for the 
rehabilitation of the opera house;
      $300,000 for the City of Laurel, Mississippi for the 
development of a veterans museum;
      $100,000 for the City of Jackson, Mississippi for the 
revitalization of LeFleur's Bluff;
      $500,000 for Rowan Oak for the restoration of the home of 
William Faulkner in Oxford, Mississippi;
      $500,000 for the George Ohr Museum in Biloxi, Mississippi 
for the development of an African-American art center;
      $500,000 for Ocean Springs, Mississippi for the 
restoration of the old high school administration building;
      $500,000 for Mississippi State University School of 
Architecture in Starkville, Mississippi for rural 
revitalization;
      $2,500,000 for the University of Alaska for a pilot 
training simulator;
      $450,000 for Bird TLC in Alaska for the construction of 
Potter's Marsh Conservation Center;
      $2,000,000 for Catholic Community Services in Alaska for 
the reconstruction of a homeless shelter and to acquire new 
housing stock for battered women;
      $270,000 for the Fairbanks Hospitality House in 
Fairbanks, Alaska for the purchase and renovation of an 
emergency shelter;
      $500,000 for Kids are People, Inc. for a transitional 
living program for homeless youth and an emergency shelter in 
Wasilla, Alaska;
      $3,000,000 for the Alaska Pacific University for the 
restoration of a historic property in Anchorage, Alaska;
      $250,000 for Marceline, Missouri for downtown 
redevelopment activities;
      $500,000 for Ozark Action, Inc. of Missouri for low-
income rural housing;
      $400,000 for Sedalia, Missouri for the Katy Depot 
Restoration Project;
      $200,000 for the Bond Family Housing Center in St. Louis, 
Missouri for the Transitional Housing Program;
      $200,000 for Trenton, Missouri for community 
redevelopment, including renovation and restoration activities 
of modifying the Plaza hotel into a senior citizen apartment 
building;
      $500,000 for Sullivan County, Missouri for water supply 
and interconnection projects;
      $2,000,000 for James S. McDonnell Planetarium in St. 
Louis, Missouri for renovation;
      $100,000 for Clarksville, Missouri for improved year-
round facilities related to the Mississippi River and the 
American Bald Eagle;
      $250,000 for the Center for Emerging Technologies in St. 
Louis, Missouri for incubator space development;
      $300,000 for the Columbia Housing Authority in Missouri 
for installation of fire suppression sprinkler systems in Oak 
and Paquin Towers;
      $200,000 for the Bonne Terre, Missouri for infrastructure 
improvement of an industrial development;
      $100,000 for the Lamar Community Betterment Association 
for an open air pavillion in Lamar, Missouri;
      $100,000 for the Roxy Theater Youth Center in Hopkins, 
Missouri for renovation;
      $250,000 for the Bootheel Youth Museum in Malden, 
Missouri for expansion;
      $500,000 for renovation of the Ridgway Center at the 
Missouri Botanical Gardens;
      $2,000,000 for Arkansas State University at Mountain 
Home, Arkansas for the construction of a multipurpose 
auditorium;
      $1,000,000 for Marion County, Indiana for the 
construction of the Sexually Transmitted Disease and HIV 
Prevention and Research Center;
      $850,000 for the South Carolina Association of Community 
Development Corporations in Charleston, South Carolina for job 
creation, small business development and quality of life 
improvements within the State of South Carolina;
      $850,000 for the University of South Carolina in 
Columbia, South Carolina to enlarge the main building at the 
University of South Carolina School of Public Health;
      $500,000 for Helping Hands Hawaii in Honolulu, Hawaii for 
community based activities including the delivery of goods and 
services to Hawaii's needy;
      $750,000 for Waipahu Community Association in Waipahu, 
Hawaii for renovations and the establishment of a Waipahu 
festival market fair;
      $500,000 for the Kauai Economic Development Board in 
Lihue, Hawaii for site acquisition, design, construction and 
equipment for the West Kauai Technology Center;
      $250,000 for the Maui Academy of Performing Arts in 
Puunene, Hawaii for the acquisition and renovation of the 
facility;
      $250,000 for the Homestake Opera House in Lead, South 
Dakota for renovation of the interior of the Homestake Opera 
House;
      $250,000 for the City of Fort Pierre, South Dakota for 
development of the Lewis and Clark Waterfront Trail;
      $250,000 for Cedar Youth Services in Lincoln, Nebraska to 
complete construction of the Northbridge Center for Children 
and Youth;
      $250,000 for Family Housing Advisory Services Project 
Jericho in Omaha, Nebraska for affordable housing activities;
      $500,000 for the Lowell Cultural and Performing Arts 
Downtown Initiative in Lowell, Massachusetts for development of 
the site for the Lowell Performing Arts Center;
      $500,000 for the City of Boston, Massachusetts for its 
Main Streets Program;
      $500,000 for the City of New Bedford, Massachusetts for 
construction and renovation of the Portugese American Cultural 
Center;
      $325,000 for the City of Racine, Wisconsin for 
construction of the Racine Root River Pathway;
      $300,000 for the Historic Third Ward Association in 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin to establish a public market;
      $250,000 for Jentry-McDonald Corporation in Baltimore, 
Maryland for capital improvements to the Jentry-McDonald House;
      $250,000 for the City of Takoma Park, Maryland for the 
construction of the Takoma Park Computer Center;
      $250,000 for Montgomery County, Maryland for costs 
associated with the Wheaton Small Business Technology Center;
      $500,000 for the Central Montana Foundation to upgrade, 
install technology, and facilitate occupancy of One Stop Center 
in Lewistown, Montana;
      $250,000 for the City of South Bend, Indiana for economic 
development activities related to the Studebaker Auto/Oliver 
Plow Works project;
      $1,000,000 for the City of Belen, New Mexico for 
construction of a community center;
      $350,000 for Rio Arriba County, New Mexico for an 
environmental impact statement;
      $150,000 for Pueblo Cochiti, New Mexico for the 
construction of a community center;
      $500,000 for Pueblo of Acoma, New Mexico for the 
construction of a multi-purpose facility;
      $500,000 for the City of San Francisco, California for 
preservation and restoration of the Old Mint;
      $500,000 for Booker T. Washington Outreach, Inc. in 
Monroe, Louisiana for construction of an Elderly Living Center;
      $250,000 for UNITY for the Homeless in New Orleans, 
Louisiana for the Oasis project;
      $2,400,000 for Wheeling Jesuit University in Wheeling, 
West Virginia for construction of science/computer centers;
      $1,800,000 for the City of Hinton, West Virginia for 
construction of a high technology office building and small 
business incubator;
      $250,000 for the Tubman African American Museum in Macon, 
Georgia for construction of the Tubman African American Museum;
      $250,000 for the Lemmon Area Charitable and Economic 
Development Corporation in Lemmon, South Dakota for economic 
development activities;
      $100,000 for the Mathilda Geppert Childcare Center in 
Vermillion, South Dakota for development of a child day care 
center;
      $75,000 for the Spearfish Economic Development 
Corporation in Spearfish, South Dakota for infrastructure 
development in the city's industrial park;
      $300,000 for the City of Brandon, South Dakota to 
construct a community library;
      $1,500,000 for the City of Aberdeen, South Dakota for 
construction of a community center;
      $500,000 for the Sioux Falls Empire Fair Association in 
Sioux Falls, South Dakota for infrastructure improvements to 
the W.H. Lyons Fairgrounds;
      $250,000 for the City of Redfield, South Dakota for 
infrastructure improvement at its industrial park;
      $250,000 for the West River Foundation in Sturgis, South 
Dakota for a statewide business development initiative;
      $100,000 for South Dakota Housing Development Authority 
in Pierre, South Dakota for the development of an employer 
assisted housing program;
      $500,000 for Fairfield University in Fairfield, 
Connecticut for continued construction of an Information 
Technology Center;
      $250,000 for Prince George's County, Maryland for the 
Prince George's County Technology Commercialization Center;
      $100,000 for the American Visionary Arts Museum in 
Baltimore, Maryland for expansion of the museum;
      $1,500,000 for the Discovery Center in Williston, North 
Dakota for construction of a visitor center and reconstruction 
of former barracks at Fort Buford State Historic Site;
      $500,000 for the Rural Economic Area Partnership Zones in 
North Dakota;
      $250,000 for North Dakota State University in Fargo, 
North Dakota for development of a campus-based technology park;
      $500,000 for the City of Taylorville, Illinois for an 
emergency services center;
      $1,000,000 for Loyola University in Chicago, Illinois for 
development of a life sciences center;
      $200,000 for the Merit Music Program in Chicago, Illinois 
to expand Project BEGIN;
      $400,000 for the City of Freeport, Illinois for 
Brownfields cleanup;
      $100,000 for the City of Benton, Illinois for streetscape 
and beautification of downtown Benton;
      $250,000 for the City of Charlotte, North Carolina for 
economic development activities within Charlotte's Wilkinson 
Boulevard Corridor;
      $250,000 for Asheville-Buncome Technical College in 
Asheville, North Carolina for construction of a small business 
incubator;
      $250,000 for the Museum of Latin American Art in Long 
Beach, California to expand and upgrade existing facilities;
      $250,000 for FAME Renaissance in Los Angeles, California 
to continue work on a small business incubator;
      $750,000 for the City of Fresno, California for the 
Fresno Community Health Centers regional medical center;
      $250,000 for the City of Inglewood, California for the 
Market Street Senior Center;
      $250,000 for the City of San Francisco, California for a 
homeless housing initiative;
      $250,000 for the City of Santa Ana, California for the 
IDEA high-tech education center;
      $1,800,000 for Comprehensive Housing Assistance, Inc., in 
Baltimore, Maryland for renovations to the Concord Apartments;
      $500,000 for the City of Davenport, Iowa for development 
of Friendly House;
      $500,000 for the City of Council Bluffs, Iowa for land 
purchase and construction of an elderly community center;
      $10,000 for LaCrosse County, Wisconsin for economic 
development information centers;
      $450,000 for the Biomedical Research Foundation of 
Northwest Louisiana, Shreveport, Louisiana for infrastructure 
improvements for InterTech Park and construction of a Cleanroom 
Biotechnology Incubator;
      $1,000,000 for University Heights Science Park, Newark, 
New Jersey for University Heights Science Park's Newark Digital 
Century Center;
      $500,000 for Bayshore Economic Development Corporation 
for development of the Henry Hudson Trail;
      $400,000 for Shepherd College in Shepherdstown, West 
Virginia for renovation of Scarborough Library;
      $400,000 for Bethany College in Bethany, West Virginia 
for continued work on a health and wellness center;
      $250,000 for the Town of Millville, New Jersey for 
development of the Glasstown Center project;
      $400,000 for the City of Burlington, Vermont for 
Firehouse Center for the Visual Arts;
      $400,000 for the City of Montpelier, Vermont for Pyralisk 
Arts Center;
      $200,000 for the Vermont Youth Orchestra Association, 
Colchester, Vermont for rehabilitation of the Fort Ethan Allen 
Riding Hall;
      $250,000 for the Kellogg-Hubbard Library, Montpelier, 
Vermont for restoration of historic library and addition to the 
children's library;
      $750,000 for the Vermont Housing and Conservation Board, 
Brattleboro, Vermont for rehabilitation of the Westgate 
apartments;
      $500,000 for the City of Detroit, Michigan for the 
Detroit River Promenade Project;
      $500,000 for the Bushnell Theatre, Hartford, Connecticut 
for final completion of renovation;
      $225,000 for the Boys and Girls Club of Drew County, 
Arkansas for construction of general purpose facility;
      $250,000 for the Frank Lloyd Wright Darwin Martin House, 
Buffalo, New York for restoration work;
      $250,000 for the Westside Rowing Club of Buffalo, New 
York for construction of the Frank Lloyd Wright Boathouse;
      $1,750,000 for the Washington State Department of 
Community Development to address farmworker housing issues in 
the State;
      $250,000 for the Three Rivers Community Foundation in 
Tri-Cities, Washington for economic development activities in 
Benton, Franklin and Grant counties related to the Hanford 
Reach National Monument;
      $250,000 for the Trinity Repertory Pell-Chafee Theatre, 
Providence, Rhode Island for theater expansion and operations;
      $250,000 for the City of Providence, Rhode Island for 
construction of the Lillian Feinstein Senior Center;
      $1,250,000 for the City of Henderson, Nevada for downtown 
redevelopment and infrastructure upgrade;
      $350,000 for Opportunity Village Foundation, Las Vegas, 
Nevada for start-up funding for downpayment assistance program 
to disabled;
      $500,000 for the Boys and Girls Club of Las Vegas, Nevada 
for the renovation and expansion of existing facilities;
      $750,000 for Henry and Martinsville Counties, Virginia 
for economic development activities;
      $300,000 for CityArts for Youth, Inc. in Providence, 
Rhode Island for renovations for a business incubator;
      $250,000 for Bayview Citizens for Social Justice and the 
Northampton-Accomack Planning District Commission to support 
economic development projects on the Eastern Shore of Virginia;
      $250,000 for Monroe Community College, Rochester, New 
York to establish a Virtual Campus Center;
      $250,000 for the West Virginia School of Osteopathic 
Medicine in Lewisburg, West Virginia for expansion of the 
ambulatory care facility;
      $400,000 for Prince George's County, Maryland for 
architecture, design and engineering work for redevelopment of 
McGuire House;
      $500,000 for Howard County, Maryland for renovations to 
Route 1;
      $250,000 for the City of Atlanta, Georgia for continued 
construction of the Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Center;
      $500,000 for Philander-Smith College, Arkansas for 
facilities and equipment upgrades for scientific and emerging 
technology research;
      $250,000 for University of Arkansas in Pine Bluff, for 
facilities and equipment upgrades for scientific and emerging 
technology research;
      $100,000 for the Boys and Girls Club of Olney, Maryland 
for facility construction;
      $100,000 for the Wesley Acres Independent Living 
Retirement Center in Mitchell, South Dakota for capital and 
other improvements;
      $500,000 for Liberty County, Georgia Economic Development 
Authority for planning and engineering the industrial park 
project in coastal Georgia;
      $500,000 for County of Maui, Hawaii for land acquisition, 
planning and design, and construction of a senior housing/
housing division office building in Central Maui, Hawaii;
      $500,000 for Vermont Historical Society for the Vermont 
Historical Society renovation project;
      $250,000 for Eva's Village in Patterson, New Jersey for 
renovation of new transitional housing sites;
      $500,000 for the Iowa Finance Authority and Muscatine 
Center for Strategic Action to reduce illegal and predatory 
mortgage lending practices;
      $500,000 for City of Reno, Nevada for land acquisition 
for downtown revitalization;
      $500,000 for the City of Sheboygan, Wisconsin to 
redevelop a contaminated former industrial site to mixed use 
development;
      $500,000 for El Centro de la Raza in Seattle, Washington 
for acquisition of the Beacon Hill School;
      $250,000 for North Dakota State University for the 
development of the Virtual Archival Storage Terminal;
      $250,000 for the Smyrna-Clayton Heritage Association in 
Smyrna, Delaware, for restoration work on the Smyrna Opera 
House;
      $400,000 for the Montana World Trade Center for the 
Informational Outreach Project;
      $325,000 to Boaz, Alabama for the Senior Citizens Center;
      $20,000 to the Blount County Multi-need Center in Alabama 
for equipment for the mentally retarded and severely 
handicapped;
      $800,000 to San Diego, California for final construction 
of San Diego's Children's Convalescent Hospital;
      $930,000 to Barry University in Miami Shores, Florida for 
an intercultural community center;
      $1,110,000 to Long Island University in New York for 
restoration of the Tilles Center for the Performing Arts;
      $575,000 for Tennessee Valley Family Services in 
Guntersville, Alabama for construction and repair costs for the 
A+ house for homeless children;
      $1,145,000 to the Lubbock Science Spectrum Museum in 
Texas for construction costs of the Brazos River Exhibit;
      $930,000 to Provo City, Utah for the Ironton 
Redevelopment Site;
      $1,110,000 to Rowan University in Glassboro, New Jersey 
for construction of a science building;
      $150,000 for the Owensboro Riverfront Project in Kentucky 
for development of its waterfront;
      $1,000,000 to the Louisville Zoo, Kentucky for 
construction of the Gorilla Forest Exhibition;
      $193,500 to the town of Yucca Valley, California for 
community regional park improvements to provide recreational 
opportunities to the local community;
      $51,600 to Susquehanna County, Pennsylvania for 
construction of an industrial park and facility;
      $215,000 to complete the Logan, Utah Emergency Services 
Training Facility project;
      $344,000 to the City of Ackerman and Choctaw County, 
Mississippi for development of a community center;
      $800,000 to Aurora, Illinois to revitalize downtown 
through adaptive reuse of architecturally significant 
structures;
      $860,000 to Waukegan, Illinois for renovation of the 
historic Genesee Theater;
      $430,000 to Riverside, California for the Goeske Center 
for Senior and Disabled Citizens;
      $200,000 to St. Stephen's Community Center in Kentucky 
for expansion of the life center;
      $258,000 to West Palm Beach, Florida to refurbish and 
expand the Northwood Community and Recreation Center;
      $825,000 to Chambersburg, Pennsylvania for the Capitol 
Theatre project;
      $60,000 to the Coos Economic Development Corporation in 
New Hampshire for the Connecticut River Byway Gateway Center 
including purchase and renovation of a former cog mill;
      $365,500 to the Boys and Girls Club of Camden, Arkansas;
      $77,400 to Wayne County, Pennsylvania to establish a 
revolving loan fund for a Small Business Incubation Program;
      $350,000 to the Patrick Henry Development Council (PHDC) 
of Virginia for economic development;
      $215,000 to Escondido, California for the Quail Hills 
Development Program;
      $860,000 to Dillard University in Louisiana to continue 
construction of the International Center for Economic Freedom;
      $215,000 to the City of Charlotte, North Carolina for 
economic development activities within Charlotte's Wilkinson 
Boulevard Corridor;
      $215,000 to Proctor Hospital in Peoria, Illinois for the 
Women's Health Center;
      $172,000 to Baton Rouge, Louisiana for Downtown 
Development/Plan Baton Rouge;
      $430,000 to the Center for Hazards Assessment, Response 
and Technology in New Orleans, Louisiana for emergency 
assessment and response;
      $43,000 to the Borough of Tunkhannock, Wyoming County, 
Pennsylvania for upgrade of the Dietrich Theater Cultural 
Center;
      $200,000 to the Marcelino Plan y Vino, Inc. A 501(c)(3) 
in Virginia for the MAPAVI program to provide assistance to 
communities and individuals coping with the financial burden of 
catastrophic illness;
      $1,000,000 to Sandy City, Utah for the purchase of land 
related to the Little Cottonwood Watershed Protection project;
      $34,400 to the YWCA of Walla Walla, Washington for the 
repair and enhancements to the family emergency shelter;
      $430,000 to Columbus, Ohio for a Housing Trust Fund;
      $250,000 to Motor City Blight Busters in Detroit, 
Michigan to establish a revolving loan fund for new 
construction, acquisition, and rehabilitation of distressed 
homes;
      $430,000 to Daytona Beach, Florida for design and 
construction of Community Center;
      $43,000 to the County of San Bernardino, California for 
roadway signage improvements to historic Route 66 between 
Topock and Victorville;
      $430,000 to Montgomery County, Kentucky for a community 
center;
      $430,000 to Hackensack University Medical Center in New 
Jersey for women's and children's hospital;
      $1,720,000 to the Olympic Regional Development Authority 
to upgrade the Lake Placid, New York winter sports facilities;
      $258,000 to the Hamlet Historic Train Depot in North 
Carolina for depot restoration;
      $43,000 to Highland Falls, New York to renovate downtown;
      $473,000 to Monroe County, Pennsylvania for construction 
of an industrial park;
      $860,000 for the restoration of Glamorgan Castle in 
Alliance, Ohio;
      $301,000 to the City of Redlands, California for 
infrastructure activities related to the Redlands Community 
Center;
      $172,000 to Ouachita County, Arkansas for Tate's Bluff 
Bridge;
      $430,000 to Doane College--Crete, Nebraska for 
rehabilitation of historic Whitcomb Conservatory for performing 
arts center;
      $215,000 to Memorial Health System in Springfield, 
Illinois for initial facility planning for a Cardiology Center;
      $301,000 to Ft. Wayne, Indiana for revitalization of the 
of Bowser Avenue and Hanna-Creighton brownfield area;
      $430,000 to the Town of Skaneateles, New York for 
construction of a recreation center;
      $645,000 to Carnegie Hall in New York for continuation of 
Carnegie Hall's Third Stage project;
      $430,000 to the MCB Foundation of Wichita, Kansas for 
revitalization of the downtown community recreation center;
      $430,000 to the VA Greater Los Angeles Health Care System 
in California for renovation of the gymnasium on the Sepulveda 
campus;
      $438,600 to the Children's Hospital and Health Center in 
San Diego, California for construction and infrastructure 
improvements;
      $301,000 to the Port of South, Louisiana for expansion of 
the Globalplex intermodal terminal facility;
      $430,000 to the City of Tucson, Arizona for clean-up and 
development of brownfield;
      $344,000 to Carmel, New York to create a downtown park 
and commercial area;
      $1,240,000 to Spring Hill College in Alabama for the 
Regional Library Resource Center;
      $25,600 to the City of Thibodaux, Louisiana for 
infrastructure improvements to the Civic Center;
      $430,000 to Tuscaloosa, Alabama for the Alberta City 
housing initiative;
      $444,000 to Knoxville, Tennessee for equipment needs of 
the Halls-Powell Boys and Girls Club of Greater Knoxville;
      $200,000 to the Virginia Department of Transportation for 
engineering design and construction of a debris diverter on the 
Tripps Run in Falls Church, Virginia;
      $64,500 to the Twentynine Palms Fire Department in 
Twentynine Palms, California for fire suppression equipment;
      $250,000 to the Natural History Museum of the Adirondacks 
in Tupper Lake, New York for the construction of the Natural 
History Museum of the Adirondacks;
      $430,000 to Redding, California for Stillwater Industrial 
Park within the Shasta Metro Enterprise Zone ``Distressed 
Community'';
      $430,000 to the Boys and Girls Club of Tucson, Arizona 
for new construction;
      $430,000 to the Coach George E. Ford Cultural Arts Center 
in Georgia for building renovation;
      $430,000 to the St. Francis Community Center in New 
Jersey for construction of indoor community pool;
      $430,000 for the New York Institute of Technology Robbins 
Hall for renovation of the auditorium;
      $215,000 to the City of Syracuse, New York for 
infrastructure improvements to the Erie Canal Museum;
      $430,000 to Kern County, California for infrastructure 
work in support of the new air terminal to Meadows Field;
      $215,000 to the City of Medford, Oregon for the City of 
Medford Urban Revitalization Project;
      $415,000 to Temecula, California for the Alternatives to 
Domestic Violence Shelter;
      $21,500 to the City of Redlands, California for 
restoration projects at the historic Kimberly Crest House and 
Gardens;
      $344,000 to the State University of New York at Albany 
for continued development of a manufacturing/workforce training 
center;
      $645,000 to the Cities of El Segundo, Manhattan Beach and 
Hawthorne, California to ease traffic congestion along the 
Rosecrans corridor;
      $645,000 to Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York City for 
facility construction;
      $430,000 to Rochelle, Illinois for economic development 
and infrastructure improvements;
      $172,000 to the ArtSpace Victory Center in Texas for the 
revitalization of the Our Lady of Victory Convent;
      $98,900 to the Whitman County Rural Fire District No. 11 
in Colfax, Washington for construction and repair of the Colfax 
Fire Station;
      $215,000 to NewTown, Inc., Macon, Georgia for 
revitalization of downtown area;
      $86,000 to the Economic Opportunity Authority of Chatham 
County, Georgia for the Austin House shelter for homeless;
      $645,000 to the City of Leesburg, Virginia for 
preservation and infrastructure improvements for the George C. 
Marshall International Center at the Dodona Manor;
      $1,118,000 to the United Cerebral Palsy of Suffolk 
County, New York for the Sports and Recreation Center and 
Education complex;
      $1,000,000 to the Future of the Piedmont Foundation in 
Danville, Virginia for development of a regional higher 
education center;
      $236,500 to Arkadelphia, Arkansas for the Streetscape 
project;
      $21,500 to the Donald L. Heiter Community Center in 
Pennsylvania for renovation project;
      $129,000 to Bruce, Mississippi for a multi-purpose 
facility for economic development purposes;
      $208,000 to Ashland, Alabama to complete renovations of 
the Clay County Courthouse;
      $215,000 to the University of Cincinnati Medical Center 
in Ohio for renovation of the Medical Sciences Building;
      $215,000 to Pike County, Pennsylvania for construction of 
an industrial facility to employ disabled individuals;
      $430,000 to the Bethesda Academy of Performing Arts in 
Maryland for creation of children's art center;
      $344,000 to the San Diego Youth and Community Services in 
California for the Storefront emergency shelter relocation of 
facilities ($172,000) and for the Take Wing transitional 
housing program for at-risk youth and families ($172,000);
      $430,000 to restore and rehabilitate Mile Square Park in 
California;
      $250,000 to Lysander, Van Buren, and Eldridge, New York 
for a water line extension for Jack's Reef;
      $430,000 to Cheyenne, Wyoming for economic development 
and infrastructure improvements to the airport;
      $129,000 to Miami-Dade County, Florida for the City of 
Miami Beach North Beach Recreational Corridor;
      $215,000 to Stamford, Connecticut to acquire property for 
the Mill River Corridor Revitalization Project;
      $150,000 to the City of Johnstown, New York for 
rehabilitation and redevelopment work at the former Karg 
Brothers Tannery;
      $1,220,000 to St. Petersburg, Florida for the Sunken 
Gardens improvement project;
      $860,000 to Citrus Heights, California for Phase II of 
the Sunrise MarketPlace Revitalization project;
      $215,000 to El Monte, California for renovation of 
recreational facility by replacing swimming pools, modernizing 
parking areas, developing youth center;
      $430,000 to Fairview Health Services in Minnesota for the 
Fairview-University Medical Center for Healthy Mothers and 
Babies Technology Demonstration Initiative;
      $86,000 to the City of New Iberia, Louisiana for economic 
development and revitalization of the downtown area;
      $215,000 to the Titusville YMCA in Pennsylvania for the 
purchase of a new structure and preliminary renovation;
      $86,000 to St. Charles Parish, Louisiana for the 
development of a bike path and enhancement of recreation 
opportunities;
      $430,000 to the Terre Haute/Vigo County Department of 
Redevelopment in Indiana pursuant to a memorandum of 
understanding between the General Services Administration and 
the United States Postal Service;
      $130,000 to El Rio, California for extension of water and 
wastewater infrastructure to the community center gymnasium;
      $430,000 to Huntingdon College in Montgomery, Alabama for 
renovation and expansion of the Natural Sciences facility, 
Bellingrath Hall;
      $200,000 to TeenPride Inc. in Morristown, New Jersey to 
expand outreach to low-income, at-risk teenagers and their 
families;
      $258,000 to Mercer County, New Jersey for the Senior 
Citizen Centers of Hamilton Township and the City of Trenton;
      $86,000 to the Upper Bucks County community of 
Quakertown, Pennsylvania for revitalization of former 
brownfield site;
      $300,000 to Santa Paula, California purchase of new fire 
engine and equipment for the Fire Department;
      $100,000 to the City of Rochester, New Hampshire for 
emergency housing;
      $86,000 to Original Town of Liberal Revitalization, Inc. 
in Kansas for economic development activities;
      $430,000 to Coachella, California for construction of 
Boys and Girls Club facility;
      $400,000 to St. Joseph's Hospital Health Care Center for 
the Central New York Cardiac Care and Hemodialysis Enhancement 
Center in Syracuse, New York;
      $75,000 to Paul Smith's College in Paul Smiths, New York 
for the construction of the Adirondack Information Resource 
Center;
      $860,000 to Rockland County, New York for extension of 
water and wastewater infrastructure of the Western Ramapo Sewer 
District;
      $450,000 to Xenia, Ohio for renovation of fire station 
No. 1;
      $860,000 to the James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for 
Children in Indiana to expand services at the autism clinic;
      $215,000 to the County of San Bernardino, California for 
a public park complex to meet the recreational needs of the 
Spring Valley Lake community in Victorville;
      $430,000 to Laural, Mississippi for the Veterans Memorial 
Museum;
      $1,500,000 for development of the Interactive Education 
Center at the Intrepid Sea Air and Space Museum in New York;
      $415,000 to Oceanside, California for the Calle Montecito 
Neighborhood Center;
      $100,000 to complete the Chattahoochee Indian Heritage 
Center at Fort Mitchell County Park, Alabama;
      $17,200 to the City of Grand Isle, Louisiana for 
emergency service needs;
      $395,000 to the City of Ellicottville, New York for use 
toward the repair and/or replacement of the City's waste water 
treatment plant;
      $172,000 to Shea's Performing Arts Center in the City of 
Buffalo, New York for renovations to the main theater;
      $430,000 to Bradford, Pennsylvania for the restoration of 
Bradford City Hall;
      $495,000 for the Green County ``Spec Building'' in 
Kentucky for preparation and construction of an industrial 
site;
      $430,000 to Oklahoma State University to continue and 
expand rural economic development;
      $430,000 to the University of Missouri-Columbia for the 
Agriculture Product Utilization and Incubation Center;
      $430,000 to Rural Enterprises Inc. of Oklahoma to 
continue and expand rural economic development;
      $114,000 to Fairfax County, Virginia for the Computer 
Clubhouse Project at the Bailey's Community Center;
      $430,000 to Yakima, Washington for railroad grade 
separations;
      $215,000 to Bristol, Pennsylvania for construction of a 
gateway and beautification;
      $172,000 to Stepping-Stones for Youth in Hutchinson, 
Kansas;
      $35,000 to the St. Lawrence Aquarium and Ecological 
Center in Massena, New York for continued development and 
construction of the St. Lawrence Aquarium;
      $245,100 to Holly Springs, Mississippi for North Memphis 
Street District Redevelopment and Revitalization Program;
      $430,000 to the Museum of Aviation, Warner Robins, 
Georgia for development plan and expansion;
      $500,000 to Somerset County, New Jersey for the Eldercare 
Center in Bridgewater Township;
      $930,000 to the City of Cincinnati, Ohio for the 
expansion of Findlay Market;
      $50,000 to the City of Ogdensburg, New York for 
reconstruction of Fort La Presentation;
      $86,000 to Nike Base in the Town of Hamburg, New York for 
removal of storage tank;
      $387,000 to Lake Worth Palm Beach County, Florida for the 
Mid-County Senior Center;
      $25,000 to Safe Haven, Inc. in Oswego, New York for 
construction of a museum/interpretive center chronicling the 
Fort Ontario Emergency Refugee;
      $215,000 to Memorial Temple Community Center in the city 
of Buffalo, New York for equipment for the inner-city community 
center;
      $43,000 to Onondaga County, New York for restoration and 
preservation of Civil War flags;
      $172,000 for the Huntington Station Enrichment Center in 
New York for renovation and conversion to a community center;
      $215,000 to Fairfield University in Connecticut for 
establishment of Information Technology Center;
      $215,000 to the City of Syracuse, New York for 
renovations to the Salt City Theatre for the Performing Arts;
      $400,000 to Marshall County, Alabama for drinking water 
infrastructure improvements on Merrill Mountain;
      $430,000 to the City of Syracuse, New York for monument 
repair and infrastructure improvements for Clinton Square;
      $75,000 to Fulton-Montgomery Community College in 
Johnstown, New York for construction of a remote sensing/
spatial information technology center;
      $200,000 to the James Lee Community Center in Virginia;
      $258,000 to Fort Worth, Texas for renovation of the 
historic Marine Theater;
      $268,000 to the Boys and Girls Club of McGehee, Arkansas;
      $430,000 to the Community House in Hinsdale, Illinois for 
renovation, upgrades and restoration to meet ADA compliance 
codes and local fire codes;
      $430,000 to South Sioux City, Nebraska for downtown 
redevelopment for civic building site;
      $430,000 to Sacramento County, California for 
rehabilitation and preservation of historic structures and 
physical improvements for the town of Locke;
      $430,000 to Chester, Pennsylvania for the Institute for 
Economic Development for planning funds for high-tech building;
      $860,000 to the City of Pikeville, Kentucky for an 
integrated transit/parking facility;
      $250,000 to Elmira College in New York for the historic 
renovation of Cowles Hall;
      $172,000 to the Millennium Port Commission for planning 
and development of the Millennium Port in south Louisiana;
      $75,000 to Fayette County, Alabama for emergency services 
equipment;
      $172,000 to Morgantown, Kentucky to construct recreation 
center;
      $215,000 to Rockdale County, Georgia for Georgia's 
Veteran's Park for future veteran memorials and events;
      $172,000 to the County of Inyo, California for facility 
and infrastructure improvements at the Bishop Airport to 
facilitate economic development and recreational access;
      $430,000 to the New Britain Museum of American Art in 
Connecticut for expansion of facilities;
      $860,000 to Arizona State University for the 
establishment of the Center for Basic Research and Applied 
Research within the Barry M. Goldwater Center for Science and 
Engineering;
      $500,000 to Cortland County, New York for infrastructure 
and expanded operational improvements for Borg-Warner 
Automotive, Inc.;
      $215,000 to the Town of Aurora, New York for renovation 
of the Aurora Senior's and Adult Day Care facility;
      $860,000 to Winston-Salem, North Carolina for Downtown 
revitalization;
      $258,000 to Albemarle, North Carolina for the Gateway to 
Albemarle project;
      $400,000 to the City of Syracuse, New York for equipment 
and infrastructure improvements for the Institute of Human 
Performance;
      $215,000 to Jacksonville, Florida for redevelopment of 
Cecil Field;
      $43,000 to the City of Dumas, Arkansas for the Tannenbaum 
Theatre renovations;
      $344,000 to Broward County, Florida for the Museum of 
Discovery and Science;
      $430,000 to Muncie, Indiana for downtown economic 
development project;
      $258,000 to the Fund for the Preservation of the 
California State Mining and Mineral Museum;
      $215,000 to Jackson, Michigan for the downtown 
redevelopment project;
      $215,000 for Roberts Wesleyan College in Rochester, New 
York for infrastructure improvements along Westside Drive;
      $86,000 to the Hamlet Opera House in North Carolina for 
development of a performing arts center;
      $430,000 to the Hebrew Academy for Special Children in 
New York to construct a national service center for low-income 
and developmentally disabled;
      $200,000 to the Village of Malone, New York for 
rehabilitation and reconstruction of the Hotel Flanagan 
Project;
      $98,900 for the Inland Northwest Blood Center in 
Washington for construction and improvements of the blood 
center;
      $56,000 to Fairfax County, Virginia for the Herndon 
Senior Center;
      $77,400 to the City of Imperial Beach, California for 
lands purchased by the city for the Tijuana Wildlife Refuge;
      $430,000 to Boyle County, Kentucky for Phase III of 
Millennium Park;
      $129,000 to SocialServe.com in North Carolina for a 
demonstration grant to increase access to low-income and 
special needs housing;
      $215,000 to Miami Beach, Florida for the Atlantic 
Greenway Corridor Initiative--North Beach Recreational 
Corridor;
      $215,000 to the Economic Corporation of Newport, New 
Hampshire for rehabilitation of Eagle Block;
      $86,000 to Vista Optimist Club, California for the Youth 
Activities Facility to build lighted ballfields;
      $750,000 to William Tyndale College in Farmington Hills, 
Michigan for the construction of a science and computing 
learning center;
      $688,000 to Baton Rouge, Louisiana for expansion of the 
South Louisiana Community Health Alliance;
      $215,000 for renovation and rehabilitation of North 
Central Flint Hills Area Agency on Aging, Manhattan, Kansas;
      $800,000 to the Tawawa Community Development Corporation 
in Wilberforce, Ohio;
      $215,000 to Shake-A-Leg Miami, Inc. in Florida for 
recreation facilities serving people with disabilities and at-
risk youth;
      $73,100 to Bellevue, Washington for Eastside Domestic 
Violence;
      $172,000 to Grand Junction, Colorado for planning 
assistance for the Grand Valley Audubon Nature Center;
      $430,000 to Lees-McRae College in North Carolina for a 
field laboratory to support the College's Biology departments 
and community outreach;
      $860,000 to Pasadena, California for construction of a 
new fire station;
      $205,000 to the Children's Center in Brooklyn, New York 
for the construction of a facility to house educational and 
therapeutic programs for disabled preschool children;
      $270,000 to the County of San Bernardino, California for 
the construction of the Hall of Paleontology at the historic 
San Bernardino County Museum;
      $250,000 to the Shiloh Community Renewal Center in 
Kentucky for rehabilitation of facilities;
      $90,000 to the Fairfax County Parks Authority in Virginia 
for the Mason District Park;
      $170,000 to the Pittsfield Library in New Hampshire for 
renovations necessary to meet ADA compliance;
      $1,935,000 to Syracuse University in New York for 
completion of the Crouse-Marshall Street Improvement Project;
      $50,000 to the Nelson County Senior Citizen Center in 
Virginia for renovation and expansion of the facility near 
Lovingston, Virginia;
      $1,200,000 to the City of Syracuse, New York for the 
building of a temporary transmission tower during the 
transition of the public TV station from analog to digital 
television;
      $430,000 for Madison County, New York for economic 
development and infrastructure improvements;
      $430,000 to California State University and the City of 
Omaha, California for the Omaha Housing Initiative;
      $430,000 to Shreveport, Louisiana for Convention Center 
Downtown Redevelopment and construction of infrastructure 
surrounding convention center;
      $258,000 to the Kalamazoo Aviation History Museum in 
Michigan for the ``Legacy of Flight'' project;
      $215,000 to the Boys Town National Research Hospital in 
Nebraska for establishing the National Center for the Study and 
Treatment of Usher Syndrome;
      $43,000 for the Central Bucks, Pennsylvania Joint 
Municipal Planning Issues study;
      $820,000 for Griffiss Business and Technology Park in 
Oneida County, New York for economic development and 
infrastructure improvements;
      $860,000 to Midwest City, Oklahoma for construction of 
small conference center;
      $645,000 to the University of Southern California to help 
create the Alfred E. Mann Institute and Biomedical Engineering 
Center;
      $215,000 to Lebanon College in New Hampshire for a 
community center;
      $430,000 to Monrovia, California for the renovation and 
upgrade of existing city facility into teen center;
      $645,000 for the Cornell Agriculture and Technical Park-
Geneva Station in Ontario County, New York;
      $800,000 to the Washington Association in Harding 
Township, New Jersey;
      $258,000 for the Troy Rent-to-Own Housing Pilot project 
in North Carolina;
      $344,000 to the University Colleges of Technology at the 
State University of New York for the continued development of a 
Telecommunications Center for Education;
      $309,000 to the New York Public Library for renovations 
and infrastructure improvements;
      $500,000 to MBI International in Michigan for economic 
development activities that provide infrastructure to 
accelerate the development of biobased industrial product 
technologies;
      $98,900 to the Oaksdale/Farmington Fire District No. 10 
in Whitman County, Washington for the repair and construction 
of facilities;
      $215,000 to the Tubman African American Museum in Macon, 
Georgia for the construction of the Tubman African American 
Museum;
      $98,900 to the Coalition for Women on the Street in 
Spokane, Washington for the development of the Downtown Women's 
Shelter;
      $20,000 to Culman, Alabama for a study to plan and design 
the Agriplex Agriculture Museum;
      $172,000 to 1490 Enterprises Inc., City of Buffalo, New 
York for a Community Action Organization (CAO) Head Start 
Expansion;
      $100,000 to the City of Bedford, Virginia for economic 
development and tourism in connection with the World War II D-
Day Memorial;
      $645,000 to Warren County, Virginia for asbestos 
remediation and lead paint removal at the Avtex Superfund site;
      $430,000 to the Next Generation Economy Initiative in 
Albuquerque, New Mexico to enter into ``matching funds'' 
technology maturation partnerships with local companies using 
the expertise from the University of New Mexico and Sandia 
National Laboratories;
      $125,000 to Escambia County in Florida for development 
costs for infrastructure of Central Commerce Park;
      $600,000 to the City of Portland, Oregon for the 
Portland-Vancouver Regional Housing Affordability Pilot 
Program;
      $750,000 to Northeast Ventures Corporation in Duluth, 
Minnesota to provide equity capital support for community 
development venture capital and microenterprise in Northeast 
Minnesota;
      $350,000 to the City of Indianapolis, Indiana for 
infrastructure needs in the King Park homeownership zone;
      $700,000 to the City of Takoma, Washington for the 
Downtown Revitalization and Shelter Improvements Program;
      $15,000 to Renew Oakville in the town of Oakville, 
Missouri for a community enhancement program;
      $200,000 to the City of Burlington, Vermont for a 
homeownership program designed to assist low and moderate 
income first time homebuyers in purchasing duplex housing, 
including down payment assistance;
      $250,000 to the Township of Plainsboro, New Jersey for 
construction of a nature center at the Plainsboro Preserve;
      $150,000 to Marin City, California for a Marin City 
Cultural and Community Center facility;
      $350,000 to the Jefferson County, Missouri Parks & 
Recreation Department for improvements to existing county-owned 
parks;
      $1,000,000 to the City of Johnstown, Pennsylvania for 
construction of an intermodal parking garage;
      $1,000,000 to the Self-Help Ventures Fund in Durham, 
North Carolina to establish a revolving loan fund;
      $150,000 to the Memphis Zoo in Memphis, Tennessee for the 
Northwest Passage Campaign;
      $50,000 to the Historical Centre Foundation in San 
Antonio, Texas for construction of a community center and 
startup of a program for community outreach near the San 
Fernando Cathedral;
      $175,000 to St. Ignace, Michigan for construction of a 
public library;
      $200,000 to the Flint, Michigan Chamber of Commerce for 
economic development efforts;
      $100,000 to the Wholistic Family Agape Ministries 
Industries in Arlington, Virginia for an HIV/AIDS/Substance 
Abuse program;
      $125,000 to the Word of God Parish and School, St. Anselm 
site, in Swissvale, Pennsylvania for infrastructure 
rehabilitation projects;
      $200,000 to the Sacramento, California Housing and 
Redevelopment Agency for the Smart Workplace Demonstration 
Center;
      $100,000 to the City of Berwyn, Illinois for the 
expansion and renovation of Public Safety and Fire facilities;
      $250,000 to the Baltimore, Maryland Symphony Orchestra 
for construction of a concert hall and youth music education 
center in Rockville, Maryland;
      $100,000 to Essex County, Massachusetts for cyberdistrict 
economic development initiatives;
      $250,000 to the City of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for the 
rehabilitation and revitalization of the Garfield neighborhood;
      $200,000 to the Governing Board of Tower Grove Park in 
St. Louis, Missouri for an ongoing renovation project;
      $350,000 to the Town of Wilson, New York for repair and 
expansion of the pier at Wilson Harbor;
      $300,000 to Southern Illinois University in Carbondale, 
Illinois for infrastructure needs related to the development of 
a University Research Park;
      $1,000,000 to Ford City Borough, Armstrong County, 
Pennsylvania for development of the Ford City Heritage and 
Technology Park;
      $310,000 to the West Virginia Humanities Council: 
$210,000 to support production of ``The Appalachians,'' a film 
documentary, and $100,000 for Council programs;
      $500,000 to the Fairmont Community Development 
Partnership for downtown revitalization, and relocation of a 
homeless nutrition service program;
      $400,000 to the City of Gainesville, Florida for the East 
Side Community Recreation Center, Cone Park;
      $250,000 to Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts 
for construction of the National Center for Science Education;
      $50,000 to the Great Lakes Consortium for an 
International Training and Development program in Toledo, Ohio;
      $100,000 to the Village of Chicago Ridge, Illinois for 
construction of a Municipal Complex;
      $450,000 to the Potomac Heritage Partnership for the 
Potomac River Heritage Trail Project to improve access to 
parks;
      $100,000 to the Washington County Economic Development 
Council in Washington County, Florida for economic development 
efforts;
      $50,000 to the Institute for Economic Development for 
development of University Technology Park in Chester, 
Pennsylvania;
      $1,000,000 to Northeastern University in Boston, 
Massachusetts for a pilot program on the health problems of 
urban communities;
      $150,000 to Elkhart County, Indiana for natural gas and 
electric service to the Harrison Ridge subdivision project;
      $100,000 to the New Kensington Redevelopment Authority in 
New Kensington, Pennsylvania for asbestos removal and 
demolition of the Ridge Avenue High School building;
      $450,000 to the City of Durham, North Carolina for 
community development, employment training, and youth 
development efforts;
      $300,000 to the City of Monticello, Florida for 
conversion of a school building to a multi-purpose community 
center;
      $270,000 to the Somerset County Commission in Somerset 
County, Pennsylvania for facilities improvements at Windber 
Recreational Park;
      $450,000 to Family Connections in Weirton, West Virginia 
for facility needs related to the provision of services to at-
risk juvenile females;
      $25,000 to the City of Jacksonville, Florida for 
development of a distinctive business district;
      $200,000 to the Abilene, Texas Regional Airport for 
hangar renovation related to the Southwest Regional Fly-In;
      $400,000 to the City of Salinas, California for the 
construction of a municipal pool;
      $50,000 to the City of Thousand Oaks, California for 
planning and construction of a child care center;
      $100,000 to the New York City, New York Department of 
Parks and Recreation for clean-up of the College Point Sports 
Complex in Queens;
      $100,000 to the Brooke-Hancock County Veterans Memorial, 
Inc. in West Virginia for a community park improvement project, 
military history museum and memorial;
      $100,000 to Covenant House Washington in Washington, D.C. 
for the construction of a Community Service Center;
      $900,000 to the City of Wausau, Wisconsin for a 
supportive living facility to serve low income elderly 
residents;
      $150,000 to the City of Tonawanda, New York for public 
works infrastructure and housing rehabilitation grants;
      $200,000 to the St. Louis County, Missouri Parks & 
Recreation Department for renovation of the structures at Bee 
Tree Park;
      $1,100,000 to Rush-Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center 
in Chicago, Illinois for the Center for Research on Aging;
      $80,000 to the Borough of Latrobe, Pennsylvania for the 
Latrobe Veterans Plaza;
      $200,000 to SW Resources, Inc. in Parkersburg, West 
Virginia for facilities expansion for the creation of 
additional job opportunities for people with disabilities;
      $50,000 to the Cambria Historical Society in Cambria, 
California for the preservation of the Bianchini House;
      $400,000 to the City of Dayton, Ohio for land acquisition 
for the Tool Town precision metal working park;
      $80,000 to the St. Louis County, Missouri Parks & 
Recreation Department for the renovation of recreation 
facilities within Black Forest Park;
      $150,000 to the North Carolina Housing Finance Agency for 
mortgage assistance in Chatham County;
      $225,000 to the Alabama State University for facility 
needs related to the Environmental Microbiology program;
      $100,000 to Lorain County Community College in Ohio for 
the establishment of the Learning Technology Center;
      $100,000 to Salem International University in West 
Virginia for equipment, information technology and 
infrastructure needs;
      $50,000 to Portland State University in Portland, Oregon 
for development of the Northwest Center for Engineering, 
Science, and Technology;
      $400,000 to the UDI Community Development Corporation in 
Durham, North Carolina for economic development efforts;
      $250,000 to the New York City, New York Department of 
Parks and Recreation for costs relating to construction of a 
Recreation Center in Chelsea;
      $250,000 to the Upper Kanawha Valley Economic Development 
Corporation in Montgomery, West Virginia for the development of 
a technology community park;
      $25,000 to CHANGE, Inc. Community Action Agency in 
Weirton, West Virginia for equipment needs for after-school 
programs for under-served youth;
      $175,000 to the National Council of La Raza to provide 
technical and financial assistance to community development 
efforts through its Hope Fund;
      $200,000 to the Southside Boys and Girls Club in St. 
Cloud, Minnesota for planning and construction of a community 
center;
      $100,000 to the Fresno Community Medical Center in 
Fresno, California for development of a regional trauma and 
burn center;
      $175,000 to the City of Houston, Texas for a 
homeownership program, involving down payment subsidy 
assistance for sewer/water hook-up;
      $150,000 to the Multicultural Educational Counseling 
Through the Arts (MECA) program in Houston, Texas for 
operational and facilities needs;
      $75,000 to the Lafayette, Louisiana Chamber of Commerce 
for the Zydetech Initiative;
      $100,000 to the Village of Tuckahoe, New York for 
streetscape improvements;
      $50,000 to the Cambridge, Massachusetts Redevelopment 
Authority for recreation development efforts;
      $1,250,000 to the City of Mt. Clemens, Michigan for the 
establishment of a community recreation center;
      $250,000 to the Los Angeles Neighborhood Initiative in 
Los Angeles, California for economic development efforts in the 
Fairfax Avenue Ethiopian Business District;
      $250,000 to the City of Brownsville, Texas for 
reconstruction of downtown streets as part of city center 
redevelopment efforts;
      $200,000 to the Village of Matteson, Illinois for 
renovation and expansion of a community center;
      $500,000 to Southern West Virginia Community and 
Technical College in Logan, West Virginia for a cooperative 
economic development effort with the Appalachian Transportation 
Institute at Marshall University, Huntington, West Virginia;
      $250,000 to Culver City, California for the construction 
of the Culver City Senior Center;
      $200,000 to the Safer Foundation in Chicago, Illinois for 
a workforce development program to provide ex-offenders with 
education and job training;
      $125,000 to the Franklin County Community Development 
Corporation in Greenfield, Massachusetts for construction of a 
food processing center;
      $200,000 to the Township of Stickney, Illinois for 
renovations related to a multipurpose municipal center;
      $150,000 to Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana 
for facilities renovation and educational outreach at the 
AMISTAD Research Center;
      $250,000 to Long Island University in Brooklyn, New York 
to study the feasibility of establishing a wellness center as a 
collaborative effort with Brooklyn Hospital;
      $200,000 to the Sacramento, California Boys and Girls 
Club for the construction of a facility on Lemon Hill Avenue;
      $200,000 to Calhoun Community College in Decatur, Alabama 
for the Aerospace and Advanced Technology Park;
      $300,000 to the Township of North Bergen, New Jersey for 
the establishment of Technology Literacy Learning Centers;
      $250,000 to Casa Puerto Rico in New York City, New York: 
$150,000 for a feasibility study and seed money for the 
restoration of a theater located in the Villa Alejandrina 
Apartments in South Bronx, New York, and $100,000 for a 
feasibility study and startup costs for the conversion of the 
Bronx Borough Courthouse into a Puerto Rican Historical, 
Cultural and Activities Center;
      $800,000 to the Wausau Performing Arts Foundation, Inc. 
in Wausau, Wisconsin for the ArtsBlock project;
      $150,000 to the City of Baytown, Texas for construction 
of an Emergency Operations Center;
      $75,000 to Northern Kentucky University in Highland 
Heights, Kentucky for the Urban Learning Center;
      $400,000 to Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia for the 
historic preservation of Packard Hall;
      $400,000 to Milwaukee County, Wisconsin for renovations 
to the Milwaukee County War Memorial;
      $50,000 to the City of Norwalk, California for 
renovations at the Norwalk Aquatic Center;
      $100,000 to the Tampa Port Authority in Tampa, Florida 
for infrastructure improvements related to the Channelside 
economic development project;
      $200,000 to the L.I.F.T. Women's Resource Center in 
Detroit, Michigan for expansion of the Positive Change Project;
      $50,000 to the 21st Century Council Adult Career Center 
in Scottsboro, Alabama for computer system improvements, 
acquisition of office equipment, and instructional materials;
      $50,000 to the Tri-Valley Business Council in Livermore, 
California for a business incubator initiative known as Tri-
Valley Technology Enterprise Center;
      $400,000 to the City of New Haven, Connecticut for the 
restoration and rehabilitation of the West River Memorial Park;
      $25,000 to the Township of Branchburg, New Jersey for the 
construction of a war veterans memorial;
      $400,000 to Ohio University in Athens, Ohio for the 
Innovation Center, a technology business incubator;
      $250,000 to the Wawashkamo Restoration and Preservation 
Fund in Mackinac Island, Michigan for initiatives related to 
the Mackinac Island Battlefield;
      $100,000 to the City of Dallas, Texas for an affordable 
housing program operated by the T.R. Hoover Community 
Development Corporation;
      $100,000 to the New London Development Corporation in New 
London, Connecticut for renovation related to affordable 
housing;
      $100,000 to Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation of 
Kansas City, Kansas for development of low income housing;
      $50,000 to the New York City, New York Department of 
Parks and Recreation for phase three of the rebuilding and 
restoration of Joyce Kilmer Park in South Bronx, New York;
      $550,000 to the Springfield Library and Museum 
Association in Springfield, Massachusetts for construction and 
infrastructure improvements related to a national memorial and 
park honoring Theodor Geisl;
      $225,000 to the City of Ferndale, Michigan for 
refurbishment of Washington Elementary School for use as a 
community center;
      $100,000 to the City of Mollalla, Oregon for the 
conversion of a gymnasium into a public library, community and 
technology training center;
      $300,000 to the City of Albany, New York for waterfront 
improvements;
      $250,000 to the Berkeley County Commission in 
Martinsburg, West Virginia for the Historic Baltimore and Ohio 
Roundhouse Renovation Project;
      $100,000 to the Cape Cod, Massachusetts Chamber of 
Commerce for the Cape Cod High Technology Center technology 
incubator initiative;
      $100,000 to Consolidated Fruit Packers, Inc. in New 
Paltz, New York for a job retention program;
      $1,000,000 to the National Children's Advocacy Center in 
Huntsville, Alabama for the establishment of a research and 
training facility;
      $350,000 to the Richland County Neighborhood Technology 
Center in Richland County, South Carolina for facilities and 
equipment needs;
      $500,000 to the Center for Economic Development at the 
University of San Francisco in San Francisco, California for 
economic development efforts;
      $400,000 to the National Coalition for Homeless Veterans 
in Washington, DC for the provision of technical assistance to 
local organizations;
      $150,000 to the Saugerties Historical Society in 
Saugerties, New York for historic preservation of the Kiersted 
House;
      $200,000 to the Village of Glenwood, Illinois for 
renovations to the Glenwood Senior Center;
      $150,000 to the Point Community Development Corporation 
in New York City, New York for the purchase and/or renovation 
as a boathouse of an abandoned factory at the corner of 
Lafayette Avenue and Edgewater Road in South Bronx, New York;
      $500,000 to the City of Falls Church, Virginia to 
refinance the Winter Hill Apartments, low-income housing 
complex;
      $100,000 to Roberts Wesleyan College in Rochester, New 
York for the establishment of a community service center;
      $1,050,000 to Lucas County, Ohio for the acquisition and 
improvement of Quarry Farms Park;
      $250,000 to Santa Monica College in Santa Monica, 
California for the Madison Site Theater Center;
      $200,000 to the Lewiston Auburn Economic Growth Council 
in Lewiston, Maine for administering loans to stimulate 
economic growth;
      $50,000 to the Borough of Peapack, New Jersey for 
facility improvements to the Township Hall;
      $225,000 to the City of Los Angeles, California for 
construction of the Ernest E. Debs Nature Center;
      $450,000 to the American Indian Business Development 
Corporation for construction of a multi-purpose facility to 
support business development in south Minneapolis, Minnesota;
      $325,000 to the Berkshire South Regional Community Center 
in Great Barrington, Massachusetts for planning and 
construction;
      $165,000 to the Millvale Borough Development Corporation 
in Millvale, Pennsylvania for the implementation of the 
Millvale Gateway and Riverfront Plan;
      $200,000 to Nanticoke, Pennsylvania for downtown 
revitalization and infrastructure improvements;
      $1,000,000 to the George Meany Center for Labor Studies 
in Silver Spring, Maryland for facility needs;
      $500,000 to the Boys and Girls Club of Nogales, Arizona 
for expenses related to the construction of a facility;
      $250,000 to the City of Buffalo, New York for 
refurbishing of the exterior of St. Louis Church, including 
facade work;
      $80,000 to the Eureka Volunteer Fire Department in 
Tarentum, Pennsylvania for asbestos removal and demolition of 
the Tarentum Municipal Building;
      $150,000 to the Tioga County Rural Economic Area 
Partnership in Owego, New York for economic development 
efforts;
      $100,000 to the Village of Hempstead, New York for 
infrastructure improvements to Kennedy Park;
      $465,000 to the Prospect Park Alliance in New York City, 
New York for interior exhibits and furnishing for Prospect Park 
Audubon Center at the Boathouse;
      $200,000 to the Ukrainian Museum Archives in Cleveland, 
Ohio for facilities improvements;
      $25,000 to the Orlando Community Redevelopment Agency in 
Orlando, Florida for redevelopment of Otey Place;
      $125,000 to the Academy Family Foundation in Fairmont, 
West Virginia for facility and programmatic needs;
      $100,000 to the Little Tokyo Service Community Center in 
Los Angeles, California for the development of a job training 
program;
      $200,000 to Broward County, Florida for the Broward 
County African-American Community and Cultural Center;
      $50,000 to the County of San Diego, California for 
planning related to the development of a business park in East 
Otay Mesa;
      $150,000 to the Indiana County Community Action Program 
in Indiana County, Pennsylvania for equipment, facilities and 
activities needs;
      $200,000 to the City of East Palo Alto, California for 
the redevelopment of the Ravenswood Industrial Area;
      $300,000 to the City of Huntington, New York for a sewage 
treatment facility;
      $100,000 to the Town of Beacon Falls, Connecticut for the 
purchase of Pinesbridge Industrial Park;
      $100,000 to the City of Worcester, Massachusetts for the 
Gardner-Kilby-Hammond Street neighborhood revitalization 
project;
      $100,000 to the Bronx Museum of the Arts in New York 
City, New York for infrastructure improvements, construction, 
renovation, operation and facility upgrades;
      $50,000 to the Eugene A. Obregon CMH Memorial Foundation 
for the creation of a memorial to honor Latinos who have served 
in the Armed Services;
      $50,000 to the City of Garden Grove, California for 
planning and construction of the West Haven Park Community 
Center;
      $250,000 to the City of Abilene, Texas for renovation of 
the historic Wooten Hotel;
      $100,000 to the City of San Leandro, California for 
landslide mitigation efforts;
      $200,000 to the City of Saint Marys, West Virginia for 
downtown revitalization, and vehicle and equipment needs to 
support the Senior Service Advisory Council's senior nutrition 
program;
      $75,000 to the City of Hartford, Connecticut for the 
Temple Street redevelopment project;
      $250,000 to the Brotherhood Crusade Business Development 
and Capital Fund in Los Angeles, California for facility 
infrastructure needs and/or technical assistance and loans to 
small businesses;
      $200,000 to West Virginia University at Parkersburg for 
equipment needs related to the Caperton Center;
      $500,000 to the International Glass Museum in Takoma, 
Washington for capital costs associated with a new facility;
      $400,000 to the Montclair Art Museum in Montclair, New 
Jersey for facility expansion;
      $225,000 to the South Sumter Resource Center in Sumter 
County, South Carolina for facilities renovation and equipment;
      $40,000 to the Schuylkill County Fire Fighters 
Association in Morea, Pennsylvania for facilities improvements;
      $100,000 to West Liberty State College in West Liberty, 
West Virginia for planning and development related to the SMART 
Center;
      $200,000 to Oakwood College in Huntsville, Alabama for 
the establishment of a Wellness Center;
      $200,000 to the Schlitz Audubon Nature Center in 
Milwaukee, Wisconsin for facilities construction;
      $200,000 to the Filipino Community Center in Seattle, 
Washington for costs related to facilities relocation;
      $250,000 to Augsburg College in Minneapolis, Minnesota 
for rehabilitation of Sverdrup Hall;
      $50,000 to the government of the U.S. Virgin Islands for 
fire fighting efforts in territorial waters;
      $1,000,000 to the Salvatore Mancini Center on Aging in 
North Providence, Rhode Island for facilities needs;
      $400,000 to Rostraver Township, Westmoreland County, 
Pennsylvania for economic development studies and activities;
      $200,000 to the St. Louis County, Missouri Parks & 
Recreation Department for renovations and improvements to 
Jefferson Barracks Park;
      $750,000 to John Carroll University in Cleveland, Ohio to 
support the Center for Mathematics and Science Education;
      $50,000 to the Town of Pelham, New York for renovations 
to Memorial Park;
      $75,000 to the Town of St. George, South Carolina for the 
Klauber Building Project;
      $150,000 to the University of North Carolina at 
Wilmington School of Nursing to provide multidisciplinary 
nurse-managed primary health care services in rural northern 
Brunswick County and rural eastern Columbus County, North 
Carolina;
      $950,000 to the Mid-Atlantic Aerospace Complex, Inc. for 
operating and marketing expenses, site use assessment, land 
acquisition and construction of facilities;
      $600,000 to the National Civil Rights Hall of Fame in 
Gary, Indiana for facility construction;
      $100,000 to Camp Kon-O-Kwee/Spencer YMCA camp in Beaver 
County, Pennsylvania for continued construction of a wastewater 
treatment facility;
      $325,000 to the Seneca Center in New York City, New York 
for the acquisition and partial renovation of a permanent 
facility in South Bronx, New York;
      $250,000 to the Huntington Park Oldtimers Foundation in 
Huntington Park, California for the rehabilitation of a senior 
center;
      $50,000 to Ottawa County, Ohio for street improvements 
for the central business district in Rocky Ridge, Ohio;
      $200,000 to the Peninsula Marine Institute in Newport 
News, Virginia for the acquisition of a permanent facility to 
house its juvenile offenders program;
      $100,000 to the Martin Luther King Freedom Center in 
Oakland, California for planning and development purposes;
      $1,500,000 to Miami-Dade County, Florida to expand and 
improve the physical plant of the anchor industry in Poinciana 
Industrial Park;
      $300,000 to St. John Fisher College in Rochester, New 
York to establish an Institute of Teaching and Learning;
      $200,000 to the Daniel Freeman Hospital in Inglewood, 
California for community health outreach to the uninsured and 
medically underserved;
      $1,000,000 to Columbia University in New York City, New 
York for its audubon research project;
      $400,000 to the University of California-Merced for the 
renovation of the civil engineering building on Castle Air 
Force Base;
      $150,000 to the City of Moundsville, West Virginia for 
downtown revitalization associated with the Strand Theater;
      $250,000 to the Mystic Valley Development Commission for 
a regional technology development project known as TeleCom 
City;
      $200,000 to Bethune Cookman College in Daytona Beach, 
Florida for costs related to a community services and student 
union building;
      $50,000 to the city of Dallas, Texas for the Pleasant 
Wood/Pleasant Grove Community Development Corporation for 
improvement efforts focused on West Dallas neighborhoods;
      $1,200,000 to the West Virginia High Technology 
Consortium Foundation, Inc. for continued development of the I-
79 Technology Park;
      $100,000 to the City of Dallas, Texas for the Southfair 
Community Development Corporation for land acquisition and 
efforts to revitalize the Grand Avenue corridor;
      $1,000,000 to the St. Coletta School in Alexandria, 
Virginia for facilities needs;
      $50,000 to the St. Louis County, Missouri Economic 
Council for infrastructure and streetscape enhancements for the 
Affton/Gravois Business District;
      $110,000 to the Reading Area Community College in Berks 
County, Pennsylvania for planning and development of an 
Advanced Technology Center;
      $100,000 to Temple University Ambler in Montgomery 
County, Pennsylvania for a community planning and sustainable 
development initiative;
      $150,000 to the Arlington Housing Corporation to purchase 
investor-owned units at the Arlington Oaks condominium complex 
for operation as affordable housing;
      $100,000 to the Abington Township Public Library in 
Abington, Pennsylvania for facilities renovation;
      $200,000 to Pittson, Pennsylvania for downtown 
revitalization and infrastructure improvements;
      $1,000,000 to Concord College in Athens, West Virginia 
for infrastructure development for an information technology 
training program;
      $200,000 to the St. Louis, Missouri City Parks Department 
for renovations of Wilmore Park;
      $250,000 to the Village of Mamaroneck, New York for 
streetscape improvements;
      $50,000 to the St. Louis County, Missouri Economic 
Council for infrastructure and streetscape enhancements for the 
LeMay Business District;
      $1,000,000 to the Mandel School of Applied Social 
Sciences' Center for Community Development at Case Western 
Reserve University for the establishment of the Lou Stokes 
Fellows Program in Community Organization and Development;
      $50,000 to the City of Tuscumbia, Alabama for stage and 
infrastructure improvements at Spring Park;
      $150,000 to Fulton County, Ohio for upgrades of emergency 
notification/siren systems;
      $225,000 to the Town of Bolton, Mississippi for a 
business district restoration plan that includes job training 
and a revolving loan fund;
      $300,000 to the Christiansburg Institute Board in 
Christiansburg, Virginia for renovation of a historic building 
into a museum and community learning center;
      $1,000,000 to St. John's County, Florida for water, 
sewer, wastewater, and stormwater system improvements.
      Excludes report language proposed by the Senate directing 
HUD to make a comprehensive report on all EDI grants. Similar 
language was not included by the House. However, the conferees 
agree that HUD should conduct a close-out review of each non-
congressionally designated EDI grant within five years of the 
award. Any funds not obligated should be identified and 
reported to the Committees by May 1, 2001, for possible 
rescission and reallocation.

