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107th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    107-272

======================================================================



 
MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE DEPARTMENTS OF VETERANS AFFAIRS AND 
  HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT, AND FOR SUNDRY INDEPENDENT AGENCIES, 
  BOARDS, COMMISSIONS, CORPORATIONS, AND OFFICES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 
  ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2002, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES

                                _______
                                

                November 6, 2001.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

  Mr. Walsh, from the committee of conference, submitted the following

                           CONFERENCE REPORT

                        [To accompany H.R. 2620]

      The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of 
the two Houses on the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 
2620) ``making appropriations for the Departments of Veterans 
Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and for sundry 
independent agencies, boards, commissions, corporations, and 
offices for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for 
other purposes'', having met, after full and free conference, 
have agreed to recommend and do recommend to their respective 
Houses as follows:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate, and agree to the same with an 
amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment, insert:
That the following sums are appropriated, out of any money in 
the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the Departments of 
Veterans Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and for 
sundry independent agencies, boards, commissions, corporations, 
and offices for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and 
for other purposes, namely:

                TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS

                    Veterans Benefits Administration


                       compensation and pensions


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the payment of compensation benefits to or on behalf of 
veterans and a pilot program for disability examinations as 
authorized by law (38 U.S.C. 107, chapters 11, 13, 18, 51, 53, 
55, and 61); pension benefits to or on behalf of veterans as 
authorized by law (38 U.S.C. chapters 15, 51, 53, 55, and 61; 
92 Stat. 2508); and burial benefits, emergency and other 
officers' retirement pay, adjusted-service credits and 
certificates, payment of premiums due on commercial life 
insurance policies guaranteed under the provisions of article 
IV of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Civil Relief Act of 1940 (50 
U.S.C. App. 540 et seq.) and for other benefits as authorized 
by law (38 U.S.C. 107, 1312, 1977, and 2106, chapters 23, 51, 
53, 55, and 61; 50 U.S.C. App. 540-548; 43 Stat. 122, 123; 45 
Stat. 735; 76 Stat. 1198), $24,944,288,000, to remain available 
until expended: Provided, That not to exceed $17,940,000 of the 
amount appropriated under this heading shall be reimbursed to 
``General operating expenses'' and ``Medical care'' for 
necessary expenses in implementing those provisions authorized 
in the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1990, and in the 
Veterans' Benefits Act of 1992 (38 U.S.C. chapters 51, 53, and 
55), the funding source for which is specifically provided as 
the ``Compensation and pensions'' appropriation: Provided 
further, That such sums as may be earned on an actual 
qualifying patient basis, shall be reimbursed to ``Medical 
facilities revolving fund'' to augment the funding of 
individual medical facilities for nursing home care provided to 
pensioners as authorized.


                         readjustment benefits


    For the payment of readjustment and rehabilitation benefits 
to or on behalf of veterans as authorized by law (38 U.S.C. 
chapters 21, 30, 31, 34, 35, 36, 39, 51, 53, 55, and 61), 
$2,135,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
That expenses for rehabilitation program services and 
assistance which the Secretary is authorized to provide under 
section 3104(a) of title 38, United States Code, other than 
under subsection (a)(1), (2), (5) and (11) of that section, 
shall be charged to this account.


                   veterans insurance and indemnities


    For military and naval insurance, national service life 
insurance, servicemen's indemnities, service-disabled veterans 
insurance, and veterans mortgage life insurance as authorized 
by 38 U.S.C. chapter 19; 70 Stat. 887; 72 Stat. 487, 
$26,200,000, to remain available until expended.

         veterans housing benefit program fund program account


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the cost of direct and guaranteed loans, such sums as 
may be necessary to carry out the program, as authorized by 38 
U.S.C. chapter 37, as amended: Provided, That such costs, 
including the cost of modifying such loans, shall be as defined 
in section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as 
amended: Provided further, That during fiscal year 2002, within 
the resources available, not to exceed $300,000 in gross 
obligations for direct loans are authorized for specially 
adapted housing loans.
    In addition, for administrative expenses to carry out the 
direct and guaranteed loan programs, $164,497,000, which may be 
transferred to and merged with the appropriation for ``General 
operating expenses''.


                  education loan fund program account


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the cost of direct loans, $1,000, as authorized by 38 
U.S.C. 3698, as amended: Provided, That such costs, including 
the cost of modifying such loans, shall be as defined in 
section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as 
amended: Provided further, That these funds are available to 
subsidize gross obligations for the principal amount of direct 
loans not to exceed $3,400.
    In addition, for administrative expenses necessary to carry 
out the direct loan program, $64,000, which may be transferred 
to and merged with the appropriation for ``General operating 
expenses''.

            vocational rehabilitation loans program account


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the cost of direct loans, $72,000, as authorized by 38 
U.S.C. chapter 31, as amended: Provided, That such costs, 
including the cost of modifying such loans, shall be as defined 
in section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as 
amended: Provided further, That funds made available under this 
heading are available to subsidize gross obligations for the 
principal amount of direct loans not to exceed $3,301,000.
    In addition, for administrative expenses necessary to carry 
out the direct loan program, $274,000, which may be transferred 
to and merged with the appropriation for ``General operating 
expenses''.

          native american veteran housing loan program account


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For administrative expenses to carry out the direct loan 
program authorized by 38 U.S.C. chapter 37, subchapter V, as 
amended, $544,000, which may be transferred to and merged with 
the appropriation for ``General operating expenses''.

  guaranteed transitional housing loans for homeless veterans program 
                                account

    For the administrative expenses to carry out the guaranteed 
transitional housing loan program authorized by 38 U.S.C. 
chapter 37, subchapter VI, not to exceed $750,000 of the 
amounts appropriated by this Act for ``General operating 
expenses'' and ``Medical care'' may be expended.

                     Veterans Health Administration


                              medical care


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For necessary expenses for the maintenance and operation of 
hospitals, nursing homes, and domiciliary facilities; for 
furnishing, as authorized by law, inpatient and outpatient care 
and treatment to beneficiaries of the Department of Veterans 
Affairs, including care and treatment in facilities not under 
the jurisdiction of the department; and furnishing recreational 
facilities, supplies, and equipment; funeral, burial, and other 
expenses incidental thereto for beneficiaries receiving care in 
the department; administrative expenses in support of planning, 
design, project management, real property acquisition and 
disposition, construction and renovation of any facility under 
the jurisdiction or for the use of the department; oversight, 
engineering and architectural activities not charged to project 
cost; repairing, altering, improving or providing facilities in 
the several hospitals and homes under the jurisdiction of the 
department, not otherwise provided for, either by contract or 
by the hire of temporary employees and purchase of materials; 
uniforms or allowances therefor, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 
5901-5902; aid to State homes as authorized by 38 U.S.C. 1741; 
administrative and legal expenses of the department for 
collecting and recovering amounts owed the department as 
authorized under 38 U.S.C. chapter 17, and the Federal Medical 
Care Recovery Act, 42 U.S.C. 2651 et seq., $21,331,164,000, 
plus reimbursements: Provided, That of the funds made available 
under this heading, $675,000,000 is for the equipment and land 
and structures object classifications only, which amount shall 
not become available for obligation until August 1, 2002, and 
shall remain available until September 30, 2003: Provided 
further, That of the funds made available under this heading, 
not to exceed $900,000,000 shall be available until September 
30, 2003: Provided further, That of the funds made available 
under this heading for non-recurring maintenance and repair 
(NRM) activities, $15,000,000 shall be available without fiscal 
year limitation to support the NRM activities necessary to 
implement Capital AssetRealignment for Enhanced Services 
(CARES) activities: Provided further, That from amounts appropriated 
under this heading, additional amounts, as designated by the Secretary 
no later than September 30, 2002, may be used for CARES activities 
without fiscal year limitation: Provided further, That the Secretary of 
Veterans Affairs shall conduct by contract a program of recovery audits 
for the fee basis and other medical services contracts with respect to 
payments for hospital care; and, notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302(b), 
amounts collected, by setoff or otherwise, as the result of such audits 
shall be available, without fiscal year limitation, for the purposes 
for which funds are appropriated under this heading and the purposes of 
paying a contractor a percent of the amount collected as a result of an 
audit carried out by the contractor: Provided further, That all amounts 
so collected under the preceding proviso with respect to a designated 
health care region (as that term is defined in 38 U.S.C. 1729A(d)(2)) 
shall be allocated, net of payments to the contractor, to that region.
    In addition, in conformance with Public Law 105-33 
establishing the Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Care 
Collections Fund, such sums as may be deposited to such Fund 
pursuant to 38 U.S.C. 1729A may be transferred to this account, 
to remain available until expended for the purposes of this 
account.


                    medical and prosthetic research


    For necessary expenses in carrying out programs of medical 
and prosthetic research and development as authorized by 38 
U.S.C. chapter 73, to remain available until September 30, 
2003, $371,000,000, plus reimbursements.


      medical administration and miscellaneous operating expenses


    For necessary expenses in the administration of the 
medical, hospital, nursing home, domiciliary, construction, 
supply, and research activities, as authorized by law; 
administrative expenses in support of capital policy 
activities, $66,731,000, plus reimbursements: Provided, That 
technical and consulting services offered by the Facilities 
Management Field Service, including project management and real 
property administration (including leases, site acquisition and 
disposal activities directly supporting projects), shall be 
provided to Department of Veterans Affairs components only on a 
reimbursable basis, and such amounts will remain available 
until September 30, 2002.

                      Departmental Administration


                       general operating expenses


    For necessary operating expenses of the Department of 
Veterans Affairs, not otherwise provided for, including 
administrative expenses in support of Department-wide capital 
planning, management and policy activities, uniforms or 
allowances therefor; not to exceed $25,000 for official 
reception and representation expenses; hire of passenger motor 
vehicles; and reimbursement of the General Services 
Administration for security guard services, and the Department 
of Defense for the cost of overseas employee mail, 
$1,195,728,000: Provided, That expenses for services and 
assistance authorized under 38 U.S.C. 3104(a)(1), (2), (5), and 
(11) that the Secretary determines are necessary to enable 
entitled veterans: (1) to the maximum extent feasible, to 
become employable and to obtain and maintain suitable 
employment; or (2) to achieve maximum independence in daily 
living, shall be charged to this account: Provided further, 
That of the funds made available under this heading, not to 
exceed $60,000,000 shall be available for obligation until 
September 30, 2003: Provided further, That from the funds made 
available under this heading, the Veterans Benefits 
Administration may purchase up to four passenger motor vehicles 
for use in operations of that Administration in Manila, 
Philippines: Provided further, That travel expenses for this 
account shall not exceed $15,665,000.

                    national cemetery administration

    For necessary expenses of the National Cemetery 
Administration for operations and maintenance, not otherwise 
provided for, including uniforms or allowances therefor; 
cemeterial expenses as authorized by law; purchase of one 
passenger motor vehicle for use in cemeterial operations; and 
hire of passenger motor vehicles, $121,169,000.

                      office of inspector general

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 
$52,308,000.


                      construction, major projects


    For constructing, altering, extending and improving any of 
the facilities under the jurisdiction or for the use of the 
Department of Veterans Affairs, or for any of the purposes set 
forth in sections 316, 2404, 2406, 8102, 8103, 8106, 8108, 
8109, 8110, and 8122 of title 38, United States Code, including 
planning, architectural and engineering services, maintenance 
or guarantee period services costs associated with equipment 
guarantees provided under the project, services of claims 
analysts, offsite utility and storm drainage system 
construction costs, and site acquisition, where the estimated 
cost of a project is $4,000,000 or more or where funds for a 
project were made available in a previous major project 
appropriation, $183,180,000, to remain available until 
expended, of which $60,000,000 shall be for Capital Asset 
Realignment for Enhanced Services (CARES) activities; and of 
whichnot to exceed $20,000,000 shall be for costs associated 
with land acquisitions for national cemeteries in the vicinity of 
Sacramento, California; Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; and Detroit, 
Michigan: Provided, That of the amount made available under this 
heading for CARES activities, up to $40,000,000 shall be for 
construction of a blind and spinal cord injury center at the Hines 
Veterans Affairs Medical Center pursuant to the Veterans Integrated 
Service Network (VISN) 12 CARES study, and construction of such center 
is hereby deemed authorized pursuant to title 38, United States Code: 
Provided further, That the amounts designated in the previous proviso 
shall be available for obligation only after the Secretary of Veterans 
Affairs has initiated all actions necessary to implement fully Option B 
of the July 19, 2001 VISN 12 Service Delivery Options after consulting 
with interested and affected parties, and has initiated Phase II of the 
CARES process: Provided further, That except for advance planning 
activities, including needs assessments which may or may not lead to 
capital investments, and other capital asset management related 
activities, such as portfolio development and management activities, 
and investment strategy studies funded through the advance planning 
fund and the planning and design activities funded through the design 
fund and CARES funds, including needs assessments which may or may not 
lead to capital investments, none of the funds appropriated under this 
heading shall be used for any project which has not been approved by 
the Congress in the budgetary process: Provided further, That funds 
provided in this appropriation for fiscal year 2002, for each approved 
project (except those for CARES activities and the three land 
acquisitions referenced above) shall be obligated: (1) by the awarding 
of a construction documents contract by September 30, 2002; and (2) by 
the awarding of a construction contract by September 30, 2003: Provided 
further, That the Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall promptly report 
in writing to the Committees on Appropriations any approved major 
construction project in which obligations are not incurred within the 
time limitations established above: Provided further, That no funds 
from any other account except the ``Parking revolving fund'', may be 
obligated for constructing, altering, extending, or improving a project 
which was approved in the budget process and funded in this account 
until one year after substantial completion and beneficial occupancy by 
the Department of Veterans Affairs of the project or any part thereof 
with respect to that part only.


                      construction, minor projects


    For constructing, altering, extending, and improving any of 
the facilities under the jurisdiction or for the use of the 
Department of Veterans Affairs, including planning and 
assessments of needs which may lead to capital investments, 
architectural and engineering services, maintenance or 
guarantee period services costs associated with equipment 
guarantees provided under the project, services of claims 
analysts, offsite utility and storm drainage system 
construction costs, and site acquisition, or for any of the 
purposes set forth in sections 316, 2404, 2406, 8102, 8103, 
8106, 8108, 8109, 8110, 8122, and 8162 of title 38, United 
States Code, where the estimated cost of a project is less than 
$4,000,000, $210,900,000, to remain available until expended, 
along with unobligated balances of previous ``Construction, 
minor projects'' appropriations which are hereby made available 
for any project where the estimated cost is less than 
$4,000,000, of which $25,000,000 shall be for Capital Asset 
Realignment for Enhanced Services (CARES) activities: Provided, 
That from amounts appropriated under this heading, additional 
amounts may be used for CARES activities upon notification of 
and approval by the Committees on Appropriations: Provided 
further, That funds in this account shall be available for: (1) 
repairs to any of the nonmedical facilities under the 
jurisdiction or for the use of the department which are 
necessary because of loss or damage caused by any natural 
disaster or catastrophe; and (2) temporary measures necessary 
to prevent or to minimize further loss by such causes.


                         parking revolving fund


    For the parking revolving fund as authorized by 38 U.S.C. 
8109, income from fees collected and $4,000,000 from the 
General Fund, both to remain available until expended, which 
shall be available for all authorized expenses except 
operations and maintenance costs, which will be funded from 
``Medical care''.


       grants for construction of state extended care facilities


    For grants to assist States to acquire or construct State 
nursing home and domiciliary facilities and to remodel, modify 
or alter existing hospital, nursing home and domiciliary 
facilities in State homes, for furnishing care to veterans as 
authorized by 38 U.S.C. 8131-8137, $100,000,000, to remain 
available until expended.


          grants for construction of state veterans cemeteries


    For grants to aid States in establishing, expanding, or 
improving State veterans cemeteries as authorized by 38 U.S.C. 
2408, $25,000,000, to remain available until expended.

                       Administrative Provisions


                     (including transfer of funds)


    Sec. 101. Any appropriation for fiscal year 2002 for 
``Compensation and pensions'', ``Readjustment benefits'', and 
``Veterans insurance and indemnities'' may be transferred to 
any other of the mentioned appropriations.
    Sec. 102. Appropriations available to the Department of 
Veterans Affairs for fiscal year 2002 for salaries and expenses 
shall be available for services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109.
    Sec. 103. No appropriations in this Act for the Department 
of Veterans Affairs (except the appropriations for 
``Construction, major projects'', ``Construction, minor 
projects'', and the ``Parking revolving fund'') shall be 
available for the purchase of any site for or toward the 
construction of any new hospital or home.
    Sec. 104. No appropriations in this Act for the Department 
of Veterans Affairs shall be available for hospitalization or 
examination of any persons (except beneficiaries entitled under 
the laws bestowing such benefits to veterans, and persons 
receiving such treatment under 5 U.S.C. 7901-7904 or 42 U.S.C. 
5141-5204), unless reimbursement of cost is made to the 
``Medical care'' account at such rates as may be fixed by the 
Secretary of Veterans Affairs.
    Sec. 105. Appropriations available to the Department of 
Veterans Affairs for fiscal year 2002 for ``Compensation and 
pensions'', ``Readjustment benefits'', and ``Veterans insurance 
and indemnities'' shall be available for payment of prior year 
accrued obligations required to be recorded by law against the 
corresponding prior year accounts within the last quarter of 
fiscal year 2001.
    Sec. 106. Appropriations accounts available to the 
Department of Veterans Affairs for fiscal year 2002 shall be 
available to pay prior year obligations of corresponding prior 
year appropriations accounts resulting from title X of the 
Competitive Equality Banking Act, Public Law 100-86, except 
that if such obligations are from trust fund accounts they 
shall be payable from ``Compensation and pensions''.
    Sec. 107. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, 
during fiscal year 2002, the Secretary of Veterans Affairs 
shall, from the National Service Life Insurance Fund (38 U.S.C. 
1920), the Veterans' Special Life Insurance Fund (38 U.S.C. 
1923), and the United States Government Life Insurance Fund (38 
U.S.C. 1955), reimburse the ``General operating expenses'' 
account for the cost of administration of the insurance 
programs financed through those accounts: Provided, That 
reimbursement shall be made only from the surplus earnings 
accumulated in an insurance program in fiscal year 2002, that 
are available for dividends in that program after claims have 
been paid and actuarially determined reserves have been set 
aside: Provided further, That if the cost of administration of 
an insurance program exceeds the amount of surplus earnings 
accumulated in that program, reimbursement shall be made only 
to the extent of such surplus earnings: Provided further, That 
the Secretary shall determine the cost of administration for 
fiscal year 2002, which is properly allocable to the provision 
of each insurance program and to the provision of any total 
disability income insurance included in such insurance program.
    Sec. 108. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
Department of Veterans Affairs shall continue the Franchise 
Fund pilot program authorized to be established by section 403 
of Public Law 103-356 until October 1, 2002: Provided, That the 
Franchise Fund, established by Title I of Public Law 104-204 to 
finance the operations of the Franchise Fund pilot program, 
shall continue until October 1, 2002.
    Sec. 109. Amounts deducted from enhanced-use lease proceeds 
to reimburse an account for expenses incurred by that account 
during a prior fiscal year for providing enhanced-use lease 
services, may be obligated during the fiscal year in which the 
proceeds are received.
    Sec. 110. Funds available in any Department of Veterans 
Affairs appropriation for fiscal year 2002 or funds for 
salaries and other administrative expenses shall also be 
available to reimburse the Office of Resolution Management and 
the Office of Employment Discrimination Complaint Adjudication 
for all services provided at rates which will recover actual 
costs but not exceed $28,555,000 for the Office of Resolution 
Management and $2,383,000 for the Office of Employment and 
Discrimination Complaint Adjudication: Provided, That payments 
may be made in advance for services to be furnished based on 
estimated costs: Provided further, That amounts received shall 
be credited to ``General operating expenses'' for use by the 
office that provided the service.
    Sec. 111. The Secretary of Veterans Affairs shall treat the 
North Dakota Veterans Cemetery, Mandan, North Dakota, as a 
veterans cemetery owned by the State of North Dakota for 
purposes of making grants to States in expanding or improving 
veterans cemeteries under section 2408 of title 38, United 
States Code. This section shall take effect on the date of 
enactment of this Act, and shall apply with respect to grants 
under section 2408 of title 38, United States Code, that occur 
on or after that date.

         TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

                       Public and Indian Housing


                        housing certificate fund


              (including transfer and rescission of funds)


    For activities and assistance to prevent the involuntary 
displacement of low-income families, the elderly and the 
disabled because of the loss of affordable housing stock, 
expiration of subsidy contracts (other than contracts for which 
amounts are provided under another heading in this Act) or 
expiration of use restrictions, or other changes in housing 
assistance arrangements, and for other purposes, 
$16,280,975,000, of which $640,000,000 shall be from 
unobligated balances from amounts recaptured from fiscal year 
2000 and prior years pursuant to a reduction in the amounts 
provided for Annual Contributions Contract Reserve Accounts, 
and amounts that are recaptured in this account to remain 
available until expended: Provided, That not later than October 
1, 2001, the Department of Housing and Urban Development shall 
reduce from 60 days to 30 days the amount of reserve funds made 
available to public housing authorities: Provided further, That 
of the total amount provided under this heading, 
$16,071,975,000, of which $11,231,975,000 and the 
aforementioned recaptures shall be available on October 1, 2001 
and $4,200,000,000 shall be available on October 1, 2002, shall 
be for assistance under the United States Housing Act of 1937, 
as amended (``the Act'' herein) (42 U.S.C. 1437 et seq.): 
Provided further, That the foregoing amounts shall be for use 
in connection with expiring or terminating section 8 subsidy 
contracts, for amendments to section 8 subsidy contracts, for 
enhanced vouchers (including amendments and renewals) under any 
provision of law authorizing such assistance under section 8(t) 
of the Act (42 U.S.C. 1437f(t)), contract administrators, and 
contracts entered into pursuant to section 441 of the McKinney-
Vento Homeless Assistance Act: Provided further, That amounts 
available under the second proviso under this heading shall be 
available for section 8 rental assistance under the Act: (1) 
for the relocation and replacement of housing units that are 
demolished or disposed of pursuant to the Omnibus Consolidated 
Rescissions and Appropriations Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-134; 
Stat. 1321-269); (2) for the conversion of section 23 projects 
to assistance under section 8; (3) for funds to carry out the 
family unification program; (4) for the relocation of witnesses 
in connection with efforts to combat crime in public and 
assisted housing pursuant to a request from a law enforcement 
or prosecution agency; (5) for tenant protection assistance, 
including replacement and relocation assistance; and (6) for 
the 1-year renewal of section 8 contracts for units in projects 
that are subject to approved plans of action under the 
Emergency Low Income Housing Preservation Act of 1987 or the 
Low-Income Housing Preservation and Resident Homeownership Act 
of 1990: Provided further, That of the total amount provided 
under this heading, no less than $13,400,000 shall be 
transferred to the Working Capital Fund for the development and 
maintenance of information technology systems: Provided 
further, That of the total amount provided under this heading, 
$143,979,000 shall be made available for incremental vouchers 
under section 8 of the Act, of which $103,979,000 shall be made 
available on a fair share basis to those public housing 
agencies that have no less than a 97 percent occupancy rate; 
and of which $40,000,000 shall be made available to nonelderly 
disabled families affected by the designation of a public 
housing development under section 7 of the Act, the 
establishment of preferences in accordance with section 651 of 
the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 (42 U.S.C. 
13611), or the restriction of occupancy to elderly families in 
accordance with section 658 of such Act (42 U.S.C. 13618), and 
to the extent the Secretary determines that such amount is not 
needed to fund applications for such affected families, to 
other nonelderly disabled families: Provided further, That up 
to $195,601,000 from amounts made available under this heading 
may be made available for contract administrators: Provided 
further, That amounts available under this heading may be made 
available for administrative fees and other expenses to cover 
the cost of administering rental assistance programs under 
section 8 of the Act: Provided further, That the fee otherwise 
authorized under section 8(q) of the Act shall be determined in 
accordance with section 8(q), as in effect immediately before 
the enactment of the Quality Housing and Work Responsibility 
Act of 1998: Provided further, That $1,200,000,000 is rescinded 
from unobligated balances remaining from funds appropriated to 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development under this 
heading or the heading ``Annual contributions for assisted 
housing'' or any other heading for fiscal year 2001 and prior 
years: Provided further, That any such balances governed by 
reallocation provisions under the statute authorizing the 
program for which the funds were originally appropriated shall 
not be available for this rescission: Provided further, That 
the Secretary shall have until September 30, 2002, to meet the 
rescission in the proviso preceding the immediately preceding 
proviso: Provided further, That any obligated balances of 
contract authority that have been terminated shall be canceled.


