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107th Congress                                            Rept. 107-133
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                     Part 1

======================================================================



 
                     NATIONAL SCIENCE EDUCATION ACT

                                _______
                                

 July 11, 2001.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Boehlert, from the Committee on Science, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 100]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

  The Committee on Science, to whom was referred the bill (H.R. 
100) to establish and expand programs relating to science, 
mathematics, engineering, and technology education, and for 
other purposes, having considered the same, report favorably 
thereon with an amendment and recommend that the bill as 
amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

   I. Amendment.......................................................1
  II. Purpose of the Bill.............................................6
 III. Background and Need for the Legislation.........................6
  IV. Summary of Hearings.............................................7
   V. Committee Actions...............................................8
  VI. Summary of Major Provisions of the Bill.........................9
 VII. Section-By-Section Analysis (By Title and Section).............10
VIII. Committee Views................................................11
  IX. Cost Estimate..................................................12
   X. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate......................13
  XI. Compliance with Public Law 104-4 (Unfunded Mandates)...........14
 XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations...............14
XIII. Constitutional Authority Statement.............................14
 XIV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement...........................15
  XV. Congressional Accountability Act...............................15
 XVI. Statement on Preemption of State, Local, or Tribal Law.........15
XVII. Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, As Reported..........15
XVIII.Committee Recommendations......................................15

 XIX. Statement on General Performance Goals and Objectives..........15
  XX. Exchange of Committee Correspondence...........................16
 XXI. Proceedings of Subcommittee Markup.............................17
XXII. Proceedings of Full Committee Markup...........................72

  The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``National Science Education Act''.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS.

  Congress finds the following:
          (1) As concluded in the report of the Committee on Science of 
        the House of Representatives, ``Unlocking Our Future Toward a 
        New National Science Policy'', the United States must maintain 
        and improve its preeminent position in science and technology 
        in order to advance human understanding of the universe and all 
        it contains, and to improve the lives, health, and freedoms of 
        all people.
          (2) It is estimated that more than half of the economic 
        growth of the United States today results directly from 
        research and development in science and technology. The most 
        fundamental research is responsible for investigating our 
        perceived universe, to extend our observations to the outer 
        limits of what our minds and methods can achieve, and to seek 
        answers to questions that have never been asked before. Applied 
        research continues the process by applying the answers from 
        basic science to the problems faced by individuals, 
        organizations, and governments in the everyday activities that 
        make our lives more livable. The scientific-technological 
        sector of our economy, which has driven our recent economic 
        boom and led the United States to the longest period of 
        prosperity in history, is fueled by the work and discoveries of 
        the scientific community.
          (3) The effectiveness of the United States in maintaining 
        this economic growth will be largely determined by the 
        intellectual capital of the United States. Education is 
        critical to developing this resource.
          (4) The education program of the United States needs to 
        provide for 3 different kinds of intellectual capital. First, 
        it needs scientists, mathematicians, and engineers to continue 
        the research and development that are central to the economic 
        growth of the United States. Second, it needs technologically 
        proficient workers who are comfortable and capable dealing with 
        the demands of a science-based, high-technology workplace. 
        Last, it needs scientifically literate voters and consumers to 
        make intelligent decisions about public policy.
          (5) Student performance on the recent Third International 
        Mathematics and Science Study highlights the shortcomings of 
        current K-12 science and mathematics education in the United 
        States, particularly when compared to other countries. We must 
        expect more from our Nation's educators and students if we are 
        to build on the accomplishments of previous generations. New 
        methods of teaching science, mathematics, engineering, and 
        technology are required, as well as better curricula and 
        improved training of teachers.
          (6) Science is more than a collection of facts, theories, and 
        results. It is a process of inquiry built upon observations and 
        data that leads to a way of knowing and explaining in logically 
        derived concepts and theories. Mathematics is more than 
        procedures to be memorized. It is a field that requires 
        reasoning, understanding, and making connections in order to 
        solve problems. Engineering is more than just designing and 
        building. It is the process of making compromises to optimize 
        design and assessing risks so that designs and products best 
        solve a given problem. Technology is more than using computer 
        applications, the Internet, and programming. Technology is the 
        innovation, change, or modification of the natural environment, 
        based on scientific, mathematical, and engineering principles.
          (7) Students should learn science primarily by doing science. 
        Science education ought to reflect the scientific process and 
        be object-oriented, experiment-centered, and concept-based. 
        Students should learn mathematics with understanding that 
        numeric systems have intrinsic properties that can represent 
        objects and systems in real life, and can be applied in solving 
        problems. Engineering education should reflect the realities of 
        real world design, and should involve hands-on projects and 
        require students to make trade-offs based upon evidence. 
        Students should learn technology as both a tool to solve other 
        problems and as a process by which people adapt the natural 
        world to suit their own purposes. Computers represent a 
        particularly useful form of technology, enabling students and 
        teachers to acquire data, model systems, visualize phenomena, 
        communicate and organize information, and collaborate with 
        others in powerful new ways. A background in the basics of 
        information technology is essential for success in the modern 
        workplace and the modern world.
          (8) Children are naturally curious and inquisitive. To 
        successfully tap into these innate qualities, education in 
        science, mathematics, engineering, and technology must begin at 
        an early age and continue throughout the entire school 
        experience.
          (9) Teachers provide the essential connection between 
        students and the content they are learning. Prospective 
        teachers need to be identified and recruited by presenting to 
        them a career that is respected by their peers, is financially 
        and intellectually rewarding, contains sufficient opportunities 
        for advancement, and has continuing access to professional 
        development.
          (10) Teachers need to have incentives to remain in the 
        classroom and improve their practice, and training of teachers 
        is essential if the results are to be good. Teachers need to be 
        knowledgeable of their content area, of their curriculum, of 
        up-to-date research in teaching and learning, and of techniques 
        that can be used to connect that information to their students 
        in their classroom.

SEC. 3. MASTER TEACHER GRANT PROGRAM.

  (a) Definitions.--In this section--
          (1) The term ``sponsoring school'' means an elementary or 
        secondary school that employs a teacher who is participating in 
        a program funded in accordance with this section.
          (2) The term ``nonclassroom time'' means time during regular 
        school hours that is not utilized by a master teacher for 
        instructing elementary or secondary school children in the 
        classroom.
          (3) The term ``master teacher'' means a mathematics or 
        science teacher who works to improve the instruction of 
        mathematics or science in kindergarten through 9th grade 
        through--
                  (A) participating in the development or revision of 
                science, mathematics, engineering, or technology 
                curricula;
                  (B) serving as a mentor to mathematics or science 
                teachers at the sponsoring school or other schools;
                  (C) coordinating and assisting teachers in the use of 
                hands-on inquiry materials, equipment, and supplies, 
                and when appropriate, supervising acquisition and 
                repair of such materials;
                  (D) providing in-classroom teaching assistance to 
                mathematics or science teachers; and
                  (E) providing professional development, including for 
                the purposes of training other master teachers, to 
                mathematics and science teachers.
          (4) The term ``mathematics or science teacher'' means a 
        teacher of mathematics, science, engineering, or technology in 
        an elementary or secondary school.
  (b) Program Authorized.--(1) The Director of the National Science 
Foundation shall establish a program to award competitive, merit-
reviewed grants to institutions of higher education (or consortia 
thereof) to train master teachers and assist elementary and secondary 
schools to design and implement master teacher programs.
  (2) Institutions of higher education receiving grants under this 
section shall offer programs to train master teachers. As part of such 
programs, a grantee shall--
          (A) recruit and select teachers to receive training;
          (B) ensure that training covers both content and pedagogy;
          (C) ensure that participating teachers have mentors; and
          (D) assist participating teachers with the development and 
        implementation of master teacher programs at their sponsoring 
        schools.
  (3) Grants awarded under this section may be used to--
          (A) develop and implement professional development programs 
        to train elementary or secondary school teachers to become 
        master teachers and to train existing master teachers;
          (B) provide stipends and reimbursement for travel to allow 
        teachers to participate in professional development programs in 
        the summer and throughout the year;
          (C) provide guidance to sponsoring schools to enable them to 
        develop and implement a plan for the use of master teachers;
          (D) support participating teachers during the summer in 
        research programs conducted at institutions of higher 
        education, private entities, or government facilities;
          (E) provide educational materials and equipment to master 
        teachers;
          (F) provide computer equipment and network connectivity 
        necessary to enable master teachers to collaborate with other 
        master teachers, to access educational materials available 
        online, and to communicate with scientists or other mentors at 
        remote locations; and
          (G) fund any other activities the Director determines will 
        accomplish the goals of this section.
  (c) Selection Process.--(1) An institution of higher education 
seeking funding under this section shall submit an application at such 
time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Director 
may require. The application shall include, at a minimum--
          (A) a description of which classroom subjects and grade 
        levels the training will address;
          (B) a description of the activities to be carried out, 
        including--
                  (i) how such activities will be aligned with State 
                and local standards and with other activities that 
                promote student achievement in mathematics and science; 
                and
                  (ii) how such activities will be based on a review of 
                relevant research and why such activities are expected 
                to strengthen the quality of mathematics and science 
                instruction;
          (C) a description of how the applicant will ensure the active 
        participation of its mathematics, science, or engineering 
        departments in the development and implementation of the 
        program;
          (D) an explanation of how the program will ensure that 
        teachers are given instruction in both content and pedagogy;
          (E) a description of how the applicant will recruit teachers 
        to participate in the program and the criteria that will be 
        used to select the participants;
          (F) a description of the type and amount of any financial 
        assistance that will be provided to teachers to enable them to 
        participate; and
          (G) a description of how the applicant will work with schools 
        to ensure the success of the participating teachers.
  (2) In evaluating the applications submitted under this subsection, 
the Director shall consider, at a minimum--
          (A) the ability of the applicant to effectively carry out the 
        proposed program;
          (B) the experience the applicant has in developing and 
        implementing high-quality professional development programs for 
        mathematics or science teachers; and
          (C) the extent to which the applicant is committed to making 
        the program a central organizational focus.
  (3) In evaluating the applications submitted under this subsection, 
the Director shall give priority to those applications that demonstrate 
the greatest participation of mathematics, science, or engineering 
departments.
  (d) Teacher Eligibility.--(1) To be eligible to participate in a 
program funded under this section, a mathematics or science teacher 
shall submit to the Director, at such time and in such manner as the 
Director may require, an assurance executed by the sponsoring school, 
that, after completing the program funded by this section, the 
participating teacher will be provided sufficient non-classroom time to 
serve as a master teacher. A copy of this assurance must be submitted 
to the institution of higher education as part of the teacher's 
application to participate in the master teacher program.
  (2) No funds authorized by this section may be used to train any 
teacher who has not complied with paragraph (1).
  (e) Accountability and Dissemination.--(1) The Director shall 
evaluate the activities carried out under this section. At a minimum 
such evaluations shall use a common set of benchmarks and assessment 
tools to identify best practices and materials developed and 
demonstrated with funds provided under this section.
  (2) The results of the evaluations required under this subsection 
shall be made available to the public, including through the National 
Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology Education Digital 
Library, and shall be provided to the Committee on Science of the House 
of Representatives and the Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and 
Pensions of the Senate.
  (3) Materials developed under the program established under this 
section that are demonstrated to be effective shall be made available 
through the National Science, Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology 
Education Digital Library.-
  (f) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation to carry out this 
section $50,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2002 through 2004.