                       BROWNFIELDS REDEVELOPMENT

      Appropriates $25,000,000 for brownfields redevelopment as 
proposed by the Senate instead of $20,000,000 as proposed by 
the House.

                  HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $1,800,000,000 for the HOME program instead 
of $1,585,000,000 as proposed by the House, and $1,600,000,000 
as proposed by the Senate. The conferees increased the funding 
level for HOME above the Senate and House levels, and above the 
request, as an indication of their support for producing 
substantially more affordable homes for low-income Americans.
      Recognizing the tremendous unmet need for affordable 
housing, and in light of the fact that 5,400,000 families pay 
more than half their income for rent, the conferees seriously 
considered proposing a new production program targeted at 
extremely low-income families. In addition to creating new 
affordable homes, the proposal would have encouraged the 
concepts of income-mixing, and tenant choice. Unfortunately, in 
deference to the committees of jurisdiction, the conferees 
agreed to withdraw the proposal. Nevertheless, the conferees 
encourage the authorizing committees to consider the need for 
additional homes for extremely low-income families, and to 
draft legislation that will meet these increasing needs.
      Includes $20,000,000 for the Housing Counseling program 
as proposed by the Senate instead of $15,000,000 as proposed by 
the House. For two consecutive years, HUD has been directed to 
develop a process for measuring the performance of housing 
counseling agencies. This year, several nonprofit 
intermediaries working cooperatively with HUD developed 
meaningful recommendations that include such measurements. The 
conferees direct HUD to implement these recommendations and, 
upon implementation, report to the Committees on 
Appropriations.
      Transfers $17,000,000 to the Working Capital Fund for the 
development and maintenance of information technology systems 
as proposed by the House instead of no funding as proposed by 
the Senate.
      The conferees are concerned that there appears to be some 
ambiguity about whether Native American non-profit entities 
working on Indian lands are eligible to receive HOME funds. 
After reviewing the relevant statutes, the conferees see 
nothing that indicates Native American nonprofits are 
ineligible to compete for HOME funds at the state level. 
Furthermore, the conferees believe it is highly questionable 
for states to count low-income Native American residents in 
their funding calculations, but upon receipt of their 
allocation, be unwilling to share HOME funds with Native 
American non-profits. Economic and housing conditions on Native 
American lands are among the most challenging in the United 
States. The HOME program was designed to assist in meeting 
these challenges for all Americans and not to discriminate 
based on where an individual chooses to live.

                       HOMELESS ASSISTANCE GRANTS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $1,025,000,000 for homeless assistance 
grants instead of $1,020,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
the Senate. Funds provided in this account include funds for 
new Shelter Plus Care grants. Renewals of existing grants are 
included in a new account called ``Shelter Plus Care 
Renewals.''
      Includes language proposed by the House requiring that 
all homeless programs be coordinated with health, social 
service, and employment programs. The Senate did not include 
similar language.
      Includes language proposed by the House providing that 
1.5 percent of the funds appropriated for the program shall be 
for technical assistance and the development and maintenance of 
management information systems, instead of .75 percent as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Appropriates $500,000 for the Interagency Council on the 
Homeless as proposed by the Senate. The House did not include 
similar language.
      The conferees reiterate and endorse language included in 
the Senate report regarding the need for data and analysis on 
the extent of homelessness and the effectiveness of McKinney 
Act programs, the desirability of convening a group of experts 
to discuss alternatives to the current ``pro rata shares'' 
formula, the importance of oversight by HUD field staff, and 
the need to increase the supply of permanent supportive 
housing. The conferees concur with the importance of developing 
unduplicated counts of the homeless at the local level, as well 
as taking whatever steps are possible to draw inferences from 
this data about the extent and nature of homelessness in the 
nation as a whole.
      Likewise, the conferees agree that local jurisdictions 
should be collecting an array of data on homelessness in order 
to prevent duplicate counting of homeless persons, and to 
analyze their patterns of use of assistance, including how they 
enter and exit the homeless assistance system and the 
effectiveness of the systems. HUD is directed to take the lead 
in working with communities toward this end, and to analyze 
jurisdictional data within three years. Implementation and 
operation of Management Information Systems (MIS), and 
collection and analysis of MIS data, have been made eligible 
uses of Supportive Housing Program funds. The conferees direct 
HUD to report to the Committees within six months after the 
date of enactment of this Act on its strategy for achieving 
this goal, including details on financing, implementing, and 
maintaining the effort.
      Recognizing the need to provide assured funding for 
renewing Shelter Plus Care grants, the conferees have shifted 
renewal funding to a separate account. The conferees are aware 
that there is a similar permanent housing component to the 
Supportive Housing Program (SHP), which remains funded through 
the Homeless Assistance Grants account under this conference 
agreement. While the conferees have not shifted renewal funding 
for the SHP permanent housing program to the new account, they 
nevertheless believe there is good reason to provide for 
reliable renewal of permanent housing for the formerly homeless 
people with disabilities, addictions, and similar problems who 
are served by both of these programs.
      Accordingly, the conferees direct HUD to implement a 
mechanism for renewing the permanent housing component of SHP 
grants as part of its process for awarding funds under this 
account--provided, of course, that the activities funded by the 
grant are determined to meet local needs and appropriate 
standards of performance and financial accountability.

                       SHELTER PLUS CARE RENEWALS

      Appropriates $100,000,000 for renewing shelter plus care 
grants that expire in fiscal years 2001 and 2002 instead of 
$105,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The House proposed 
renewing these contracts in the Housing Certificate Fund. These 
are the grants that would be subject to renewal in the fiscal 
years 2000 and 2001 funding cycles.
      Because renewal funding is provided in this account for 
Shelter Plus Care grants being handled in the fiscal year 2000 
continuum of care funding competition now underway, the 
conferees intend that grants qualifying for renewal under this 
account be removed from that competition and instead be renewed 
with funds in this account.

                            HOUSING PROGRAMS

                    HOUSING FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $996,000,000 for housing for special 
populations as proposed by the Senate instead of $911,000,000 
as proposed by the House.
      Includes $779,000,000 for section 202 housing for the 
elderly instead of $783,000,000 as proposed by the Senate and 
$710,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      Includes $217,000,000 for section 811 housing for the 
disabled instead of $213,000,000 as proposed by the Senate and 
$210,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      Includes language proposed by the House providing grants 
under section 202b for converting eligible projects to assisted 
living.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate allowing the 
Secretary to designate up to 25% of amounts earmarked for 
section 811 for tenant-based assistance. The House included 
language that allowed the Secretary to earmark between 25% and 
50% of the funds for this use.
      Transfers $1,000,000 to the Working Capital Fund for the 
development and maintenance of information technology systems 
as proposed by the House. The Senate did not include a similar 
provision.

                     FEDERAL HOUSING ADMINISTRATION

             FHA--MUTUAL MORTGAGE INSURANCE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Limits obligations for direct loans to no more than 
$250,000,000 as proposed by the Senate instead of $100,000,000 
as proposed by the House.
      Transfers $96,500,000 from administrative contract 
expenses to the Working Capital Fund for the development and 
maintenance of information technology systems as proposed by 
the House. The Senate did not include similar language.
      The conferees reiterate report language included by the 
Senate regarding the implementation of the single family 
property disposition legislation, specifically the statutory 
authority to discount properties in distressed neighborhoods. 
In fiscal year 1999, legislation was enacted authorizing HUD to 
dispose of its HUD-held single family loans. As part of that 
agreement, seriously distressed neighborhoods where the 
possibility of disinvestment is greatest could be designated as 
asset control areas. For these areas, HUD was granted the 
authority to establish discounts on the price of foreclosed 
homes for local governments and nonprofit institutions that 
establish neighborhood redevelopment plans to revitalize these 
areas.
      HUD, however, has not aggressively implemented this 
legislative mandate. In fact, HUD has instituted a pricing 
structure that is far more restrictive than required in the 
law, making it extremely difficult for local governments to 
repair deteriorated homes and to reinvigorate neighborhoods. 
The conferees reiterate their support for the solution 
contained in the fiscal year 1999 legislation, and direct HUD 
to implement it--specifically the discount provisions--in a way 
that allows local governments and nonprofits to rebuild 
neighborhoods. Furthermore, the conferees reaffirm the Senate's 
directive to report on the implementation of the disposition 
program by May 15, 2001.
      Finally, the conferees are extremely concerned about the 
proliferation of predatory lending and commend HUD for acting 
to combat this practice. As directed in the Senate report, the 
conferees look forward to being briefed by HUD on the progress 
made in this area.
      The conferees are disappointed that HUD utilized only a 
small fraction of the lending authority made available in 
fiscal year 1999 for direct loans to nonprofit organizations 
and local government agencies in connection with sales of HUD-
owned single-family homes under section 204(g) of the National 
Housing Act. HUD is expected to make fuller use of this lending 
authority in fiscal year 2001. In particular, the conferees 
believe that section 204(g) loans could be a valuable tool to 
assist with the acquisition, rehabilitation, and sale of homes 
in the asset control areas created in the fiscal year 1999 VA, 
HUD, and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act, and direct 
HUD to take steps to facilitate use of section 204(g) loans by 
nonprofit organizations working to revitalize neighborhoods in 
these areas.

             FHA--GENERAL AND SPECIAL RISK PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Transfers $33,500,000 from administrative contract 
expenses to the Working Capital Fund for the development and 
maintenance of information technology systems as proposed by 
the House. The Senate did not include similar language.
      Deletes language included by the Senate requiring at 
least $50,000,000 of credit subsidy be directed to insuring 
multifamily projects where a portion of the units are targeted 
to extremely low-income families. However, HUD is directed to 
report back to the Committees on Appropriations on the 
feasibility of creating an insurance program that targets 
extremely low- and low-income families. As part of this report, 
HUD should include an estimate of the costs of providing credit 
subsidy, or of any other subsidies, that would be necessary for 
such a program to be successful.

                    POLICY DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH

                        RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY

      Appropriates $53,500,000 for research and technology 
instead of $45,000,000 as proposed by the Senate and 
$40,000,000 as proposed by the House. As proposed by the House, 
$3,000,000 of the amount provided is for program evaluation to 
support the inclusion of strategic planning and performance 
measurements in the preparation of the budget. The Senate did 
not include similar language.
      Includes new language providing $500,000 for the 
Commission on Affordable Housing and Health Care Facility Needs 
for Seniors in the 21st Century.

                   FAIR HOUSING AND EQUAL OPPORTUNITY

                        FAIR HOUSING ACTIVITIES

      Appropriates $46,000,000 for fair housing activities 
instead of $44,000,000 as proposed by the House and the Senate. 
Of the amount provided, $24,000,000 is for section 561 of the 
Housing and Community Development Act of 1987.

                     OFFICE OF LEAD HAZARD CONTROL

                         LEAD HAZARD REDUCTION

      Appropriates $100,000,000 for lead hazard reduction, as 
proposed by the Senate instead of $80,000,000 as proposed by 
the House.
      Of the amount, $10,000,000 is for the Healthy Homes 
Initiative as proposed by the House instead of $5,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Inserts language proposed by the House and stricken by 
the Senate providing $1,000,000 for CLEARCorps.
      Deletes language proposed by the Senate transferring 
balances from pre-existing lead reduction programs. This 
transfer was included in the fiscal year 2000 appropriations 
measure and has already been implemented.

                     MANAGEMENT AND ADMINISTRATION

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $1,072,000,000 for salaries and expenses 
instead of $1,003,380,000 as proposed by the House and 
$1,002,233,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Deletes language proposed by the Senate limiting per-
employee costs (including benefits) to an average of $78,000. 
The House did not include similar language.
      Inserts language proposed by the Senate prohibiting HUD 
from employing more than 14 employees in the Office of Public 
Affairs. The House did not include similar language.
      Deletes language proposed by the Senate limiting the 
number of HUD full time equivalent (FTE) positions to no more 
than 9,100.
      Inserts new language limiting the personal services 
object class to no more than $758,000,000.
      Inserts new language requiring that not less than 
$100,000,000 in the Working Capital Fund be used for the 
development and maintenance of information technology systems.
      Inserts new language limiting the number of outside 
employees that HUD may hire at grade levels of GS-14 and GS-15. 
Under the limitation, HUD may hire only 7 GS-14 and GS-15 level 
employees for every 10 such employees who leave the Department. 
The limitation will be lifted only when the number of GS-14 and 
GS-15 level employees falls 2.5 percent from the level at the 
date of enactment. This moratorium on hiring does not include 
promoting from within HUD, nor does it impact the number of 
Schedule C employees that can be hired at these grade levels.
      The conferees are concerned about the growth of the 
personal service object class in the salaries and expenses 
account. To gain control over its growth, a cap of $758,000,000 
has been placed on the personal service object class. Finally, 
HUD is directed to spend at least $100,000,000 on the 
development and maintenance of information technology systems. 
The conferees hope that HUD will use these tools in a 
constructive manner to deal with several serious issues.
      First, HUD has been unable to accurately portray its 
salary and expense needs. In its fiscal year 2000 request, HUD 
requested funding for 9,300 people though only 9,030 people 
were on staff at the time. Despite this knowledge, which HUD 
did not share with the Committees, HUD threatened a reduction 
in force (RIF) unless more funds were forthcoming. Relying on 
the representation that a RIF was a real possibility, 
$20,000,000 more than was recommended was provided. Even then, 
HUD claimed this amount was insufficient.
      However, during fiscal year 2000, instead of threatened 
staff reductions, HUD hired more than 700 employees, an 
unprecedented number of new hires. In addition, HUD increased 
the number of personnel receiving quality step increases from a 
negligible amount to approximately 30% of the total staff. This 
action brought the average cost per employee up to $81,500--a 
level that is $2,700 higher than estimated in the fiscal year 
2001 budget request--thus making the fiscal year 2001 budget 
request insufficient by $18,650,000.
      Making a bad situation worse, almost 25% of HUD's total 
staff--or 2,018 people according to HUD--are at the GS-14 and 
GS-15 levels of pay. Yet in fiscal year 2000 alone, HUD hired 
more than 200 new GS-14 and GS-15s, causing displacement of 
existing staff and making it virtually impossible for younger 
employees to expect upward movement in their careers in a 
reasonable amount of time.
      Such poor management decisions only underscore other 
management deficiencies. For years, Congress has requested HUD 
to provide a staff plan that matches staffing requirements with 
programmatic responsibilities. For six years, HUD has 
systematically and deliberately ignored these Congressional 
requests and directives. Therefore, it isn't surprising that 
the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA) recently 
reported that ``. . . the basis for most staff level changes in 
the recent past has been top-down direction that HUD reduce 
staff levels to get to a target number. The lack of an 
analytical basis for much of that direction has not let top 
management know whether resulting staff levels in individual 
offices and overall are adequate to accomplish the department's 
mission.'' Not only does this conclusion concern the conferees, 
it flies in the face of HUD's own restructuring plan embodied 
in Management Reform Plan 2020.
      Exacerbating these problems is HUD's annual transfer of 
funds from its information technology account to offset the 
personal services account, significantly delaying HUD's entry 
to the information age. HUD's inability to account for its 
appropriations--in terms of funding and in terms of results--
and its raid of the IT account to supplement an inadequate 
personal services account is simply unacceptable. For that 
reason, the conferees have fenced the IT account and direct HUD 
to move forward on implementing an enterprise data warehouse 
that incorporates a geographic information system (GIS) 
platform for HUD as quickly as possible.
      The conferees reassert the House report language 
directing HUD to present a comprehensive, multi-year budget 
plan that creates, maintains, and refines HUD's information 
technology systems. Finally, HUD is directed to provide a plan 
that matches staff resources with programmatic needs by May 15, 
2001.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

      Appropriates $85,000,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General instead of $83,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$87,843,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

      Restores language proposed by the House and stricken by 
the Senate giving HUD enhanced authority to dispose of HUD-held 
mortgages.
      Restores language proposed by the House and stricken by 
the Senate allowing HUD to set maximum payment standards for 
enhanced vouchers.
      Deletes language proposed by the House authorizing PHAs 
to utilize any excess section 8 for increasing the value of a 
voucher in high cost areas, and for other purposes. The Senate 
had included similar language in its Title II of Division B.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate to prohibit HUD 
from prohibiting or debarring entities that administer the 
continuum of care process for homeless grants without due 
process. The House did not include similar language.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate to require all 
Title II programs to comply with the HUD Reform Act. The House 
did not include similar language.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate enabling 
homeless programs to utilize the environmental assumption 
authority contained in section 305(c) of the Multifamily 
Housing Property Disposition Reform Act of 1994. The House did 
not include similar language.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate making technical 
changes and corrections to the National Housing Act. The House 
did not include similar language.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate making law 
enforcement officers eligible for housing assistance under the 
Indian housing block grant program. The House did not include 
similar language.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate prohibiting 
federal assistance to facilities that sell predominantly 
cigarettes or other tobacco products. The House did not include 
similar language.
      Modifies language proposed by the Senate prohibiting the 
implementation of the Puerto Rico PHA settlement agreement 
until management reform goals and benchmarks are identified 
including safeguards against fraud and abuse by inserting a 
date by which the report is due. The House did not include 
similar language.
      Modifies language proposed by the Senate allowing a grant 
award to the Hollander Ridge project to be used for activities 
that benefit the site. The House did not include similar 
language.
      Deletes language proposed by the Senate reducing the 
downpayment requirements for teachers and uniformed municipal 
employees. The House did not include similar language. However, 
the Office of Policy Development and Research is directed to 
contract with an outside entity to determine the feasibility of 
decreasing the downpayment requirements for these individuals 
and assess its impact on communities.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate authorizing the 
``neighborhood networks'' computer concept to be an eligible 
activity to receive funding under the modernization and HOPE VI 
grant programs. The House did not include similar language.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate deeming a 
project in Independence, Missouri, to be eligible for mark-to-
market reforms. The House did not include similar language.
      Modifies language proposed by the Senate to extend 
section 236(g)(3)(A) of the National Housing Act for one year. 
The House did not include similar language.
      Modifies language proposed by the Senate enabling a 
county to elect to remain an ``urban county'' if it was so 
defined in fiscal year 1999. The House did not include similar 
language.
      Deletes language proposed by the Senate to authorize a 
low-income multifamily risk-sharing mortgage insurance program. 
The House did not include similar language.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate exempting Alaska 
and Mississippi from the statutory requirement of having a 
resident on the board of a PHA. The House did not include 
similar language.
      Includes new language making moderate rehabilitation 
funds available for use under the HOME Investment Partnerships 
Act for two projects in New Rochelle, New York.
      Includes new language reprogramming $1,000,000 for the 
City of Loma Linda for infrastructure improvements at Redlands 
Boulevard and California Streets, for infrastructure 
improvements in the city related to Mountain View Bridge.
      Includes new language making Native American communities 
eligible to receive funding under the Resident Opportunity and 
Social Services program.
      Includes new language extending for one year an economic 
development initiative in Miami Beach, Florida.
      Includes new language reprogramming funds from Homestead, 
Florida, to housing for low-income elderly persons in Dade 
County, Florida.
      Includes new language waiving the CDBG social services 
cap for the City of Los Angeles.
      Includes new language extending FHA's downpayment 
simplification provisions to December 31, 2002.
      Includes new language amending section 423 of the Stewart 
B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act program to allow grants to 
be used to pay for the costs of implementing and operating 
management information systems.
      Includes new language amending section 184 of the Housing 
and Community Development Act of 1992 by allowing the program 
to be used to refinance previously made loans for purposes of 
rehabilitation, and by eliminating the requirement to show lack 
of access to private financial markets.
      Includes new language making enhanced vouchers available 
to residents who have continued to reside in section 8 
properties which opted out of expired federal assistance 
contracts prior to enactment of Subtitle C of Title V of the 
fiscal year 2000 VA, HUD and Independent Agencies 
Appropriations Act.
      Includes new language requiring grantees under Subtitle A 
of title IV of the Stewart B. McKinney Homeless Assistance Act 
to coordinate their discharge policies.
      Includes new language amending section 525 of the VA, HUD 
and Independent Agencies Appropriations Act of 2000 by changing 
the title of the ``Commission on Affordable Housing and Health 
Care Facility Needs'' to the ``Commission on Affordable Housing 
and Health Care Facility Needs for Seniors in the 21st 
Century.''
      Includes new language amending the McKinney Act allowing 
for the chair of the Interagency Council for the Homeless to 
rotate between HUD, the Department of Health and Human 
Services, the Department of Labor, and the Department of 
Veterans Affairs.
      Modifies language proposed by the Senate amending the 
Quality Housing and Work Responsibility Act of 1998 (QHWRA), to 
allow PHAs to ``project-base'' up to 20 percent of their 
section 8 voucher funds. For many reasons, including burdensome 
implementation regulations, the option in QHWRA has never 
worked effectively. Therefore, the conferees have agreed to 
include legislation that makes substantive revisions to section 
8(o)(13) of the United States Housing Act.
      First, the revision makes the option to project-base 
vouchers more flexible, and allows PHAs to designate up to 20% 
of their available voucher funds for this purpose without any 
requirement that owners invest additional funding in the units. 
This change allows PHAs to decide whether to link project-
basing to new construction, to rehabilitation, or simply to use 
project-basing as a tool to promote voucher utilization and to 
expand housing opportunities. A PHA may project-base their 
vouchers only if the choice is consistent with the housing 
needs and strategies identified in the PHA plan. If a PHA 
chooses this option, the initial contract term with the owner 
of the development may be no more than 10 years in duration, 
but may be extended, subject to the agreement of the owner and 
the PHA. All contracts are subject to the availability of 
appropriations.
      Additionally, it requires PHAs to offer families with 
project-based vouchers a ``continued assistance option''--a 
program variation that allows families to move from the 
assisted building, and to retain federal housing assistance. 
Under this option, PHAs agree to link a specified number of 
subsidies to a particular development. The initial families are 
selected by the manager of the development from among families 
referred by PHAs. Families with the continued assistance option 
have the right to move after one year but retain their federal 
housing assistance by going to the top of the PHA waiting list, 
or by receiving assistance through other means devised by the 
PHA. Families that move from a subsidized unit are replaced by 
families referred from the PHA's waiting list, ensuring that 
the specified number of subsidies continue to be utilized at 
the development throughout the term of the PHA's contract with 
the owner. Special rules would be applied in tax credit units.
      To promote mixed-income developments, only 25 percent of 
the units in a multifamily building may have project-based 
assistance. PHAs are allowed to offer vacancy payments to 
owners for no more than 60 days. However, PHAs and owners must 
seek to reduce the need for vacancy payments and such payments 
may not be made if the vacancy is the fault of the owner--for 
example, the unit does not pass re-inspection, or a PHA refers 
a reasonable number of families to the owner but the owner 
refuses to select any of them.
      Modifies language proposed by the Senate requiring HUD to 
maintain section 8 rental assistance payments on HUD-held or 
HUD-owned properties that are occupied primarily by elderly or 
disabled families. If the properties are not viable affordable 
housing, the Secretary may contract for project-based 
assistance with other existing housing properties, or provide 
other rental assistance.
      Modifies language proposed by the Senate making the 
family unification program more flexible.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate making the FHA 
risk-sharing programs permanent.

                    TITLE III--INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

                  American Battle Monuments Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      Appropriates $28,000,000 for salaries and expenses as 
proposed by the House instead of $26,196,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The conferees commend the ABMC for the progress made in 
reducing the backlogged maintenance needs throughout the ABMC 
system, and have provided funds in excess of the budget request 
to continue this important program.

             Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      Appropriates $7,500,000 for salaries and expenses instead 
of $8,000,000 as proposed by the House and $7,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Bill language has been included again 
this fiscal year which limits the number of career Senior 
Executive Service positions to three. Of the available funds, 
$5,000,000 shall remain available until September 30, 2001, and 
$2,500,000 shall remain available until September 30, 2002.
      In addition, language has been adopted which stipulates 
that the Inspector General of the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency shall also serve as the Inspector General of the Board, 
shall utilize personnel of the Office of Inspector General of 
FEMA in performing the duties of the Inspector General of the 
Board, and shall not appoint any individuals to positions 
within the Board.
      The conferees agree that not later than March 1, 2002, 
and thereafter, the Chief Operating Officer of the Board shall 
prepare a financial report for the preceding year, covering all 
accounts and associated activities of the Board. Each such 
financial report shall be audited according to generally 
accepted accounting principles by the Inspector General of the 
Board or another qualified external auditor as determined by 
the Inspector General, and each such audit report shall be 
submitted to the Chief Operating Officer not later than June 30 
following the fiscal year for which the audit was performed.

                       Department of the Treasury

              COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

   COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

      Appropriates $118,000,000 for community development 
financial institutions fund program account instead of 
$105,000,000 as proposed by the House and $95,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Includes $5,000,000 for technical assistance to promote 
economic development in Native American communities. The 
conferees intend that this assistance be provided primarily 
through qualified community development lenders, organizations 
with experience and expertise in banking and lending in Indian 
country, Native American organizations, and other suitable 
providers, as well as through financial assistance to tribes 
and tribal organizations for procurement of appropriate 
expertise and services.
      Provides $8,750,000 for administrative expenses instead 
of $9,500,000 as proposed by the House, and $8,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Provides $19,750,000 for the cost of direct loans instead 
of $23,000,000 as proposed by the House, and $16,500,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Excludes language proposed by the House and stricken by 
the Senate regarding the accounting of certain administrative 
costs.
      Eliminates language proposed by the Senate capping the 
Bank Enterprise Award program at $30,000,000. The House did not 
include similar language.

                   Consumer Product Safety Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      Appropriates $52,500,000 for the Consumer Product Safety 
Commission, salaries and expenses, as proposed by the Senate, 
instead of $51,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      The conferees are in agreement that significant progress 
has been made by the Commission in reducing children's deaths 
in cribs. Despite this accomplishment, deaths in used cribs 
remain too high. Accordingly, the conferees urge the Commission 
to undertake an initiative to continue its excellent efforts to 
further reduce crib deaths.

             Corporation for National and Community Service

       NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAMS OPERATING EXPENSES

              (INCLUDING TRANSFER AND RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $458,500,000 for national and community 
service programs operating expenses, instead of $433,500,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The House proposed termination of the 
Corporation for National and Community Service using funds 
appropriated in prior years.
      Limits funds for administrative expenses to not more than 
$31,000,000, instead of $29,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. 
The conferees have included language proposed by the Senate 
which directs the Corporation to use $2,000,000 for acquisition 
of a cost accounting system for the Corporation's financial 
management system, an integrated grants management system that 
provides comprehensive financial management information for all 
Corporation grants and cooperative agreements, and the 
establishment, operation and maintenance of a central archives. 
The conferees agree that improvements to the Corporation's 
accounting systems, including a cost accounting system, is of 
very high priority and deserves senior management's full 
attention. The conferees agree that the Corporation is 
prohibited from providing any salary increases (with the 
exception of locality adjustments and other appropriate 
adjustments provided to all government employees) or bonuses to 
its senior management until the Corporation has certified, with 
the IG's concurrence, that an adequate cost accounting and 
grants management system has been acquired, implemented, and 
conforms to all Federal requirements.
      Limits funds as proposed by the Senate to not more than: 
$28,500,000 for quality and innovation activities; $2,500 for 
official reception and representation expenses; $70,000,000 for 
education awards, of which not to exceed $5,000,000 shall be 
available for national service scholarships for high school 
students performing community service; $231,000,000 for 
AmeriCorps grants, of which not to exceed $45,000,000 may be 
for national direct programs and $25,000,000 shall be for 
activities dedicated to developing computer and information 
technology skills; $10,000,000 for the Points of Light 
Foundation; $21,000,000 for the civilian community corps; 
$43,000,000 for school-based and community-based service-
learning programs; and $5,000,000 for audits and other 
evaluations.
      The conferees agree to add $3,000,000 to the national 
civilian community corps (NCCC) account to cover the additional 
costs of relocating a campus site in San Diego and to 
administer a program level of 1,100 members, which would match 
its fiscal year 1998 level. The conferees understand that the 
number of campuses would remain at the current level of five 
sites.
      Inserts language proposed by the Senate which prohibits 
using any funds for national service programs run by Federal 
agencies; provides that, to the maximum extent feasible, funds 
for the AmeriCorps program will be provided consistent with the 
recommendation of peer review panels; and provides that, to the 
maximum extent practicable, the level of matching funds shall 
be increased, education only awards shall be expanded, and the 
cost per participant shall be reduced.
      Rescinds $30,000,000 from the National Service Trust, 
instead of $50,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conferees 
have taken this action because the balances in the Trust appear 
at this time to be in excess of requirements based upon usage 
rates. The conferees direct the Corporation to provide a 
quarterly report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House and Senate on the assets and liabilities of the National 
Service Trust fund, including information on interest earned 
and interest received and an explanation of the relationship 
between the amounts in the completed financial statements and 
the budget request.
      The conferees agree to the Senate proposal to earmark 
$5,000,000 for Communities In Schools, Inc., $2,500,000 for 
Parents as Teachers National Center, Inc., $7,500,000 for 
America's Promise--The Alliance for Youth, Inc., and $2,500,000 
for Boys and Girls Clubs of America.
      The conferees agree to provide $1,500,000 for the Youth 
Life Foundation (YLF). The YLF aims to replicate the programs 
it has developed in Washington, D.C. to address the challenges 
of children living in insecure environments and make those 
programs applicable to other parts of the Nation. The conferees 
recognize that America's Promise is already trying to establish 
partnerships with locally-based organizations such as YLF. 
Accordingly, the conferees expect YLF to continue its effort in 
coordinating and collaborating its activities with America's 
Promise.
      The House proposed that the Corporation be terminated and 
did not include any of the foregoing limitations or provisions 
proposed by the Senate.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

      Appropriates $5,000,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General, the same amount as provided by the House and the 
Senate.

                        administrative provision

      Includes an administrative provision, as proposed by the 
Senate, which provides a technical correction to language 
included in the fiscal year 2000 appropriations Act.

                  Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims

                         salaries and expenses

      Appropriates $12,445,000 for the Court of Appeals for 
Veterans Claims as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$12,500,000 as proposed by the House.

         Department of Defense-Civil Cemeterial Expenses, Army

                         salaries and expenses

      Appropriates $17,949,000 for salaries and expenses as 
proposed by the House instead of $15,949,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The conferees note that the funding level represents an 
increase of over $5,000,000 above the previous fiscal year, and 
will be used for the highest priority maintenance and capital 
improvement projects as identified in the Cemetery's Ten-Year 
Plan.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

                     National Institutes of Health

          national institute of environmental health sciences

      Appropriates $63,000,000 for the National Institute of 
Environmental Health Sciences in a new, separate account 
instead of $60,000,000 as proposed in a new account by the 
House and $60,000,000 as proposed through the Environmental 
Protection Agency's Hazardous Substance Superfund account by 
the Senate. The conferees believe this new account structure 
will provide higher visibility and better oversight of the 
NIEHS. The conferees have deleted language proposed by the 
House making funding available until September 30, 2002.
      Of the funds provided, $40,000,000 is for the research 
program and $23,000,000 is for the worker training program.

            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

                         salaries and expenses

      Appropriates $75,000,000 for salaries and expenses of the 
Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry in a new, 
separate account instead of $70,000,000 as provided by the 
House in a new account and $75,000,000 as provided through the 
Environmental Protection Agency's Hazardous Substance Superfund 
account by the Senate. The conferees believe this new account 
structure will provide higher visibility and better oversight 
of the ATSDR.
      The conferees have also included bill language which 
permits the Administrator of the ATSDR to conduct other 
appropriate health studies and evaluations or activities in 
lieu of health assessments pursuant to section 104(i)(6) of the 
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
Liability Act of 1980, as amended (CERCLA). The language 
further stipulates that in the conduct of such other health 
assessments, evaluations, or activities, the ATSDR shall not be 
bound by the deadlines imposed in section 104(i)(6)(A) of 
CERCLA. The conferees have deleted language proposed by the 
House making funding available until September 30, 2002.
      Funds provided for fiscal year 2001 cannot be used by the 
ATSDR to conduct in excess of 40 toxicological profiles.
      Within the appropriated level, ATSDR is to use up to 
$2,000,000 to continue the Great Lakes fish consumption study; 
up to $6,000,000 for medical monitoring and related activities 
in Libby, Montana; $500,000 to conduct subsistence and dietary 
studies of contaminents in the environment, subsistence 
resources, and people in Alaska Native populations; and up to 
$1,000,000 for completion of the Toms River, New Jersey cancer 
evaluation and research project. The ATSDR is further directed 
to provide support for the minority health professions program.
      As in the past, ATSDR's administrative costs charged by 
the CDC are capped at 7.5 percent of the amount appropriated 
herein.

                    Environmental Protection Agency

                         science and technology

      Appropriates $696,000,000 for science and technology 
instead of $650,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$670,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees have agreed to the following increases to 
the budget request:
      1. $2,500,000 for EPSCoR.
      2. $4,000,000 for the Water Environment Research 
Foundation.
      3. $4,000,000 for the American Water Works Association 
Research Foundation.
      4. $2,000,000 for the National Decentralized Water 
Resource Capacity Development Project, in coordination with 
EPA, for continued training and research and development.
      5. $1,500,000 for the National Jewish Medical and 
Research Center for research on the relationship between indoor 
and outdoor pollution and the development of respiratory 
diseases.
      6. $1,900,000 for the National Environmental Respiratory 
Center at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute. The 
research should be coordinated with EPA's overall particulate 
matter research program and consistent with the recommendations 
set forth by the National Academy of Sciences report on PM 
research.
      7. $1,000,000 for the Environmental Technology 
Commercialization Center to increase the transfer of federally-
developed environmental technology.
      8. $1,250,000 for the Center for Air Toxics Metals at the 
Energy and Environmental Research Center.
      9. $1,500,000 for the Mickey Leland National Urban Air 
Toxics Research Center.
      10. $250,000 for acid rain research at the University of 
Vermont.
      11. $1,500,000 for the Gulf Coast Hazardous Substance 
Research Center.
      12. $250,000 for the Institute for Environmental and 
Industrial Science at Southwest Texas State University.
      13. $750,000 for the Integrated Public/Private Energy and 
Environmental Consortium (IPEC) to develop cost-effective 
environmental technology, improved business practices, and 
technology transfer for the domestic petroleum industry.
      14. $1,000,000 for the University of South Alabama Center 
for Estuarine Research.
      15. $4,527,000 for the Mine Waste Technology Program and 
the Heavy Metal Water Program at the National Environmental 
Waste Technology, Testing, and Evaluation Center ($3,902,000) 
and for a field demonstration of ceramic microfiltration 
technology ($625,000).
      16. $400,000 for the Texas Institute for Applied 
Environmental Research at Tarleton State University.
      17. $500,000 for the Consortium for Plant Biotechnology 
Research.
      18. $750,000 for the Geothermal Heat Pump (GHP) 
Consortium.
      19. $750,000 for the Kalamazoo River Watershed Initiative 
through Western Michigan University's Environmental Research 
Institute.
      20. $900,000 to Old Dominion University in Virginia for 
the continued development, design, and implementation of a 
research effort on tributyltin-based ship bottom paints.
      21. $1,000,000 to the University of California, Riverside 
for continued research of advanced vehicle design, advanced 
transportation systems, vehicle emissions, and atmospheric 
pollution at the CE-CERT facility.
      22. $2,000,000 to the University of Miami in Florida for 
the Rosentiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.
      23. $1,000,000 for the Environmental Protection Agency to 
become involved in the Department of Energy's fine particulate 
matter research program.
      24. $3,000,000 to the National Technology Transfer Center 
to continue its cooperative agreement with EPA to assess, 
market and license technologies owned by EPA, and to conduct 
commercialization best practices training activities.
      25. $2,000,000 to the Canaan Valley Institute for 
continuation of its regional environmental data center and 
coordinated information management system in the Mid-Atlantic 
Highlands in coordination with the Federal Geographic Data 
Committee and the National Spatial Data Infrastructure.
      26. $1,000,000 above the budget request to the Canaan 
Valley Institute in close coordination with the Regional 
Vulnerability and Assessment (ReVA) initiative to develop 
research and educational tools using integrative technologies 
to predict future environmental risk and support informed, 
proactive decision-making.
      27. $500,000 to establish the Center for Metals in the 
Environment in Delaware.
      28. $625,000 to New Mexico State University to determine 
the Carbon Sequestration Potential of southwestern lands.
      29. $1,400,000 to the University of New Hampshire for 
continuation of the Bedrock Bioremediation Center research 
project.
      30. $990,000 for research associated with the restoration 
and enhancement of Manchac Swamp conducted by Southeastern 
Louisiana at the Turtle Cove Research Station.
      31. $500,000 to the Metropolitan Development Association 
of Syracuse and Central New York to continue assessing and 
mitigating the impact of exposure to multiple indoor 
contaminants on human health.
      32. $3,637,000 to the National Alternative Fuels 
Foundation for research and development of a new class of 
alternative fuels known as vapor-phase combustion fuels.
      The conferees have agreed to the following reductions 
from the budget request:
      1. $26,089,000 from the CCTI Transportation research 
program; and
      2. $1,138,000 from project EMPACT.
      Within the funds transferred from the Hazardous Substance 
Superfund (HSS) account, $7,000,000 is for the Superfund 
Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) program, including 
$500,000 for a demonstration project at the Port of Richfield, 
Washington involving an innovative steam extraction technology. 
Also from within those funds transferred from HSS as well as 
from funds appropriated to science and technology, $4,500,000 
is for continued operation of the Hazardous Substance Research 
Centers.
      The conferees direct EPA to contract, within 30 days of 
enactment of this Act, with the National Academy of Sciences or 
other appropriate entity for a study of carbon monoxide 
episodes in meteorological and topographical problem areas, 
addressing the role of cold weather inversions and addressing 
public health significance and strategies, including the use of 
catalytic converter and other cold-start technology, for 
managing these rare occurrences in national ambient air quality 
standards non-attainment areas, due mostly to cold weather 
inversions. One of the major case studies is to be Fairbanks, 
Alaska, for which there shall be a preliminary report by 
September 1, 2001 in order to inform the further development of 
a State Implementation Plan for such area.