                      public housing capital fund


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the Public Housing Capital Fund Program to carry out 
capital and management activities for public housing agencies, 
as authorized under section 9 of the United States Housing Act 
of 1937, as amended (42 U.S.C. 1437g), $2,843,400,000, to 
remain available until September 30, 2005: Provided, That, 
hereafter, notwithstanding any other provision of law or any 
failure of the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development to 
issue regulations to carry out section 9(j) of the United 
States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437g(j)), such section 
is deemed to have taken effect on October 1, 1998, and, except 
as otherwise provided in this heading, shall apply to all 
assistance made available under this same heading on or after 
such date: Provided further, That of the total amount provided 
under this heading, in addition to amounts otherwise allocated 
under this heading, $550,000,000 shall be allocated for such 
capital and management activities only among public housing 
agencies that have obligated all assistance for the agency for 
fiscal years 1998 and 1999 made available under this same 
heading in accordance with the requirements under paragraphs 
(1) and (2) of section 9(j) of such Act: Provided further, That 
notwithstanding any other provision of law or regulation, 
during fiscal year 2002, the Secretary may not delegate to any 
Department official other than the Deputy Secretary any 
authority under paragraph (2) of such section 9(j) regarding 
the extension of the time periods under such section for 
obligation of amounts made available for fiscal year 1998, 
1999, 2000, 2001, or 2002: Provided further, That 
notwithstanding the first proviso and paragraphs (3) and (5)(B) 
of such section 9(j), if at any time before the effectiveness 
of final regulations issued by the Secretary under section 6(j) 
of the United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437d(j)) 
providing for assessment of public housing agencies and 
designation of high-performing agencies, any amounts made 
available under the public housing Capital Fund for fiscal year 
1999, 2000, 2001, or 2002 remain unobligated in violation of 
paragraph (1) of such section 9(j) or unexpended in violation 
of paragraph (5)(A) of such section 9(j), the Secretary shall 
recapture any such amounts and reallocate such amounts among 
public housing agencies that, at the time of such reallocation, 
are not in violation of any requirement under paragraph (1) or 
(5)(A) of such section: Provided further, That for purposes of 
this heading, the term ``obligate'' means, with respect to 
amounts, that the amounts are subject to a binding agreement 
that will result in outlays immediately or in the future: 
Provided further, That of the total amount provided under this 
heading, up to $51,000,000 shall be for carrying out activities 
under section 9(h) of such Act, of which up to $10,000,000 
shall be for the provision of remediation services to public 
housing agencies identified as ``troubled'' under the Section 8 
Management Assessment Program: Provided further, That of the 
total amount provided under this heading, up to $500,000 shall 
be for lease adjustments to section 23 projects, and no less 
than $52,700,000 shall be transferred to the Working Capital 
Fund for the development and maintenance of information 
technology systems: Provided further, That no funds may be used 
under this heading for the purposes specified in section 9(k) 
of the United States Housing Act of 1937, as amended: Provided 
further, That of the total amount provided under this heading, 
up to $75,000,000 shall be available for the Secretary of 
Housing and Urban Development to make grants to public housing 
agencies for emergency capital needs resulting from emergencies 
and natural disasters in fiscal year 2002: Provided further, 
That of the total amount provided under this heading, 
$15,000,000 shall be for a Neighborhood Networks initiative for 
activities authorized in section 9(d)(1)(E) of the United 
States Housing Act of 1937, as amended: Provided further, That 
notwithstanding any other provision of law, amounts made 
available in the previous proviso shall be awarded to public 
housing agencies on a competitive basis as provided in section 
102 of the Department of Housing and Urban Development Reform 
Act of 1989.


                     public housing operating fund


              (including transfer and rescission of funds)


    For payments to public housing agencies for the operation 
and management of public housing, as authorized by section 9(e) 
of the United States Housing Act of 1937, as amended (42 U.S.C. 
1437g(e)), $3,494,868,000, to remain available until September 
30, 2003: Provided, That of the total amount provided under 
this heading, $5,000,000 shall be provided to the Office of 
Inspector General: Provided further, That of the total amount 
provided under this heading, $10,000,000 shall be for programs, 
as determined appropriate by the Attorney General, which assist 
in the investigation, prosecution, and prevention of violent 
crimes and drug offenses in public and federally-assisted low-
income housing, including Indian housing: Provided further, 
That funds made available in the previous proviso shall be 
administered by the Department of Justice through a 
reimbursable agreement with the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development: Provided further, That no funds may be used under 
this heading for the purposes specified in section 9(k) of the 
United States Housing Act of 1937, as amended: Provided 
further, That of the unobligated balances remaining from funds 
appropriated in fiscal year 2001 and prior yearsunder the 
heading ``Drug elimination grants for low-income housing'' for 
activities related to the Operation Safe Home Program, $11,000,000 is 
hereby rescinded.


     revitalization of severely distressed public housing (hope vi)


    For grants to public housing agencies for demolition, site 
revitalization, replacement housing, and tenant-based 
assistance grants to projects as authorized by section 24 of 
the United States Housing Act of 1937, as amended, $573,735,000 
to remain available until September 30, 2003, of which the 
Secretary may use up to $6,250,000 for technical assistance and 
contract expertise, to be provided directly or indirectly by 
grants, contracts or cooperative agreements, including training 
and cost of necessary travel for participants in such training, 
by or to officials and employees of the department and of 
public housing agencies and to residents: Provided, That none 
of such funds shall be used directly or indirectly by granting 
competitive advantage in awards to settle litigation or pay 
judgments, unless expressly permitted herein: Provided further, 
That of the total amount provided under this heading, 
$5,000,000 shall be for a Neighborhood Networks initiative for 
activities authorized in section 24(d)(1)(G) of the United 
States Housing Act of 1937, as amended: Provided further, That 
notwithstanding any other provision of law, amounts made 
available in the previous proviso shall be awarded to public 
housing agencies on a competitive basis as provided in section 
102 of the Department of Housing and Urban Development Reform 
Act of 1989.

                  native american housing block grants


                     (including transfers of funds)


    For the Native American Housing Block Grants program, as 
authorized under title I of the Native American Housing 
Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996 (NAHASDA) (25 
U.S.C. 4111 et seq.), $648,570,000, to remain available until 
expended, of which $2,200,000 shall be contracted through the 
Secretary as technical assistance and capacity building to be 
used by the National American Indian Housing Council in support 
of the implementation of NAHASDA; of which $5,000,000 shall be 
to support the inspection of Indian housing units, contract 
expertise, training, and technical assistance in the training, 
oversight, and management of Indian housing and tenant-based 
assistance, including up to $300,000 for related travel; and of 
which no less than $3,000,000 shall be transferred to the 
Working Capital Fund for the development and maintenance of 
information technology systems: Provided, That of the amount 
provided under this heading, $5,987,000 shall be made available 
for the cost of guaranteed notes and other obligations, as 
authorized by title VI of NAHASDA: Provided further, That such 
costs, including the costs of modifying such notes and other 
obligations, shall be as defined in section 502 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended: Provided further, 
That these funds are available to subsidize the total principal 
amount of any notes and other obligations, any part of which is 
to be guaranteed, not to exceed $52,726,000: Provided further, 
That the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development may provide 
technical and financial assistance to Indian tribes and their 
tribally-designated housing entities in accordance with the 
provisions of NAHASDA for emergency housing, housing 
assistance, and other assistance to address the problem of 
mold: Provided further, That for administrative expenses to 
carry out the guaranteed loan program, up to $150,000 from 
amounts in the first proviso, which shall be transferred to and 
merged with the appropriation for ``Salaries and expenses'', to 
be used only for the administrative costs of these guarantees.


           indian housing loan guarantee fund program account


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the cost of guaranteed loans, as authorized by section 
184 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 (12 
U.S.C. 1715z-13a), $5,987,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That such costs, including the costs of 
modifying such loans, shall be as defined in section 502 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended: Provided further, 
That these funds are available to subsidize total loan 
principal, any part of which is to be guaranteed, not to exceed 
$234,283,000.
    In addition, for administrative expenses to carry out the 
guaranteed loan program, up to $200,000 from amounts in the 
first paragraph, which shall be transferred to and merged with 
the appropriation for ``Salaries and expenses'', to be used 
only for the administrative costs of these guarantees.


              native hawaiian housing loan guarantee fund


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the cost of guaranteed loans, as authorized by section 
184A of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1992 (12 
U.S.C. 1715z-13b), $1,000,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That such costs, including the costs of 
modifying such loans, shall be as defined in section 502 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended: Provided further, 
That these funds are available to subsidize total loan 
principal, any part of which is to be guaranteed, not to exceed 
$40,000,000.
    In addition, for administrative expenses to carry out the 
guaranteed loan program, up to $35,000 from amounts in the 
first paragraph, which shall be transferred to and merged with 
the appropriation for ``Salaries andexpenses'', to be used only 
for the administrative costs of these guarantees.

                   Community Planning and Development

              housing opportunities for persons with aids

    For carrying out the Housing Opportunities for Persons with 
AIDS program, as authorized by the AIDS Housing Opportunity Act 
(42 U.S.C. 12901 et seq.), $277,432,000, to remain available 
until September 30, 2003: Provided, That the Secretary shall 
renew all expiring contracts for permanent supportive housing 
that were funded under section 854(c)(3) of such Act that meet 
all program requirements before awarding funds for new 
contracts and activities authorized under this section: 
Provided further, That the Secretary may use up to $2,000,000 
of the funds under this heading for training, oversight, and 
technical assistance activities.


                 rural housing and economic development


    For the Office of Rural Housing and Economic Development in 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development, $25,000,000 to 
remain available until expended, which amount shall be awarded 
by June 1, 2002, to Indian tribes, State housing finance 
agencies, State community and/or economic development agencies, 
local rural nonprofits and community development corporations 
to support innovative housing and economic development 
activities in rural areas: Provided, That all grants shall be 
awarded on a competitive basis as specified in section 102 of 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development Reform Act of 
1989.


                empowerment zones/enterprise communities


    For grants in connection with a second round of empowerment 
zones and enterprise communities, $45,000,000, to remain 
available until expended, for ``Urban Empowerment Zones'', as 
authorized in section 1391(g) of the Internal Revenue Code of 
1986 (26 U.S.C. 1391(g)), including $3,000,000 for each 
empowerment zone for use in conjunction with economic 
development activities consistent with the strategic plan of 
each empowerment zone.

                       community development fund


                     (including transfers of funds)


    For assistance to units of State and local government, and 
to other entities, for economic and community development 
activities, and for other purposes, $5,000,000,000, to remain 
available until September 30, 2004: Provided, That of the 
amount provided, $4,341,000,000 is for carrying out the 
community development block grant program under title I of the 
Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended (the 
``Act'' herein) (42 U.S.C. 5301 et seq.): Provided further, 
That $70,000,000 shall be for grants to Indian tribes 
notwithstanding section 106(a)(1) of such Act; $3,300,000 shall 
be available as a grant to the Housing Assistance Council; 
$2,600,000 shall be available as a grant to the National 
American Indian Housing Council; $5,000,000 shall be available 
as a grant to the National Housing Development Corporation, for 
operating expenses not to exceed $2,000,000 and for a program 
of affordable housing acquisition and rehabilitation; 
$5,000,000 shall be available as a grant to the National 
Council of La Raza for the HOPE Fund, of which $500,000 is for 
technical assistance and fund management, and $4,500,000 is for 
investments in the HOPE Fund and financing to affiliated 
organizations; and $42,500,000 shall be for grants pursuant to 
section 107 of the Act of which $4,000,000 shall be made 
available to support Alaska Native serving institutions and 
Native Hawaiian serving institutions as defined under the 
Higher Education Act, as amended, and of which $3,000,000 shall 
be made available to tribal colleges and universities to build, 
expand, renovate and equip their facilities: Provided further, 
That $9,600,000 shall be made available to the Department of 
Hawaiian Homelands to provide assistance as authorized under 
title VIII of the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-
Determination Act of 1996 (22 U.S.C. 4221 et seq.) (with no 
more than 5 percent of such funds being available for 
administrative costs): Provided further, That no less than 
$13,800,000 shall be transferred to the Working Capital Fund 
for the development and maintenance of information technology 
systems: Provided further, That $22,000,000 shall be for grants 
pursuant to the Self Help Housing Opportunity Program: Provided 
further, That not to exceed 20 percent of any grant made with 
funds appropriated under this heading (other than a grant made 
available in this paragraph to the Housing Assistance Council 
or the National American Indian Housing Council, or a grant 
using funds under section 107(b)(3) of the Act) shall be 
expended for ``Planning and Management Development'' and 
``Administration'', as defined in regulations promulgated by 
the Department.
    Of the amount made available under this heading, 
$29,000,000 shall be made available for capacity building, of 
which $25,000,000 shall be made available for Capacity Building 
for Community Development and Affordable Housing for LISC and 
the Enterprise Foundation for activities as authorized by 
section 4 of the HUD Demonstration Act of 1993 (42 U.S.C. 9816 
note), as in effect immediately before June 12, 1997, with not 
less than $5,000,000 of the funding to be used in rural areas, 
including tribal areas, and of which $4,000,000 shall be 
forcapacity building activities administered by Habitat for Humanity 
International.
    Of the amount made available under this heading, the 
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development may use up to 
$55,000,000 for supportive services for public housing 
residents, as authorized by section 34 of the United States 
Housing Act of 1937, as amended, and for residents of housing 
assisted under the Native American Housing Assistance and Self-
Determination Act of 1996 (NAHASDA) and for grants for service 
coordinators and congregate services for the elderly and 
disabled residents of public and assisted housing and housing 
assisted under NAHASDA.
    Of the amount made available under this heading, 
$42,000,000 shall be available for neighborhood initiatives 
that are utilized to improve the conditions of distressed and 
blighted areas and neighborhoods, to stimulate investment, 
economic diversification, and community revitalization in areas 
with population outmigration or a stagnating or declining 
economic base, or to determine whether housing benefits can be 
integrated more effectively with welfare reform initiatives: 
Provided, That these grants shall be provided in accord with 
the terms and conditions specified in the statement of managers 
accompanying this conference report.
    Of the amount made available under this heading, 
notwithstanding any other provision of law, $65,000,000 shall 
be available for YouthBuild program activities authorized by 
subtitle D of title IV of the Cranston-Gonzalez National 
Affordable Housing Act, as amended, and such activities shall 
be an eligible activity with respect to any funds made 
available under this heading: Provided, That local YouthBuild 
programs that demonstrate an ability to leverage private and 
nonprofit funding shall be given a priority for YouthBuild 
funding: Provided further, That no more than ten percent of any 
grant award may be used for administrative costs: Provided 
further, That not less than $10,000,000 shall be available for 
grants to establish Youthbuild programs in underserved and 
rural areas: Provided further, That of the amount provided 
under this paragraph, $2,000,000 shall be set aside and made 
available for a grant to YouthBuild USA for capacity building 
for community development and affordable housing activities as 
specified in section 4 of the HUD Demonstration Act of 1993, as 
amended.
    Of the amount made available under this heading, 
$294,200,000 shall be available for grants for the Economic 
Development Initiative (EDI) to finance a variety of targeted 
economic investments in accordance with the terms and 
conditions specified in the statement of managers accompanying 
this conference report.


         community development loan guarantees program account


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the cost of guaranteed loans, $14,000,000, to remain 
available until September 30, 2003, as authorized by section 
108 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as 
amended: Provided, That such costs, including the cost of 
modifying such loans, shall be as defined in section 502 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended: Provided further, 
That these funds are available to subsidize total loan 
principal, any part of which is to be guaranteed, not to exceed 
$608,696,000, notwithstanding any aggregate limitation on 
outstanding obligations guaranteed in section 108(k) of the 
Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended: 
Provided further, That in addition, for administrative expenses 
to carry out the guaranteed loan program, $1,000,000, which 
shall be transferred to and merged with the appropriation for 
``Salaries and expenses''.

                       brownfields redevelopment

    For Economic Development Grants, as authorized by section 
108(q) of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as 
amended, for Brownfields redevelopment projects, $25,000,000, 
to remain available until September 30, 2003: Provided, That 
the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development shall make these 
grants available on a competitive basis as specified in section 
102 of the Department of Housing and Urban Development Reform 
Act of 1989.


                  home investment partnerships program


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the HOME investment partnerships program, as authorized 
under title II of the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable 
Housing Act, as amended, $1,846,040,000 to remain available 
until September 30, 2004: Provided, That of the total amount 
provided under this heading, $50,000,000 shall be available for 
the Downpayment Assistance Initiative, subject to the enactment 
of subsequent legislation authorizing such initiative: Provided 
further, That should legislation authorizing such initiative 
not be enacted by June 30, 2002, amounts designated in the 
previous proviso shall become available for any such purpose 
authorized under title II of the Cranston-Gonzalez National 
Affordable Housing Act, as amended: Provided further, That of 
the total amount provided under this heading, up to $20,000,000 
shall be available for housing counseling under section 106 of 
the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968; and no less than 
$17,000,000 shall be transferred to the Working Capital Fund 
for thedevelopment and maintenance of information technology 
systems.


                       homeless assistance grants


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the emergency shelter grants program as authorized 
under subtitle B of title IV of the McKinney-Vento Homeless 
Assistance Act, as amended; the supportive housing program as 
authorized under subtitle C of title IV of such Act; the 
section 8 moderate rehabilitation single room occupancy program 
as authorized under the United States Housing Act of 1937, as 
amended, to assist homeless individuals pursuant to section 441 
of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act; and the shelter 
plus care program as authorized under subtitle F of title IV of 
such Act, $1,122,525,000, to remain available until September 
30, 2004: Provided, That not less than 30 percent of funds made 
available, excluding amounts provided for renewals under the 
shelter plus care program, shall be used for permanent housing: 
Provided further, That all funds awarded for services shall be 
matched by 25 percent in funding by each grantee: Provided 
further, That the Secretary shall renew on an annual basis 
expiring contracts or amendments to contracts funded under the 
shelter plus care program if the program is determined to be 
needed under the applicable continuum of care and meets 
appropriate program requirements and financial standards, as 
determined by the Secretary: Provided further, That all awards 
of assistance under this heading shall be required to 
coordinate and integrate homeless programs with other 
mainstream health, social services, and employment programs for 
which homeless populations may be eligible, including Medicaid, 
State Children's Health Insurance Program, Temporary Assistance 
for Needy Families, Food Stamps, and services funding through 
the Mental Health and Substance Abuse Block Grant, Workforce 
Investment Act, and the Welfare-to-Work grant program: Provided 
further, That $2,000,000 of the funds appropriated under this 
heading shall be available for the national homeless data 
analysis project: Provided further, That $6,600,000 of the 
funds appropriated under this heading shall be available for 
technical assistance: Provided further, That no less than 
$5,600,000 of the funds appropriated under this heading shall 
be transferred to the Working Capital Fund: Provided further, 
That $500,000 shall be made available to the Interagency 
Council on the Homeless for administrative needs.

                            Housing Programs


                    housing for special populations


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For assistance for the purchase, construction, acquisition, 
or development of additional public and subsidized housing 
units for low income families not otherwise provided for, 
$1,024,151,000, to remain available until September 30, 2004: 
Provided, That $783,286,000 shall be for capital advances, 
including amendments to capital advance contracts, for housing 
for the elderly, as authorized by section 202 of the Housing 
Act of 1959, as amended, and for project rental assistance for 
the elderly under section 202(c)(2) of such Act, including 
amendments to contracts for such assistance and renewal of 
expiring contracts for such assistance for up to a 1-year term, 
and for supportive services associated with the housing, of 
which amount $50,000,000 shall be for service coordinators and 
the continuation of existing congregate service grants for 
residents of assisted housing projects, and of which amount 
$50,000,000 shall be for grants under section 202b of the 
Housing Act of 1959 (12 U.S.C. 1701q-2) for conversion of 
eligible projects under such section to assisted living or 
related use: Provided further, That of the amount under this 
heading, $240,865,000 shall be for capital advances, including 
amendments to capital advance contracts, for supportive housing 
for persons with disabilities, as authorized by section 811 of 
the Cranston-Gonzalez National Affordable Housing Act, for 
project rental assistance for supportive housing for persons 
with disabilities under section 811(d)(2) of such Act, 
including amendments to contracts for such assistance and 
renewal of expiring contracts for such assistance for up to a 
1-year term, and for supportive services associated with the 
housing for persons with disabilities as authorized by section 
811(b)(1) of such Act, and for tenant-based rental assistance 
contracts entered into pursuant to section 811 of such Act: 
Provided further, That no less than $1,200,000, to be divided 
evenly between the appropriations for the section 202 and 
section 811 programs, shall be transferred to the Working 
Capital Fund for the development and maintenance of information 
technology systems: Provided further, That, in addition to 
amounts made available for renewal of tenant-based rental 
assistance contracts pursuant to the second proviso of this 
paragraph, the Secretary may designate up to 25 percent of the 
amounts earmarked under this paragraph for section 811 of such 
Act for tenant-based assistance, as authorized under that 
section, including such authority as may be waived under the 
next proviso, which assistance is five years in duration: 
Provided further, That the Secretary may waive any provision of 
such section 202 and such section 811 (including the provisions 
governing the terms and conditions of project rental assistance 
and tenant-based assistance) that the Secretary determines is 
not necessary to achieve the objectives of these programs, or 
that otherwise impedes the ability to develop, operate, or 
administerprojects assisted under these programs, and may make 
provision for alternative conditions or terms where appropriate.


                         flexible subsidy fund


                          (transfer of funds)


    From the Rental Housing Assistance Fund, all uncommitted 
balances of excess rental charges as of September 30, 2001, and 
any collections made during fiscal year 2002, shall be 
transferred to the Flexible Subsidy Fund, as authorized by 
section 236(g) of the National Housing Act, as amended.


                  manufactured housing fees trust fund


    For necessary expenses as authorized by the National 
Manufactured Housing Construction and Safety Standards Act of 
1974, as amended (42 U.S.C. 5401 et seq.), $13,566,000, to 
remain available until expended, to be derived from the 
Manufactured Housing Fees Trust Fund: Provided, That not to 
exceed the total amount appropriated under this heading shall 
be available from the general fund of the Treasury to the 
extent necessary to incur obligations and make expenditures 
pending the receipt of collections to the Fund pursuant to 
section 620 of such Act: Provided further, That the amount made 
available under this heading from the general fund shall be 
reduced as such collections are received during fiscal year 
2002 so as to result in a final fiscal year 2002 appropriation 
from the general fund estimated at not more than $0 and fees 
pursuant to such section 620 shall be modified as necessary to 
ensure such a final fiscal year 2002 appropriation.

                     Federal Housing Administration


               mutual mortgage insurance program account


                     (including transfers of funds)


    During fiscal year 2002, commitments to guarantee loans to 
carry out the purposes of section 203(b) of the National 
Housing Act, as amended, shall not exceed a loan principal of 
$160,000,000,000.
    During fiscal year 2002, obligations to make direct loans 
to carry out the purposes of section 204(g) of the National 
Housing Act, as amended, shall not exceed $250,000,000: 
Provided, That the foregoing amount shall be for loans to 
nonprofit and governmental entities in connection with sales of 
single family real properties owned by the Secretary and 
formerly insured under the Mutual Mortgage Insurance Fund.
    For administrative expenses necessary to carry out the 
guaranteed and direct loan program, $336,700,000, of which not 
to exceed $332,678,000 shall be transferred to the 
appropriation for ``Salaries and expenses''; and not to exceed 
$4,022,000 shall be transferred to the appropriation for 
``Office of Inspector General''. In addition, for 
administrative contract expenses, $160,000,000, of which no 
less than $118,400,000 shall be transferred to the Working 
Capital Fund for the development and maintenance of information 
technology systems: Provided, That to the extent guaranteed 
loan commitments exceed $65,500,000,000 on or before April 1, 
2002, an additional $1,400 for administrative contract expenses 
shall be available for each $1,000,000 in additional guaranteed 
loan commitments (including a pro rata amount for any amount 
below $1,000,000), but in no case shall funds made available by 
this proviso exceed $16,000,000.


                general and special risk program account


                     (including transfers of funds)


    For the cost of guaranteed loans, as authorized by sections 
238 and 519 of the National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715z-3 and 
1735c), including the cost of loan guarantee modifications, as 
that term is defined in section 502 of the Congressional Budget 
Act of 1974, as amended, $15,000,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That these funds are available to subsidize 
total loan principal, any part of which is to be guaranteed, of 
up to $21,000,000,000: Provided further, That any amounts made 
available in any prior appropriations Act for the cost (as such 
term is defined in section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act 
of 1974) of guaranteed loans that are obligations of the funds 
established under section 238 or 519 of the National Housing 
Act that have not been obligated or that are deobligated shall 
be available to the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development 
in connection with the making of such guarantees and shall 
remain available until expended, notwithstanding the expiration 
of any period of availability otherwise applicable to such 
amounts.
    Gross obligations for the principal amount of direct loans, 
as authorized by sections 204(g), 207(l), 238, and 519(a) of 
the National Housing Act, shall not exceed $50,000,000, of 
which not to exceed $30,000,000 shall be for bridge financing 
in connection with the sale of multifamily real properties 
owned by the Secretary and formerly insured under such Act; and 
of which not to exceed $20,000,000 shall be for loans to 
nonprofit and governmental entities in connection with the sale 
of single-family real properties owned by the Secretary and 
formerly insured under such Act.
    In addition, for administrative expenses necessary to carry 
out the guaranteed and direct loan programs, $216,100,000, of 
which $197,779,000, shall be transferred to the appropriation 
for ``Salaries and expenses''; and of which $18,321,000 shall 
be transferred to the appropriation for ``Office of Inspector 
General''. In addition, for administrative contract expenses 
necessary to carry out the guaranteed and direct loan 
programs,$144,000,000, of which no less than $41,000,000 shall be 
transferred to the Working Capital Fund for the development and 
maintenance of information technology systems: Provided, That to the 
extent guaranteed loan commitments exceed $8,426,000,000 on or before 
April 1, 2002, an additional $1,980 for administrative contract 
expenses shall be available for each $1,000,000 in additional 
guaranteed loan commitments over $8,426,000,000 (including a pro rata 
amount for any increment below $1,000,000), but in no case shall funds 
made available by this proviso exceed $14,400,000.

            Government National Mortgage Association (GNMA)


guarantees of mortgage-backed securities loan guarantee program account


                     (including transfer of funds)


    New commitments to issue guarantees to carry out the 
purposes of section 306 of the National Housing Act, as amended 
(12 U.S.C. 1721(g)), shall not exceed $200,000,000,000, to 
remain available until September 30, 2003.
    For administrative expenses necessary to carry out the 
guaranteed mortgage-backed securities program, $9,383,000, to 
be derived from the GNMA guarantees of mortgage-backed 
securities guaranteed loan receipt account, of which not to 
exceed $9,383,000 shall be transferred to the appropriation for 
``Salaries and expenses''.

