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107th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    107-166

======================================================================



 
               THURGOOD MARSHALL UNITED STATES COURTHOUSE

                                _______
                                

   July 26, 2001.--Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be 
                                printed

                                _______
                                

     Mr. Young of Alaska, from the Committee on Transportation and 
                Infrastructure, submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 988]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

    The Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, to whom 
was referred the bill (H.R. 988) to designate the United States 
courthouse located at 40 Centre Street in New York, New York, 
as the ``Thurgood Marshall United States Courthouse'', having 
considered the same, report favorably thereon without amendment 
and recommend that the bill do pass.
    Thurgood Marshall was born in Baltimore, Maryland, July 2, 
1908. His father, William C. Marshall, was a club steward and 
his mother Norma A. Marshall, was a primary school teacher. In 
1930, he graduated cum laude from Lincoln University in 
Chester, Pennsylvania. Three years later, he graduated at the 
top of his class from the Howard University School of Law.
    Upon graduation from law school, Justice Marshall embarked 
on a legal career with the National Association for the 
Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). In 1940, he became the 
head of the newly formed NAACP Legal Defense and Education 
Fund, a post that he held for twenty years. It was during this 
tenure as Chief Counsel that Justice Marshall organized efforts 
to end segregation in voting, housing, public accommodations, 
and education. These efforts led to a series of cases grouped 
under the title of Brown v. Board of Education, in which 
Marshall argued and the Supreme Court declared segregation in 
public schools unconstitutional.
    In 1961, President John F. Kennedy appointed Marshall to 
the Second Circuit Court of Appeals. Four years after he 
received appointment to the court of appeals, President Lyndon 
B. Johnson chose Justice Marshall to be the nation's first 
black solicitor general. Two years later, on June 13, 1967, 
President Johnson chose Marshall to be a Justice of the Supreme 
Court where he served with distinction until his retirement in 
1991. He died in 1993.
    It is fitting to name a courthouse in honor of this 
American who believed in equal justice for all Americans, and 
devoted his life to obtaining the values which we all hold 
dear.

                    HEARINGS AND LEGISLATIVE HISTORY

    No hearings were held in conjunction with ordering reported 
H.R. 988.

                        COMMITTEE CONSIDERATION

    The Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings 
and Emergency Management approved H.R. 988 on July 17, 2001 by 
voice vote with a quorum present. On July 18, 2001, the Full 
Committee met in open session and ordered reported H.R. 988 to 
designate the United States courthouse located at 40 Centre 
Street in New York, New York as the ``Thurgood Marshall United 
States Courthouse''. A motion by Mr. LaTourette to order H.R. 
988 favorably reported to the House was agreed by voice vote, a 
quorum being present.

                      COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT FINDINGS

    With respect to the requirements of clause 3(c)(1) of rule 
XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, the 
Committee's oversight findings and recommendations are 
reflected in this report.

                          COST OF LEGISLATION

    Clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives does not apply where a cost estimate and 
comparison prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget 
Office under section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 
1974 has been timely submitted prior to the filing of the 
report and is included in the report. Such a cost estimate is 
included in this report.

                    COMPLIANCE WITH HOUSE RULE XIII

    1. With respect to the requirement of clause 3(c)(2) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives, and 
section 308(a) of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
Committee references the report of the Congressional Budget 
Office below.
    2. With respect to clause 3(c)(4) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee advises that the 
bill contains no measure that authorizes funding, so no 
statement of general performance and objectives for which any 
measure authorizes funding is required.
    3. With respect to the requirement of clause 3(c)(3) of 
rule XIII of the Rules of the House of Representatives and 
section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, the 
Committee has received the following cost estimate for H.R. 988 
from the Director of the Congressional Budget Office.

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                     Washington, DC, July 24, 2001.
Hon. Don Young,
Chairman, Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 988, a bill to 
designate the United States courthouse located at 40 Centre 
Street in New York, New York, as the ``Thurgood Marshall United 
States Courthouse.'' CBO estimates that enacting H.R. 988 would 
have no significant impact on the federal budget and would not 
affect direct spending or receipts; therefore, pay-as-you-go 
procedures would not apply. The bill contains no 
intergovernmental or private-sector mandates as defined in the 
Unfunded Mandates Reform Act and would impose no costs on 
state, local, or tribal governments.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Mark 
Grabowicz.
            Sincerely,
                                        Steven M. Lieberman
                                    (For Dan L. Crippen, Director).
    Enclosure.

                   CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY STATEMENT

    Pursuant to clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, committee reports on a bill or joint 
resolution of a public character shall include a statement 
citing the specific powers granted to the Congress in the 
Constitution to enact the measure. The Committee on 
Transportation and Infrastructure finds that Congress has the 
authority to enact this measure pursuant to its powers granted 
under Article I, section 8 of the Constitution.

                       FEDERAL MANDATES STATEMENT

    The Committee adopts as its own the estimate of Federal 
mandates prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget 
Office pursuant to section 423 of the Unfunded Mandates Reform 
Act. (Public Law 104-4.)

                      ADVISORY COMMITTEE STATEMENT

    No advisory committees within the meaning of section 5(b) 
of the Federal Advisory Committee Act were created by this 
legislation.

                APPLICABILITY TO THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

    The Committee finds that the legislation does not relate to 
the terms and conditions of employment or access to public 
services or accommodations within the meaning of section 
102(b)(3) of the Congressional Accountability Act. (Public Law 
104-1.)