SEC. 4. DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATION ON REQUIRED COURSE OF STUDY FOR 
                    CAREERS IN SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, ENGINEERING, AND 
                    TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION.

  (a) In General.--The Director of the National Science Foundation 
shall, jointly with the Secretary of Education, compile and disseminate 
information (including through outreach, school counselor education, 
and visiting speakers) regarding--
          (1) typical standard prerequisites for middle school and high 
        school students who seek to enter a course of study at an 
        institution of higher education in science, mathematics, 
        engineering, or technology education for purposes of teaching 
        in an elementary or secondary school; and
          (2) the licensing requirements in each State for science, 
        mathematics, engineering, or technology elementary or secondary 
        school teachers.
  (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation to carry out this 
section $5,000,000 for each of fiscal years 2002 through 2004.

SEC. 5. REQUIREMENT TO CONDUCT STUDY EVALUATION.

  (a) Study Required.--The Director of the National Science Foundation 
shall enter into an agreement with the National Academies of Sciences 
and Engineering under which the Academies shall review existing studies 
on the effectiveness of technology in the classroom on learning and 
student performance, using various measures of learning and teaching 
outcome including standardized tests of student achievement, and 
explore the feasibility of one or more methodological frameworks to be 
used in evaluations of technologies that have different purposes and 
are used by schools and school systems with diverse educational goals. 
The study evaluation shall include, to the extent available, 
information on the type of technology used in each classroom, the 
reason that such technology works, and the teacher training that is 
conducted in conjunction with the technology.
  (b) Deadline for Completion.--The study evaluation required by 
subsection (a) shall be completed not later than one year after the 
date of the enactment of this Act.
  (c) Definition of Technology.--In this section, the term 
``technology'' has the meaning given that term in section 3113(11) of 
the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 
6813(11)).
  (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation for the purpose of 
conducting the study evaluation required by subsection (a), $600,000.

SEC. 6. SCIENCE, MATHEMATICS, ENGINEERING, AND TECHNOLOGY BUSINESS 
                    EDUCATION CONFERENCE.

  (a) In General.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Director of the National Science Foundation 
shall convene the first of an annual 3- to 5-day conference for 
kindergarten through 12th grade science, mathematics, engineering, and 
technology education stakeholders, including--
          (1) representatives from Federal, State, and local 
        governments, private industries, private businesses, and 
        professional organizations;
          (2) educators;
          (3) science, mathematics, engineering, and technology 
        educational resource providers;
          (4) students; and
          (5) any other stakeholders the Director determines would 
        provide useful participation in the conference.
  (b) Purposes.--The purposes of the conference convened under 
subsection (a) shall be to--
          (1) identify and gather information on existing science, 
        mathematics, engineering, and technology education programs and 
        resource providers, including information on distribution, 
        partners, cost assessment, and derivation;
          (2) determine the extent of any existing coordination between 
        providers of curricular activities, initiatives, and units; and
          (3) identify the common goals and differences among the 
        participants at the conference.
  (c) Report and Publication.--At the conclusion of the conference the 
Director shall--
          (1) transmit to the Committee on Science of the House of 
        Representatives and to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
        Transportation of the Senate a report on the outcome and 
        conclusions of the conference, including an inventory of 
        curricular activities, initiatives, and units, the content of 
        the conference, and strategies developed that will support 
        partnerships and leverage resources; and
          (2) ensure that a similar report is published and distributed 
        as widely as possible to stakeholders in science, mathematics, 
        engineering, and technology education.
  (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation to carry out this 
section--
          (1) $300,000 for fiscal year 2002; and
          (2) $200,000 for each of fiscal years 2003 and 2004.

SEC. 7. DISTANCE LEARNING GRANTS.

  (a) In General.--The Director of the National Science Foundation 
shall establish a program to award competitive, merit-based grants to 
institutions of higher education to provide distance learning 
opportunities in mathematics or science to elementary or secondary 
school students.
  (b) Use of Funds.--Grants awarded under this section shall be used by 
institutions of higher education to establish programs under which 
elementary or secondary school students can participate in research 
activities in mathematics or science occurring at the grantees' 
institution via the Internet.
  (c) Selection Process.--(1) An institution of higher education 
seeking funding under this section shall submit an application at such 
time, in such manner, and containing such information as the Director 
may require. The application shall include, at a minimum--
          (A) a description of the research opportunities that will be 
        offered;
          (B) a description of how the applicant will publicize these 
        research opportunities to schools and teachers;
          (C) a description of how the applicant will involve teachers 
        of participating students in the program;
          (D) a description of how students will be selected to 
        participate;
          (E) a description of how the institution of higher education 
        will ensure that the research is enhancing the participants' 
        education and will make it more likely that the participants 
        will continue their studies in mathematics or science; and
          (F) a description of how the funds will be spent.
  (2) In evaluating the applications submitted under this subsection, 
the Director shall consider--
          (A) the ability of the applicant to effectively carry out the 
        proposed program;
          (B) the extent to which the proposed program will enhance the 
        participants' education and encourage them to continue the 
        study of mathematics or science; and
          (C) the extent to which the proposed program will provide 
        opportunities that would not otherwise be available to 
        students.
  (3) The Director shall ensure, to the extent practicable, that the 
program established under this section serves students in a wide range 
of geographic areas and in rural, suburban, and urban schools.
  (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the National Science Foundation to carry out this 
section $5,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 2002 through 2004.

SEC. 8. DEFINITIONS.

  In this Act:
          (1) The term ``elementary school'' has the meaning given that 
        term by section 14101(14) of the Elementary and Secondary 
        Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 8801(14)).
          (2) The term ``secondary school'' has the meaning given that 
        term by section 14101(25) of the Elementary and Secondary 
        Education Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 8801(25)).
          (3) The term ``institution of higher education'' has the 
        meaning given that term by section 101 of the Higher Education 
        Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1001).

                        II. PURPOSE OF THE BILL

    The purpose of H.R. 100 is to authorize appropriations for 
science, mathematics, engineering and technology (SMET) 
education programs at the National Science Foundation (NSF) and 
other purposes. The bill authorizes appropriations of $60.9 
million for Fiscal Year 2002 and $60.2 million for Fiscal Years 
2003 and 2004.

              III. BACKGROUND AND NEED FOR THE LEGISLATION

    In 1945 when Dr. Vannevar Bush transmitted his landmark 
report, ``Science--the Endless Frontier'', he paraphrased 
Harvard President John Conant in making the case for the 
importance of a targeted investment in mathematics and science 
education as part of a National research policy:

          In every section of the entire area where the word 
        science may properly be applied, the limiting factor is 
        a human one. We shall have rapid or slow advance in 
        this direction or in that depending on the number of 
        really first-class scientists who are engaged in the 
        work in question. . . . So in the last analysis, the 
        future of science in this country will be determined by 
        our basic educational policy.