                 ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS AND MANAGEMENT

      Appropriates $2,087,990,000 for environmental programs 
and management instead of $1,895,000,000 as proposed by the 
House and $2,000,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
conferees have included bill language as proposed by the House, 
identical to that carried in the fiscal years 1999 and 2000 
Acts, which limits the expenditure of funds to implement or 
administer guidance relating to title VI of the Civil Rights 
Act of 1964, with certain exceptions. This provision does not 
provide the Agency statutory authority to implement its 
Environmental Justice Guidance. Rather, it simply clarifies the 
applicability of the Interim Guidance with respect to certain 
pending cases as an administrative convenience for the Agency.
      The conferees have included bill language providing up to 
an additional 6 months for EPA to issue a final regulation for 
arsenic in drinking water. The conferees are very concerned 
about the cost of EPA's proposed arsenic drinking water rule to 
small communities. Moreover, the information EPA used to 
develop the proposed standard is the subject of considerable 
controversy and disagreement. The conferees believe EPA should 
take a full year--as intended by the Safe Drinking Water Act 
Amendments of 1996--to finalize the new standard and therefore 
strongly recommend EPA not finalize the rule until June 2001 
and provide significant, additional opportunity for public 
comment.
      Bill language proposed by the House and the Senate has 
been included, as in the past two fiscal years, prohibiting EPA 
from spending funds to implement the Kyoto Protocol. The 
conferees note that this restriction on the use of funds shall 
not apply to the conduct of education activities and seminars 
by the agency.
      The conferees note that several programs funded through 
this Act conduct science and technology research that are 
associated partly with global climate change. To the extent 
that the conferees have funded this work, they have done so 
based on each program's individual merits of contributing to 
issues associated with domestic energy production, national 
energy security, energy efficiency and cost savings, related 
environmental assessments, and general energy emission 
improvements. The bill language is intended to prohibit funds 
provided in this bill from being used to implement actions 
called for solely under the Kyoto Protocol, prior to its 
ratification.
      The Byrd-Hagel Resolution passed in 1997 (S. Res. 98) 
remains the clearest statement of the will of the Senate with 
regards to the Kyoto Protocol, and the conferees are committed 
to ensuring that the Administration not implement the Kyoto 
Protocol without Congressional consent. The conferees 
recognize, however, that there are also longstanding energy 
research programs which have goals and objectives that, if met, 
could have positive effects on energy use and the environment. 
The conferees do not intend to preclude these programs from 
proceeding, provided they have been funded and approved by 
Congress.
      To the extent future funding requests may be submitted 
which would increase funding for climate change activities 
prior to Senate consideration of the Kyoto Protocol (whether 
under the auspices of the Climate Change Technology Initiative 
or any other initiative), the Administration must do a better 
job of explaining the components of the programs, their 
anticipated goals and objectives, the justification for any 
funding increases, a discussion of how success will be 
measured, and a clear definition of how these programs are 
justified by goals and objectives independent of implementation 
of the Kyoto Protocol. The conferees expect these items to be 
included as part of the fiscal year 2002 budget submission for 
all affected agencies.
      The conferees have agreed to the following increases to 
the budget request:
      1. $14,500,000 for rural water technical assistance and 
groundwater protection, including $8,600,000 for the NRWA, 
$2,600,000 for RCAP, $700,000 for GWPC, $1,600,000 for the SFC, 
and $1,000,000 for the NETC.
      2. $1,000,000 for implementation of the National 
Biosolids Partnership Program.
      3. $1,500,000 for source water protection programs. These 
funds are to be used to develop local source water protection 
programs within each state utilizing the infrastructure and 
process of an organization now engaged in groundwater and 
wellhead protection programs.
      4. $1,250,000 for the national onsite and community 
wastewater treatment demonstration project through the Small 
Flows Clearinghouse.
      5. $2,500,000 for the Southwest Center for Environmental 
Research and Policy.
      6. $4,000,000 for the Small Public Water System 
Technology Centers at Western Kentucky University; the 
University of New Hampshire; the University of Alaska-Sitka; 
Pennsylvania State University; the University of Missouri-
Columbia; Montana State University; the University of Illinois; 
and Mississippi State University.
      7. $500,000 for the final year of Federal funding to 
assist communities in Hawaii to meet successfully the water 
quality permitting requirements for rehabilitating native 
Hawaiian fishponds.
      8. $5,000,000 under section 104(b) of the Clean Water Act 
for America's Clean Water Foundation for implementation of on-
farm environmental assessments for livestock operations, with 
the goal of improving surface and ground water quality.
      9. $500,000 for the Ohio River Watershed Pollutant 
Reduction Program, to be cost-shared.
      10. $1,650,000 to continue the sediment decontamination 
technology demonstration in the New York-New Jersey Harbor.
      11. $1,500,000 for the National Alternative Fuels Vehicle 
Training Program.
      12. $300,000 for the Coalition for Utah's Future to 
continue the Envision Utah project including the development of 
a sustainable plan for future growth and environmental 
stewardship in the Wasatch Front.
      13. $300,000 for the Northeast States for Coordinated Air 
Use Management.
      14. $750,000 for planning, coordination and development 
of a comprehensive watershed based implementation program for 
the Santa Fe River.
      15. $500,000 for the Brazos-Navasota watershed management 
project.
      16. $500,000 for the Kentucky Center for Wastewater 
Research to establish training, education and database 
management for wastewater research to identify the greatest 
threats to regional watersheds.
      17. $250,000 for the Maryland Bureau of Mines for an acid 
mine drainage remediation project to reduce or eliminate the 
loss of quality water from surface streams in the Kempton Mine 
complex.
      18. $2,000,000 to the University of Missouri-Rolla for 
research and development of technologies to mitigate the 
impacts of livestock operations on the environment.
      19. $500,000 for marsh restoration activities at Acowmin 
Marsh and Little River Marsh near North Hampton and Rye, New 
Hampshire.
      20. $200,000 for the Tri-State Water Quality Council for 
development of voluntary nutrient reduction programs, 
establishing a basin-wide water quality monitoring program, and 
related activities.
      21. $1,000,000 for the Global Environmental Management 
Education Center within the College of Natural Resources at the 
University of Wisconsin-Stevens Point, to provide training and 
outreach education for safeguarding the quality of surface and 
groundwater resources.
      22. $1,000,000 for the Frank Tejeda Center for Excellence 
in Environmental Operations to continue its efforts to 
demonstrate new technology for water and wastewater treatment.
      23. $1,250,000 for the Chesapeake Bay Small Watershed 
Grants Program. Funds provided for the Chesapeake Bay small 
watersheds program are to be managed by the Fish and Wildlife 
Foundation and shall be used for community-based projects 
including those that design and implement on-the-ground and in-
the-water environmental restoration or protection activities to 
help meet Chesapeake Bay Program goals and objectives.
      24. $1,000,000 for the Lake Champlain management plan.
      25. $4,500,000 for operation of the Long Island Sound 
Office and programs consistent with new authorization relative 
to the Long Island Sound. The total program is provided 
$5,000,000.
      26. $500,000 for the Environmentors project.
      27. $200,000 for the Northeast Waste Management Officials 
Association to continue solid waste, hazardous waste, cleanup 
and pollution prevention programs.
      28. $2,000,000 for the Food and Agricultural Policy 
Research Institute's Missouri watershed initiative project to 
link economic and environmental data with ambient water 
quality.
      29. $500,000 for the Small Business Pollution Prevention 
Center at the University of Northern Iowa.
      30. $750,000 for the painting and coating compliance 
enhancement project through the Iowa Waste Reduction Center.
      31. $1,890,000 for the Michigan Biotechnology Institute 
for development and demonstration of environmental cleanup 
technologies.
      32. $200,000 for the Hawaii Department of Agriculture and 
the University of Hawaii College of Tropical Agriculture and 
Human Resources to continue projects aimed at improving the 
acceptability and efficacy of agriculturally-based 
environmental restoration technologies.
      33. $1,000,000 for the Animal Waste Management Consortium 
through the University of Missouri, acting with Iowa State 
University, North Carolina State University, Michigan State 
University, Oklahoma State University, and Purdue University to 
supplement ongoing research, demonstration, and outreach 
projects associated with animal waste management.
      34. $1,000,000 to complete a cumulative impacts study by 
the National Academy of Sciences of North Slope oil and gas 
development.
      35. $750,000 for an expansion of EPA's efforts related to 
the Government's purchase and use of environmentally preferable 
products focused on bio-based products with an emphasis on soy-
based industrial oils, greases and hydraulic fluid. This 
includes $200,000 to complete the soy smoke initiative through 
the University of Missouri-Rolla.
      36. $975,000 for the Alabama Department of Environmental 
Management water and wastewater training programs.
      37. $250,000 for the Vermont Department of Agriculture to 
work with the conservation districts along the Connecticut 
River in Vermont to reduce nonpoint source pollution.
      38. $600,000 for the Wetland Development project in 
Logan, Utah.
      39. $500,000 for the Economic Development Alliance of 
Hawaii to accelerate commercialization of biotechnology to 
reduce pesticide use in tropical and subtropical agricultural 
production.
      40. $100,000 for the Connecticut River Science Consortium 
to develop an interdisciplinary scientific monitoring and 
analysis project in the Connecticut River Basin.
      41. $1,000,000 to develop and demonstrate new tools for 
imaging and monitoring the movement of fluids and contaminants 
in the shallow subsurface using time-lapse geophysical imaging 
and tomography techniques. This project will involve 
researchers from Boise State University, the Idaho National 
Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, other Federal labs 
and industry.
      42. $500,000 for Mississippi State University, the 
University of Mississippi and the University of Georgia to 
conduct forestry best management practice water quality 
effectiveness studies in the States of Mississippi and Georgia.
      43. $750,000 for the University of Idaho's groundwater 
assessment project for rural Idaho cities and towns.
      44. $500,000 for a study by the City of Fairbanks using 
geographic information system mapping to assess methods to 
comply with NPDES requirements.
      45. $150,000 to Colchester, Vermont to study nonpoint 
source influences on water quality in Mallets Bay on Lake 
Champlain and to plan for mitigation, with a focus on 
stormwater management and on-site disposal systems.
      46. $750,000 for the Resource and Agricultural Policy 
Systems Project at Iowa State University.
      47. $700,000 to continue the Urban Rivers Awareness 
Program at the Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia for 
its environmental science program.
      48. $500,000 for the Kenai River Center for continued 
research on watershed issues and related activities.
      49. $750,000 for the New Hampshire Estuaries Project 
management plan implementation.
      50. $100,000 to continue the Design for the Environment 
for Farmers Program to address the unique environmental 
concerns of the American Pacific area through the adoption of 
sustainable agricultural practices.
      51. $5,000,000 to the Gas Research Institute for the 
development of a bio-refinery commercialization pilot project 
which will utilize thermal-depolymerization technology to break 
down waste streams into usable products.
      52. $700,000 to the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission 
for programs as described in Senate Report 106-410.
      53. $300,000 to Davie County, North Carolina for the 
Cooleemee Falls Project.
      54. $1,000,000 to Union County, Arkansas for the 
continuation of the Union County Sparta Aquifer study.
      55. $500,000 to Riverside County, California for the 
Community and Environmental Transportation Acceptability 
Process (CETAP).
      56. $150,000 for the Santa Clara River Enhancement and 
Management Plan.
      57. $450,000 to Ventura County, California for continued 
development of the Calleguas Creek Watershed management plan.
      58. $1,200,000 to Gateway Cities, Council of Governments 
in California to complete Phase II of the Truck Impacted 
Intersections Program and develop the comprehensive Diesel 
Emissions Reduction Program.
      59. $900,000 for continuation of the Sacramento River 
Toxic Pollution Control Project, to be cost shared.
      60. $600,000 to Fort Lauderdale, Florida for design and 
construction as part of the Fort Lauderdale International 
Airport Wetlands Development Project.
      61. $131,000 to Miami-Dade County, Florida for lead 
screening, testing, outreach, education and abatement in the 
Liberty City neighborhood.
      62. $600,000 for fishery and habitat restoration in Lake 
Panasoffkee, Florida.
      63. $600,000 to Osceola County, Florida to preserve the 
watershed and drainage system currently under attack by exotic 
aquatic plants.
      64. $1,150,000 for the Tampa Bay Watch program.
      65. $1,000,000 to St. Petersburg, Florida for the Clam 
Bayou Habitat Restoration Project.
      66. $100,000 to Pinellas County, Florida for the 
cooperative exchange education module on environmental 
sustainability and the stewardship of natural resources.
      67. $1,000,000 to the Illinois Environmental Protection 
Agency for the ``Illinois Rivers 2020'' restoration program.
      68. $600,000 for the Water Systems Council in Iowa to 
assist in the effective delivery of water to rural citizens 
nationwide.
      69. $300,000 for investigation of pollution sources in 
the Lower Arkansas River in Wichita, Kansas.
      70. $300,000 for the Urban Waste Management and Research 
Center in Louisiana.
      71. $700,000 for the Louisiana Environmental Research 
Center.
      72. $300,000 for the Oyster Habitat Restoration program 
in the Chesapeake Bay.
      73. $800,000 for the National Center for Manufacturing 
Sciences in Michigan to facilitate industrial input into EPA's 
compliance assistance clearinghouse and to expand the scope of 
compliance assistance centers ($500,000) and for continuation 
of EPA's Environmental Roadmapping Initiative ($300,000).
      74. $300,000 to Mississippi State University for the 
Southeast Center for Technology Assistance for Small Drinking 
Water Systems.
      75. $300,000 to the Ten Towns Great Swamp Watershed 
Management Committee in New Jersey.
      76. $1,000,000 to Alfred University in New York for the 
Center for the Engineered Conservation of Energy (EnCo).
      77. $1,000,000 to the Darrin Fresh Water Institute in New 
York to extend and expand studies of acid deposition.
      78. $500,000 to Cortland County, New York for continued 
work on the aquifer protection plan of which $150,000 is for 
continued implementation of the comprehensive water quality 
management program in the Upper Susquehanna Watershed.
      79. $1,200,000 for continued work on the water quality 
management plans for the Central New York watersheds in 
Onondaga and Cayuga Counties.
      80. $300,000 to the Central New York Regional Planning 
and Development Board for the Oneida Lake and Watershed 
Management Plan.
      81. $1,200,000 for the Dry Creek Flood Mitigation project 
in Cortland, New York.
      82. $500,000 to the town of Pilot Mountain, North 
Carolina for stream restoration and upland protection in the 
watershed.
      83. $300,000 to Charlotte, North Carolina for the 
Charlotte Surface Water Improvement and Management Program.
      84. $855,000 to North Carolina Central University for the 
Environmental Risk and Impact Research Initiative.
      85. $300,000 to Cleveland State University in Ohio for 
continuation of the Program of Excellence in Risk Analysis.
      86. $1,000,000 to the Pennsylvania Geographic Information 
Consortium to continue development of a comprehensive 
environmental masterplan for Upper Susquehanna-Lackawanna 
Watershed.
      87. $175,000 to the Pennsylvania State University 
Technical Assistance Center to provide technical expertise to 
operate public water systems.
      88. $2,000,000 to the University of Houston, Texas and in 
consultation with the Greater Houston Partnership for Ozone 
Simulation and Forecasting.
      89. $500,000 to Texas A&M; University for the National 
Chemical Safety Data System.
      90. $2,500,000 to the Salt Lake Organizing Committee or 
its designee for environmental programs and operations of the 
2002 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games. Eligible activities 
may include tree programs; environmental compliance activities; 
programs highlighting the use of environmentally-friendly 
technologies including, but not limited to, photovoltaic 
lighting and CNG fuel; waste management and recycling programs 
and operations; and public information and outreach efforts.
      91. $600,000 to Fairfax County, Virginia for the Fairfax 
County Water Authority to conduct a study on water supply for 
drought resistance.
      92. $1,000,000 to Arlington County and the City of 
Alexandria, Virginia for demonstration of environmental 
improvements to Four Mile Run.
      93. $600,000 to Franklin, Grant and Adams counties in 
Washington for the Groundwater Management Area to address 
nitrate levels in drinking water.
      94. $300,000 for the continuation of the Molten Carbonate 
Fuel Cell Demonstration project in King County, Washington.
      95. $168,000 for the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Wildlife 
Commission for technical work near the Crandon Mine in 
Wisconsin.
      96. $1,225,000 to the Canaan Valley Institute for ongoing 
operations.
      97. $2,400,000 for the National Energy Technology 
Laboratory (NETL) for continued activities of a comprehensive 
clean water initiative in cooperation with EPA Region III.
      98. $2,800,000 to the Polymer Alliance Zone's MARCEE 
Initiative with oversight being provided by the Office of Solid 
Waste.
      99. $500,000 to the University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro for the Bioterrorism Water Quality Protection 
Program with the aim of developing highly automated and 
inexpensive testing protocols.
      100. $500,000 to Water Project 2000 in Tennessee to 
provide a benchmark water quality study.
      101. $500,000 to Fallon, Nevada to address levels of 
naturally occurring arsenic.
      102. $500,000 to the University of Toledo in the Ohio 
Lake Erie Research Center for participation in the Western Lake 
Erie Basin Study authorized by Sec. 441 of WRDA 1999, Public 
Law 106-53.
      103. $450,000 for the Water Resources Institute at 
California State University, San Bernardino to develop and 
maintain an information repository of water-related research 
and conflict resolution.
      104. $600,000 for the San Bernardino Municipal Water 
District in California for research and design of a mitigation 
project addressing the City's contaminated high groundwater 
table and dangers presented by liquefaction.
      105. $990,000 for continuation of the Soil Aquifer 
Treatment Project.
      106. $200,000 to Miami-Dade County Department of 
Environmental Resources Management in Florida to expand the 
existing education program.
      107. $300,000 to Leon County, Florida for the Aquifer 
Protection Assessment program.
      108. $750,000 to Calhoun County, Michigan for development 
of a comprehensive research and development plan for Kalamazoo 
River Watershed.
      109. $250,000 to the Northwest Straits Advisory 
Commission of Washington.
      The conferees have agreed to the following reductions 
from the budget request:
      1. $27,413,000 from the CCTI Buildings program.
      2. $9,495,000 from the CCTI Transportation program.
      3. $31,686,100 from the CCTI Industry program.
      4. $5,076,200 from the CCTI International Capacity 
Building program.
      5. $2,025,000 from the CCTI State and Local program.
      6. $2,410,000 from the CCTI Carbon Removal program.
      7. $848,800 from Project EMPACT.
      8. $9,000,000 from the Integrated Information Initiative. 
The conferees have provided $5,000,000 for continued planning 
and design of this new initiative's exchange network.
      9. $4,841,000 from the innovative community partnership 
program.
      10. $9,000,000 from the Montreal Protocol Multilateral 
Fund.
      11. $4,250,000 from the international environmental 
monitoring program.
      12. $3,840,000 from the regional geographic program.
      13. $3,395,000 from urban environmental quality and human 
health.
      14. $10,000,000 as a reduction in payroll costs.
      The seven Environmental Finance Centers and the Regional 
Environmental Enforcement Associations are to be funded at the 
fiscal year 2000 funding level, and the Environmental Education 
programs are to be funded as proposed in the budget submission. 
The conferees agree that operations of the Clean Water Act Sec. 
104(g)(1) Wastewater Onsite Technical Assistance Centers shall 
remain at the current funding level.
      The conference agreement includes the budget request of 
$34,100,000 for pesticides reregistration, and $39,300,000 for 
pesticides registration activities performed by EPA. Faster 
review and approval for registration applications will allow 
safer, more environmentally friendly products on the market 
sooner and ensure that farmers have the ability to protect 
their crop. The conferees expect no reductions to be proposed 
for these programs in the operating plan submission.
      Similarly, the Endocrine Disruptor Screening and the 
Pesticide Residue Tolerance Reassessment programs are to 
receive $10,200,000 and $14,600,000, respectively. The 
Tolerance Reassessment program has been funded at a level that 
equals the budget request if a tolerance fee was imposed by EPA 
and an additional $7,000,000 was recovered through that fee. 
The conferees have prohibited implementation of the fee again 
this year, due in part to provisions of that fee structure 
proposed by EPA which would charge more than 100 percent of 
actual costs and which would make such charges retroactive. 
Until the Agency works toward a fee-for-service proposal which 
is both fair and reasonable, the conferees do not expect to 
entertain approval. As noted previously, these programs are not 
to be proposed for reduction through the operating plan 
submission.
      The Agency is directed to take no reductions below the 
budget request from the NPDES permit backlog, the High 
Production Volume Chemical Challenge Program, the Chesapeake 
Bay Program Office, and the water quality monitoring program 
along the New Jersey-New York shoreline. The Agency is expected 
to fund the Great Lakes Program Office and the National Estuary 
program at no less than the 2000 level, and is directed to fund 
compliance assistance activities at no less than $25,000,000.
      The conferees direct EPA to contract expeditiously with 
the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) for a review of the 
quality of science used to develop and implement TMDLs, and 
direct that the final report be submitted to Congress by June 
1, 2001. Further, EPA is directed to conduct a comprehensive 
assessment of the potential State resources which will be 
required for the development and implementation of TMDLs and 
present the results of the study to Congress within 120 days of 
enactment of this Act. In conducting this cost assessment, EPA 
must, in addition to direction included in Senate Report 106-
410, provide an estimate of the annual costs to the regulated 
community in both the private and public sectors; address 
concerns regarding the economic analysis performed by the 
Administrator on regulatory changes to the TMDL program that 
were identified by the Comptroller General in a June 21, 2000, 
report; and estimate the costs to small businesses that would 
result from regulatory changes to the TMDL program. In 
conducting these analyses, the Administrator shall solicit 
comment from the Comptroller General, each State, and the 
public regarding the Agency's assessment.
      In addition, the conferees direct the Agency to prepare 
an analysis of the monitoring data needed for development and 
implementation of TMDLs, and further direct EPA Region IX as 
well as all other EPA Regions and EPA Headquarters not to 
impose or mandate new TMDL-related requirements or issue new 
guidance relative to new TMDL-related permits prior to the date 
the TMDL rule can be implemented under current law.
      The conferees understand that in June 2000, EPA released 
a substantially revised draft dioxin reassessment after five 
years of considering recommendations from its Science Advisory 
Board (SAB). The SAB's November 1995 Report noted numerous 
weaknesses in the risk characterization and dose-response 
chapters of the 1994 draft reassessment and directed EPA to 
ensure that its conclusions were based on a more complete 
consideration of available scientific studies.
      The conferees commend EPA for convening a peer review 
panel to assess two key sections of the revised reassessment 
prior to a second SAB review. The conferees are concerned, 
based on the report of this peer review panel, that EPA's key 
conclusions regarding dioxin risks remain controversial and do 
not completely address questions raised by the SAB in 1995.
      The conferees understand that Congressional science and 
agriculture committees have called for a SAB review of the full 
dioxin reassessment, including all new information. The 
conferees further understand that the Department of Agriculture 
is finalizing an agreement with the National Academy of 
Sciences to understand better the dioxin impacts on the U.S. 
food supply. Therefore, the conferees strongly encourage the 
Agency to await completion of these reviews before finalizing 
its dioxin reassessment.
      This direction should not be interpreted to restrict EPA 
from issuing regulations to control dioxin emissions such as 
air toxics rules under Section 112 of the Clean Air Act 
Amendments of 1990, which have reduced industrial emissions of 
dioxin by 90 percent.
      In view of the uncertain future supply of pharmaceutical-
grade CFCs, the conferees are mindful that a smooth and timely 
transition to chlorofluorocarbon-free metered dose inhalers 
(MDIs) is needed for patients to continue to have access to the 
treatments they need. The conferees are aware that a year ago 
FDA, in consultation with EPA, issued a proposed rule to 
determine when CFC MDIs are non-essential, and that a decision 
was proposed at a July 2000 Meeting of the Montreal Protocol's 
Open-Ended Working Group. The conferees understand that major 
patient and physician organizations, environmental groups and 
industry supported the July decision. This decision has now 
been revised. The conferees note that the July decision and 
this revised decision include a provision on the non-
essentiality of new CFC MDIs unless certain specified criteria 
are met. The conferees believe that a decision by the Protocol 
Parties such as the revised decision could facilitate the 
transition without putting patients at risk, and believe it is 
important that a final decision make it clear that each 
national health authority make the finding as to whether the 
essentiality criteria are met for a particular product. The 
conferees strongly urge EPA to work with the U.S. Delegation to 
the Protocol's Meeting of the Parties this December to actively 
seek adoption of a decision which incorporates the essential 
use criteria contained in the revised July decision, which 
adheres to a timely phase-out of new CFC MDIs, and which 
retains the ability of FDA to protect the health and safety of 
U.S. citizens. The conferees further urge EPA to work with FDA 
on any final Protocol decision.
      The conferees note that EPA's plans to promulgate a 
regulation pertaining to radon in drinking water have 
significant financial implications for states and local water 
districts across the United States. The conferees believe it is 
important that the Agency obtain cost data prior to finalizing 
such a rule. In this regard, the General Accounting Office is 
directed to study the financial impacts of the proposed EPA 
regulation and submit the report expeditiously to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate. Prior to 
finalizing this rule, the Agency is strongly encouraged to 
consider fully the GAO's findings.
      The conferees note with disappointment that the Agency 
has not solicited public comment regarding scientific community 
recommendations for exemptions from the 1994 proposed rule 
regarding so-called ``plant pesticides.'' The conferees urge 
EPA to solicit and consider public comment regarding such 
recommendations before completion of the ``plant pesticide'' 
rulemaking. EPA's failure to consider such exemptions timely is 
not a basis for promulgation of an over-reaching final rule.
      The conferees fully expect the Agency to follow through 
on its current commitment to the Sustainable Industry program. 
The program's success thus far with the metal finishing 
industry has focused on collaboration rather than confrontation 
with industry, improved EPA understanding of industry 
practices, and achieving better environmental results from 
companies in tandem with concrete improvements to the 
regulatory system. The Agency is encouraged to provide 
resources at the fiscal year 1999 level in order to support 
necessary personnel, outreach, grants, and EPA regional 
capacity for continued progress with the metal finishing 
industry and other key participating sectors, including 
specialty chemicals, meat processing, metal casting, 
shipbuilding and repair, photo processing, and travel and 
tourism.
      The conferees are concerned that EPA has not submitted 
for independent peer review the Agency's application of the 
persistent, bioaccumulative toxicants (PBT) criteria and 
methodology to metals as utilized in various Agency programs 
and proposed regulations. Serious doubts about the scientific 
validity of applying PBT criteria and methodology to metals 
have been expressed by international scientific bodies, invited 
experts at a January 2000 public workshop co-sponsored by EPA, 
and EPA's Science Advisory Board (SAB). In May 2000, the SAB 
noted that ``classification of metals as PBTs is problematic, 
since their environmental fate and transport cannot be 
adequately described using models for organic contaminants.'' 
Therefore, the conferees urge EPA to seek independent peer 
review and refer to the SAB the question of the scientific 
appropriateness of applying PBT criteria and methodology to 
metals before any application of the PBT criteria and 
methodology to metals.
      The EPA has proposed to redesignate the San Joaquin 
Valley Ozone Nonattainment area from ``serious'' to ``severe'' 
nonattainment. The conferees note that the East Kern County 
portion of this area is geographically separated from the San 
Joaquin Valley air basin and in itself may not warrant a 
reclassification and may not contribute to the ozone 
nonattainment in the San Joaquin Valley. The conferees also 
note that within the East Kern County area are two defense 
installations pursuing vital defense programs and a NASA 
laboratory conducting advanced aerospace research which could 
be hampered seriously by reclassification. In view of this the 
Administrator is strongly encouraged to exclude the East Kern 
County area from the San Joaquin area redesignation.
      The conferees continue to be concerned with EPA's chosen 
preferred alternative for constructing secondary treatment 
facilities at the USIWTP near San Diego. The conferees are 
aware of EPA's request to raise the existing cap on 
construction spending at the IWTP in order to build 25 mgd of 
secondary ponds at the IWTP with previously appropriated monies 
in the BEIF. The conferees are also aware of the significant 
concerns which exist regarding the limited capacity of EPA's 
preferred alternative, the lack of available land on which 
future capacity could be constructed, and its inadequacy in 
addressing increasing future cross-border sewage flows in the 
region. Finally, the conferees note there is at least one 
private sector proposal to construct in Mexico similar 
secondary facilities which would have considerably greater 
potential capacity better suited to the long term sewage 
treatment needs of the rapidly growing border region.
      The conferees are encouraged by the progress of separate 
authorizing legislation now pending before the Congress which 
would facilitate such a proposal, as well as the growing level 
of documented support for such a proposal by Mexican leaders. 
The conferees thus continue to believe that it would be 
inappropriate to lift the cap at this time or to permit 
construction of a limited capacity secondary treatment facility 
at the IWTP which would not meet long-term sewage treatment 
needs. The conferees urge EPA to continue working with the 
IBWC, State Department, and its counterparts in Mexico to 
encourage and develop such a viable proposal in a timely 
manner.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

      Appropriates $34,094,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General as proposed by the Senate instead of $34,000,000 as 
proposed by the House. In addition to this appropriation, 
$11,500,000 is available to the OIG by transfer from the 
Hazardous Substance Superfund account.

                        BUILDINGS AND FACILITIES

      Appropriates $23,931,000 for buildings and facilities as 
proposed by the House instead of $23,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.

                     HAZARDOUS SUBSTANCE SUPERFUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $1,270,000,000 for hazardous substance 
superfund as proposed by the House instead of $1,400,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Bill language provides that 
$635,000,000 of the appropriated amount is to be derived from 
the Superfund Trust Fund, while the remaining $635,000,000 is 
to be derived from General Revenues of the Treasury. Additional 
language (1) provides for a transfer of $11,500,000 to the 
Office of Inspector General; (2) provides for a transfer of 
$36,500,000 to the Science and Technology account; and (3) 
provides that $100,000,000 of the appropriated amount shall not 
become available for obligation until September 1, 2001.
      The conferees note that funds for the Agency for Toxic 
Substances and Disease Registry and for the National Institute 
of Environmental Health Sciences have been provided in new, 
separate accounts elsewhere in this Act instead of through the 
Environmental Protection Agency as has been done in previous 
years.
      The conferees have agreed to the following fiscal year 
2001 funding levels:
      1. $914,800,000 for Superfund response/cleanup actions.
      2. $140,000,000 for enforcement activities.
      3. $139,500,000 for management and support. Of this 
amount, $11,500,000 is to be provided by transfer to the Office 
of Inspector General.
      4. $36,500,000 for research and development activities, 
to be transferred to the Science and Technology account.
      5. $39,200,000 for reimbursable interagency activities, 
including $28,500,000 for the Department of Justice, $650,000 
for OSHA, $1,100,000 for FEMA, $2,450,000 for NOAA, $5,500,000 
for the Coast Guard, and $1,000,000 for the Department of the 
Interior.
      6. The Brownfields program has been funded at the budget 
request level of $91,600,000, which includes funding from 
various programs within this account and the Environmental 
Programs and Management account.
      The Agency is directed to notify the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House and Senate of any non-ATSDR 
resources to be devoted to the Libby, Montana medical 
monitoring program and related activities.
      The conferees remain concerned regarding the Agency's 
plans to conduct certain dredging or invasive remediation 
technology activities while these matters remain under study by 
the National Academy of Sciences (NAS). The pending NAS study 
is addressing dredging, capping, source control, natural 
recovery, and disposal of contaminated sediments, and is 
comparing the risks of each technology. The NAS expects to 
submit its draft report of this study during Fall 2000 and the 
conferees strongly encourage the NAS to issue a final report no 
later than January 1, 2001. Accordingly, the conferees continue 
to direct the EPA to take no action to initiate or order the 
use of dredging or invasive remedial technologies where a final 
plan has not been adopted prior to October 1, 2000 or where 
such activities are not now occuring until the NAS report has 
been completed and its findings have been properly considered 
by the Agency. As in previous years, exceptions are provided 
for voluntary agreements and for urgent cases where 
contaminated sediment poses a significant threat to public 
health.
      In adopting this direction to the Agency, the conferees 
do not intend to prevent EPA from publishing, issuing, or 
taking public comment on specific proposed or draft remediation 
plans; but do encourage the Agency to take into account the NAS 
study when available as it goes through the above process. 
However, any such plans are not to be finalized until June 30, 
2001 or until the Agency has properly considered the NAS 
report, whichever comes first.

                LEAKING UNDERGROUND STORAGE TANK PROGRAM

      Appropriates $72,096,000 for the leaking underground 
storage tank program as provided by the Senate instead of 
$79,000,000 as proposed by the House.

                           OIL SPILL RESPONSE

      Appropriates $15,000,000 for oil spill response as 
provided by both the House and the Senate.

                   STATE AND TRIBAL ASSISTANCE GRANTS

      Appropriates $3,628,740,000 for state and tribal 
assistance grants instead of $3,176,957,000 as proposed by the 
House and $3,320,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Bill 
language specifically provides $1,350,000,000 for Clean Water 
State Revolving Fund (SRF) capitalization grants, $825,000,000 
for Safe Drinking Water SRF capitalization grants, $75,000,000 
for the United States-Mexico Border program, $35,000,000 for 
grants to address drinking water and wastewater infrastructure 
needs in rural and native Alaska, $1,008,000,000 for 
categorical grants to the states and tribes, and $335,740,000 
for grants for construction of water and wastewater treatment 
facilities and for groundwater protection infrastructure.
      The conferees have included bill language which, for 
fiscal year 2001 only, authorizes the Administrator of the EPA 
to use funds appropriated under section 319 of the Federal 
Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA) to make grants to Indian 
tribes pursuant to section 319(h) and 518(e) of FWPCA. In 
addition, bill language has been adopted by the conferees to 
permit states to include as principal amounts considered to be 
the cost of administering SRF loans to eligible borrowers, with 
certain limitations.
      The conferees have further agreed to include bill 
language which resolves in favor of the grantee two disputed 
grants, docket numbers C-180840-01, C-180840-04, C-470319-03, 
and C-470319-04; as well as language carried in previous years' 
Acts which stipulates that none of the funds in this or any 
previous Act may be used by the Administrator for health 
effects studies on drinking water contaminants. As in past 
years, funds for such studies have been provided in other EPA 
accounts. In addition, language requested in the budget 
submission has been included which permits the Administrator to 
reserve up to 1\1/2\ percent of the funds appropriated for the 
SRF under Title VI of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act 
for grants under section 518(c) of the Act.
      Finally, the conferees have included language which 
stipulates that no funds provided in this Act to address water 
infrastructure needs of colonias within the United States along 
the U.S.-Mexico border shall be made available after June 1, 
2001 unless the receiving governmental entity has established 
an enforceable ordinance or rule which prevents the development 
or construction of any additional colonia areas, or the 
development within an existing colonia of any new home, 
business, or other structure which lacks water, wastewater or 
other necessary infrastructure.
      Of the funds provided for the United States-Mexico Border 
Program, $3,500,000 is for the El Paso-Las Cruces sustainable 
water project, $2,000,000 is for the Brownsville, Texas water 
supply project, $1,000,000 is for the Del Rio/San Felipe 
Springs Water Treatment Plant, and $3,000,000 is for upgrades 
and expansion of the Nogales International Waste Treatment 
Plant, replacement of the International Outfall Interceptor, 
and replacement of sewer infrastructure facilities of the City 
of Nogales. Of the funds provided for rural and Alaska Native 
villages, $2,000,000 is for training and technical assistance. 
The State of Alaska must also provide a 25 percent match for 
all expenditures through this program.
      The conferees agree that the $335,740,000 provided to 
communities or other entities for construction of water and 
wastewater treatment facilities and for groundwater protection 
infrastructure shall be accompanied by a cost-share requirement 
whereby 45 percent of a project's cost is to be the 
responsibility of the community or entity consistent with long-
standing guidelines of the Agency. These guidelines also offer 
flexibility in the application of the cost-share requirement 
for those few circumstances when meeting the 45 percent 
requirement is not possible. The Agency is commended for its 
past efforts in working with communities and other entities to 
resolve problems in this regard, and the conferees expect this 
level of effort and flexibility to continue throughout fiscal 
year 2001. The distribution of funds under this program is as 
follows:
      1. $2,100,000 for the Jasper, Alabama sewer extension 
project.
      2. $900,000 for the Scottsboro, Alabama drinking water 
project.
      3. $3,000,000 for the Thomasville, Alabama water facility 
project.
      4. $350,000 to Winfield, Alabama for sewer infrastructure 
improvements near the Corridor X highway.
      5. $350,000 to Hamilton, Alabama for water and sewer 
infrastructure improvements.
      6. $1,000,000 to Cullman County, Alabama for a water 
infrastructure improvements.
      7. $150,000 to the Fayett County Water Board in Alabama 
for drinking water system enhancements.
      8. $60,000 to Winston County, Alabama to complete Phase I 
of the Houston-Moreland water project.
      9. $1,000,000 to Shelby County, Alabama for water 
infrastructure improvements.
      10. $1,000,000 to the City of Huntsville, Alabama for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      11. $1,000,000 to the City of Hartselle, Alabama for 
wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      12. $1,000,000 to Morgan County, Alabama for wastewater 
infrastructure improvements at the Sherbrooke Sanitary Sewer 
System.
      13. $500,000 to the Limestone County Water and Sewer 
Authority in Alabama for wastewater infrastructure 
improvements.
      14. $250,000 to the City of Rogersville, Alabama for 
wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      15. $250,000 the City of Triana, Alabama for wastewater 
infrastructure improvements.
      16. $3,000,000 for the State of Alaska Department of 
Environmental Conservation groundwater remediation project near 
the Kenai River. The match requirement can be met with non-
Federally funded pre-award expenditures by the State of Alaska 
for this project.
      17. $2,200,000 for water and sewer improvements in the 
North Star Borough, Alaska.
      18. $1,100,000 for water and sewer improvements in 
Whittier, Alaska.
      19. $2,200,000 for water and sewer improvements in Sitka, 
Alaska.
      20. $2,500,000 for the Water Infrastructure Finance 
Authority of Arizona (WIFA) for a loan to Pima County, Arizona 
for wastewater treatment facility improvements. WIFA may lend 
the funds directly to Pima County or use the funds to support 
bonds to fund loans to Pima County and other Arizona 
communities on Arizona's SRF priority list. Pima County and 
other benefiting communities, if any, shall repay loans to 
Arizona's SRF.
      21. $750,000 to Gila County, Arizona for water 
infrastructure improvements in the Kellner and Ice House Canyon 
areas.
      22. $450,000 to Barling, Arkansas for water 
infrastructure development and engineering studies for future 
water and sewer improvements.
      23. $2,000,000 to San Diego, California for the Coastal 
Low Flow Storm Drain Diversion Project.
      24. $1,500,000 to the Mission Springs Water District in 
California to protect groundwater in the City of Desert Hot 
Springs.
      25. $2,650,000 to Olivenhain Municipal Water District in 
California for continued construction of a water treatment 
plant.
      26. $1,000,000 for the Cutler-Orosi Wastewater JPA for a 
wastewater treatment plant serving Cutler, Orosi, East Orosi, 
and Sultana, California.
      27. $1,000,000 for wastewater infrastructure improvements 
at the Placer County, California Subregional Wastewater 
Treatment Plant.
      28. $1,900,000 to the Metropolitan Water District of 
Southern California for the Desalination Research and 
Innovation Partnership.
      29. $1,500,000 to Lomita, California to upgrade water 
reservoir infrastructure.
      30. $600,000 for the continuation of a water reuse 
nitrate treatment demonstration project in Yucca Valley, 
California.
      31. $500,000 for continuation of water infrastructure 
improvements in Twentynine Palms, California.
      32. $850,000 for the continuation of water infrastructure 
improvements in the Yucaipa Valley Water District in Yucaipa, 
California.
      33. $1,300,000 for the Lower Owens River Project in Inyo 
County, California ($900,000) and in the City of Los Angeles 
($400,000).
      34. $500,000 for storm and wastewater drainage and 
infrastructure improvements in the City of Yucaipa, California 