                    Policy Development and Research


                        research and technology


    For contracts, grants, and necessary expenses of programs 
of research and studies relating to housing and urban problems, 
not otherwise provided for, as authorized by title V of the 
Housing and Urban Development Act of 1970, as amended (12 
U.S.C. 1701z-1 et seq.), including carrying out the functions 
of the Secretary under section 1(a)(1)(i) of Reorganization 
Plan No. 2 of 1968, $50,250,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2003: Provided, That $1,500,000 shall be for 
necessary expenses of the Millennial Housing Commission, as 
authorized by section 206 of Public Law 106-74, with the final 
report due no later than May 30, 2002 and a termination date of 
August 30, 2002, notwithstanding section 206 (f) and (g) of 
Public Law 106-74: Provided further, That $1,000,000 shall be 
for necessary expenses of the commission established under 
section 525 of the Preserving Affordable Housing for Senior 
Citizens and Families in the 21st Century Act, with the final 
report due no later than June 30, 2002 and a termination date 
of September 30, 2002, notwithstanding section 525 (f) and (g) 
of Public Law 106-74: Provided further, That of the total 
amount provided under this heading, $8,750,000 shall be for the 
Partnership for Advancing Technology in Housing (PATH) 
Initiative.

                   Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity


                        fair housing activities


    For contracts, grants, and other assistance, not otherwise 
provided for, as authorized by title VIII of the Civil Rights 
Act of 1968, as amended by the Fair Housing Amendments Act of 
1988, and section 561 of the Housing and Community Development 
Act of 1987, as amended, $45,899,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2003, of which $20,250,000 shall be to carry out 
activities pursuant to such section 561: Provided, That no 
funds made available under this heading shall be used to lobby 
the executive or legislative branches of the Federal Government 
in connection with a specific contract, grant or loan.

                     Office of Lead Hazard Control


                         lead hazard reduction


    For the Lead Hazard Reduction Program, as authorized by 
section 1011 of the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard 
Reduction Act of 1992, $109,758,000 to remain available until 
September 30, 2003, of which $10,000,000 shall be for the 
Healthy Homes Initiative, pursuant to sections 501 and 502 of 
the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1970 that shall 
include research, studies, testing, and demonstration efforts, 
including education and outreach concerning lead-based paint 
poisoning and other housing-related diseases and hazards: 
Provided, That of the amounts provided under this heading, 
$3,500,000 shall be for a one-time grant to the National Center 
for Lead-Safe Housing.

                     Management and Administration


                         salaries and expenses


                     (including transfers of funds)


    For necessary administrative and non-administrative 
expenses of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, 
not otherwise provided for, including not to exceed $25,000 for 
official reception and representation expenses, $1,097,292,000, 
of which $530,457,000 shall be provided from the various funds 
of the Federal Housing Administration, $9,383,000 shall be 
provided from funds of the Government National Mortgage 
Association, $1,000,000 shall be provided from the ``Community 
development loan guarantees program'' account, $150,000 shall 
be provided by transfer from the ``Native American housing 
block grants'' account, $200,000 shall be provided by transfer 
from the ``Indian housing loan guarantee fund program'' account 
and $35,000 shall be transferred from the ``Native Hawaiian 
housing loan guarantee fund'' account: Provided, That no less 
than $85,000,000 shallbe transferred to the Working Capital 
Fund for the development and maintenance of information technology 
systems: Provided further, That the Secretary shall fill 7 out of 10 
vacancies at the GS-14 and GS-15 levels until the total number of GS-14 
and GS-15 positions in the Department has been reduced from the number 
of GS-14 and GS-15 positions on the date of enactment of Public Law 
106-377 by two and one-half percent: Provided further, That the 
Secretary shall submit a staffing plan for the Department by January 
15, 2002.

                      office of inspector general

    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 
$93,898,000, of which $22,343,000 shall be provided from the 
various funds of the Federal Housing Administration and 
$5,000,000 shall be provided from the appropriation for the 
``Public housing operating fund'': Provided, That the Inspector 
General shall have independent authority over all personnel 
issues within the Office of Inspector General.


                         consolidated fee fund


                              (rescission)


    Of the balances remaining available from fees and charges 
under section 7(j) of the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development Act, $6,700,000 is rescinded.

             Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight


                         salaries and expenses


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For carrying out the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial 
Safety and Soundness Act of 1992, including not to exceed $500 
for official reception and representation expenses, 
$27,000,000, to remain available until expended, to be derived 
from the Federal Housing Enterprises Oversight Fund: Provided, 
That not to exceed such amount shall be available from the 
general fund of the Treasury to the extent necessary to incur 
obligations and make expenditures pending the receipt of 
collections to the Fund: Provided further, That the general 
fund amount shall be reduced as collections are received during 
the fiscal year so as to result in a final appropriation from 
the general fund estimated at not more than $0: Provided 
further, That this Office shall submit a staffing plan to the 
House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no later than 
January 30, 2002.

                       Administrative Provisions

    Sec. 201. Fifty percent of the amounts of budget authority, 
or in lieu thereof 50 percent of the cash amounts associated 
with such budget authority, that are recaptured from projects 
described in section 1012(a) of the Stewart B. McKinney 
Homeless Assistance Amendments Act of 1988 (42 U.S.C. 1437 
note) shall be rescinded, or in the case of cash, shall be 
remitted to the Treasury, and such amounts of budget authority 
or cash recaptured and not rescinded or remitted to the 
Treasury shall be used by State housing finance agencies or 
local governments or local housing agencies with projects 
approved by the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development for 
which settlement occurred after January 1, 1992, in accordance 
with such section. Notwithstanding the previous sentence, the 
Secretary may award up to 15 percent of the budget authority or 
cash recaptured and not rescinded or remitted to the Treasury 
to provide project owners with incentives to refinance their 
project at a lower interest rate.
    Sec. 202. None of the amounts made available under this Act 
may be used during fiscal year 2002 to investigate or prosecute 
under the Fair Housing Act any otherwise lawful activity 
engaged in by one or more persons, including the filing or 
maintaining of a non-frivolous legal action, that is engaged in 
solely for the purpose of achieving or preventing action by a 
Government official or entity, or a court of competent 
jurisdiction.
    Sec. 203. (a) Notwithstanding section 854(c)(1)(A) of the 
AIDS Housing Opportunity Act (42 U.S.C. 12903(c)(1)(A)), from 
any amounts made available under this title for fiscal year 
2002 that are allocated under such section, the Secretary of 
Housing and Urban Development shall allocate and make a grant, 
in the amount determined under subsection (b), for any State 
that--
            (1) received an allocation in a prior fiscal year 
        under clause (ii) of such section; and
            (2) is not otherwise eligible for an allocation for 
        fiscal year 2002 under such clause (ii) because the 
        areas in the State outside of the metropolitan 
        statistical areas that qualify under clause (i) in 
        fiscal year 2002 do not have the number of cases of 
        acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) required 
        under such clause.
    (b) The amount of the allocation and grant for any State 
described in subsection (a) shall be an amount based on the 
cumulative number of AIDS cases in the areas of that State that 
are outside of metropolitan statistical areas that qualify 
under clause (i) of such section 854(c)(1)(A) in fiscal year 
2002, in proportion to AIDS cases among cities and States that 
qualify under clauses (i) and (ii) of such section and States 
deemed eligible under subsection (a).
    Sec. 204. (a) Section 225(a) of the Departments of Veterans 
Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and Independent 
Agencies Appropriations Act, 2000, Public Law 106-74 (113 Stat. 
1076), is amended by inserting ``and fiscal year 2002'' after 
``fiscal year 2001''.
    (b) Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development shall allocate to 
Wake County, North Carolina, the amounts that otherwise would 
be allocated for fiscal year 2002 under section 854(c) of the 
AIDS Housing Opportunity Act (42 U.S.C. 12903(c)) to the City 
of Raleigh, North Carolina, on behalf of the Raleigh-Durham-
Chapel Hill, North Carolina Metropolitan Statistical Area. Any 
amounts allocated to Wake County shall be used to carry out 
eligible activities under section 855 of such Act (42 U.S.C. 
12904) within such metropolitan statistical area.
    Sec. 205. Section 106(c)(9) of the Housing and Urban 
Development Act of 1968 (12 U.S.C. 1701x(c)(9)) is repealed.
    Sec. 206. Section 251 of the National Housing Act (12 
U.S.C. 1715z-16) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (b), by striking ``issue 
        regulations'' and all that follows and inserting the 
        following: ``require that the mortgagee make available 
        to the mortgagor, at the time of loan application, a 
        written explanation of the features of an adjustable 
        rate mortgage consistent with the disclosure 
        requirements applicable to variable rate mortgages 
        secured by a principal dwelling under the Truth in 
        Lending Act.''; and
            (2) by adding the following new subsection at the 
        end:
    ``(d)(1) The Secretary may insure under this subsection a 
mortgage that meets the requirements of subsection (a), except 
that the effective rate of interest--
            ``(A) shall be fixed for a period of not less than 
        the first 3 years of the mortgage term;
            ``(B) shall be adjusted by the mortgagee initially 
        upon the expiration of such period and annually 
        thereafter; and
            ``(C) in the case of the initial interest rate 
        adjustment, is subject to the 1 percent limitation only 
        if the interest rate remained fixed for five or fewer 
        years.
    ``(2) The disclosure required under subsection (b) shall be 
required for a mortgage insured under this subsection.''.
    Sec. 207. (a) Section 203(c) of the National Housing Act 
(12 U.S.C. 1709(c)) is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (1), by striking ``and (k)'' and 
        inserting ``or (k)''; and
            (2) in paragraph (2)--
                    (A) by inserting after ``subsection (v)'' 
                the following: ``and each mortgage that is 
                insured under subsection (k) or section 
                234(c),''; and
                    (B) by striking ``and executed on or after 
                October 1, 1994,''.
    (b) The amendments made by subsection (a) shall--
            (1) apply only to mortgages that are executed on or 
        after the date of enactment of this Act; and
            (2) be implemented in advance of any necessary 
        conforming changes to regulations.
    Sec. 208. (a) During fiscal year 2002, in the provision of 
rental assistance under section 8(o) of the United States 
Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f(o)) in connection with a 
program to demonstrate the economy and effectiveness of 
providing such assistance for use in assisted living facilities 
that is carried out in the counties of the State of Michigan 
specified in subsection (b) of this section, notwithstanding 
paragraphs (3) and (18)(B)(iii) of such section 8(o), a family 
residing in an assisted living facility in any such county, on 
behalf of which a public housing agency provides assistance 
pursuant to section 8(o)(18) of such Act, may be required, at 
the time the family initially receives such assistance, to pay 
rent in an amount exceeding 40 percent of the monthly adjusted 
income of the family by such a percentage or amount as the 
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development determines to be 
appropriate.
    (b) The counties specified in this subsection are Oakland 
County, Macomb County, Wayne County, and Washtenaw County, in 
the State of Michigan.
    Sec. 209. Section 533 of the National Housing Act (12 
U.S.C. 1735f-11) is amended to read as follows:
    ``Sec. 533. Review of Mortgagee Performance and Authority 
To Terminate.--
    ``(a) Periodic Review of Mortgagee Performance.--To reduce 
losses in connection with single family mortgage insurance 
programs under this Act, at least once a year the Secretary 
shall review the rate of early defaults and claims for insured 
single family mortgages originated or underwritten by each 
mortgagee.
    ``(b) Comparison With Other Mortgagees.--For each 
mortgagee, the Secretary shall compare the rate of early 
defaults and claims for insured single family mortgage loans 
originated or underwritten by the mortgagee in an area with the 
rate of early defaults and claims for other mortgagees 
originating or underwriting insured single family mortgage 
loans in the area. For purposes of this section, the term 
`area' means each geographic area in which the mortgagee is 
authorized by the Secretary to originate insured single family 
mortgages.
    ``(c) Termination of Mortgagee Origination Approval.--(1) 
Notwithstanding section 202(c) of thisAct, the Secretary may 
terminate the approval of a mortgagee to originate or underwrite single 
family mortgages if the Secretary determines that the mortgage loans 
originated or underwritten by the mortgagee present an unacceptable 
risk to the insurance funds. The determination shall be based on the 
comparison required under subsection (b) and shall be made in 
accordance with regulations of the Secretary. The Secretary may rely on 
existing regulations published before this section takes effect.
    ``(2) The Secretary shall give a mortgagee at least 60 days 
prior written notice of any termination under this subsection. 
The termination shall take effect at the end of the notice 
period, unless the Secretary withdraws the termination notice 
or extends the notice period. If requested in writing by the 
mortgagee within 30 days of the date of the notice, the 
mortgagee shall be entitled to an informal conference with the 
official authorized to issue termination notices on behalf of 
the Secretary (or a designee of that official). At the informal 
conference, the mortgagee may present for consideration 
specific factors that it believes were beyond its control and 
that caused the excessive default and claim rate.''.
    Sec. 210. Except as explicitly provided in law, any grant 
or assistance made pursuant to title II of this Act shall be 
made on a competitive basis in accordance with section 102 of 
the Department of Housing and Urban Development Reform Act of 
1989.
    Sec. 211. Public housing agencies in the States of Alaska, 
Iowa, and Mississippi shall not be required to comply with 
section 2(b) of the United States Housing Act of 1937, as 
amended, during fiscal year 2002.
    Sec. 212. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, in 
fiscal year 2002, in managing and disposing of any multifamily 
property that is owned or held by the Secretary and is occupied 
primarily by elderly or disabled families, the Secretary of 
Housing and Urban Development shall maintain any rental 
assistance payments under section 8 of the United States 
Housing Act of 1937 that are attached to any dwelling units in 
the property. To the extent the Secretary determines that such 
a multifamily property owned or held by the Secretary is not 
feasible for continued rental assistance payments under such 
section 8, the Secretary may, in consultation with the tenants 
of that property, contract for project-based rental assistance 
payments with an owner or owners of other existing housing 
properties or provide other rental assistance.
    Sec. 213. (a) Section 207 Limits.--Section 207(c)(3) of the 
National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1713(c)(3)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``$30,420'', ``$33,696'', 
        ``$40,248'', ``$49,608'', and ``$56,160'' and inserting 
        ``$38,025'', ``$42,120'', ``$50,310'', ``$62,010'', and 
        ``$70,200'', respectively;
            (2) by striking ``$9,000'' and inserting 
        ``$11,250''; and
            (3) by striking ``$35,100'', ``$39,312'', 
        ``$48,204'', ``$60,372'', and ``$68,262'' and inserting 
        ``$43,875'', ``$49,140'', ``$60,255'', ``$75,465'', and 
        ``$85,328'', respectively.
    (b) Section 213 Limits.--Section 213(b)(2) of the National 
Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715e(b)(2)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``$30,420'', ``$33,696'', 
        ``$40,248'', ``$49,608'', and ``$56,160'' and inserting 
        ``$38,025'', ``$42,120'', ``$50,310'', ``$62,010'', and 
        ``$70,200'', respectively; and
            (2) by striking ``$35,100'', ``$39,312'', 
        ``$48,204'', ``$60,372'', and ``$68,262'' and inserting 
        ``$43,875'', ``$49,140'', ``$60,255'', ``$75,465'', and 
        ``$85,328'', respectively.
    (c) Section 220 Limits.--Section 220(d)(3)(B)(iii) of the 
National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715k(d)(3)(B)(iii)) is 
amended--
            (1) by striking ``$30,420'', ``$33,696'', 
        ``$40,248'', ``$49,608'', and ``$56,160'' and inserting 
        ``$38,025'', ``$42,120'', ``$50,310'', ``$62,010'', and 
        ``$70,200'', respectively; and
            (2) by striking ``$35,100'', ``$39,312'', 
        ``$48,204'', ``$60,372'', and ``$68,262'' and inserting 
        ``$43,875'', ``$49,140'', ``$60,255'', ``$75,465'', and 
        ``$85,328'', respectively.
    (d) Section 221(d)(3) Limits.--Section 221(d)(3)(ii) of the 
National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715l(d)(3)(ii)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``$33,638'', ``$38,785'', 
        ``$46,775'', ``$59,872'', and ``$66,700'' and inserting 
        ``$42,048'', ``$48,481'', ``$58,469'', ``$74,840'', and 
        ``$83,375'', respectively; and
            (2) by striking ``$35,400'', ``$40,579'', 
        ``$49,344'', ``$63,834'', and ``$70,070'' and inserting 
        ``$44,250'', ``$50,724'', ``$61,680'', ``$79,793'', and 
        ``$87,588'', respectively.
    (e) Section 221(d)(4) Limits.--Section 221(d)(4)(ii) of the 
National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715l(d)(4)(ii)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``$30,274'', ``$34,363'', 
        ``$41,536'', ``$52,135'', and ``$59,077'' and inserting 
        ``$37,843'', ``$42,954'', ``$51,920'', ``$65,169'', and 
        ``$73,846'', respectively; and
            (2) by striking ``$32,701'', ``$37,487'', 
        ``$45,583'', ``$58,968'', and ``$64,730'' and inserting 
        ``$40,876'', ``$46,859'', ``$56,979'', ``$73,710'', and 
        ``$80,913'', respectively.
    (f) Section 231 Limits.--Section 231(c)(2) of the National 
Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715v(c)(2)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``$28,782'', ``$32,176'', 
        ``$38,423'', ``$46,238'', and ``$54,360'' and inserting 
        ``$35,978'', ``$40,220'', ``$48,029'', ``$57,798'', 
        ``$67,950'', respectively; and
            (2) by striking ``$32,701'', ``$37,487'', 
        ``$45,583'', ``$58,968'', and ``$64,730'' and inserting 
        ``$40,876'', ``$46,859'', ``$56,979'', ``$73,710'', and 
        ``$80,913'', respectively.
    (g) Section 234 Limits.--Section 234(e)(3) of the National 
Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 1715y(e)(3)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``$30,420'', ``$33,696'', 
        ``$40,248'', ``$49,608'', and ``$56,160'' and inserting 
        ``$38,025'', ``$42,120'', ``$50,310'', ``$62,010'', and 
        ``$70,200'', respectively; and
            (2) by striking ``$35,100'', ``$39,312'', 
        ``$48,204'', ``$60,372'', and ``$68,262'' and inserting 
        ``$43,875'', ``$49,140'', ``$60,255'', ``$75,465'', and 
        ``$85,328'', respectively.
    Sec. 214. Of the amounts appropriated in the Consolidated 
Appropriations Act, 2001 (Public Law 106-554), for the 
operation of an historical archive at the University of South 
Carolina, Department of Archives, South Carolina, such funds 
shall be available to the University of South Carolina to fund 
an endowment for the operation of an historical archive at the 
University of South Carolina, without fiscal year limitation.
    Sec. 215. Section 247 of the National Housing Act (12 
U.S.C. 1715z-12) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (d), by striking paragraphs (1) 
        and (2) and inserting the following:
            ``(1) Native hawaiian.--The term `native Hawaiian' 
        means any descendant of not less than one-half part of 
        the blood of the races inhabiting the Hawaiian Islands 
        before January 1, 1778, or, in the case of an 
        individual who is awarded an interest in a lease of 
        Hawaiian home lands through transfer or succession, 
        such lower percentage as may be established for such 
        transfer or succession under section 208 or 209 of the 
        Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920 (42 Stat. 111), 
        or under the corresponding provision of the 
        Constitution of the State of Hawaii adopted under 
        section 4 of the Act entitled `An Act to provide for 
        the admission of the State of Hawaii into the Union', 
        approved March 18, 1959 (73 Stat. 5).
            ``(2) Hawaiian home lands.--The term `Hawaiian home 
        lands' means all lands given the status of Hawaiian 
        home lands under section 204 of the Hawaiian Homes 
        Commission Act of 1920 (42 Stat. 110), or under the 
        corresponding provision of the Constitution of the 
        State of Hawaii adopted under section 4 of the Act 
        entitled `An Act to provide for the admission of the 
        State of Hawaii into the Union', approved March 18, 
        1959 (73 Stat. 5).''; and
            (2) by adding at the end the following:
    ``(e) Certification of Eligibility for Existing Lessees.--
Possession of a lease of Hawaiian home lands issued under 
section 207(a) of the Hawaiian Homes Commission Act of 1920 (42 
Stat. 110), shall be sufficient to certify eligibility to 
receive a mortgage under this section.''.
    Sec. 216. Notwithstanding the requirement regarding 
commitment of funds in the first sentence of section288(b) of 
the HOME Investment Partnerships Act (42 U.S.C. 12838(b)), the 
Secretary of Housing and Urban Development (in this section referred to 
as the ``Secretary'') shall approve the release of funds under that 
section to the Arkansas Development Finance Authority (in this section 
referred to as the ``ADFA'') for projects, if--
            (1) funds were committed to those projects on or 
        before June 12, 2001;
            (2) those projects had not been completed as of 
        June 12, 2001;
            (3) the ADFA has fully carried out its 
        responsibilities as described in section 288(a); and
            (4) the Secretary has approved the certification 
        that meets the requirements of section 288(c) with 
        respect to those projects.
    Sec. 217. Notwithstanding any other provision of law with 
respect to this or any other fiscal year, the Housing Authority 
of Baltimore City may use the remaining balance of the grant 
award of $20,000,000 made to such authority for development 
efforts at Hollander Ridge in Baltimore, Maryland with funds 
appropriated for fiscal year 1996 under the heading ``Public 
Housing Demolition, Site Revitalization, and Replacement 
Housing Grants'' for the rehabilitation of the Claremont Homes 
project and for the provision of affordable housing in areas 
within the City of Baltimore either (1) designated by the 
partial consent decree in Thompson v. HUD as nonimpacted census 
tracts or (2) designated by said authority as either strong 
neighborhoods experiencing private investment or dynamic growth 
areas where public and/or private commercial or residential 
investment is occurring.

                    TITLE III--INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

                  American Battle Monuments Commission


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, of the 
American Battle Monuments Commission, including the acquisition 
of land or interest in land in foreign countries; purchases and 
repair of uniforms for caretakers of national cemeteries and 
monuments outside of the United States and its territories and 
possessions; rent of office and garage space in foreign 
countries; purchase (one for replacement only) and hire of 
passenger motor vehicles; and insurance of official motor 
vehicles in foreign countries, when required by law of such 
countries, $30,466,000, to remain available until expended.
    In addition, for the partial cost of construction of a new 
interpretive and visitor center at the American Cemetery in 
Normandy, France, $5,000,000, to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That the Commission shall ensure that the 
placement, scope and character of this new center protect the 
solemnity of the site and the sensitivity of interested parties 
including families of servicemen interred at the cemetery, the 
host country and Allied forces who participated in the invasion 
and ensuing battle: Provided further, That not more than 
$1,000,000 shall be for non-construction related costs 
including initial consultations with interested parties and the 
conceptual study and design of the new center.

             Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses in carrying out activities pursuant 
to section 112(r)(6) of the Clean Air Act, as amended, 
including hire of passenger vehicles, uniforms or allowances 
therefor, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902, and for services 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, but at rates for individuals not 
to exceed the per diem equivalent to the maximum rate payable 
for senior level positions under 5 U.S.C. 5376, $7,850,000, 
$5,350,000 of which to remain available until September 30, 
2002 and $2,500,000 of which to remain available until 
September 30, 2003: Provided, That the Chemical Safety and 
Hazard Investigation Board shall have not more than three 
career Senior Executive Service positions: Provided further, 
That, hereafter, there shall be an Inspector General at the 
Board who shall have the duties, responsibilities, and 
authorities specified in the Inspector General Act of 1978, as 
amended: Provided further, That an individual appointed to the 
position of Inspector General of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency (FEMA) shall, by virtue of such appointment, 
also hold the position of Inspector General of the Board: 
Provided further, That the Inspector General of theBoard shall 
utilize personnel of the Office of Inspector General of FEMA in 
performing the duties of the Inspector General of the Board, and shall 
not appoint any individuals to positions within the Board.

                       Department of the Treasury

              Community Development Financial Institutions


              community development financial institutions


                          fund program account


    To carry out the Community Development Banking and 
Financial Institutions Act of 1994, including services 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, but at rates for individuals not 
to exceed the per diem rate equivalent to the rate for ES-3, 
$80,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2003, of 
which $5,000,000 shall be for technical assistance and training 
programs designed to benefit Native American, Native Hawaiian, 
and Alaskan Native communities, and up to $9,500,000 may be 
used for administrative expenses, including administration of 
the New Markets Tax Credit, up to $6,000,000 may be used for 
the cost of direct loans, and up to $1,000,000 may be used for 
administrative expenses to carry out the direct loan program: 
Provided, That the cost of direct loans, including the cost of 
modifying such loans, shall be as defined in section 502 of the 
Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as amended: Provided further, 
That these funds are available to subsidize gross obligations 
for the principal amount of direct loans not to exceed 
$51,800,000.

                   Consumer Product Safety Commission


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses of the Consumer Product Safety 
Commission, including hire of passenger motor vehicles, 
services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, but at rates for 
individuals not to exceed the per diem rate equivalent to the 
maximum rate payable under 5 U.S.C. 5376, purchase of nominal 
awards to recognize non-Federal officials' contributions to 
Commission activities, and not to exceed $500 for official 
reception and representation expenses, $55,200,000.