    This analysis is as true today as it was fifty years ago. 
Recent studies have shown that the most important factor in 
successful educational improvement efforts, especially those in 
science, math, engineering and technology, is the skill of 
enthusiastic and well-prepared teachers. When integrating the 
needs of learners into the context of the emerging needs of the 
American workplace and society, the truth of the observation 
``teaching is the essential profession, the one that makes all 
other professions possible'' is obvious. Teachers provide the 
essential connection between students and the content they are 
learning. A gifted and well-trained teacher can instill the 
excitement of scientific inquiry while anchoring the material 
in the context of everyday life.
    Thus, high quality teachers must be identified, recruited, 
and retained in every school district throughout the Nation. K-
12 science, mathematics, engineering, or technology teachers 
should be respected by their peers, rewarded financially and 
intellectually, and have sufficient opportunities for 
advancement. In exchange, we must expect that all teachers have 
mastered their content area, curricula, up-to-date research in 
teaching and learning, and techniques that can be used to 
connect information to the students in their classrooms.
    The National Commission on Mathematics and Science Teaching 
for the 21st Century concluded that the most efficient way to 
disseminate information about best practices and to improve the 
quality of professional development was to train a cadre of 
master teachers. These teachers, who must be well versed in the 
most effective teaching methods, have demonstrated the ability 
to obtain high student achievement, and be able to effectively 
use technology for teaching and learning, can assume 
responsibility for reviewing and modifying curriculum and 
developing and implementing professional development and 
mentoring programs for their peers. H.R. 100, the National 
Science Education Act (NSEA) responds to these recommendations 
and authorizes the Director of the National Science Foundation 
to establish a program to provide grants to universities to 
train master teachers and for other purposes designed to 
improve the instruction of elementary and secondary mathematics 
and science education.

                        IV. SUMMARY OF HEARINGS

    On Wednesday, March 7, 2001, the House Committee on Science 
held a hearing to gather teachers' perspectives on how the 
federal government can help improve K-12th grade science and 
math education. Testifying before the committee were four 
teachers representing elementary, middle, and secondary math 
and science educators, three of whom were recipients of the 
prestigious Presidential Award for Excellence in Science and 
Mathematics Teaching. These witnesses spoke to the importance 
of improving the quality and availability of professional 
development, developing better student assessment tools, 
increasing the prestige of mathematics and science teachers, 
reducing the professional isolation experienced in the 
classroom, and building stronger partnerships between schools 
and universities.
    On Wednesday, May 2, 2001, the House Science Committee's 
Subcommittee on Research held a hearing on ways the National 
Science Foundation could most effectively stimulate K-12 math 
and science education reform. The witnesses addressed the 
central role that higher education, business, and school 
district partnerships can play in stimulating science and 
mathematics education reform. The witnesses emphasized the 
importance of high quality professional development programs, 
the important role that the prestige of business partners can 
play in encouraging broaderacceptance of reform activities, the 
need to recruit better prepared teachers, the important mentoring role 
that can be played by master teachers, and the importance of long-term 
rather than short-term programs.
    On May 10, 2001, the House Service Committee's subcommittee 
on Research held a hearing to examine the gap that currently 
exists between what is known about how people learn and the 
methods and materials educators use to teach. The witnesses 
gave testimony to the critical importance of establishing a 
long-term research agenda designed to bridge the gap between 
cognitive science and education research and to finding better 
ways to ensure that the results of this research are 
incorporated into teacher education, professional development, 
and classroom activities.

                          V. COMMITTEE ACTIONS

    On January 3, 2001, Dr. Vernon J. Ehlers (MI) joined by 
seven other co-sponsors, introduced H.R. 100, the National 
Science Education Act, a bill to authorize appropriations for 
science, mathematics, engineering and technology education for 
Fiscal Years 2002 through 2004. The Subcommittee on Research 
met to consider H.R. 100 on June 7, 2001, and entertained the 
following amendment--
    Amendment 1. Mr. Boehlert (NY) offered an amendment in the 
nature of a substitute: (1) to revise Section 4, the master 
teacher program, by authorizing grants to institutions of 
higher education for the purpose of training master teachers; 
(2) to revise Section 9, the distance learning grant program, 
by providing grants to higher education institutions for the 
implementation of K-12 distance learning programs; and (3) to 
strike Section 3--Assurance of Continued Local Control, Section 
7--Teacher Technology Professional Development, Section 10--
Scholarships to Participate in Certain Research Activities, and 
Section 11--Interagency Coordination of Science Education 
Programs. The amendment was adopted by voice vote.
    With a quorum present, Ms. Johnson moved that the 
Subcommittee favorably report the bill, H.R. 100, as amended, 
to the Full Committee on Science with the recommendation that 
it be in order for the amendment, in the nature of a substitute 
adopted by the Subcommittee, to be considered as an original 
bill for the purpose of amendment under the five minute rule at 
Full Committee, and that the staff be instructed to make 
technical and conforming changes to the bill as amended. The 
motion was agreed to by a voice vote.
    On June 13, 2001, the Full Committee met to consider the 
bill, H.R. 100, as adopted by the Subcommittee on Research. 
With a quorum present, Mr. Gordon moved that the Committee 
favorably report the bill, H.R. 100, as amended, to the House 
with the recommendation that the bill as amended do pass, and 
that the staff be instructed to make technical and conforming 
changes to the bill as amended and prepare the legislative 
report, and that the Chairman take all necessary steps to bring 
the bill before the House for consideration. The motion was 
agreed to by a voice vote.

              VI. SUMMARY OF MAJOR PROVISIONS OF THE BILL

    The National Science Education Act, H.R. 100, focuses on 
improving elementary and secondary science, mathematics, 
engineering and technology education. H.R. 100 would authorize 
appropriations of $60.9 million for fiscal year 2002 and $60.2 
million for fiscal years 2003 and 2004. More specifically, the 
bill--
     Authorizes the Director of NSF to award grants to 
institutions of higher education (or consortia thereof) to 
develop and implement programs to train master mathematics and 
science teachers. In order to participate in the program, 
teachers must obtain a written assurance from their school or 
school district that they will be provided with sufficient 
release time to fulfill the responsibilities of a master 
teacher. The program is authorized at $50 million for each of 
fiscal years 2002-2004.
     Authorizes the Director of NSF to compile and 
disseminate to students information regarding the typical 
prerequisites for middle school and high school students 
seeking to pursue post-secondary degrees in mathematics, 
science or engineering in order to become teachers. The program 
is authorized at $5 million for each fiscal years 2002-2004.
     Authorizes the Director of NSF to enter into an 
agreement with the National Academy of Sciences to review 
studies on the effectiveness of technology in the classroom. 
The study is authorized at $600,000.
     Authorizes the Director of NSF to convene an 
annual business conference on science, mathematics, 
engineering, and technology education. The purpose of the 
conference is to identify and disseminate model programs 
developed or implemented by business for the reform of 
mathematics and science education. The conference is authorized 
at $300,000 for fiscal year 2002 and $200,000 for fiscal years 
2003 and 2004.
     Authorizes the Director of NSF to award grants to 
institutions of higher education to provide elementary and 
secondary school students an opportunity to participate over 
the Internet in research projects conducted in laboratories at 
institutions of higher education. The program is authorized at 
$5 million in each of fiscal years 2002-2004.
    Table 1 provides a detailed summary of the authorizations 
in H.R. 100.

                                  TABLE 1.--THE NATIONAL SCIENCE EDUCATION ACT
                                    [By fiscal year; in millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                  FY 2002          FY 2003          FY 2004           Total
                  Activity                     authorization    authorization    authorization    authorization
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
NSF:
    Total Grants............................             55.0             55.0             55.0            165.0
    Total Other.............................              5.9              5.2              5.2             16.3
Grants:
    Master Teacher Grants...................             50.0             50.0             50.0            150.0
    Distance Learning Grants................              5.0              5.0              5.0             15.0
Other:
    Course Dissemination....................              5.0              5.0              5.0             15.0
    Study Evaluation........................               .6  ...............  ...............  ...............
    Business Conference.....................               .3               .2               .2               .7
                                             -------------------------------------------------------------------
        Total...............................             60.9             60.2             60.2            181.3
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                    VII. SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS

Section 1. Short title

    Cites the Act as the ``National Science Education Act.''

