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107th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    107-265

======================================================================



 
  INTERNATIONAL DISABILITY AND VICTIMS OF LANDMINES, CIVIL STRIFE AND 
                     WARFARE ASSISTANCE ACT OF 2001

                                _______
                                

November 5, 2001.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Hyde, from the Committee on International Relations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 3169]

    The Committee on International Relations, to whom was 
referred the bill (H.R. 3169) to authorize assistance for 
individuals with disabilities in foreign countries, including 
victims of landmines and other victims of civil strife and 
warfare, and for other purposes, having considered the same, 
reports favorably thereon with an amendment and recommends that 
the bill as amended do pass.

                           TABLE OF CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
The Amendment....................................................     2
Background and Purpose for the Legislation.......................     4
Committee Consideration..........................................     7
Votes of the Committee...........................................     7
Committee Oversight Findings.....................................     7
New Budget Authority and Tax Expenditures........................     7
Committee Cost Estimate..........................................     7
Performance Goals and Objectives.................................     7
Constitutional Authority Statement...............................     7
Section-by-Section Analysis......................................     7
Agency Views.....................................................    10
New Advisory Committees..........................................    10
Congressional Accountability Act.................................    10
Federal Mandates.................................................    10
Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported............    10

                             The Amendment

    The amendment is as follows:
    Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the ``International Disability and Victims 
of Landmines, Civil Strife and Warfare Assistance Act of 2001''.

SEC. 2. FINDINGS AND PURPOSE.

    (a) Findings.--Congress makes the following findings:
            (1) According to the World Health Organization (WHO), 
        between 7 percent and 10 percent of the world's population, or 
        almost 500,000,000 people, live with disabilities. About 80 
        percent of these individuals live in developing countries, 
        where only 1 percent to 2 percent have access to the necessary 
        rehabilitation services, and many face numerous physical and 
        social barriers that inhibit their full participation in their 
        communities.
            (2) Factors contributing to the number of individuals with 
        disabilities include war and other forms of violence, 
        inadequate medical care, and natural and other disasters.
            (3)(A) According to the International Committee of the Red 
        Cross, there are tens of millions of landmines in over 60 
        countries around the world, and it has estimated that as many 
        as 24,000 people are maimed or killed each year by landmines, 
        mostly civilians, resulting in amputations and disabilities of 
        various kinds.
            (B) While the United States Government invests more than 
        $100,000,000 in mine action programs annually, including 
        funding for mine awareness and demining training programs, only 
        about ten percent of these funds go to directly aid landmine 
        victims.
            (C) The Patrick Leahy War Victims Fund, administered by the 
        United States Agency for International Development, has 
        provided essential prosthetics and rehabilitation for landmine 
        and other war victims in developing countries who are disabled 
        and has provided long-term sustainable improvements in quality 
        of life for victims of civil strife and warfare, addressing 
        such issues as barrier-free accessibility, reduction of social 
        stigmatization, and increasing economic opportunities.
            (D) Enhanced coordination is needed among Federal agencies 
        that carry out assistance programs in foreign countries for 
        victims of landmines and other victims of civil strife and 
        warfare to make better use of interagency expertise and 
        resources.
            (4) According to a review of Poverty and Disability 
        commissioned by the World Bank, ``disabled people have lower 
        education and income levels than the rest of the population. 
        They are more likely to have incomes below poverty level than 
        the non-disabled population, and they are less likely to have 
        savings and other assets . . . [t]he links between poverty and 
        disability go two ways--not only does disability add to the 
        risk of poverty, but conditions of poverty add to the risk of 
        disability.''.
            (5) Numerous international human rights conventions and 
        declarations recognize the need to protect the rights of 
        individuals regardless of their status, including those 
        individuals with disabilities, through the principles of 
        equality and non-discrimination.
    (b) Purpose.--The purpose of this Act is to authorize assistance 
for individuals with disabilities, including victims of landmines and 
other victims of civil strife and warfare.

SEC. 3. INTERNATIONAL DISABILITIES AND WAR VICTIMS ASSISTANCE.