      35. $1,000,000 to San Clemente, California for the storm 
drainage management and pilot program implementation.
      36. $1,750,000 to Carlsbad, California for the Encina 
Basin Recycled Water System.
      37. $1,000,000 to San Joaquin County, California to 
rehabilitate water, sewer, storm drains, and surface 
infrastructure in East Stockton.
      38. $1,250,000 to Huntington Beach, California for 
wastewater and sewer infrastructure improvements.
      39. $1,000,000 for the City of Sacramento, California 
combined sewer overflow project.
      40. $1,000,000 for the City of Vallejo, California for a 
sanitary sewer system at Mare Island.
      41. $100,000 for wastewater and groundwater 
infrastructure improvements in Murrieta, California.
      42. $500,000 for Eureka, California for work on the 
Martin Slough Interceptor.
      43. $2,000,000 for the City of Montrose, Colorado sewage 
treatment upgrade.
      44. $1,500,000 for the New Britain Water Department in 
Connecticut for wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      45. $1,000,000 to the Council of Governments of the 
Central Naugatuck Valley, Connecticut for water and sewer 
improvements in the Naugatuck Valley.
      46. $1,000,000 to Lewes, Delaware to construct pump 
stations, force mains, storage lagoons and spray irrigation 
facility.
      47. $1,200,000 for the West Rehoboth Expansion of the 
Dewey Beach Sanitary District, Delaware.
      48. $15,000,000 to the Florida Department of 
Environmental Protection for the Tampa Bay, Florida regional 
reservoir infrastructure project.
      49. $1,700,000 to the City of Tallahassee, Florida for 
improvements to the stormwater drainage system.
      50. $900,000 to the City of West Palm Beach, Florida for 
completion of wetlands-based indirect potable water and 
wastewater reuse program.
      51. $1,325,000 to the City of Opa-locka, Florida for 
wastewater and sewer infrastructure improvements.
      52. $2,325,000 to the City of North Miami Beach, Florida 
for wastewater and sewer infrastructure improvements in the 
Highland Village Neighborhood.
      53. $1,500,000 to Sarasota Bay, Florida for wastewater 
infrastructure improvements necessary to reduce effluent 
discharge into the Bay.
      54. $1,000,000 to the Escambia County Utilities Authority 
in Florida for extension of the sanitary sewer collection 
system.
      55. $1,500,000 for the Homosassa Regional Wastewater 
Project in Citrus County, Florida.
      56. $1,000,000 to Paulding County, Georgia for the 
Richland Creek Reservoir Project.
      57. $1,000,000 to the City of Roswell, Georgia for 
infrastructure development and improvements of the Big Creek 
Watershed Demonstration Project.
      58. $700,000 to the Toombs County Development Authority 
in Georgia to provide water and wastewater infrastructure 
improvements.
      59. $1,900,000 to Big Haynes Creek, Georgia for continued 
work on the basin stormwater retention and reuse project.
      60. $500,000 for the Waimea Wastewater Treatment Plant 
Interim Expansion in the County of Kauai, Hawaii.
      61. $1,000,000 for Burley, Idaho sewer system improvement 
project.
      62. $2,300,000 for Granite Reeder, Idaho Water and Sewer 
District sewer system construction.
      63. $1,500,000 for the McCall, Idaho water plant 
improvement project.
      64. $500,000 to Burley, Idaho for water and wastewater 
infrastructure improvements.
      65. $750,000 to the City of Hailey, Idaho for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      66. $750,000 to the City of Glenns Ferry, Idaho for the 
Glenns Ferry Water Improvement Project.
      67. $500,000 to Burr Ridge, Illinois for a sanitary sewer 
improvement project.
      68. $400,000 to Earlville, Illinois for a new wastewater 
treatment facility.
      69. $250,000 to Maple Park, Illinois for wastewater 
infrastructure improvements.
      70. $1,750,000 to North Aurora, Illinois for construction 
of water treatment and wastewater treatment facilities.
      71. $1,000,000 to West Chicago, Illinois for construction 
of water treatment and wastewater treatment facilities.
      72. $1,750,000 to Dixon, Illinois for construction of 
water treatment and wastewater treatment facilities.
      73. $1,900,000 to Bloomington, Illinois for construction 
of water treatment and wastewater treatment facilities.
      74. $350,000 to DuPage County, Illinois for the Village 
of Bensenville and the City of Wood Dale water and wastewater 
infrastructure improvements.
      75. $1,400,000 to Prospect Heights, Illinois for 
construction of a new drinking water conveyance system.
      76. $1,000,000 for the Village of Johnsburg, Illinois 
wastewater treatment project.
      77. $3,440,000 to the Metropolitan Water Reclamation 
District in Chicago, Illinois for continued development of the 
tunnel and reservoir project (TARP).
      78. $550,000 to the City of Liberty, Indiana for the 
Waterworks System Improvement Project.
      79. $1,000,000 to Evansville, Indiana for infrastructure 
development of the Pigeon Creek Enhancement project.
      80. $1,000,000 to West Lafayette, Indiana for 
infrastructure improvements associated with the development of 
a new business district.
      81. $1,000,000 to Mason City, Iowa for construction of a 
new water treatment facility.
      82. $3,250,000 for Clinton, Iowa to separate storm and 
sewage systems.
      83. $2,000,000 to Wichita, Kansas for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      84. $500,000 to Clark County, Kentucky for the WMU head 
works facility.
      85. $500,000 to upgrade the wastewater infrastructure 
facilities in Cynthiana, Harrison County, Kentucky.
      86. $300,000 to the Bluegrass Area Development District 
in Kentucky for a regional water treatment feasibility study.
      87. $200,000 to Scott County, Kentucky for construction 
of a water tower.
      88. $500,000 to Madison County, Kentucky for sewer 
infrastructure improvements.
      89. $100,000 to Mercer County, Kentucky for drinking 
water system enhancements.
      90. $500,000 to the East Casey County Water District, 
Kentucky for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      91. $1,000,000 for the Northern Kentucky Area Development 
District for the expansion of the Carrollton, Kentucky Regional 
Wastewater Treatment Plant.
      92. $1,000,000 to Pike County, Kentucky for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      93. $1,000,000 to Lawrence County, Kentucky for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      94. $400,000 to Christian County, Kentucky for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      95. $300,000 to the Crittenden-Livingston Regional Water 
System in Kentucky for the improvement of water distribution 
facilities.
      96. $400,000 to Madisonville, Kentucky for sewer system 
improvements.
      97. $300,000 to Centertown, Kentucky for sewer system 
improvements.
      98. $3,000,000 for Logan/Todd, Kentucky Regional Water 
Commission for water system improvements.
      99. $1,000,000 to the City of Monroe, Louisiana for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      100. $800,000 to the East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana 
for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      101. $600,000 to the Town of Livingston, Louisiana to 
expand the town's water system.
      102. $100,000 to Iberville Parish, Louisiana for water 
and sewer infrastructure improvements.
      103. $1,000,000 to Shreveport, Louisiana to address 
infrastructure and storage problems affecting water quality as 
identified in a recent study.
      104. $1,400,000 to St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      105. $1,200,000 to Iberia Parish, Louisiana for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements in the City of Iberia 
($1,000,000) and to the City of Jeanerette ($200,000).
      106. $100,000 to St. John Parish, Louisiana for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      107. $50,000 to Ascension Parish, Louisiana for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      108. $100,000 to Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      109. $1,000,000 for the Corinna, Maine sewer upgrade.
      110. $4,600,000 for biological nutrient removal on the 
eastern shore of Maryland, including $2,000,000 to the City of 
Crisfield; $1,800,000 for the City of Fruitland; and $800,000 
for the Somerset County Sanitary District for Princess Anne.
      111. $2,000,000 for Bristol County, Massachusetts, 
wastewater projects.
      112. $1,000,000 for the Massachusetts Water Resources 
Authority's combined sewer overflow control plan.
      113. $1,000,000 for water and wastewater infrastructure 
improvements in Taunton, Massachusetts.
      114. $2,000,000 for St. Clair Shores, Michigan combined 
sewer overflow correction project.
      115. $1,000,000 to Bad Axe, Michigan for continued 
drinking water infrastructure improvements.
      116. $1,500,000 to Port Huron, Michigan for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      117. $500,000 to Mt. Clemens, Michigan for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      118. $1,000,000 to Higgins Lake, Michigan for a 
wastewater treatment program.
      119. $1,500,000 to Grand Rapids, Michigan for combined 
sewer overflow infrastructure improvements for the National 
Pollutant Discharge Elimination System.
      120. $2,000,000 for continuation of the Rouge River 
National Wet Weather Demonstration Project.
      121. $800,000 to Oakland County, Michigan for 
infrastructure improvements within the George W. Kuhn Drainage 
District.
      122. $1,000,000 for water system infrastructure 
improvements in Jackson, Mississippi.
      123. $1,500,000 to the City of Picayune, Mississippi for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      124. $1,300,000 to Tupelo, Mississippi for water 
infrastructure needs.
      125. $3,000,000 for the DeSoto County, Mississippi 
comprehensive water and wastewater management project.
      126. $1,000,000 for the City of Pearl, Mississippi 
wastewater collection rehabilitation.
      127. $3,000,000 for Jefferson County, Mississippi water 
and sewer infrastructure needs.
      128. $1,000,000 for West Rankin Metropolitan Sewer 
Authority to develop alternative water and wastewater systems 
for Rankin County, Mississippi.
      129. $6,500,000 for St. Louis and Kansas City, Missouri 
for the Meramec River enhancement and wetlands protection 
project ($3,500,000) and the Central Industrial District 
wastewater project ($3,000,000).
      130. $100,000 for Allendale, Missouri wastewater 
infrastructure improvements.
      131. $900,000 for Nodaway County, Missouri wastewater 
needs, including the communities of Pickering and Ravenwood.
      132. $500,000 to Holt County, Missouri for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements including the 
communities of Mound City and Craig.
      133. $2,000,000 to Jefferson County, Missouri for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      134. $700,000 to the City of Byrnes Mill, Missouri for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      135. $3,000,000 for the Lockwood, Montana wastewater 
collection system and wastewater treatment and disposal system.
      136. $2,000,000 for the City of Belgrade, Montana 
wastewater collection, treatment and disposal system.
      137. $1,000,000 for West Valley, Montana water and sewer 
development.
      138. $1,000,000 for water and wastewater infrastructure 
needs of the Moapa Valley, Nevada Water District.
      139. $1,000,000 to Omaha, Nebraska for combined sewer 
overflow infrastructure improvements.
      140. $2,000,000 to Nashua, New Hampshire for combined 
sewer overflow infrastructure improvements.
      141. $300,000 for Lebanon, New Hampshire combined sewer 
overflow elimination project.
      142. $400,000 for the Newmarket, New Hampshire outflow 
discharge pipe.
      143. $2,000,000 for the Berlin, New Hampshire water works 
improvement project.
      144. $1,500,000 for the City of Elizabeth, New Jersey 
combined sewer overflow abatement project.
      145. $1,500,000 for the City of Carteret, New Jersey 
combined sewer overflow improvements.
      146. $2,500,000 to the Musconetcong Sewerage Authority in 
New Jersey to assist the plant in accommodating sewage from 
Hopatcong and Jefferson Township.
      147. $800,000 to the Ocean County Utilities Authority in 
New Jersey for reimbursement of the completed Crestwood 
Interceptor project.
      148. $1,700,000 to Las Cruces, New Mexico for 
improvements to the wastewater collection and treatment 
facilities.
      149. $500,000 to Village Bosque Farms, New Mexico for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      150. $1,000,000 to Silver City, New Mexico for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      151. $4,380,000 for North and South Valley of the City of 
Albuquerque and the county of Bernalillo, New Mexico regional 
water and wastewater system improvements.
      152. $990,000 for Corrales, New Mexico centralized water 
and wastewater treatment system.
      153. $830,000 for Los Lunas, New Mexico wastewater system 
upgrade.
      154. $750,000 for Clovis, New Mexico wastewater treatment 
system repair.
      155. $750,000 to the Village of Morrisville, New York for 
the construction of a wastewater treatment system.
      156. $1,400,000 to Genesee County, New York for Phase I 
of the Public Water Supply Program.
      157. $14,000,000 for continued clean water improvements 
for Onondaga Lake, New York.
      158. $2,500,000 to the City of Auburn, New York for the 
Auburn Municipal Water Filtration Plant and Water Reservoir.
      159. $3,000,000 to Wayne County, New York for Phase I of 
the Wayne County wastewater treatment facility improvements.
      160. $500,000 to Onondaga County, New York for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements in the Village of Minoa.
      161. $350,000 to Onondaga County, New York for drainage 
improvements in the Town of Onondaga for Nedrow.
      162. $300,000 to Onondaga County, New York for drainage 
improvements in the Village of Marcellus.
      163. $500,000 to the Town of Clarence, New York for 
construction of a sanitary sewer system.
      164. $300,000 to the Village of McGraw, New York for the 
replacement of a water storage tank.
      165. $8,000,000 for drinking water infrastructure needs 
in the New York City Watershed.
      166. $1,350,000 for extension and construction of water 
infrastructure in Union County, North Carolina.
      167. $650,000 for water and wastewater infrastructure 
improvements in Stanly County, North Carolina.
      168. $2,000,000 to the North Carolina Rural Economic 
Development Center for water and wastewater treatment planning.
      169. $1,500,000 to Henderson County, North Carolina for 
sewer line connections and improvements.
      170. $1,000,000 to Rosman, North Carolina for facility 
repairs to the current wastewater treatment facility and 
engineering plans for a new facility.
      171. $500,000 to Rutherford County, North Carolina for 
repairs to water and sewer lines in Lake Lure, Spindale and 
Chimney Rock, North Carolina.
      172. $3,000,000 for Grand Forks, North Dakota water 
treatment plant.
      173. $1,800,000 to the City of Toledo, Ohio for Secor 
Garden infrastructure improvements ($1,400,000) and for Erie 
Street Market water and wastewater infrastructure improvements 
($400,000).
      174. $300,000 to the City of Oregon, Ohio for extension 
of water and wastewater infrastructure.
      175. $300,000 to Lucas County, Ohio for the Jerusalem 
Township water and wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      176. $200,000 to Swanton Township, Ohio for the 
Bittersweet Farms/Camp Courageous Infrastructure project.
      177. $75,000 to Fulton County, Ohio for the Village of 
Lyons Sanitary Sewer Project.
      178. $825,000 to Wood County Regional Water and Sewer 
District in Ohio for the Owens-Walbridge-Plumey Roads Sanitary 
Sewer Project ($325,000); for the Village of Millbury 
Infiltration Inflow project ($250,000); and for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements in the Village of 
Walbridge ($250,000).
      179. $1,650,000 for the Doan Brook Watershed Area in Ohio 
for continued development of a storm water abatement system.
      180. $1,500,000 to Beach City, Ohio for a wastewater 
infrastructure improvement project.
      181. $2,875,000 for Dunlap Reservoir and related 
infrastructure upgrades, and phase I and II wastewater 
treatment plant improvements for the city of Washington Court 
House, Ohio.
      182. $875,000 for sewer infrastructure upgrades for the 
villages of DeGraff and Quincy, Ohio.
      183. $250,000 for water and sewer infrastructure upgrades 
for the City of Springfield, Ohio.
      184. $1,650,000 to Norman, Oklahoma for expanding 
existing wastewater treatment facilities.
      185. $1,000,000 to Hood River, Oregon for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      186. $750,000 to Hermitage, Pennsylvania for the Pine 
Hollow Pump Station upgrade and forcemain replacement.
      187. $750,000 to Sharon, Pennsylvania for storm and 
sanitary sewer projects repairs.
      188. $1,000,000 to Washington County, Pennsylvania for 
construction of wastewater infrastructure improvements in Cecil 
Township.
      189. $2,000,000 to Lincoln Township in Somerset County, 
Pennsylvania for water and wastewater infrastructure 
improvements.
      190. $500,000 to Monroe County, Pennsylvania for sewer 
and water infrastructure improvements.
      191. $500,000 to Wayne County, Pennsylvania to upgrade 
and renovate a sewer system in the Borough of Honesdale.
      192. $1,000,000 to Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania for 
upgrade of combined sewer overflow system for the Borough of 
Moosic ($500,000) and the Borough of Archbald ($500,000).
      193. $450,000 for water and wastewater infrastructure 
improvements in Sandy Township, Clearfield County, 
Pennsylvania.
      194. $450,000 to Blair County, Pennsylvania for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements in Logan Township.
      195. $450,000 to the Clearfield Municipal Authority in 
Clearfield County, Pennsylvania for water and wastewater 
infrastructure improvements.
      196. $450,000 to the Bear Valley, Franklin County, 
Pennsylvania Joint Authority for water and wastewater 
infrastructure improvements.
      197. $450,000 to Mifflin County, Pennsylvania for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements in Lewistown 
Borough.
      198. $450,000 to the Bedford Township Municipal Authority 
in Bedford County, Pennsylvania for water and wastewater 
infrastructure improvements.
      199. $1,000,000 for the Springettsbury, Pennsylvania 
regional sewer project.
      200. $5,000,000 for the Three Rivers Wet Weather 
Demonstration project, Allegheny County, Pennsylvania.
      201. $750,000 for the Pawtucket, Rhode Island water 
treatment plant construction.
      202. $1,000,000 to the Narragansett Bay Commission of 
Rhode Island for the combined sewer overflow control project.
      203. $900,000 to the West Georgetown, South Carolina 
County Regional Wastewater Treatment System for construction of 
a wastewater interceptor transmission system.
      204. $1,000,000 for the City of Florence, South Carolina 
for water and wastewater infrastructure.
      205. $500,000 for Branchville, South Carolina water 
distribution system.
      206. $1,000,000 for the City of York, South Carolina 
water treatment plant upgrade.
      207. $500,000 for the City of Alcester, South Dakota for 
a wastewater treatment facility.
      208. $3,000,000 for Rapid City, South Dakota to upgrade 
its water reclamation facility.
      209. $4,000,000 for the City of Huron, South Dakota to 
upgrade its water treatment facility.
      210. $1,000,000 to Athens, Tennessee for storm sewer 
reconstruction and improvements to the drainage basin.
      211. $500,000 to Clinton, Tennessee for engineering study 
and design to address water and wastewater system flooding 
problems.
      212. $1,000,000 to Oak Ridge, Tennessee for the extension 
of water and sewer infrastructure.
      213. $1,000,000 to Sequatchie County, Tennessee for 
waterline infrastructure improvements.
      214. $1,000,000 to the City of Meridian, Texas for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements.
      215. $1,000,000 for the City of Abilene, Texas water 
treatment facility.
      216. $1,750,000 to Grand Water and Sewer Service Agency 
in Utah for the extension of water and sewer lines to Arches 
National Park.
      217. $2,000,000 for Ogden, Utah, water and sewer 
improvements.
      218. $4,000,000 for water and wastewater infrastructure 
improvements in Sandy City, Utah.
      219. $1,000,000 for Montgomery, Vermont wastewater 
demonstration project.
      220. $2,500,000 for the City of Pownal, Vermont 
wastewater treatment project.
      221. $2,000,000 to Richmond, Virginia for continued 
development of combined sewer overflow improvements.
      222. $2,000,000 to Lynchburg, Virginia for continued 
development of combined sewer overflow improvements.
      223. $1,000,000 to Tazewell County, Virginia for 
construction of a public wastewater system to serve Bluefield 
and Divides.
      224. $650,000 to the Smith Mountain Lake 4-H Education 
Center in Wirtz, Virginia for sewage treatment operation 
improvements.
      225. $2,000,000 to Henry County, Virginia for the Henry 
County City of Martinsville's water and sewer infrastructure 
improvements project.
      226. $250,000 to Buckley, Washington for water pipe 
replacement.
      227. $85,000 to the City of Carnation, Washington for the 
engineering and design of wastewater treatment plant and 
collection facilities.
      228. $3,000,000 for the City of Bremerton, Washington 
Callow 5 combined sewer overflow project.
      229. $600,000 for the Hoodsport Water System, Mason 
County, Washington drinking water system improvements.
      230. $2,000,000 for the Coulee Dam, Washington water 
infiltration system.
      231. $650,000 for the Cowen Public Service District to 
provide water and sewer to the proposed Cowen Industrial Park 
in Webster County, West Virginia.
      232. $10,200,000 to the Brooke County PSD, West Virginia 
for wastewater infrastructure needs in the Eldersville Road, 
Mahan's Lane and Bruin Drive areas.
      233. $3,200,000 to the City of Thomas, West Virginia for 
water infrastructure needs.
      234. $1,500,000 to Huntington, West Virginia for the 
Fourpole/Park Sewer project No. 1.
      235. $680,000 to the Lake Tomahawk Sanitary District, 
Wisconsin for repayment of debt on a water treatment conveyance 
project.
      236. $1,000,000 for Beloit, Wisconsin combined sewer 
overflow project.
      237. $3,000,000 for Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Metropolitan 
Sewerage District for continued renovations and repairs to the 
sewer system.
      The conferees have included bill language which allows 
the Administrator to use up to 3% of the appropriated amount of 
each above-listed project to administer the management and 
oversight of construction of such projects through contracts, 
allocation to the Corps of Engineers, or grants to the States.
      The conferees intend that the non-federal share of the 
cost of planning, design and construction of water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements in Bernalillo, New 
Mexico and in the North and South Valley areas of Albuquerque 
and Bernalillo County, New Mexico, may be paid in installments 
of any amount so long as the entire amount of the non-federal 
share is paid by the end of the 10-year project period, 
including fiscal year 2000. Bill language has been included 
regarding a grant provided in fiscal year 1999 for Cumberland, 
Maryland clarifying the intent of this grant.
      Of the amount provided for categorical grants, 
$209,000,000 is for State and local air assistance grants, 
including $8,000,000 for section 103 grants to the states to 
develop regional haze programs under title I, part C of the 
Clean Air Act. It is the intention of the conferees that these 
funds be used to aid states in the development of emissions 
inventories, quantification of natural visibility conditions, 
monitoring and other data necessary to define reasonable 
progress and develop control strategies, and to support the 
states' participation in regional efforts to coordinate their 
strategies, where necessary, and at the election of the 
individual states. The conferees have also provided 
$238,000,000 for section 319 non-point source pollution grants 
and $172,262,300 for section 106 pollution control grants to, 
among other things, assist the States in meeting the long-term 
needs of the TMDL program. Included in the total is $2,000,000 
for grants to coastal states as provided in Senate Report 106-
410.
      No funds have been provided for the new Great Lakes 
Initiative program, and funds for the Information Integration 
Initiative have been provided only in the Environmental 
Programs and Management account. Funds for the new Clean Air 
Partnership have not been provided by the conferees. 
Legislation proposed by the Agency to require a 40% cost-share 
for the section 106 grant program has not been approved by the 
conferees.
      In the interest of minimizing the need for additional 
administrative appeals, judicial review, and legislative 
remedies relative to EPA's construction grant program, the 
conferees direct EPA to resolve, equitably and as expeditiously 
as its resources will allow, grantee requests for review or 
waiver, audit resolutions, and appeals in accordance with a 
specific set of guidelines set forth on page 62 of House Report 
106-674. The conferees expect this process will eliminate the 
need for Congress to resolve specific audit disputes in the 
future.
      The conferees agree that, due to economic hardship, EPA 
should not apply the normal cost-share requirements to a grant 
provided for the Fancy Farm, Kentucky water system in Public 
Law 106-74.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

      The conferees have included an administrative provision 
which, for fiscal year 2001 and thereafter, provides that the 
obligated balances of sums available in multiple year 
appropriations accounts shall remain available through the 
seventh fiscal year after their period of availability has 
expired for liquidating obligations made during the period of 
availability.
      In addition, an administrative provision is included 
which stipulates that, for fiscal year 2001, the Administrator, 
in carrying out environmental programs required or authorized 
by law in the absence of an acceptable tribal program, may 
award cooperative agreements to federally-recognized tribes or 
duly authorized intertribal groups to assist the Administrator 
in implementing federal environmental programs for tribes 
required or authorized by law. Funds designated for State 
financial assistance agreements may not be used for such 
cooperative agreements.
      Finally, an administrative provision has been included 
which reinstates the 12-month grace period following 
designation for new nonattainment areas for the National 
Ambient Air Quality Standards originally contained in EPA 
conformity regulations.
      The conferees direct EPA to implement GPRA to the fullest 
extent possible. This includes defining its long-term strategic 
goals in terms of environmental, health, and other outcomes and 
tracking progress using appropriate outcomes measures. Such 
measures include indicators of health, ecology and welfare, 
exposure or body burden or uptake, ambient environmental 
conditions, discharges or emissions, and actions and/or 
responses by regulated parties.
      The conferees recognize that the Agency may not be able 
to establish nor measure all the appropriate outcome measures 
by the time of its first Strategic Plan revision after 2000. 
The conferees therefore direct the Agency to make significant 
progress in its first revision after 2000, and in subsequent 
revisions to the Strategic Plan. Further, the conferees call on 
the Agency to organize and present performance measures in a 
manner that makes appropriate use of performance information 
supplied by EPA regions and states.

                   Executive Office of The President

                OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY

      Appropriates $5,201,000 for the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$5,150,000 as proposed by the House.
      Public Law 105-261 transferred responsibility for 
satellite technology export licensing from the Department of 
Commerce to the Department of State as part of the 
International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR). An 
unfortunate and unintended consequence of that move has been 
that university-based fundamental science and engineering 
research, widely disseminated and unclassified, has become 
subject to overly restrictive and inconsistent ITAR direction. 
The result has been critical delays in NASA-funded research 
projects and has forced some universities to forgo 
participation in such projects. Such research traditionally has 
been excluded from export controls under the fundamental 
research exemption. The conferees find the current situation to 
be unacceptable and direct the Office of Science and Technology 
Policy to work jointly with the National Security Council, in 
consultation with the NASA Administrator and the Secretary of 
State, to expeditiously issue clarification of ITAR that 
ensures that university collaborations and personnel exchanges, 
which are vital to the continued success of federally-funded 
research, are allowed to continue as they had under the long-
standing fundamental research exception in the Export 
Administration Regulations, which had governed export controls 
over this technology when the Department of Commerce had 
jurisdiction over it. The conferees expect this review to be 
completed within 120 days of enactment of this Act. Upon the 
issuance of guidance, NASA shall ensure that university 
principal investigators are fully aware of their 
responsibilities.

  COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

      Appropriates $2,900,000 for the Council on Environmental 
Quality and the Office of Environmental Quality as proposed by 
the House and the Senate. The conferees have once again 
included bill language which prohibits CEQ from using funds 
other than those appropriated directly under this heading. The 
Council is expected to implement this provision in a manner 
consistent with its implementation during fiscal years 1998 and 
1999. Language has also been included again this year which, 
notwithstanding law, authorizes the Council to operate with one 
member, that member acting as chairman of the Council.

                 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $33,660,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General as proposed by the Senate instead of $33,661,000 as 
proposed by the House. Funds for this account are derived from 
the Bank Insurance Fund, the Savings and Loan Association 
Insurance Fund, and the FSLIC Resolution Fund, and are 
therefore not reflected in either the budget authority or 
budget outlay totals.

                  Federal Emergency Management Agency

                            DISASTER RELIEF

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $300,000,000 for disaster relief as proposed 
by both the House and the Senate. In addition, appropriates 
$1,300,000,000 in emergency funding for disaster relief instead 
of $2,609,220,000 as proposed by the Senate. The House had 
proposed no emergency funding. Retains language proposed by the 
Senate authorizing the transfer of $2,900,000 to EMPA for the 
consolidated emergency management performance grant, in lieu of 
$5,500,000 as proposed by the House.
      The conferees agree that up to $15,000,000 of the funds 
provided in this account may be used for flood map 
modernization activities in areas which receive Presidential 
disaster declarations, as proposed by the Senate. The House had 
proposed that $30,000,000 be transferred from this account to 
the Flood Map Modernization Fund for non-disaster and disaster-
related flood map modernization.
      The conferees do not agree with the House proposal to 
allow up to $50,000,000 of the disaster relief funds to be 
obligated for predisaster mitigation and repetitive loss 
property buyouts. The conferees have taken this action because 
additional funding was provided for buyouts and elevation of 
flood damaged properties as part of the fiscal year 2000 
supplemental and these funds are not required at this time.
      The conferees have agreed to include language in the bill 
making $3,000,000 from section 404 hazard mitigation grant 
funding available to the State of Florida hurricane mitigation 
initiative in Miami-Dade County, Florida. The conferees 
recognize that, in light of the devastation of Hurricanes 
Floyd, Irene, and Dennis to the Southeast United States, 
resources must be focused on mitigation activities because many 
communities are not adequately prepared to provide local 
emergency shelter for category 3 or higher hurricanes. To 
demonstrate the effectiveness of certain mitigation 
technologies, the conferees direct that a portion of the 
section 404 hazard mitigation grant funding available to the 
State of Florida be used for a pre-disaster hurricane 
mitigation program initiative in Miami-Dade County, Florida 
utilizing perforated metal technology employed in fixed, 
passive protection window applications as demonstrated through 
the Miami Wind Shutter Program.
      The conferees are not in agreement with regard to the 
issue of insurance requirements for public and non-profit 
buildings. While the goal of reducing Federal costs associated 
with natural disasters is shared by the conferees, there is not 
agreement on the best way to achieve that goal. The House 
continues to believe that FEMA must ensure that the concerns of 
all interested parties are taken into consideration and that a 
detailed cost-benefit analysis must be completed prior to 
finalizing any rule in this regard. The Senate continues to 
believe that all relevant information is in hand and that a 
final rule should be promulgated expeditiously. The conferees 
acknowledge their inability to resolve this issue and urge the 
Congress to address this issue as part of a comprehensive 
legislative package.

            DISASTER ASSISTANCE DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT

      The conferees agree to provide a limitation of 
$25,000,000 on direct loans, a cost of $1,678,000 for direct 
loans, and a limitation on administrative expenses of $427,000 
for the disaster assistance direct loan program account. The 
foregoing amounts are the same as proposed by the Senate. The 
House had proposed a limitation of $19,000,000 on direct loans, 
a cost of $1,295,000 for direct loans, and a limitation on 
administrative expenses of $420,000.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      Appropriates $215,000,000 for salaries and expenses as 
proposed by the Senate instead of $190,000,000 as proposed by 
the House.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

      Appropriates $10,000,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General as proposed by the Senate instead of $8,015,000 as 
proposed by the House. The conferees are in agreement that the 
FEMA Inspector General shall also serve as the Inspector 
General for the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board. 
In order to fulfill these additional duties, the conferees 
agree to provide the Inspector General with additional funds 
and anticipate that the duties will require an increase of 8 
FTE. To ensure the independence of the Office of Inspector 
General, funds are provided to enable the OIG to support its 
own administrative functions rather than relying on FEMA for 
support services such as budget and accounting, procurement and 
personnel.

              EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND ASSISTANCE

      Appropriates $269,652,000 for emergency management 
planning and assistance as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$267,000,000 as proposed by the House. The conferees agree to 
include bill language earmarking $25,000,000 of the funds 
provided in this account for pre-disaster mitigation activities 
as proposed by the Senate. The House had included authority to 
use disaster relief funds for this purpose, to be administered 
through the EMPA account.

                   EMERGENCY FOOD AND SHELTER PROGRAM

      Appropriates $140,000,000 for emergency food and shelter 
instead of $110,000,000 as proposed by both the House and 
Senate.

                      FLOOD MAP MODERNIZATION FUND

      Appropriates no funding for this activity in this 
account. The conferees have included authority within the 
disaster relief account to use up to $15,000,000 for post-
disaster flood map activities in areas which receive 
Presidential disaster declarations.

                     NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      The conferees agree to include bill language which 
authorizes the National Flood Insurance Program through 
December 31, 2001 instead of September 30, 2001 as proposed by 
the House and Senate. Without this authorization, new flood 
insurance policies could not be written throughout the fiscal 
year. In addition, the conferees direct FEMA to make $2,000,000 
available to the New York Department of Environmental 
Conservation for initiating the Statewide Flood Plain Mapping 
Program.

                     NATIONAL FLOOD MITIGATION FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Provides for the transfer of $20,000,000 from the 
National Flood Insurance Fund to the National Flood Mitigation 
Fund as proposed by both the House and Senate.

                    General Services Administration

                FEDERAL CONSUMER INFORMATION CENTER FUND

      Appropriates $7,122,000 for the Federal Consumer 
Information Fund as proposed by both the House and the Senate.

             National Aeronautics and Space Administration

      The conferees agree with the requirement of the Senate 
that NASA must articulate a comprehensive agenda and strategy 
through a strategic plan for each of NASA's primary centers 
that links staffing, funding resources, mission activities and 
core competencies in a manner that will ensure each primary 
center will be vested with specific responsibilities and 
activities. Within each plan, NASA should identify where a 
center has or is expected to develop the same or similar 
expertise and capacity as another center, including the 
justification for this need. The plan should also include a 
specific 10-year profile of flight mission elements. This 
profile should identify the primary NASA center responsible for 
each flight's mission management. The profile also should 
articulate clearly the criteria that is used and/or will be 
used to permit missions to be built intramurally, as well as 
the strategy for using industry and leading academic 
laboratories for mission development and execution. These plans 
are to be updated annually, with the first plan to be submitted 
to the Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate by 
July 31, 2001. For purposes of the foregoing reporting 
requirement, primary NASA centers shall include the nine 
centers and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory listed on page AS-21 
of the fiscal year 2001 budget submission.
      The conferees agree that information on the long-term 
consequences of reprogramming and operating plan actions should 
be made available to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House and Senate when requested. While the Senate had proposed 
making the information a requirement to be submitted with all 
reprogrammings and operating plans, the conferees recognize 
that this would be a burden on the agency when most of the 
changes are relatively minor in nature. The conferees expect 
NASA to be responsive whenever such an information request is 
made.
      The conferees agree that NASA should report annually on 
the issue of safeguarding sensitive technology as proposed by 
the Senate.
      The conferees agree that NASA should not be required to 
include an accounting of program reserves when addressing a 
program in the initial operating plan or subsequent operating 
plans. The conferees expect NASA to be able to provide this 
information when requested by the Committees on Appropriations.
      The conferees have agreed to delete the general 
provision, proposed by the House which would have terminated 
all NASA-Air Force joint aeronautics and space-related 
research.
      The conferees do not agree that NASA should conduct a 
joint study with the National Research Council and the National 
Academy of Public Administration on the research and analysis 
portions of NASA's programs. The conferees urge NASA to take 
actions to ensure that research and analysis funding is 
sufficient to support the goals of the various programs.
      Of the amounts approved in the following appropriations 
accounts, NASA must limit transfers of funds between programs 
and activities to not more than $500,000 without prior approval 
of the Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate. 
Further, no changes may be made to any account or program 
element if it is construed to be policy or a change in policy. 
Any activity or program cited in this report shall be construed 
as the position of the conferees and should not be subject to 
reductions or reprogramming without prior approval of the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate. Finally, 
it is the intent of the conferees that all carryover funds in 
the various appropriations accounts are subject to the normal 
reprogramming requirements outlined above.
      The conferees recognize that personnel management at an 
agency such as NASA is difficult and note that the Congress has 
provided authority in the past for NASA to offer incentives to 
employees as a way to reduce the agency's overall workforce. 
The challenge NASA now faces is to ensure that the proper skill 
mix is in place at the various NASA Centers. To accomplish this 
task, NASA has proposed a continuation of its current buyout 
authority with modifications which allow the agency to retain 
the same number of full-time equivalent personnel, while 
offering incentives to achieve a workforce reduction in skill 
areas where an excess exists. The conferees agree to provide 
NASA with this authority for two years and have included the 
necessary statutory authority as a general provision of the 
bill.
      The conferees agree to include the House provision on 
NASA full cost accounting instead of the Senate provision. The 
conferees remain concerned about the impact of full cost 
accounting on program and financial information that will be 
made available to the Congress through full cost accounting. If 
the program and financial information is determined to be 
inadequate, the conferees expect NASA to be able to address the 
concerns of the Congress. In addition, the conferees direct 
NASA to report to the Committees on Appropriations of the House 
and Senate on the status of any program or activity that has 
exceeded its budget plan by 15 percent. The report should be 
provided to the Committees within 15 days of the date on which 
NASA has determined that the budget overrun has occurred. This 
report shall include the reasons for the budget overrun 
including any proposals for the termination or restructuring of 
the program or activity and the related impact on the funding 
of other programs or activities.

                           HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT

      Appropriates $5,462,900,000 for Human Space Flight 
instead of $5,472,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$5,400,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The funding level 
arrived at for this account includes a reduction of $40,000,000 
as proposed by NASA to provide additional funding for the Mars 
2003 Lander program. This reduction includes $30,000,000 from 
shuttle reserves and $10,000,000 from the commercialization and 
technology program. Other adjustments follow.
      The conferees recognize that NASA is obligated to ensure 
the well-being of astronauts, who will build the International 
Space Station (ISS), and live and work there for increasingly 
longer periods of time. On-orbit stay times beyond 90 days will 
require implementation of countermeasures against the negative 
effects of space flight. The basic research and countermeasure 
development will be done using the ISS crew members as research 
subjects. This requires establishment of medical baselines 
prior to flight, close monitoring of in-flight changes to the 
baseline, including the beneficial impacts of the 
countermeasures, and post-flight monitoring throughout the 
rehabilitation process. A key objective of NASA's 
Bioastronautics Initiative is to re-focus existing NASA 
biomedical assets to accomplish this aim more effectively.
      The conferees understand that NASA has determined that 
the most effective approach to ensuring synergy between a 
strong research program and necessary astronaut clinical care 
is to construct a Bioastronautics Facility at the Johnson Space 
Center. The facility will be sited at NASA's Johnson Space 
Center because that is the living and working area of the 
astronaut corps and the medical support personnel. The facility 
will provide a necessary focal point for human health care 
delivery, research, and education for Space Medicine and 
Research. The research capabilities provided in this facility 
will be consistent with the NASA analysis of research 
requirements. This facility will enable access to all peer 
reviewed researchers, including universities across the 
country, NASA, NIH, and NSBRI, to carry out their science in a 
symbiotic laboratory setting and accomplish their goals.
      The conferees agree to provide $3,000,000 to complete the 
facility design effort, and that a design/build approach is 
being baselined to ensure timely completion of the facility. 
The conferees further understand that initial construction 
funding could be required in fiscal year 2001 if the design is 
completed as planned by mid-2001, and direct NASA to submit an 
Operating Plan notification to the Committees on Appropriations 
of the House and Senate at that time to identify construction 
funds within ISS resources.
      The conferees agree that NASA should develop a 10-year 
plan for all research efforts related to the International 
Space Station, including operational needs as proposed by the 
Senate. NASA is directed to submit this report to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate no later 
than April 15, 2001.
      The conferees do not agree with the Senate requirement 
for a blueprint plan that identifies lead and complimentary 
universities that will coordinate with NASA for science 
disciplines that will be the focus of research after assembly 
of the ISS is complete. The conferees direct NASA to submit a 
plan to the Committees on Appropriations of the House and 
Senate which includes various ISS management options. The 
conferees agree that such a plan will give the Congress the 
information it needs in order to determine what management 
structure is best and most able to deliver the benefits of the 
ISS. The Committees on Appropriations will require this 
information prior to approving funding for any final agreement. 
Therefore, the conferees have included an administrative 
provision which prohibits the expenditure of any funds prior to 
December 1, 2001 for finalizing an agreement between NASA and a 
non government organization to conduct research utilization and 
commercialization management activities of the ISS.
      For the past several years, the conferees have expressed 
dismay at the lack of dedicated life and microgravity research 
missions being flown on shuttle during station assembly. This 
problem is made worse by continuing delay in station assembly, 
leading to a significant backlog of critical research waiting 
to be flown. The conferees believe it is prudent to plan 
regular life and microgravity shuttle research missions during 
station assembly to protect the shuttle flight rate and to 
prepare experiments for the space station. The conferees 
therefore direct NASA, within 30 days of enactment of this Act, 
to submit a plan to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House and Senate which details a schedule for shuttle research 
missions, beginning after the flight of STS-107 and continuing 
until the space station reaches its full research capability.

                  SCIENCE, AERONAUTICS AND TECHNOLOGY

      Appropriates $6,190,700,000 for science, aeronautics and 
technology instead of $5,579,600,000 as proposed by the House 
and $5,837,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The amount 
provided is $261,300,000 above the budget request. The amount 
provided consists of:
                $2,508,300,000 for space science.
                $316,900,000 for life and microgravity 
                sciences.
                $1,498,050,000 for earth sciences.
                $1,253,150,000 for aero-space technology.
                $529,400,000 for space operations.
                $134,000,000 for academic programs.
                $49,100,000 as a general reduction.
      In reaching the amount of $6,190,700,000 appropriated for 
science, aeronautics and technology, the conferees have 
included only $8,000,000 for space solar power, $20,000,000 for 
commercial remote sensing data buys, $20,000,000 for quiet 
aircraft technology, $10,000,000 for the EPSCoR program, and 
$19,100,000 for space grant colleges designated under section 
208 of the National Space Grant College and Fellowship Act.
      The conferees recognize the efforts of NASA, particularly 
Goddard Space Flight Center, in developing comprehensive 
programmatic and operations plans for the Independent 
Verification and Validation Facility and in confirming the 
Facility's agency-wide role in software reliability. The 
conferees further recognize NASA's increased commitment to IV&V; 
as a mission critical activity, as evidenced by the increase in 
funding (to $40,000,000 for fiscal year 2001) dedicated to IV&V; 
activities. The conferees expect NASA to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate by May 1, 
2001 regarding progress on development of the Facility, its 
role within NASA and the degree to which new and related 
software initiatives have been implemented.

                             Space Science

      The conferees have agreed to provide $2,508,300,000 for 
space science programs. Included in this amount is $75,000,000 
for the Mars 2003 Lander program as proposed by NASA in 
communications with the conferees subsequent to submission of 
the budget. Of this amount, $2,000,000 is to be financed within 
the space science account; $7,000,000 is to be derived from the 
life and microgravity account; $20,000,000 is to be derived 
from the aeronautics and space technology account; $6,000,000 
is to be derived from the mission support account; and 
$40,000,000 is to be derived from the human space flight 
account.
      Prior conference agreements have directed NASA to 
establish a goal of competitively selecting 75 percent of space 
science advanced technology funding. Based upon this direction, 
NASA recently released an open research announcement in the 
Cross-Enterprise Technology Development Program (CETDP) that 
resulted in an impressive response of over 1,200 proposals 
competing for $40,000,000 in funding. The conferees are aware 
that NASA was only able to award funding for 8 percent of the 
proposals and that a 92 percent disapproval rate is frustrating 
to the university community and industry partners. In addition, 
the conferees note that NASA has expressed concern that the 
diversion of a high percentage of funds to open solicitations 
is contributing to a loss of needed ``core competencies'' in 
technology at the NASA field centers. NASA, on the CETDP, is 
directed to allocate at least 75% of all new procurement awards 
through full and open competition. If NASA feels that 
additional funding is needed in fiscal year 2001 to address 
transitional core competency issues, then the agency may 
propose for the consideration by the Committees on 
Appropriations, a reprogramming of funds from other sources.
      The conferees understand that the responsibility and 
funding for the CETDP is being transferred from the Office of 
Space Science to the Office of Aerospace Technology. Therefore, 
the conferees direct that NASA's Office of Aerospace Technology 
submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House and Senate by April 30, 2001 which addresses how NASA 
plans to increase competitive selection of advanced technology 
funding while maintaining NASA Center core competencies. The 
report should identify the core competencies by NASA Center 
that are critical to the long-term future of the Nation's space 
program and the level of resources required to ensure their 
support. The NASA core competency strategy should include long-
term strategic alliances with universities and industry 
partners.
      The conferees note that applying the recommendations of 
the Mars Program Independent Assessment Team to all space 
science programs may lead to cost increases for those programs. 
The conferees agree that NASA should provide a five-year 
profile of the costs associated with implementing these 
recommendations as part of the budget submission for fiscal 
year 2002, as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees have provided the budget request of 
$20,000,000 for the Living with a Star program, as proposed by 
the Senate. The House had deleted the funding for this program 
because of concern about the contracting strategy being used by 
the program. The NASA Inspector General has reviewed the 
procurement strategy and the conferees are confident that NASA 
will take into consideration the recommendations of the 
Inspector General with regard to this program, as well as the 
recommendations of the Applied Physics Laboratory and NASA. The 
conferees agree with the direction of the Senate that NASA 
should submit a long-term plan to create a resilient Sun-Earth 
Connection program and that the report should be submitted by 
February 15, 2001.
      The conferees agree that the cost of the Hubble Wide 
Field Camera 3 should have a cost cap of $75,500,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The conferees do not agree that cost 
increases associated with the Hubble Servicing Mission should 
be allocated to the Human Space Flight account. Instead, the 
conferees direct NASA to provide a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House and Senate on the policy for 
allocating cost increases which are associated with launch or 
payload delays and the rationale for the policy. The report 
should be provided no later that March 31, 2001.
      The conferees agree to the following changes to the 
budget request:
      1. An increase of $1,500,000 for Ohio Wesleyan University 
for infrastructure needs.
      2. An increase of $1,500,000 for the Center for Space 
Sciences at Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas.
      3. An increase of $8,000,000 for space solar power.
      4. An increase of $5,000,000 for the STEP-AirSEDS tether 
propulsion program.
      5. An increase of $2,500,000 for the Hubble telescope 
project to initiate a Composites Technology Institute in 
Bridgeport, West Virginia.
      6. An increase of $3,500,000 for a center on life in 
extreme thermal environments at Montana State University, 
Bozeman.
      7. An increase of $2,500,000 for the Bishop Museum/Mauna 
Kea Astronomy Education Center.
      8. An increase of $1,000,000 for the Chabot Observatory 
and Science Center, Oakland, California.
      9. An increase of $4,000,000 for the Green Bank Radio 
Astronomy Observatory visitor center.
      10. An increase of $2,000,000 for equipment for the South 
Carolina State Museum's Observatory, Planetarium and Theater.
      11. An increase of $8,000,000 for the University of 
Hawaii for infrastructure needs of the Mauna Kea Education 
Center.

                     Life and Microgravity Sciences

      The conferees agree to provide $316,900,000 for life and 
microgravity sciences. This amount includes a reduction of 
$7,000,000 from the biomedical research and countermeasures 
program which has been transferred to the space sciences 
account for the Mars 2003 Lander program. The conferees agree 
to the following changes to the budget request:
      1. An increase of $5,000,000 for the Space Radiation 
program at Loma Linda University Hospital.
      2. An increase of $1,000,000 to EARTH University and the 
University of Alabama in Birmingham to research Chagas disease.
      3. An increase of $500,000 for ongoing research in the 
area of disease monitoring and diagnosis through the use of 
medical intelligence for the manned spaceflight effort.
      4. An increase of $3,000,000 for the Donald Danforth 
Plant Science Center's Modern Genetics project.
      5. An increase of $15,000,000 for infrastructure needs 
for the Life Sciences building at the University of Missouri-
Columbia.

                             Earth Sciences

      The conferees agree to provide $1,498,050,000 for the 
earth sciences account.
      The conferees take seriously their responsibility to 
oversee the activities of the various Departments and Agencies 
and feel the direction provided by the Congress in the 
Statement of Managers accompanying the Conference Report for 
prior fiscal years should be implemented without fail. It has 
come to the attention of the conferees that this has not been 
the case with the implementation of direction contained in the 
fiscal year 2000 Appropriations Act and accompanying Statement 
of Managers. For this reason, the conferees agree with the 
Senate proposal to suspend the authority of the Office of Earth 
Science to reprogram any funds in fiscal year 2001 unless 
specifically authorized by the Committees on Appropriations of 
the House and Senate.
      The conferees direct NASA to report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House and Senate, by March 15, 2001 with 
a ten-year strategy and funding profile to extend the benefits 
of Earth science, technology and data results beyond the 
traditional science community and address practical, near-term 
problems. This strategy should incorporate fully the unique 
data, data products and services available from U.S. companies. 
NASA is also directed to develop, with universities, existing 
Applications Centers, such as ARCs and RESACs, NASA Field 
Centers, and other cognizant Federal agencies, mechanisms 
through which current public and private remote sensing and 
related technologies will be made readily available to state 
and local governments, public agencies and private 
organizations for applications in agriculture, flood mapping, 
forestry, environmental protection, urban planning and other 
land-use issues.
      The Vegetation Canopy LIDAR Project (VCL), the first NASA 
Earth Systems Pathfinder Mission, is designed to provide a 
global database of forest structure and tree height. The 
conferees believe that this data will be invaluable as the 
scientific community continues research into global climate 
change and related areas. At the same time, the conferees 
recognize the valuable commercial potential of the data and the 
associated interest within the commercial sector. The conferees 
are concerned that if the VCL mission is not launched by 2002, 
the baseline data needed by the United States scientific and 
commercial community may be delayed or lost. Therefore, the 
conferees direct NASA to report by October 2001 on the progress 
of developing the VCL mission, with the expectation of a Spring 
2002 launch date.
      The conferees agree to the following changes to the 
budget request:
      1. An increase of $500,000 for the Temporal Landscape 
Change Research Program to establish a regional baseline 
monitoring program.
      2. An increase of $500,000 for the operations of the 
applications center for remote sensing at Fulton-Montgomery 
Community College, Johnston, New York.
      3. An increase of $1,000,000 for the Center for Earth 
Observing and Space Research at George Mason University.
      4. An increase of $5,000,000 for NASA's Regional 
Applications Center for the Northeast.
      5. An increase of $2,500,000 for the U.S. portion of the 
joint U.S./Italian satellite development program to remotely 
observe forest fires.
      6. An increase of $450,000 for continuation of 
application remote sensing to forestry at the State University 
of New York, College of Environmental Sciences and Forestry.
      7. An increase of $4,000,000 for the continuation of 
programs at the American Museum of Natural History.
      8. An increase of $1,000,000 for the Advanced Tropical 
Remote Sensing Center of the National Center for Tropical 
Remote Sensing Applications and Resources at the Rosenstiel 
School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.
      9. An increase of $8,800,000 to the Institute for 
Software Research, for the following activities: $5,000,000 for 
development and construction of research facilities; $2,300,000 
for the development of a Goddard Institute for Systems, 
Software and Technology Research (GISSTR) in cooperation with 
the Goddard Space Flight Center's Systems, Technology and 
Advanced Concepts (STAAC) organization; and $1,500,000 for a 
microcomputer clustering and data throughput/visualization 
algorithm research initiative.
      10. An increase of $20,000,000 to continue commercial 
data purchases.
      11. An increase of $3,000,000 for the University of South 
Mississippi for research into remotely sensed data for coastal 
zone management.
      12. An increase of $1,000,000 for carbon cycle remote 
sensing technology at the KARS Regional Earth Sciences 
Applications Center at the University of Kansas.
      13. An increase of $1,500,000 for the University of North 
Dakota to support the Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium.
      14. An increase of $1,500,000 for topographic sensor 
measurement efforts in Alaska.
      15. An increase of $2,000,000 for remote ocean sensing 
research and measurements in the areas of the Bering Sea and 
the northernmost Pacific Ocean.
      16. An increase of $500,000 for continued development of 
nickel metal hydride battery technology.
      17. An increase of $3,000,000 for the NASA International 
Earth Observing System Natural Resource Training Center at the 
University of Montana, Missoula.
      18. An increase of $1,000,000 for the Pipelines Project 
at Iowa State University/Southern University--Baton Rouge.
      19. An increase of $35,000,000 for the Earth Observing 
System Data Information System, for a total fiscal year 2001 
program level of $277,000,000. These additional funds are for 
the EOSDIS Core System only so that its total program level in 
fiscal year 2001 shall be $115,000,000 allocated as follows: 
First, an additional $22,500,000 should be added to the core 
ECS program to provide optimized system functionality, planning 
for future growth and adaptations due to instrument team 
changes, provision for additional processing, and archival 
capabilities needed at the DAAC's. Second, the remaining 
$12,500,000 is to continue and expand the Synergy program that 
was begun in fiscal year 2000. In fiscal year 2001, the 
conferees believe the Synergy program should focus on the 
following: continued development of the current applications to 
make them accessible to the general public; expansion of the 
number of info marts/data store fronts to broaden the 
application base and implementation of a unified access data 
server for local, State, and Federal agencies and the 
commercial marketplace. As part of this effort, NASA is 
directed to integrate the regional earth science applications 
centers into the Synergy program by the end of fiscal year 
2001.
      20. The conferees provided the full amount requested for 
the EOS follow-on. Within the amount provided, the conferees 
recommend: $1,500,000 for studies initiating a Landsat-7 
follow-on commercial data purchase; $2,000,000 for the Global 
Precipitation Mission for phase A/B studies and preliminary 
advanced technology development work; $2,000,000 for the Global 
Earthquake Satellite for phase A/B studies and preliminary 
advanced technology development work; $1,500,000 for studies 
related to the ``New DIS'' which the conferees believe should 
emphasize the re-use of the existing system in order to 
minimize future costs; $35,600,000 for studies and advanced 
technology development for the NPOESS preparatory project of 
which $4,000,000 shall be allocated for the development of high 
speed data processing and algorithm validation processes that 
maximize prior year investments in this area; and $2,000,000 to 
initiate a global wind profile commercial data purchase 
consistent with the science objectives identified in the 
National Academy of Sciences study.

                         Aero-Space Technology

      The conferees agree to provide $1,253,150,000 for the 
aero-space technology account. Included in this amount is a 
reduction of $20,000,000 to the research and technology base 
with the funds transferred to the space sciences account for 
the Mars 2003 Lander program.
      The conferees agree to provide the budget request of 
$9,000,000 for the small aircraft transportation system (SATS) 
as proposed by the Senate. The House had deleted funding for 
this effort. The House action was based upon limited funding 
available to NASA and an underlying concern that the Federal 
Aviation Administration (FAA) was less than enthusiastic about 
the program which was not very well defined in the budget 
submission. Based upon new information provided to the 
conferees, funding for SATS has been restored to be used for 
operational evaluations, or proofs of concept where operational 
evaluations are not possible, of four new capabilities that 
promise to increase the safe and efficient capacity of the 
National Airspace System for all NAS users, and to extend 
reliable air service to smaller communities. These capabilities 
are:
            High-volume operations at airports without control 
        towers or terminal radar facilities.
            Lower adverse weather landing minimums at minimally 
        equipped landing facilities.
            Integration of SATS aircraft into a higher en route 
        capacity air traffic control system with complex flows 
        and slower aircraft.
            Improved single-pilot ability to function 
        competently in complex airspace in an evolving NAS.
      The conferees recognize that the expansion of the SATS is 
a technically high-risk program, and that the expansion of the 
SATS program to perform operational evaluations on all four 
capabilities will require additional resources. Therefore, the 
conferees direct the Administration to include such resources 
in the fiscal year 2002 budget request for NASA.
      It is the expectation of the conferees that SATS will 
develop and operationally evaluate these four capabilities in a 
five-year program which will produce sufficient data to support 
FAA decisions to approve operational use of the capabilities, 
and FAA and industry decisions to invest in the necessary 
technologies. The conferees direct that not less than 75% of 
the funding provided for development of technologies shall be 
awarded subject to full and open competition. Collaborative 
industry/university teams are encouraged to compete for these 
awards. In addition, NASA is directed to transfer funds as 
required to the FAA for personnel with authority to set 
criteria and approve test plans.
      The usefulness of the data for this purpose will be 
ensured through the following process:
      1. In fiscal year 2001, NASA will plan SATS activities 
with, and secure the agreement of, FAA staff from aircraft 
certification, flight standards, air traffic, and airports 
before undertaking the proof of concept or operational 
evaluations. This will also be done with appropriate industry 
involvement.
      2. The SATS plan will identify the operational safety 
criteria required by FAA for each capability, and test plans 
determined by FAA to be adequate to establish that these 
criteria are met.
      3. The objective of SATS is that the output of the 
operational evaluation as defined in the plan will be 
sufficient for the FAA to give full credit to the test data 
when an applicant subsequently proposes the certification and 
operational approvals for a system that would implement these 
SATS capabilities.
      NASA and FAA SATS program managers will keep the SATS 
Subcommittee, a joint subcommittee of NASA's Aero Space 
Technology Advisory Committee and FAA's Research Engineering 
and Development Advisory Committee, fully informed of all 
planning activities. SATS program managers will seek specific 
advice on their plan from the Subcommittee and respond in 
writing to such advice. The Advisory Committees will request 
status reports from the SATS Subcommittee on the planning 
activities and their conformance to the above directions of the 
conferees and these reports shall also be provided to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate.
      NASA is directed to provide a report the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House and Senate on the status of 
implementing this program with the first report to be submitted 
by July 31, 2001 and subsequent reports to be submitted on each 
March 31 thereafter.
      The conferees agree to provide the budget request for the 
Space Launch Initiative (SLI) as proposed by the Senate. The 
conferees are in general agreement with the direction in the 
Senate report with regard to the key principles NASA should 
maintain throughout the life of the program, namely: (1) any 
launch vehicles developed fully will be owned and operated by 
private industry and be capable of competing effectively in the 
commercial marketplace; and (2) the program will rely on 
competition from existing and emerging launch service providers 
to ensure innovations, openness, and resiliency. Further, the 
conferees are in agreement that at least 75% of SLI funding 
should be subject to full and open competition and that all 
NASA Centers should be eligible to participate in the SLI 
program.
      The conferees continue to support the Software 
Optimization and Reuse Technology (SORT) program, which will 
help NASA address the growing cost and schedule complexities 
associated with traditional one-at-a-time software development 
strategies. The conferees are aware of a recent independent 
assessment of SORT program efforts at the Goddard Space Flight 
Center (GSFC) Information Systems Center (ISC), which confirmed 
the compatibility of GSFC/ISC goals with those of the SORT 
program. The report confirmed that the technologies proposed 
under the SORT program would promote improvements in 
productivity, quality, cost and schedule, but identified 
communication and management problems between the SORT program 
and NASA. The conferees fully support the transfer of SORT's 
management to the GSFC/ISC, and expect the contents of the 
independent assessment to be integrated into a detailed plan 
for future SORT activities. The conferees direct GSFC/ISC to 
submit this plan to Congress no later than April 1, 2001.
      The conferees agree to the following changes to the 
budget request:
      1. An increase of $13,000,000 for the Ultra Efficient 
Engine Technology program.
      2. An increase of $2,000,000 for the development of 
eyetracking technology and applications research.
      3. An increase of $500,000 for evaluation and design of 
Lithium-Ion batteries for use on space shuttles.
      4. An increase of $3,000,000 for the NASA-Illinois 
Technology Commercialization Center at DuPage County Research 
Park.
      5. An increase of $3,000,000 for the University of New 
Orleans Composites Research Center for Excellence at Michoud, 
Louisiana.
      6. An increase of $5,000,000 for Rotocraft Research and 
Technology base programs.
      7. An increase of $6,000,000 to expand the Space Alliance 
Technology Outreach Program in the states of Florida, New 
Mexico, New York, and Texas.
      8. An increase of $4,000,000 for deployment of 
multilateration and Mode-S based Automatic Dependent 
Surveillance-Broadcast sensors for the Helicopter In-Flight 
Tracking System.
      9. An increase of $1,800,000 to augment deployment of an 
ATIDS multilateration sensor and surveillance server for the 
Airport Surface Management System.
      10. An increase of $1,600,000 for the continued 
development of the Dynamic Runway Occupancy Measurement System 
integration with the Multistatic Dependent Surveillance System 
and SensorBahn server.
      11. An increase of $1,000,000 for the remote sensing SAID 
research program at Syracuse University.
      12. An increase of $1,000,000 for Agile Collaboration 
Environments for Systems Synthesis in Engineering Education.
      13. An increase of $1,000,000 for Enhanced Vision Systems 
development and testing.
      14. An increase of $2,000,000 to continue work on 
SOCRATES.
      15. An increase of $1,000,000 for the Center for Emerging 
Technologies at Stony Brook, State University of New York.
      16. An increase of $1,000,000 for the Garrett Morgan 
Commercialization Initiative in Ohio.
      17. An increase of $6,500,000 to the Institute for 
Software Research, for the following activities: $2,000,000 to 
perform fundamental research of propellantless space propulsion 
with NASA's Center of Excellence for Space Propulsion, 
including the analysis of prototype radio frequency momentum 
sources and the use of automated tensor algorithms to simulate 
and evaluate prototype drive mechanisms; $3,500,000 to continue 
the Self-Adaptive Vehicular Equipment (SAVE) initiative; and 
$1,000,000 to continue the Breakthrough Propulsion Physics 
(BPP) program.
      18. An increase of $7,500,000 for completion of the 
National Space Science and Technology Center for infrastructure 
needs.
      19. An increase of $2,000,000 for the Earth Alert project 
at the Goddard Space Flight Center.
      20. An increase of $10,000,000 for a Propulsion Research 
Laboratory to be located at NASA's Center of Excellence for 
Space Propulsion at the Marshall Space Flight Center.
      21. An increase of $2,000,000 for Montana State 
University, Bozeman for research in advanced optoelectronic 
materials.
      22. An increase of $1,000,000 for the University of 
Akron, for nanotechnology research.
      23. An increase of $1,000,000 for aerospace projects at 
MSE Technology Applications in Butte, Montana.
      24. An increase of $250,000 for the Oklahoma Aeronautics 
and Space Commission for sounding rockets.
      25. An increase of $1,000,000 for Montana State 
University for the techlink program.
      26. An increase of $500,000 for the National Aviation 
Hall of Fame for development of exhibits.
      27. An increase of $1.500,000 for the National Technology 
Transfer Center, for a total of $7,300,000.