Section 2. Findings

    The Committee finds that: (1) the United States must 
maintain its preeminent position in science and technology to 
advance human understanding and to improve the lives of all 
people; (2) the growth of the economy depends upon continued 
scientific and technological research; (3) economic growth is 
possible only through intellectual capital and education is 
instrumental to developing this resource; (4) educational 
institutions must provide for three kinds of intellectual 
capital: that needed by scientists, mathematicians and 
engineers, that needed by other workers to succeed in a high-
technology workplace, and that needed by the general citizenry 
to enable them to make informed and educated decisions as 
voters and consumers; (5) student performance on recent 
assessments indicates that American students are being 
outperformed by their international peers. We must expect more 
from American educators and students, and new methods, better 
curricula and improved training of teachers is needed; (6) 
science, mathematics, engineering and technology are more than 
subjects that contain facts to memorized--each is the 
foundation of principles that must be applied throughout a 
lifetime; (7) science, mathematics, engineering and technology 
must be learned by doing; (8) children are naturally curious 
and learning of science, mathematics, engineering and 
technology must begin early and continue from kindergarten 
through high school; (9) teachers are the most essential 
component of a successful learning experience and teachers must 
be offered a career that is respected by their peers, is 
financially and intellectually rewarding, provides continuing 
access to professional development and offers opportunity for 
advancement; and (10) teachers must have incentives to remain 
in the profession and improve their practice and they must be 
knowledgeable about their content area, the curriculum, and 
effective pedagogical techniques.

Section 3. Master Teacher grant program

    Establishes within NSF a master teacher program, which 
awards funds to institutions ofhigher education for the purpose 
of training science or math teachers to lead instruction and manage 
hands-on resources in grades K-9. Grantees must recruit and select 
teachers to participate, provide training in both content and pedagogy, 
provide teachers with mentors, and assist teachers in the 
implementation of master teacher programs in their schools. Authorizes 
$50 million for each of FY2002-FY2004.

Section 4. Dissemination of information on required course of study for 
        careers in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology 
        education

    Requires NSF and the Department of Education to disseminate 
to high schools information explaining the high school courses 
typically prerequisite to pursuing a college teaching degree in 
science and math. Authorizes $5 million for each of FY2002-
FY2004.

Section 5. Requirement to conduct study evaluation

    Authorizes an evaluation of studies on the effectiveness of 
technology in the classroom for learning. Authorizes $600,000 
to be obligated within one year of enactment of this Act.

Section 6. Science, mathematics, engineering, and technology business 
        education conference

    Authorizes NSF to convene a conference to bring together 
private sector participants in education. Authorizes $300,000 
for FY2002, $200,000 for FY2003 and FY2004.

Section 7. Grants for distance learning

    Authorizes NSF to make grants to institutions of higher 
education to provide research opportunities to elementary and 
secondary school students via the Internet. Authorizes $5 
million for each of FY2002-FY2004.

Section 8. Definitions

    Defines: (1) ``elementary school'' and ``secondary school'' 
as defined in the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 
1965; and (2) ``institution of higher education'' as defined in 
the Higher Education Act of 1965.

                         viii. committee views

Sec. 3--Master Teacher grant program

    The Committee has authorized the Director of the National 
Science Foundation to award grants to institutions of higher 
education (or consortia thereof) to recruit and train master 
teachers. The Committee believes that it is absolutely 
essential that master teachers be provided with sufficient 
release time from the classroom to allow them to fulfill the 
responsibilities of a master teacher (including, developing and 
providing professional development for other teachers, leading 
curriculum review activities, management of laboratory 
materials and equipment). In order to ensure that sufficient 
release time is provided, the Director of NSF is required to 
secure a written assurance from the school or local educational 
agency that employs a teacher participating in the master 
teacher program. The written assurance shall guarantee that the 
school or local educational agency shall provide the master 
teacher with paid release time to fulfill the responsibilities 
of a master teacher upon completion of the program.

Sec. 4--Dissemination of information on required course of study for 
        careers in science, mathematics, engineering, and technology 
        education

    Recent surveys conducted by the National Science Foundation 
have revealed that many students fail to understand the 
importance of taking mathematics and science courses throughout 
their middle and secondary school years. These same surveys 
reveal that an alarming number of students who wish to pursue 
careers in engineering, medicine, mathematics and science fail 
to take the required mathematics and science courses. 
Inadequate mathematics and science preparation during a 
student's middle school and high school years can have a 
profound negative impact on the number and kind of higher 
education and professional opportunities available to a 
student. The Committee authorizes the Director of NSF to 
coordinate with the Secretary of Education in developing a 
program to ensure that students and their parents better 
understand the importance and consequences of decisions to 
pursue or not pursue additional coursework in mathematics and 
science.
    The Committee believes that hands-on science instruction 
will motivate students to pursue careers in math and sciences 
and that dissemination of information regarding prerequisite 
secondary school courses will be a helpful tool for students 
considering careers in teaching. However, none of the funds 
authorized to be appropriated in this bill may be used for the 
purpose of requiring any individual student to pursue any 
particular career.

                           ix. cost estimate

    Rule XIII, clause 3(d)(2) of the House of Representatives 
requires each committee report accompanying each bill or joint 
resolution of a public character to contain: (1) an estimate, 
made by such committee, of the costs which would be incurred in 
carrying out such bill or joint resolution in the fiscal year 
in which it is reported and in each of the five fiscal years 
following such fiscal year (or for the authorized duration of 
any program authorized by such bill or joint resolution, if 
less than five years); (2) a comparison of the estimate of 
costs described in subparagraph (1) of this paragraph made by 
such committee with an estimate of such costs made by any 
Government agency and submitted to such committee; and (3) when 
practicable, a comparison of the total estimated funding level 
for the relevant program (or programs) with the appropriate 
levels under current law. However, House Rule XII, clause 
3(d)(3)(B) provides that this requirement does not apply when a 
cost estimate and comparison prepared by the Director of the 
Congressional Budget Office under section 402 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974 has been timely submitted 
prior to the filing of the report and included in the report 
pursuant to House Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(3). A cost estimate 
and comparison prepared by the Director of the Congressional 
Budget Office under section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974 has been timely submitted to the Committee on Science 
prior tothe filing of this report and is included in Section X 
of this report pursuant to House Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(3).
    Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(2) of the House of Representatives 
requires each committee report that accompanies a measure 
providing new budget authority (other than continuing 
appropriations), new spending authority, or new credit 
authority, or changes in revenues or tax expenditures to 
contain a cost estimate, as required by section 308(a)(1) of 
the Congressional Budget Act of 1974 and, when practicable with 
respect to estimates of new budget authority, a comparison of 
the total estimated funding level for the relevant program (or 
programs) to the appropriate levels under current law. H.R. 100 
does not contain any new budget authority, credit authority, or 
changes in revenue or tax expenditures. Assuming that the sums 
authorized under the bill are appropriated, H.R. 100 does 
authorize additional discretionary spending, as described in 
the Congressional Budget Officer report on the bill, which is 
contained in Section X of this report.

              X. CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE COST ESTIMATE

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                     Washington, DC, June 21, 2001.
Hon. Sherwood L. Boehlert,
Chairman, Committee on Science,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 100, the National 
Science Education Act.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contacts are Melissa 
Zimmerman and Kathleen Gramp.
            Sincerely,
                                          Barry B. Anderson
                                    (For Dan L. Crippen, Director).
    Enclosure.

H.R. 100--National Science Education Act

    Summary: H.R. 100 would authorize several new programs at 
the National Science Foundation to promote science and 
technology in elementary and secondary education. The bill 
would authorize approximately $60 million for a year for fiscal 
years 2002 through 2004 for these initiatives. Assuming 
appropriation of the authorized amounts, CBO estimates that 
implementing H.R. 100 would cost $167 million over the 2002-
2006 period. The bill would not affect direct spending or 
receipts; therefore, pay-as-you-go procedures would not apply.
    H.R. 100 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA). 
This bill would benefit state and local governments, including 
local school districts and public universities. However, any 
costs incurred to participate in the program would be 
voluntary.
    Estimated cost to the Federal Government: The estimated 
budgetary impact of H.R. 100 is shown in the following table. 
The cost of the legislation falls within budget function 250 
(general science, space, and technology):

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                By fiscal year, in millions of dollars--
                                                     -----------------------------------------------------------
                                                        2001      2002      2003      2004      2005      2006
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                  CHANGES IN SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Authorized Level....................................         0        61        60        60         0         0
Estimated Outlays...................................         0         9        36        52        48        22
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Basis of estimate: For this estimate, CBO assumes that the 
authorized amounts will be appropriated for each year, 
beginning in 2002. We assume outlays will follow historical 
spending patterns for similar programs. Over the 2002-2004 
period, the bill would authorized $50 million a year for grants 
to colleges and universities to support master teacher 
programs; $5 million a year for initiatives related to distance 
learning; and $5 million a year for the creation and 
distribution of teaching-career information to students. In 
addition, H.R. 100 would authorize $300,000 for fiscal year 
2002 and $200,000 a year for fiscal years 2003 and 2004 for 
annual education conferences and $600,000 for the National 
Academies of Sciences and Engineering to evaluate the 
effectiveness of technology in the classroom.
    Pay-as-you-go considerations: None.
    Intergovernmental and private-sector impact: H.R. 100 
contains no intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as 
defined in UMRA. The bill would benefit state and local 
governments, including local school districts and public 
universities, by authorizing appropriations to the National 
Science Foundation for grant programs designed to improve 
science education. Any costs incurred by intergovernmental 
entities to participate in grant programs would be voluntary.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal costs: Melissa Zimmerman and 
Kathleen Gramp; impact on State, local, and tribal governments: 
Elyse Goldman; impact on the private sector: Lauren Marks.
    Estimate approved by: Peter H. Fontaine, Deputy Assistant 
Director for Budget Analysis.