             Corporation for National and Community Service


                national and community service programs


                           operating expenses


    For necessary expenses for the Corporation for National and 
Community Service (the ``Corporation'') in carrying out 
programs, activities, and initiatives under the National and 
Community Service Act of 1990 (the ``Act'') (42 U.S.C. 12501 et 
seq.), $401,980,000, to remain available until September 30, 
2003: Provided, That not more than $31,000,000 shall be 
available for administrative expenses authorized under section 
501(a)(4) of the Act (42 U.S.C. 12671(a)(4)) with not less than 
$2,000,000 targeted for the acquisition of a cost accounting 
system for the Corporation's financial management system, an 
integrated grants management system that provides comprehensive 
financial management information for all Corporation grants and 
cooperative agreements, and the establishment, operation, and 
maintenance of a central archives serving as the repository for 
all grant, cooperative agreement, and related documents, 
without regard to the provisions of section 501(a)(4)(B) of the 
Act: Provided further, That not more than $2,500 shall be for 
official reception and representation expenses: Provided 
further, That of amounts previously transferred to the National 
Service Trust, $5,000,000 shall be available for national 
service scholarships for high school students performing 
community service: Provided further, That not more than 
$240,492,000 of the amount provided under this heading shall be 
available for grants under the National Service Trust program 
authorized under subtitle C of title I of the Act (42 U.S.C. 
12571 et seq.) (relating to activities including the AmeriCorps 
program), of which not more than $47,000,000 may be used to 
administer, reimburse, or support any national service program 
authorized under section 121(d)(2) of such Act (42 U.S.C. 
12581(d)(2)); not more than $25,000,000 shall be made available 
to activities dedicated to developing computer and information 
technology skills for students and teachers in low-income 
communities: Provided further, That not more than $10,000,000 
of the funds made available under this heading shall be made 
available for the Points of Light Foundation for activities 
authorized under title III of the Act (42 U.S.C. 12661 et 
seq.), of which not more than $2,500,000 may be used to 
establish or support an endowment fund, the corpus of which 
shall remain intact and the interest income from which shall be 
used to support activities described in title III of the Act, 
provided that the Foundation may invest the corpus and income 
in federally insured bank savings accounts or comparable 
interest bearing accounts, certificates of deposit, money 
market funds, mutual funds, obligations of the United States, 
and other market instruments and securities but not in real 
estate investments: Provided further, That notwithstanding any 
other law $2,500,000 of the funds made available by the 
Corporation to the Foundation under Public Law 106-377 may be 
used in the manner described in the preceding proviso: Provided 
further, That no funds shall be available for national service 
programs run by Federal agencies authorized under section 
121(b) of such Act (42 U.S.C. 12571(b)): Provided further, That 
to the maximum extent feasible, funds appropriated under 
subtitle C of title I of the Act shall be provided in a 
mannerthat is consistent with the recommendations of peer review panels 
in order to ensure that priority is given to programs that demonstrate 
quality, innovation, replicability, and sustainability: Provided 
further, That not more than $25,000,000 of the funds made available 
under this heading shall be available for the Civilian Community Corps 
authorized under subtitle E of title I of the Act (42 U.S.C. 12611 et 
seq.): Provided further, That not more than $43,000,000 shall be 
available for school-based and community-based service-learning 
programs authorized under subtitle B of title I of the Act (42 U.S.C. 
12521 et seq.): Provided further, That not more than $28,488,000 shall 
be available for quality and innovation activities authorized under 
subtitle H of title I of the Act (42 U.S.C. 12853 et seq.): Provided 
further, That not more than $5,000,000 shall be available for audits 
and other evaluations authorized under section 179 of the Act (42 
U.S.C. 12639): Provided further, That to the maximum extent 
practicable, the Corporation shall increase significantly the level of 
matching funds and in-kind contributions provided by the private 
sector, and shall reduce the total Federal costs per participant in all 
programs: Provided further, That not more than $7,500,000 of the funds 
made available under this heading shall be made available to America's 
Promise--The Alliance for Youth, Inc., only to support efforts to 
mobilize individuals, groups, and organizations to build and strengthen 
the character and competence of the Nation's youth: Provided further, 
That not more than $5,000,000 of the funds made available under this 
heading shall be made available to the Communities In Schools, Inc., to 
support dropout prevention activities: Provided further, That not more 
than $2,500,000 of the funds made available under this heading shall be 
made available to the YMCA of the USA to support school-based programs 
designed to strengthen collaborations and linkages between public 
schools and communities: Provided further, That not more than 
$1,000,000 of the funds made available under this heading shall be made 
available to Teach For America: Provided further, That not more than 
$1,500,000 of the funds made available under this heading shall be made 
available to Parents As Teachers National Center, Inc., to support 
literacy activities: Provided further, That not more than $1,500,000 of 
the funds made available under this heading shall be made available to 
the Youth Life Foundation to meet the needs of children living in 
insecure environments.


                      office of inspector general


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 
$5,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2003.

               U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses for the operation of the United 
States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims as authorized by 38 
U.S.C. 7251-7298, $13,221,000, of which $895,000 shall be 
available for the purpose of providing financial assistance as 
described, and in accordance with the process and reporting 
procedures set forth, under this heading in Public Law 102-229.

                      Department of Defense--Civil

                       Cemeterial Expenses, Army


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses, as authorized by law, for 
maintenance, operation, and improvement of Arlington National 
Cemetery and Soldiers' and Airmen's Home National Cemetery, 
including the purchase of two passenger motor vehicles for 
replacement only, and not to exceed $1,000 for official 
reception and representation expenses, $22,537,000, to remain 
available until expended.

                Department of Health and Human Services

                     National Institutes of Health


          national institute of environmental health sciences


    For necessary expenses for the National Institute of 
Environmental Health Sciences in carrying out activitiesset 
forth in section 311(a) of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, 
Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended, $70,228,000.

            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry


            toxic substances and environmental public health


    For necessary expenses for the Agency for Toxic Substances 
and Disease Registry (ATSDR) in carrying out activities set 
forth in sections 104(i), 111(c)(4), and 111(c)(14) of the 
Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and 
Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA), as amended; section 118(f) of 
the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 
(SARA), as amended; and section 3019 of the Solid Waste 
Disposal Act, as amended, $78,235,000, to be derived from the 
Hazardous Substance Superfund Trust Fund pursuant to section 
517(a) of SARA (26 U.S.C. 9507): Provided, That notwithstanding 
any other provision of law, in lieu of performing a health 
assessment under section 104(i)(6) of CERCLA, the Administrator 
of ATSDR may conduct other appropriate health studies, 
evaluations, or activities, including, without limitation, 
biomedical testing, clinical evaluations, medical monitoring, 
and referral to accredited health care providers: Provided 
further, That in performing any such health assessment or 
health study, evaluation, or activity, the Administrator of 
ATSDR shall not be bound by the deadlines in section 
104(i)(6)(A) of CERCLA: Provided further, That none of the 
funds appropriated under this heading shall be available for 
ATSDR to issue in excess of 40 toxicological profiles pursuant 
to section 104(i) of CERCLA during fiscal year 2002, and 
existing profiles may be updated as necessary.

                    Environmental Protection Agency


                         science and technology


    For science and technology, including research and 
development activities, which shall include research and 
development activities under the Comprehensive Environmental 
Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended; 
necessary expenses for personnel and related costs and travel 
expenses, including uniforms, or allowances therefor, as 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; services as authorized by 5 
U.S.C. 3109, but at rates for individuals not to exceed the per 
diem rate equivalent to the maximum rate payable for senior 
level positions under 5 U.S.C. 5376; procurement of laboratory 
equipment and supplies; other operating expenses in support of 
research and development; construction, alteration, repair, 
rehabilitation, and renovation of facilities, not to exceed 
$75,000 per project, $698,089,000, which shall remain available 
until September 30, 2003.


                 environmental programs and management


    For environmental programs and management, including 
necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, for personnel 
and related costs and travel expenses, including uniforms, or 
allowances therefor, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; 
services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, but at rates for 
individuals not to exceed the per diem rate equivalent to the 
maximum rate payable for senior level positions under 5 U.S.C. 
5376; hire of passenger motor vehicles; hire, maintenance, and 
operation of aircraft; purchase of reprints; library 
memberships in societies or associations which issue 
publications to members only or at a price to members lower 
than to subscribers who are not members; construction, 
alteration, repair, rehabilitation, and renovation of 
facilities, not to exceed $75,000 per project; and not to 
exceed $6,000 for official reception and representation 
expenses, $2,054,511,000, which shall remain available until 
September 30, 2003.


                      office of inspector general


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act of 
1978, as amended, and for construction, alteration, repair, 
rehabilitation, and renovation of facilities, not to exceed 
$75,000 per project, $34,019,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2003.


                        buildings and facilities


    For construction, repair, improvement, extension, 
alteration, and purchase of fixed equipment or facilities of, 
or for use by, the Environmental Protection Agency, 
$25,318,000, to remain available until expended.


                     hazardous substance superfund


                     (including transfers of funds)


    For necessary expenses to carry out the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 
(CERCLA), as amended, including sections 111(c)(3), (c)(5), 
(c)(6), and (e)(4) (42 U.S.C. 9611), and for construction, 
alteration, repair, rehabilitation, and renovation of 
facilities, not to exceed $75,000 per project; $1,270,000,000 
(of which $100,000,000 shall not become available until 
September 1, 2002), to remain available until expended, 
consisting of $635,000,000, as authorized by section 517(a) of 
the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 
(SARA), as amended by Public Law 101-508, and $635,000,000 as a 
payment from general revenues to the Hazardous Substance 
Superfund for purposes as authorized by section 517(b) of SARA, 
as amended: Provided, That funds appropriated under this 
heading may be allocated to other Federal agencies in 
accordance with section 111(a) of CERCLA: Provided further, 
That of the funds appropriated under this heading, $11,867,000 
shall be transferred to the ``Office of Inspector General'' 
appropriation to remain available until September 30, 2003, and 
$36,891,000 shall be transferred to the ``Science and 
technology'' appropriation to remain available until September 
30, 2003.


                leaking underground storage tank program


    For necessary expenses to carry out leaking underground 
storage tank cleanup activities authorized by section 205 of 
the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986, and 
for construction, alteration, repair, rehabilitation, and 
renovation of facilities, not to exceed $75,000 per project, 
$73,000,000, to remain available until expended.


                           oil spill response


    For expenses necessary to carry out the Environmental 
Protection Agency's responsibilities under the Oil Pollution 
Act of 1990, $15,000,000, to be derived from the Oil Spill 
Liability trust fund, to remain available until expended.


                   state and tribal assistance grants


    For environmental programs and infrastructure assistance, 
including capitalization grants for State revolving funds and 
performance partnership grants, $3,733,276,000, to remain 
available until expended, of which $1,350,000,000 shall be for 
making capitalization grants for the Clean Water State 
Revolving Funds under title VI of the Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act, as amended (the ``Act''); $850,000,000 shall be 
for capitalization grants for the Drinking Water State 
Revolving Funds under section 1452 of the Safe Drinking Water 
Act, as amended, except that, notwithstanding section 1452(n) 
of the Safe Drinking Water Act, as amended, none of the funds 
made available under this heading in this Act, or in previous 
appropriations Acts, shall be reserved by the Administrator for 
health effects studies on drinking water contaminants; 
$75,000,000 shall be for architectural, engineering, planning, 
design, construction and related activities in connection with 
the construction of high priority water and wastewater 
facilities in the area of the United States-Mexico Border, 
after consultation with the appropriate border commission; 
$40,000,000 shall be for grants to the State of Alaska to 
address drinking water and wastewater infrastructure needs of 
rural and Alaska Native Villages; $343,900,000, in addition to 
$124,725 previously appropriated under this heading in Public 
Law 106-377 and $498,900 previously appropriated under this 
heading in Public Law 106-554, shall be for making grants for 
the construction of wastewater and water treatment facilities 
and groundwater protection infrastructure in accordance with 
the terms and conditions specified for such grants in the 
statement of the managers accompanying this Act; and 
$1,074,376,000 shall be for grants, including associated 
program support costs, to States, federally recognized tribes, 
interstate agencies, tribal consortia, and air pollution 
control agencies for multi-media or single media pollution 
prevention, control and abatement and related activities, 
including activities pursuant to the provisions set forth under 
this heading in Public Law 104-134, and for making grants under 
section 103 of the Clean Air Act for particulate matter 
monitoring and data collection activities of which and subject 
to terms and conditions specified by the Administrator, 
$25,000,000 shall be for Environmental Information Exchange 
Network grants, including associated program support costs: 
Provided, That for fiscal year 2002, State authority under 
section 302(a) of Public Law 104-182 shall remain in effect: 
Provided further, That notwithstanding section 603(d)(7) of the 
Act, the limitation on the amounts in a State water pollution 
control revolving fund that may be used by a State to 
administer the fund shall not apply to amounts included as 
principal in loans made by such fund in fiscal year 2002 and 
prior years where such amounts represent costs of administering 
the fund to the extent that such amounts are or were deemed 
reasonable by the Administrator, accounted for separately from 
other assets in the fund, and used for eligible purposes of the 
fund, including administration: Provided further, That for 
fiscal year 2002, and notwithstanding section 518(f) ofthe 
Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended, the Administrator is 
authorized to use the amounts appropriated for any fiscal year under 
section 319 of that Act to make grants to Indian tribes pursuant to 
section 319(h) and 518(e) of that Act: Provided further, That for 
fiscal year 2002, notwithstanding the limitation on amounts in section 
518(c) of the Act, up to a total of 1\1/2\ percent of the funds 
appropriated for State Revolving Funds under title VI of that Act may 
be reserved by the Administrator for grants under section 518(c) of 
such Act: Provided further, That no funds provided by this legislation 
to address the water, wastewater and other critical infrastructure 
needs of the colonias in the United States along the United States-
Mexico border shall be made available to a county or municipal 
government unless that government has established an enforceable local 
ordinance, or other zoning rule, which prevents in that jurisdiction 
the development or construction of any additional colonia areas, or the 
development within an existing colonia the construction of any new 
home, business, or other structure which lacks water, wastewater, or 
other necessary infrastructure.


                       administrative provisions


    For fiscal year 2002, notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 6303(1) and 
6305(1), the Administrator of the Environmental Protection 
Agency, in carrying out the Agency's function to implement 
directly Federal environmental programs required or authorized 
by law in the absence of an acceptable tribal program, may 
award cooperative agreements to federally-recognized Indian 
Tribes or Intertribal consortia, if authorized by their member 
Tribes, to assist the Administrator in implementing Federal 
environmental programs for Indian Tribes required or authorized 
by law, except that no such cooperative agreements may be 
awarded from funds designated for State financial assistance 
agreements.
    Section 136a-1 of title 7, U.S.C. is amended--
            (1) in subsection (i)(5)(C)(i) by striking 
        ``$14,000,000'' and inserting ``$17,000,000''; and, by 
        striking ``each'' and inserting ``2002'' after ``fiscal 
        year'';
            (2) in subsection (i)(5)(H) by striking ``2001'' 
        and inserting ``2002'';
            (3) in subsection (i)(6) by striking ``2001'' and 
        inserting ``2002''; and
            (4) in subsection (k)(3)(A) by striking ``2001'' 
        and inserting ``2002''; and, by striking ``\1/7\'' and 
        inserting ``\1/10\''.

                   Executive Office of the President


                office of science and technology policy


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy, in carrying out the purposes of the National 
Science and Technology Policy, Organization, and Priorities Act 
of 1976 (42 U.S.C. 6601 and 6671), hire of passenger motor 
vehicles, and services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, not to 
exceed $2,500 for official reception and representation 
expenses, and rental of conference rooms in the District of 
Columbia, $5,267,000.


  council on environmental quality and office of environmental quality


    For necessary expenses to continue functions assigned to 
the Council on Environmental Quality and Office of 
Environmental Quality pursuant to the National Environmental 
Policy Act of 1969, the Environmental Quality Improvement Act 
of 1970, and Reorganization Plan No. 1 of 1977, and not to 
exceed $750 for official reception and representation expenses, 
$2,974,000: Provided, That notwithstanding section 202 of the 
National Environmental Policy Act of 1970, the Council shall 
consist of one member, appointed by the President, by and with 
the advice and consent of the Senate, serving as chairman and 
exercising all powers, functions, and duties of the Council.

                 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation


                      office of inspector general


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act of 
1978, as amended, $33,660,000, to be derived from the Bank 
Insurance Fund, the Savings Association Insurance Fund, and the 
FSLIC Resolution Fund.

                  Federal Emergency Management Agency


                            disaster relief


                     (including transfers of funds)


    For necessary expenses in carrying out the Robert T. 
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 
U.S.C. 5121 et seq.), $664,000,000, and, notwithstanding 42 
U.S.C. 5203, to remain available until expended, of which not 
to exceed $2,900,000 may be transferred to ``Emergency 
management planning and assistance'' for the consolidated 
emergency management performance grant program; $25,000,000 
shall be transferred to the Flood Map Modernization Fund; 
$25,000,000 shall be transferred to ``Emergency management 
planning and assistance'', for pre-disaster mitigation 
activities; and $21,577,000 may be used by the Office of 
Inspector General for audits and investigations.
    In addition, for the purposes under this heading, 
$1,500,000,000, to remain available until expended: Provided, 
That such amount is designated by the Congress as an emergency 
requirement pursuant to section 251(b)(2)(A) of the Balanced 
Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended: 
Provided further, That such amount shall be available only to 
the extent that an official budget request, that includes 
designation of the entire amount of the request as an emergency 
requirement as defined in the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985, as amended, is transmitted by the 
President to the Congress.


            disaster assistance direct loan program account


    For the cost of direct loans, $405,000 as authorized by 
section 319 of the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and 
Emergency Assistance Act: Provided, That such costs, including 
the cost of modifying such loans, shall be as defined in 
section 502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, as 
amended: Provided further, That these funds are available to 
subsidize gross obligations for the principal amount of direct 
loans not to exceed $25,000,000.
    In addition, for administrative expenses to carry out the 
direct loan program, $543,000.


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, 
including hire and purchase of motor vehicles as authorized by 
31 U.S.C. 1343; uniforms, or allowances therefor, as authorized 
by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, 
but at rates for individuals not to exceed the per diem rate 
equivalent to the maximum rate payable for senior level 
positions under 5 U.S.C. 5376; expenses of attendance of 
cooperating officials and individuals at meetings concerned 
with the work of emergency preparedness; transportation in 
connection with the continuity of Government programs to the 
same extent and in the same manner as permitted the Secretary 
of a Military Department under 10 U.S.C. 2632; and not to 
exceed $2,500 for official reception and representation 
expenses, $233,801,000.


                      office of inspector general


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 
$10,303,000: Provided, That notwithstanding any other provision 
of law, the Inspector General of the Federal Emergency 
Management Agency shall also serve as the Inspector General of 
the Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board.


              emergency management planning and assistance


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, to 
carry out activities under the National Flood Insurance Act of 
1968, as amended, and the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 
1973, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4001 et seq.), the Robert T. 
Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 
U.S.C. 5121 et seq.), the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 
1977, as amended (42 U.S.C. 7701 et seq.), the Federal Fire 
Prevention and Control Act of 1974, as amended (15 U.S.C. 2201 
et seq.), the Defense Production Act of 1950, as amended (50 
U.S.C. App. 2061 et seq.), sections 107 and 303 of the National 
Security Act of 1947, as amended (50 U.S.C. 404-405), and 
Reorganization Plan No. 3 of 1978, $254,623,000: Provided, That 
for purposes of pre-disaster mitigation pursuant to 42 U.S.C. 
5131(b) and (c) and 42 U.S.C. 5196(e) and (i), $25,000,000 of 
the funds made available for project grants under this heading 
by transfer from ``Disaster relief'', shall be available until 
expended.
    For an additional amount for ``Emergency management 
planning and assistance'', $150,000,000 for programs as 
authorized by section 33 of the Federal Fire Prevention and 
Control Act of 1974, as amended (15 U.S.C. 2201 et seq.): 
Provided, That up to 5 percent of this amount shall be 
transferred to ``Salaries and expenses'' for program 
administration.


                radiological emergency preparedness fund


    The aggregate charges assessed during fiscal year 2002, as 
authorized by Public Law 106-377, shall not be less than 100 
percent of the amounts anticipated by FEMA necessary for its 
radiological emergency preparedness program for the next fiscal 
year. The methodology for assessment and collection of fees 
shall be fair and equitable; and shall reflect costs of 
providing such services, including administrative costs of 
collecting such fees. Fees received pursuant to this section 
shall be deposited in the Fund as offsetting collections and 
will become available for authorized purposes on October 1, 
2002, and remain available until expended.


                   emergency food and shelter program


    To carry out an emergency food and shelter program pursuant 
to title III of Public Law 100-77, as amended, $140,000,000, to 
remain available until expended: Provided, That total 
administrative costs shall not exceed 3\1/2\ percent of the 
total appropriation.


                     national flood insurance fund


                     (including transfers of funds)


    For activities under the National Flood Insurance Act of 
1968 (``the Act''), the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973, 
as amended, not to exceed $28,798,000 for salaries and expenses 
associated with flood mitigation and flood insurance 
operations, and not to exceed $76,381,000 for flood mitigation, 
including up to $20,000,000 for expenses under section 1366 of 
the Act, which amount shall be available for transfer to the 
National Flood Mitigation Fund until September 30, 2003. In 
fiscal year 2002, no funds in excess of: (1) $55,000,000 for 
operating expenses; (2) $536,750,000 for agents' commissions 
and taxes; and (3) $30,000,000 for interest on Treasury 
borrowings shall be available from the National Flood Insurance 
Fund without prior notice to the Committees on Appropriations.
    In addition, up to $7,000,000 in fees collected but 
unexpended during fiscal years 2000 through 2001 shall be 
transferred to the Flood Map Modernization Fund and available 
for expenditure in fiscal year 2002.
    Section 1309(a)(2) of the Act (42 U.S.C. 4016(a)(2)), as 
amended, is further amended by striking ``2001'' and inserting 
``2002''.
    Section 1319 of the Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4026), is 
amended by striking ``September 30, 2001'' and inserting 
``December 31, 2002''.
    Section 1336(a) of the Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4056), is 
amended by striking ``September 30, 2001'' and inserting 
``December 31, 2002''.
    Section 1376(c) of the Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4127(c)), 
is amended by striking ``December 31, 2001'' and inserting 
``December 31, 2002''.


                     national flood mitigation fund


    Notwithstanding sections 1366(b)(3)(B)-(C) and 1366(f) of 
the National Flood Insurance Act of 1968, as amended, 
$20,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2003, for 
activities designed to reduce the risk of flood damage to 
structures pursuant to such Act, of which $20,000,000 shall be 
derived from the National Flood Insurance Fund. Of the amount 
provided, $2,500,000 is to be used for the purchase of flood-
prone properties in the city of Austin, Minnesota, and any 
cost-share is waived.

                    General Services Administration


                federal consumer information center fund


    For necessary expenses of the Federal Consumer Information 
Center, including services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, 
$7,276,000, to be deposited into the Federal Consumer 
Information Center Fund: Provided, That the appropriations, 
revenues, and collections deposited into the Fund shall be 
available for necessary expenses of Federal Consumer 
Information Center activities in the aggregate amount of 
$12,000,000. Appropriations, revenues, and collections accruing 
to this Fund during fiscal year 2002 in excess of $12,000,000 
shall remain in the Fund and shall not be available for 
expenditure except as authorized in appropriations Acts.

             National Aeronautics and Space Administration


                           human space flight


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the 
conduct and support of human space flight research and 
development activities, including research, development, 
operations, support and services; maintenance; construction of 
facilities including repair, rehabilitation, revitalization and 
modification of facilities, construction of new facilities and 
additions to existing facilities, facility planning and design, 
environmental compliance and restoration, and acquisition or 
condemnation of real property,as authorized by law; space 
flight, spacecraft control and communications activities including 
operations, production, and services; program management; personnel and 
related costs, including uniforms or allowances therefor, as authorized 
by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; travel expenses; purchase and hire of passenger 
motor vehicles; not to exceed $20,000 for official reception and 
representation expenses; and purchase, lease, charter, maintenance and 
operation of mission and administrative aircraft, $6,912,400,000, to 
remain available until September 30, 2003, of which amounts as 
determined by the Administrator for salaries and benefits; training, 
travel and awards; facility and related costs; information technology 
services; science, engineering, fabricating and testing services; and 
other administrative services may be transferred to ``Science, 
aeronautics and technology'' in accordance with section 312(b) of the 
National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958, as amended by Public Law 
106-377.


                  science, aeronautics and technology


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided for, in the 
conduct and support of science, aeronautics and technology 
research and development activities, including research, 
development, operations, support and services; maintenance; 
construction of facilities including repair, rehabilitation, 
revitalization, and modification of facilities, construction of 
new facilities and additions to existing facilities, facility 
planning and design, environmental compliance and restoration, 
and acquisition or condemnation of real property, as authorized 
by law; space flight, spacecraft control and communications 
activities including operations, production, and services; 
program management; personnel and related costs, including 
uniforms or allowances therefor, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 
5901-5902; travel expenses; purchase and hire of passenger 
motor vehicles; not to exceed $20,000 for official reception 
and representation expenses; and purchase, lease, charter, 
maintenance and operation of mission and administrative 
aircraft, $7,857,100,000, to remain available until September 
30, 2003, of which amounts as determined by the Administrator 
for salaries and benefits; training, travel and awards; 
facility and related costs; information technology services; 
science, engineering, fabricating and testing services; and 
other administrative services may be transferred to ``Human 
space flight'' in accordance with section 312(b) of the 
National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958, as amended by 
Public Law 106-377, except that no funds may be transferred to 
the program budget element for the Space Station.


                      office of inspector general


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 
$23,700,000.


                       administrative provisions


    Notwithstanding the limitation on the availability of funds 
appropriated for ``Human space flight'', or ``Science, 
aeronautics and technology'' by this appropriations Act, when 
any activity has been initiated by the incurrence of 
obligations for construction of facilities as authorized by 
law, such amount available for such activity shall remain 
available until expended. This provision does not apply to the 
amounts appropriated for institutional minor revitalization and 
construction of facilities, and institutional facility planning 
and design.
    Notwithstanding the limitation on the availability of funds 
appropriated for ``Human space flight'', or ``Science, 
aeronautics and technology'' by this appropriations Act, the 
amounts appropriated for construction of facilities shall 
remain available until September 30, 2004.
    Notwithstanding the limitation on the availability of funds 
appropriated for ``Office of Inspector General'', amounts made 
available by this Act for personnel and related costs and 
travel expenses of the National Aeronautics and Space 
Administration shall remain available until September 30, 2002 
and may be used to enter into contracts for training, 
investigations, costs associated with personnel relocation, and 
for other services, to be provided during the next fiscal year. 
Funds for announced prizes otherwise authorized shall remain 
available, without fiscal year limitation, until the prize is 
claimed or the offer is withdrawn.
    No funds in this or any other Appropriations Act may be 
used to finalize an agreement prior to December 1, 2002 between 
NASA and a nongovernment organization to conduct research 
utilization and commercialization management activities of the 
International Space Station.