    The Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151 et seq.) is 
amended by inserting after section 134 the following:

``SEC. 135. INTERNATIONAL DISABILITIES AND WAR VICTIMS ASSISTANCE.

    ``(a) Authorization.--The President, acting through the 
Administrator of the United States Agency for International 
Development, is authorized to furnish assistance to individuals with 
disabilities, including victims of civil strife and warfare, in foreign 
countries.
    ``(b) Activities.--The programs established pursuant to subsection 
(a) may include activities such as the following:
            ``(1) Development of local capacity to provide medical and 
        rehabilitation services for individuals with disabilities, 
        including victims of civil strife and warfare, in foreign 
        countries, such as--
                    ``(A) support for and training of medical 
                professionals, including surgeons, nurses, and physical 
                therapists, to provide effective emergency and other 
                medical care and for the development of training 
                manuals relating to first aid and other medical 
                treatment;
                    ``(B) support for sustainable prosthetic and 
                orthotic services; and
                    ``(C) psychological and social rehabilitation of 
                such individuals, together with their families as 
                appropriate, for the reintegration of such individuals 
                into local communities.
            ``(2) Support for policy reform and advocacy efforts 
        related to the needs and abilities of individuals with 
        disabilities, including victims of civil strife and warfare.
            ``(3) Coordination of programs established pursuant to 
        subsection (a) with existing programs for individuals with 
        disabilities, including victims of civil strife and warfare.
            ``(4) Support for establishment of appropriate entities in 
        foreign countries to coordinate programs, projects, and 
        activities related to assistance for individuals with 
        disabilities, including victims of civil strife and warfare.
            ``(5) Support for primary, secondary, and vocational 
        education, public awareness and training programs and other 
        activities that help prevent war-related injuries and assist 
        individuals with disabilities, including victims of civil 
        strife and warfare, with their reintegration into society and 
        their ability to make sustained social and economic 
        contributions to society.
    ``(c) Priority.--To the maximum extent feasible, assistance under 
this section shall be provided through nongovernmental organizations, 
and, as appropriate, through governments to establish appropriate 
norms, standards, and policies related to rehabilitation and issues 
affecting individuals with disabilities, including victims of civil 
strife and warfare.
    ``(d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to carry out this section $15,000,000 for each of the 
fiscal years 2002 and 2003. Amounts appropriated pursuant to the 
authorization of appropriations under the preceding sentence are 
authorized to be provided notwithstanding any other provision of 
law.''.

SEC. 4. RESEARCH, PREVENTION, AND ASSISTANCE RELATED TO INTERNATIONAL 
                    DISABILITIES AND LANDMINE AND OTHER WAR VICTIMS.

    (a) Authorization.--
            (1) In general.--The Secretary of Health and Human 
        Services, acting through the Director of the Centers for 
        Disease Control and Prevention, is authorized--
                    (A) to conduct programs in foreign countries 
                related to individuals with disabilities, including 
                victims of landmines and other victims of civil strife 
                and warfare; and
                    (B) to provide grants to nongovernmental 
                organizations for the purpose of carrying out research, 
                prevention, public awareness and assistance programs in 
                foreign countries related to individuals with 
                disabilities, including victims of landmines and other 
                victims of civil strife and warfare.
            (2) Approval of secretary of state.--Activities under 
        programs established pursuant to paragraph (1) may be carried 
        out in foreign countries only after consultation with the 
        Administrator of the United States Agency for International 
        Development, and upon approval for such activities in such 
        countries by the Secretary of State.
    (b) Activities.--Programs established pursuant to subsection (a) 
may include the following activities:
            (1) Research on trauma, physical, psychological, and social 
        rehabilitation, and continuing medical care related to 
        individuals with disabilities, including victims of landmines 
        and other victims of civil strife and warfare, including--
                    (A) conducting research on psychological and social 
                factors that lead to successful recovery;
                    (B) developing, testing, and evaluating model 
                interventions that reduce post-traumatic stress and 
                promote health and well-being;
                    (C) developing basic instruction tools for initial 
                medical response to traumatic injuries; and
                    (D) developing basic instruction manuals for 
                patients and healthcare providers, including for 
                emergency and follow-up care, proper amputation 
                procedures, and reconstructive surgery.
            (2) Facilitation of peer support networks for individuals 
        with disabilities, including victims of landmines and other 
        victims of civil strife and warfare, in foreign countries, 
        including--
                    (A) establishment of organizations at the local 
                level, administered by such individuals, to assess and 
                address the physical, psychological, economic and 
                social rehabilitation and other needs of such 
                individuals, together with their families as 
                appropriate, for the purpose of economic and social 
                reintegration into local communities; and
                    (B) training related to the implementation of such 
                peer support networks, including training of outreach 
                workers to assist in the establishment of organizations 
                such as those described in subparagraph (A) and 
                assistance to facilitate the use of the networks by 
                such individuals.
            (3) Sharing of expertise from limb-loss and disability 
        research centers in the United States with similar centers and 
        facilities in war-affected countries, including promoting 
        increased health for individuals with limb loss and limb 
        deficiency and epidemiological research on secondary medical 
        conditions related to limb loss and limb deficiency.
            (4) Developing a database of best practices to address the 
        needs of the war-related disabled through comprehensive 
        examination of support activities related to such disability 
        and access to medical care and supplies.
    (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the Secretary of Health and Human Services to carry out 
this section such sums as may be necessary for each of fiscal years 
2002 through 2004.