                  XI. Compliance With Public Law 104-4

    H.R. 100 contains no unfunded mandates.

         XII. Committee Oversight Findings and Recommendations

    Rule XIII, clause 3(c)(1) of the House of Representatives 
requires each committee report to include oversight findings 
and recommendations required pursuant to clause 2(b)(1) of rule 
X. The Committee on Science's oversight findings and 
recommendations are reflected in the body of this report.

                XIII. Constitutional Authority Statement

    Rule XIII, clause 3(d)(1) of the House of Representatives 
requires each report of a committee on a bill or joint 
resolution of a public character to include a statement citing 
the specific powers granted to the Congress in the Constitution 
to enact the law proposed by the bill or joint resolution. 
Article I, section 8 of the Constitution of the United States 
grants Congress the authority to enact H.R. 100.

               XIV. Federal Advisory Committee Statement

    H.R. 100 does not establish nor authorize the establishment 
of any advisory committee.

                  XV. Congressional Accountability Act

    The Committee finds that H.R. 100 does not relate to the 
terms and conditions of employment or access to public services 
or accommodations within the meaning of section 102(b)(3) of 
the Congressional Accountability Act (Public Law 104-1).

      xvi. statement on preemption of state, local, or tribal law

    This bill is not intended to preempt any state, local, or 
tribal law.

      xvii. changes in existing law made by this bill, as reported

    This legislation does not amend any existing Federal 
statute.

                    xviii. committee recommendations

    On June 13, 2001, a quorum being present, the Committee on 
Science favorably reported the National Science Education Act, 
by a voice vote, and recommends its enactment.

       xix. statement on general performance goals and objectives

    Pursuant to clause (3)(c) of House rule XIII, the goals of 
H.R. 100 are to improve student mathematics and science 
achievement in elementary and secondary schools through the 
education and training of master teachers, encourage middle 
school and high school students to take additional mathematics 
and science courses and encourage greater collaboration between 
businesses and other education stakeholders.
    Section 3 of the Act authorizes the Director of NSF to 
provide grants to institutions of higher education to recruit 
and train master teachers. It is the performance objective of 
this program to improve elementary and secondary school student 
achievement by increasing the number and quality of master 
teachers that are available to reform curricula, implement 
professional development programs, and serve as mentors to 
other teachers.
    Section 4 of the Act authorizes the Director of NSF to 
compile and disseminate information (through outreach, school 
counselor education, and visiting speakers, etc.) about the 
courses middle and high school students must take to pursue 
science, mathematics, engineering and technology education at 
institutions of higher education to become elementary or 
secondary school teachers. The general performance goal of this 
program is to encourage middle and high school students who are 
considering careers in teaching to take additional science and 
mathematics courses.
    Section 6 of the Act authorizes the Director of NSF to 
convene an annual conference for kindergarten through 12th 
grade science, mathematics, engineering, and technology 
stakeholders. The general performance goals of the conference 
are to share information about business initiated education 
reform programs and to improve collaboration among 
stakeholders.
    Section 7 of the Act authorizes the Director of NSF to 
establish a program to provide distance learning opportunities 
in mathematics or science to elementary or secondary school 
students. The general performance objective of the program is 
to increase student achievement by using distance learning 
technologies to provide students with opportunities to 
participate in research projects conducted at institutions of 
higher education.

                xx. exchange of committee correspondence

                          House of Representatives,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                     Washington, DC, June 25, 2001.
Hon. John Boehner,
Chairman, House Committee on Education and the Workforce,
Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC.
    Dear Chairman Boehner: Thank you for your letter of June 
26, 2001 regarding H.R. 100, the National Science Education 
Act.
    I appreciate your waiving your Committee's right to a 
referral on this bill so that it can move expeditiously to the 
floor. I recognize your Committee's jurisdiction in this area 
and will support any request you may make to have conferees on 
H.R. 100 or similar legislation.
    The exchange of letters between our two committees will be 
included in the Committee report on H.R. 100 and will be made 
part of the floor record.
            Sincerely,
                                    Sherwood L. Boehlert, Chairman.

                          House of Representatives,
                  Committee on Education and the Workforce,
                                     Washington, DC, June 26, 2001.
Hon. Sherwood L. Boehlert,
Chairman, Committee on Science,
Washington, DC.
    Dear Chairman Boehlert: Thank you for working with me 
regarding H.R. 100, the ``National Science Education Act'', 
which was introduced by Rep. Vern Ehlers, referred to the 
Committee on Science and in addition the Committee on Education 
and the Workforce, and ordered favorably reported by your 
Committee on June 13, 2001. I understand your desire to have 
this legislation considered expeditiously by the House; hence, 
I do not intend to hold a hearing or markup on this 
legislation.
    In agreeing to waive consideration by our Committee, I 
would expect you to agree that this procedural route should not 
be construed to prejudice the Committee on Education and the 
Workforce's jurisdictional interest and prerogatives on this or 
any similar legislation and will not be considered as precedent 
for consideration of matters of jurisdictional interest to my 
Committee in the future. I would also expect your support in my 
request to the Speaker for the appointment of conferees from my 
Committee with respect to matters within the jurisdiction of my 
Committee should a conference with the Senate be convened on 
this or similar legislation.
    I would appreciate your including our exchange of letters 
in your Committee's report to accompany H.R. 100. Again, I 
thank you for working with me in developing this legislation 
and I look forward to working with you on these issues in the 
future.
            Sincerely,
                                            John Boehner, Chairman.

                xxi. proceedings of subcommittee markup



                H.R. 100, NATIONAL SCIENCE EDUCATION ACT

                              ----------                              


                              JUNE 7, 2001

                  House of Representatives,
                          Subcommittee on Research,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.
    Chairman Smith. To move forward now with the consideration 
of Mr. Ehlers' bill, H.R. 100, we will now consider that bill 
to establish and expand programs relating to science, 
mathematics, engineering, and technology education and for 
other purposes. I would now recognize the gentleman from 
Michigan, Mr. Ehlers, the author of the bill for five minutes.
    Mr. Ehlers. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. First of all, I have a 
prepared statement but in the interest of time I ask that you 
have it entered.
    Chairman Smith. Without objection the statement will be 
included in the record.
    Mr. Ehlers. Thank you.
    [Statement of Mr. Ehlers follows:]
               Opening Statement of Hon. Vernon J. Ehlers
    Today we are marking up H.R. 100, the National Science Education 
Act, the first of three bills aimed at improving science, math, 
engineering, and technology education--known as ``SMET ed.'' H.R. 100 
is a similar version to H.R. 4271, which passed this Committee by a 
unanimous vote during the 106th Congress. I want to thank Chairman 
Boehlert and Chairman Smith for their leadership on this issue.
    Our K-12 education system serves three main purposes: it is 
responsible for preparing future scientists and engineers for further 
study in college and graduate school; it provides all future workers 
the basic technical skills they will need in a 21st century workforce, 
where nearly every job will have a technical component; and it provides 
scientific and technical understanding so that citizens may make 
informed decisions as consumers and voters. Unfortunately, recent 
international assessments of student performance in science and math 
showed that our twelfth grade students were well behind their 
international peers.
    As most of you know, during the 106th Congress, this Committee 
conducted a series of hearings to further examine the state of the 
nation's math and science education, and to suggest improvements. While 
there are many factors that impact student achievement, a common theme 
that arose from our discussions is that there is no substitute for a 
knowledgeable and well-prepared teacher in the classroom.
    Teachers, particularly at the elementary and middle school level, 
often lack time and school resources to implement an inquiry-based, 
hands on science curriculum. H.R. 100 authorizes a competitive grant 
program for higher education institutions to train teachers with strong 
backgrounds in math, science, engineering and technology to become 
master teachers. Master teachers would be trained to provide on-going 
professional development, in-classroom assistance, and oversight of 
hands-on science materials to a group of elementary and middle school 
SMET teachers. This is the type of support our teachers deserve and 
should be receiving.
    In addition, this bill requires NSF and the National Academies to 
evaluate existing studies on the effectiveness of technology in the 
classroom on learning and student performance. Federal, state, and 
local governments have done a good job providing funds for technology 
acquisition, but it is unclear what technologies and how technology 
enhance student learning.
    This bill also creates a program for higher education institutions 
to provide distance learning opportunities for elementary and secondary 
students. Distance learning invites exciting possibilities for student 
learning, particularly for student scientific research.
    I look forward to having my colleagues' input today and to 
consideration by the full Committee and full House in the future. With 
this effort, our nation's teachers and students will be one step closer 
to receiving the support they so much deserve.
    I would like to close by thanking Chairman Boehlert and Chairman 
Smith for working with me to bring this bill forward today.