                  National Credit Union Administration


                       central liquidity facility


                     (including transfer of funds)


    During fiscal year 2002, gross obligations of the Central 
Liquidity Facility for the principal amount of new direct loans 
to member credit unions, as authorized by 12 U.S.C. 1795 et 
seq., shall not exceed $1,500,000,000: Provided, That 
administrative expenses of the Central Liquidity Facility shall 
not exceed $309,000: Provided further, That $1,000,000 shall be 
transferred to the Community Development Revolving Loan Fund, 
of which $650,000, together with amounts of principal and 
interest on loans repaid, shall be available until expended for 
loans to community development credit unions, and $350,000 
shall beavailable until expended for technical assistance to 
low-income and community development credit unions.

                      National Science Foundation


                    research and related activities


    For necessary expenses in carrying out the National Science 
Foundation Act of 1950, as amended (42 U.S.C. 1861-1875), and 
the Act to establish a National Medal of Science (42 U.S.C. 
1880-1881); services as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109; authorized 
travel; maintenance and operation of aircraft and purchase of 
flight services for research support; acquisition of aircraft; 
$3,598,340,000, of which not to exceed $300,000,000 shall 
remain available until expended for Polar research and 
operations support, and for reimbursement to other Federal 
agencies for operational and science support and logistical and 
other related activities for the United States Antarctic 
program; the balance to remain available until September 30, 
2003: Provided, That receipts for scientific support services 
and materials furnished by the National Research Centers and 
other National Science Foundation supported research facilities 
may be credited to this appropriation: Provided further, That 
to the extent that the amount appropriated is less than the 
total amount authorized to be appropriated for included program 
activities, all amounts, including floors and ceilings, 
specified in the authorizing Act for those program activities 
or their subactivities shall be reduced proportionally: 
Provided further, That $75,000,000 of the funds available under 
this heading shall be made available for a comprehensive 
research initiative on plant genomes for economically 
significant crops.


          major research equipment and facilities construction


    For necessary expenses for the acquisition, construction, 
commissioning, and upgrading of major research equipment, 
facilities, and other such capital assets pursuant to the 
National Science Foundation Act of 1950, as amended, including 
authorized travel, $138,800,000 to remain available until 
expended: Provided, That the Director shall submit a report to 
the Committees on Appropriations by February 28, 2002 on the 
full life-cycle costs of projects funded through this account 
since fiscal year 1995.


                     education and human resources


    For necessary expenses in carrying out science and 
engineering education and human resources programs and 
activities pursuant to the National Science Foundation Act of 
1950, as amended (42 U.S.C. 1861-1875), including services as 
authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109, authorized travel, and rental of 
conference rooms in the District of Columbia, $875,000,000, to 
remain available until September 30, 2003: Provided, That to 
the extent that the amount of this appropriation is less than 
the total amount authorized to be appropriated for included 
program activities, all amounts, including floors and ceilings, 
specified in the authorizing Act for those program activities 
or their subactivities shall be reduced proportionally.


                         salaries and expenses


    For salaries and expenses necessary in carrying out the 
National Science Foundation Act of 1950, as amended (42 U.S.C. 
1861-1875); services authorized by 5 U.S.C. 3109; hire of 
passenger motor vehicles; not to exceed $9,000 for official 
reception and representation expenses; uniforms or allowances 
therefor, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; rental of 
conference rooms in the District of Columbia; reimbursement of 
the General Services Administration for security guard 
services; $170,040,000: Provided, That contracts may be entered 
into under ``Salaries and expenses'' in fiscal year 2002 for 
maintenance and operation of facilities, and for other 
services, to be provided during the next fiscal year.


                      office of inspector general


    For necessary expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
as authorized by the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, 
$6,760,000, to remain available until September 30, 2003.

                 Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation


          payment to the neighborhood reinvestment corporation


    For payment to the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation 
for use in neighborhood reinvestment activities, as authorized 
by the Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation Act (42 U.S.C. 
8101-8107), $105,000,000, of which $10,000,000 shall be for a 
homeownership program that is used in conjunction with section 
8 assistance under the United States Housing Act of 1937, as 
amended.

                        Selective Service System


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses of the Selective Service System, 
including expenses of attendance at meetings and of training 
for uniformed personnel assigned to the Selective Service 
System, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 4101-4118 for civilian 
employees; and not to exceed $750 for official reception and 
representation expenses; $25,003,000: Provided, That during the 
current fiscal year, the President may exempt this 
appropriation from the provisions of 31 U.S.C. 1341, whenever 
the President deems such action to be necessary in the interest 
of national defense: Provided further, That none of the funds 
appropriated by this Act may be expended for or in connection 
with the induction of any person into the Armed Forces of the 
United States.

                      TITLE IV--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 401. Where appropriations in titles I, II, and III of 
this Act are expendable for travel expenses and no specific 
limitation has been placed thereon, the expenditures for such 
travel expenses may not exceed the amounts set forth therefor 
in the budget estimates submitted for the appropriations: 
Provided, That this provision does not apply to accounts that 
do not contain an object classification for travel: Provided 
further, That this section shall not apply to travel performed 
by uncompensated officials of local boards and appeal boards of 
the Selective Service System; to travel performed directly in 
connection with care and treatment of medical beneficiaries of 
the Department of Veterans Affairs; to travel performed in 
connection with major disasters or emergencies declared or 
determined by the President under the provisions of the Robert 
T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act; to 
travel performed by the Offices of Inspector General in 
connection with audits and investigations; or to payments to 
interagency motor pools where separately set forth in the 
budget schedules: Provided further, That if appropriations in 
titles I, II, and III exceed the amounts set forth in budget 
estimates initially submitted for such appropriations, the 
expenditures for travel may correspondingly exceed the amounts 
therefor set forth in the estimates only to the extent such an 
increase is approved by the Committees on Appropriations.
    Sec. 402. Appropriations and funds available for the 
administrative expenses of the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development and the Selective Service System shall be available 
in the current fiscal year for purchase of uniforms, or 
allowances therefor, as authorized by 5 U.S.C. 5901-5902; hire 
of passenger motor vehicles; and services as authorized by 5 
U.S.C. 3109.
    Sec. 403. Funds of the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development subject to the Government Corporation Control Act 
or section 402 of the Housing Act of 1950 shall be available, 
without regard to the limitations on administrative expenses, 
for legal services on a contract or fee basis, and for 
utilizing and making payment for services and facilities of the 
Federal National Mortgage Association, Government National 
Mortgage Association, Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation, 
Federal Financing Bank, Federal Reserve banks or any member 
thereof, Federal Home Loan banks, and any insured bank within 
the meaning of the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Act, 
as amended (12 U.S.C. 1811-1831).
    Sec. 404. No part of any appropriation contained in this 
Act shall remain available for obligation beyond the current 
fiscal year unless expressly so provided herein.
    Sec. 405. No funds appropriated by this Act may be 
expended--
            (1) pursuant to a certification of an officer or 
        employee of the United States unless--
                    (A) such certification is accompanied by, 
                or is part of, a voucher or abstract which 
                describes the payee or payees and the items or 
                services for which such expenditure is being 
                made; or
                    (B) the expenditure of funds pursuant to 
                such certification, and without such a voucher 
                or abstract, is specifically authorized by law; 
                and
            (2) unless such expenditure is subject to audit by 
        the General Accounting Office or is specifically exempt 
        by law from such audit.
    Sec. 406. None of the funds provided in this Act to any 
department or agency may be expended for the transportation of 
any officer or employee of such department or agency between 
the domicile and the place of employment of the officer or 
employee, with the exception of an officer or employee 
authorized such transportation under 31 U.S.C. 1344 or 5 U.S.C. 
7905.
    Sec. 407. None of the funds provided in this Act may be 
used for payment, through grants or contracts, to recipients 
that do not share in the cost of conducting research resulting 
from proposals not specifically solicited by the Government: 
Provided, That the extent of cost sharing by the recipient 
shall reflect the mutuality of interest of the grantee or 
contractor and the Government in the research.
    Sec. 408. None of the funds provided in this Act may be 
used, directly or through grants, to pay or to provide 
reimbursement for payment of the salary of a consultant 
(whether retained by the Federal Government or a grantee) at 
more than the daily equivalent of the rate paid for level IV of 
the Executive Schedule, unless specifically authorized by law.
    Sec. 409. None of the funds provided in this Act may be 
used to pay the expenses of, or otherwise compensate, non-
Federal parties intervening in regulatory or adjudicatory 
proceedings. Nothing herein affects the authority of the 
Consumer Product Safety Commission pursuant to section 7 of the 
Consumer Product Safety Act (15 U.S.C. 2056 et seq.).
    Sec. 410. Except as otherwise provided under existing law, 
or under an existing Executive Order issued pursuant to an 
existing law, the obligation or expenditure of any 
appropriation under this Act for contracts for any consulting 
service shall be limited to contracts which are: (1) a matter 
of public record and available for public inspection; and (2) 
thereafter included in a publicly available list of all 
contracts entered into within 24 months prior to the date on 
which the list is made available to the public and of all 
contracts on which performance has not been completed by such 
date. The list required by the preceding sentence shall be 
updated quarterly and shall include a narrative description of 
the work to be performed under each such contract.
    Sec. 411. Except as otherwise provided by law, no part of 
any appropriation contained in this Act shall be obligated or 
expended by any executive agency, as referred to in the Office 
of Federal Procurement Policy Act (41 U.S.C. 401 et seq.), for 
a contract for services unless such executive agency: (1) has 
awarded and entered into such contract in full compliance with 
such Act and the regulations promulgated thereunder; and (2) 
requires any report prepared pursuant to such contract, 
including plans, evaluations, studies, analyses and manuals, 
and any report prepared by the agency which is substantially 
derived from or substantially includes any report prepared 
pursuant to such contract, to contain information concerning: 
(A) the contract pursuant to which the report was prepared; and 
(B) the contractor who prepared the report pursuant to such 
contract.
    Sec. 412. Except as otherwise provided in section 406, none 
of the funds provided in this Act to any department or agency 
shall be obligated or expended to provide a personal cook, 
chauffeur, or other personal servants to any officer or 
employee of such department or agency.
    Sec. 413. None of the funds provided in this Act to any 
department or agency shall be obligated or expended to procure 
passenger automobiles as defined in 15 U.S.C. 2001 with an EPA 
estimated miles per gallon average of less than 22 miles per 
gallon.
    Sec. 414. None of the funds appropriated in title I of this 
Act shall be used to enter into any new lease of real property 
if the estimated annual rental is more than $300,000 unless the 
Secretary submits a report which the Committees on 
Appropriations of the Congress approve within 30 days following 
the date on which the report is received.
    Sec. 415. (a) It is the sense of the Congress that, to the 
greatest extent practicable, all equipment and products 
purchased with funds made available in this Act should be 
American-made.
    (b) In providing financial assistance to, or entering into 
any contract with, any entity using funds made available in 
this Act, the head of each Federal agency, to the greatest 
extent practicable, shall provide to such entity anotice 
describing the statement made in subsection (a) by the Congress.
    Sec. 416. None of the funds appropriated in this Act may be 
used to implement any cap on reimbursements to grantees for 
indirect costs, except as published in Office of Management and 
Budget Circular A-21.
    Sec. 417. Such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 
2002 pay raises for programs funded by this Act shall be 
absorbed within the levels appropriated in this Act.
    Sec. 418. None of the funds made available in this Act may 
be used for any program, project, or activity, when it is made 
known to the Federal entity or official to which the funds are 
made available that the program, project, or activity is not in 
compliance with any Federal law relating to risk assessment, 
the protection of private property rights, or unfunded 
mandates.
    Sec. 419. Corporations and agencies of the Department of 
Housing and Urban Development which are subject to the 
Government Corporation Control Act, as amended, are hereby 
authorized to make such expenditures, within the limits of 
funds and borrowing authority available to each such 
corporation or agency and in accord with law, and to make such 
contracts and commitments without regard to fiscal year 
limitations as provided by section 104 of such Act as may be 
necessary in carrying out the programs set forth in the budget 
for 2002 for such corporation or agency except as hereinafter 
provided: Provided, That collections of these corporations and 
agencies may be used for new loan or mortgage purchase 
commitments only to the extent expressly provided for in this 
Act (unless such loans are in support of other forms of 
assistance provided for in this or prior appropriations Acts), 
except that this proviso shall not apply to the mortgage 
insurance or guaranty operations of these corporations, or 
where loans or mortgage purchases are necessary to protect the 
financial interest of the United States Government.
    Sec. 420. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the 
term ``qualified student loan'' with respect to national 
service education awards shall mean any loan determined by an 
institution of higher education to be necessary to cover a 
student's cost of attendance at such institution and made 
directly to a student by a state agency, in addition to other 
meanings under section 148(b)(7) of the National and Community 
Service Act.
    Sec. 421. Unless otherwise provided for in this Act or 
through reprogramming of funds, no part of any appropriation 
for the Department of Housing and Urban Development shall be 
available for any activity in excess of amounts set forth in 
the budget estimates submitted to Congress.
    Sec. 422. None of the funds appropriated or otherwise made 
available by this Act shall be used to promulgate a final 
regulation to implement changes in the payment of pesticide 
tolerance processing fees as proposed at 64 Fed. Reg. 31040, or 
any similar proposals. The Environmental Protection Agency may 
proceed with the development of such a rule.
    Sec. 423. The Environmental Protection Agency may not use 
any of the funds appropriated or otherwise made available by 
this Act to implement the Registration Fee system codified at 
40 Code of Federal Regulations Subpart U (sections 152.400 et 
seq.) if its authority to collect maintenance fees pursuant to 
FIFRA section 4(i)(5) is extended for at least 1 year beyond 
September 30, 2001.
    Sec. 424. Except in the case of entities that are funded 
solely with Federal funds or any natural persons that are 
funded under this Act, none of the funds in this Act shall be 
used for the planning or execution of any program to pay the 
expenses of, or otherwise compensate, non-Federal parties to 
lobby or litigate in respect to adjudicatory proceedings funded 
in this Act. A chief executive officer of any entity receiving 
funds under this Act shall certify that none of these funds 
have been used to engage in the lobbying of the Federal 
Government or in litigation against the United States unless 
authorized under existing law.
    Sec. 425. No part of any funds appropriated in this Act 
shall be used by an agency of the executive branch, other than 
for normal and recognized executive-legislative relationships, 
for publicity or propaganda purposes, and for the preparation, 
distribution or use of any kit, pamphlet, booklet, publication, 
radio, television or film presentation designed to support or 
defeat legislation pending before the Congress, except in 
presentation to the Congress itself.
    Sec. 426. None of the funds provided in title II for 
technical assistance, training, or management improvements may 
be obligated or expended unless HUD provides to the Committees 
on Appropriations a description of each proposed activity and a 
detailed budget estimate of the costs associated with each 
activity as part of the Budget Justifications. For fiscal year 
2002, HUD shall transmit this information to the Committees by 
January 8, 2002 for 30 days of review.
    Sec. 427. All Departments and agencies funded under this 
Act are encouraged, within the limits of the existing statutory 
authorities and funding, to expand their use of ``E-Commerce'' 
technologies and procedures in theconduct of their business 
practices and public service activities.
    Sec. 428. Section 104(n)(4) of the Cerro Grande Fire 
Assistance Act (Public Law 106-246) is amended by striking 
``beginning not later than the expiration of the 1-year period 
beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act.'' and 
inserting ``within 120 days after the Director issues the 
report required by subsection (n) in 2002 and 2003.''.
    Sec. 429. None of the funds provided by this Act may be 
used for the purpose of implementing any administrative 
proposal that would require military retirees to make an 
``irrevocable choice'' for any specified period of time between 
Department of Veterans Affairs or military health care under 
the new TRICARE for Life plan authorized in the Floyd D. Spence 
National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2001 (as 
enacted into law by Public 106-398).
    Sec. 430. None of the funds appropriated by this Act may be 
used to delay the national primary drinking water regulation 
for Arsenic published on January 22, 2001, in the Federal 
Register (66 Fed. Reg. pages 6976 through 7066, amending parts 
141 through 142 of title 40 of the Code of Federal 
Regulations).
    Sec. 431. Subtitle B of title VI of the Robert T. Stafford 
Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (42 U.S.C. 5197-
5197g) is amended by adding at the end the following:

``SEC. 629. MINORITY EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS DEMONSTRATION PROGRAM.

    ``(a) In General.--The Director shall establish a minority 
emergency preparedness demonstration program to research and 
promote the capacity of minority communities to provide data, 
information, and awareness education by providing grants to or 
executing contracts or cooperative agreements with eligible 
nonprofit organizations to establish and conduct such programs.
    ``(b) Activities Supported.--An eligible nonprofit 
organization may use a grant, contract, or cooperative 
agreement awarded under this section--
            ``(1) to conduct research into the status of 
        emergency preparedness and disaster response awareness 
        in African American and Hispanic households located in 
        urban, suburban, and rural communities, particularly in 
        those States and regions most impacted by natural and 
        manmade disasters and emergencies; and
            ``(2) to develop and promote awareness of emergency 
        preparedness education programs within minority 
        communities, including development and preparation of 
        culturally competent educational and awareness 
        materials that can be used to disseminate information 
        to minority organizations and institutions.
    ``(c) Eligible Organizations.--A nonprofit organization is 
eligible to be awarded a grant, contract, or cooperative 
agreement under this section with respect to a program if the 
organization is a nonprofit organization that is described in 
section 501(c)(3) of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 (26 
U.S.C. 501(c)(3)) and exempt from tax under section 501(a) of 
such Code, whose primary mission is to provide services to 
communities predominately populated by minority citizens, and 
that can demonstrate a partnership with a minority-owned 
business enterprise or minority business located in a HUBZone 
(as defined in section 3(p) of the Small Business Act (15 
U.S.C. 632(p))) with respect to the program.
    ``(d) Use of Funds.--A recipient of a grant, contract, or 
cooperative agreement awarded under this section may only use 
the proceeds of the grant, contract, or agreement to--
            ``(1) acquire expert professional services 
        necessary to conduct research in communities 
        predominately populated by minority citizens, with a 
        primary emphasis on African American and Hispanic 
        communities;
            ``(2) develop and prepare informational materials 
        to promote awareness among minority communities about 
        emergency preparedness and how to protect their 
        households and communities in advance of disasters;
            ``(3) establish consortia with minority national 
        organizations, minority institutions of higher 
        education, and faith-based institutions to disseminate 
        information about emergency preparedness to minority 
        communities; and
            ``(4) implement a joint project with a minority 
        serving institution, including a part B institution (as 
        defined in section 322(2) of the Higher Education Act 
        of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1061(2))), an institution described 
        in subparagraph (A), (B), or (C) of section 326 of that 
        Act (20 U.S.C. 1063b(e)(1)(A), (B), or (C)), and a 
        Hispanic-serving institution (as defined in section 
        502(a)(5) of that Act (20 U.S.C. 1101a(a)(5))).
    ``(e) Application and Review Procedure.--To be eligible to 
receive a grant, contract, or cooperative agreement under this 
section, an organization must submit an application to the 
Director at such time, in such manner, and accompanied by such 
information as the Director may reasonably require. The 
Director shall establish a procedure by which to accept such 
applications.
    ``(f) Authorization of Appropriation.--There is authorized 
to be appropriated to carry out this section $1,500,000 for 
fiscal year 2002 and such funds as may be necessary for fiscal 
years 2003 through 2007. Such sums shall remain available until 
expended.''.
    Sec. 432. None of the funds made available by this Act may 
be used to implement or enforce the requirement under section 
12(c) of the United States Housing Act of 1937, as amended (42 
U.S.C. 1437j(c)) relating to community service, except with 
respect to any resident of a public housing project funded with 
any amounts provided under section 24 of the United States 
Housing Act of 1937, as amended, or any predecessor program for 
the revitalization of severely distressed public housing (HOPE 
VI).
    Sec. 433. Section 1301 of title XIII of Division B of H.R. 
5666, as enacted by section 1(a)(4) of Public Law 106-554, is 
amended by striking ``facilities'' and inserting in lieu 
thereof ``facilities, including the design and construction of 
such facilities,''.
    Sec. 434. The amounts subject to the fifth proviso under 
the heading, ``Emergency Response Fund'', in Public Law 107-38, 
which are available for transfer to the Department of Housing 
and Urban Development 15 days after the Director of the Office 
of Management and Budget has submitted to the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations a proposed allocation and plan for 
use of the funds for the Department, may be used for purposes 
of `Community Development Block Grants', as authorized by title 
I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as 
amended: Provided, That such funds may be awarded to the State 
of New York for assistance for properties and businesses 
damaged by, and for economic revitalization related to, the 
September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks on New York City, for the 
affected area of New York City, and for reimbursement to the 
State and City of New York for expenditures incurred from the 
regular Community Development Block Grant formula allocation 
used to achieve these same purposes: Provided further, That the 
State of New York is authorized to provide such assistance to 
the City of New York: Provided further, That in administering 
these funds and funds under section 108 of such Act used for 
economic revitalization activities in New York City, the 
Secretary may waive, or specify alternative requirements for, 
any provision of any statute or regulation that the Secretary 
administers in connection with the obligation by the Secretary 
or the use by the recipient of these funds or guarantees 
(except for requirements related to fair housing, 
nondiscrimination, labor standards, and the environment), upon 
a finding that such waiver is required to facilitate the use of 
such funds or guarantees, and would not be inconsistent with 
the overall purpose of the statute or regulation: Provided 
further, That such funds shall not adversely affect the amount 
of any formula assistance received by the State of New York, 
New York City, or any categorical application for other Federal 
assistance: Provided further, That the Secretary shall publish 
in the Federal Register any waiver of any statute or regulation 
that the Secretary administers pursuant to title I of the 
Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended, no 
later than 5 days before the effective date of such waiver: 
Provided further, That the Secretary shall notify the 
Committees on Appropriations on the proposed allocation of any 
funds and any related waivers pursuant to this section no later 
than 5 days before such allocation.
    This Act may be cited as the ``Departments of Veterans 
Affairs and Housing and Urban Development, and Independent 
Agencies Appropriations Act, 2002''.
    And the Senate agree to the same.

                                   James T. Walsh,
                                   Tom DeLay,
                                   David L. Hobson,
                                   Joe Knollenberg,
                                   Rodney P. Frelinghuysen,
                                   Anne M. Northup,
                                   John E. Sununu,
                                   Virgil Goode, Jr.,
                                   Robert B. Aderholt,
                                   Bill Young,
                                   Alan B. Mollohan,
                                   Marcy Kaptur,
                                   Carrie P. Meek,
                                   David Price,
                                   Robert E. Cramer, Jr.,
                                   Chaka Fattah,
                                   David Obey,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Barbara A. Mikulski,
                                   Patrick J. Leahy,
                                   Tom Harkin,
                                   Robert C. Byrd,
                                   Herb Kohl,
                                   Tim Johnson,
                                   Ernest F. Hollings,
                                   Daniel K. Inouye,
                                   Christopher S. Bond,
                                   Conrad Burns,
                                   Richard C. Shelby,
                                   Larry E. Craig,
                                           (except for general 
                                               provision on arsenic),
                                   Pete V. Domenici,
                                           (except for general 
                                               provision on arsenic),
                                   Mike DeWine,
                                   Ted Stevens,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.
       JOINT EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE COMMITTEE OF CONFERENCE

      The managers on the part of the House and the Senate at 
the conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on 
the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 2620) making 
appropriations for the Departments of Veterans Affairs and 
Housing and Urban Development, and for sundry independent 
agencies, boards, commissions, corporations, and offices for 
the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for other 
purposes, submit the following joint statement to the House and 
the Senate in explanation of the effect of the action agreed 
upon by the managers and recommended in the accompanying 
report.
      The language and allocations set forth in House Report 
107-159 and Senate Report 107-43 should be complied with unless 
specifically addressed to the contrary in the conference report 
and statement of the managers. Report language included by the 
House which is not changed by the report of the Senate or the 
conference and Senate report language which is not changed by 
the conference is approved by the committee of the conference. 
The statement of the managers, while repeating some report 
language for emphasis, does not intend to negate the language 
referred to above unless expressly provided herein. In cases 
which the House or Senate have directed the submission of a 
report, such report is to be submitted to both House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations.
      Unless specifically addressed in this statement of the 
managers or in the House or Senate reports accompanying H.R. 
2620, the conferees agree to retain the reprogramming 
thresholds for each department or agency at the level 
established by the fiscal year 1999 reports.

                    relationship with budget offices

      Through the years, the Appropriations Committees have 
channeled most of their inquiries and requests for information 
and assistance through the budget offices of the various 
departments, agencies, and commissions. The Committees have 
often pointed out the natural affinity and relationship between 
these organizations and the Appropriations Committees which 
makes such a relationship workable. The conferees reiterate 
their position that while the Committees reserve the right to 
call upon all offices in the departments, agencies, and 
commissions, the primary conjunction between the Committees and 
these entities must normally be through the budget offices. The 
Committees appreciate all the assistance received from each of 
the departments, agencies, and commissions during this past 
year. The workload generated by the budget process is large and 
growing, and therefore, a positive, responsive relationship 
between the Committees and the budget offices is absolutely 
essential to the appropriations process.

                TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS

      Of the amounts approved in the appropriations accounts in 
this title, the Department must limit transfers of funds 
between objectives to not more than $500,000, except as 
specifically noted, without prior approval of the Committees. 
No changes may be made to any account or objective, except as 
approved by the Committees, if it is construed to be policy or 
change in policy. Any activity or program cited in the 
statement of the managers shall be construed as the position of 
the conferees and should not be subject to reductions or 
reprogramming without prior approval of the Committees. It is 
the intent of the conferees that all carryover funds in the 
various appropriations accounts are subject to the normal 
reprogramming requirements outlined above. The Department is 
expected to comply with all normal rules and regulations in 
carrying out these directives. Finally, the Department should 
continue to notify the Committees regarding reorganizations of 
offices, programs, or activities prior to the planned 
implementation of such reorganizations.

                    Veterans Benefits Administration

                       compensation and pensions

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $24,944,288,000 for compensation and 
pensions as proposed by both the House and the Senate, of which 
not more than $17,940,000 is to be transferred to general 
operating expenses and medical care.

                         READJUSTMENT BENEFITS

      Appropriates $2,135,000,000 for readjustment benefits as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate. Deletes bill 
language proposed by the Senate allowing funds to be payable 
for any court order, award or settlement.

                   VETERANS INSURANCE AND INDEMNITIES

      Appropriates $26,200,000 for veterans insurance and 
indemnities as proposed by both the House and the Senate.

         VETERANS HOUSING BENEFIT PROGRAM FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates such sums as may be necessary for costs 
associated with direct and guaranteed loans from the veterans 
housing benefit program fund program account as proposed by 
both the House and the Senate, plus $164,497,000 to be 
transferred to and merged with general operating expenses.

                  EDUCATION LOAN FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $1,000 for the costs of direct loans from 
the education loan fund program account as proposed by both the 
House and the Senate, plus $64,000 to be transferred to and 
merged with general operating expenses.

            VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION LOANS PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $72,000 for the costs of direct loans from 
the vocational rehabilitation loans program account as proposed 
by both the House and the Senate, plus $274,000 to be 
transferred to and merged with general operating expenses.

    NATIVE AMERICAN VETERAN HOUSING LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT (INCLUDING 
                           TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $544,000 for administrative expenses of the 
Native American housing loan program account to be transferred 
to and merged with general operating expenses as proposed by 
both the House and the Senate.

  GUARANTEED TRANSITIONAL HOUSING LOANS FOR HOMELESS VETERANS PROGRAM 
                                ACCOUNT

      Provides up to $750,000 of the funds available in medical 
care and general operating expenses to carry out the guaranteed 
transitional housing loans for homeless veterans program as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate.

                     Veterans Health Administration

                              MEDICAL CARE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $21,331,164,000 for medical care instead of 
$21,282,587,000 as proposed by the House and $21,379,742,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Retains bill language proposed by the Senate delaying the 
availability of $675,000,000 for equipment and land and 
structures until August 1, 2002 remaining available until 
September 30, 2003. The House proposed delaying $900,000,000 
for the same purposes.
      Retains bill language making $900,000,000 available until 
September 30, 2003 as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$500,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      Deletes bill language limiting $3,000,000,000 for 
maintenance and operations expenses as proposed by the House. 
The conferees strongly support the redirection of medical 
resources from the maintenance and operations of unneeded 
buildings to support direct patient care and encourage the 
efforts to reduce those expenditures as the Capital Asset 
Realignment for Enhanced Services (CARES) process moves 
forward.
      Provides $15,000,000 from medical funds for CARES 
projects instead of $30,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
House did not identify any funds in this account for CARES.
      Retains language proposed by the Senate transferring 
collected receipts in the medical care collections fund to the 
medical care account. The House provided transfer authority in 
a separate medical care collections fund appropriating 
paragraph.
      For a number of years GAO and the Congress have been 
encouraging the VA and Department of Defense (DOD) to work 
together to find ways to share resources and provide better 
health care for our Nation's military, military retirees, and 
veterans. The conferees direct the Secretary of Veterans 
Affairs, in cooperation with the Secretary of Defense, to 
submit to the Committees on Appropriations a credible plan by 
September 1, 2002 for no less than three demonstration sites 
where the VA and DOD will fully integrate operations, pharmacy 
services, billing and records, and treatment. Further, the 
conferees direct the VA to include in the plan VA-DOD sharing 
options that complement CARES principles. The conferees direct 
both Secretaries to consider the opportunity presented at the 
Tripler Army Medical Center for this demonstration program.
      The conferees are dismayed by GAO reports outlining the 
dismal state of VHA's record on third party collections. The 
conferees direct the Secretary to undertake a demonstration 
project for a minimum of two years utilizing not less than 
$3,000,000 to obtain a private sector contractor to install and 
operate a total patient financial services system. In addition 
to the guidelines set forth in House Report 107-159, the 
demonstration should be developed in a manner that recognizes 
that this problem exists in all VISNs and any solution for a 
single VISN must be useable and exportable in an efficient 
manner to all VISNs. The conferees believe an essential element 
of this demonstration is the effective use of private sector 
business services in concert with VA employees.
      The conferees are troubled by the abundance of 
conflicting information and lack of uniformity across VA's 
health system in regard to atypical anti-psychotic medications. 
Providing care for the seriously mentally ill is one of VA's 
top priorities and requires a special level of commitment, as 
this population is especially vulnerable and difficult to 
treat. Atypical anti-psychotic medication prescribing practices 
must not be used as performance indicators when evaluating a 
physician's work; nor should price, market share, and corporate 
interest factor into choosing the best drug to treat mental 
illness. To this end, the conferees direct the Secretary to 
communicate clearly to each doctor, facility director and 
pharmacy manager that atypical anti-psychotic pharmaceutical 
prescribing practices are not to be used as a measure of job 
performance and reiterate the Department's policy that 
physicians are to use their best clinical judgment when 
choosing atypical anti-psychotic medications. However, the 
conferees are aware that there is a wide price disparity 
between the currently available atypical anti-psychotic drugs 
and the Department should feel free to also communicate 
relative cost data for all atypical anti-psychotic drugs to its 
physicians.
      The conferees direct the VA to keep an open policy with 
regard to formulating new schizophrenia and serious mental 
illness treatment protocols as new treatments become available, 
but those protocols should be based on scientific and clinical 
studies showing improvements in treatment efficacy or a 
decrease in side-effects, with cost savings as a subordinate 
goal to appropriate treatment options.
      The conferees are aware of a proposal to establish a 
Center for Healthcare Information at the Office of Medical 
Information Security Service at the Martinsburg VAMC to improve 
the security of VA's computerized medical records. The 
conferees direct the VA to report to the Committees by March 1, 
2002 on the feasibility of establishing this Center.
      The conferees direct the VA to report to the Committees 
on Appropriations by August 2, 2002 on the VA's application of 
viscosupplementation as an alternative means of treating 
degenerative knee diseases in veterans. The report should 
include the potential costs and benefits of the procedure as a 
part of VA's health care delivery and VA's recommendations for 
future use of the procedure.
      The conferees are aware of local concerns regarding the 
elements of the April 2001 report titled ``Plan for the 
Development of a 25-Year General Use Plan for Department of 
Veterans Affairs West Los Angeles Healthcare Center.'' The 
confereesstrongly urge the VA to work with the local community 
when formulating a plan to best use the campus for improving veterans' 
access to VA-provided services.

                     MEDICAL CARE COLLECTIONS FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Deletes the medical care collections fund paragraph as 
proposed by the House and instead provides transfer authority 
in medical care as proposed by the Senate.

                    MEDICAL AND PROSTHETIC RESEARCH

      Appropriates $371,000,000 for medical and prosthetic 
research as proposed by the House instead of $390,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees understand that the VA has developed an 
agreement for intellectual property sharing with university 
research institutions. Some universities have expressed 
concerns about a university's right to inventions that are 
developed from supported research. Further, there are concerns 
whether the VA's agreements are consistent with the Bayh-Dole 
Act and similar agreements utilized by other Federal agencies. 
Accordingly, the conferees direct the VA to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations by February 1, 2002 regarding 
these concerns. In responding to the Committees, the VA should 
consult with universities and university associations, 
including the American Association of Medical Colleges, the 
Association of University Technology Managers, and the Council 
on Government Relations.
      The conferees direct the continued partnership with the 
National Technology Transfer Center at the current level of 
effort.

      MEDICAL ADMINISTRATION AND MISCELLANEOUS OPERATING EXPENSES

      Appropriates $66,731,000 for medical administration and 
miscellaneous operating expenses as proposed by the House 
instead of $67,628,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conferees 
agree to retain language proposed by the Senate providing a 
limitation on the availability of funds from Management Field 
Service reimbursements of September 30, 2002.
      The conferees agree that there is concern about the 
guidance and leadership provided by headquarters to guarantee 
quality healthcare and sound fiscal management across the 
system. The VA is directed to submit with the fiscal year 2002 
operating plan the signed performance agreements of all 22 VISN 
directors, action plans for each VISN on how that VISN will 
improve collection rates, and financial reports from the three 
VISNs which received supplemental loans and funding for the 
second consecutive year summarizing how those VISNs have become 
financially sound.

                      Departmental Administration

                       GENERAL OPERATING EXPENSES

      Appropriates $1,195,728,000 for general operating 
expenses as proposed by the House instead of $1,194,831,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Retains language proposed by the House 
allowing funds to be used for the administrative expenses of 
department-wide capital planning, management and policy 
activities.
      The conferees agree to fund the Veterans Benefits 
Administration at not less than $955,352,000. The conferees are 
optimistic about the recommendations put forward by the 
Department of Veterans Affairs Compensations and Pensions Task 
Force and commend the Secretary for announcing his intentions 
to implement most of the recommendations. The conferees look 
forward to the fiscal year 2003 budget hearings in hopes that 
implementation of the short-term recommendations will yield 
improvements in claims processing times by spring 2003.

                    NATIONAL CEMETERY ADMINISTRATION

      Appropriates $121,169,000 for the national cemetery 
administration as proposed by both the House and the Senate.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

      Appropriates $52,308,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General as proposed by the House instead of $48,308,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The conferees have agreed to provide 
the higher funding level due to the nation-wide benefit payment 
review planned in response to the recent benefits fraud 
investigation in Atlanta, Georgia.

                      CONSTRUCTION, MAJOR PROJECTS

      Appropriates $183,180,000 for construction, major 
projects as proposed by the House instead of $155,180,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees agree to the projects included in the 
budget estimate plus $125,000 for planning a national cemetery 
in the Albuquerque, New Mexico area to be offset from the 
working reserve. The conferees have provided up to $125,000 to 
start initial cemetery planning activities in Albuquerque, but 
direct that further funding for cemetery construction 
activities must be considered in the greater context of funding 
the country's national veterans cemetery needs as presented in 
the Department's needs assessment report due December, 2001.
      The conferees agree that the electrical fire at the Miami 
VAMC presents a unique situation compromising VA's ability to 
provide patient care in an environment safe for patients and 
employees and agree to provide $28,300,000 for the emergency 
repair project even though VISN 8 has not undergone a CARES 
review.
      The conferees remain strongly supportive of CARES. This 
nation-wide review is critical to ensuring VA's capital assets 
can support current and long-term health care needs and are 
rehabilitated and aligned for optimal efficiency and access. 
The conferees agree to provide $60,000,000 from construction, 
major projects, for CARES initiatives, of which $10,000,000 is 
for Phase III studies. If less than $10,000,000 is required for 
Phase III, the balance may be used for construction.
      The conferees are strongly encouraged by the 
recommendations from Phase I of CARES, which if implemented, 
could re-invest at least $270,000,000 over the next 20 years 
from capital costs to improving direct access and care for 
veterans in the region. In support of the Phase I 
recommendations, the conferees have identified $40,000,000 of 
the $60,000,000 provided in construction, major projects to 
move forward with the blind and spinal cord injury center at 
the Hines VAMC conditional upon the Secretary certifying that a 
full and open consultation process was conducted regarding the 
VISN 12 recommendations, implementing Option B of the CARES 
VISN 12 Service Delivery Options with a developed 
implementation plan including milestones, and initiating Phase 
II of CARES.
      As a part of the CARES process in VISN 12, VA recently 
completed a formal comment process where VA solicited input 
from a large number of affected and interested parties. The 
conferees direct the Secretary to certify to the Congress that 
he has carried out a full and open consultation process with 
all affected stakeholders andafter submission of such 
certification, finalize decisions regarding CARES in VISN 12 not later 
than January 15, 2002.
      The conferees strongly urge that the Secretary consider 
the needs for improvements and safety upgrades to the West 
Virginia National Cemetery in Grafton, West Virginia in the 
formulation of the Department's fiscal year 2003 budget 
requirements. The conferees are aware that initial planning 
documents have been prepared for this initiative and encourage 
the completion of design and architectural plans within 
available funds pending this review.

                      FACILITY REHABILITATION FUND

      Deletes $300,000,000 for establishment of the facility 
rehabilitation fund as proposed by the House. The Senate did 
not include this account.

                      CONSTRUCTION, MINOR PROJECTS

      Appropriates $210,900,000 for construction, minor 
projects instead of $178,900,000 as proposed by both the House 
and the Senate. Retains language proposed by the House limiting 
additional CARES funds upon notification of and approval by the 
Committees on Appropriations.

                         PARKING REVOLVING FUND

      Appropriates $4,000,000 for the parking revolving fund as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate.

       GRANTS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF STATE EXTENDED CARE FACILITIES

      Appropriates $100,000,000 for grants for construction of 
state extended care facilities as proposed by both the House 
and the Senate.

          GRANTS FOR CONSTRUCTION OF STATE VETERANS CEMETERIES

      Appropriates $25,000,000 for grants for construction of 
state veterans cemeteries as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

                     (including transfer of funds)

      Retains eight administrative provisions proposed by both 
the House and the Senate, seven of which were included in the 
fiscal year 2001 bill.
      Deletes language proposed by the House eliminating the 
health services improvement fund.
      Retains language proposed by the House allowing VA to 
deduct associated administrative expenses from enhanced use 
proceeds and use those receipts in the same fiscal year the 
receipts are received.
      Retains language proposed by the House allowing the 
Department to reimburse from fiscal year 2002 salary and 
expenses accounts for services rendered to the Office of 
Resolution Management up to $28,555,000 and the Office of 
Employment Discrimination Complaint Adjudication up to 
$2,383,000. The Senate proposed a similar provision with 
technical differences.
      Deletes language proposed by the Senate directing the VA 
to conduct a cost and benefit study on viscosupplementation as 
a treatment option for knee replacements. The conferees have 
agreed to instead include report language in the medical care 
account directing the VA to complete such a study.
      Retains language proposed by the Senate recognizing the 
North Dakota Veterans Cemetery as a state cemetery eligible 
under the Grants for State Veterans Cemeteries Program.
      Deletes language proposed by the Senate establishing a 
60-day wait period for any action related to VISN 12 
realignment. The conferees have agreed to instead include 
report language in the construction, major projects account.

         TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT

      The conferees restate the reprogramming requirements with 
respect to amounts approved for each appropriations account 
within this title. The Department must limit the reprogramming 
of funds between the programs, projects, and activities within 
each account to not more than $500,000 without prior approval 
of the Committees on Appropriations. Unless otherwise 
identified in this statement of managers or committee reports, 
the most detailed allocation of funds presented in the budget 
justifications shall be considered to be approved, with any 
deviation from such approved allocation subject to the normal 
reprogramming requirements outlined above. Further, it is the 
intent of the conferees that all carryover funds in the various 
accounts, including recaptures and deobligations, are subject 
to the normal reprogramming requirements outlined above. 
Further, no changes may be made to any program, project, or 
activity if it is construed to be policy or a change in policy, 
without prior approval of the Committees. Finally, the 
conferees expect to be notified regarding reorganizations of 
offices, programs or activities prior to the planned 
implementation of such reorganizations, as well as be notified, 
on a monthly basis, of all ongoing litigation, including any 
negotiations or discussions, planned or ongoing, regarding a 
consent decree between the Department and any other entity.

                       Public and Indian Housing

                        HOUSING CERTIFICATE FUND

              (INCLUDING TRANSFER AND RESCISSION OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $15,640,975,000 instead of $15,694,242,000 
as proposed by the House and $15,658,769,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement assumes an additional 
$640,000,000 in prior year carryover is available to meet 
section 8 renewal requirements based upon a reduction in 
reserve funds available to public housing authorities (PHAs) as 
proposed by the House and the Senate. Language is included to 
implement the change in reserve funds as proposed by the House. 
The conferees understand that HUD has the authority to provide 
PHAs with the necessary funds to administer their section 8 
contracts, nevertheless the conferees direct HUD to ensure that 
PHAs have the funds to administer all section 8 contracts in a 
normal manner, including vouchers that turn over during the 
year. In cases where PHAs require additional funds for approved 
uses and amounts, HUD shall provide to these PHAs the necessary 
section 8 funds. The conferees also direct HUD to make 
quarterly reports to the Committees on Appropriations on the 
status and availability of all section 8 reserves maintained by 
PHAs.
      The conference agreement includes the following:
      Contract Renewals.--$15,725,153,000, of which 
$640,000,000 is derived from prior year carryover, for expiring 
section 8 housing assistance contracts, section 8 amendments, 
enhanced vouchers, and contracts entered into pursuant to 
section 441 of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act. 
Funds for the renewal of section 811 tenant-based assistance is 
provided under the housing for special populations account as 
proposed by the House.
      The conferees reiterate the direction included in the 
Senate report requiring renewal costs for section 8 project-
based programs to be discretely identified in the fiscal year 
2003 budget justifications.
      Incremental Vouchers.--$143,979,000 to provide 
``incremental'' section 8 housing assistance vouchers to 
increase the number of low-income individuals and families 
receiving assistance. Of this amount, $103,979,000 is provided 
for 18,000 vouchers to be distributed on a fair share basis to 
PHAs having a voucher utilization rate of at least 97 percent, 
instead of $157,334,000 as proposed by the House and 
$98,623,000 as proposed by the Senate. HUD is expected to 
distribute these vouchers within 90 days of enactment of this 
Act, and to report to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House and the Senate on compliance with this requirement no 
later than February 15, 2002. The remaining $40,000,000 is 
provided for 7,900 new vouchers for distribution to non-
elderly, disabled residents who are affected by the designation 
of public and assisted housing as ``elderly-only'' 
developments, instead of $39,912,000 as proposed by the House. 
Bill language is included, as proposed by the House and the 
Senate, to earmark funds for this purpose in recognition of the 
fact that people with disabilities are often unable to find 
affordable housing absent section 8 tenant-based assistance.
      The conferees reiterate the House reporting requirement 
related to identification and remediation of PHAs designated as 
troubled under the Section Eight Management Assessment Program 
(SEMAP).
      Contract Administrators.--$195,601,000 for section 8 
contract administrators as proposed by the House. Modified 
language is included, similar to language proposed by the 
House, to designate funds for this purpose. The Senate bill did 
not include a similar provision.
      Tenant Protection.--$202,842,000 for tenant protection 
vouchers to replace lost project-based section 8 assistance. 
Funding for new vouchers under the HOPE VI program is provided 
within the revitalization of severely distressed public housing 
(HOPE VI) account as proposed by the House and the Senate.
      Includes language transferring no less than $13,400,000 
to the Working Capital Fund for development and maintenance of 
information technology systems as proposed by the Senate, 
instead of no less than $11,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      Rescinds $1,200,000,000 from unobligated balances 
available from the recapture of excess section 8 funds, instead 
of $886,000,000 as proposed by the House and $615,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Language is included requiring that the 
rescission be applied against available funds appropriated in 
fiscal year 2001 and prior years for any account under title II 
as proposed by the House, instead of requiring that the 
rescission be applied against available funds appropriated in 
fiscal year 2002 and prior years in this account as proposed by 
the Senate.
      Includes language proposed by the House to prohibit the 
rescission of funds governed by statutory reallocation 
provisions. The Senate did not include a similar provision.
      Does not include language proposed by the Senate 
requiring that the renewal of expiring section 8 contracts 
subject to the Emergency Low Income Housing Preservation Act of 
1987 (ELIHPA) and the Low-Income Housing Preservation and 
Resident Homeownership Act of 1990 (LIHPRHA) are to be capped 
at current rents. This means that the rents for these projects 
shall be renewed on a one-year basis consistent with the plans 
of action that were approved as part of the efforts to preserve 
these projects as low-income housing under ELIHPA and LIHPRHA. 
Nevertheless, the conferees remain concerned that many of these 
projects were over-subsidized through these preservation 
efforts. The conferees believe HUD needs to review all these 
preservation projects and look at restructuring the mortgages 
and contract requirements where appropriate. The conferees 
direct HUD to report to the Committees on Appropriations on 
this review and the status of these projects no later than June 
15, 2002.
      Does not include language proposed by the Senate 
requiring that additional unobligated balances from this 
account be rescinded and reallocated to other accounts in title 
II and title III of this Act. The House bill did not include a 
similar provision.

                      public housing capital fund

                     (including transfer of funds)

      Appropriates $2,843,400,000 for the public housing 
capital fund instead of $2,943,400,000 as proposed by the 
Senate and $2,555,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      Includes modified language designating $550,000,000 to be 
allocated only to those PHAs which utilized their funds in 
compliance with statutory timeliness requirements pursuant to 
the Quality Housing and Work Responsibility Act of 1998 
(QHWRA), similar to language proposed by the House, to enable 
those PHAs to address their backlog of maintenance needs in 
addition to their annual maintenance requirements. The Senate 
did not include similar language.
      Includes modified language making funds available for 
four years instead of two years as proposed by the House and 
the Senate.
      Includes language restating the applicability of the 
QHWRA timeliness requirements to fiscal year 1999 funds as 
proposed by the House. The Senate did not include a similar 
provision.
      Includes modified language allowing the Secretary or 
Deputy Secretary to waive QHWRA timeliness requirements similar 
to language proposed by the House. The Senate did not include a 
similar provision.
      Includes modified language requiring the recapture of 
funds from PHAs not in compliance with QHWRA timeliness 
requirements similar to language proposed by the House. The 
Senate did not include a similar provision.
      Includes language to define obligations as proposed by 
the House. The Senate did not include a similar provision.
      The conferees reiterate the House direction requiring 
quarterly reports on PHA utilization of capital funds, 
delineated by PHA and fiscal year, with the first report due no 
later than February 1, 2002.
      Includes $51,000,000 for technical assistance as proposed 
by the House, instead of $50,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. 
Of this amount, $10,000,000 is for remediation services to 
troubled PHAs as proposed by the House. The Senate did not 
include a similar provision.
      Transfers no less than $52,700,000 from this account to 
the Working Capital Fund for the development and maintenance of 
information technology systems, instead of no less than 
$43,000,000 as proposed by the House and the Senate.
      Includes new language designating $15,000,000 for the 
Neighborhood Networks Initiative. These funds are to be 
competitively awarded to PHAs for the establishment and initial 
operation of computer centers in and around public housing to 
enhance resident self-sufficiency, employability, and economic 
self-reliance. These amounts, combined with $5,000,000 provided 
for under the revitalization of severely distressed public 
housing (HOPE VI) account, as well as $5,000,000 in current on-
going projects, will provide a total of $25,000,000 for the 
Neighborhood Networks Initiative in fiscal year 2002. The 
conferees support efforts to close the digital divide, and 
believe that the needs of public housing residents must be an 
important part of any initiative to achieve that goal and can 
help ameliorate drug and crime problems in public housing 
through new opportunities for education growth and employment 
opportunities. The conferees expect HUD to work with other 
Federal agencies to develop a comprehensive approach to address 
the digital divide, and encourages HUD to submit a proposal as 
part of the fiscal year 2003 budget to address comprehensively 
the needs of public and federally-assisted housing residents.
      The conferees remain concerned over the long-term capital 
needs and viability of public housing projects. The conferees 
believe that reforms included in the public housing capital 
fund account will result in a more effective and targeted use 
of these capital funds and help preserve the investment that 
has been made in public housing over the years. In addition, 
the conferees continue to support funding for the HOPE VI 
program as a complementary program targeted to the 
revitalization of distressed public housing. The conferees 
direct HUD to provide by June 15, 2002, a report on the lessons 
learned from HOPE VI, including best practices and the impact 
of HOPE VI on surrounding communities as well as the extent to 
which HOPE VI projects have leveraged private investments and 
revitalized economic redevelopment in these communities. In 
addition, the conferees request that HUD provide an analysis of 
the extent to which the HOPE VI program can be a model for the 
replacement of the older and distressed section 8 housing 
stock.

                     public housing operating fund

              (including transfer and rescission of funds)

      Appropriates $3,494,868,000 for the public housing 
operating fund as proposed by the House instead of 
$3,384,868,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees have provided an 8.1 percent increase over 
the fiscal year 2001 level for this account to reflect the 
merger of funds previously provided for drug elimination 
activities through the public housing drug elimination program 
(PHDEP) into this account. The conferees note that PHAs are 
authorized to use their operating and capital funds for anti-
crime and anti-drug activities. It is the conferees 
understanding that two-thirds of all PHAs fund these activities 
from within their operating and capital funds, while the 
remaining one-third of PHAs receive supplemental funding 
through PHDEP in addition to their regular operating and 
capital fund allocations. In lieu of continuing to provide a 
supplementary funding source for selected PHAs, the conferees 
have instead increased funding for operating subsidies to be 
distributed to all PHAs. To the extent that additional 
assistance is required to combat issues and activities related 
to crime and drugs, the conferees have included modified 
language designating $10,000,000 to be allocated by the United 
States Attorney General through existing Department of Justice 
programs, such as the Weed and Seed program, to address those 
areas in public, Indian, and federally-assisted housing where 
additional resources are necessary to augment State and local 
efforts to effectively fight crime and drugs as proposed by the 
House. The Senate bill did not include similar language.
      The conference agreement assumes the termination of the 
Operation Safe Home program as recommended by the Senate. Of 
the amount provided, $5,000,000 is available to the Office of 
Inspector General to support the closeout of this program and 
to transition personnel previously participating in Operation 
Safe Home to other investigative activities. The House bill 
proposed $10,000,000 for the Office of Inspector General 
exclusively for Operation Safe Home, while the Senate did not 
propose any funding for this activity. In addition, $6,500,000 
from prior year funds appropriated under PHDEP for Operation 
Safe Home operational costs remain available for operational 
costs necessary to complete on-going activities. Includes new 
language rescinding $11,000,000 from prior year funds made 
available for Operation Safe Home which are in excess of 
amounts necessary to complete on-going activities.
      The conferees do not concur with the language in the 
Senate report related to the June 7, 2000, settlement agreement 
with the Puerto Rico Public Housing Authority (PRPHA). However, 
the conferees expect HUD to ensure that PRPHA is treated in a 
manner consistent with similar PHAs as HUD develops a final 
rule implementing a new operating fund formula for all PHAs 
based upon the results of the public housing operating cost 
study mandated in Public Law 106-74.
      The conferees expect HUD to provide the Chicago Housing 
Authority (CHA) with maximum regulatory flexibility as provided 
for in the Moving to Work Demonstration agreement dated 
February 6, 2000, as amended, as proposed in the Senatereport. 
The conferees direct HUD to determine CHA's funding allocation in the 
same manner as all other PHAs.
      The conferees have included direction under the public 
housing capital fund account in lieu of the direction included 
in the Senate report under this account related to the long-
term capital needs for public housing.