SEC. 5. EXPERTISE OF THE DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS.

    The Secretary of Veterans Affairs is authorized--
            (1) to provide advice and expertise on prosthetics, 
        orthotics, physical and psychological rehabilitation and 
        treatment, and disability assistance to other Federal 
        departments and agencies, including providing for temporary 
        assignment on a non-reimbursable basis of appropriate 
        Department of Veterans Affairs personnel, with respect to the 
        implementation of programs to provide assistance to victims of 
        landmines and other victims of civil strife and warfare in 
        foreign countries and landmine research and health-related 
        programs, including programs established pursuant to section 
        135 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (as added by section 
        3 of this Act) and programs established pursuant to section 4 
        of this Act; and
            (2) to provide technical assistance to private voluntary 
        organizations on a reimbursable basis with respect to the 
        planning, development, operation, and evaluation of such 
        landmine assistance, research, and prevention programs.

SEC. 6. INTERAGENCY GROUP.

    (a) Establishment.--The Secretary of State shall establish and 
chair an interagency group to ensure coordination of all Federal 
programs that furnish assistance to victims of landmines and other 
victims of civil strife and warfare, and conduct landmine research, 
demining and prevention programs.
    (b) Other Members.--Members of the interagency group shall include, 
but not be limited to, representatives from--
            (1) the United States Agency for International Development;
            (2) the Department of Health and Human Services;
            (3) the Department of Education;
            (4) the Department of Defense; and
            (5) the Department of Veterans Affairs.
    (c) Public meetings.--At least once each calendar year, the 
interagency group should hold a public meeting in order to afford an 
opportunity for any person to present views regarding the activities of 
the United States Government with respect to assistance to victims of 
landmines and other victims of civil strife and warfare and related 
programs. The Secretary of State shall maintain a record of each 
meeting and shall make the record available to the public.