                            Space Operations

      The conferees have provided $529,400,000 for space 
operations, the same amount as provided by both the House and 
Senate.

                           Academic Programs

      The conferees have agreed to provide $134,000,000 for 
academic programs. The conferees agree to the following changes 
to the budget request:
      1. An increase of $3,000,000 for continued academic and 
infrastructure needs related to the computer sciences, 
mathematics and physics building at the University of Redlands, 
Redlands, California.
      2. An increase of $1,000,000 for equipment needs at the 
University of San Diego Science and Education Outreach Center.
      3. An increase of $500,000 for Science, Engineering, Math 
and Aerospace Academy programs at Central Arizona College.
      4. An increase of $1,000,000 for the Science Facilities 
Initiative at Heidelberg College in Ohio.
      5. An increase of $1,000,000 for the NASA Glenn ``Gateway 
to the Future: Ohio Pilot'' project.
      6. An increase of $1,500,000 for the Santa Ana College 
Space Education Center in California.
      7. An increase of $5,400,000 for the EPSCoR program for a 
total funding level of $10,000,000 in fiscal year 2001.
      8. An increase of $9,100,000 for the Minority University 
Research and Education program for a total funding level of 
$55,000,000 in fiscal year 2001.
      9. An increase of $500,000 for a hands-on interactive 
science education facility at the University of North Carolina 
at Chapel Hill.
      10. An increase of $1,000,000 for the Science Learning 
Center in Hammond, Indiana.
      11. An increase of $1,000,000 for the Environmental 
Sciences Learning Center (part of the California Science 
Center) in Los Angeles, California.
      12. An increase of $2,000,000 for the University of 
Wisconsin-Milwaukee to implement the Wisconsin Initiative for 
Math, Science, and Technology.
      13. An increase of $2,500,000 for the jason Foundation.
      14. An increase of $1,000,000 for the NASA Center of 
Excellence in Mathematics, Science and Technology at Texas 
College in Tyler, Texas.
      15. An increase of $2,000,000 for the Lewis and Clark 
Rediscovery Web Technology Project.
      16. An increase of $500,000 for the Aerospace Education 
Center in Cleveland, Ohio as a national hub for the SEMAA 
program.
      17. An increase of $1,000,000 for the Carl Sagan 
Discovery Science Center at the Children's Hospital at 
Montefiore Medical Center to implement the educational 
programming for this science learning project.
      18. An increase of $1,000,000 for the Challenger Learning 
Center in Kenai, Alaska.

                            MISSION SUPPORT

      Appropriates $2,608,700,000 for mission support instead 
of $2,584,000,000 as proposed by the House and Senate. The 
funding level arrived at for this account includes a reduction 
of $6,000,000 to research operations support from IFMP 
rescheduling as proposed by NASA to provide additional funding 
for the Mars 2003 Lander program.
      The conferees are aware that NASA owns and operates a 
small fleet of administrative aircraft that are vital for the 
oversight and implementation of its mission. The conferees 
understand that the majority of the aircraft in this fleet are 
aging, presenting a burden upon NASA management in terms of 
maintenance requirements and resultant costs. The conferees, 
therefore, direct that NASA develop a plan to replace these 
aging administrative aircraft and consider fractional ownership 
as an alternative. NASA should submit this plan for 
administrative aircraft replacement to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House and Senate by April 15, 2001. The 
conferees continue to believe that fractional ownership may be 
of value to NASA and have therefore included $2,200,000 to be 
used for a two-year test of the concept. NASA is directed to 
enter into a fractional ownership contract, to be fully 
competed, by June 15, 2001.
      The conferees agree to provide $18,000,000 for the E-
Complex upgrades at Stennis Space Center and $10,500,000 for a 
propulsion test operations building and for upgrades to the 
East/West access road at Stennis. In addition, the funds used 
for upgrades to the East/West access road may be used to match 
title 23 highway funds.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

      The conferees agree to provide $23,000,000 for the Office 
of Inspector General, the same as proposed by both the House 
and Senate.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

      The conferees agree to include four administrative 
provisions which were included in the bill in fiscal year 2000. 
The fifth administrative provision is addressed at the 
beginning of the NASA section of this statement. The conferees 
have not included an administrative provision proposed by the 
Senate which would have incorporated the Senate report into the 
bill by reference.

                  National Credit Union Administration

                       CENTRAL LIQUIDITY FACILITY

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Limits direct loans from the Central Liquidity Facility 
(CLF) to credit unions from borrowed funds to $1,500,000,000 
instead of $3,000,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$600,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Appropriates $1,000,000 to the National Credit Union 
Administration for the Community Development Revolving Loan 
Program for low-income credit unions of which $350,000 is 
provided specifically for technical assistance, as proposed by 
the House instead of no funding as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees are very supportive of the credit union 
industry and the service it provides to its members. Increasing 
the lending cap for the Central Liquidity Facility (CLF) for 
new direct loans gives greater financial security to the 
industry and ensures the statutory role of the CLF to provide 
liquidity to credit unions experiencing unusual or unexpected 
shortfalls.
      The conferees consider loans administered through the CLF 
necessary in situations when private sources are not available 
and when unanticipated events are the cause of liquidity 
drains. The conferees do not expect that loan sales or other 
business decisions that result in excessive demand for 
liquidity should be considered emergency events that warrant 
the use of CLF funds. To this end, the conferees direct the 
NCUA to develop written policies and procedures to clarify the 
role of the CLF and the circumstances when the CLF will approve 
a Regular or Agent Member's request for a CLF advance. This 
information is to be included in the budget request for fiscal 
year 2002. The conferees also direct the NCUA to report on the 
loans made by the CLF for short-term adjustment, seasonal, and 
protracted adjustment liquidity needs for each month from 1996 
through December 2000. This report is to be submitted to the 
Committees by February 15, 2001. The conferees request that 
NCUA continue to provide this information on CLF loans on a 
monthly basis through September 2001.

                      National Science Foundation

                    research and related activities

      Appropriates $3,350,000,000 for research and related 
activities instead of $3,117,690,000 as proposed by the House 
and $3,245,562,000 as proposed by the Senate. Bill language 
provides up to $275,592,000 of this amount for Polar research 
and operations support.
      The conferees have included bill language which specifies 
that $65,000,000 of appropriated funds are to be for a 
comprehensive research initiative on plant genomes for 
economically significant crops.
      Finally, the conferees have agreed to bill language 
which: (1) prohibits funds spent in this or any other Act to 
acquire or lease a research vessel with ice-breaking capability 
built or retrofitted outside of the United States if such a 
vessel of United States origin can be obtained at a cost of not 
more than 50 per centum above the cost of the least expensive, 
technically acceptable, non-United States vessel; (2) requires 
that the amount of subsidy or financing provided by a foreign 
government, or instrumentality thereof, to a vessel's 
construction shall be included as part of the total cost of 
such vessel; and (3) provides that should a U.S. vessel as set 
forth in the foregoing language not be available for leasing 
for the austral summer Antarctic season of 2002-2003, and 
thereafter, a vessel of any origin can be leased for a period 
not to exceed 120 days of that season and every season 
thereafter until delivery of such a United States vessel 
occurs.
      The conference agreement provides an increase of 
$384,000,000 above the fiscal year 2000 appropriated level for 
research and related activities. Within the appropriated level 
is $215,000,000 for the information technology initiative, 
$75,000,000 for the biocomplexity initiative, $65,000,000 for 
plant genome research for economically significant crops, 
$150,000,000 for the new nanotechnology initiative, $75,000,000 
for major research instrumentation, $94,910,000 for facilities 
within the astronomical sciences activity, and $1,000,000 to 
begin design and model testing of a vessel to replace the R/V 
Alpha Helix.
      The increase of $15,000,000 provided for astronomical 
sciences facilities is intended to upgrade specifically 
facilities and operations, including new construction and 
instrumentation as appropriate, for the Arecibo Observatory, 
the Green Bank Telescope, the Very Large Array, the Very Long 
Baseline Array, and other facilities in need of such attention 
on a priority basis. The Foundation is directed to provide the 
Committees on Appropriations of the House and Senate with a 
list of facilities and the specific needs of each, on a 
priority basis, within the Operating Plan submission and on a 
semi-yearly basis after that.
      The conferees have provided $5,000,000 within the total 
for social and behavioral sciences to initiate a separately 
competed Children's Research Initiative (CRI). While the NSF 
does fund some research that provides a better understanding of 
children, a distinct program is needed if the recommendations 
of the 1997 National Science and Technology Council report are 
to be achieved. In fact, as the NSF anticipates potential 
budget growth in future years, the conferees expect the CRI to 
be a vital part of any planned program expansion. The NSF 
should employ its normal peer review process for determining 
grants for the CRI, and should award both principal 
investigator and no less than three center awards with this 
first-year funding.
      Highest funding priority should be given to proposals 
from distinct human sciences units in institutions of higher 
education that have an interdisciplinary academic program in 
human and family development, nutrition, and related areas. 
Proposals should also be evaluated for their effectiveness in 
utilizing existing delivery systems for program outreach and 
evaluation to assess how the implementation of research 
findings can benefit the majority of all children in a given 
state or region. A strong emphasis should also be placed on 
pursuing theory-driven, applied policy-related research on 
children, learning, and the influence of families and 
communities on child development.
      The conferees expect the Foundation to work with the 
human sciences community in the development of the proposed 
program guidelines for the CRI and to have awards made by June 
2001. Finally, the conferees expect a detailed plan in the 
fiscal year 2002 budget submission on how the NSF intends to 
expand the CRI as a multi-year strategic initiative.
      The Opportunity Fund has again, without prejudice, not 
been funded for fiscal year 2001.
      Except as previously noted, the conferees expect that the 
remaining funds will be distributed proportionately and 
equitably, consistent with the ratio of the budget request 
level above the fiscal year 2000 funding level, among all of 
the remaining directorates. In the distribution of funds within 
each directorate, the NSF is directed to provide each program, 
project, and activity the same percentage of the overall budget 
as that provided in the budget request. The conferees request 
that such distribution be specifically noted in the fiscal year 
2001 Operating Plan submission.

                        major research equipment

      Appropriates $121,600,000 for major research equipment 
instead of $76,600,000 as proposed by the House and 
$109,100,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement provides the budget request 
level for all ongoing projects within the MRE account, 
including $45,000,000 for the development and construction of a 
second, single site, five-plus teraflop computing facility. The 
conferees are encouraged by the recent progress made in the 
development of the first terascale facility and urge the 
Foundation to move as quickly as possible in soliciting 
proposals for the second facility. The conferees urge the 
Foundation to pay special attention to qualified proposals that 
will utilize newer generation processors and other equipment as 
well as exhibit appropriate cost-share benefits as part of a 
proposal.
      The conferees expect the Foundation to provide regular, 
informal reports as to the progress of the entire terascale 
program, including updates on construction, acquisition, 
funding requirements, and other appropriate information 
associated with this important program.
      The conference agreement also provides $12,500,000 to 
continue production of the High-Performance Instrumented 
Airborne Platform for Environmental Research (HIAPER). This new 
high-altitude research aircraft will, upon its completion, be 
available to support critical and outstanding atmospheric 
science research opportunities over the next 25 to 30 years.
      Budget constraints have forced the conferees to not 
approve funding for two new starts for fiscal year 2001 under 
major research equipment, the U.S. Array and San Andreas Fault 
Observatory at Depth, and the National Ecological Observatory 
Network. This decision was made without prejudice and does not 
reflect on the quality of research proposed to be developed 
through these two programs.

                     education and human resources

      Appropriates $787,352,000 for education and human 
resources instead of $694,310,000 as proposed by the House and 
$765,352,000 as proposed by the Senate. Bill language is 
included which requires that from within available funds, 
$10,000,000 is for the Office of Innovation Partnerships.
      Within this appropriated level, the conferees have 
provided $75,000,000 for the Experimental Program to Stimulate 
Competitive Research (EPSCoR) to allow for renewed emphasis on 
research infrastructure development in the EPSCoR states, as 
well as to permit full implementation awards to states which 
have research proposals in the planning process. In addition, 
the conferees have provided $10,000,000 to fund the Office of 
Innovation Partnerships. This new office was created last year 
to, among other things, house the EPSCoR program, and should 
continue to examine means of helping those non-EPSCoR 
institutions receiving among the least federal research funding 
expand their research capacity and competitiveness so as to 
develop a truly national scientific research community with 
appropriate research centers located throughout the nation.
      The conference agreement provides $15,000,000 for the 
HBCU-UP program, including $14,000,000 from the EHR account and 
$1,000,000 from the RRA account. The conferees have provided an 
increase of $10,000,000 above the budget request level for the 
Informal Science Education (ISE) program. This increase is 
intended to provide additional resources to expand the pool of 
ISE grantees to providers in smaller communities, thus ensuring 
that the impact of the ISE program reaches an even more diverse 
audience.
      The conference agreement further provides $34,250,000 for 
Advanced Technological Education; $13,000,000 for the SMETE 
Digital Library; $19,750,000 for Graduate Teaching Fellowships 
in K-12 Education; $16,500,000 for programs designed for women 
and persons with disabilities; $55,200,000 for the Graduate 
Research Fellowships program; and the fiscal year 2001 budget 
requests for the Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority 
Participation program, the new Tribal Colleges program, the 
Minority Graduate Education program, the Centers of Research 
Excellence in Science and Technology program, and the Model 
Institutions for Excellence program.
      Finally, the conferees have agreed to provide $11,200,000 
for the new Scholarships for Service program.
      Except as previously noted, the conferees expect that the 
remaining funds will be distributed proportionately and 
equitably, consistent with the ratio of the budget request 
level above the fiscal year 2000 funding level, among all of 
the remaining directorates. In the distribution of funds within 
each directorate, the NSF is directed to provide each program, 
project, and activity the same percentage of the overall budget 
as that provided in the budget request. The conferees request 
that such distribution be specifically noted in the fiscal year 
2001 Operating Plan submission.

                         salaries and expenses

      Appropriates $160,890,000 for salaries and expenses 
instead of $152,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$170,890,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees note that the increase of $3,000,000 above 
the budget request is for travel expenses that the budget 
submission proposed to fund from within the RRA and EHR 
accounts instead of from within salaries and expenses. 
Accordingly, the conferees direct the NSF to fund employee 
travel from within salaries and expenses, consistent with 
existing practice.

                      office of inspector general

      Appropriates $6,280,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General as proposed by the Senate instead of $5,700,000 as 
proposed by the House. The conferees continue to expect the OIG 
to increase efforts in the areas of cost-sharing, indirect 
costs, and misconduct in scientific research. The conferees 
further direct the OIG to evaluate the Foundation's management 
of its growing program responsibilities.

                 Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation

          Payment to the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation

      Appropriates $90,000,000 for the Neighborhood 
Reinvestment Corporation as proposed by the House instead of 
$80,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Includes language proposed by the House allowing 
$5,000,000 of the total appropriation to be used for a section 
8 homeownership program. The Senate did not include a similar 
provision.
      Includes new language making $2,500,000 available for the 
purpose of endowing a ``George Knight Scholarship Fund.'' The 
conferees would like to recognize the retirement of George 
Knight, executive director of Neighborhood Reinvestment 
Corporation since 1990. Mr. Knight has dedicated more than 24 
years of service to the Corporation and its predecessor 
organization, the Urban Reinvestment Task Force. To acknowledge 
Mr. Knight's dedication to America's communities, the conferees 
are designating a set-aside of $2,500,000 to establish a 
scholarship fund in his honor for the Neighborhood Reinvestment 
Training Institute. This fund will allow hundreds of local 
leaders, community developers and residents to have access to 
high-quality training, which will help them acquire the 
expertise to improve their communities.

                        Selective Service System

                         salaries and expenses

      Appropriates $24,480,000 for salaries and expenses as 
proposed by the Senate instead of $23,000,000 as proposed by 
the House.
      Retains language proposed by the Senate providing a one-
year exemption from 31 U.S.C. 1341 if the President deems the 
exemption necessary in the interest of national defense.

                      TITLE IV--GENERAL PROVISIONS

      Inserts language proposed by the Senate permitting EPA 
appropriations to be used for comprehensive conservation and 
management plans.
      Retains language proposed by the House amending the 
National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 to implement full 
cost accounting, allow the transfer of administrative funds and 
allow the transfer of balances from old accounts to new 
accounts. The Senate deleted the House language, but included 
language implementing full cost accounting in a new account 
structure and limiting the transfer of funds. The Senate had 
also proposed a requirement for notification if program costs 
increase by 15 percent.
      Inserts language proposed by the Senate defining a 
qualified student loan.
      Retains language proposed by the House prohibiting HUD 
from using funds for any activity in excess of amounts set 
forth in the budget estimates to the Congress. The Senate 
included similar language referencing the budget estimates 
submitted for appropriations, not the Congress.
      Deletes language proposed by the Senate prohibiting the 
use of funds to carry out Executive Order 13083.
      Inserts language proposed by the House and stricken by 
the Senate prohibiting the EPA's expenditure of funds to 
promulgate a final regulation to implement changes in the 
payment of pesticide tolerance fees for fiscal year 2001. This 
issue is addressed under the Environmental Protection Agency 
elsewhere in this joint explanatory statement of the managers.
      Deletes language proposed by the House and stricken by 
the Senate directing the General Services Administration (GSA) 
to allocate one of its Senior Executive Service positions for 
Director, Federal Consumer Information Center. The conferees 
recognize the GSA has already taken action on this issue.
      Deletes language proposed by the House and stricken by 
the Senate restricting the use of funds for joint NASA--Air 
Force research programs.
      Modifies language proposed by the House and stricken by 
the Senate prohibiting the use of funds for the designation of 
any area as an ozone nonattainment area. The conferees agree to 
limit the prohibition until the Supreme Court rules on this 
issue or June 15, 2001, whichever comes first.
      Deletes language proposed by the House and stricken by 
the Senate prohibiting the use of funds for administration of 
the Communities for Safer Guns Coalition.
      Inserts language proposed by the Senate prohibiting the 
use of funds for the purpose of lobbying or litigating against 
any Federal entity or official, with certain exceptions.
      Inserts language proposed by the Senate prohibiting the 
use of funds for any activity or publication or distribution of 
literature that is designed to promote public support or 
opposition to any legislative proposal on which Congressional 
action is not complete.
      Inserts language encouraging the use of E-Commerce as a 
cost effective and efficient method of purchasing needed 
products in a timely, paperless manner from qualified vendors. 
In addition, the conferees encourage open, non-proprietary, 
Internet access to conduct E-Commerce as the use of proprietary 
software in services can diminish the net value of E-Commerce 
and limit choices by the customer. The conferees note that the 
use of E-Commerce is in harmony with the goals of the Federal 
Acquisition and Streamlining Act of 1994 and will enhance 
government purchasing efficiency.
      Retains language proposed by the House and stricken by 
the Senate requiring HUD to provide detailed descriptions of 
how funds identified for technical assistance, training, or 
management in the budget justifications will be utilized.
      Inserts language amending the National Aeronautics and 
Space Act of 1958 to allow for insurance, indemnification, and 
liability protection for experimental aerospace vehicle 
developers through December 31, 2001.
      Inserts language extending for two years and modifying 
NASA employee buyout authority.

           TITLE V--FILIPINO VETERANS' BENEFITS IMPROVEMENTS

      The conference agreement includes a new title that 
provides more equitable veterans benefits for certain Filipino 
Army veterans who served with the U.S. Armed Forces and under 
the U.S. Command during World War II. Under current law these 
veterans are entitled to compensation from the VA but at a 
lower level than other veterans and medical care only for 
service-connected conditions. The changes covered by this 
amendment include equal disability payments and health care 
services for those covered veterans who live permanently and 
legally in the United States, and expanded outpatient 
healthcare at the Manila VA Outpatient Clinic for these covered 
veterans who live in the Philippines.
      During WW II the Philippines was a Commonwealth of the 
United States and members of the Commonwealth Army and the New 
Philippine Scouts were called into service with the U.S. Armed 
Forces at the order of President Roosevelt. The bravery, 
sacrifice and commitment of these soldiers to the cause of 
winning the war are legendary. In 1946, Congress provided 
$200,000,000 to the Philippines to create their own veterans 
benefit system and passed the Rescissions Act of 1946 which 
authorized disability pay at a rate for Filipino veterans 
significantly below that paid to American veterans, except to 
the Old Philippine Scouts, who to date receive compensation and 
medical benefits equal to U.S. veterans. The language added by 
this title restores a portion of these benefits to the small 
number of these veterans who live in the U.S. The changes 
include:
            Increasing the disability benefits compensation 
        paid to such veterans who live legally and permanently 
        in the United States to full parity with benefits paid 
        to other entitled veterans. Currently these benefits 
        are paid at a 50 percent level. This affects only the 
        level of benefits paid. No new eligibility is 
        established under this section.
            Filipino veterans who already receive medical care 
        at VA facilities for service-connected conditions are 
        made eligible for full medical and related care at 
        medical care facilities on the same basis as other U.S. 
        veterans. Currently these veterans are only eligible 
        for care for treatment of service-connected problems.
            Veterans living in the Philippines who already 
        receive medical care at a VA facility for service-
        connected conditions are made eligible for full medical 
        care at the VA outpatient facility in the Philippines.
      The conferees believe that recognizing the service of 
these loyal veterans through enactment of a more equitable 
benefit structure is long overdue. Because of the advanced age 
of this small population, enacting legislation has been given 
special consideration in this conference agreement.

                   conference total--with comparisons

      The total new budget (obligational) authority for the 
fiscal year 2001 recommended by the Committee of Conference, 
with comparisons to the fiscal year 2000 amount, the 2001 
budget estimates, and the House and Senate bills for 2001 
follow:

                        [In thousands of dollars]

New budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 2000...     $99,736,845
Budget estimates of new (obligational) authority fiscal 
    year 2001...........................................     109,783,099
House bill, fiscal year 2001............................     103,101,836
Senate bill, fiscal year 2001...........................     107,507,953
Conference agreement, fiscal year 2001..................     107,341,317
Conference agreement compared with:
    New budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 
      2000..............................................      +7,604,472
    Budget estimates of new (obligational) authority, 
      fiscal year 2001..................................      -2,441,782
    House bill, fiscal year 2001........................      +4,239,481
    Senate bill, fiscal year 2001.......................        -166,636
              ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT APPROPRIATIONS

      The conference agreement would enact the provisions of 
H.R. 5483 as introduced on October 18, 2000. The text of that 
bill follows:

 A BILL Making appropriations for energy and water development for the 
     fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, and for other purposes.

      Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives 
of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the 
following sums are appropriated, out of any money in the 
Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for energy and water 
development for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2001, and 
for other purposes, namely:

                                TITLE I

                      DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE--CIVIL

                         DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

                       Corps of Engineers--Civil

      The following appropriations shall be expended under the 
direction of the Secretary of the Army and the supervision of 
the Chief of Engineers for authorized civil functions of the 
Department of the Army pertaining to rivers and harbors, flood 
control, beach erosion, and related purposes.

                         General Investigations

      For expenses necessary for the collection and study of 
basic information pertaining to river and harbor, flood 
control, shore protection, and related projects, restudy of 
authorized projects, miscellaneous investigations, and, when 
authorized by laws, surveys and detailed studies and plans and 
specifications of projects prior to construction, $160,038,000, 
to remain available until expended: Provided, That in 
conducting the Southwest Valley Flood Damage Reduction Study, 
Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Secretary of the Army, acting 
through the Chief of Engineers, shall include an evaluation of 
flood damage reduction measures that would otherwise be 
excluded from the feasibility analysis based on policies 
regarding the frequency of flooding, the drainage areas, and 
the amount of runoff: Provided further, That the Secretary of 
the Army is directed to use $750,000 of the funds appropriated 
herein to continue preconstruction engineering and design for 
the Murrieta Creek, California flood protection and 
environmental restoration project in accordance with 
Alternative 6, based on the Murrieta Creek feasibility report 
and environmental impact statement dated June 2000 at a total 
cost of $90,866,000, with an estimated Federal cost of 
$59,063,900 and an estimated non-Federal cost of $31,803,100.

                         Construction, General

      For the prosecution of river and harbor, flood control, 
shore protection, and related projects authorized by laws; and 
detailed studies, and plans and specifications, of projects 
(including those for development with participation or under 
consideration for participation by States, local governments, 
or private groups) authorized or made eligible for selection by 
law (but such studies shall not constitute a commitment of the 
Government to construction), $1,717,199,000, to remain 
available until expended, of which such sums as are necessary 
for the Federal share of construction costs for facilities 
under the Dredged Material Disposal Facilities program shall be 
derived from the Harbor Maintenance Trust Fund, as authorized 
by Public Law 104-303; and of which such sums as are necessary 
pursuant to Public Law 99-662 shall be derived from the Inland 
Waterways Trust Fund, for one-half of the costs of construction 
and rehabilitation of inland waterways projects, including 
rehabilitation costs for the Lock and Dam 12, Mississippi 
River, Iowa; Lock and Dam 24, Mississippi River, Illinois and 
Missouri; Lock and Dam 3, Mississippi River, Minnesota; and 
London Locks and Dam, and Kanawha River, West Virginia, 
projects; and of which funds are provided for the following 
projects in the amounts specified:
            Elba, Alabama, $8,400,000;
            Geneva, Alabama, $10,800,000;
            San Gabriel Basin Groundwater Restoration, 
        California, $25,000,000;
            San Timoteo Creek (Santa Ana River Mainstem), 
        California, $5,000,000;
            Indianapolis Central Waterfront, Indiana, 
        $10,000,000;
            Southern and Eastern Kentucky, Kentucky, 
        $4,000,000;
            Clover Fork, Middlesboro, City of Cumberland, Town 
        of Martin, Pike County (including Levisa Fork and Tug 
        Fork Tributaries), Bell County, Martin County, and 
        Harlan County, Kentucky, elements of the Levisa and Tug 
        Forks of the Big Sandy River and Upper Cumberland 
        River, Kentucky, $20,000,000: Provided, That the 
        Secretary of the Army, acting through the Chief of 
        Engineers, is directed to proceed with planning, 
        engineering, design and construction of the Town of 
        Martin, Kentucky, element, in accordance with Plan A as 
        set forth in the preliminary draft Detailed Project 
        Report, Appendix T of the General Plan of the 
        Huntington District Commander;
            Jackson County, Mississippi, $2,000,000;
            Bosque and Leon Rivers, Texas, $4,000,000; and
            Upper Mingo County (including Mingo County 
        Tributaries), Lower Mingo County (Kermit), Wayne 
        County, and McDowell County, elements of the Levisa and 
        Tug Forks of the Big Sandy River and Upper Cumberland 
        River project in West Virginia, $4,100,000:
Provided further, That using $900,000 of the funds appropriated 
herein, the Secretary of the Army, acting through the Chief of 
Engineers, is directed to undertake the Bowie County Levee 
project, which is defined as Alternative B Local Sponsor 
Option, in the Corps of Engineers document entitled Bowie 
County Local Flood Protection, Red River, Texas, Project Design 
Memorandum No. 1, Bowie County Levee, dated April 1997: 
Provided further, That no part of any appropriation contained 
in this Act shall be expended or obligated to begin Phase II of 
the John Day Drawdown study or to initiate a study of the 
drawdown of McNary Dam unless authorized by law: Provided 
further, That the Secretary of the Army, acting through the 
Chief of Engineers, is directed hereafter to use available 
Construction, General funds in addition to funding provided in 
Public Law 104-206 to complete design and construction of the 
Red River Regional Visitors Center in the vicinity of 
Shreveport, Louisiana at an estimated cost of $6,000,000: 
Provided further, That section 101(b)(4) of the Water Resources 
Development Act of 1996, is amended by striking ``total cost of 
$8,600,000'' and inserting in lieu thereof ``total cost of 
$15,000,000'': Provided further, That the Secretary of the 
Army, acting through the Chief of Engineers, is directed to use 
$3,000,000 of the funds appropriated herein for additional 
emergency bank stabilization measures at Galena, Alaska under 
the same terms and conditions as previous emergency bank 
stabilization work undertaken at Galena, Alaska pursuant to 
Section 116 of Public Law 99-190: Provided further, That with 
$4,200,000 of the funds appropriated herein, the Secretary of 
the Army, acting through the Chief of Engineers, is directed to 
continue construction of the Brunswick County Beaches, North 
Carolina-Ocean Isle Beach portion in accordance with the 
General Reevaluation Report approved by the Chief of Engineers 
on May 15, 1998: Provided further, That the Secretary of the 
Army, acting through the Chief of Engineers, is directed to use 
not to exceed $300,000 of funds appropriated herein to 
reimburse the City of Renton, Washington, at full Federal 
expense, for mitigation expenses incurred for the flood control 
project constructed pursuant to 33 U.S.C. 701s at Cedar River, 
City of Renton, Washington, as a result of over-dredging by the 
Army Corps of Engineers: Provided further, That $2,000,000 of 
the funds appropriated herein shall be available for 
stabilization and renovation of Lock and Dam 10, Kentucky 
River, Kentucky, subject to enactment of authorization by law: 
Provided further, That the Secretary of the Army, acting 
through the Chief of Engineers, is directed to use $3,000,000 
of the funds appropriated herein to initiate construction of a 
navigation project at Kaumalapau Harbor, Hawaii: Provided 
further, That the Secretary of the Army is directed to use 
$2,000,000 of the funds provided herein for Dam Safety and 
Seepage/Stability Correction Program to design and construct 
seepage control features at Waterbury Dam, Winooski River, 
Vermont: Provided further, That the Secretary of the Army, 
acting through the Chief of Engineers, is directed to design 
and construct barge lanes at the Houston-Galveston Navigation 
Channels, Texas, project, immediately adjacent to either side 
of the Houston Ship Channel, from Bolivar Roads to Morgan 
Point, to a depth of 12 feet with prior years' Construction, 
General carry-over funds: Provided further, That the Secretary 
of the Army, acting through the Chief of Engineers, may use 
Construction, General funding as directed in Public Law 105-62 
and Public Law 105-245 to initiate construction of an emergency 
outlet from Devils Lake, North Dakota, to the Sheyenne River, 
except that the funds shall not become available unless the 
Secretary of the Army determines that an emergency (as defined 
in section 102 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5122)) exists with respect 
to the emergency need for the outlet and reports to Congress 
that the construction is technically sound, economically 
justified, and environmentally acceptable, and in compliance 
with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (42 U.S.C. 
4321 et seq.): Provided further, That the economic 
justification for the emergency outlet shall be prepared in 
accordance with the principles and guidelines for economic 
evaluation as required by regulations and procedures of the 
Army Corps of Engineers for all flood control projects, and 
that the economic justification be fully described, including 
the analysis of the benefits and costs, in the project plan 
documents: Provided further, That the plans for the emergency 
outlet shall be reviewed and, to be effective, shall contain 
assurances provided by the Secretary of State, after 
consultation with the International Joint Commission, that the 
project will not violate the requirements or intent of the 
Treaty Between the United States and Great Britain Relating to 
Boundary Waters Between the United States and Canada, signed at 
Washington, January 11, 1909 (36 Stat. 2448; TS 548) (commonly 
known as the ``Boundary Waters Treaty of 1909''): Provided 
further, That the Secretary of the Army shall submit the final 
plans and other documents for the emergency outlet to Congress: 
Provided further, That no funds made available under this Act 
or any other Act for any fiscal year may be used by the 
Secretary of the Army to carry out the portion of the 
feasibility study of the Devils Lake Basin, North Dakota, 
authorized under the Energy and Water Development 
Appropriations Act, 1993 (Public Law 102-377), that addresses 
the needs of the area for stabilized lake levels through inlet 
controls, or to otherwise study any facility or carry out any 
activity that would permit the transfer of water from the 
Missouri River Basin into Devils Lake: Provided further, That 
within available funds, the Secretary of the Army, acting 
through the Chief of Engineers, is directed to continue 
construction of the Rio Grand de Manati flood control project 
at Barceloneta, Puerto Rico, which was initiated under the 
authority of the Section 205 program prior to being 
specifically authorized in the Water Resources Development Act 
of 1999.


 flood control, mississippi river and tributaries, arkansas, illinois, 
       kentucky, louisiana, mississippi, missouri, and tennessee


      For expenses necessary for prosecuting work of flood 
control, and rescue work, repair, restoration, or maintenance 
of flood control projects threatened or destroyed by flood, as 
authorized by law (33 U.S.C. 702a and 702g-1), $347,731,000, to 
remain available until expended: Provided, That the Secretary 
of the Army is directed to complete his analysis and 
determination of Federal maintenance of the Greenville Inner 
Harbor, Mississippi navigation project in accordance with 
section 509 of the Water Resources Development Act of 1996.

                   Operation and Maintenance, General

      For expenses necessary for the preservation, operation, 
maintenance, and care of existing river and harbor, flood 
control, and related works, including such sums as may be 
necessary for the maintenance of harbor channels provided by a 
State, municipality or other public agency, outside of harbor 
lines, and serving essential needs of general commerce and 
navigation; surveys and charting of northern and northwestern 
lakes and connecting waters; clearing and straightening 
channels; and removal of obstructions to navigation, 
$1,901,959,000, to remain available until expended, of which 
such sums as become available in the Harbor Maintenance Trust 
Fund, pursuant to Public Law 99-662, may be derived from that 
Fund, and of which such sums as become available from the 
special account established by the Land and Water Conservation 
Act of 1965, as amended (16 U.S.C. 460l), may be derived from 
that account for construction, operation, and maintenance of 
outdoor recreation facilities: Provided, That the Secretary of 
the Army, acting through the Chief of Engineers, from the funds 
provided herein for the operation and maintenance of New York 
Harbor, New York, is directed to prepare the necessary 
documentation and initiate removal of submerged obstructions 
and debris in the area previously marked by the Ambrose Light 
Tower in the interest of safe navigation: Provided further, 
That the Secretary of the Army is directed to use $500,000 of 
funds appropriated herein to remove and reinstall the docks and 
causeway, in kind, at Astoria East Boat Basin, Oregon: Provided 
further, That $500,000 of the funds appropriated herein for the 
Ohio River Open Channel, Illinois, Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, 
West Virginia, and Pennsylvania, project, are provided for the 
Secretary of the Army, acting through the Chief of Engineers, 
to dredge a channel from the mouth of Wheeling Creek to Tunnel 
Green Park in Wheeling, West Virginia.

                           Regulatory Program

      For expenses necessary for administration of laws 
pertaining to regulation of navigable waters and wetlands, 
$125,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
That the Secretary of the Army, acting through the Chief of 
Engineers, is directed to use funds appropriated herein to: (1) 
by March 1, 2001, supplement the report, Cost Analysis For the 
1999 Proposal to Issue and Modify Nationwide Permits, to 
reflect the Nationwide Permits actually issued on March 9, 
2000, including changes in the acreage limits, preconstruction 
notification requirements and general conditions between the 
rule proposed on July 21, 1999, and the rule promulgated and 
published in the Federal Register; (2) after consideration of 
the cost analysis for the 1999 proposal to issue and modify 
nationwide permits and the supplement prepared pursuant to this 
Act and by September 30, 2001, prepare, submit to Congress and 
publish in the Federal Register a Permit Processing Management 
Plan by which the Corps of Engineers will handle the additional 
work associated with all projected increases in the number of 
individual permit applications and preconstruction 
notifications related to the new and replacement permits and 
general conditions. The Permit Processing Management Plan shall 
include specific objective goals and criteria by which the 
Corps of Engineers' progress towards reducing any permit 
backlog can be measured; (3) beginning on December 31, 2001, 
and on a biannual basis thereafter, report to Congress and 
publish in the Federal Register, an analysis of the performance 
of its program as measured against the criteria set out in the 
Permit Processing Management Plan; (4) implement a 1-year pilot 
program to publish quarterly on the U.S. Army Corps of 
Engineer's Regulatory Program website all Regulatory Analysis 
and Management Systems (RAMS) data for the South Pacific 
Division and North Atlantic Division beginning within 30 days 
of the enactment of this Act; and (5) publish in Division 
Office websites all findings, rulings, and decisions rendered 
under the administrative appeals process for the Corps of 
Engineers Regulatory Program as established in Public Law 106-
60: Provided further, That, through the period ending on 
September 30, 2003, the Corps of Engineers shall allow any 
appellant to keep a verbatim record of the proceedings of the 
appeals conference under the aforementioned administrative 
appeals process: Provided further, That within 30 days of the 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of the Army, acting 
through the Chief of Engineers, shall require all U.S. Army 
Corps of Engineers Divisions and Districts to record the date 
on which a section 404 individual permit application or 
nationwide permit notification is filed with the Corps of 
Engineers: Provided further, That the Corps of Engineers, when 
reporting permit processing times, shall track both the date a 
permit application is first received and the date the 
application is considered complete, as well as the reason that 
the application is not considered complete upon first 
submission.

            Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

      For expenses necessary to clean up contamination from 
sites throughout the United States resulting from work 
performed as part of the Nation's early atomic energy program, 
$140,000,000, to remain available until expended.

                            General Expenses

      For expenses necessary for general administration and 
related functions in the Office of the Chief of Engineers and 
offices of the Division Engineers; activities of the Coastal 
Engineering Research Board, the Humphreys Engineer Center 
Support Activity, the Water Resources Support Center, and 
headquarters support functions at the USACE Finance Center, 
$152,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
That no part of any other appropriation provided in title I of 
this Act shall be available to fund the activities of the 
Office of the Chief of Engineers or the executive direction and 
management activities of the division offices: Provided 
further, That none of these funds shall be available to support 
an office of congressional affairs within the executive office 
of the Chief of Engineers.

                             Revolving Fund

      Amounts in the Revolving Fund are available for the costs 
of relocating the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers headquarters to 
office space in the General Accounting Office headquarters 
building in Washington, D.C.

                       Administrative Provisions

      Appropriations in this title shall be available for 
official reception and representation expenses (not to exceed 
$5,000); and during the current fiscal year the Revolving Fund, 
Corps of Engineers, shall be available for purchase (not to 
exceed 100 for replacement only) and hire of passenger motor 
vehicles.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                       Corps of Engineers--Civil

      Sec. 101. (a) The Secretary of the Army shall enter into 
an agreement with the City of Grand Prairie, Texas, wherein the 
City agrees to assume all of the responsibilities of the 
Trinity River Authority of Texas under Contract No. DACW63-76-
C-0166, other than financial responsibilities, except as 
provided for in subsection (c) of this section. The Trinity 
River Authority shall be relieved of all of its financial 
responsibilities under the Contract as of the date the 
Secretary of the Army enters into the agreement with the City.
      (b) In consideration of the agreement referred to in 
subsection (a), the City shall pay the Federal Government a 
total of $4,290,000 in two installments, one in the amount of 
$2,150,000, which shall be due and payable no later than 
December 1, 2000, and one in the amount of $2,140,000, which 
shall be due and payable no later than December 1, 2003.
      (c) The agreement executed pursuant to subsection (a) 
shall include a provision requiring the City to assume all 
costs associated with operation and maintenance of the 
recreation facilities included in the Contract referred to in 
that subsection.
      Sec. 102. Agreements proposed for execution by the 
Assistant Secretary of the Army for Civil Works or the United 
States Army Corps of Engineers after the date of the enactment 
of this Act pursuant to section 4 of the Rivers and Harbor Act 
of 1915, Public Law 64-291; section 11 of the River and Harbor 
Act of 1925, Public Law 68-585; the Civil Functions 
Appropriations Act, 1936, Public Law 75-208; section 215 of the 
Flood Control Act of 1968, as amended, Public Law 90-483; 
sections 104, 203, and 204 of the Water Resources Development 
Act of 1986, as amended (Public Law 99-662); section 206 of the 
Water Resources Development Act of 1992, as amended, Public Law 
102-580; section 211 of the Water Resources Development Act of 
1996, Public Law 104-303, and any other specific project 
authority, shall be limited to credits and reimbursements per 
project not to exceed $10,000,000 in each fiscal year, and 
total credits and reimbursements for all applicable projects 
not to exceed $50,000,000 in each fiscal year.
      Sec. 103. The Secretary of the Army, acting through the 
Chief of Engineers, is authorized to construct the locally 
preferred plan for flood control, environmental restoration and 
recreation, Murrieta Creek, California, described as 
Alternative 6, based on the Murrieta Creek Feasibility Report 
and Environmental Impact Statement dated October 2000, at a 
total cost of $89,850,000, with an estimated Federal cost of 
$57,735,000 and an estimated non-Federal cost of $32,115,000.
      Sec. 104. St. Georges Bridge, Delaware.--None of the 
funds made available by this Act may be used to carry out any 
activity relating to closure or removal of the St. Georges 
Bridge across the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal, Delaware, 
including a hearing or any other activity relating to 
preparation of an environmental impact statement concerning the 
closure or removal.
    Sec. 105. Within available funds under title I, the 
Secretary of the Army, acting through the Chief of Engineers, 
shall provide up to $7,000,000 to replace and upgrade the dam 
in Kake, Alaska which collapsed July 2000, to provide drinking 
water and hydroelectricity.

                                TITLE II

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                          Central Utah Project


                central utah project completion account


    For carrying out activities authorized by the Central Utah 
Project Completion Act, $38,724,000, to remain available until 
expended, of which $19,158,000 shall be deposited into the Utah 
Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Account: Provided, That 
of the amounts deposited into that account, $5,000,000 shall be 
considered the Federal contribution authorized by paragraph 
402(b)(2) of the Central Utah Project Completion Act and 
$14,158,000 shall be available to the Utah Reclamation 
Mitigation and Conservation Commission to carry out activities 
authorized under that Act.
    In addition, for necessary expenses incurred in carrying 
out related responsibilities of the Secretary of the Interior, 
$1,216,000, to remain available until expended.

                         Bureau of Reclamation

    The following appropriations shall be expended to execute 
authorized functions of the Bureau of Reclamation:


                      water and related resources


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For management, development, and restoration of water and 
related natural resources and for related activities, including 
the operation, maintenance and rehabilitation of reclamation 
and other facilities, participation in fulfilling related 
Federal responsibilities to Native Americans, and related 
grants to, and cooperative and other agreements with, State and 
local governments, Indian tribes, and others, $678,450,000, to 
remain available until expended, of which $1,916,000 shall be 
available for transfer to the Upper Colorado River Basin Fund 
and $39,467,000 shall be available for transfer to the Lower 
Colorado River Basin Development Fund; of which such amounts as 
may be necessary may be advanced to the Colorado River Dam 
Fund; of which $16,000,000 shall be for on-reservation water 
development, feasibility studies, and related administrative 
costs under Public Law 106-163; of which not more than 25 
percent of the amount provided for drought emergency assistance 
may be used for financial assistance for the preparation of 
cooperative drought contingency plans under Title II of Public 
Law 102-250; and of which not more than $500,000 is for high 
priority projects which shall be carried out by the Youth 
Conservation Corps, as authorized by 16 U.S.C. 1706: Provided, 
That such transfers may be increased or decreased within the 
overall appropriation under this heading: Provided further, 
That of the total appropriated, the amount for program 
activities that can be financed by the Reclamation Fund or the 
Bureau of Reclamation special fee account established by 16 
U.S.C. 460l-6a(i) shall be derived from that Fund or account: 
Provided further, That funds contributed under 43 U.S.C. 395 
are available until expended for the purposes for which 
contributed: Provided further, That funds advanced under 43 
U.S.C. 397a shall be credited to this account and are available 
until expended for the same purposes as the sums appropriated 
under this heading: Provided further, That funds available for 
expenditure for the Departmental Irrigation Drainage Program 
may be expended by the Bureau of Reclamation for site 
remediation on a non-reimbursable basis: Provided further, That 
section 301 of Public Law 102-250, Reclamation States Emergency 
Drought Relief Act of 1991, as amended, is amended further by 
inserting ``2000, and 2001'' in lieu of ``and 2000'': Provided 
further, That the amount authorized for Indian municipal, 
rural, and industrial water features by section 10 of Public 
Law 89-108, as amended by section 8 of Public Law 99-294, 
section 1701(b) of Public Law 102-575, Public Law 105-245, and 
Public Law 106-60 is increased by $2,000,000 (October 1998 
prices): Provided further, That the amount authorized for 
Minidoka Project North Side Pumping Division, Idaho, by Section 
5 of Public Law 81-864, is increased by $2,805,000: Provided 
further, That the Reclamation Safety of Dams Act of 1978 (43 
U.S.C. 509) is amended as follows: (1) by inserting in Section 
4(c) after ``1984,'' and before ``costs'' the following: ``and 
the additional $95,000,000 further authorized to be 
appropriated by amendments to that Act in 2000,''; (2) by 
inserting in section 5 after ``levels),'' and before ``plus'' 
the following: ``and, effective October 1, 2000, not to exceed 
an additional $95,000,000 (October 1, 2000, price levels),''; 
and (3) by striking ``sixty days (which'' and all that follows 
through ``day certain)'' and inserting in lieu thereof ``30 
calendar days''.


               bureau of reclamation loan program account


    For the cost of direct loans and/or grants, $8,944,000, to 
remain available until expended, as authorized by the Small 
Reclamation Projects Act of August 6, 1956, as amended (43 
U.S.C. 422a-422l): Provided, That such costs, including the 
cost of modifying such loans, shall be as defined in section 
502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended: 
Provided further, That these funds are available to subsidize 
gross obligations for the principal amount of direct loans not 
to exceed $27,000,000.
    In addition, for administrative expenses necessary to carry 
out the program for direct loans and/or grants, $425,000, to 
remain available until expended: Provided, That of the total 
sums appropriated, the amount of program activities that can be 
financed by the Reclamation Fund shall be derived from that 
Fund.


                central valley project restoration fund


    For carrying out the programs, projects, plans, and habitat 
restoration, improvement, and acquisition provisions of the 
Central Valley Project Improvement Act, $38,382,000, to be 
derived from such sums as may be collected in the Central 
Valley Project Restoration Fund pursuant to sections 3407(d), 
3404(c)(3), 3405(f ), and 3406(c)(1) of Public Law 102-575, to 
remain available until expended: Provided, That the Bureau of 
Reclamation is directed to assess and collect the full amount 
of the additional mitigation and restoration payments 
authorized by section 3407(d) of Public Law 102-575.


                       policy and administration


    For necessary expenses of policy, administration, and 
related functions in the office of the Commissioner, the Denver 
office, and offices in the five regions of the Bureau of 
Reclamation, to remain available until expended, $50,224,000, 
to be derived from the Reclamation Fund and be nonreimbursable 
as provided in 43 U.S.C. 377: Provided, That no part of any 
other appropriation in this Act shall be available for 
activities or functions budgeted as policy and administration 
expenses.