    Mr. Ehlers. I deeply appreciate the interest in science 
education on the part of the Full Committee Chairman, Mr. 
Boehlert, and the Subcommittee Chairman, Mr. Smith. I think it 
has been a number of years since we had a combination like 
that, and I especially appreciate Mr. Boehlert's deep interest 
in promoting science and insuring that our students have a good 
opportunity to learn science when they are in elementary 
schools and that we will have an adequate number of trained 
citizens in the future.
    I also appreciate that we now have a President who has made 
education a high priority and naturally, science education is 
part of that.
    We all recognize, I believe, as the Subcommittee Chairman 
mentioned during his comments that today's economic boom is 
largely related to the work that we have done in science and 
technology and the discoveries that we have made there.
    What most people in this nation do not recognize, however, 
is the role of improved education in providing the workforce 
for that economic boom and also the continuing research to keep 
it going. And that is the purpose of this bill and the previous 
bill.
    Expressing it in three specific purposes, number one, we 
want to make sure we have an adequate supply of well-trained 
scientists and engineers. Number two, we want to insure that we 
have enough technically-trained workers for the many 
technically-oriented positions that are going to be in the 
workplace of the future, and thirdly, we want to make sure that 
we have an insured electorate and an insured group of consumers 
in this country.
    If you ask the question, how can you best impact science 
and math education in the K-12 system, the obvious answer is 
through better-trained teachers. I have worked in this field 
for over 30 years now, and I am pleased to say that the problem 
is not that the teachers don't want to teach science or that 
they are incapable of teaching science. It is that they really 
do sincerely want to do a good job of teaching science and 
mathematics. The difficulty is they have not been properly 
trained in their college or university experiences, and so I 
believe our first goal has to be to adequately train the 
teachers who are already in the classrooms who have not 
received sufficient training when they were in the higher 
educational system.
    A subsidiary to that which we will address later on in 
other bills is how do we train teachers currently in the higher 
educational system in a better way to teach math and science.
    So the emphasis of H.R. 100 is twofold. First of all,making 
certain that we do a good job of training existing teachers, and 
secondly, to provide a master teacher system, what I call the go-to 
teacher. In my personal experience in working with the schools the 
single biggest factor in whether or not a teacher succeeded in the 
classroom in teaching math and science when they had not had a large 
amount of training in it, the single biggest factor was whether they 
had a go-to person in the school that they could go to for help and 
advice when the guppies died or the plants failed or the equipment 
broke. And if they did not have that go-to person, generally the 
science program did not succeed because the average teacher does not 
have the expertise or the time to take care of problems like that.
    It does take extra time and effort to teach science 
properly, particularly with the hands-on approach. And the--at 
the university level we have no extra time for faculty to teach 
science through the laboratory system. We do not do that in the 
K-8 system, and we need people around who are trained in the 
field who can serve as a resource for the classroom teacher and 
particularly who can take care of the equipment, make certain 
that it is up to snuff and repair it when it is not.
    The purpose of the H.R. 100 bill, the primary purpose is to 
train a core of master teachers who will have the knowledge and 
expertise to help other teachers in their particular school 
building do an adequate job of teaching math and science but 
who will also serve as a resource person in terms of the 
equipment and materials needed.
    I deeply appreciate the willingness of the Chair of the 
Subcommittee and the Chair of the Full Committee. They have 
been very, very helpful in reviewing this bill. As most of you 
know this bill went to the floor last year. It passed this 
Committee unanimously. It was defeated on suspensions last year 
for another reason which we incidentally have corrected in this 
bill but it still received a majority of the votes last year. 
There is a lot of support for it. I appreciate the help I have 
had from the Committee and the Subcommittee, both the Chairs 
and the staff in revising the bill to take account of some of 
the objections raised last year.
    I believe it is in great shape, and I ask for your support. 
I thank you, Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Smith. We would thank the gentleman for--from 
Michigan for his leadership in this area. I would like to note 
for the record that this Subcommittee has held two hearings in 
this area of improving math and science education, and it was 
interesting that two of the witnesses suggested that the 
initial interest and excitement andmotivation to move ahead and 
take up math and science started in the kindergarten through the third 
grade. And also that parents are so vital in lighting that initial fire 
that tends to keep burning as far as pursuing the interest and the 
knowledge in this area.
    So it is my hope that we also can look at that kind of 
example, that kind of success that has been exhibited in some 
areas of kindling that initial fire of interest and then 
continuing with the quality kind of education.
    I ask unanimous consent that the bill be considered as read 
and open to amendment at any point, and without objection it is 
so ordered.
    I move the first reading of the bill be dispensed with if 
that is in accord with the wishes of the Subcommittee. Without 
objection it is so ordered.
    We will move to the first amendment on the roster, which is 
the amendment in the nature of a substitute offered by Chairman 
Boehlert, and the clerk will report the amendment.
    Madam Clerk. Amendment in the nature of a substitute to 
H.R. 100 offered by Mr. Boehlert.
    Chairman Smith. I would ask unanimous consent to dispense 
with the reading. Without objection it is so ordered. Mr. 
Boehlert is recognized for five minutes. Mr. Chairman.
    Chairman Boehlert. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I am pleased to 
offer this amendment in the nature of a substitute on behalf of 
Dr. Ehlers who will explain ifs contents momentarily. Just let 
me say once again this is a bipartisan amendment that insures 
that all the goals of H.R. 100 will be met. And as we all know 
very well the most important ingredient in a child's education 
is not a fancy new physical plant, although we want our 
youngsters to have good facilities, not the brightest and best-
illustrated textbooks, although they are very important. The 
most important ingredient in a child's education is the 
teacher. And we are focusing on the teacher, and let me 
congratulate Dr. Ehlers for his leadership in this area. And 
Mr. Chairman, let me congratulate you also, the dynamic duo 
from Michigan I guess.
    But it just bothers me as it should bother all Americans 
that depending on whose figures you believe a 
disproportionately high share of our youngsters K through 12 
education are taking their science courses from people who are 
not trained to teach science course. Dedicated educators, they 
may have majored in French or history or something. They are in 
the classroom teaching science because that is their 
assignment.
    We want to help them, and we want to get the best qualified 
science disciplined major teachers in theclassroom, and we want 
to get them the best instruction they have, and Dr. Ehlers' suggestion 
on the development of master teacher core is just outstanding.
    So with that I would hope that the Committee will move 
forward, and I look forward to Dr. Ehlers' more comprehensive 
explanation of the amendment.
    Chairman Smith. The Chair would recognize for five minutes 
the Ranking Member, the gentle lady from Texas, Representative 
Johnson.
    Ms. Johnson. Thank you very much, Mr. Chairman. I am 
prepared to support the substitute amendment. It addresses the 
main concern I had with the underlying bill by recasting the 
master teacher provision in such a way as to provide for the 
professional development and training of master teachers.
    The provision as now constituted is consistent with the 
approach taken by the master teacher language in H.R. 1693, the 
Hall Science Education Bill. I would like to add that the 
master teacher language in the bill follows the approach that 
Congressman Etheridge recommended.
    During the Committee's consideration of the Ehlers' Science 
Education Bill last year the other provisions in the amendment 
are consistent with what was approved in a bipartisan manner by 
the Committee last year, and I recommend passage of this 
substitute amendment. Thank you.
    Chairman Smith. Chair would recognize the gentleman from 
Michigan, Mr. Ehlers, for a brief explanation of the amendment.
    Mr. Ehlers. Thank you, Mr. Chairman, and I believe I was 
can do it in less than five minutes because I have already 
referred to parts of it. I appreciate the support evidenced, 
and this shows that the legislator process does work because 
the--everyone on this Committee has participated in some way in 
revising the bill from last year and I think has improved it.
    The H.R. 100 as introduced provided grants to schools to 
hire master teachers, and that was a subject of some contention 
last year when it reached the floor. This amendment changes 
this program by providing grants to institutions of higher 
education for the purpose of training master teachers but when 
they do that, there will have to be a commitment from the 
school that the teacher is employed by that they will use the 
newly-trained talents of the master teachers to maximum 
advantage so we are not just putting money into training. We 
are insuring that the schools make a commitment to use that 
training in a beneficial way.
    This amendment also changes a provision in the bill we had 
last year which provided for distance learning. It--rather than 
providing grants directly to schools for distancelearning 
activities as we had last year, the substitute amendment before us 
would provide the grants to higher education institutions or 
implementation of K-12 distance learning programs, primarily intended 
so that the universities can develop distance learning experiments so 
that students in elementary and secondary schools can actually be 
involved in ongoing university experiments, doing it all through 
distance learning through the internet.
    This amendment also strikes Section 710 and 11, which 
were--which we have determined to be duplicative of other 
legislative proposals that are currently moving through the 
House in the President's Education Bill.
    So it is a streamlined bill compared to last year's but it 
gets at the essence, and I think it improves the essence that 
we had last year.
    I appreciate the assistance everyone has given, and I urge 
adoption of the amendment.
    Chairman Smith. Any other discussions? If not, the vote 
occurs on the amendment. All in favor will say aye. Aye. Those 
opposed no. The ayes have it, and the amendment is agreed to.
    Are there any further amendments? Hearing none the question 
is on the passage of the bill H.R. 100 as amended. All those in 
favor will say aye. Aye. Those opposed say no. In the opinion 
of the Chair the ayes have it.
    The Ranking Member for a motion.
    Ms. Johnson. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I move that the 
substitute--the Subcommittee favorably report the bill H.R. 100 
is amended to the Full Committee with the recommendation that 
it be an order for the amendment in the nature of a substitute 
adopted by the Subcommittee, be considered as an original bill 
for the purpose of amendment under the five-minute rule of the 
Full Committee.
    Further, I ask unanimous consent that the staff be 
instructed to make all necessary technical and conforming 
changes to the bill as amended in accordance with the 
recommendations of the Subcommittee.
    Chairman Smith. The Committee has heard the motion. Those 
in favor will say aye. Aye. Those opposed say no. The ayes have 
it, and the motion is agreed to.
    [H.R. 100 follows:]
    
    
    Chairman Smith. Without objection the motion to reconsider 
is laid on the table, and the Chair notes the presence of a 
quorum. I would like to thank all of the members of the 
Committee and good work, and with that I applaud everybody that 
has been working on this. And the Subcommittee is adjourned.
    [Whereupon, at 10:40 a.m., the Subcommittee was adjourned.]