               Background and Purpose for the Legislation

    H.R. 3167, the International Disabilities and Victims of 
Landmines, Civil Strife and Warfare, addresses an issue which 
transcends politics: the suffering of individuals with 
disabilities and the innocent victims of landmines, civil 
strife and warfare--men, women and children who often lead 
shattered lives. The World Health Organization estimates that 
between 7% and 10% of the world's population--nearly 500 
million people--live with disabilities. Yet only 1% to 2% have 
any access to the necessary rehabilitation services. Most 
disabled people live in developing countries, often in poverty. 
In certain developing countries nearly 20 per cent of the 
general population is in some way disabled; if the impact on 
their families is taken into account, as much as 50 per cent of 
the population is impacted by disabilities. The overwhelming 
majority live in isolated rural areas. Almost that many live in 
areas where the services needed to help them are unavailable. 
Too often their lives are handicapped by physical and social 
barriers in societies which hamper their full participation. 
Because of this, in many parts of the world, the disabled live 
in isolation and insecurity.
    The U.S. provides some assistance for rehabilitation and 
societal reintegration of individuals suffering from 
disabilities and for landmine victims, but there is a 
tremendous potential for focusing additional U.S. effort and 
expertise from all relevant parts of the U.S. Government on 
this massive problem. Beginning in fiscal year 2001, for 
example, the Department of Health and Human Services 
established a pilot program housed in the Centers for Disease 
Control (CDC) to provide assistance to landmine and other 
victims of civil strife and warfare. However, establishing new 
programs in this area is very difficult--individuals suffering 
from disabilities and landmine victims in particular face a 
wide range of both physical and psychosocial trauma which is 
difficult to treat effectively. The Committee believes that one 
of the primary benefits of this legislation is to ensure that 
the CDC and other agencies who may become involved in these 
efforts consult and coordinate with the United States Agency 
for International Development (USAID) which has 12 years of 
experience working in this field.

                               Landmines

    In particular, the Committee is concerned with injuries 
that result from landmines, other unexploded ordnance, and 
other wartime activities. Landmines alone are significant cause 
of injuries and deaths. According to some reports, 1,200 people 
are maimed by landmines each month, with nearly one-third 
estimated to be children. A child injured at the age of 10 may 
need more than 25 artificial limbs in his or her lifetime. The 
scope of this problem requires a continued U.S. commitment to 
addressing these victims, not only as a humanitarian matter but 
also as an important development issue.
    An often-difficult life in the developing world is 
instantly made nearly impossible, for example, when a landmine 
indiscriminately transforms a productive member of a village, 
an irreplaceable provider for a family, a child hoping for a 
better life, or a young woman looking forward to marriage and 
children, into a disabled, demoralized person who is often 
shunned as a liability by his or her society. Persons with 
disabilities--either from birth, accidents, civil strife or 
other means--are marginalized, often without any hope of 
leading useful and productive lives. Victims assistance means 
not only physical and psychological assistance to individuals 
with international disabilities and their families, but also 
trying to create new policy frameworks so that foreign 
societies can accommodate such victims more broadly and 
decrease the stigma often attached to such conditions.
    The worst landmine-affected countries include:

         LAngola--An estimated 1 in every 415 Angolans 
        has a landmine-related injury. There are an estimated 
        120 new landmine victims per month.

         LAfghanistan--There may be as many as 10 
        million landmines left in Afghanistan, laid by the 
        Soviets during their occupation and by all the warring 
        parties since that conflict. One adult male in 10 has 
        been involved in a landmine incident.

         LCambodia--In 1998, it has been reported that 
        there are 28,000 amputees, with 95% landmine victims. 
        While the overall number of civilian landmine 
        casualties is dropping, the percentage of incidents 
        involving children is increasing, from 16% in 1998 to 
        30% in the first 5 months of 2000.

         LVietnam--There are an estimated 180 landmine 
        casualties per month. 14% of landmine victims were not 
        born when the war ended Four to 7 percent of the 
        population are reportedly disabled; of this group a 
        third have war-related injuries.

    Landmines are particularly devastating to children. It has 
been estimated that between 8,000-10,000 children, about a 
third of all landmine casualties, are killed or maimed by 
landmines each year. Because their bodies are smaller and 
closer to the ground children are more likely to die from 
landmines, or to suffer more serious injury in a landmine 
blast. Physical rehabilitation programs and services are 
critical to ensure the availability of devices that are safe, 
durable and can be maintained and repaired locally. As an 
amputee's first artificial limb is transitional and may not fit 
properly or may need eventual repair and replacement, the 
availability of long-term services must be ensured. In 
addition, attention must be given to resources and training for 
treatment of landmine injuries other than limb loss, such as 
loss of eyesight, deafness and paralysis. To return to being 
fully participating members of society, landmine survivors 
require ongoing and complementary types of assistance, 
including: Emergency medical care; Amputation Surgery; Physical 
Rehabilitation and Assistive Devices; Social and economic 
reintegration into mainstream society; and Psychological 
support and counseling.