                        administrative provision


    Appropriations for the Bureau of Reclamation shall be 
available for purchase of not to exceed four passenger motor 
vehicles for replacement only.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

    Sec. 201. None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available by this or any other Act may be used to pay the 
salaries and expenses of personnel to purchase or lease water 
in the Middle Rio Grande or the Carlsbad Projects in New Mexico 
unless said purchase or lease is in compliance with the 
purchase requirements of section 202 of Public Law 106-60.
    Sec. 202. Funds under this title for Drought Emergency 
Assistance shall be made available primarily for leasing of 
water for specified drought related purposes from willing 
lessors, in compliance with existing State laws and 
administered under State water priority allocation. Such leases 
may be entered into with an option to purchase: Provided, That 
such purchase is approved by the State in which the purchase 
takes place and the purchase does not cause economic harm 
within the State in which the purchase is made.
    Sec. 203. Beginning in fiscal year 2001 and thereafter, the 
Secretary of the Interior shall assess and collect annually 
from Central Valley Project (CVP) water and power contractors 
the sum of $540,000 (June 2000 price levels) and remit, without 
further appropriation, the amount collected annually to the 
Trinity Public Utilities District (TPUD). This assessment shall 
be payable 70 percent by CVP Preference Power Customers and 30 
percent by CVP Water Contractors. The CVP Water Contractor 
share of this assessment shall be collected by the Secretary 
through established Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) 
Operation and Maintenance ratesetting practices. The CVP Power 
Contractor share of this assessment shall be assessed by 
Reclamation to the Western Area Power Administration, Sierra 
Nevada Region (Western), and collected by Western through 
established power ratesetting practices.
    Sec. 204. (a) In General.--For fiscal year 2001 and each 
fiscal year thereafter, the Secretary of the Interior shall 
continue funding, from power revenues, the activities of the 
Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program as authorized by 
section 1807 of the Grand Canyon Protection Act of 1992 (106 
Stat. 4672), at not more than $7,850,000 (October 2000 price 
level), adjusted in subsequent years to reflect changes in the 
Consumer Price Index for All Urban Consumers published by the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics of the Department of Labor.
    (b) Voluntary Contributions.--Nothing in this section 
precludes the use of voluntary financial contributions (except 
power revenues) to the Adaptive Management Program that may be 
authorized by law.
    (c) Activities To Be Funded.--The activities to be funded 
as provided under subsection (a) include activities required to 
meet the requirements of section 1802(a) and subsections (a) 
and (b) of section 1805 of the Grand Canyon Protection Act of 
1992 (106 Stat. 4672), including the requirements of the 
Biological Opinion on the Operation of Glen Canyon Dam and 
activities required by the Programmatic Agreement on Cultural 
and Historic Properties, to the extent that the requirements 
and activities are consistent with the Grand Canyon Protection 
Act of 1992 (106 Stat. 4672).
    (d) Additional Funding.--To the extent that funding under 
subsection (a) is insufficient to pay the costs of the 
monitoring and research and other activities of the Glen Canyon 
Dam Adaptive Management Program, the Secretary of the Interior 
may use funding from other sources, including funds 
appropriated for that purpose. All such appropriated funds 
shall be nonreimbursable and nonreturnable.
    Sec. 205. The Secretary of the Interior is authorized and 
directed to use not to exceed $1,000,000 of the funds 
appropriated under title II to refund amounts received by the 
United States as payments for charges assessed by the Secretary 
prior to January 1, 1994 for failure to file certain 
certification or reporting forms prior to the receipt of 
irrigation water, pursuant to sections 206 and 224(c) of the 
Reclamation Reform Act of 1982 (96 Stat. 1226, 1272; 43 U.S.C. 
390ff, 390ww(c)), including the amount of associated interest 
assessed by the Secretary and paid to the United States 
pursuant to section 224(i) of the Reclamation Reform Act of 
1982 (101 Stat. 1330-268; 43 U.S.C. 390ww(i)).
    Sec. 206. Canyon Ferry Reservoir, Montana. (a) 
Appraisals.--Section 1004(c)(2)(B) of title X of division C of 
the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental 
Appropriations Act, 1999 (112 Stat. 2681-713; 113 Stat. 1501A-
307) is amended--
            (1) in clause (i), by striking ``be based on'' and 
        inserting ``use'';
            (2) in clause (vi), by striking ``Notwithstanding 
        any other provision of law,'' and inserting ``To the 
        extent consistent with the Uniform Appraisal Standards 
        for Federal Land Acquisition,''; and
            (3) by adding at the end the following:
                    ``(vii) Applicability.--This subparagraph 
                shall apply to the extent that its application 
                is practicable and consistent with the Uniform 
                Appraisal Standards for Federal Land 
                Acquisition.''.
    (b) Timing.--Section 1004(f )(2) of title X of division C 
of the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental 
Appropriations Act, 1999 (112 Stat. 2681-714; 113 Stat. 1501A-
308) is amended by inserting after ``Act,'' the following: ``in 
accordance with all applicable law,''.
    (c) Interest.--Section 1008(b) of title X of division C of 
the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental 
Appropriations Act, 1999 (112 Stat. 2681-717; 113 Stat. 1501A-
310) is amended by striking paragraph (4).
    Sec. 207. Beginning in fiscal year 2000 and thereafter, any 
amounts provided for the Newlands Water Rights Fund for 
purchasing and retiring water rights in the Newlands 
Reclamation Project shall be non-reimbursable.
    Sec. 208. Use of Colorado-Big Thompson Project Facilities 
for Nonproject Water.--The Secretary of the Interior may enter 
into contracts with the city of Loveland, Colorado, or its 
Water and Power Department or any other agency, public utility, 
or enterprise of the city, providing for the use of facilities 
of the Colorado-Big Thompson Project, Colorado, under the Act 
of February 21, 1911 (43 U.S.C. 523), for--
            (1) the impounding, storage, and carriage of 
        nonproject water originating on the eastern slope of 
        the Rocky Mountains for domestic, municipal, 
        industrial, and other beneficial purposes; and
            (2) the exchange of water originating on the 
        eastern slope of the Rocky Mountains for the purposes 
        specified in paragraph (1), using facilities associated 
        with the Colorado-Big Thompson Project, Colorado.
    Sec. 209. Amendment to Irrigation Project Contract 
Extension Act of 1998.--(a) Section 2(a) of the Irrigation 
Project Contract Extension Act of 1998, Public Law 105-293, is 
amended by striking the date ``December 31, 2000'', and 
inserting in lieu thereof the date ``December 31, 2003''; and
    (b) Subsection 2(b) of the Irrigation Project Contract 
Extension Act of 1998, Public Law 105-293, is amended by--
            (1) striking the phrase ``not to go beyond December 
        31, 2001'', and inserting in lieu thereof the phrase 
        ``not to go beyond December 31, 2003''; and
            (2) striking the phrase ``terminates prior to 
        December 31, 2000'', and inserting in lieu thereof 
        ``terminates prior to December 31, 2003''.
    Sec. 210. Section 202 of Division B, Title I, Chapter 2 of 
Public Law 106-246 is amended by adding at the end the 
following: ``This section shall be effective through September 
30, 2001.''.
      Sec. 211. (a) Section 106 of the San Luis Rey Indian 
Water Rights Settlement Act (Public Law 100-675; 102 Stat. 4000 
et seq.) is amended by adding at the end the following new 
subsection:
      ``(f) Requirements To Furnish Water, Power Capacity, and 
Energy.--Notwithstanding any other provision of law, in order 
to fulfill the trust responsibility to the Bands, the 
Secretary, acting through the Commissioner of Reclamation, 
shall permanently furnish annually the following:
            ``(1) Water.--16,000 acre-feet of the water 
        conserved by the works authorized by title II, for the 
        benefit of the Bands and the local entities in 
        accordance with the settlement agreement: Provided, 
        That during construction of said works, the Indian 
        Water Authority and the local entities shall receive 17 
        percent of any water conserved by said works up to a 
        maximum of 16,000 acre-feet per year. The Indian Water 
        Authority and the local entities shall pay their 
        proportionate share of such costs as are provided by 
        section 203(b) of title II or are agreed to by them.
            ``(2) Power capacity and energy.--Beginning on the 
        date when conserved water from the works authorized by 
        title II first becomes available, power capacity and 
        energy through the Yuma Arizona Area Aggregate Power 
        Managers (Yuma Area Contractors), at no cost and at no 
        further expense to the United States, the Indian Water 
        Authority, the Bands, and the local entities, in 
        amounts sufficient to convey the water conserved 
        pursuant to paragraph (1) from Lake Havasu through the 
        Colorado River Aqueduct and to the places of use on the 
        Bands' reservations or in the local entities' service 
        areas in accordance with the settlement agreement. The 
        Secretary, through a coterminous exhibit to Bureau of 
        Reclamation Contract No. 6-CU-30-P1136, shall enter 
        into an agreement with the Yuma Area Contractors which 
        shall provide for furnishing annually and permanently 
        said power capacity and energy by said Yuma Area 
        Contractors at no cost and at no further expense to the 
        United States, the Indian Water Authority, the Bands, 
        and the local entities. The Secretary shall authorize 
        the Yuma Area Contractors to utilize Federal project 
        use power provided in Bureau of Reclamation Contracts 
        numbered 6-CU-30-P1136, 6-CU-30-P1137, and 6-CU-30-
        P1138 for the full range of purposes served by the Yuma 
        Area Contractors, including the purpose of supplying 
        the power capacity and energy to convey the conserved 
        water referred to in paragraph (1), for so long as the 
        Yuma Area Contractors meet their obligation to provide 
        sufficient power capacity and energy for the conveyance 
        of said conserved water. If for any reason the Yuma 
        Area Contractors do not provide said power capacity and 
        energy for the conveyance of said conserved water, then 
        the Secretary shall furnish said power capacity and 
        energy annually and permanently at the lowest rate 
        assigned to project use power within the jurisdiction 
        of the Bureau of Reclamation in accordance with Exhibit 
        E `Project Use Power' of the Agreement between Water 
        and Power Resources Service, Department of the 
        Interior, and Western Area Power Administration, 
        Department of Energy (March 26, 1980).''.
      (b) Title II of the San Luis Rey Indian Water Rights 
Settlement Act (Public Law 100-675; 102 Stat. 4000 et seq.) is 
amended by adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 210. ANNUAL REPAYMENT INSTALLMENTS.

      ``During the period of planning, design, and construction 
of the works and during the period that the Indian Water 
Authority and the local entities receive up to 16,000 acre-feet 
of the water conserved by the works, the annual repayment 
installments provided in section 102(b) of the Colorado River 
Basin Salinity Control Act (Public Law 93-320; 88 Stat. 268) 
shall continue to be non-reimbursable. Nothing in this section 
shall affect the national obligation set forth in section 
101(c) of such Act.''.
    Sec. 212. (a) Definitions.--For the purpose of this 
section, the term--
            (1) ``Secretary'' means the Secretary of the 
        Interior;
            (2) ``Sly Park Unit'' means the Sly Park Dam and 
        Reservoir, Camp Creek Diversion Dam and Tunnel, and 
        conduits and canals as authorized under the American 
        River Act of October 14, 1949 (63 Stat. 853), including 
        those used to convey, treat, and store water delivered 
        from Sly Park, as well as all recreation facilities 
        thereto; and
            (3) ``District'' means the El Dorado Irrigation 
        District.
    (b) In General.--The Secretary shall, as soon as 
practicable after date of the enactment of this Act and in 
accordance with all applicable law, transfer all right, title, 
and interest in and to the Sly Park Unit to the District.
    (c) Sale Price.--The Secretary is authorized to receive 
from the District $2,000,000 to relieve payment obligations and 
extinguish the debt under contract number 14-06-200-949IR3, and 
$9,500,000 to relieve payment obligations and extinguish all 
debts associated with contracts numbered 14-06-200-7734, as 
amended by contracts numbered 14-06-200-4282A and 14-06-200-
8536A. Notwithstanding the preceding sentence, the District 
shall continue to make payments required by section 3407(c) of 
Public Law 102-575 through year 2029.
    (d) Credit Revenue to Project Repayment.--Upon payment 
authorized under subsection (b), the amount paid shall be 
credited toward repayment of capital costs of the Central 
Valley Project in an amount equal to the associated 
undiscounted obligation.
    (e) Future Benefits.--Upon payment, the Sly Park Unit shall 
no longer be a Federal reclamation project or a unit of the 
Central Valley Project, and the District shall not be entitled 
to receive any further reclamation benefits.
      (f) Liability.--Except as otherwise provided by law, 
effective on the date of conveyance of the Sly Park Unit under 
this Act, the United States shall not be liable for damages of 
any kind arising out of any act, omission, or occurrence based 
on its prior ownership or operation of the conveyed property.
      (g) Costs.--All costs, including interest charges, 
associated with the Project that have been included as a 
reimbursable cost of the Central Valley Project are declared to 
be nonreimbursable and nonreturnable.

                               TITLE III

                          DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

                            ENERGY PROGRAMS

                             Energy Supply

      For Department of Energy expenses including the purchase, 
construction and acquisition of plant and capital equipment, 
and other expenses necessary for energy supply, and uranium 
supply and enrichment activities in carrying out the purposes 
of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et 
seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real 
property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, 
construction, or expansion; and the purchase of not to exceed 
17 passenger motor vehicles for replacement only, $660,574,000 
to remain available until expended: Provided, That, in 
addition, royalties received to compensate the Department of 
Energy for its participation in the First-Of-A-Kind-Engineering 
program shall be credited to this account to be available until 
September 30, 2002, for the purposes of Nuclear Energy, Science 
and Technology activities.

                  Non-Defense Environmental Management

      For Department of Energy expenses, including the 
purchase, construction and acquisition of plant and capital 
equipment and other expenses necessary for non-defense 
environmental management activities in carrying out the 
purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 
U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation 
of any real property or any facility or for plant or facility 
acquisition, construction or expansion, $277,812,000, to remain 
available until expended.

             Uranium Facilities Maintenance and Remediation


                     (including transfer of funds)


      For necessary expenses to maintain, decontaminate, 
decommission, and otherwise remediate uranium processing 
facilities, $393,367,000, of which $345,038,000 shall be 
derived from the Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and 
Decommissioning Fund, all of which shall remain available until 
expended: Provided, That $72,000,000 of amounts derived from 
the Fund for such expenses shall be available in accordance 
with title X, subtitle A, of the Energy Policy Act of 1992.

                                Science

      For Department of Energy expenses including the purchase, 
construction and acquisition of plant and capital equipment, 
and other expenses necessary for science activities in carrying 
out the purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act 
(42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the acquisition or 
condemnation of any real property or facility or for plant or 
facility acquisition, construction, or expansion, and purchase 
of not to exceed 58 passenger motor vehicles for replacement 
only, $3,186,352,000, to remain available until expended.

                         Nuclear Waste Disposal

      For nuclear waste disposal activities to carry out the 
purposes of Public Law 97-425, as amended, including the 
acquisition of real property or facility construction or 
expansion, $191,074,000, to remain available until expended and 
to be derived from the Nuclear Waste Fund: Provided, That not 
to exceed $2,500,000 may be provided to the State of Nevada 
solely for expenditures, other than salaries and expenses of 
State employees, to conduct scientific oversight 
responsibilities pursuant to the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 
1982, Public Law 97-425, as amended: Provided further, That 
$6,000,000 shall be provided to affected units of local 
governments, as defined in Public Law 97-425, to conduct 
appropriate activities pursuant to the Act: Provided further, 
That the distribution of the funds as determined by the units 
of local government shall be approved by the Department of 
Energy: Provided further, That the funds for the State of 
Nevada shall be made available solely to the Nevada Division of 
Emergency Management by direct payment and units of local 
government by direct payment: Provided further, That within 90 
days of the completion of each Federal fiscal year, the Nevada 
Division of Emergency Management and the Governor of the State 
of Nevada and each local entity shall provide certification to 
the Department of Energy that all funds expended from such 
payments have been expended for activities authorized by Public 
Law 97-425 and this Act. Failure to provide such certification 
shall cause such entity to be prohibited from any further 
funding provided for similar activities: Provided further, That 
none of the funds herein appropriated may be: (1) used directly 
or indirectly to influence legislative action on any matter 
pending before Congress or a State legislature or for lobbying 
activity as provided in 18 U.S.C. 1913; (2) used for litigation 
expenses; or (3) used to support multi-State efforts or other 
coalition building activities inconsistent with the 
restrictions contained in this Act: Provided further, That all 
proceeds and recoveries by the Secretary in carrying out 
activities authorized by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 
in Public Law 97-425, as amended, including but not limited to, 
any proceeds from the sale of assets, shall be available 
without further appropriation and shall remain available until 
expended.

                      Departmental Administration

      For salaries and expenses of the Department of Energy 
necessary for departmental administration in carrying out the 
purposes of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 
U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the hire of passenger motor 
vehicles and official reception and representation expenses 
(not to exceed $35,000), $226,107,000, to remain available 
until expended, plus such additional amounts as necessary to 
cover increases in the estimated amount of cost of work for 
others notwithstanding the provisions of the Anti-Deficiency 
Act (31 U.S.C. 1511 et seq.): Provided, That such increases in 
cost of work are offset by revenue increases of the same or 
greater amount, to remain available until expended: Provided 
further, That moneys received by the Department for 
miscellaneous revenues estimated to total $151,000,000 in 
fiscal year 2001 may be retained and used for operating 
expenses within this account, and may remain available until 
expended, as authorized by section 201 of Public Law 95-238, 
notwithstanding the provisions of 31 U.S.C. 3302: Provided 
further, That the sum herein appropriated shall be reduced by 
the amount of miscellaneous revenues received during fiscal 
year 2001 so as to result in a final fiscal year 2001 
appropriation from the General Fund estimated at not more than 
$75,107,000.

                    Office of the Inspector General

      For necessary expenses of the Office of the Inspector 
General in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General 
Act of 1978, as amended, $31,500,000, to remain available until 
expended.

                    ATOMIC ENERGY DEFENSE ACTIVITIES

                National Nuclear Security Administration


                           weapons activities


      For Department of Energy expenses, including the 
purchase, construction and acquisition of plant and capital 
equipment and other incidental expenses necessary for atomic 
energy defense weapons activities in carrying out the purposes 
of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et 
seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real 
property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, 
construction, or expansion; and the purchase of passenger motor 
vehicles (not to exceed 12 for replacement only), 
$5,015,186,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
That, $130,000,000 shall be immediately available for Project 
96-D-111, the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore 
National Laboratory: Provided further, That $69,100,000 shall 
be available only upon a certification by the Administrator of 
the National Nuclear Security Administration to the Congress 
after March 31, 2001, that: (a) includes a recommendation on an 
appropriate path forward for the project; (b) certifies all 
established project and scientific milestones have been met on 
schedule and on cost; (c) certifies the first and second 
quarter project reviews in fiscal year 2001 determined the 
project to be on schedule and cost; (d) includes a study of 
requirements for and alternatives to a 192 beam ignition 
facility for maintaining the safety and reliability of the 
current nuclear weapons stockpile; (e) certifies an integrated 
cost-schedule earned-value project control system has been 
fully implemented; and (f ) includes a 5-year budget plan for 
the stockpile stewardship program.


                    defense nuclear nonproliferation


      For Department of Energy expenses, including the 
purchase, construction and acquisition of plant and capital 
equipment and other incidental expenses necessary for atomic 
energy defense, Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation activities, in 
carrying out the purposes of the Department of Energy 
Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the 
acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any 
facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or 
expansion, $874,196,000, to remain available until expended: 
Provided, That not to exceed $7,000 may be used for official 
reception and representation expenses for national security and 
nonproliferation (including transparency) activities in fiscal 
year 2001.


                             naval reactors


      For Department of Energy expenses necessary for naval 
reactors activities to carry out the Department of Energy 
Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the 
acquisition (by purchase, condemnation, construction, or 
otherwise) of real property, plant, and capital equipment, 
facilities, and facility expansion, $690,163,000, to remain 
available until expended.


                      office of the administrator


      For necessary expenses of the Office of the Administrator 
of the National Nuclear Security Administration, including 
official reception and representation expenses (not to exceed 
$5,000), $10,000,000, to remain available until expended.

                    OTHER DEFENSE RELATED ACTIVITIES

         Defense Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

      For Department of Energy expenses, including the 
purchase, construction and acquisition of plant and capital 
equipment and other expenses necessary for atomic energy 
defense environmental restoration and waste management 
activities in carrying out the purposes of the Department of 
Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including the 
acquisition or condemnation of any real property or any 
facility or for plant or facility acquisition, construction, or 
expansion; and the purchase of 30 passenger motor vehicles for 
replacement only, $4,974,476,000, to remain available until 
expended.

                  Defense Facilities Closure Projects

      For expenses of the Department of Energy to accelerate 
the closure of defense environmental management sites, 
including the purchase, construction and acquisition of plant 
and capital equipment and other necessary expenses, 
$1,082,714,000, to remain available until expended.

             Defense Environmental Management Privatization

      For Department of Energy expenses for privatization 
projects necessary for atomic energy defense environmental 
management activities authorized by the Department of Energy 
Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), $65,000,000, to 
remain available until expended.

                        Other Defense Activities

      For Department of Energy expenses, including the 
purchase, construction and acquisition of plant and capital 
equipment and other expenses necessary for atomic energy 
defense, other defense activities, in carrying out the purposes 
of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et 
seq.), including the acquisition or condemnation of any real 
property or any facility or for plant or facility acquisition, 
construction, or expansion, $585,755,000, to remain available 
until expended, of which $17,000,000 shall be for the 
Department of Energy Employees Compensation Initiative upon 
enactment of authorization legislation into law.

                     Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal

      For nuclear waste disposal activities to carry out the 
purposes of Public Law 97-425, as amended, including the 
acquisition of real property or facility construction or 
expansion, $200,000,000, to remain available until expended.

                    Power Marketing Administrations


                  bonneville power administration fund


      Expenditures from the Bonneville Power Administration 
Fund, established pursuant to Public Law 93-454, are approved 
for the Nez Perce Tribe Resident Fish Substitution Program, the 
Cour D'Alene Tribe Trout Production facility, and for official 
reception and representation expenses in an amount not to 
exceed $1,500.
      During fiscal year 2001, no new direct loan obligations 
may be made. Section 511 of the Energy and Water Development 
Appropriations Act, 1997 (Public Law 104-206), is amended by 
striking the last sentence and inserting ``This authority shall 
expire January 1, 2003.''.

      Operation and Maintenance, Southeastern Power Administration

      For necessary expenses of operation and maintenance of 
power transmission facilities and of marketing electric power 
and energy, including transmission wheeling and ancillary 
services, pursuant to the provisions of section 5 of the Flood 
Control Act of 1944 (16 U.S.C. 825s), as applied to the 
southeastern power area, $3,900,000, to remain available until 
expended; in addition, notwithstanding the provisions of 31 
U.S.C. 3302, amounts collected by the Southeastern Power 
Administration pursuant to the Flood Control Act to recover 
purchase power and wheeling expenses shall be credited to this 
account as offsetting collections, to remain available until 
expended for the sole purpose of making purchase power and 
wheeling expenditures as follows: for fiscal year 2001, up to 
$34,463,000; for fiscal year 2002, up to $26,463,000; for 
fiscal year 2003, up to $20,000,000; and for fiscal year 2004, 
up to $15,000,000.

      Operation and Maintenance, Southwestern Power Administration

      For necessary expenses of operation and maintenance of 
power transmission facilities and of marketing electric power 
and energy, and for construction and acquisition of 
transmission lines, substations and appurtenant facilities, and 
for administrative expenses, including official reception and 
representation expenses in an amount not to exceed $1,500 in 
carrying out the provisions of section 5 of the Flood Control 
Act of 1944 (16 U.S.C. 825s), as applied to the southwestern 
power area, $28,100,000, to remain available until expended; in 
addition, notwithstanding the provisions of 31 U.S.C. 3302, not 
to exceed $4,200,000 in reimbursements, to remain available 
until expended: Provided, That amounts collected by the 
Southwestern Power Administration pursuant to the Flood Control 
Act to recover purchase power and wheeling expenses shall be 
credited to this account as offsetting collections, to remain 
available until expended for the sole purpose of making 
purchase power and wheeling expenditures as follows: for fiscal 
year 2001, up to $288,000; for fiscal year 2002, up to 
$288,000; for fiscal year 2003, up to $288,000; and for fiscal 
year 2004, up to $288,000.


 construction, rehabilitation, operation and maintenance, western area 
                          power administration


      For carrying out the functions authorized by title III, 
section 302(a)(1)(E) of the Act of August 4, 1977 (42 U.S.C. 
7152), and other related activities including conservation and 
renewable resources programs as authorized, including official 
reception and representation expenses in an amount not to 
exceed $1,500, $165,830,000, to remain available until 
expended, of which $154,616,000 shall be derived from the 
Department of the Interior Reclamation Fund: Provided, That of 
the amount herein appropriated, $5,950,000 is for deposit into 
the Utah Reclamation Mitigation and Conservation Account 
pursuant to title IV of the Reclamation Projects Authorization 
and Adjustment Act of 1992: Provided further, That amounts 
collected by the Western Area Power Administration pursuant to 
the Flood Control Act of 1944 and the Reclamation Project Act 
of 1939 to recover purchase power and wheeling expenses shall 
be credited to this account as offsetting collections, to 
remain available until expended for the sole purpose of making 
purchase power and wheeling expenditures as follows: for fiscal 
year 2001, up to $65,224,000; for fiscal year 2002, up to 
$33,500,000; for fiscal year 2003, up to $30,000,000; and for 
fiscal year 2004, up to $20,000,000.

           Falcon and Amistad Operating and Maintenance Fund

      For operation, maintenance, and emergency costs for the 
hydroelectric facilities at the Falcon and Amistad Dams, 
$2,670,000, to remain available until expended, and to be 
derived from the Falcon and Amistad Operating and Maintenance 
Fund of the Western Area Power Administration, as provided in 
section 423 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal 
Years 1994 and 1995.

                  Federal Energy Regulatory Commission


                         salaries and expenses


      For necessary expenses of the Federal Energy Regulatory 
Commission to carry out the provisions of the Department of 
Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7101 et seq.), including 
services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, the hire of passenger 
motor vehicles, and official reception and representation 
expenses (not to exceed $3,000), $175,200,000, to remain 
available until expended: Provided, That notwithstanding any 
other provision of law, not to exceed $175,200,000 of revenues 
from fees and annual charges, and other services and 
collections in fiscal year 2001 shall be retained and used for 
necessary expenses in this account, and shall remain available 
until expended: Provided further, That the sum herein 
appropriated from the General Fund shall be reduced as revenues 
are received during fiscal year 2001 so as to result in a final 
fiscal year 2001 appropriation from the General Fund estimated 
at not more than $0.

                              RESCISSIONS

                     Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal


                              (rescission)


      Of the funds appropriated in Public Law 104-46 for 
interim storage of nuclear waste, $75,000,000 are transferred 
to this heading and are hereby rescinded.

             Defense Environmental Management Privatization


                              (rescission)


      Of the funds appropriated in Public Law 106-60 and prior 
Energy and Water Development Acts for the Tank Waste 
Remediation System at Richland, Washington, $97,000,000 of 
unexpended balances of prior appropriations are rescinded.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                          DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

      Sec. 301. (a) None of the funds appropriated by this Act 
may be used to award a management and operating contract unless 
such contract is awarded using competitive procedures or the 
Secretary of Energy grants, on a case-by-case basis, a waiver 
to allow for such a deviation. The Secretary may not delegate 
the authority to grant such a waiver.
      (b) At least 60 days before a contract award, amendment, 
or modification for which the Secretary intends to grant such a 
waiver, the Secretary shall submit to the Subcommittees on 
Energy and Water Development of the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the Senate a 
report notifying the subcommittees of the waiver and setting 
forth the reasons for the waiver.
      Sec. 302. None of the funds appropriated by this Act may 
be used to--
            (1) develop or implement a workforce restructuring 
        plan that covers employees of the Department of Energy; 
        or
            (2) provide enhanced severance payments or other 
        benefits for employees of the Department of Energy,

under section 3161 of the National Defense Authorization Act 
for Fiscal Year 1993 (Public Law 102-484; 106 Stat. 2644; 42 
U.S.C. 7274h).
      Sec. 303. None of the funds appropriated by this Act may 
be used to augment the $24,500,000 made available for 
obligation by this Act for severance payments and other 
benefits and community assistance grants under section 3161 of 
the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1993 
(Public Law 102-484; 106 Stat. 2644; 42 U.S.C. 7274h) unless 
the Department of Energy submits a reprogramming request 
subject to approval by the appropriate Congressional 
committees.
      Sec. 304. None of the funds appropriated by this Act may 
be used to prepare or initiate Requests For Proposals (RFPs) 
for a program if the program has not been funded by Congress.


                   (transfers of unexpended balances)


      Sec. 305. The unexpended balances of prior appropriations 
provided for activities in this Act may be transferred to 
appropriation accounts for such activities established pursuant 
to this title. Balances so transferred may be merged with funds 
in the applicable established accounts and thereafter may be 
accounted for as one fund for the same time period as 
originally enacted.
      Sec. 306. Of the funds in this Act provided to 
government-owned, contractor-operated laboratories, not to 
exceed 6 percent shall be available to be used for Laboratory 
Directed Research and Development.
      Sec. 307. (a) Of the funds appropriated by this title to 
the Department of Energy, not more than $185,000,000 shall be 
available for reimbursement of management and operating 
contractor travel expenses, of which $10,000,000 is available 
for use by the Chief Financial Officer of the Department of 
Energy for emergency travel expenses.
      (b) Funds appropriated by this title to the Department of 
Energy may be used to reimburse a Department of Energy 
management and operating contractor for travel costs of its 
employees under the contract only to the extent that the 
contractor applies to its employees the same rates and amounts 
as those that apply to Federal employees under subchapter I of 
chapter 57 of title 5, United States Code, or rates and amounts 
established by the Secretary of Energy. The Secretary of Energy 
may provide exceptions to the reimbursement requirements of 
this section as the Secretary considers appropriate.
      (c) The limitation in subsection (a) shall not apply to 
reimbursement of management and operating contractor travel 
expenses within the Laboratory Directed Research and 
Development program.
      Sec. 308. No funds are provided in this Act or any other 
Act for the Administrator of the Bonneville Power 
Administration to enter into any agreement to perform energy 
efficiency services outside the legally defined Bonneville 
service territory, with the exception of services provided 
internationally, including services provided on a reimbursable 
basis, unless the Administrator certifies that such services 
are not available from private sector businesses.
      Sec. 309. None of the funds in this Act may be used to 
dispose of transuranic waste in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant 
which contains concentrations of plutonium in excess of 20 
percent by weight for the aggregate of any material category on 
the date of enactment of this Act, or is generated after such 
date. For the purposes of this section, the material categories 
of transuranic waste at the Rocky Flats Environmental 
Technology Site include: (1) ash residues; (2) salt residues; 
(3) wet residues; (4) direct repackage residues; and (5) scrub 
alloy as referenced in the ``Final Environmental Impact 
Statement on Management of Certain Plutonium Residues and Scrub 
Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology 
Site''.
      Sec. 310. The Administrator of the National Nuclear 
Security Administration may authorize the plant manager of a 
covered nuclear weapons production plant to engage in research, 
development, and demonstration activities with respect to the 
engineering and manufacturing capabilities at such plant in 
order to maintain and enhance such capabilities at such plant: 
Provided, That of the amount allocated to a covered nuclear 
weapons production plant each fiscal year from amounts 
available to the Department of Energy for such fiscal year for 
national security programs, not more than an amount equal to 2 
percent of such amount may be used for these activities: 
Provided further, That for purposes of this section, the term 
``covered nuclear weapons production plant'' means the 
following:
            (1) The Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, Missouri.
            (2) The Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee.
            (3) The Pantex Plant, Amarillo, Texas.
            (4) The Savannah River Plant, South Carolina.
      Sec. 311. Notwithstanding any other law, and without 
fiscal year limitation, each Federal Power Marketing 
Administration is authorized to engage in activities and 
solicit, undertake and review studies and proposals relating to 
the formation and operation of a regional transmission 
organization.
      Sec. 312. Not more than $10,000,000 of funds previously 
appropriated for interim waste storage activities for Defense 
Nuclear Waste Disposal in Public Law 104-46, the Energy and 
Water Development Appropriations Act, 1996, may be made 
available to the Department of Energy upon written 
certification by the Secretary of Energy to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations that the Site 
Recommendation Report cannot be completed on time without 
additional funding.
    Sec. 313. Term of Office of Person First Appointed as Under 
Secretary for Nuclear Security of the Department of Energy. (a) 
Length of Term.--The term of office as Under Secretary for 
Nuclear Security of the Department of Energy of the first 
person appointed to that position shall be 3 years.
    (b) Exclusive Reasons for Removal.--The exclusive reasons 
for removal from office as Under Secretary for Nuclear Security 
of the person described in subsection (a) shall be 
inefficiency, neglect of duty, or malfeasance in office.
    (c) Position Described.--The position of Under Secretary 
for Nuclear Security of the Department of Energy referred to in 
this section is the position established by subsection (c) of 
section 202 of the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 
U.S.C. 7132), as added by section 3202 of the National Nuclear 
Security Administration Act (title XXXII of Public Law 106-65; 
113 Stat. 954).
    Sec. 314. Scope of Authority of Secretary of Energy To 
Modify Organization of National Nuclear Security 
Administration. (a) Scope of Authority.--Subtitle A of the 
National Nuclear Security Administration Act (title XXXII of 
Public Law 106-65; 113 Stat. 957; 50 U.S.C. 2401 et seq.) is 
amended by adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 3219. SCOPE OF AUTHORITY OF SECRETARY OF ENERGY TO MODIFY 
                    ORGANIZATION OF ADMINISTRATION.

    ``Notwithstanding the authority granted by section 643 of 
the Department of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7253) or 
any other provision of law, the Secretary of Energy may not 
establish, abolish, alter, consolidate, or discontinue any 
organizational unit or component, or transfer any function, of 
the Administration, except as authorized by subsection (b) or 
(c) of section 3291.''.
    (b) Conforming Amendments.--Section 643 of the Department 
of Energy Organization Act (42 U.S.C. 7253) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``The Secretary'' and inserting 
        ``(a) Subject to subsection (b), the Secretary''; and
            (2) by adding at the end the following new 
        subsection:
    ``(b) The authority of the Secretary to establish, abolish, 
alter, consolidate, or discontinue any organizational unit or 
component of the National Nuclear Security Administration is 
governed by the provisions of section 3219 of the National 
Nuclear Security Administration Act (title XXXII of Public Law 
106-65).''.
    Sec. 315. Prohibition on Pay of Personnel Engaged in 
Concurrent Service or Duties Inside and Outside National 
Nuclear Security Administration.--Subtitle C of the National 
Nuclear Security Administration Act (title XXXII of Public Law 
106-65; 50 U.S.C. 2441 et seq.) is amended by adding at the end 
the following new section:

``SEC. 3245. PROHIBITION ON PAY OF PERSONNEL ENGAGED IN CONCURRENT 
                    SERVICE OR DUTIES INSIDE AND OUTSIDE 
                    ADMINISTRATION.

    ``(a) Except as otherwise expressly provided by statute, no 
funds authorized to be appropriated or otherwise made available 
for the Department of Energy may be obligated or utilized to 
pay the basic pay of an officer or employee of the Department 
of Energy who--
            ``(1) serves concurrently in a position in the 
        Administration and a position outside the 
        Administration; or
            ``(2) performs concurrently the duties of a 
        position in the Administration and the duties of a 
        position outside the Administration.
    ``(b) The provision of this section shall take effect 60 
days after the date of enactment of this section.''.

                                TITLE IV

                          INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

                    Appalachian Regional Commission

    For expenses necessary to carry out the programs authorized 
by the Appalachian Regional Development Act of 1965, as 
amended, for necessary expenses for the Federal Co-Chairman and 
the alternate on the Appalachian Regional Commission, for 
payment of the Federal share of the administrative expenses of 
the Commission, including services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 
3109, and hire of passenger motor vehicles, $66,400,000, to 
remain available until expended.

                Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses of the Defense Nuclear Facilities 
Safety Board in carrying out activities authorized by the 
Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended by Public Law 100-456, 
section 1441, $18,500,000, to remain available until expended.

                        Delta Regional Authority


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses to establish the Delta Regional 
Authority and to carry out its activities, $20,000,000, to 
remain available until expended.

                           Denali Commission

    For expenses of the Denali Commission including the 
purchase, construction and acquisition of plant and capital 
equipment as necessary and other expenses, $30,000,000, to 
remain available until expended.

                     Nuclear Regulatory Commission


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses of the Commission in carrying out 
the purposes of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974, as 
amended, and the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended, 
including official representation expenses (not to exceed 
$15,000), $481,900,000, to remain available until expended: 
Provided, That of the amount appropriated herein, $21,600,000 
shall be derived from the Nuclear Waste Fund: Provided further, 
That revenues from licensing fees, inspection services, and 
other services and collections estimated at $447,958,000 in 
fiscal year 2001 shall be retained and used for necessary 
salaries and expenses in this account, notwithstanding 31 
U.S.C. 3302, and shall remain available until expended: 
Provided further, That $3,200,000 of the funds herein 
appropriated for regulatory reviews and assistance to other 
Federal agencies and States shall be excluded from license fee 
revenues, notwithstanding 42 U.S.C. 2214: Provided further, 
That the sum herein appropriated shall be reduced by the amount 
of revenues received during fiscal year 2001 so as to result in 
a final fiscal year 2001 appropriation estimated at not more 
than $33,942,000.

                      Office of Inspector General

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act of 
1978, as amended, $5,500,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That revenues from licensing fees, 
inspection services, and other services and collections 
estimated at $5,390,000 in fiscal year 2001 shall be retained 
and be available until expended, for necessary salaries and 
expenses in this account notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302: 
Provided further, That the sum herein appropriated shall be 
reduced by the amount of revenues received during fiscal year 
2001 so as to result in a final fiscal year 2001 appropriation 
estimated at not more than $110,000.

                  Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses of the Nuclear Waste Technical 
Review Board, as authorized by Public Law 100-203, section 
5051, $2,900,000, to be derived from the Nuclear Waste Fund, 
and to remain available until expended.

                                TITLE V

               FISCAL YEAR 2001 EMERGENCY APPROPRIATIONS

                          DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

                    ATOMIC ENERGY DEFENSE ACTIVITIES


                      cerro grande fire activities


    For necessary expenses to remediate damaged Department of 
Energy facilities and for other expenses associated with the 
Cerro Grande fire, $203,460,000, to remain available until 
expended, of which $2,000,000 shall be made available to the 
United States Army Corps of Engineers to undertake immediate 
measures to provide erosion control and sediment protection to 
sewage lines, trails, and bridges in Pueblo and Los Alamos 
Canyons downstream of Diamond Drive in New Mexico: Provided, 
That the entire amount shall be available only to the extent an 
official budget request for $203,460,000, that includes 
designation of the entire amount of the request as an emergency 
requirement as defined in the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended, is transmitted by the 
President to the Congress: Provided further, That the entire 
amount is designated by the Congress as an emergency 
requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended.

                          INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

                    Appalachian Regional Commission

    For necessary expenses to carry out the programs authorized 
by the Appalachian Regional Development Act of 1965, as 
amended, $11,000,000, to remain available until expended, which 
shall be available only to the extent an official budget 
request for $11,000,000, that includes designation of the 
entire amount of the request as an emergency requirement as 
defined in the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control 
Act of 1985, as amended, is transmitted by the President to the 
Congress: Provided, That the entire amount is designated by the 
Congress as an emergency requirement pursuant to section 
251(b)(2)(A) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985, as amended.

                                TITLE VI

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 601. None of the funds appropriated by this Act may be 
used in any way, directly or indirectly, to influence 
congressional action on any legislation or appropriation 
matters pending before Congress, other than to communicate to 
Members of Congress as described in section 1913 of title 18, 
United States Code.
    Sec. 602. (a) Purchase of American-Made Equipment and 
Products.--It is the sense of the Congress that, to the 
greatest extent practicable, all equipment and products 
purchased with funds made available in this Act should be 
American-made.
     (b) Notice Requirement.--In providing financial assistance 
to, or entering into any contract with, any entity using funds 
made available in this Act, the head of each Federal agency, to 
the greatest extent practicable, shall provide to such entity a 
notice describing the statement made in subsection (a) by the 
Congress.
     (c) Prohibition of Contracts With Persons Falsely Labeling 
Products as Made in America.--If it has been finally determined 
by a court or Federal agency that any person intentionally 
affixed a label bearing a ``Made in America'' inscription, or 
any inscription with the same meaning, to any product sold in 
or shipped to the United States that is not made in the United 
States, the person shall be ineligible to receive any contract 
or subcontract made with funds made available in this Act, 
pursuant to the debarment, suspension, and ineligibility 
procedures described in sections 9.400 through 9.409 of title 
48, Code of Federal Regulations.
    Sec. 603. (a) None of the funds appropriated or otherwise 
made available by this Act may be used to determine the final 
point of discharge for the interceptor drain for the San Luis 
Unit until development by the Secretary of the Interior and the 
State of California of a plan, which shall conform to the water 
quality standards of the State of California as approved by the 
Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency, to 
minimize any detrimental effect of the San Luis drainage 
waters.
    (b) The costs of the Kesterson Reservoir Cleanup Program 
and the costs of the San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program shall 
be classified by the Secretary of the Interior as reimbursable 
or nonreimbursable and collected until fully repaid pursuant to 
the ``Cleanup Program--Alternative Repayment Plan'' and the 
``SJVDP--Alternative Repayment Plan'' described in the report 
entitled ``Repayment Report, Kesterson Reservoir Cleanup 
Program and San Joaquin Valley Drainage Program, February 
1995'', prepared by the Department of the Interior, Bureau of 
Reclamation. Any future obligations of funds by the United 
States relating to, or providing for, drainage service or 
drainage studies for the San Luis Unit shall be fully 
reimbursable by San Luis Unit beneficiaries of such service or 
studies pursuant to Federal Reclamation law.
    Sec. 604. None of the funds appropriated by this Act shall 
be used to propose or issue rules, regulations, decrees, or 
orders for the purpose of implementation, or in preparation for 
implementation, of the Kyoto Protocol which was adopted on 
December 11, 1997, in Kyoto, Japan at the Third Conference of 
the Parties to the United Nations Framework Convention on 
Climate Change, which has not been submitted to the Senate for 
advice and consent to ratification pursuant to article II, 
section 2, clause 2, of the United States Constitution, and 
which has not entered into force pursuant to article 25 of the 
Protocol.
    Sec. 605. Funding of the Coastal Wetlands Planning, 
Protection and Restoration Act. Section 4(a) of the Act of 
August 9, 1950 (16 U.S.C. 777c(a)), is amended in the second 
sentence by striking ``2000'' and inserting ``2009''.
    Sec. 606. Redesignation of Interstate Sanitation Commission 
and District. (a) Interstate Sanitation Commission.--
            (1) In general.--The district known as the 
        ``Interstate Sanitation Commission'', established by 
        article III of the Tri-State Compact described in the 
        Resolution entitled, ``A Joint Resolution granting the 
        consent of Congress to the States of New York, New 
        Jersey, and Connecticut to enter into a compact for the 
        creation of the Interstate Sanitation District and the 
        establishment of the Interstate Sanitation 
        Commission'', approved August 27, 1935 (49 Stat. 933), 
        is redesignated as the ``Interstate Environmental 
        Commission''.
            (2) References.--Any reference in a law, 
        regulation, map, document, paper, or other record of 
        the United States to the Interstate Sanitation 
        Commission shall be deemed to be a reference to the 
        Interstate Environmental Commission.
    (b) Interstate Sanitation District.--
            (1) In general.--The district known as the 
        ``Interstate Sanitation District'', established by 
        article II of the Tri-State Compact described in the 
        Resolution entitled, ``A Joint Resolution granting the 
        consent of Congress to the States of New York, New 
        Jersey, and Connecticut to enter into a compact for the 
        creation of the Interstate Sanitation District and the 
        establishment of the Interstate Sanitation 
        Commission'', approved August 27, 1935 (49 Stat. 932), 
        is redesignated as the ``Interstate Environmental 
        District''.
            (2) References.--Any reference in a law, 
        regulation, map, document, paper, or other record of 
        the United States to the Interstate Sanitation District 
        shall be deemed to be a reference to the Interstate 
        Environmental District.

                               TITLE VII

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

                       Bureau of the Public Debt


      gifts to the united states for reduction of the public debt


    For deposit of an additional amount for fiscal year 2001 
into the account established under section 3113(d) of title 31, 
United States Code, to reduce the public debt, $5,000,000,000.

                               TITLE VIII

                     NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION

    Section 6101 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 
1990 (42 U.S.C. 2214) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (a)(3), by striking ``September 
        30, 1999'' and inserting ``September 20, 2005''; and
            (2) in subsection (c)--
                    (A) in paragraph (1), by inserting ``or 
                certificate holder'' after ``licensee''; and
                    (B) by striking paragraph (2) and inserting 
                the following:
            ``(2) Aggregate amount of charges.--
                    ``(A) In general.--The aggregate amount of 
                the annual charges collected from all licensees 
                and certificate holders in a fiscal year shall 
                equal an amount that approximates the 
                percentages of the budget authority of the 
                Commission for the fiscal year stated in 
                subparagraph (B), less--
                            ``(i) amounts collected under 
                        subsection (b) during the fiscal year; 
                        and
                            ``(ii) amounts appropriated to the 
                        Commission from the Nuclear Waste Fund 
                        for the fiscal year.
                    ``(B) Percentages.--The percentages 
                referred to in subparagraph (A) are--
                            ``(i) 98 percent for fiscal year 
                        2001;
                            ``(ii) 96 percent for fiscal year 
                        2002;
                            ``(iii) 94 percent for fiscal year 
                        2003;
                            ``(iv) 92 percent for fiscal year 
                        2004; and
                            ``(v) 90 percent for fiscal year 
                        2005.''.
    This Act may be cited as the ``Energy and Water Development 
Appropriations Act, 2001''.
              ENERGY AND WATER DEVELOPMENT APPROPRIATIONS

      Following is explanatory language on H.R. 5483, as 
introduced on October 18, 2000.
      The conferees on H.R. 4635 agree with the matter included 
in H.R. 5483 and enacted in this conference report by reference 
and the following description of it. This bill was developed 
through negotiations by subcommittee members of the Energy and 
Water Development Subcommittees of the House and Senate on the 
differences in H.R. 4733, a bill that was vetoed. That vetoed 
bill has been modified and is included in this conference 
report. References in the following description to the 
``conference agreement'' mean the matter included in the 
introduced bill enacted by this conference report. References 
to the House bill mean the House passed version of H.R. 4733. 
References to the Senate bill mean the Senate passed version of 
H.R. 4733, not the Senate passed version of H.R. 4635, unless 
otherwise stated.
      The language and allocations set forth in House Report 
106-693 and Senate Report 106-395 should be complied with 
unless specifically addressed to the contrary in the conference 
report and statement of the managers. Report language included 
by the House which is not contradicted by the report of the 
Senate or the statement of the managers, and Senate report 
language which is not contradicted by the report of the House 
or the statement of the managers is approved by the committee 
of conference. The statement of the managers, while repeating 
some report language for emphasis, does not intend to negate 
the language referred to above unless expressly provided 
herein. In cases where both the House report and Senate report 
address a particular issue not specifically addressed in the 
conference report or joint statement of managers, the conferees 
have determined that the House and Senate reports are not 
inconsistent and are to be interpreted accordingly. In cases in 
which the House or Senate have directed the submission of a 
report, such report is to be submitted to both House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations.
      Senate amendment: The Senate deleted the entire House 
bill after the enacting clause and inserted the Senate bill. 
The conference agreement includes a revised bill.

                                TITLE I

                      DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE--CIVIL

                         DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

                       Corps of Engineers--Civil

      The summary tables at the end of this title set forth the 
conference agreement with respect to the individual 
appropriations, programs, and activities of the Corps of 
Engineers. Additional items of conference are discussed below.

                         General Investigations

      The conference agreement appropriates $160,038,000 for 
General Investigations instead of $153,327,000 as proposed by 
the House and $139,219,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Within available funds, $50,000 is provided for erosion 
control studies in the Harding Lake watershed in Alaska. The 
conference agreement deletes the bill language proposed by the 
Senate for this project.
      The conference agreement does not include funds proposed 
by the House in this account for the Hamilton Airfield Wetlands 
Restoration project in California and the Ohio River Greenway 
project in Indiana. Funding for these projects is included in 
the Construction, General account. The conference agreement 
does not include funds in this account for the White River, 
Muncie, Indiana, project. Funding for this project has been 
included within the amount provided for the Section 1135 
program.
      The conference agreement includes $150,000 for the Corps 
of Engineers to undertake studies of potential navigational 
improvements, shoreline protection, and breakwater protection 
at the ports of Rota and Tinian in the Commonwealth of the 
Northern Mariana Islands.
      The conferees have provided $200,000 for the Corps of 
Engineers to initiate and complete a comprehensive water 
management reconnaissance study for ecosystem restoration and 
related purposes in the St. Clair River and Lake St. Clair 
watersheds in Michigan pursuant to section 426 of the Water 
Resources Development Act of 1999.
      Within the amount provided for Research and Development, 
$200,000 is provided for a topographic/bathymetric mapping 
project for Coastal Louisiana in cooperation with the National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration at the interagency 
Federal laboratory in Lafayette, Louisiana. The conference 
agreement does not include bill language proposed by the Senate 
for this work. The conferees also urge the Corps of Engineers 
to use available Research and Development funds for a review of 
innovative dredging technologies for potential implementation 
in the Peoria Lakes, Illinois, area.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the House and the Senate which provides that in conducting the 
Southwest Valley Flood Damage Reduction, Albuquerque, New 
Mexico, study, the Corps of Engineers shall include an 
evaluation of flood damage reduction measures that would 
otherwise be excluded from the feasibility analysis based on 
policies regarding the frequency of flooding, the drainage 
area, and the amount of runoff.
      The conferees have agreed to include language in the bill 
which directs the Corps of Engineers to use $750,000 to 
continue preconstruction engineering and design of the Murrieta 
Creek, California, flood control project in accordance with 
Alternative 6, as identified in the Murrieta Creek Feasibility 
Report and Environmental Impact Statement dated June 2000.
      The conference agreement deletes bill language proposed 
by the Senate providing funds for the John Glenn Great Lakes 
Basin Program, the Detroit River, Michigan, project, and the 
Niobrara River and Missouri River, South Dakota, project. Funds 
for these projects have been included in the overall amount 
provided for General Investigations.
      The conference agreement does not include language 
proposed by the Senate providing funds for the selection of a 
permanent disposal site for environmentally sound dredged 
material from navigation projects in the State of Rhode Island. 
Funds for this work have been provided within the amount 
appropriated for Operation and Maintenance, General.
      Within the amount provided for Flood Plain Management 
Services, the conference agreement includes $250,000 for the 
Corps of Engineers to undertake a study of drainage problems in 
the Winchester, Kentucky, area. In addition, the conferees urge 
the Corps of Engineers to complete a report on flood control 
problems on Negro Creek at Sprague, Washington.
      Within the amount provided for Planning Assistance to 
States, the conference agreement includes $100,000 for the 
Corps of Engineers to update the daily flow model for the 
Delaware River Basin.