               XXII. PROCEEDINGS OF FULL COMMITTEE MARKUP



                H.R. 100, NATIONAL SCIENCE EDUCATION ACT

                              ----------                              


                             JUNE 13, 2001

                          House of Representatives,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                                    Washington, DC.
    Chairman Boehlert. We will now consider H.R. 100, National 
Science Education Act. And I think in view of the action on the 
floor, we probably should suspend our deliberations for now. Go 
to the floor, cast our ballots and come right back. And we 
should be able to dispense of another very important bill in 
short order.
    Mr. Smith. Mr. Chairman?
    Chairman Boehlert. Yes.
    [Statement of Nick Smith follows:]

                          House of Representatives,
                                      Committee on Science,
                                      Washington, DC, June 7, 2001.
To: Sherwood L. Boehlert, Chairman.
From: Nick Smith, Chairman Subcommittee on Research.
Re: Subcommittee Mark-up of H.R. 1858.

    On June 7, 2001, the Subcommittee on Research held a mark-up of 
H.R. 1858, National Mathematics and Science Partnerships Act. A 
Manager's Amendment was offered by Mr. Smith and Ms. Johnson and was 
adopted by a voice vote.
    Attached for your information is a section by section analysis and 
a copy of the measure.
                                   ____
                                 

 H.R. 1858, as Reported by the Subcommittee on Research on June 7, 2001

                          sec. 1. short title
    ``National Mathematics and Science Partnerships Act''.
                            sec. 2. findings
    Discuss the goal set by the nation's Governors to establish the 
U.S. as the world's leaders in math and science achievement by the year 
2000, the failure to reach that goal, and the need to redouble efforts 
to provide all of the country's students with a world-class education 
in math, science, engineering, and technology.
                          sec. 3. definitions
    Provides the standard references to define ``institution of higher 
education'', ``local educational agency'', ``state educational 
agency'', ``Director'', and defines ``eligible nonprofit 
organization''.
                sec. 4. authorizations of appropriations
    Any authorization of appropriations in the bill is in addition to 
amounts otherwise authorized or appropriated for the National Science 
Foundation (NSF).
                     sec. 5. matching requirements
    Allows the Director of NSF to establish matching fund requirements 
for any of the programs authorized by the bill, with the exception of 
the Noyce Scholarship program described in Title IV.
        title i. mathematics and science education partnerships
Subtitle A. Mathematics and science education partnerships
    Establishes a competitive, merit-based program to award grants to 
institutions of higher education or eligible nonprofit organizations to 
establish math and science partnership programs. Requires institutions 
of higher education to partner with one or more local educational 
agencies to be eligible to receive a partnership grant. Partnerships 
may also include a state educational agency and/or one or more 
businesses. Requires that the higher education institution include a 
mathematics, science or engineering department in the programs carried 
out through the partnership. At least 50% of the partnerships must 
include businesses.
    Lists allowable activities for partnership programs that include 
teacher recruitment, training, and professional development--including 
training in educational technologies--distance learning programs, 
development of curricular materials and assessment tools, and others, 
including any other activities the NSF Director determines will 
accomplish the goals of the program. Specifies that the allowable 
activities for partnerships shall include programs to encourage the 
ongoing interest of girls in science, mathematics, engineering and 
technology and prepare them to pursue college and graduate-level study 
in these fields.Requires NSF Director to ensure, to the extent 
practicable, that partnership grants be awarded in a geographically 
diverse fashion, and that the partnerships include a diverse array of 
rural, urban and suburban school districts.
    Authorization of $200 million for each of fiscal years 2002 through 
2006.
Subtitle B. Teacher research scholarship program
    Establishes a competitive, merit-based grant program for 
institutions of higher education or eligible nonprofit organizations to 
provide research opportunities in mathematics, science, and engineering 
for math and science teachers. Businesses or State laboratories may be 
included as partners in the program. Grant recipients recruit and 
select teachers, give them opportunities to conduct research, and 
provide them with mentors and programming support. Grant recipients 
must provide a stipend to participating teachers and may provide room 
and board. Requires NSF Director to ensure, to the extent practicable, 
that partnership grants be awarded in a geographically diverse fashion, 
including rural, urban and suburban areas.
    Authorization of $15 million for each of fiscal years 2002 through 
2006.
 title ii. national science, mathematics, engineering, and technology 
                       education digital library
    Directs the NSF Director to expand the National Science, 
Mathematics, Engineering, and Technology Education Digital Library 
program by providing grants, on a competitive, peer-reviewed basis, to 
institutions of higher education or other qualified entities to provide 
timely and continuous dissemination of K-12 science, math, engineering, 
and technology educational resources, materials, practices, and 
policies through the Internet and other digital technologies. Allows 
grant recipients to use funds to provide assistance to schools for the 
selection and adaptation of curricular materials, practices, and 
teaching methods that are made available through the Digital Library. 
Allows the Director to contract out operation of the Digital Library.
    Authorization of $20 million for each of fiscal years 2002 through 
2006.
            title iii. strategic education research program
Subtitle A. Centers
    Directs the NSF Director to establish four multidisciplinary 
Centers for Research on Learning and Education Improvement by awarding 
grants, using a merit-based, competitive process, to institutions of 
higher education. Centers are to conduct and evaluate research in 
cognitive science, education and related fields and to develop ways in 
which the results of such research can be applied to the teaching of K-
12 math and science. Each Center is to have a distinct research focus, 
determined by the Director in consultation with the National Academy of 
Sciences. Requires the Director to convene an annual meeting of the 
Centers.
    Authorization of $12 million for each of fiscal years 2002 through 
2006.
Subtitle B. Fellowships
    Establishes a fellowship program for K-12 teachers to pursue 
education research fellowships at institutions of higher education. 
Grants are to be awarded on a competitive, peer-reviewed basis to 
institutions of higher education to set up programs that will enable K-
12 teachers to conduct research on cognitive science or education 
research under the guidance of a researcher at the institution. Grant 
recipients must recruit and select teachers, give them opportunities to 
conduct research, and provide them with mentors and programming 
support. Grant recipients must provide a stipend to participating 
teachers and may provide room and board.
    $5 million authorized for each of fiscal years 2002 through 2004.
               title iv. robert noyce scholarship program
    Establishes a competitive, merit-based grant program for 
institutions of higher education to obtain grants in order to award 
scholarships to recruit and train K-12 science and math teachers. Grant 
recipients are to use the funds to establish programs that encourage 
top college juniors and seniors majoring in science, math and 
engineering, as well as science, math, and engineering professionals to 
become K-12 science and math teachers by administering scholarships and 
stipends, offering programs to help scholarship/stipend recipients 
become certified to teach in K-12 schools, and offering programs to 
help scholarship/stipend recipients to become better mathematics and 
science teachers. Grant recipients will also offer programs to provide 
professional and academic support to scholarship/stipend recipients 
during their early years of teaching.
    Scholarships for undergraduates are to be awarded for $7500 or the 
cost of attendance, whichever is less. Stipends for science, math, and 
engineering professionals are to be awarded for $7500 or the cost of 
tuition, whichever is less. Individuals may receive a maximum of two 
years' worth of support, and must agree to complete two years of 
teaching in a K-12 school for every year of scholarship or stipend 
funds awarded.
    Scholarship recipients who do not complete even a single year of 
their service obligation would be required to pay back the amount of 
the award (plus interest) multiplied by two. Scholarship recipients who 
complete at least one year of their service obligation but do not 
complete the rest must repay only the total amount of their award, less 
$3750 for each year of service completed, plus interest.
    Requires NSF Director to ensure, to the extent practicable, that 
partnership grants be awarded in a geographically diverse fashion, and 
prepare recipients for jobs in rural, urban and suburban areas.
    $20 million authorized for each of fiscal years 2002 through 2005.
               title v. requirements for research centers
    Requires the Director of NSF to ensure that grants that establish 
new research centers at institutions of higher education incorporate an 
elementary and secondary mathematics, science, engineering or 
technology education component into their program.
                   title vi. miscellaneous provisions
Sec. 601. Mathematics and science proficiency partnerships
    Establishes an NSF program to award grants of not more than 
$300,000 (on a peer-reviewed, competitive basis) to local educational 
agencies to develop math, science, and information technology 
curricula, purchase equipment necessary to establish such programs, and 
provide professional development opportunities for teachers. In order 
to qualify for such a grant, the local educational agency must execute 
an agreement with a private sector entity to provide services and funds 
that include: donations of computers, establishment of internship and 
mentoring programs, and the provision of college scholarships for 
students committed to pursuing a career in math, science or information 
technology. Special priority is to be given to grant applicants that 
demonstrate the greatest economic need and the greatest ability to 
attract funds and services from the private sector.
    $5 million authorized for each of fiscal years 2002 through 2004.
Sec. 602. Articulation partnerships between community colleges and 
        secondary schools
    For grant awards authorized under section 3(c)(2) of the Scientific 
and Advanced-Technology Act of 1992, requires the Director to give 
priority to grant proposals that involve secondary schools with a 
majority of students from groups that are underrepresented in the 
science, mathematics, and engineering workforce.
    $5 million authorized for each of fiscal years 2002 through 2004.
Sec. 603. Assessment of in-service professional development programs
    Requires the Director to review all NSF programs that support 
teacher training programs to determine (1) what level of resources and 
degree of emphasis is placed on the training of teachers in the 
effective use of information technologies and (2) the allocation of 
resources between summer activities and follow-on training and support 
to participating teachers during the school year. Requires that a 
report be made to Congress on the results of the review.
                  title vii. educational technologies
    Establishes an NSF program to award grants (on a peer-reviewed, 
competitive basis) to institutions of higher education to establish 
centers to evaluate and improve the effectiveness of information 
technologies in K-12 math and science education. Centers would be 
required to identify and study the effectiveness of educational 
approaches and techniques that are based on the use of information 
technology, to identify the key variables affecting educational 
effectiveness, and then to ensure that the results of this analysis are 
widely disseminated and effectively applied by K-12 schools. Allows the 
Director to sponsor conferences, workshops, and websites in order to 
disseminate information further.
    $25 million authorized for each of fiscal years 2002 through 2004; 
$30 million authorized for each of fiscal years 2005 and 2006.