                     Existing Mine Action Programs

    The Committee in no way intends for funds for assistance 
programs for foreign persons with disabilities and victims of 
landmines and civil strife and warfare to come at the expense 
of U.S. programs to remove existing mines in various foreign 
countries. Extraction of leftover landmines and unexploded 
ordnance is a crucial aspect of victims assistance; through 
prophylaxis, lifelong injuries can be prevented. However, 
efforts at prevention is not enough. Assistance to persons 
already injured by landmines and unexploded ordnance is 
critical and cannot be disregarded to focus solely on demining. 
Assistance programs for the disabled and victims of landmines 
and civil strife, and appropriations for these same programs, 
must be increased, independently from continuing U.S. demining 
programs.
    Nor does the Committee intend or expect that any increase 
in appropriations and new assistance programs to come at the 
expense of the Patrick Leahy War Victims Fund. Since 1989, this 
program has been the primary means to provide U.S. 
rehabilitative assistance to victims of landmines, war and 
civil strife, and the Committee expects that funds appropriated 
for victims of civil strife and warfare, including landmine 
victims, would continue to be channeled through this program.

                        Committee Consideration

    On November 1, 2001, the Committee met in open session and 
ordered favorably reported the bill H.R. 3169 with an amendment 
by voice vote, a quorum being present.

                         Votes of the Committee

    There were no recorded votes on this bill.

                      Committee Oversight Findings

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee reports that the 
findings and recommendations of the Committee, based on 
oversight activities under clause 2(b)(1) of rule X of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, are incorporated in the 
descriptive portions of this report.

               New Budget Authority and Tax Expenditures

    Clause 3(c)(2) of House Rule XIII is inapplicable because 
this legislation does not provide new budgetary authority or 
increased tax expenditures.

                        Committee Cost Estimate

    In compliance with clause 3(d)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee believes that 
the bill will have a $12 million cost for the current fiscal 
year 2002, and a $15 million cost in fiscal year 2003.

                    Performance Goals and Objectives

    The performance and objectives of this bill are set forth 
in the Government Performance and Results Act Plan submitted by 
the Agency for International Development.

                   Constitutional Authority Statement

    Pursuant to clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee finds the authority for 
this legislation in article I, section 8, clause 18 of the 
Constitution.