             DRUG ELIMINATION GRANTS FOR LOW-INCOME HOUSING

      The conferees do not provide funding for this account. 
The conferees have instead merged funding for these activities 
into the public housing operating fund account, and increased 
operating funds to accommodate this merger. All activities 
permissible under the public housing drug elimination program 
(PHDEP) are authorized activities under the operating and 
capital fund accounts. In addition, the conferees are aware 
that some PHAs currently have unspent PHDEP funds available. 
The conferees intend that PHAs be allowed to continue to spend 
their PHDEP funds as PHAs transition their anti-crime and anti-
drug programs into their annual operating budgets, and 
encourage PHAs to continue to support such programs.
      The conferees understand that PHDEP was created in 1989, 
to provide supplemental funding to address the gaps in services 
and programs available to combat serious crime and drug 
problems which existed in some areas of public housing, 
particularly severely distressed public housing. At the time 
PHDEP was created, Federal assistance to States and localities 
to address crime and drug problems in local communities, 
including public housing, was limited. The conferees note that 
since that time, however, Federal funding to States and 
localities for police, crime, and drug prevention programs has 
grown dramatically, particularly through the Department of 
Justice. Over the last six years, over $9,000,000,000 in new 
Federal assistance has been provided through the Department of 
Justice, including funds to deploy over 110,000 new police 
officers into local communities and funds to establish 1,000 
new Boys and Girls Clubs exclusively in public housing.
      The conferees further note that over the last six years, 
funds have been provided to demolish over 100,000 units of the 
most severely distressed public housing through the HOPE VI 
program and the capital fund program, resulting in the 
revitalization of entire neighborhoods previously adversely 
impacted by the presence of severely deteriorated housing.
      To the extent that additional assistance is required, the 
conferees have also included $10,000,000 under the public 
housing operating fund account to be allocated by the United 
States Attorney General through existing Department of Justice 
programs, such as the Weed and Seed program, to address those 
areas in public, Indian, and federally-assisted housing where 
additional resources are necessary to augment State and local 
efforts to combat crime and drugs.

     REVITALIZATION OF SEVERELY DISTRESSED PUBLIC HOUSING (HOPE VI)

      Appropriates $573,735,000 for the revitalization of 
severely distressed public housing program (HOPE VI) as 
proposed by the House and the Senate. Includes language 
designating $6,250,000 for technical assistance and contract 
expertise instead of $5,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$7,500,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Includes new language designating $5,000,000 for the 
Neighborhood Networks Initiative. These funds are to be 
competitively awarded to PHAs for the establishment and initial 
operation of computer centers in conjunction with fiscal year 
2002 HOPE VI applicants to enhance resident self-sufficiency, 
employability, and economic self-reliance. These funds are not 
intended to limit the Secretary's ability to award additional 
funds for these activities as part of the regular HOPE VI 
process. These amounts, combined with $15,000,000 provided 
under the public housing capital fund, as well as $5,000,000 in 
current on-going projects, will provide a total of $25,000,000 
for the Neighborhood Networks Initiative in fiscal year 2002.
      The conferees are aware of the valuable efforts made by 
the Housing Research Foundation to collect and disseminate 
objective information on the HOPE VI program. The conferees 
encourage HUD to continue this initiative.

                  NATIVE AMERICAN HOUSING BLOCK GRANTS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $648,570,000 as proposed by the House and 
the Senate. Transfers no less than $3,000,000 to the Working 
Capital Fund for the development and maintenance of information 
technology systems as proposed by the Senate instead of no less 
than $2,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      Includes language to establish a total loan volume of not 
to exceed $52,726,000 for title VI loans as proposed by the 
House instead of $54,600,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Includes modified language, similar to language proposed 
by the Senate, to allow the Secretary to provide assistance to 
Indian tribes and tribally-designated housing entities to 
address the problem of black mold consistent with the terms of 
NAHASDA. The Secretary is directed to work with FEMA, the 
Indian Health Service, the Bureau of Indian Affairs, and other 
appropriate Federal agencies in developing a plan to maximize 
Federal resources to address emergency housing and related 
problems associated with black mold. The House did not include 
similar language.

           INDIAN HOUSING LOAN GUARANTEE FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $5,987,000 for guaranteed loans for Native 
American housing on trust lands as proposed by the House and 
the Senate.

              NATIVE HAWAIIAN HOUSING LOAN GUARANTEE FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $1,000,000 for guaranteed loans for Native 
Hawaiian housing as proposed by the Senate. Includes language 
establishing a total loan volume of not to exceed $40,000,000 
and provides $35,000 for administrative costs as proposed by 
the Senate. The House did not propose funding for this program.

                   Community Planning and Development

              HOUSING OPPORTUNITIES FOR PERSONS WITH AIDS

      Appropriates $277,432,000 for housing opportunities for 
persons with AIDS (HOPWA) as proposed by the House and the 
Senate.
      Includes modified language similar to language proposed 
by the Senate requiring HUD to renew all expiring HOPWA 
contracts for permanent supportive housing funded under the 
non-formula component of the HOPWA program so long as the 
projects meet all other program requirements. The House did not 
include a similar provision.

                 RURAL HOUSING AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

      Appropriates $25,000,000 for rural housing and economic 
development as proposed by the Senate. Includes language 
requiring funds to be awarded competitively by June 1, 2002 as 
proposed by the Senate. The House did not propose funding for 
this program.

                EMPOWERMENT ZONES/ENTERPRISE COMMUNITIES

      Appropriates $45,000,000 for grants to the second round 
of empowerment zones instead of $75,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Includes language designating $3,000,000 for each 
empowerment zone to be used in conjunction with economic 
development activities detailed in the strategic plans of each 
empowerment zone instead of $5,000,000 for each zone as 
proposed by the Senate. The House did not propose funding for 
this program. The conferees believe that this program should be 
funded as a mandatory program as originally contemplated.
      The conferees direct the HUD Inspector General to review 
the use of empowerment zone funds and report the findings to 
the Committees on Appropriations no later than April 1, 2002.