                         Construction, General

      The conference agreement appropriates $1,717,199,000 for 
Construction, General instead of $1,378,430,000 as proposed by 
the House and $1,361,449,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
amount recommended by the conferees for the Corps of Engineers 
construction program represents a significant increase over the 
budget request and the amount appropriated in fiscal year 2000. 
However, the conferees note that the budget request grossly 
underfunds many ongoing construction projects, and its 
enactment would result in increased project costs, major delays 
in the completion of projects and loss of project benefits. The 
conferees also note that the Corps of Engineers, through the 
use of unobligated balances, expects its fiscal year 2000 
construction expenditures to be approximately $1,600,000,000.
      The conferees note that the Lake Worth Inlet, Florida, 
sand transfer plant project is behind schedule and expect the 
Corps of Engineers to proceed with the project as expeditiously 
as possible.
      Within the amount provided for the West Virginia and 
Pennsylvania Flood Control Project, $1,000,000 is provided for 
the following projects within the State of Pennsylvania: Bloody 
Run/Everett Borough ($25,000); Shoups Run/Carbon Township 
($150,500); Six Mile Run/Coaldale ($125,000); Black Log Creek/
Boroughs of Orbisonia and Rockhill Furnace ($127,000); Newton 
Hamilton Borough ($465,500); and Coal Bank Run/Coalmont Borough 
($107,000).
      The conference agreement includes $150,000 for the 
Southeastern Pennsylvania project for the Corps of Engineers to 
prepare a decision document to determine the Federal interest 
in and the scope of the problems in the Logan and Feltonville 
sections of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
      The conferees direct the Corps of Engineers to use 
$500,000 to initiate the Hillsboro Inlet, Florida, project in 
accordance with the Jacksonville District's General 
Reevaluation Report for the project dated May 2000.
      The conference agreement includes $4,000,000 for the 
Corps of Engineers to undertake water related infrastructure 
projects in northeastern Pennsylvania as authorized by section 
502(f)(11) of the Water Resources Development Act of 1999.
      The conference agreement includes $500,000 for the Corps 
of Engineers to undertake water related infrastructure projects 
in Avis Borough and Renovo Borough, Clinton County, 
Pennsylvania.
      The conference agreement includes $1,000,000 for sanitary 
sewer and water and wastewater infrastructure projects in 
Towanencin Township, Pennsylvania, as authorized by section 
502(f)(8) of the Water Resources Development Act of 1999; 
$3,000,000 for a project to eliminate or control combined sewer 
overflows in the city of St. Louis, Missouri, as authorized by 
section 502(f)(32) of the Water Resources Development Act of 
1999; and $300,000 for water related infrastructure projects in 
Lake and Porter Counties, Indiana, as authorized by section 
502(f)(12) of the Water Resources Development Act of 1999. In 
addition, the conference agreement includes $2,500,000 to carry 
out environmental infrastructure projects in northeastern 
Minnesota as authorized by section 569 of the Water Resources 
Development Act of 1999.
      The conference agreement includes $25,000,000 for the 
Corps of Engineers to design, construct, and operate water 
quality projects in the San Gabriel Basin of California; and 
$4,000,000 for the Corps of Engineers, in coordination with 
other Federal agencies and the Brazos River Authority, to 
participate in investigations and projects in the Bosque and 
Leon Watersheds in Texas to assess the impact of the 
perchlorate associated with the former Naval Weapons Industrial 
Reserve Plant at McGregor, Texas.
      The conference agreement includes $300,000 for the Corps 
of Engineers to continue the environmental restoration pilot 
project at Dog River, Alabama.
      The conference agreement includes $1,500,000 for a 
project to eliminate or control combined sewer overflows in the 
City of Lebanon, New Hampshire, as authorized by section 
502(f)(37) of the Water Resources Development Act of 1999; 
$1,500,000 for environmental infrastructure projects in Ohio 
authorized in section 594 of the Water Resources Development 
Act of 1999; and $3,000,000 for environmental infrastructure 
projects in central New Mexico authorized in section 593 of the 
Water Resources Development Act of 1999.
      The conference agreement includes a total of $37,100,000 
for the Levisa and Tug Forks of the Big Sandy River and Upper 
Cumberland River project. In addition to the amounts included 
in the budget request, the conference agreement includes: 
$4,000,000 for the Clover Fork, Kentucky, element of the 
project; $4,800,000 for the Middlesboro, Kentucky, element of 
the project; $1,000,000 for the City of Cumberland, Kentucky, 
element of the project; $700,000 for the Town of Martin, 
Kentucky, element of the project; $4,200,000 for the Pike 
County, Kentucky, element of the project, including $1,400,000 
for additional studies along the tributaries of the Tug Fork 
and the initiation of a Detailed Project Report for the Levisa 
Fork; $3,500,000 for the Martin County, Kentucky, element of 
the project; $1,200,000 for additional studies along the 
tributaries of the Cumberland River in Bell County, Kentucky; 
$800,000 to continue the detailed project report for the 
Buchanan County, Virginia, element of the project; $700,000 to 
continue the detailed project report for the Dickenson County, 
Virginia, element of the project; $1,500,000 for the Upper 
Mingo County, West Virginia, element of the project; $1,600,000 
for the Kermit, Lower Mingo County (Kermit), West Virginia, 
element of the project; $400,000 for the Wayne County, West 
Virginia, element of the project; and $600,000 for the McDowell 
County, West Virginia, element of the project.
      The conference agreement includes $7,000,000 for the Dam 
Safety and Seepage Stability Correction Program. Of the amount 
provided, $1,000,000 is for repairs to the Mississinewa Lake, 
Indiana, project, and up to $2,000,000 is for the Waterbury 
Dam, Vermont, project.
      Within the funds provided for the Missouri River Levee 
System project, $227,000 is provided for the Unit L15 levee, 
the same as the budget request. With these funds, the conferees 
expect the Corps of Engineers to complete engineering and 
design, negotiate a Project Cooperation Agreement, and initiate 
construction of the project.
      The conference agreement includes $4,000,000 for the 
Rural Nevada project authorized by section 595 of the Water 
Resources Development Act of 1999. Of the amount provided, 
$1,500,000 is for the Lawton-Verdi, Nevada, sewer inceptor 
project; $1,000,000 is for the Mesquite, Nevada, project; and 
$1,500,000 for the Silver Springs, Nevada, sanitary sewer 
project.
      The conferees direct the Corps of Engineers to undertake 
the projects listed in the House and Senate reports and the 
projects described below for the various continuing authorities 
programs. The recommended funding levels for those programs are 
as follows: Section 206--$19,000,000; Section 204--$4,000,000; 
Section 14--$9,000,000; Section 205--$35,000,000; Section 111--
$300,000; Section 107--$11,000,000; Section 1135--$21,000,000; 
Section 103--$2,500,000; and Section 208--$600,000. The 
conferees are aware that there are funding requirements for 
ongoing continuing authorities projects that may not be 
accommodated within the funds provided for each program. It is 
not the conferees' intent that ongoing projects be terminated. 
If additional funds are needed during the year to keep ongoing 
work in any program on schedule, the conferees urge the Corps 
of Engineers to reprogram funds into the program within 
available funds.
      Of the amount provided for the Section 14 program, 
$580,000 is to initiate and complete the planning and design 
analysis phase, execute a project cooperation agreement, and 
initiate and complete construction for the Rouge River, 
Southfield, Michigan, project.
      Of the amount provided for the Section 111 program, 
$300,000 is to prepare a shoreline stabilization study and 
plans and specifications, and award a construction contract for 
the Virginia Key, Florida, project.
      Of the amount provided for the Section 205 program, 
$100,000 is to undertake the Columbus, New Mexico, project; and 
$200,000 is to undertake the Battle Mountain, Nevada, project. 
The conference agreement deletes the bill language proposed by 
the Senate for the Hay Creek project. In addition, for the 
McKeel Brook, Dover and Rockaway Townships, New Jersey, 
project, the funds provided are to be used to complete plans 
and specifications and initiate construction of the Morris 
County plan.
      Of the amount provided for the Section 1135 program, 
$100,000 is to initiate the upland environmental restoration 
study for the Virginia Key, Florida, project; $300,000 is to 
prepare an environmental restoration report and prepare a 
project cooperation agreement for the White River, Muncie, 
Indiana, project; $250,000 is to initiate and complete a 
preliminary restoration plan and a feasibility report for the 
Sand Creek, Newton, Kansas, project; and $200,000 is to 
initiate the ecosystem restoration report for the Lake 
Champlain Watershed, Vermont, project. In addition, the Corps 
of Engineers is directed to proceed with the most cost 
effective solution to the water quality degradation and related 
environmental and public impacts associated with the western 
jetty at the mouth of the Genessee River at Rochester, New 
York.
      Of the amount provided for the Section 107 program, 
$810,000 is for construction of the Pemiscot Harbor, Missouri, 
project; $3,000,000 is for construction of the Ouzinkie Harbor, 
Alaska, project; and $500,000 is to initiate construction of 
the South Basin Inner Harbor, Buffalo, New York, project.
      The amount provided for the Section 206 program does not 
include funds for the Upper Truckee River project. Funds for 
this project are included in the Bureau of Reclamation's 
Wetlands Development Program. The amount provided for the 
Section 206 program includes $500,000 for the Hay Creek, Roseau 
County, Minnesota, project. The conference agreement deletes 
the bill language proposed by the Senate for the Hay Creek 
project.
      The conference agreement includes $4,000,000 for the 
Aquatic Plant Control program. Within the amount provided, 
$400,000 is for aquatic weed control in Lake Champlain, 
Vermont, $250,000 is for aquatic plant control within the State 
of South Carolina, and $100,000 is for the control and tracking 
of aquatic plants in the Potomac River in Virginia and 
Maryland.
      The conferees have included language in the bill 
earmarking funds for the following projects in the amount 
specified: Elba, Alabama, $8,400,000; Geneva, Alabama, 
$10,800,000; San Timoteo Creek (Santa Ana River Mainstem), 
California, $5,000,000; San Gabriel Basin Groundwater 
Restoration, California, $25,000,000; Indianapolis Central 
Waterfront, Indiana, $10,000,000; Southern and Eastern 
Kentucky, Kentucky, $4,000,000; Clover Fork, Middlesboro, City 
of Cumberland, Town of Martin, Pike County (including Levisa 
Fork and Tug Fork tributaries), Bell County, Martin County, and 
Harlan County, Kentucky, elements of the Levisa and Tug Forks 
of the Big Sandy River and Upper Cumberland River project, 
$20,000,000; Jackson County, Mississippi, $2,000,000; Bosque 
and Leon Rivers, Texas, $4,000,000; Upper Mingo County 
(including Mingo County Tributaries), Lower Mingo County 
(Kermit), Wayne County, and McDowell County, West Virginia, 
elements of the Levisa and Tug Forks of the Big Sandy River and 
Upper Cumberland River project, $4,100,000.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the House which directs the Corps of Engineers to proceed with 
the Town of Martin element of the Levisa and Tug Forks of the 
Big Sandy River and Upper Cumberland River project in 
accordance with a Plan A as set forth in the preliminary draft 
Detailed Project Report, Appendix T of the General Plan of the 
Huntington District Commander.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the House which directs the Corps of Engineers to use $900,000 
to undertake the Bowie County Levee project in Texas, which is 
defined as Alternative B Local Sponsor Option in the Corps of 
Engineers document entitled Bowie County Local Flood 
Protection, Red River, Texas, project Design Memorandum No. 1, 
Bowie County Levee, dated April 1997.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the Senate which provides that none of the funds appropriated 
in the Act may be used to begin Phase II of the John Day 
Drawdown study or to initiate a study of the drawdown of McNary 
Dam unless authorized by law.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the Senate which directs the Corps of Engineers to use 
available Construction, General, funds to complete design and 
construction of the Red River Regional Visitors Center in the 
vicinity of Shreveport, Louisiana, at an estimated cost of 
$6,000,000.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the Senate which increases the authorization for the Norco 
Bluffs, California, project.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the Senate which directs the Corps of Engineers to use 
$3,000,000 of the funds appropriated in the Act for additional 
emergency bank stabilization measures at Galena, Alaska, under 
the same terms and conditions as previously undertaken 
emergency bank stabilization work.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the Senate directing the Corps of Engineers to use $4,200,000 
appropriated in the Act to continue construction of the Ocean 
Isle Beach segment of the Brunswick County Beaches, North 
Carolina, project in accordance with the General Reevaluation 
Report approved by the Chief of Engineers on May 15, 1998.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the Senate which directs the Corps of Engineers to use $300,000 
of the funds appropriated in the Act to reimburse the City of 
Renton, Washington, for mitigation expenses incurred for the 
flood control project constructed on the Cedar River at Renton 
as a result of over-dredging by the Corps of Engineers.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the Senate subjecting the expenditure of previously 
appropriated funds for the Devils Lake, North Dakota, project 
to a number of conditions.
      The conference agreement includes language which provides 
that $2,000,000 shall be available for stabilization and 
renovation of Lock and Dam 10 on the Kentucky River, subject to 
the enactment of authorization for the project.
      The conference agreement includes language which directs 
the Corps of Engineers to use $3,000,000 to initiate 
construction of a navigation project at Kaumalapau Harbor, 
Hawaii. The project will consist of a 350-foot long breakwater 
and a channel depth of 19 feet.
      The conference agreement includes language which directs 
the Corps of Engineers to design and construct seepage control 
features at Waterbury Dam, Winooski River, Vermont. The Dam 
Safety and Seepage Correction Program includes up to $2,000,000 
to initiate this work. The proposed corrective actions will 
restore the structural integrity of the dam and reduce the 
chances of potential failure.
      The conference agreement includes language which directs 
the Corps of Engineers to design and construct barge lanes at 
the Houston-Galveston Navigation Channels, Texas, project.
      The conference agreement includes language which directs 
the Corps of Engineers to continue construction of the Rio 
Grand de Manati flood control project at Barceloneta, Puerto 
Rico.

 Flood Control, Mississippi River and Tributaries, Arkansas, Illinois, 
       Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, Missouri, and Tennessee

      The conference agreement appropriates $347,731,000 for 
Flood Control, Mississippi River and Tributaries instead of 
$323,350,000 as proposed by the House and $334,450,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $900,000 for the 
Southeast Arkansas feasibility study. The House had proposed to 
fund this study in the General Investigations account.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the Senate which directs the Secretary of the Army to complete 
the analysis and determination regarding Federal maintenance of 
the Greenville Inner Harbor, Mississippi, navigation project in 
accordance with section 509 of the Water Resources Development 
Act of 1996.
      The conference agreement includes $375,000 for 
construction of the Yazoo Basin Tributaries project and 
$47,000,000 for continuing construction of Mississippi River 
levees. The conference agreement deletes bill language proposed 
by the Senate regarding these projects.
      The conference agreement includes $7,242,000 for 
operation and maintenance of Arkabutla Lake; $5,280,000 for 
operation and maintenance of Grenada Lake; $7,680,000 for 
operation and maintenance of Sardis Lake; and $4,376,000 for 
operation and maintenance of Enid Lake. The conference 
agreement deletes bill language proposed by the Senate 
regarding these projects.

                   Operation and Maintenance, General

      The conference agreement appropriates $1,901,959,000 for 
Operation and Maintenance, General, instead of $1,854,000,000 
as proposed by the House and $1,862,471,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $6,755,000 for the 
Apalachicola, Chattahoochee, and Flint Rivers project in 
Georgia, Alabama, and Florida. The additional funds above the 
budget request shall be used to implement environmental 
restoration requirements as specified under the certification 
issued by the State of Florida under section 401 of the Federal 
Water Pollution Control Act and dated October 1999, including 
$1,200,000 for increased environmental dredging and $500,000 
for related environmental studies required by the state water 
quality certification. The conference agreement does not 
include bill language proposed by the Senate regarding this 
project.
      The conferees have provided $5,071,000 for the Red Rock 
Dam and Lake, Iowa, project. The funds provided above the 
budget request are for repair and replacement of various 
features of the project including repair of the scouring of the 
South-East Des Moines levee.
      The conference agreement includes $10,400,000 for 
operation and maintenance of the Pascagoula Harbor, 
Mississippi, project.
      The conference agreement includes $1,500,000 over the 
budget request for the Corps of Engineers to address impacts of 
recent fires, undertake habitat restoration activities, and 
address other essential requirements at Cochiti Lake in New 
Mexico.
      The conference agreement includes an additional 
$3,000,000 for the Jemez Dam, New Mexico, project for the Corps 
of Engineers to address the impacts of increased water releases 
required to help sustain the endangered silvery minnow.
      The conferees have provided an additional $600,000 for 
the Waco Lake, Texas, project for the Corps of Engineers to 
address the higher lake levels associated with the raising of 
the dam.
      The conferees have provided $12,570,000 for the Grays 
Harbor, Washington, project, including $650,000 for repair of 
the south jetty, $1,000,000 to complete the rehabilitation of 
the north jetty at Ocean Shores, and $1,100,000 for the north 
jetty operations and maintenance study.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the Senate which directs the Corps of Engineers to prepare the 
necessary documents and initiate removal of submerged 
obstructions in the area previously marked by the Ambrose Light 
Tower in New York Harbor.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate providing $500,000 for maintenance and repair of the 
Sakonnet Harbor breakwater in Little Compton, Rhode Island. 
Funds for this project are included in the amount appropriated 
for Operation and Maintenance, General.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate providing $50,000 for a study of crossings across the 
Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. The amount provided for 
operation and maintenance of the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal 
project includes $50,000 for the Corps of Engineers to conduct 
a study to determine the adequacy and timing for maintaining 
good and sufficient crossings across the canal.
      Although the conference agreement deletes bill language 
proposed by the Senate regarding the marketing of dredged 
material from the Delaware River Deepening project, the 
conferees expect the Corps of Engineers to establish such a 
program.
      The conference agreement includes language which directs 
the Corps of Engineers to use $500,000 to dredge a channel from 
the mouth of Wheeling Creek to Tunnel Green Park in Wheeling, 
West Virginia.
      The conference agreement includes language which provides 
that $500,000 of the funds provided for the Columbia and Lower 
Willamette River below Vancouver, Washington, and Portland, 
Oregon, project shall be used to remove and reinstall the docks 
and causeway, in kind, at the Astoria East Boat Basin in 
Oregon.
      The Secretary of the Army, acting through the Chief of 
Engineers, is authorized and directed to extend the sheet pile 
wall on the west end of the entrance to the Dillingham, Alaska, 
small boat harbor, and to replace the existing wooden bulkhead 
at the city dock under the provisions of Public Law 99-190.
      The conferees are aware of costs associated with 
maintaining and operating the complex computer system used to 
execute and program activities for the entire Operation and 
Maintenance program. The conferees direct the Corps of 
Engineers to specifically budget for this computer system in 
future years and, within available fiscal year 2001 funds, pay 
for this effort under Operation and Maintenance, General.
      The conferees are aware of a plan to improve the 
effectiveness of public information exhibits located within 
visitor centers at Corps of Engineers projects. The initial 
plan will be developed by a multidiscipline team and is 
scheduled to be completed this year. The conferees expect the 
plan to be developed within available Operation and 
Maintenance, General, funds and expect implementation of any 
plans to be justified in future budget requests.

                 Flood Control and Coastal Emergencies

      The Secretary of the Army, acting through the Chief of 
Engineers, is authorized and directed to extend the existing 
Bethel Bank Stabilization project in Alaska an additional 1200 
linear feet upstream, and to remove sediments from Brown's 
Slough that hamper safe navigation.

                           Regulatory Program

      The conference agreement appropriates $125,000,000 for 
the Corps of Engineers Regulatory Program as proposed by the 
House instead of $120,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the House and the Senate which will improve the analysis and 
increase the information available to the public and the 
Congress regarding the costs of the nationwide permit program 
and permit processing times.

            Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program

      The conference agreement appropriates $140,000,000 for 
the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program as proposed 
by the House and the Senate.
      The conferees concur with the language in the Senate 
report regarding the Parks Township Shallow Land Disposal Area 
in Armstrong County, Pennsylvania.

                            General Expenses

      The conference agreement appropriates $152,000,000 for 
General Expenses as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$149,500,000 as proposed by the House.

                             Revolving Fund

      The conference agreement includes language proposed by 
the House and the Senate which provides that amounts in the 
Revolving Fund are available for the costs of relocating the 
Corps of Engineers headquarters to the General Accounting 
Office building.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                       Corps of Engineers--Civil

      Section 101. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the House which provides for the transfer of 
responsibility of local sponsorship of recreation development 
at Joe Pool Lake, Texas, from the Trinity River Authority to 
the City of Grand Prairie, Texas.
      Section 102. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the Senate which places a limit on credits and 
reimbursements allowable per project and annually.
      Section 103. The conference agreement includes language 
authorizing the Corps of Engineers to construct the Murrieta 
Creek, California, flood control project.
      Section 104. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the Senate which provides that none of the funds 
provided in this Act may be used for activities related to the 
closure or removal of the St. Georges Bridge across the 
Chesapeake and Delaware Canal in Delaware.
      Section 105. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the Senate which provides that the Secretary of the 
Army shall provide up to $7,000,000 to replace and upgrade the 
dam in Kake, Alaska.
      Provisions not included in the conference agreement.--The 
conference agreement does not include language proposed by the 
House extending the authorization for spending Coastal Wetlands 
Restoration Trust Fund receipts. This matter has been addressed 
in Title VI. The conference agreement does not include language 
proposed by the Senate regarding the use of continuing 
contracts for Corps of Engineers projects. The conference 
agreement does not include language proposed by the Senate 
earmarking funds for the Pascagoula Harbor, Mississippi, 
project and the Gulfport Harbor, Mississippi, project. Funds 
for those projects are included in the amounts appropriated for 
Operation and Maintenance, General, and Construction, General, 
respectively.
      The conference agreement does not include language 
proposed by the Senate regarding the Kihei Area Erosion project 
in Hawaii. It is the intent of the conferees that the Kihei 
Area Erosion study shall include an analysis of the extent and 
causes of the shoreline erosion. Further, a regional economic 
development (RED) analysis shall be included. The results of 
the RED analysis shall be displayed in all study documents 
along with the traditional benefit-cost analysis including 
recommendations of the Chief of Engineers.
      The conference agreement does not include language 
proposed by the Senate regarding the Waikiki Erosion Control 
project in Hawaii. It is the intent of the conferees that the 
Waikiki Erosion Control study shall include an analysis of 
environmental resources that have been, or may be, threatened 
by erosion of the shoreline. Further, a regional economic 
development (RED) analysis shall be included. The results of 
the RED analysis shall be displayed in all study documents 
along with the traditional benefit-cost analysis including 
recommendations of the Chief of Engineers.
      The conference agreement does not include language 
proposed by the Senate directing the Secretary of the Army to 
conduct a study to determine the need for providing additional 
crossing capacity across the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. The 
conference agreement includes $50,000 under Operation and 
Maintenance, General for the Corps of Engineers to conduct a 
study to determine the adequacy and timing for maintaining good 
and sufficient crossings across the Chesapeake and Delaware 
Canal.
      The conference agreement does not include language 
proposed by the Senate expressing the sense of the Senate 
concerning dredging of the main channel of the Delaware River 
and language proposed by the Senate regarding the Historic Area 
Remediation Site.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate regarding the Missouri River Master Water Control 
Manual.


                                TITLE II

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR

                          Central Utah Project

                Central Utah Project Completion Account

      The conference agreement appropriates $39,940,000 to 
carry out the provisions of the Central Utah Project Completion 
Act as proposed by the House and the Senate.

                         Bureau of Reclamation

      The summary tables at the end of this title set forth the 
conference agreement with respect to the individual 
appropriations, programs and activities of the Bureau of 
Reclamation. Additional items of the conference agreement are 
discussed below.

                      Water and Related Resources

      The conference agreement appropriates $678,450,000 for 
Water and Related Resources instead of $635,777,000 as proposed 
by the House and $655,192,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $39,467,000 for the 
Central Arizona Project as proposed by the House.
      The additional funds provided by the House under the 
California Investigations Program for studies of ways to 
increase the reliability of water supplies in southern Orange 
County, California, have been included under the Southern 
California Investigations Program.
      The conference agreement includes an additional 
$1,000,000 for the Columbia and Snake Rivers Salmon Recovery 
project. The additional funds may be used for water acquisition 
and other actions that may be required by Endangered Species 
Act biological opinions concerning the operation and 
maintenance of Bureau of Reclamation projects.
      The conference agreement includes an increase of 
$4,758,000 over the budget request for the Middle Rio Grande 
project in New Mexico for the Bureau of Reclamation to 
undertake research, monitoring, and modeling of 
evapotranspiration, implement a program for the transplant of 
silvery minnow larvae and young-of-year, and carry out habitat 
conservation and restoration activities along the middle Rio 
Grande River valley as specified in the Senate report. 
Additional funding is also provided for Bureau of Reclamation 
participation in the recent settlement regarding the recovery 
of the Rio Grande silvery minnow.
      The conference agreement includes $2,960,000 for the 
Title XVI Water Reclamation and Reuse Program. Of the funds 
provided, $500,000 is provided for the Bureau of Reclamation to 
participate with the City of Espanola, New Mexico, in a 
feasibility study to investigate opportunities to reclaim and 
reuse municipal wastewater and naturally impaired surface and 
groundwater, and $300,000 is provided to continue the Phoenix 
Metropolitan Water Reclamation and Reuse (Aqua Fria) project in 
Arizona. In addition, $1,000,000 is provided for the Bureau of 
Reclamation to support the WateReuse Foundation's research 
program as described in the House report.
      The conferees have provided $5,000,000 for the Drought 
Emergency Assistance Program to address the severe drought 
conditions that currently exist in New Mexico and other western 
states. The conferees direct the attention of the Bureau of 
Reclamation to the need for the acquisition of water for the 
San Carlos Reservoir on the Gila River in Arizona.
      The conference agreement includes $8,500,000 for the 
Native American Affairs Program of the Bureau of Reclamation, 
of which $200,000 is for the Bureau to undertake studies, in 
consultation and cooperation with the Jicarilla Apache Tribe, 
of the most feasible method of developing a safe and adequate 
municipal, rural and industrial water supply for the residents 
of the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation in New Mexico.
      Of the amount provided for the Wetlands Development 
Program, $1,500,000 is provided for design and construction of 
the restoration of the Upper Truckee River in the vicinity of 
the airport at South Lake Tahoe, California, including channel 
realignment, and meadow and floodplain restoration.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
House which provides that none of the funds appropriated in the 
Act may be used by the Bureau of Reclamation for closure of the 
Auburn Dam, California, diversion tunnel or restoration of the 
American River channel through the Auburn Dam construction 
site.
      The conferees have included language in the bill proposed 
by the Senate which provides that $16,000,000 shall be 
available for the Rocky Boys Indian Water Rights Settlement 
project in Montana; provides that not more than $500,000 shall 
be available for projects carried out by the Youth Conservation 
Corps; increases the amount authorized for Indian municipal, 
rural, and industrial water features of the Garrison Diversion 
project in North Dakota by $2,000,000; and amends the 
Reclamation Safety of Dams Act of 1978.
      The conference agreement deletes bill language proposed 
by the Senate providing $2,300,000 for the Albuquerque 
Metropolitan Area Water Reclamation and Reuse project. Funding 
for this project is included in the total amount appropriated 
for Water and Related Resources.

               Bureau of Reclamation Loan Program Account

      The conference agreement appropriates $9,369,000 for the 
Bureau of Reclamation Loan Program account as proposed by the 
House and the Senate.

                Central Valley Project Restoration Fund

      The conference agreement appropriates $38,382,000 for the 
Central Valley Project Restoration Fund as proposed by the 
House and the Senate.

                       Policy and Administration

      The conference agreement appropriates $50,224,000 for 
Policy and Administration as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$47,000,000 as proposed by the House.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                       Department of the Interior

      Section 201. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the House which provides that none of the funds 
appropriated by this or any other Act may be used to purchase 
or lease water in the Middle Rio Grande or Carlsbad projects in 
New Mexico unless the purchase or lease is in compliance with 
the requirements of section 202 of Public Law 106-60.
      Section 202. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the Senate which provides that funds for Drought 
Emergency Assistance are to be used primarily for leasing of 
water for specified drought related purposes from willing 
lessors in compliance with State laws. The language also 
provides that leases may be entered into with an option to 
purchase provided the purchase is approved in the State in 
which the purchase takes place and does not cause economic harm 
in the State in which the purchase is made.
      Section 203. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the House which provides authority to the Secretary 
of the Interior to make an annual assessment upon Central 
Valley Project water and power contractors for the purpose of 
making an annual payment to the Trinity Public Utilities 
District. The language has been amended to clarify that the 
payments to the Trinity Public Utilities District will be made 
without the need for appropriations.
      Section 204. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the Senate regarding the activities of the Glen 
Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program. The language in the 
Senate bill has been amended to increase the funding limit for 
the program to not more than $7,850,000, adjusted for 
inflation, and to not preclude voluntary contributions to the 
Adaptive Management Program.
      Section 205. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the Senate which authorizes and directs the 
Secretary of the Interior to use not to exceed $1,000,000 to 
refund amounts received by the United States as payments for 
charges assessed by the Secretary prior to January 1, 1994, for 
failure to file certain certification or reporting forms prior 
to the receipt of project water pursuant to sections 206 and 
224(c) of the Reclamation Reform Act of 1982.
      Section 206. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the Senate which amends the Canyon Ferry Reservoir, 
Montana, Act.
      Section 207. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the Senate which provides that beginning in fiscal 
year 2000 and thereafter, any amounts provided for the Newlands 
Water Rights Fund for purchasing and retiring water rights in 
the Newlands Reclamation Project shall be non-reimbursable.
      Section 208. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the Senate which permits the use of Colorado-Big 
Thompson Project facilities for nonproject water.
      Section 209. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the Senate which amends the Irrigation Project 
Contract Extension Act of 1998.
      Section 210. The conference agreement includes a 
provision proposed by the Senate which extends through fiscal 
year 2001 the prohibition on the use of funds to further 
reallocate Central Arizona Project water until the enactment of 
legislation authorizing and directing the Secretary of the 
Interior to make allocations and enter into contracts for the 
delivery of Central Arizona Project water.
      Section 211. The conference agreement includes language 
which amends the San Luis Rey Indian Water Rights Settlement 
Act, Public Law 100-675.
      Section 212. The conference agreement includes language 
providing for the conveyance of the Sly Park Unit in California 
to the El Dorado Irrigation District.
      Provision not included in the conference agreement.--The 
conference agreement does not include a provision proposed by 
the Senate related to recreation development within the State 
of Montana.


                               TITLE III

                          DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

      The summary tables at the end of this title set forth the 
conference agreement with respect to the individual 
appropriations, programs, and activities of the Department of 
Energy. Additional items of conference agreement are discussed 
below.

                           PROJECT MANAGEMENT

      The conferees strongly support the progress being made by 
the Office of Engineering and Construction Management in 
bringing standardization, discipline, oversight, and increased 
professionalism to the Department's project management efforts. 
The project engineering and design (PED) process developed by 
the Department represents significant progress toward 
correcting serious management deficiencies that have 
historically plagued the Department's construction projects. 
The conferees believe that implementation of the PED process 
for all construction and environmental projects throughout the 
Department will provide the assurance necessary to eliminate 
the current requirement for an external independent review of 
all projects prior to releasing funds for construction. The 
conferees expect the continuation of the external independent 
review process as discussed in both the House and Senate 
reports.

                        PASSENGER MOTOR VEHICLES

      The conferees have provided statutory limitations on the 
number of passenger motor vehicles that can be purchased by the 
Department of Energy in fiscal year 2001. These limitations are 
included each year, but the Department has been interpreting 
this limitation to mean that sport utility vehicles are not 
considered passenger motor vehicles and do not count against 
the appropriation ceiling. The conferees consider this to be 
disingenuous at best and a violation of the appropriations 
language at worst.
      The conferees expect the Department to adhere strictly to 
the limits set for the purchase of motor vehicles. It is the 
intention of the conferees in prescribing these limitations 
that sport utility vehicles are to be considered passenger 
motor vehicles and, therefore, subject to the limitation. 
Further, the Department is to provide a full and complete 
accounting of the current motor vehicle inventory at each 
location. The Department should work with the Committees on 
Appropriations to ensure that the report provides the necessary 
information.

                           CONTRACTOR TRAVEL

      The conference agreement includes a statutory provision 
limiting reimbursement of Department of Energy management and 
operating contractors for travel expenses to not more than 
$185,000,000. This limitation consists of $175,000,000 for 
contractor travel and a reserve fund of $10,000,000 to be 
administered by the Department's Chief Financial Officer and 
released for emergency travel requirements.
      The Department had requested $200,000,000 for contractor 
travel. The reduction in fiscal year 2001 is not to be 
prorated, but should be applied to those organizations that 
appear to have the most questionable travel practices. This is 
not meant to restrict trips between laboratories to coordinate 
on program issues.

                          INDEPENDENT CENTERS

      The Department is to identify all independent centers at 
each DOE laboratory and facility in the fiscal year 2002 budget 
submission. These centers are to be funded directly in program 
accounts, rather than overhead, with the exception of those 
centers which clearly benefit more than one program at a 
laboratory or facility. The Department is directed to provide a 
list of any centers that are funded through overhead accounts 
with the fiscal year 2002 budget submission.

                             REPROGRAMMINGS

      The conference agreement does not provide the Department 
of Energy with any internal reprogramming flexibility in fiscal 
year 2001 unless specifically identified by the House, Senate, 
or conference agreement. Any reallocation of new or prior year 
budget authority or prior year deobligations must be submitted 
to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations in 
advance, in writing, and may not be implemented prior to 
approval by the Committees.

              LABORATORY DIRECTED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

      The conference agreement includes an allowance of six 
percent for the laboratory directed research and development 
(LDRD) program and two percent for nuclear weapons production 
plants. Travel costs for LDRD are exempt from the contractor 
travel ceiling. The conferees direct the Department's Chief 
Financial Officer to develop and execute a financial accounting 
report of LDRD expenditures by laboratory and weapons 
production plant. This report, due to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations by December 31, 2000, and each 
year thereafter, should provide costs by personnel salaries, 
equipment, and travel. The Department should work with the 
Committees on the specific information to be included in the 
report.

                SAFEGUARDS AND SECURITY BUDGET AMENDMENT

      The conferees have chosen to reflect the amounts 
requested for safeguards and security funding in the manner 
proposed in the budget amendment submitted to Congress by the 
Department. Adjustments have been made in each account to 
reflect the consolidation of safeguards and security costs into 
a few major accounts and the transfer of these costs from 
overhead accounts to specific program line items. However, the 
conferees do not concur with the amendment to the extent its 
purpose is to reorganize all safeguards and security functions 
at the Department under the control and direction of the Office 
of Security and Emergency Operations, or any other entity not 
part of line management. The conferees agree that the direct 
responsibility for safeguards and security must be united and 
integrated with the responsibility of line operations.

              ADDITIONAL DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REQUIREMENTS

      The conferees agree with the House report language on 
augmenting Federal staff, overhead costs reviews and 
reprogramming guidelines.

GENERAL REDUCTIONS NECESSARY TO ACCOMMODATE SPECIFIC PROGRAM DIRECTIONS

      The Department is directed to provide a report to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations by January 15, 
2001, on the actual application of any general reductions of 
funding or use of prior year balances contained in the 
conference agreement. In general, such reductions should not be 
applied disproportionately against any program, project, or 
activity. However, the conferees are aware there may be 
instances where proportional reductions would adversely impact 
critical programs and other allocations may be necessary. The 
report should also include the distribution of the safeguards 
and security funding adjustments.

                             Energy Supply

      The conference agreement provides $660,574,000 for Energy 
Supply instead of $616,482,000 as proposed by the House and 
$691,520,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conference 
agreement includes the House proposal to make funds available 
until expended rather than the Senate proposal to limit 
availability to two years. The conference agreement does not 
include the Senate bill language transferring funds from the 
United States Enrichment Corporation or earmarking funds for a 
variety of projects to demonstrate alternative energy 
technologies.

                       Renewable Energy Resources

      The conference agreement provides $422,085,000 instead of 
$390,519,000 as proposed by the House and $444,117,000 as 
proposed by the Senate for renewable energy resources.
      Biomass/biofuels.--The conference agreement includes 
$112,900,000 for biomass/biofuels. The conferees have provided 
$26,740,000 for research to be managed by the Office of 
Science, the same as the budget request. The conference 
agreement includes $40,000,000 for power systems and 
$46,160,000 for the transportation program. The conference 
agreement does not include prescriptive language specifying 
funding allocations as contained in the House and Senate 
reports.
      The conferees encourage the Department to continue the 
integrated approach to bioenergy activities and recommend the 
use of up to $18,000,000 within available funds for the 
bioenergy initiative. Funding for this initiative may be 
derived from both the power and transportation programs.
      In the power program, the conference agreement provides 
$2,000,000 for the Iowa switch grass project which is a multi-
year project; $4,000,000 for the McNeill biomass plant in 
Burlington, Vermont; $395,000 for the final Federal 
contribution to the Vermont agriculture methane project; 
$500,000 for the bioreactor landfill project to be administered 
by the Environmental Education and Research Foundation and 
Michigan State University; $1,000,000 for methane energy and 
agriculture development (MEAD) in Tillamook Bay, Oregon; and 
$1,000,000 for the Mount Wachusett College biomass conversion 
project in Massachusetts.
      The Department is to accelerate the large-scale biomass 
demonstration at the Winona, Mississippi, site.
      The conference agreement provides $4,000,000 in power 
systems to support a project to demonstrate a commercial 
facility employing the thermo-depolymerization technology at a 
site adjacent to the Nevada Test Site. The project shall 
proceed on a cost-shared basis where Federal funding shall be 
matched in at least an equal amount with non-Federal funding.
      In the transportation program, the conference agreement 
provides $1,000,000 for continuation of biomass research at the 
Energy and Environmental Research Center on the integration of 
biomass with fossil fuels for advanced power systems 
transportation fuels; $600,000 for the University of Louisville 
to work on the design of bioreactors for production of fuels 
and chemicals for ethanol production; and $2,000,000 for the 
design and construction of a demonstration facility for 
regional biomass ethanol manufacturing in southeast Alaska.
      The conference agreement also includes $2,000,000 for the 
Michigan Biotechnology Institute to be derived equally from 
power and transportation systems.
      Funding allocated by the Department for the regional 
biomass program and feedstock production should be derived 
equally from the power and transportation programs.
      Geothermal.--The conference agreement includes 
$27,000,000 for geothermal activities. The conference agreement 
does not include language specifying funding allocations as 
contained in the Senate report. The conferees have provided 
$2,000,000 to complete the Lake County Basin 2000 Geothermal 
project in Lake County, California.
      Hydrogen.--The conference agreement includes $29,970,000 
for hydrogen activities, including $350,000 for the Montana 
Trade Port Authority in Billings, Montana; $250,000 for the 
gasification of Iowa switch grass; and $800,000 for the ITM 
Syngas project.
      The conferees have also provided $2,000,000 for the 
multi-year demonstration of an underground mining locomotive 
and an earth loader powered by hydrogen at existing facilities 
within the State of Nevada. The demonstration is subject to a 
private sector industry cost-share of not less than an equal 
amount, and a portion of these funds may also be used to 
acquire a prototype hydrogen fueling appliance to provide on-
site hydrogen in the demonstration.
      Hydropower.--The conference agreement includes $5,000,000 
for hydropower. The conferees are aware that the Department is 
funding research that is supposed to be applicable to the needs 
of the large dams in the northwest United States. The 
Department is concerned that the Federal power marketing 
administrations are not involved in developing this research 
program. The Department is directed to provide a report 
coordinated with the power marketing administrations that 
indicates how this hydropower research is applicable to the 
current and future needs of the power marketing administrations 
and the schedule by which this research will provide useable 
products.
      Solar Energy.--The conference agreement includes 
$110,632,000 for solar energy programs. The conference 
agreement does not include language specifying funding 
allocations as contained in the House and Senate reports.
      The conference agreement provides $13,800,000 for 
concentrating solar power, including $1,000,000 to initiate 
planning of a one MW dish engine field validation power project 
at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas.
      The conference agreement includes $78,622,000 for 
photovoltaic energy systems, including up to $3,000,000 for the 
million solar roofs initiative. The conferees have provided 
$1,500,000 for the Southeast and Southwest photovoltaic 
experiment stations.
      The conference agreement includes $3,950,000 for solar 
building technology research.
      Wind.--The conference agreement includes $40,283,000 for 
wind programs. The conference agreement does not include 
prescriptive language specifying allocations as included in the 
Senate report. The conferees have provided $1,000,000 for the 
Kotzebue wind project. Of the funding for wind energy systems, 
not less than $5,000,000 shall be made available for new and 
ongoing small wind programs, including not less than $2,000,000 
for the small wind turbine development project. From within 
available funds, $100,000 has been provided for a wind turbine 
and for educational purposes at the Turtle Mountain Community 
College in North Dakota.
      Electric energy systems and storage.--The conference 
agreement includes $52,000,000 for electric energy systems and 
storage. The conferees urge the Department to support the 
university, industry-based partnership at the University of 
California-Irvine Advanced Power and Energy Program to conduct 
energy and information related technology demonstrations to 
accelerate the development and deployment of cost-efficient 
technologies benefiting all energy consumers affected by a 
deregulated energy industry.
      The conference agreement includes $6,000,000 to 
accelerate the development and application of high temperature 
superconductor technologies through joint efforts among DOE 
laboratories, universities, and industry to be led by Los 
Alamos and Oak Ridge National Laboratories.
      The conference agreement includes $500,000 for completion 
of the distributed power demonstration project begun last year 
at the Nevada Test Site.
      Renewable Support and Implementation.--The conference 
agreement includes $21,600,000 for renewable support and 
implementation programs.
      The Federal Energy Management Program should report to 
the Committees on Appropriations by December 31, 2001, on the 
accomplishments of the Departmental energy management program 
with the fiscal year 2001 appropriations including the number 
of energy efficiency projects funded, the number of energy 
savings performance contracts supported, and the total 
estimated savings.
      From within available funds, the conference agreement 
provides $1,000,000 for the Office of Arctic Energy as proposed 
by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $5,000,000 for the 
international renewable energy program. Of this amount, 
$1,000,000 is to be provided to International Utility 
Efficiency Partnerships, Inc. (IUEP). The IUEP shall 
competitively award all projects, continuing its leadership 
role in reducing carbon dioxide emissions using voluntary 
market-based mechanisms.
      The conference agreement includes $4,000,000 for the 
renewable energy production incentive program.
      The conference agreement includes $6,600,000 for 
renewable Indian energy resources projects as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $4,000,000 for 
renewable program support, of which $1,000,000 is for an Indoor 
Air Quality and Energy Conservation Research Planning grant to 
study and develop technologies to improve air quality within 
homes and buildings.
      Program direction.--The conference agreement includes 
$18,700,000 for program direction. The conferees have provided 
additional funding to support implementation of the management 
reforms identified in the recent National Academy of Public 
Administration review.

                             Nuclear Energy

      The conference agreement provides $259,925,000 for 
nuclear energy activities instead of $231,815,000 as proposed 
by the House and $262,084,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Advanced radioisotope power systems.--The conference 
agreement includes $32,200,000, an increase over the budget 
request of $30,864,000. The additional funds are to maintain 
the infrastructure to support future national security needs 
and NASA missions.
      Isotope support.--The conference agreement includes a 
total program level of $27,215,000 for the isotope program. 
This amount is reduced by offsetting collections of $8,000,000 
to be received in fiscal year 2001, resulting in a net 
appropriation of $19,215,000. The conferees understand that the 
total estimated cost of Project 99-E-201, the isotope 
production facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, has 
increased significantly due to factors outside the control of 
the Office of Nuclear Energy and have included $2,500,000 to 
partially cover these additional costs.
      University reactor fuel assistance and support.--The 
conference agreement includes $12,000,000, the same as the 
budget request.
      Research and development.--The conference agreement 
provides $47,500,000 for nuclear energy research and 
development activities.
      The conference agreement includes $5,000,000, the same as 
the budget request, for nuclear energy plant optimization. The 
conferees direct the Department to ensure that projects are 
funded jointly with non-Federal partners and that total non-
Federal contributions are equal to or in excess of total 
Department contributions to projects funded in this program.
      The conferees have provided $35,000,000 for the nuclear 
energy research initiative.
      The conference agreement includes $7,500,000 for nuclear 
energy technologies. The Senate had included these activities 
in the nuclear energy research initiative program. Funding of 
$4,500,000 is provided to develop a road map for the commercial 
deployment of a next generation power reactor; $1,000,000 for 
the preparation of a detailed assessment that analyzes and 
describes the changes needed to existing advanced light water 
reactor (ALWR) designs; $1,000,000 for planning and 
implementation of initiatives in support of an advanced gas 
reactor; and $1,000,000 to undertake a study to determine the 
feasibility of deployment of small modular reactors.
      Infrastructure.--The conference agreement includes the 
budget request of $39,150,000 for ANL-West Operations, 
$9,000,000 for test reactor landlord activities, and 
$44,010,000 for the Fast Flux Test Facility.
      Nuclear facilities management.--The conference agreement 
adopts the budget structure proposed by the House and provides 
$34,850,000 for nuclear facilities management activities, the 
same as the budget request.
      The conference agreement provides the full amount of the 
budget request to complete draining and processing EBR-II 
primary sodium. The conferees direct the Department to notify 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations immediately 
if any issues arise that would delay the Department's scheduled 
date to complete these activities.
      Uranium programs.--The conference agreement transfers the 
budget request of $53,400,000 for uranium programs to a new 
appropriation account, Uranium Facilities Maintenance and 
Remediation.
      Program direction.--The conference agreement includes 
$22,000,000 for program direction. This reduction reflects the 
transfer of 25 employees in the field and up to 5 employees at 
Headquarters who managed the uranium programs to the Office of 
Environmental Management.

                     Environment, Safety and Health

      The conference agreement includes $35,998,000 for non-
defense environment, safety and health activities. The 
conferees direct that the reduction from the budget request be 
directed to eliminate lower-priority activities currently 
funded in this program. The conference agreement includes 
$1,000,000 to be transferred to the Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration as proposed by the House. The conferees 
expect the Department to budget for this activity in fiscal 
year 2002.

                Technical Information Management Program

      The conference agreement includes $8,600,000 as proposed 
by the Senate.

                          Funding Adjustments

      The conference agreement also includes $47,100,000, the 
same amount as the budget request, for research performed by 
the Office of Science related to renewable energy technologies, 
and $2,352,000 proposed as an offset from nuclear energy 
royalties to be received in fiscal year 2001. A reduction of 
$16,582,000 reflects the transfer of safeguards and security 
costs in accordance with the Department's amended budget 
request.

                  Non-Defense Environmental Management

      The conference agreement provides $277,812,000 for Non-
Defense Environmental Management instead of $281,001,000 as 
proposed by the House and $309,141,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Funding of $5,000,000 is provided to expedite 
environmental cleanup at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. No 
funding has been provided for the Atlas site in Moab, Utah, 
which has not been authorized. The recommendation transfers 
$1,900,000 from the post-2006 program to the site/project 
completion program to maintain the schedule for completing 
cleanup of three Oakland geographic sites.

             Uranium Facilities Maintenance and Remediation

      The conference agreement provides $393,367,000 for 
uranium activities instead of $301,400,000 as proposed by the 
House and $297,778,000 as proposed by the Senate, and adopts 
the budget structure proposed by the House.

      Uranium Enrichment Decontamination and Decommissioning Fund

      The conference agreement includes $345,038,000 for the 
uranium enrichment decontamination and decommissioning fund. 
This includes $273,038,000 for cleanup activities and 
$72,000,000 for uranium and thorium reimbursements. The 
conferees recognize there are eligible uranium and thorium 
licensee claims under Title X of the Energy Policy Act that 
have been approved for reimbursement, but not yet paid in full. 
Additional funding of $42,000,000 over the budget request of 
$30,000,000 has been provided for these payments.

                            Uranium Programs

      The conference agreement provides $62,400,000 for uranium 
activities, an increase of $9,000,000 over the budget request 
of $53,400,000. Additional funding of $9,000,000, as proposed 
by the Senate, has been provided for activities associated with 
the depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6) management and 
conversion project.

                       Domestic Uranium Industry

      The conferees are very concerned about the front end of 
the U.S. nuclear fuel cycle. The conferees direct the Secretary 
to work with the President and other Federal agencies to ensure 
that current laws with respect to the privatization of USEC and 
with respect to the implementation of the Russian HEU agreement 
and their impact on United States domestic capabilities are 
carried out. In addition, the Secretary is instructed to take 
timely measures to ensure that conversion capability is not 
lost in the United States. The conferees expect that any such 
measures will not interfere with the implementation of the 
Russian HEU agreement and the important national security goals 
it is accomplishing.
      The conferees direct the Secretary to undertake an 
evaluation and make specific recommendations on the various 
options to sustain a domestic uranium enrichment industry in 
the short- and long-term to be delivered to Congress no later 
than December 31, 2000. The Secretary's evaluation shall 
include recommendations for dealing with the Portsmouth 
facility and its role in maintaining a secure and sufficient 
domestic supply of enriched uranium. Further, this 
investigation should consider the technological viability and 
commercial feasibility of all proposed enrichment technologies 
including various centrifuge options, AVLIS and SILEX 
technologies, or other emerging technology. The evaluation 
should also consider the role of the Federal government in 
developing and supporting the implementation and regulation of 
these new technologies in order to secure a reliable and 
competitive source of domestic nuclear fuel.

                           Funding Adjustment

      A reduction of $14,071,000 reflects the transfer of 
safeguards and security costs in accordance with the 
Department's amended budget request.

                                Science

      The conference agreement provides $3,186,352,000 instead 
of $2,830,915,000 as proposed by the House and $2,870,112,000 
as proposed by the Senate. The conference agreement does not 
include the Senate language earmarking funds for various 
purposes and limiting funding for the small business innovation 
research program.
      High energy physics.--The conference agreement provides 
$726,130,000 for high energy physics and reflects the 
adjustments recommended in the Science budget amendment 
submitted by the Department. Funding of $230,931,000 has been 
provided for facility operations at the Fermi National 
Accelerator Laboratory.
      Nuclear physics.--The conference agreement provides 
$369,890,000 for nuclear physics, the same as the original 
budget request.
      Biological and environmental research.--The conference 
agreement includes $500,260,000 for biological and 
environmental research. The conferees have included $20,135,000 
for the low-dose effects program, an increase of $8,453,000 
over the budget request. The conference agreement provides 
$9,000,000 for molecular nuclear medicine.
      The conferees have provided the budget request of 
$2,500,000 for the Laboratory for Comparative and Functional 
Genomics at Oak Ridge National Laboratory.
      The conference agreement includes $2,000,000 for the 
Discovery Science Center in Orange County, California; 
$1,500,000 for the Children's Hospital emergency power plant in 
San Diego; $1,000,000 for the Center for Science and Education 
at the University of San Diego; $500,000 for the bone marrow 
transplant program at Children's Hospital Medical Center 
Foundation in Oakland, California; $1,000,000 for the North 
Shore Long Island Jewish Health System in New York; $1,700,000 
for the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago; $2,000,000 
for the Livingston Digital Millenium Center to be located at 
Tulane University; and $1,000,000 for the Center for Nuclear 
Magnetic Resonance at the University of Alabama-Birmingham.
      The conference agreement includes $3,000,000 for the 
Nanotechnology Engineering Center at the University of Notre 
Dame in South Bend, Indiana; $2,000,000 for the School of 
Public Health at the University of South Carolina for 
modernization upgrades; $2,000,000 for the National Center for 
Musculoskeletal Research at the Hospital for Special Surgery in 
New York; and $1,300,000 for the Western States Visibility 
Assessment Program at New Mexico Tech to trace emissions 
resulting from energy consumption.
      The conference agreement includes $1,000,000 for high 
temperature super conducting research and development at Boston 
College; $2,500,000 for the positron emission tomography 
facility at West Virginia University; $1,000,000 for the 
advanced medical imaging center at Hampton University; $500,000 
for the Natural Energy Laboratory in Hawaii; $800,000 for the 
Child Health Institute of New Brunswick, New Jersey; and 
$900,000 for the linear accelerator for University Medical 
Center of Southern Nevada.
      The conference agreement also includes $200,000 for the 
study of biological effects of low level radioactive activity 
at University of Nevada-Las Vegas; $1,000,000 for the Medical 
University of South Carolina Oncology Center; $11,000,000 for 
development of technologies using advanced functional brain 
imaging methodologies, including magnetoencephalography, for 
conduct of basic research in mental illness and neurological 
disorders, and for construction; $2,000,000 for a science and 
technology facility at New Mexico Highlands University; 
$2,000,000 for the University of Missouri-Columbia to expand 
the federal investment in the university's nuclear medicine and 
cancer research capital program; and $2,000,000 for the Inland 
Northwest Natural Resources Research Center at Gonzaga 
University.
      Basic energy sciences.--The conference agreement includes 
$1,013,370,000 for basic energy sciences. The conferees have 
included $8,000,000 for the Experimental Program to Stimulate 
Competitive Research (EPSCoR).
      Spallation Neutron Source.--The recommendation includes 
$278,600,000, including $259,500,000 for construction and 
$19,100,000 for related research and development, the same as 
the amended budget request, for the Spallation Neutron Source.
      Advanced scientific computing research.--The conference 
agreement includes $170,000,000 for advanced scientific 
computing research.
      Energy research analyses.--The conference agreement 
includes $1,000,000 for energy research analyses, the same 
amount provided by the House and the Senate.
      Multiprogram energy labs--facility support.--The 
conference agreement includes $33,930,000 for multi-program 
energy labs-facility support.
      Fusion energy sciences.--The conference agreement 
includes $255,000,000, as proposed by the House, for fusion 
energy sciences.
      Safeguards and security.--Consistent with the 
Department's amended budget request for safeguards and 
security, the conference agreement includes $49,818,000 for 
safeguards and security activities at laboratories and 
facilities managed by the Office of Science. This is offset by 
a reduction of $38,244,000 that is to be allocated among the 
various programs which budgeted for safeguards and security 
costs in their overhead accounts.
      Program Direction.--The conference agreement includes 
$139,245,000 for program direction. Funding of $4,500,000 has 
been provided for science education.
      Funding adjustments.--A reduction of $38,244,000 reflects 
the allocation of safeguards and security costs in accordance 
with the Department's amended budget request. A general 
reduction of
$34,047,000 has been applied to this account.