               Section-by-Section Analysis and Discussion

Section 1: Short Title.
    Provides the title for the Act as the ``International 
Disability and Victims of Landmines, Civil Strife and Warfare 
Assistance Act of 2001.''
Section 2: Findings and Purpose.
    Provides various findings and outlines the purposes of the 
bill.
Section 3: International Disabilities and War Victims Assistance.
    Section 3 amends the Foreign Assistance Act (FAA) of 1961 
to provide permanent authority for international disability 
programs. Section 135(a) authorizes the President, acting 
through the Administrator of USAID, to furnish assistance to 
individuals with disabilities, including victims of civil 
strife and warfare. For the purposes of this new section, 
``victims of civil strife and warfare'' includes landmine 
victims, as well as victims of unexploded ordnance, individuals 
suffering from other war-related injuries, and persons who 
might have suffered similar injuries during times of civil 
unrest.
    Section 135(b) describes the kinds of activities that may 
be conducted under the authority of this new section. Such 
activities include building local capacity regarding medical 
training, prosthetic and orthotic services, psychological and 
social rehabilitation and reintegration into society, and 
education and training related to public awareness and advocacy 
programs. The Committee believes that education, public 
awareness and other programs that help prevent war-related 
injuries is a very important area, because one of the best ways 
to deal with landmine or other war-related injuries is to 
prevent them in the first instance. Nothing in the Act is 
intended to lessen the priority that USAID assigns to these 
activities or to re-allocate funds from such activities and 
transfer them to physical, psychological or other treatment 
programs.
    Subsection (c) of the new section 135 provides that, to the 
maximum extent feasible, assistance should be provided through 
nongovernmental organizations and, as appropriate, through 
governments to establish appropriate norms, standards and 
policies related to rehabilitation and issues affecting 
individuals with disabilities. Currently, much of the 
assistance related to victims of civil strife and warfare is 
provided through nongovernmental organizations, and the 
Committee believes that this practice and policy should 
continue. However, there may be cases where assistance should 
be provided through governments in order to establish 
appropriate norms, standards and policies in this area. In the 
final analysis, after consultation with nongovernmental 
organizations, governments must ultimately devise and implement 
such norms, standards and policies. Accordingly funds should, 
in part, be provided through governments if such governments 
have demonstrated an interest in this field and USAID believes 
they can be effective in this area.
    Section 135(d) authorizes to be appropriated $15 million in 
each of fiscal years 2002 and 2003 to carry out the activities 
discussed in this section. This section also provides that 
amounts appropriated for development assistance and economic 
support funds may be used to fund the activities described in 
this section. This codifies current practice with respect to 
these activities.
    The Committee commends USAID for its efforts to address 
landmine victim needs. Since the Leahy War Victims Fund was 
established in 1989, programs funded by USAID have helped 
thousands of landmine victims with their vital needs. The 
Committee is particularly impressed with the programs that 
develop local expertise and capacity in countries that have a 
large landmine problem and victim population, such as Cambodia, 
where local citizens are trained to build and fit prosthetics, 
orthotics and other devices. The Committee encourages USAID and 
CDC to continue in this vein where possible so that local 
populations, including the victims themselves, can benefit from 
these programs economically and can achieve self-sufficiency.
Section 4: Research, Prevention, and Assistance Related to 
        International Disabilities and Landmine and Other War Victims.
    Section 4 provides a new freestanding authority to the 
Department of Health and Human Services and the Center for 
Disease Control and Prevention (HHS/CDC) to conduct programs in 
foreign countries related to individuals with disabilities, 
including victims of landmines and other victims of civil 
strife and warfare. Subsection (a) provides the general 
authority for these programs, including providing 
nongovernmental organizations grants to carry out this program. 
Subsection (a)(2) provides that activities under programs 
established pursuant to this section may be carried out in 
foreign countries only after consultation with the 
Administrator of USAID and upon approval for such activities by 
the Secretary of State. This provision is intended to ensure 
that the Secretary of State is aware and approves of the CDC's 
programs abroad and that there is proper coordination between 
USAID and CDC to prevent unnecessary duplication. In addition 
the Committee believes that both USAID and CDC can benefit from 
each other's experience in these fields by enhanced cooperation 
and coordination.
    Subsection (b) describes the kinds of activities that may 
be conducted under the authority of this new section, including 
development of instructional tools for surgeons and for first 
aid response, model interventions that reduce post-traumatic 
stress, and other research on landmine- and civil-strife 
related research. It also provides for peer support networks 
assistance, sharing of expertise from limb-loss and disability 
research centers in the United States, and for the development 
of a global database on medical and rehabilitation resources on 
war-related injuries.
Section 5: Expertise of the Department of Veterans Affairs.
    Section 5 also authorizes the Secretary of Veteran Affairs 
to provide relevant advice and expertise to other government 
agencies on a non-reimbursable cost basis and technical 
assistance to non-governmental organizations on a reimbursable 
cost basis. The Committee applauds the work of the Department 
of Veterans Affairs (VA) for its support and assistance to 
thousands of American veterans who have been injured by 
landmines and unexploded ordnance. The VA has unparalleled 
experience in providing assistance to landmine victims, and the 
Committee believes that other agencies that manage such 
programs can benefit from the VA's expertise. It should be 
noted, however, that this bill does not in any way intend, and 
should not be construed to require, the diversion of the VA's 
resources or detract from its primary mission of assisting 
American veterans.
Section 6: Interagency Group.
    Section 6 requires the establishment of an interagency 
mechanism to provide better coordination of programs of 
assistance to disabled and victims of landmines, warfare, and 
civil strife. The Committee believes that such a coordinating 
mechanism is essential. It is apparent that various agencies 
that conduct landmine assistance programs are unaware of each 
others' activities. Moreover, agencies beyond USAID and CDC are 
involved in public awareness programs and should meet to 
discuss and exchange views on their various approaches and 
activities in the field.
    The Committee wishes to be clear that an additional 
interagency coordinating mechanism or group does not 
necessarily have to be created to carry out this 
responsibility. The addition of the responsibilities envisioned 
by this Act to an existing interagency group, if the Secretary 
of State so determines to be the most effective and efficient 
way of implementing this provision, would in the judgment of 
the Committee, satisfy the Act's requirements so long as the 
membership of the group includes all the agencies described in 
subsection (b).