    Mr. Smith. Would it be possible, with the consent of the 
sponsor of the bill that maybe we could do this in the next 5 
minutes, before we go to the floor?
    Chairman Boehlert. Dr. Ehlers?
    Mr. Ehlers. Mr. Chairman, I am quite sure we can.
    Chairman Boehlert. All right. I ask unanimous consent that 
the bill be considered as read and open to amendment at any 
point. I ask the members to proceed with the amendments in the 
order of the roster. I move that the first reading of the bill 
be dispensed with. I--let's see. Chair recognizes Mr. Ehlers.
    [Statements of Vernon J. Ehlers and Sheila Jackson Lee 
follow:]

               Opening Statement of Hon. Vernon J. Ehlers

    Today we are marking up H.R. 100, the National Science Education 
Act, the first of three bills aimed at improving science, math, 
engineering, and technology education--known as ``SMET ed.'' H.R. 100 
is similar to H.R. 4271, which passed this Committee by a unanimous 
vote during the 106th Congress. I want to thank Chairman Boehlert for 
his leadership on this issue.
    Our K-12 education system serves three main purposes: it is 
responsible for preparing future scientists and engineers for further 
study in college and graduate school; it provides all future workers 
the basic technical skills they will need in a 21st century workforce, 
where nearly every job will have a technical component; and it provides 
scientific and technical understanding so that citizens may make 
informed decisions as consumers and voters. Unfortunately, recent 
international assessments of student performance in science and math 
showed that our twelfth grade students were well behind their 
international peers.
    As most of you know, during the 106th Congress, this Committee 
conducted a series of hearings to further examine the state of the 
nation's math and science education, and to suggest improvements. While 
there are many factors that impact student achievement, a common theme 
that arose from our discussions is that there is no substitute for a 
knowledgeable and well-prepared teacher in the classroom.
    Teachers, particularly at the elementary and middle school level, 
often lack time and school resources to implement an inquiry-based, 
hands-on science curriculum. Unlike H.R. 4271 of last year, which 
authorized grants to elementary and middle schools to hire master 
teachers, H.R. 100 authorizes a competitive grant program for higher 
education institutions to train teachers to become master teachers. 
Teachers with strong backgrounds in math, science, engineering and 
technology would be trained as master teachers to provide on-going 
professional development, in-classroom assistance, and oversight of 
hands-on science materials to a group of elementary and middle school 
SMET teachers. This is the type of support our teachers deserve and 
should be receiving.
    In addition, this bill requires NSF and the National Academies to 
evaluate existing studies on the effectiveness of technology in the 
classroom on learning and student performance. Federal, state, and 
local governments have done a good job providing funds for technology 
acquisition, but it is unclear what technologies and software work best 
and how technology enhances student learning.
    This bill also creates a program for higher education institutions 
to provide distance learning opportunities for elementary and secondary 
students. Distance learning invites exciting possibilities for student 
learning, particularly for student scientific research.
    I look forward to having my colleagues' input and support today and 
to consideration by the full House in the future. With this effort, our 
nation's teachers and students will be one step closer to receiving the 
support and education they so much deserve.
    I would like to close by thanking Chairman Boehlert and 
subcommittee Chairman Smith for working with me to bring this bill 
forward today.
                               __________

                  Statement of Hon. Sheila Jackson Lee

    Mr. Chairman, I would like to thank you and Ranking Member Ralph 
Hall for this opportunity to markup, H.R. 1858, which would make 
improvements in mathematics and science education in our nation, and 
H.R. 100, the National Science and Education Act. These bills are long 
over due and are much needed in ensuring that we have adequate numbers 
of trained scientists and mathematicians for the technological and 
economic challenges of tomorrow.
    H.R. 1858 offers support to current teachers and help to recruit 
and retain new teachers who are trained and accredited to teach math 
and science.
    In order to accomplish the goals of this legislation it would 
create new approaches for the Nations Science Foundation (NSF) to take 
in building a stronger and more diverse repository of mathematics and 
science trained teachers. The long range goal is to provide instruction 
in math and science by teachers who are trained in those areas, and 
through this effort increase the number of students who pursue math and 
science undergraduate and graduate degrees.
    It is my goal along with the committee's to create a public 
education system that would develop a technologically capable workforce 
that can compete in the global economy.
    Toward this end, I have offered several amendments to H.R. 1858. 
The first amendment directs that the National Digital Library contain 
information about electronic links to materials that educators may 
access. The second amendment requires that research center awards focus 
on research and development of educational practices designed to 
improve the academic performance of a broad range of students, 
including those from underrepresented groups.
    Through the committee hearing process on these particular bills the 
groups that are underrepresented have been identified as African 
Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans and women.
    The last amendment directs that the NSF provide information on the 
awarding of Robert Noyce Scholarships. As a result of this amendment 
the NSF will be required to collect relevant statistically and 
demographic data on scholarship recipients and information on the 
locations at which scholarship recipients carry out their teaching 
requirement. This report is required by year 7 of the program assessing 
its impact on drawing math and science students into teaching careers, 
including students from underrepresented groups.
    I thank the Chair and committee members for their consideration of 
these amendments and look forward to their inclusion in the final bill 
sent to the House by this committee.
    Thank you.

    Mr. Ehlers. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. I have an opening 
statement. In the interest of time, I will just give that to 
the reporter to enter into the record.
    Let me just say this bill has had thorough examination and 
passed this Committee last year, unanimously. It has been 
improved since that time. I think it deserves the same action 
today, that is, unanimous passage. And in the interest of time, 
I will just withhold further comment at this time.
    Chairman Boehlert. Thank you very much. Is there any other 
discussion? No amendments? Then--I move that the Committee 
report that bill H.R. 100, as amend--no amendments. Further, I 
move to instruct the staff to prepare the legislative report to 
make technical and confirming amendments and that the Chairman 
take all necessary steps to bring the bill before the House for 
consideration. The vote is on the bill, H.R. 100. All in favor 
say aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it. The chair notes the 
presence of a reported quorum. The question is then--well, we 
already did that. I move that the members have 2 subsequent 
calendar days in which to submit supplemental, minority or 
additional views on the measure. Mr. Gordon?
    Mr. Gordon. Mr. Chairman, I move the Committee favorably 
report H.R. 100 as amended to the House, with the 
recommendation that the bill, as amended, do pass. Furthermore, 
I move that the staff be instructed to prepare the legislative 
report and make necessary technical and performing changes. 
That the Chairman take all necessary steps to bring the bill 
before the House for consideration.
    Chairman Boehlert. We do have a reporting quorum. All in 
favor say aye. Opposed, no. The ayes have it. And I move that 
the Members have 2 subsequent calendar days, et cetera. This 
Committee is now adjourned. Good work.
    [Whereupon, at 10:40 a.m., the Committee was adjourned.]