                         Nuclear Waste Disposal

      The conference agreement provides $191,074,000 for 
Nuclear Waste Disposal instead of $213,000,000 as proposed by 
the House and $59,175,000 as proposed by the Senate. Combined 
with the appropriation of $200,000,000 to the Defense Nuclear 
Waste Disposal account, a total of $391,074,000 will be 
available for program activities in fiscal year 2001. The 
funding level reflects a reduction of $39,500,000 from the 
budget request and the transfer of $6,926,000 in safeguards and 
security costs in accordance with the Department's amended 
budget request.
      In addition, the conferees recommend that $10,000,000 of 
funds previously appropriated for interim waste storage 
activities in Public Law 104-46 may be made available upon 
written certification by the Secretary of Energy to the House 
and Senate Committees on Appropriations that the site 
recommendation report cannot be completed on time without 
additional funding.
      Site recommendation report.--The conferees reiterate the 
expectation by Congress that the Department submit its site 
recommendation report in July 2001 according to the current 
schedule. While the conference agreement does not provide the 
full funding requested by the Department, the conferees expect 
the Department to promptly submit a reprogramming request if it 
becomes apparent that limited funding will delay the site 
recommendation report beyond July 2001.
      The conferees further expect that, if the site is 
approved, the Department will continue to analyze further 
design improvements and enhancements between that time and the 
submittal of a license application to the Nuclear Regulatory 
Commission.
      State oversight funding.--The conference agreement 
includes $2,500,000 for the State of Nevada. This funding will 
be provided to the Department of Energy which will reimburse 
the State for actual expenditures on appropriate scientific 
oversight responsibilities conducted pursuant to the Nuclear 
Waste Policy Act of 1982. These funds are to be provided to the 
Nevada Division of Emergency Management for program management 
and execution and may not be used for payment of salaries and 
expenses for State employees.
      Local oversight funding.--The conference agreement 
includes $6,000,000 for affected units of local government. The 
conferees expect the Department to provide the full amount of 
funding allocated to the State and local counties for oversight 
activities. Any proposed reduction to the amounts identified by 
Congress for State and local oversight will require prior 
approval of a reprogramming request by the Committees on 
Appropriations.
      Limitation on the use of funds to promote or advertise 
public tours.--The conferees direct that none of the funds be 
used to promote or advertise any public tour of the Yucca 
Mountain facility, other than public notice that is required by 
statute or regulation.

                      Departmental Administration

      The conference agreement provides $226,107,000 for 
Departmental Administration instead of $153,527,000 as proposed 
by the House and $210,128,000 as proposed by the Senate. 
Additional funding adjustments include a transfer of 
$25,000,000 from Other Defense Activities; the use of 
$8,000,000 of prior year balances; and a reduction of $18,000 
for safeguards and security costs. Revenues of $151,000,000 are 
estimated to be received in fiscal year 2001, resulting in a 
net appropriation of $75,107,000.
      The conference agreement provides $5,000,000 for the 
Office of the Secretary as proposed by the House. All funds for 
the newly established National Nuclear Security Administration 
have been provided in the defense portion of this bill.
      The conference agreement provides $32,148,000 for the 
Chief Financial Officer, an increase of $1,400,000 over the 
budget request of $30,748,000. These additional funds are to 
support the DOE project management career development program.
      Working capital fund.--The conference agreement does not 
include statutory language proposed by the House prohibiting 
funding Federal employee salaries and expenses in the working 
capital fund. However, any proposal by the Department to 
transfer salaries and expenses to the working capital fund will 
require prior approval by the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations.
      Cost of work for others.--The conference agreement 
includes a one-time increase of $40,000,000 in the cost of work 
for others program to accommodate safeguards and security 
requirements. It is anticipated that this amount will be offset 
by an estimated $40,000,000 in revenues derived from non-
Department of Energy customers for the purpose of funding 
safeguards and security activities throughout the Department. 
In fiscal year 2002 and beyond, the conferees expect the 
Department to submit a safeguards and security budget that 
includes amounts obtained previously from other agencies or 
customers.

                    Office of the Inspector General

      The conference agreement provides $31,500,000 for the 
Inspector General as proposed by the House instead of 
$28,988,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conference agreement 
does not include statutory language proposed by the House 
requiring a study of the economic basis of recent gasoline 
price levels.

                    ATOMIC ENERGY DEFENSE ACTIVITIES

                National Nuclear Security Administration

      The conferees support the Administrator's efforts to 
establish and fill critical positions within the National 
Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA). The conferees agree 
that the Administrator's authority should not be impacted by 
any action that would otherwise limit or preclude hiring which 
may occur as a result of a change of administrations, and that 
the Administrator should to the maximum extent possible under 
applicable statutes proceed with effecting appointments.

                           Weapons Activities

      The conference agreement provides $5,015,186,000 for 
Weapons Activities instead of $4,579,684,000 as proposed by the 
House and $4,883,289,000 as proposed by the Senate. Statutory 
language proposed by the House limiting the funds availability 
to two years has not been included by the conferees.
      Reprogramming.--The conference agreement provides limited 
reprogramming authority of $5,000,000 or 5 percent, whichever 
is less, within the Weapons Activities account without 
submission of a reprogramming to be approved in advance by the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations. No individual 
program account may be increased or decreased by more than this 
amount during the fiscal year using this reprogramming 
authority. This should provide the needed flexibility to manage 
this account.
      Congressional notification within 30 days of the use of 
this reprogramming authority is required. Transfers which would 
result in increases or decreases in excess of $5,000,000 or 5 
percent to an individual program account during the fiscal year 
require prior notification and approval from the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations.
      The Department is directed to submit a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations by January 15, 2001, that reflects 
the allocation of the safeguards and security reduction, the 
use of prior year balances and the application of general 
reductions, and any proposed accounting adjustments.
      Directed stockpile work.--In stockpile research and 
development, additional funding of $19,000,000 has been 
provided for life extension development activities and to 
support additional sub-critical experiments. Additional funding 
of $10,000,000 has been provided to support activities required 
to maintain the delivery date for a certified pit. No 
additional funds are provided for cooperative research on hard 
and deeply buried targets.
      Funding for stockpile maintenance has been increased by 
$22,000,000 as follows: $13,000,000 for life extension 
operations and development and engineering activities; 
$5,000,000 for the Kansas City Plant; and $4,000,000 for the Y-
12 Plant.
      Funding for stockpile evaluation has been increased by 
$23,000,000 as follows: $6,000,000 for the elimination of the 
testing backlog and joint test equipment procurements; 
$8,000,000 for the Pantex Plant; $6,000,000 for the Y-12 Plant; 
and $3,000,000 for the Savannah River Plant.
      Campaigns.--The conference agreement provides $41,400,000 
for pit certification, the same as the budget request. 
Additional funding of $10,000,000 has been provided for dynamic 
materials properties to support the maintenance of core 
scientific capabilities, Liner Demonstration Experiments, and 
other various multi-campaign supporting physics demonstrations 
for the Atlas pulsed power facility at the Los Alamos National 
Laboratory and the Nevada Test Site.
      An additional $15,000,000 has been provided to support 
research, development and pre-conceptual design studies for an 
advanced hydrodynamic test facility using protons.
      Additional funding of $17,000,000 has been provided for 
enhanced surveillance activities as follows: $3,000,000 for the 
Kansas City Plant; $7,000,000 for the Pantex Plant; $4,000,000 
for the Y-12 Plant; $1,000,000 for the Savannah River Plant; 
and $2,000,000 to support accelerated deployment of test and 
diagnostic equipment.
      Funding for pit manufacturing readiness is increased by 
$17,000,000. An increase of $2,000,000 is provided to initiate 
conceptual design work on a pit manufacturing facility. 
Additional funding of $15,000,000 is provided to support the 
pit production program which is now behind schedule and over 
cost. The conferees strongly support the Senate language 
regarding the Department's lack of attention to this critical 
program and the requirement for a progress report by December 
1, 2000, and each quarter thereafter.
      An additional $5,000,000 has been provided to the Y-12 
Plant for secondary readiness.
      Inertial Fusion.--The conference agreement includes 
$449,600,000 for the inertial fusion program in the budget 
structure proposed by the House.
      Additional funding of $25,000,000 as proposed by the 
House has been provided to further development of high average 
power lasers. The conference agreement includes the budget 
request of $9,750,000 for the Naval Research Laboratory and the 
budget request of $32,150,000 for the University of Rochester. 
The conference agreement reflects the transfer of $40,000,000 
from National Ignition Facility (NIF) operations funding to the 
NIF construction project.
      The conference agreement provides $2,500,000 from within 
available funds to transfer the Petawatt Laser from Lawrence 
Livermore National Laboratory to the University of Nevada-Reno, 
as proposed by the Senate.
      National Ignition Facility.--The conference agreement 
provides $199,100,000 for continued construction of the 
National Ignition Facility (NIF). The conferees have included a 
directed reduction of $25,000,000 in the Weapons Activities 
account which is to be applied to programs under the direction 
of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.
      The conferees have included statutory language providing 
that only $130,000,000 shall be made available for NIF at the 
beginning of fiscal year 2001 and the remaining $69,100,000 
shall be available only upon a certification after March 31, 
2001, by the Administrator of the National Nuclear Security 
Administration that several requirements have been met. These 
requirements include:
      A. A recommendation on an appropriate path forward for 
the project based on a detailed review of alternative 
construction options that would (1) focus on first achieving 
operation of a 48 or 96 beam laser; (2) allow for the full 
demonstration of a such a system in support of the stockpile 
stewardship program before proceeding with construction and 
operation of a larger laser complex; and (3) include a program 
and funding plan for the possible future upgrade to a full NIF 
configuration. The recommendation should include identification 
of available ``off-ramps'' and decision points where the 
project could be scaled to a smaller system.
      B. Certification that project and scientific milestones 
as established in the revised construction project data sheet 
for the fourth quarter of fiscal year 2000 and the first two 
quarters of fiscal year 2001 have been met on schedule and on 
cost.
      C. Certification that the first and second quarter 
project reviews in fiscal year 2001 determined the project to 
be on schedule and cost and have provided further validation to 
the proposed path forward.
      D. Completion of a study that includes conclusions as to 
whether the full-scale NIF is required in order to maintain the 
safety and reliability of the current nuclear weapons 
stockpile, and whether alternatives to the NIF could achieve 
the objective of maintaining the safety and reliability of the 
current nuclear weapons stockpile.
      E. Certification that the NIF project has implemented an 
integrated cost-schedule earned-value project control system by 
March 1, 2001.
      F. A five-year budget plan for the stockpile stewardship 
program that fully describes how the NNSA intends to pay for 
NIF over the out years and what the potential for other impacts 
on the stockpile stewardship program will be.
      The conferees remain concerned about the Department's 
proposed budget increase and schedule delay for the NIF at the 
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The conferees 
believe that previously the Department of Energy, and most 
recently the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), 
may have failed to examine adequately options for NIF that have 
fewer than the full 192 beams. For example, a preferred course 
for NIF may be to complete 48 or 96 beams as soon as possible 
(although block procurement of infrastructure and glass may be 
considered), bring the reduced NIF into operation, perform the 
necessary scientific and technical tests to evaluate whether a 
full NIF will work and its impact on stockpile stewardship, and 
then develop a path forward for NIF that balances its 
scientific importance within the overall needs of the stockpile 
stewardship program. To move on this path in fiscal year 2001, 
the conferees recommend that $199,100,000 be appropriated for 
NIF as follows: $74,100,000 as originally proposed for Project 
96-D-111, $40,000,000 from NIF operations funding within the 
budget request for LLNL, $25,000,000 to be identified within 
the budget request at LLNL, plus an additional $60,000,000 in 
new appropriations.
      Furthermore, the conferees direct the Administration to 
prepare a budget request for fiscal year 2002 that fully 
reflects a balanced set of programs and investments within the 
stockpile stewardship program, and that the overall budget 
profile over the next eight years will accommodate a $3.4 
billion NIF along with the other critical aspects of the 
program.
      Defense computing and modeling.--The conference agreement 
provides $786,175,000 for defense computing modeling and the 
Accelerated Strategic Computing Initiative in the budget 
structure proposed by the House. The recommendation is 
$10,000,000 less than the budget request, and the reduction 
should be taken against lower priority activities.
      Tritium.--A total of $167,000,000 is provided for 
continued research and development on a new source of tritium. 
Funding of $15,000,000 has been provided for design only 
activities in Project 98-D-126, Accelerator Production of 
Tritium.
      Readiness in technical base and facilities.--The 
conference agreement includes several funding adjustments 
transferring funds from this program to individual campaigns.
      For operations of facilities, $137,300,000 has been 
transferred to the inertial fusion program. An additional 
$36,000,000 has been provided to the production plants for 
replacement of critical infrastructure and equipment as 
follows: $12,000,000 for the Kansas City Plant; $12,000,000 for 
the Pantex Plant; $10,000,000 for the Y-12 Plant; and 
$2,000,000 for the Savannah River Plant.
      Additional funding of $10,000,000 has been provided for 
the operation of pulsed power facilities; $20,000,000 for 
microsystems and microelectronics activities at the Sandia 
National Laboratory; $7,000,000 for a replacement CMR facility 
at Los Alamos National Laboratory; and $3,100,000 to fund the 
transition period for the new contractor at the Pantex Plant in 
Texas.
      For program readiness, the conference agreement transfers 
$7,400,000 to the inertial fusion program and adds $6,100,000 
for the TA-18 relocation.
      For nuclear weapons incident response, a new program 
established in readiness technical base and facilities, the 
conference agreement provides $56,289,000. Funding of 
$44,205,000 for the nuclear emergency search team and 
$12,084,000 for the accident response group was transferred 
from the emergency management program in the Other Defense 
Activities account.
      Special projects are supported at the budget request of 
$48,297,000. Additional funds have not been provided for AMTEX. 
From within available funds, $1,000,000 has been provided to 
support a program in partnership with university systems to 
meet the needs of the NNSA.
      For materials recycling, the conference agreement 
provides an additional $8,000,000 to maintain restart schedules 
for hydrogen fluoride and wet chemistry operations at the Y-12 
Plant.
      For containers, the conference agreement provides an 
additional $4,000,000 to support the effort to repackage pits 
which is currently behind schedule at the Pantex Plant due to 
operational problems.
      Funding for advanced simulation and computing has been 
transferred to the defense computing and modeling campaign.
      The conference agreement does not provide additional 
funding to process uranium-233 as proposed by the Senate, but 
the conferees expect the Department to act expeditiously to 
process this material in a manner that would retain and make 
available isotopes for beneficial use. The Department should 
provide to the House and Senate Committees a report on the 
status of this project by March 1, 2001.
      Construction projects.--The conference agreement provides 
$35,500,000 for preliminary project engineering and design. 
Funding of $20,000,000 is provided for design and supporting 
infrastructure upgrades for the Microsystems and Engineering 
Sciences Applications facility at Sandia National Laboratory; 
$5,000,000 for proof of concept and completion of facility 
operational capability for the Atlas pulsed power machine at 
the Nevada Test Site; and $1,000,000 for initiation of design 
activities for the relocation of the TA-18 nuclear materials 
handling facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory.
      Safeguards and security.--Consistent with the 
Department's amended budget request for safeguards and 
security, the conference agreement includes $377,596,000 for 
safeguards and security activities at laboratories and 
facilities managed by the Office of Defense Programs. This is 
offset by a reduction of $310,796,000 to be allocated among the 
various programs which budgeted for safeguards and security 
costs in their overhead accounts.
      Program direction.--The conference agreement provides 
$224,071,000 for program direction as proposed by the Senate.
      Funding adjustments.--The conference agreement includes 
the use of $13,647,000 in prior year balances and a reduction 
of $310,796,000 that reflects the allocation of safeguards and 
security costs in accordance with the Department's amended 
budget request. In addition, the conference agreement includes 
a general reduction of $35,700,000 of which $25,000,000 is to 
be taken against programs at Lawrence Livermore National 
Laboratory.

                    Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation

      The conference agreement provides $874,196,000 for 
Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation instead of $861,477,000 as 
proposed by the House and $908,967,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Statutory language proposed by the House limiting the 
funds availability to two years has not been included by the 
conferees. Statutory language proposed by the Senate to earmark 
funding for the Incorporated Research Institutions for 
Seismology has not been included. The conferees have provided a 
total of $53,000,000 for the long-term Russian initiative 
within this account.
      Limitation on Russian and Newly Independent States' (NIS) 
program funds.--The conferees are concerned about the amount of 
funding for Russian and NIS programs which remains in the 
United States for Department of Energy contractors and 
laboratories rather than going to the facilities in Russia and 
the NIS. The conferees direct that not more than the following 
percentages of funding may be spent in the United States in 
fiscal year 2001 for these programs: Materials Protection, 
Control and Accounting, 43%; International Proliferation 
Prevention Program, 40%; Nuclear Cities Initiative, 49%; 
Russian Plutonium Disposition, 38%; and International Nuclear 
Safety, 78%.
      The conferees expect the Department to continue to 
increase the level of funding which is provided to Russia 
versus the funding which remains in the United States for 
Department of Energy contractors and laboratories in each 
subsequent year. The Department is to provide a report to the 
Committees by January 31, 2001, and each subsequent year on the 
amount of funding provided to Russia and NIS in each program 
area. The Department should work with the Committees on the 
specific information to be included in the report.
      Nonproliferation and verification research and 
development.--The conference agreement provides $252,990,000 
for nonproliferation and verification research and development. 
Funding of $17,000,000 has been provided for the 
nonproliferation and international security center (NISC) at 
Los Alamos National Laboratory, and $1,000,000 for the 
Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology PASSCAL 
Instrument Center.
      Concerns have been raised repeatedly that there should be 
more opportunity for open competition in certain areas of the 
nonproliferation and verification research and development 
program. A recent report by an outside group established by the 
Department to review the Office of Nonproliferation Research 
and Engineering included a similar recommendation. The report 
stated that, ``There should be greater opportunity for the 
wider U.S. scientific and technical community to contribute to 
the success of the NN-20 portfolio. This can be done through 
open competition administered by DOE Headquarters and through 
partnerships chosen and managed by the DOE national 
laboratories.'' . . . ``Areas that come to mind as candidates 
for open competition include seismic verification technologies 
for very low yield underground nuclear tests and chemical and 
biological agent detection and identification technologies. 
Other possible areas might be specialized electronic chip 
development and certain radio-frequency technologies.''
      The conferees expect the Department to act in good faith 
on the recommendations provided by the external review group, 
and direct the Department to initiate a free and open 
competitive process for 25 percent of its research and 
development activities during fiscal year 2001 for ground-based 
systems treaty monitoring. The competitive process should be 
open to all Federal and non-Federal entities.
      The conferees direct the Department to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations on the status of implementing the 
external review panel's recommendations and the results of the 
directed open competition by March 30, 2001.
      Arms control.--The conference agreement provides 
$152,014,000 for arms control activities including $24,500,000 
for the Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention and 
$27,500,000 for the Nuclear Cities Initiative. In addition to 
the $10,000,000 added to the Nuclear Cities Initiative, the 
conferees have provided another $19,000,000 for the long-term 
Russian initiative in the arms control program to be 
distributed as follows: $15,000,000 for spent fuel dry storage; 
$500,000 for the plutonium registry at Mayak; $2,500,000 for 
geologic repository cooperation research and planning; and 
$1,000,000 for research reactor spent fuel acceptance.
      International materials protection, control and 
accounting (MPC&A;).--The conference agreement includes 
$173,856,000 for the MPC&A; program including $24,000,000 for 
the long-term Russian initiative. The conferees have provided 
$5,000,000 for plutonium storage at Mayak and $19,000,000 for 
expanded MPC&A; activities at Russian naval sites.
      HEU transparency implementation.--The conference 
agreement provides $15,190,000, the same as the budget request.
      International nuclear safety.--The conference agreement 
provides $20,000,000, the same as the budget request, for the 
international nuclear safety program. This funding is to be 
used only for activities in support of completing the upgrades 
to Soviet-designed nuclear reactors. From within available 
funds, the conference agreement provides $1,000,000 for a 
cooperative effort between the United States and Russia to 
address intergranular stress corrosion cracking and restore the 
structural integrity of Russian nuclear plants until 
decommissioning.
      Fissile materials disposition.--The conference agreement 
provides $249,449,000 for fissile materials disposition. 
Funding of $139,517,000, as proposed by the House, has been 
provided for the U.S. surplus materials disposition program. 
The conference agreement provides $26,000,000 for Project 99-D-
143, the MOX fuel fabrication facility.
      Program direction.--The conference agreement provides 
$51,468,000 for the program direction account as proposed by 
the House. The conferees are aware that the Department does not 
have enough qualified Federal employees available to manage the 
nonproliferation and national security programs, particularly 
the Russian programs. The conferees will favorably consider a 
reprogramming of funds from program areas to the program 
direction account as Federal employees are hired to replace the 
contractor employees who currently oversee these programs.
      Funding adjustment.--The conference agreement includes a 
reduction of $40,245,000 that reflects the transfer of 
safeguards and security costs in accordance with the 
Department's amended budget request.

                             Naval Reactors

      The conference agreement provides $690,163,000 for Naval 
Reactors instead of $694,600,000 as proposed by the Senate and 
$677,600,000 as proposed by the House. Additional funding of 
$17,000,000 is provided to optimize the program to shutdown 
prototype reactors and complete all major inactivation work by 
fiscal year 2002.
      Funding adjustment.--The conference agreement includes a 
reduction of $4,437,000 that reflects the transfer of 
safeguards and security costs in accordance with the 
Department's amended budget request.

                      Office of the Administrator

      The conference agreement provides $10,000,000 for this 
new account as proposed by the Senate. These funds are provided 
to the Administrator of the National Nuclear Security 
Administration for the costs associated with hiring new 
employees and establishing the office.

                    OTHER DEFENSE RELATED ACTIVITIES

         Defense Environmental Restoration and Waste Management

      The conference agreement provides $4,974,476,000 for 
Defense Environmental Restoration and Waste Management instead 
of $4,522,707,000 as proposed by the House and $4,635,763,000 
as proposed by the Senate. Additional funding of $1,082,714,000 
is contained in the Defense Facilities Closure Projects account 
and $65,000,000 in the Defense Environmental Management 
Privatization account for a total of $6,122,190,000 provided 
for all defense environmental management activities.
      The conference agreement does not include statutory 
language proposed by the House pertaining to the use of funds 
for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant or language proposed by the 
Senate earmarking funds for programs to be managed by the 
Carlsbad office of the Department of Energy.
      The conference agreement limits the number of motor 
vehicles that can be purchased in fiscal year 2001 to not more 
than 30 for replacement only. The conferees have included an 
additional reporting requirement on the entire Department and 
have specified that sport utility vehicles are to be counted 
within this ceiling.
      National monument designation.--The conferees agree that 
no funds spent by the Department for the coordination, 
integration, or implementation of a management plan related to 
the Hanford Reach National Monument shall result in the 
reduction or delay of cleanup at the Hanford site.
      Site/Project Completion.--The conference agreement 
provides an additional $11,000,000 for F and H-area 
stabilization activities at the Savannah River Site in South 
Carolina as proposed by the House, and $19,000,000 to address 
funding shortfalls at the Hanford site in Richland, Washington, 
as proposed by the Senate. Funding of $12,308,000 has been 
transferred to other accounts as proposed by the House.
      The conference agreement supports the budget request of 
$2,500,000 for the cooperative agreement with WERC and provides 
$25,000 for an independent evaluation of the mixed-waste 
landfill at Sandia National Laboratories in New Mexico.
      For construction, the conference agreement provides 
$17,300,000 for Project 01-D-414, preliminary project 
engineering and design (PE&D;). Project 01-D-415, 235-F 
packaging and stabilization, at the Savannah River Site has 
been funded at $4,000,000. Funding of $500,000 requested for 
Project 01-D-402, INTEC cathodic protection system expansion 
project, at Idaho Falls has been transferred to the new PE&D; 
project. Funding of $27,932,000 for the Highly Enriched Blend 
Down Facility has been transferred to the fissile materials 
disposition program.
      Post 2006 Completion.--The conference agreement includes 
an additional $10,000,000 to maintain schedules required by 
revised compliance agreements with the State of Washington as 
proposed by the Senate, and $6,000,000 to support transuranic 
and low-level waste activities at the Savannah River Site in 
South Carolina as proposed by the House. Funding of $10,000,000 
for the Four Mile Branch project and $18,000,000 for the 
Consolidated Incinerator Facility at the Savannah River Site 
has not been provided as proposed by the House. Funding of 
$18,692,000 has been transferred to the Science and Technology 
program.
      The conference agreement provides $400,000 to begin 
design activities for a subsurface geosciences laboratory at 
Idaho.
      From within available funds for the Waste Isolation Pilot 
Plant, $1,000,000 has been provided for a transparency 
demonstration project.
      A total of $3,000,000 has been provided to support a 
program with the United States-Mexico Border Health Commission 
to demonstrate technologies to reduce hazardous waste streams 
and to support the Materials Corridor Partnership Initiative.
      Funding of $1,300,000 for Project 01-D-403, immobilized 
high level waste interim storage facility, at Richland, 
Washington, has been transferred to the PE&D; project in site/
project completion account.
      Office of River Protection.--The conference agreement 
provides $757,839,000 for the Office of River Protection at the 
Hanford site in Washington. The conference agreement provides 
$377,000,000 for Project 01-D-416, Tank Waste Remediation 
System, at Richland, Washington, to vitrify the high-level 
waste in underground tanks. Funding to vitrify waste at the 
Hanford site was requested in the Defense Environmental 
Management Privatization account in fiscal year 2001. However, 
due to the failure of the contractor to provide a viable cost 
estimate under the concept of a ``privatized'' contract, the 
contract will now be structured as a cost plus incentive fee 
contract and will be funded in the regular appropriation 
account.
      Science and technology development.--The conference 
agreement provides $256,898,000 for the science and technology 
development program. Funding of $21,000,000 has been 
transferred to this account for the Idaho validation and 
verification program. This transfer is not intended to reduce 
the environmental management base program in Idaho. The 
Department is directed to provide $10,000,000 for the next 
round of new and innovative research grants in the 
environmental management science program in fiscal year 2001, 
and $10,000,000 for technology deployment activities.
      The conference agreement provides $4,000,000 for the 
international agreement with AEA Technology; $4,500,000 for the 
Diagnostic Instrumentation and Analysis Laboratory; $4,350,000 
for the university robotics research program; an additional 
$1,000,000 for the D&D; focus area; and up to $4,000,000 to 
continue evaluation, development and demonstration of the 
Advanced Vitrification System upon successful completion of 
supplemental testing. The conferees have provided $2,000,000 to 
the National Energy Technology Laboratory to be used for the 
continuation of the Mid-Atlantic Recycling Center for End-of-
Life Electronics initiative (MARCEE) in cooperation with the 
Polymer Alliance Zone.
      The conference agreement includes $4,000,000 for the 
long-term stewardship program to be administered at 
Headquarters and $4,000,000 for the Idaho National Engineering 
and Environmental Laboratory. No funds are provided for the low 
dose radiation effects program, as the entire Senate 
recommended amount is provided within the Office of Science.
      Safeguards and security.--Consistent with the 
Department's amended budget request for safeguards and 
security, the conference agreement includes $203,748,000 for 
safeguards and security activities at laboratories and 
facilities managed by the Office of Defense Programs. This is 
offset by a reduction of $193,217,000 to be allocated among the 
various programs which budgeted for safeguards and security 
costs in their overhead accounts.
      Program direction.--The conferees have provided 
$363,988,000 for the program direction account. This funding 
level reflects the transfer of the uranium programs from the 
office of nuclear energy to the office of environmental 
management. Funding of $4,100,000 has been provided to allow 
for the transfer of up to 5 employees from Headquarters and 25 
employees at Oak Ridge who manage the uranium programs.
      Funding adjustments.--The conference agreement includes 
the use of $34,317,000 of prior year balances and $50,000,000 
in pension refunds, the same as the budget request. The 
conference agreement includes a reduction of $193,217,000 that 
reflects the allocation of safeguards and security costs in 
accordance with the Department's amended budget request. A 
general reduction of $10,700,000 has also been included.

                  Defense Facilities Closure Projects

      The conference agreement appropriates $1,082,714,000 the 
same as the amended budget request. The conferees expect the 
Department to request adequate funds to keep each of these 
projects on a schedule for closure by 2006 or earlier.
      Any savings resulting from safeguards and security costs 
are to be retained and used for cleanup activities at the 
closure sites.

             Defense Environmental Management Privatization

      The conference agreement provides $65,000,000 for the 
defense environmental management privatization program instead 
of $259,000,000 as proposed by the House and $324,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The conference agreement provides no 
funds for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) project at 
Hanford. Funding for this project, which had previously been 
considered as a privatization contract, has been transferred to 
the Defense Environmental Restoration and Waste Management 
appropriation account.
      The conference agreement also includes a rescission of 
$97,000,000 of funds previously appropriated for the TWRS 
project in the Defense Environmental Management Privatization 
appropriation account.

                        Other Defense Activities

      The conference agreement appropriates $585,755,000 for 
Other Defense Activities instead of $592,235,000 as proposed by 
the House and $579,463,000 as proposed by the Senate. Details 
of the conference agreement are provided below.

                   Security and Emergency Operations

      For nuclear safeguards and security, the conference 
agreement provides $116,409,000 as proposed by the House. The 
conferees have provided $3,000,000 for the critical 
infrastructure protection program, an increase of $600,000 over 
fiscal year 2000. The conference agreement also provides 
$2,000,000 to procure safety locks to meet Federal 
specifications.
      The conference agreement provides $33,000,000 for 
security investigations, the same as the budget request.
      The conference agreement includes $33,711,000 for 
emergency management. Funding of $3,600,000 was transferred to 
the program direction account to reflect the conversion of 
contractor employees to Federal employees at a substantial cost 
savings. Funding of $44,205,000 for the nuclear emergency 
search team and $12,084,000 for the accident response group was 
transferred to the Weapons Activities account.
      Program direction.--The conference agreement provides 
$92,967,000 for the program direction account as proposed by 
the House. This reflects the transfer of $3,600,000 from the 
emergency management program.

                              Intelligence

      The conference agreement includes $38,059,000 as proposed 
by the House and the Senate to support the Department's 
intelligence program.

                          Counterintelligence

      The conference agreement includes $45,200,000 as proposed 
by the House and the Senate to support the Department's 
counterintelligence program.

                   Advanced Accelerator Applications

      The conference agreement provides $34,000,000 to 
establish a new program for advanced accelerator applications, 
including $3,000,000 for research and development of 
technologies for economic and environmentally sound refinement 
of spent nuclear fuel at the University of Nevada-Las Vegas.
      The Department is directed to prepare a program plan for 
managing and executing this program using the extensive 
expertise of the Office of Science and the Office of Defense 
Programs in accelerator research, design, and applications, and 
the expertise of the Office of Nuclear Energy in transmutation 
of nuclear waste. This program plan should be submitted to the 
Committees by March 1, 2001.
      The conferees make no recommendation as to how the 
Department should manage the advanced accelerator application 
program.

            Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance

      The conference agreement provides $14,937,000, the same 
as the budget request for the office of independent oversight 
and performance assurance.

                Environment, Safety and Health (Defense)

      The conference agreement provides $125,567,000 for 
defense-related environment, safety and health activities. The 
conferees have provided $3,000,000 to establish a program at 
the University of Nevada-Las Vegas for Department-wide 
management of electronic records; $1,750,000 for the University 
of Louisville and the University of Kentucky to undertake 
epidemiological studies of workers; $880,000 to provide medical 
screening for workers employed at the Amchitka nuclear weapons 
test site; and $500,000 for the State of Nevada to address 
deficiencies in the Cancer Registry, Vital Statistics, and 
Birth Defects Registry activities.
      The conference agreement includes $17,000,000 for the 
Department's administrative costs associated with the proposed 
Energy Employees Compensation Initiative. These funds are not 
available until the program is authorized by law.

                    Worker and Community Transition

      The conference agreement provides $24,500,000 for the 
worker and community transition program, including $2,100,000 
for infrastructure improvements at the former Pinellas plant. 
The conferees expect that communities denied funds in fiscal 
year 2000 will be granted priority status in fiscal year 2001.
      The conference agreement provides that no funds may be 
used to augment the $24,500,000 made available for obligation 
for severance payments and other benefits and community 
assistance grants unless the Department of Energy submits a 
reprogramming request subject to approval by the appropriate 
Congressional committees.

           National Security Programs Administrative Support

      The conference agreement provides $25,000,000 for 
national security programs administrative support instead of 
$51,000,000 as proposed by the House and no funding as proposed 
by the Senate.

                     Office of Hearings And Appeals

      The conference agreement provides $3,000,000 as proposed 
by the House and the Senate.

                          Funding Adjustments

      A reduction of $595,000 and the elimination of the 
$20,000,000 offset to user organizations for security 
investigations reflects the allocation of the safeguards and 
security amended budget request.

                     Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal

      The conference agreement provides $200,000,000 as 
proposed by the House instead of $292,000,000 as proposed by 
the Senate.

                    Power Marketing Administrations

                  BONNEVILLE POWER ADMINISTRATION FUND

      The conferees have included the statutory language 
extending Bonneville's voluntary separation incentive program 
until January 1, 2003.
      During fiscal year 2001, Bonneville plans to pay the 
Treasury $620,000,000 of which $163,000,000 is to repay 
principal on the Federal investment in these facilities.

                   SOUTHEASTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION

      The conference agreement includes $3,900,000, the same as 
the budget request, for the Southeastern Power Administration.

                   SOUTHWESTERN POWER ADMINISTRATION

      The conference agreement includes $28,100,000, the same 
as the budget request, for the Southwestern Power 
Administration.

                   WESTERN AREA POWER ADMINISTRATION

      The conference agreement provides $165,830,000, instead 
of $164,916,000 as proposed by the Senate and $160,930,000 as 
proposed by the House. The conference agreement increases the 
amount of purchase power and wheeling to $65,224,000 and 
increases offsetting collections by the same amount. Funding of 
$5,950,000 is provided for the Utah Reclamation Mitigation and 
Conservation Account.

                        FALCON AND AMISTAD FUND

      The conference agreement includes $2,670,000, the same as 
the budget request, for the Falcon and Amistad Operating and 
Maintenance Fund.

                  Federal Energy Regulatory Commission

      The conference agreement includes $175,200,000, the same 
as the budget request for the Federal Energy Regulatory 
Commission.

                              Rescissions

                     Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal

      The conference agreement includes language rescinding 
$75,000,000 from funds previously appropriated for interim 
waste storage activities for Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal in 
Public Law 104-46, the fiscal year 1996 Energy and Water 
Development Appropriations Act.

             Defense Environmental Management Privatization

      The conference agreement includes language rescinding 
$97,000,000 from the Defense Environmental Management 
Privatization account. Funds were appropriated in this account 
in prior years for the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System 
Project. This project is no longer being considered for a 
privatization contract. It has been transferred to the Defense 
Environmental Restoration and Waste Management appropriation 
account and will be funded there in future appropriation acts.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

                          Department of Energy

      Sec. 301. The conference agreement includes a provision 
proposed by the House that none of the funds may be used to 
award a management and operating contract unless such contract 
is awarded using competitive procedures, or the Secretary of 
Energy grants a waiver to allow for such a deviation. Section 
301 does not preclude extension of a contract awarded using 
competitive procedures.
      Sec. 302. The conference agreement includes a provision 
proposed by the House and Senate that none of the funds may be 
used to prepare or implement workforce restructuring plans or 
provide enhanced severance payments and other benefits and 
community assistance grants for Federal employees of the 
Department of Energy under section 3161 of the National Defense 
Authorization Act of Fiscal Year 1993, Public Law 102-484.
      Sec. 303. The conference agreement modifies a provision 
proposed by the House that none of the funds may be used to 
augment the $24,500,000 made available for obligation for 
severance payments and other benefits and community assistance 
grants unless the Department of Energy submits a reprogramming 
request subject to approval by the appropriate Congressional 
committees.
      Sec. 304. The conference agreement includes a provision 
proposed by the House and Senate that none of the funds may be 
used to prepare or initiate Requests for Proposals for a 
program if the program has not been funded by Congress in the 
current fiscal year. This provision precludes the Department 
from initiating activities for new programs which have been 
proposed in the budget request, but which have not yet been 
funded by Congress.
      Sec. 305. The conference agreement includes a provision 
proposed by the House and Senate that permits the transfer and 
merger of unexpended balances of prior appropriations with 
appropriation accounts established in this bill.
      Sec. 306. The conference agreement includes language 
providing that not to exceed 6 percent of funds shall be 
available for Laboratory Directed Research and Development.
      Sec. 307. The conference agreement includes language 
limiting to $185,000,000 the funds available for reimbursement 
of management and operating contractor travel expenses. Of the 
$185,000,000, $175,000,000 is available for contractor travel 
and $10,000,000 is to be held in reserve by the Department's 
Chief Financial Officer for emergency travel requirements. The 
language also requires the Department of Energy to reimburse 
contractors for travel consistent with regulations applicable 
to Federal employees and specifies that the travel ceiling does 
not apply to travel funded from Laboratory Directed Research 
and Development funds.
      Sec. 308. The conference agreement includes language 
prohibiting the Bonneville Power Administration from performing 
energy efficiency services outside the legally defined 
Bonneville service territory.
      Sec. 309. The conference agreement includes language 
limiting the types of waste that can be disposed of in the 
Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. None of the funds 
may be used to dispose of transuranic waste in excess of 20 
percent plutonium by weight for the aggregate of any material 
category. At the Rocky Flats site, this provision includes ash 
residues; salt residues; wet residues; direct repackage 
residues; and scrub alloy as referenced in the ``Final 
Environmental Impact Statement on Management of Certain 
Plutonium Residues and Scrub Alloy Stored at the Rocky Flats 
Environmental Technology Site''.
      Sec. 310. The conference agreement includes language 
allowing the Administrator of the National Nuclear Security 
Administration to authorize certain nuclear weapons production 
plants to use not more than 2 percent of available funds for 
research, development and demonstration activities.
      Sec. 311. The conference agreement includes language 
allowing each Federal power marketing administration to engage 
in activities relating to the formation and operation of a 
regional transmission organization.
      Sec. 312. The conference agreement includes language that 
would permit the Secretary of Energy to use $10,000,000 of 
funds previously appropriated for interim waste storage 
activities for Defense Nuclear Waste Disposal upon receipt of 
written certification that the site recommendation report 
cannot be completed on time without additional funding.
      Sec. 313. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the Senate that would provide a three year term of 
office for the first person appointed to the position of the 
Under Secretary of Nuclear Security of the Department of 
Energy.
      Sec. 314. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the Senate limiting the authority of the Secretary 
of Energy to modify the organization of the National Nuclear 
Security Administration.
      Sec. 315. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the Senate prohibiting the pay of personnel engaged 
in concurrent service or duties inside and outside the National 
Nuclear Security Administration.
      Report on impacts of limits on on-site storage.--The 
conference agreement does not include statutory language 
proposed by the Senate, but the conferees direct that not later 
than 90 days after enactment of the fiscal year 2001 Energy and 
Water Development Appropriations Act, the Secretary of Energy 
shall submit to Congress a report containing a description of 
all alternatives that are available to the Northern States 
Power Company and the Federal government to allow the company 
to continue to operate the Prairie Island nuclear generating 
plant until the end of the term of the license issued to the 
company by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, in view of a law 
of the State of Minnesota that limits the quantity of spent 
nuclear fuel that may be stored at the plant, assuming that the 
existing Federal and State laws remain unchanged.
      Report on electricity prices.--The conferees note that 
California is currently experiencing an energy crisis. 
Wholesale electricity prices have soared, resulting in 
electrical bills that have increased by as much as 300 percent 
in the San Diego area. Conferees understand that the staff of 
the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission is currently 
investigating the crisis. The Commission is directed to submit 
to Congress a report on the results of the investigation no 
later than December 1, 2000. The report shall include 
identification of the causes of the San Diego price increases, 
a determination whether California wholesale electricity 
markets are competitive, a recommendation whether a regional 
price cap should be set in the Western States, a determination 
whether manipulation of prices has occurred at the wholesale 
level, and a determination of remedies, including legislation 
or regulations, that are necessary to correct the problem and 
prevent similar incidents in California and elsewhere in the 
United States.
      Provisions not adopted by the conferees.--The conference 
agreement deletes language proposed by the House and Senate 
prohibiting the use of funds for contracts modified in a manner 
that deviates from the Federal Acquisition Regulation.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate allowing the Secretary of Energy to enter into multiyear 
contracts without obligating the estimated costs.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate requiring the Department of Energy's laboratories to 
provide an annual funding plan to the Department.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
House prohibiting the payment of Federal salaries in the 
working capital fund.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate prohibiting the expenditure of funds to establish or 
maintain independent centers at Department of Energy 
laboratories or facilities. The conference agreement includes 
report language requiring the Department to identify these 
centers in the budget request.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
House requiring a report on activities of the executive branch 
to address high gasoline prices and develop an overall national 
energy strategy.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate prohibiting the expenditure of funds to restart the High 
Flux Beam Reactor.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate limiting the inclusion of costs of protecting fish and 
wildlife within the rates charged by the Bonneville Power 
Administration.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate limiting the cost of construction of the National 
Ignition Facility.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate requiring an evaluation of innovative technologies for 
demilitarization of weapons components and treatment of 
hazardous waste.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate requiring a report on national energy policy.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate noting concern with the House provision on limiting 
funds for worker and community transition.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate requiring a report on the impact of State-imposed limits 
on spent nuclear fuel storage. This requirement has been 
included in report language.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate limiting the use of funds to promote or advertise public 
tours at Yucca Mountain. This requirement has been included in 
report language.

                       CONFERENCE RECOMMENDATIONS

      The conference agreement's detailed funding 
recommendations for programs in title III are contained in the 
following table:


                                TITLE IV

                          INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

                    Appalachian Regional Commission

      The conference agreement includes $66,400,000 for the 
Appalachian Regional Commission as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $63,000,000 as proposed by the House.

                Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board

      The conference agreement includes $18,500,000 for the 
Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board as proposed by the 
Senate instead of $17,000,000 as proposed by the House.

                        Delta Regional Authority

      The conference agreement includes $20,000,000 for the 
Delta Regional Authority as proposed by the Senate.

                           Denali Commission

      The conference agreement includes $30,000,000 for the 
Denali Commission as proposed by the Senate.

                     Nuclear Regulatory Commission

                         salaries and Expenses

      The conference agreement includes $481,900,000 as 
proposed by the House and the Senate, to be offset by revenues 
of $447,958,000, for a net appropriation of $33,942,000. This 
reflects the statutory language adopted by the conference to 
reduce the revenues collected in fiscal year 2001 by 2 percent.

                      Office of Inspector General

      The conference agreement includes $5,500,000 as proposed 
by the House and the Senate, to be offset by revenues of 
$5,390,000, for a net appropriation of $110,000. This reflects 
the statutory language adopted by the conference to reduce the 
revenues collected in fiscal year 2001 by 2 percent.

                  Nuclear Waste Technical Review Board

      The conference agreement provides $2,900,000 instead of 
$2,700,000 as proposed by House and $3,000,000 as proposed by 
the Senate.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate establishing a Presidential Energy Commission.

                                TITLE V

               FISCAL YEAR 2001 EMERGENCY APPROPRIATIONS

                          DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

                    Atomic Energy Defense Activities

                      Cerro Grande Fire Activities

      The conference agreement includes an emergency 
appropriation of $203,460,000 as proposed by the Senate for 
Cerro Grande Fire Activities at the Los Alamos National 
Laboratory in New Mexico.
      The recommendation includes $46,860,000 for repair and 
risk mitigation associated with physical damage and 
destruction; $25,400,000 for restoring services; $18,000,000 
for emergency response; and $15,000,000 for resuming laboratory 
operations.
      In addition, funding is provided for the following 
construction projects: $6,100,000 for Project 97-D-102, Dual-
Axis Radiographic Hydrotest Facility (DAHRT); $25,000,000 for 
Project 01-D-701, Site-wide Fire Alarm System Replacement; 
$20,000,000 for Project 01-D-702, Emergency Operations Center 
Replacement and Relocation; $29,100,000 for Project 01-D-703, 
TA-54 Waste Management Mitigation; $10,000,000 for Project 01-
D-704, Office Building Replacement Program for Vulnerable 
Facilities; and $8,000,000 for Project 01-D-705, Multi-channel 
Communications System. The Department is directed to include 
construction project data sheets for these projects in the 
fiscal year 2002 budget request.

                          INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

                    Appalachian Regional Commission

      The conference agreement includes an emergency 
appropriation of $11,000,000 for the Appalachian Regional 
Commission for the North Fork Hughes River Watershed project in 
Ritchie County, West Virginia.

                                TITLE VI

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

      Sec. 601. The conference agreement includes language 
directing that none of the funds in this Act or any prior 
appropriations Act may be used in any way, directly or 
indirectly, to influence congressional action on any 
legislation or appropriation matters pending before Congress, 
other than to communicate to Members of Congress as described 
in section 1913 of title 18, United States Code.
      Sec. 602. The conference agreement includes language 
regarding the purchase of American-made equipment and products, 
and prohibiting contracts with persons falsely labeling 
products as made in America.
      Sec. 603. The conference agreement includes language 
providing that no funds may be used to determine the final 
point of discharge for the interceptor drain for the San Luis 
Unit of the Central Valley Project until certain conditions are 
met. The language also provides that the costs of the Kesterson 
Reservoir Cleanup Program and the San Joaquin Valley Drainage 
Program shall be classified as reimbursable or non-reimbursable 
by the Secretary of the Interior and that any future obligation 
of funds for drainage service or drainage studies for the San 
Luis Unit shall be fully reimbursable by San Luis Unit 
beneficiaries pursuant to Reclamation law.
      Sec. 604. The conference agreement includes language 
proposed by the Senate limiting the use of funds to propose or 
issue rules, regulations, decrees, or orders for the purpose of 
implementing the Kyoto Protocol. The conferees do not concur 
with the report language proposed by the House.
      Sec. 605. The conference agreement includes language 
extending the Coastal Wetlands Planning, Protection and 
Restoration Act.
      Sec. 606. The conference agreement includes language 
redesignating the Interstate Sanitation Commission as the 
Interstate Environmental Commission.
      Provisions not adopted.--The conference agreement deletes 
language proposed by the House amending the Energy Policy and 
Conservation Act.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
House limiting the use of funds to pay salaries of employees of 
the Department of Energy who refused to take polygraph 
examinations.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate repealing sections of Public Law 106-246.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate requiring the Tennessee Valley Authority to complete an 
environmental impact statement before proceeding with the sale 
of mineral rights.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate requiring a report to Congress on electricity prices. 
This requirement has been included in report language.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
House prohibiting the use of funds to pay an individual who 
simultaneously holds positions within the National Nuclear 
Security Administration and the Department of Energy. This 
matter has been addressed in section 315.

                               TITLE VII

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

                       Bureau of the Public Debt

      Gifts to the United States for Reduction of the Public Debt

      The conference agreement includes language providing 
funds to reduce the public debt.

                               TITLE VIII

                     Nuclear Regulatory Commission

      The conference agreement includes language extending the 
Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) authority to assess 
license and annual fees through fiscal year 2005. This 
extension is necessary to provide the resources needed to fund 
the activities of the Commission. The conferees have also 
provided authority to reduce the fee recovery requirement from 
100 percent to 98 percent in fiscal year 2001, and further 
decrease the fee incrementally until the fee recovery 
requirement is reduced to 90 percent in 2005. This will address 
fairness and equity concerns relating to charging NRC licensees 
for agency expenses which do not provide a direct benefit to 
them.

                   Conference Total--With Comparisons

      The total new budget (obligational) authority for the 
fiscal year 2001 recommended by the Committee of Conference, 
with comparisons to the fiscal year 2000 amount, the 2001 
budget estimates, and the House and Senate bills for 2001 
follow:

                        [In thousands of dollars]

New budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 2000...     $21,647,047
Budget estimates of new (obligational) authority, fiscal 
    year 2001...........................................      23,146,559
House bill, fiscal year 2001............................      22,204,000
Senate bill, fiscal year 2001...........................      23,131,901
Conference agreement, fiscal year 2001..................      24,088,380
Conference agreement compared with:
    New budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 
      2000..............................................      +2,441,333
    Budget estimates of new (obligational) authority, 
      fiscal year 2001..................................        +941,821
    House bill, fiscal year 2001........................      +1,884,380
    Senate bill, fiscal year 2001.......................        +956,479

                                   James T. Walsh,
                                   Tom DeLay,
                                   Dave Hobson,
                                   Joe Knollenberg,
                                   Rodney Frelinghuysen,
                                   Anne M. Northup,
                                   John E. Sununu,
                                   Virgil Goode, Jr.,
                                   Bill Young,
                                   Alan B. Mollohan,
                                   Marcy Kaptur,
                                   Carrie P. Meek,
                                   David E. Price,
                                   Bud Cramer,
                                   Dave Obey,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Christopher S. Bond,
                                   Conrad Burns,
                                   Richard C. Shelby,
                                   Larry E. Craig,
                                   Kay Bailey Hutchison,
                                   Ted Stevens,
                                   Pete V. Domenici,
                                   Barbara A. Mikulski,
                                   Patrick Leahy,
                                   Frank R. Lautenberg,
                                   Tom Harkin,
                                   Robert C. Byrd,
                                   Harry Reid,
                                   Daniel K. Inouye,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.