                              Agency Views

    The State Department appreciates the increased flexibility 
provided by H.R. 3169 regarding appropriate forms of assistance 
to victims of landmines in developing nations. The State 
Department does not believe that the establishment of a new 
interagency group to coordinate landmine victim assistance and 
landmine awareness is necessary because an interagency group on 
Mine Action already provides interagency coordination on these 
subjects. Nevertheless, in general, the State Department has no 
objection to H.R. 3169.

                        New Advisory Committees

    H.R.3169 does not establish or authorize any new advisory 
committees.

                    Congressional Accountability Act

    H.R.3169 does not apply to the legislative branch.

                            Federal Mandages

    H.R.3169 provides no Federal mandates.

         Changes in Existing Law Made by the Bill, as Reported

    In compliance with clause 3(e) of rule XIII of the Rules of 
the House of Representatives, changes in existing law made by 
the bill, as reported, are shown as follows (new matter is 
printed in italics and existing law in which no change is 
proposed is shown in roman):

           SECTION 135 OF THE FOREIGN ASSISTANCE ACT OF 1961

SEC. 135. INTERNATIONAL DISABILITIES AND WAR VICTIMS ASSISTANCE.

    (a) Authorization.--The President, acting through the 
Administrator of the United States Agency for International 
Development, is authorized to furnish assistance to individuals 
with disabilities, including victims of civil strife and 
warfare, in foreign countries.
    (b) Activities.--The programs established pursuant to 
subsection (a) may include activities such as the following:
            (1) Development of local capacity to provide 
        medical and rehabilitation services for individuals 
        with disabilities, including victims of civil strife 
        and warfare, in foreign countries, such as--
                    (A) support for and training of medical 
                professionals, including surgeons, nurses, and 
                physical therapists, to provide effective 
                emergency and other medical care and for the 
                development of training manuals relating to 
                first aid and other medical treatment;
                    (B) support for sustainable prosthetic and 
                orthotic services; and
                    (C) psychological and social rehabilitation 
                of such individuals, together with their 
                families as appropriate, for the reintegration 
                of such individuals into local communities.
            (2) Support for policy reform and advocacy efforts 
        related to the needs and abilities of individuals with 
        disabilities, including victims of civil strife and 
        warfare.
            (3) Coordination of programs established pursuant 
        to subsection (a) with existing programs for 
        individuals with disabilities, including victims of 
        civil strife and warfare.
            (4) Support for establishment of appropriate 
        entities in foreign countries to coordinate programs, 
        projects, and activities related to assistance for 
        individuals with disabilities, including victims of 
        civil strife and warfare.
            (5) Support for primary, secondary, and vocational 
        education, public awareness and training programs and 
        other activities that help prevent war-related injuries 
        and assist individuals with disabilities, including 
        victims of civil strife and warfare, with their 
        reintegration into society and their ability to make 
        sustained social and economic contributions to society.
    (c) Priority.--To the maximum extent feasible, assistance 
under this section shall be provided through nongovernmental 
organizations, and, as appropriate, through governments to 
establish appropriate norms, standards, and policies related to 
rehabilitation and issues affecting individuals with 
disabilities, including victims of civil strife and warfare.
    (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized 
to be appropriated to carry out this section $15,000,000 for 
each of the fiscal years 2002 and 2003. Amounts appropriated 
pursuant to the authorization of appropriations under the 
preceding sentence are authorized to be provided 
notwithstanding any other provision of law.