                       COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $5,000,000,000 for various activities funded 
in this account, instead of $4,811,993,000 as proposed by the 
House and $5,012,993,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
conferees agree to the following:
      --$4,341,000,000 for formula grants under the Community 
Development Block Grant program (CDBG), instead of 
$4,339,300,000 as proposed by the House and the Senate;
      --$70,000,000 for grants to Indian tribes instead of 
$69,000,000 as proposed by the House and $71,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate;
      --$42,500,000 for section 107 grants, instead of 
$34,434,000 as proposed by the House and $45,500,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Within the amount provided for section 
107 grants, the conference agreement provides the following 
earmarks:
            $7,000,000 for insular areas;
            $10,500,000 for historically black colleges and 
        universities;
            $3,000,000 for community development work study;
            $7,500,000 for Hispanic serving institutions;
            $7,500,000 for the Community Outreach Partnerships 
        program;
            $3,000,000 for tribal colleges and universities; 
        and
            $4,000,000 for Alaska Native serving institutions 
        and Native Hawaiian serving institutions;
      --$3,300,000 for the Housing Assistance Council as 
proposed by the House instead of $3,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate;
      --$2,600,000 for the National American Indian Housing 
Council as proposed by the Senate instead of $2,794,000 as 
proposed by the House;
      --$5,000,000 for the National Housing Development 
Corporation for continuation of its program of acquisition, 
rehabilitation, and preservation of at-risk affordable housing, 
including $2,000,000 for operating expenses as proposed by the 
House. The Senate did not propose funding for this program;
      --$5,000,000 for the National Council of La Raza HOPE 
Fund, of which $500,000 is for technical assistance and fund 
management and $4,500,000 is for investments and financing as 
proposed by the House. The Senate did not propose funding for 
this program;
      --$9,600,000 for the Department of Hawaiian Homelands for 
assistance as authorized by title VIII of the Native American 
Housing Assistance and Self-Determination Act of 1996, with not 
more than five percent for administrative costs, as proposed by 
the Senate. The House did not propose funding for this program;
      --$22,000,000 for grants to eligible grantees under 
section 11 of the Self-Help Housing Opportunity Program, 
instead of $21,956,000 as proposed by the House and $20,000,000 
as proposed by the Senate;
      --$29,000,000 for the Capacity Building for Community 
Development and Affordable Housing program, authorized by 
section 4 of the Department of Housing and Urban Development 
Demonstration Act, as in effect before June 12, 1997, instead 
of $29,387,000 as proposed by the House and $28,450,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Of the amount provided, at least 
$5,000,000 shall be for capacity building activities in rural 
areas as proposed by the Senate instead of $4,989,000 as 
proposed by the House. Additionally, $4,000,000 is for Habitat 
for Humanity International, instead of $4,442,000 as proposed 
by the House and $3,450,000 as proposed by the Senate;
      --$55,000,000 for supportive services, congregate 
services and service coordinators for residents of public and 
Indian housing as proposed by the Senate, instead of 
$54,879,000 as proposed by the House;
      --$65,000,000 for Youthbuild instead of $69,868,000 as 
proposed by the House and $70,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. This amount includes $2,000,000 forcapacity building 
activities as proposed by the House and the Senate, and $10,000,000 for 
underserved and rural areas as proposed by the Senate;
      --$42,000,000 for the Neighborhood Initiatives program 
instead of $25,000,000 as proposed by the House and the Senate. 
Does not include language proposed by the House related to 
unobligated prior year balances. The Senate did not include a 
similar provision. Targeted grants shall be provided as 
follows:
            $500,000 for the County of Tulare, California, for 
        development of the Dinuba regional vocational training 
        facility;
            $250,000 for the City of Oceanside, California for 
        the Crown Heights neighborhood revitalization project;
            $1,000,000 for the Colorado Mountain Housing 
        Coalition;
            $700,000 for the City of Miami, Florida, Model 
        Homeownership Zone Pilot Project;
            $200,000 for McHenry County, Illinois, for economic 
        development along the Fox River;
            $3,000,000 for the Louisville Community Development 
        Bank for continuation of the Louisville Neighborhood 
        Initiative;
            $750,000 for the City of Brewer, Maine for the 
        redevelopment of its waterfront;
            $750,000 for the City of St. Paul, Minnesota, for 
        the Phalen Village Superblock project;
            $2,500,000 for the Grand Avenue Redevelopment 
        Project in Kansas City, Missouri;
            $1,000,000 for Urban Strategies for the 
        construction of affordable, mixed-income housing for 
        disabled individuals in the Central West End area of 
        the City of Saint Louis, Missouri;
            $750,000 for the City of St. Louis, Missouri, for 
        development of the Forest Park Master Plan;
            $1,000,000 for Beyond Housing, a St. Louis Missouri 
        non-profit to preserve homes in the Castle Point, 
        Pagedale and NE University City areas;
            $250,000 for the City of Wildwood, New Jersey, for 
        revitalization of the Pacific Avenue Business District;
            $1,000,000 to the City of Syracuse, New York for 
        the Neighborhood Initiative Program;
            $5,000,000 to Home Headquarters in Syracuse, New 
        York for a Home Equity Assurance Pilot Program and 
        other Neighborhood Initiative projects;
            $200,000 to the City of Canandaigua, New York, for 
        Lagoon Park development;
            $200,000 to the City of Albany, New York, for the 
        Corning Park Revitalization Project;
            $300,000 to the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
        to support the Neighborhood Transformation Initiative, 
        which will demolish many abandoned homes as well as 
        revitalize the areas;
            $200,000 to Universal Community Homes, 
        Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to continue the conversion 
        of more than 500 parcels of land into for-sale units to 
        low- and moderate-income families;
            $250,000 for the City of Anderson, South Carolina 
        for the Murray/Franklin Street neighborhood 
        revitalization project;
            $10,000,000 for the State of South Dakota to 
        maintain the physical integrity of the Homestake Mine 
        in preparation for the potential development of a major 
        research facility on that site;
            $400,000 for the City of Watertown, South Dakota, 
        for a community revitalization project;
            $300,000 for Campbell County, South Dakota, for 
        economic development activities;
            $1,000,000 for the City of Bellingham, Washington, 
        for the Holly Street landfill redevelopment project;
            $1,000,000 for the City of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, 
        for the Menominee River Valley redevelopment project;
            $500,000 for the City of Madison, Wisconsin to 
        develop affordable low income housing;
            $6,000,000 to the Vandalia Heritage Foundation, 
        Inc. for community and neighborhood revitalization and 
        economic diversification initiatives;
            $1,000,000 for the City of Beckley, West Virginia, 
        to revitalize a blighted area;
            $2,000,000 for the Boys and Girls Clubs of America 
        for the operating and start-up costs of clubs located 
        in or near, and primarily serving residents of, public 
        and Indian housing.
      --$294,200,000 for economic development initiatives. 
Targeted grants shall be made as follows:
            $490,000 to the Kenai Peninsula Borough in Alaska 
        for construction of low-income housing for senior 
        citizens;
            $990,000 for Catholic Community Services for its 
        Adult Day Care facility in Juneau, Alaska to provide 
        day care for the elderly persons;
            $1,250,000 for the United Way community services 
        facility in Anchorage, Alaska to complete construction 
        of a social service facility to serve low-income 
        people;
            $1,500,000 for Alaska Pacific University for the 
        restoration of a historic property in Anchorage, 
        Alaska;
            $1,500,000 for the Municipality of Anchorage, 
        Alaska for the expansion of the Alaska Zoo;
            $2,250,000 for Fairbanks, Alaska to provide winter 
        recreation opportunities for military and civilian 
        persons at the Fairbanks North Star Borough Birch Hill 
        recreation area;
            $45,000 to the Hillsboro-Lawrence County, Alabama 
        Boys and Girls Club;
            $50,000 to Guntersville, Alabama to extend sewer 
        lines to the Marshall-Jackson Mental Health Center;
            $50,000 to the City of Decatur, Alabama for 
        improvements to Delano Park;
            $50,000 to the City of Hollywood, Alabama for 
        wastewater infrastructure improvements;
            $50,000 to the Housing Authority of the City of 
        Huntsville, Alabama for the continuation of a music 
        education program;
            $50,000 to Walker County, Alabama for assembly 
        costs of the Walker County Center of Technology;
            $80,000 to Leesburg, Alabama for sewer and water 
        infrastructure expansion to the city boat dock;
            $85,000 to The Whole Backstage Marshall County 
        Theater Group in Marshall County, Alabama for 
        renovation of facilities;
            $100,000 to the City of Selma, Alabama for the 
        acquisition of the Lovelady Building on historic Water 
        Avenue in Selma, Alabama;
            $100,000 to the Northwest Alabama Council of Local 
        Governments for the development of a master plan for 
        the Florence-Lauderdale County Port Authority;
            $100,000 to the Tuskegee Area Health Education 
        Center in Alabama for a rural HIV/AIDS program;
            $115,000 to the Birmingham Building Trade Towers, 
        Inc. for renovation of the Birmingham Building Trades 
        Tower in Alabama;
            $115,000 to the University of Montevallo, Alabama 
        for repair of historic structures;
            $125,000 to Brilliant, Alabama for access road 
        improvement and water line extension to industrial 
        park;
            $125,000 to Winfield, Alabama for site work 
        preparation of land for industrial use;
            $150,000 to Family Connection, Inc. in Alabaster, 
        Alabama to construct a facility to house a new 
        diversionary program for first time juvenile offenders 
        in Shelby County, Alabama;
            $150,000 for the City of Mobile, Alabama for the 
        building renovation for the Mobile Opera/Symphony 
        Collaboration;
            $190,000 to Albertville, Alabama for a civic 
        center;
            $200,000 to Jasper, Alabama for recreational park 
        construction;
            $200,000 to the Clark County Commission, Alabama 
        for establishment of the Forestry Museum;
            $400,000 to the Shoals Economic Development 
        Authority in Florence, Alabama for the construction of 
        a joint economic development facility to be used by 
        SEDA and the Shoals Chamber of Commerce;
            $240,000 for the Patient One Medical Transport 
        System of Alabama for wheelchair accessible vehicles, 
        drivers, and program expenses;
            $250,000 to Oakwood College of Alabama for the 
        establishment of a Wellness Center;
            $250,000 for Eufala, Alabama for downtown 
        revitalization;
            $300,000 to BizTech located in Huntsville, Alabama 
        for the construction of a business development 
        facility;
            $300,000 to the City of Mobile, Alabama for 
        improvements to a recreational pier and facilities at 
        McNally Park;
            $300,000 to the Covington County Commission in 
        Alabama for the construction of the second phase of the 
        Covington County Farm Center;
            $350,000 to the Housing Authority of the City of 
        Andalusia to expand their existing preschool programs 
        and facility to accommodate more low-income, high risk 
        children in Andalusia, Alabama;
            $400,000 to the Alabama Historical Commission for 
        the renovation of the Historic Green County Courthouse 
        in Green County, Alabama;
            $500,000 to the American Village for the 
        construction of Federal Hall and the Liberty Square 
        Expansion in Montevallo, Alabama;
            $500,000 to the City of Hamilton, Alabama for the 
        construction of a call center facility;
            $500,000 to the City of Winfield, Alabama for the 
        construction of a call center facility;
            $500,000 to the Cleveland Avenue YMCA so that they 
        may expand their existing programs to serve more young 
        people in Montgomery, Alabama;
            $500,000 to the Lakeshore Foundation in Birmingham, 
        Alabama to expand their existing facilities to serve a 
        larger population of Alabamians with physical 
        disabilities;
            $500,000 to the National Children's Advocacy Center 
        in Huntsville, Alabama for the establishment of a 
        research and training facility;
            $500,000 to the USS Alabama Battleship Commission 
        for a restoration initiative;
            $1,000,000 to Spring Hill College in Mobile, 
        Alabama for construction of the Regional Library 
        Resource Center;
            $300,000 for Studio for the Arts of Pocahontas, 
        Arkansas, for a new facility;
            $1,000,000 or the City of DeQueen, Arkansas for the 
        development of a cultural awareness center;
            $50,000 to the Tohono O'odham Tribe in Arizona for 
        development of a veterans memorial monument and park;
            $300,000 Boys and Girls Club of the East Valley, 
        Temple Arizona for its Guadalupe Branch;
            $740,000 to Arizona State University for the 
        establishment of the Center for Basic Research and 
        Applied Research within the Barry M. Goldwater Center 
        for Science and Engineering;
            $1,000,000 to the City of Tucson, Arizona for the 
        Fox Tucson Theatre and Archive Project to restore and 
        renovate a historic theater;
            $30,000 to the City of Temecula, California for the 
        Job Skills and Commuter Census;
            $30,000 to the Cuban Resource Center in Los 
        Angeles, California for community center improvements;
            $50,000 to Easter Seals Tri-Counties in California 
        for the Easter Seals Child Development Center;
            $50,000 to Environment Now in Santa Monica, 
        California for continued development of the Ballona 
        Creek Trail and Bikeway;
            $50,000 to the City of Anaheim, California for the 
        Senior Citizen Wing Expansion of the Brookhurst 
        Community Center;
            $50,000 to the City of La Puente, California for an 
        addition to the La Puente Youth Learning Center;
            $50,000 to the City of Placerville, California for 
        the rehabilitation and development of the Gold Bug 
        Park, the Meagher House;
            $50,000 to the City of Rancho Cucamonga, California 
        for construction of a senior center;
            $50,000 to the County of San Bernardino, California 
        for the youth baseball/softball field complex at Spring 
        Valley Lake in Victorville;
            $50,000 to the County of San Bernardino, California 
        for the Barstow Wading Pool;
            $50,000 to the Mothers of East LA Santa Isabel in 
        Los Angeles, California for improvements to a community 
        garden;
            $50,000 to the West Haven Community Center in 
        Garden Grove, California for construction costs;
            $75,000 to the Angelus Plaza Senior Housing Complex 
        in Los Angeles, California for the acquisition of 
        multi-language translation equipment;
            $75,000 to the City of Long Beach, California for 
        construction of the Admiral Kidd Park Community Center;
            $90,000 to the City of Temecula, California for the 
        Vail Ranch Middle School Basketball Lighting Project;
            $100,000 to the Ed Roberts Campus in Berkeley, 
        California for planning and development of their 
        disability campus;
            $100,000 to Marin City, California for Marin City 
        Cultural and Community Center facility needs;
            $100,000 to the American Film Institute for the 
        establishment of a Screen Education Center for public 
        school teacher training;
            $100,000 to the City of Los Angeles, California for 
        construction needs of the Boyle Heights Youth 
        Technology and Recreation Center;
            $100,000 to the City of Los Angeles, California for 
        the Red Car Trolley study;
            $75,000 to the Fort Ord Re-use Authority in Marina, 
        California for economic development re-use activities 
        at the former Fort Ord;
            $100,000 to the Heritage Camp Foundation in 
        California for its Feria de California program;
            $100,000 to the Housing Trust of Santa Clara 
        County, California for affordable housing efforts in 
        Silicon Valley;
            $100,000 to the Leimert Park Merchants Association 
        in Los Angeles, California for continued revitalization 
        efforts in the Leimert Park Village;
            $125,000 to the City of Los Angeles, California for 
        construction of the Ernest E. Debs Nature Center;
            $150,000 to the City of Modesto, California for 
        infrastructure needs in distressed neighborhoods;
            $150,000 to the City of Vallejo, California for 
        development of a fire suppression system of Mare 
        Island;
            $150,000 to the Davis Street Community Center in 
        Central Alameda, California for facilities needs;
            $175,000 to the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, 
        California for construction needs of the M.H. de Young 
        Memorial Museum;
            $190,000 to the City of Simi Valley, California for 
        the expansion of the Simi Valley Senior Citizens 
        Center;
            $190,000 to the City of Westminster, California for 
        construction of a multi-cultural Community Center;
            $198,000 to the City of Riverside, California and 
        the California Department of Parks and Recreation for 
        the Citrus Park project;
            $200,000 to the City of Eureka, California for 
        Fisherman Dock Area Harbor capital improvement needs;
            $200,000 to the City of Highland, California for 
        the city history museum;
            $200,000 to the City of Inglewood, California for 
        design and construction needs related to a new seniors 
        center;
            $200,000 to the City of Needles, California for 
        blight abatement;
            $200,000 to the City of Twentynine Palms, 
        California for the Twentynine Palms Visitor Center;
            $200,000 to the County of San Bernardino, 
        California for construction of the Hall of Paleontology 
        at the San Bernardino County Museum;
            $200,000 to the County of San Bernardino, 
        California for the Big Bear Zoo relocation and 
        expansion;
            $200,000 to the Town of Apple Valley, California 
        for Phase One of Civic Center Park;
            $200,000 to the Town of Yucca Valley, California 
        for the Southside Community Park;
            $240,000 to the City of Diamond Bar, California for 
        construction of a senior center;
            $240,000 to the Kern County Superintendent of 
        Schools Office for the Mobility Opportunities via 
        Education project as a component of the Southeast 
        Bakersfield, California Redevelopment Project;
            $250,000 for Covenant House California, for 
        purchase and renovation of a new facility for the East 
        Bay Street Outreach and Community Service Center;
            $250,000 for the Center Theatre Group, of Los 
        Angeles, California, for the Culver City Theater 
        project;
            $250,000 for the Martin Luther King, Jr. Freedom 
        Center of Oakland, California, for facility 
        construction;
            $250,000 to Pacific Union College in Angwin, 
        California for the Napa Valley Community Resource 
        Center;
            $290,000 to the City of Citrus Heights, California 
        for the Sunrise MarketPlace Revitalization Project;
            $290,000 to the City of Stockton, California for 
        the historic restoration of the Fox Theatre;
            $290,000 to the Fund for the Preservation of the 
        California State Mining and Mineral Museum;
            $300,000 for Community Medical Centers of Fresno, 
        California, for renovations to the Fresno Community 
        Regional Medical Center;
            $300,000 to the City and County of San Francisco, 
        California for its Masterlease Hotel program for the 
        homeless;
            $300,000 to the City of East Palo Alto, California 
        for the redevelopment of the Ravenswood Industrial 
        Area;
            $300,000 to the City of Salinas, California for 
        construction of a municipal pool;
            $275,000 to the City of Santa Monica, California 
        for gateway needs at the Santa Monica Mountains 
        National Recreation Area;
            $300,000 to the Sacramento California Housing and 
        Redevelopment Agency for the Sacramento Asian Sports 
        Foundation, to construct a community center;
            $490,000 to El Centro Regional Medical Center in 
        Imperial County, California for construction of a 
        heliport;
            $490,000 to HomeAid to assist efforts to build and 
        renovate homeless shelters;
            $490,000 to the City of Bakersfield, California for 
        the Baker Street Corridor project;
            $490,000 to the City of Monrovia, California for 
        the Old Town Monrovia Revitalization Project;
            $490,000 to the City of Redding, California for the 
        Stillwater Industrial Park;
            $490,000 to the Sweetwater Authority in California 
        for the Sweetwater and Loveland Reservoirs Recreation 
        Project;
            $500,000 to the San Dieguito Transportation 
        Cooperative of California to centralize school bus 
        transportation operations and increase service 
        capacity;
            $740,000 to the City of Lancaster, California to 
        complete the Lancaster National Soccer Center;
            $750,000 for the City of East Palo Alto, California 
        to redevelop the Ravenswood industrial area;
            $750,000 for the West Angeles Community Development 
        Corporation of Los Angeles, California, for development 
        of the West Angeles Plaza;
            $190,000 to the City of Oceanside, California for 
        revitalization of the Crown Heights Neighborhood;
            $800,000 for the Town of Mountain Village, Colorado 
        for an affordable housing initiative;
            $1,500,000 for the City of Denver, Colorado for 
        revitalization;
            $50,000 to the City of Hartford, Connecticut for 
        redevelopment of the North Star Plaza area in the North 
        End community of Hartford;
            $75,000 to the University of Hartford, in Hartford, 
        Connecticut for the Hartt School Performing Arts 
        Center;
            $100,000 to the Town of Derby, Connecticut for 
        restoration of the Sterling Opera House;
            $300,000 for Connecticut Hospice, Inc., of 
        Branford, Connecticut, for construction of a new 
        facility;
            $800,000 for the Southside Institutions 
        Neighborhood Alliance of Hartford, Connecticut, for 
        neighborhood revitalization in Hartford;
            $390,000 to Norwich Community Development 
        Corporation in Norwich, Connecticut for rehabilitation 
        of the historic Capehart Mill;
            $375,000 to the Domestic Violence Services of 
        Greater New Haven, Connecticut for a domestic violence 
        transitional housing project;
            $490,000 to the Warner Theater in Torrington, 
        Connecticut for facility renovations;
            $50,000 for the Delaware Valley Historical Aircraft 
        Association, Delaware County to complete their building 
        project which will house historic military aircraft 
        presently on outdoor display in Willow Grove, 
        Pennsylvania;
            $50,000 to Delaware Valley Community Health, Inc. 
        for facilities needs at the Maria de los Santos Health 
        Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania;
            $300,000 for the Boys and Girls Club of Delaware 
        for facility construction and renovation;
            $750,000 for the YMCA of Delaware for renovations 
        to the Central Branch YMCA;
            $25,000 to the Orlando Community Redevelopment 
        Agency in Orlando, Florida for redevelopment of Otey 
        Place;
            $50,000 to the Tampa Bay Performing Arts Center in 
        Tampa, Florida for expansion purposes;
            $50,000 to the Tampa Bay, Florida Port Authority 
        for the channelside economic development project;
            $100,000 to the Alachua County Board of 
        Commissioners in Alachua County, Florida for land 
        conservation efforts related to the Emerald Necklace 
        initiative;
            $100,000 to the City of Gainesville, Florida for 
        the Depot Avenue economic development project;
            $200,000 to St. Petersburg Beach, Florida for the 
        Don Vista Community Center;
            $200,000 to the Alachua County Board of 
        Commissioners in Alachua County, Florida for a program 
        to stabilize and revitalize distressed neighborhoods, 
        including the City of Archer;
            $240,000 to the Brevard Community College in 
        Florida for renovations and infrastructure improvements 
        to the Cocoa Village Playhouse;
            $240,000 to the City of Daytona Beach, Florida for 
        the Daytona Beach Boardwalk Revitalization;
            $240,000 to the City of Maitland, Florida for a 
        senior citizens center;
            $240,000 to the Florida Association of Counties for 
        continuation of a national pilot project for assisting 
        rural communities to develop and sustain professional 
        economic development initiatives;
            $450,000 to Bethune Cookman College in Daytona 
        Beach, Florida for costs related to a community 
        services and student union building;
            $340,000 to the City of South Miami, Florida for 
        urban infrastructure upgrades and street enhancements;
            $350,000 for Covenant House, Florida, Inc., for 
        transitional housing;
            $490,000 to Sebring Airport Authority of Florida 
        for development of a light industrial commercial 
        business park;
            $490,000 to the City of Clearwater, Florida for the 
        ``Beach by Design Initiative'';
            $490,000 to the City of Deerfield Beach, Florida 
        for the construction of the Mitigation Operation 
        Center;
            $500,000 to Pinellas County, Florida for the Gulf 
        Boulevard project;
            $500,000 to Pinellas Park, Florida for community 
        hurricane evacuation infrastructure improvements;
            $500,000 to the City of Safety Harbor, Florida to 
        repair and replace brick streets and underground 
        utilities;
            $500,000 to the Miami-Dade County Housing Finance 
        Authority of Florida for the provision of housing 
        within the Liberty City/Model City neighborhoods for 
        public housing residents of those neighborhoods 
        displaced by changes in public housing;
            $740,000 to Edison Community College in Fort Myers, 
        Florida for the renovation of the Barbara B. Mann 
        Performing Arts Hall;
            $1,000,000 to Miami-Dade County, Florida for the 
        provision of housing within the Liberty City/Model City 
        neighborhoods for public housing residents of those 
        neighborhoods displaced by changes in public housing;
            $2,000,000 to St. Petersburg, Florida for the 
        Sunken Gardens improvement project;
            $100,000 to Clarkston Community Center, Inc. in 
        DeKalb County, Georgia for renovations;
            $100,000 to DeKalb County, Georgia for development 
        of a multipurpose civic and community center;
            $100,000 to Spelman College in Atlanta, Georgia for 
        historic preservation of Packard Hall;
            $150,000 to the Historic Savannah Foundation of 
        Georgia to revitalize housing in the historic Savannah 
        neighborhoods;
            $200,000 to College Partners, Inc in Atlanta, 
        Georgia for community development and revitalization 
        initiative;
            $240,000 to the ARCH Educational Network in Georgia 
        for construction of an education center;
            $240,000 to the City of Macon, Georgia for 
        redevelopment of a Brownfields site;
            $300,000 for Covenant House Georgia, to purchase 
        and renovate a new community service center in Atlanta, 
        Georgia;
            $350,000 for Rockdale County, Georgia, for 
        construction of Georgia's Veterans Park;
            $400,000 for the Tubman African American Museum in 
        Macon, Georgia for construction of the Tubman African 
        American Museum;
            $490,000 to Gwinnett County, Georgia for the 
        Liberty Heights Neighborhood Revitalization Project;
            $490,000 to the Warner Robins Century of Flight 
        Museum in Georgia for facilities expansion;
            $500,000 to the Liberty County, Georgia Development 
        Authority for the Coastal MegaPark for continued 
        planning and engineering studies and infrastructure 
        development;
            $750,000 for development of the Dr. Martin Luther 
        King, Sr., Community Service Center in Atlanta, 
        Georgia;
            $200,000 for the County of Maui, Hawaii for 
        restoration of the Iao Theater in Wailuku Town;
            $300,000 for the County of Kauai, Hawaii, for the 
        Heritage Trails project;
            $500,000 for the YMCA of Honolulu, Hawaii, for 
        reconstruction and expansion of the Kalihi YMCA 
        facility;
            $500,000 for the YMCA of Kauai, Hawaii, for 
        construction of a multipurpose community center;
            $750,000 for the Boys and Girls Club of Hawaii to 
        establish three new Boys and Girls Clubs of Hawaii in 
        the Hawaiian homestead areas of Papakolea, Nanakuli and 
        Paukukalo;
            $800,000 for the Filipino Community Center, Inc. of 
        Honolulu, Hawaii to develop a new community center;
            $490,000 to the City of Des Moines, Iowa for the 
        redevelopment of the Des Moines Advance Technology 
        Agribusiness Park;
            $500,000 for City of Waterloo, Iowa, for 
        brownfields redevelopment;
            $500,000 for the City of Cedar Rapids, Iowa, for 
        brownfields revitalization;
            $500,000 for the City of Council Bluffs, Iowa, for 
        the Katelman neighborhood redevelopment project;
            $500,000 for the City of Davenport, Iowa, for the 
        East Davenport Development Corporation mixed-income 
        housing development;
            $500,000 for the City of Des Moines, Iowa, for 
        brownfields redevelopment;
            $500,000 for the Iowa Department of Economic 
        Development for the Main Street Program;
            $500,000 to Homeward, Inc. in North Central Iowa to 
        assist local employers with housing programs and help 
        low- to moderate-income families purchase or remodel 
        existing homes;
            $1,000,000 for Dubuque, Iowa for the development of 
        an American River Museum;
            $290,000 to the City of Jerome, Idaho for the 
        renovation of facilities for a mixed-use community 
        education, health, and technology center;
            $500,000 for the Lewis and Clark State College for 
        the Idaho Virtual Incubator;
            $500,000 for the University of Idaho for a 
        technology incubator at Post Falls, Idaho;
            $1,000,000 for the Clearwater Economic Development 
        Association for the implementation of the Lewis and 
        Clark Bicentennial plan;
            $1,000,000 for the University of Idaho for a 
        performance and education facility;
            $50,000 to Family Focus in Evansville, Illinois for 
        facilities needs;
            $75,000 to Columbia College in Chicago, Illinois 
        for an integrated student services and activities 
        center;
            $90,000 to the Taylorville Community School 
        District in Taylorville, Illinois for construction of a 
        Fine Arts Educational Center;
            $100,000 to Knox College in Illinois for 
        renovations of Alumni Hall for the Abraham Lincoln 
        Studies Center;
            $100,000 to the City of Calumet Park, Illinois for 
        recreation center facility needs;
            $100,000 to the City of Chicago, Illinois for the 
        Lake Calumet Area Land Acquisition Redevelopment 
        project;
            $100,000 to the City of Elgin, Illinois for 
        expansion of the Elgin Child Daycare Center;
            $100,000 to the Haymarket Center in Chicago, 
        Illinois for the purchase and renovation of a facility;
            $100,000 to the Illinois Quad Cities Mississippi 
        Riverfront Redevelopment partnership for redevelopment 
        efforts;
            $100,000 to the Westie Holistic in Chicago, 
        Illinois for expansion of the Youth and Services 
        Division;
            $100,000 to the United Services of Chicago, Inc. in 
        Illinois for a job training project in the Chicago 
        metropolitan area;
            $140,000 to the Morrisonville Emergency Services 
        Facility in Morrison, Illinois for construction of 
        facilities;
            $150,000 for American Lung Association of Illinois 
        for technology upgrades for the Tobacco Quitline and 
        veterans outreach programs;
            $150,000 for Asian Human Services of Chicago, 
        Illinois, to expand its community empowerment programs;
            $150,000 for Catholic Urban Programs of East St. 
        Louis, Illinois to expand its emergency housing 
        facility;
            $150,000 for the Shelby County Community Services 
        Agency, of Shelbyville, Illinois, for construction of a 
        child care center;
            $150,000 for the World War II Illinois Veterans 
        Memorial of Springfield, Illinois, for construction;
            $150,000 to Southern Illinois University in 
        Carbondale, Illinois for infrastructure needs related 
        to the development of a University Research Park;
            $175,000 for the Quincy, Illinois, Housing 
        Authority to expand its community center facilities;
            $200,000 to the City of Berwyn, Illinois for 
        expansion and renovations of public safety and fire 
        facilities;
            $225,000 for the Peace/Education Coalition of 
        Chicago, Illinois for expansion of a community youth 
        center and related programs;
            $240,000 to Cornerstone Services, Inc. in Will 
        County, Illinois for the reconstruction of a warehouse 
        into a developmental training center for adults with 
        disabilities;
            $240,000 to Joliet Junior College of Illinois for 
        the Bridging Community, Economic and Workforce 
        Development Through Local Partnerships Project;
            $300,000 for Casa Central of Chicago, Illinois, for 
        expansion of a community technology center facility and 
        services;
            $300,000 to Sugar Grove, Illinois for drinking 
        water infrastructure improvements;
            $350,000 for Career Transitions Center of Chicago, 
        Illinois, for property acquisition and rehabilitation 
        to develop a social services outreach facility;
            $470,000 to Will County, Illinois for renovation, 
        expansion and facility improvement for the County 
        Courthouse;
            $490,000 to the City of Des Plaines, Illinois for 
        conversion of an existing building into a multi-use 
        community resource center;
            $500,000 for Christopher House of Chicago, 
        Illinois, for construction of a family resource center;
            $500,000 for the City of Moline, Illinois, for 
        riverfront redevelopment efforts in Moline, East 
        Moline, and Rock Island;
            $500,000 to Eureka College in Eureka, Illinois for 
        construction of a new science and technology center;
            $1,300,000 to Rush-Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical 
        Center in Chicago, Illinois for the Center on Research 
        and Aging;
            $50,000 to the City of Indianapolis, Indiana for 
        revitalization efforts focused on the historic 
        Massachusetts Avenue Corridor;
            $50,000 to the War Memorials Commission in 
        Indianapolis, Indiana for continued restoration of the 
        Indiana World War Memorial Plaza;
            $100,000 to the City of South Bend, Indiana for 
        demolition and revitalization in the Studebaker Auto/
        Oliver Plow Works industrial corridor;
            $140,000 for Tri-State University located in 
        Angola, Indiana for the development of the Tri-State 
        University Center for Educational Excellence;
            $190,000 to the University of Saint Francis in Fort 
        Wayne, Indiana for construction and outfitting of the 
        proposed Professional Development Center;
            $290,000 to Ball State University of Muncie, 
        Indiana for facilities expansion and renovation of the 
        Midwest Entrepreneurial Education Center;
            $300,000 for the City of Jeffersonville, Indiana, 
        for redevelopment of the Quartermaster Depot;
            $490,000 to the James Whitcomb Riley Hospital for 
        Children in Indiana to expand and enhance services at 
        the autism clinic;
            $500,000 for the Historic Preservation Association 
        of Jasper County, Indiana for the restoration of Drexel 
        Hall;
            $500,000 to the City of Merrillville, Indiana for 
        drinking water and wastewater infrastructure 
        improvements;
            $650,000 to the City of Hobart, Indiana for sewage 
        treatment facility needs;
            $740,000 to Purdue University in Indiana for the 
        Ultra-Performance Nanotechnology Center in West 
        Lafayette, Indiana;
            $1,000,000 for the City of Carmel for its Indiana 
        parks development;
            $240,000 to the City of Manhattan, Kansas for the 
        apron expansion at the Manhattan Regional Airport;
            $490,000 to the City of Hutchinson, Kansas to 
        properly seal all abandoned brine well sites;
            $750,000 to Power Community Development Corporation 
        for development of a grocery supermarket in Wichita, 
        Kansas;
            $1,000,000 to the City of Hutchinson, Kansas for 
        revitalization;
            $70,000 to Allen County, Kentucky for upgrades to 
        the Emergency 911 System;
            $190,000 to Simpson County, Kentucky for repairs 
        and renovation of the Emergency Operations Center;
            $200,000 to the Southern Star Development 
        Corporation for construction of a multipurpose 
        community facility;
            $228,000 to the First Gethsemane Center in 
        Louisville, Kentucky for renovation of facilities;
            $250,000 to the Western Kentucky Growers 
        Association for capital improvements and equipment;
            $275,000 to Brooklawn Youth Services for 
        construction of a multipurpose activities building and 
        gymnasium;
            $347,000 to the Canaan Community Development 
        Corporation for the Canaan Christian Academy child 
        development center;
            $400,000 to the Shiloh Community Renewal Center in 
        Kentucky for facilities reconstruction and 
        rehabilitation;
            $475,000 to the City of Lynch, Kentucky for 
        construction and restoration of facilities associated 
        with the Kentucky Coal Mine Museum;
            $500,000 to the New Zion Community Foundation 
        Development for construction of a community-based 
        consumer center;
            $525,000 to the London-Laurel County Tourist 
        Commission for design and land acquisition for a Civil 
        War historical/interpretive theme park in Laurel 
        County, Kentucky;
            $4,500,000 for the University of Louisville for the 
        expansion of its main library;
            $50,000 to the Acadia Economic Development 
        Corporation for establishment of a business incubator 
        in Crowley, Louisiana;
            $90,000 to the City of New Iberia, Louisiana for 
        downtown revitalization;
            $100,000 to Iberia Parish, Louisiana for the New 
        Iberia conference center;
            $100,000 to the Town of Golden Meadow, Louisiana 
        for recreational and job training uses;
            $100,000 to the Town of Grand Isle, Louisiana for 
        the Grand Isle Civic/Conference Center;
            $150,000 to St. John the Baptist Parish, Louisiana 
        for the planning, design and construction of a civic 
        center/farmers market;
            $200,000 for Booker T. Community Outreach, Inc., of 
        Monroe, Louisiana, for an elderly living center;
            $200,000 for Kingsley House, Inc., of New Orleans, 
        Louisiana, for facility and service expansion;
            $200,000 to the New Orleans Regional Planning 
        Commission for bike paths and recreational 
        infrastructure improvements in the St. Charles, St. 
        Bernard, and Plaquemines Parishes of Louisiana;
            $250,000 for Dillard University of New Orleans, 
        Louisiana, the International Center for Economic 
        Freedom project;
            $250,000 for the City of Donaldsonville, Louisiana, 
        for riverfront development;
            $250,000 to the City of Mandeville, Louisiana for 
        the Mandeville Trailhead Project;
            $250,000 to the Port of South Louisiana for 
        expansion of the Globalplex Intermodal Terminal 
        Facility;
            $275,000 for the Mirabeau Family Learning Center, 
        Inc., of New Orleans, Louisiana, for expansion of 
        facilities and services;
            $290,000 to DeSoto Parish, Louisiana for 
        transportation infrastructure improvements associated 
        with the West DeSoto Industrial Park and Riverfront 
        Park;
            $300,000 for the City of Shreveport, Louisiana, for 
        develop supporting infrastructure for its Convention 
        Center and Downtown Redevelopment project;
            $400,000 for the City of Vidalia, Louisiana for 
        construction of the Gateway Center at the Vidalia 
        riverfront;
            $490,000 to the City of Port Allen, Louisiana for 
        economic development and downtown revitalization;
            $500,000 for the Audubon Nature Institute, Inc., of 
        New Orleans, Louisiana, for development of the Living 
        Science Museum;
            $1,000,000 for the Louisiana Department of Culture, 
        Recreation, and Tourism for development activities 
        related to the Louisiana Purchase Bicentennial 
        Celebration;
            $50,000 to the Cambridge, Massachusetts 
        Redevelopment Authority for implementation of a public 
        space redevelopment initiative;
            $100,000 to Salem State College in Salem, 
        Massachusetts for construction of an arts center;
            $100,000 to the Caritas Good Samaritan Medical 
        Center in Brockton, Massachusetts for construction of a 
        cancer center;
            $100,000 to the City of Lawrence, Massachusetts for 
        parking facility needs in the Lower Gateway area of 
        Lawrence;
            $100,000 to the City of Worchester, Massachusetts 
        for the Gardner-Kirby-Hammond Street neighborhood 
        revitalization project;
            $100,000 to the Computer Access for Empowerment 
        Program in North Worchester County, Massachusetts for a 
        program to bring computer access to needy areas;
            $150,000 for Fall River, Massachusetts, for the Iwo 
        Jima project;
            $150,000 for the Charlestown, Massachusetts, Boys 
        and Girls Club for facility renovations;
            $175,000 to North Adams, Massachusetts for 
        facilities needs related to the Windsor Mills Incubator 
        Project;
            $250,000 to the Mystic Valley Development 
        Commission for a regional technology development 
        project known as TeleCom City;
            $325,000 to Nueva Esperanza in Holyoke, 
        Massachusetts for the Main Street Mercado project and 
        the New Hope Fish Farm project;
            $275,000 to the Baystate Medical Center, Inc. in 
        Springfield, Massachusetts for the Pioneer Valley Life 
        Sciences Initiative;
            $300,000 to the YMCA of Greater Springfield, 
        Massachusetts for rehabilitation of Camp Norwood;
            $350,000 for Fitchburg State College, of Fitchburg 
        Massachusetts, for the development of a new technology 
        center;
            $400,000 for the City of Lawrence, Massachusetts, 
        for economic development activities;
            $70,000 for St. Ambrose Housing Aid Center of 
        Baltimore, Maryland, for development of a new youth 
        center by the Stadium School Youth Dreamers;
            $100,000 to the Fayette Street Outreach Center in 
        Baltimore, Maryland for development of a building into 
        offices and a community center;
            $150,000 for the Rural Development Center, 
        University of Maryland Eastern Shore, for economic 
        development efforts of Delmarva Low Impact Tourism 
        Experiences;
            $240,000 to the Bethesda Academy of Performing Arts 
        in Maryland for continued construction of the 
        ``Imagination Stage Center for the Arts'';
            $240,000 to the Town of Garrett Park, Maryland for 
        renovation of the town center, Penn Place;
            $290,000 for the Enterprise Foundation for 
        stabilization and redevelopment efforts in the Forrest 
        Park and Lauraville neighborhoods of Baltimore, 
        Maryland;
            $300,000 for the Living Classrooms Foundation of 
        Baltimore, Maryland, for expansion of the Workforce 
        Development Center;
            $300,000 for the Ruth Enlow Library System of 
        Garrett County, Maryland, for construction of the new 
        Grantsville Branch library;
            $300,000 to the Spring Dell Center in La Plata, 
        Maryland for construction of a new facility;
            $375,000 to the Bowie Regional Arts Vision 
        Association in Bowie, Maryland for construction of a 
        new concert hall;
            $400,000 for the Women's Industrial Exchange of 
        Baltimore, Maryland, for redevelopment of Charles 
        Street property;
            $500,000 for the Kennedy Kreiger Institute of 
        Baltimore, Maryland, for development of a new community 
        behavioral health center;
            $500,000 for the Montgomery County Department of 
        Housing and Community Affairs, Maryland, for 
        streetscaping and revitalization efforts in Wheaton;
            $500,000 for the Montgomery County Department of 
        Housing and Community Affairs, Maryland, for the 
        Stewartown Homes digital divide initiative;
            $500,000 for the National Federation of the Blind 
        for the development of the National Research and 
        Training Institute for the Blind in Baltimore, 
        Maryland;
            $500,000 for the New Shiloh Community Development 
        Corporation of Baltimore, Maryland, for construction of 
        a multi-purpose center;
            $500,000 for Way Station, Inc., of Frederick, 
        Maryland, for development of the Way Station Community 
        Mental Health and National Education Center;
            $750,000 for the Fells Point Creative Alliance of 
        Baltimore, Maryland, for development of the Patterson 
        Center for the Arts;
            $50,000 to the City of Westbrook, Maine for 
        downtown revitalization efforts including the 
        construction of a parking garage;
            $50,000 to the International Northeast 
        Biotechnology Corridor in Fairfield, Maine for economic 
        development efforts directed at biotechnology 
        companies;
            $100,000 to the Franco-American Heritage Center at 
        St. Mary's in Lewiston, Maine for the redevelopment of 
        the St. Mary's Church into a learning center, museum 
        and performing arts space;
            $1,000,000 for the City of Lewiston, Maine for the 
        funding of a community and economic development center;
            $1,000,000 for the Wiscassett Regional Development 
        Corporation for the Maine Yankee Power Plane Reuse 
        Initiative;
            $140,000 to the Livingston Arts Council for 
        renovations of the Downtown Howell Opera House in 
        Howell, Michigan;
            $140,000 to the Village of Holly, Michigan for the 
        Railroad Depot Renovation Project;
            $150,000 to the Detroit Medical Center in Detroit, 
        Michigan for site readiness efforts related to the 
        Sinai Redevelopment Project;
            $250,000 to the Chippewa-Luce-Mackinac Community 
        Action Human Resources Authority in Michigan for a 
        downtown community revitalization project;
            $250,000 to the Henry Ford Museum and Greenfield 
        Village in Dearborn, Michigan for the ``America's 
        Transportation Stories'' project;
            $750,000 for Wayne County, Michigan, for the Wayne 
        County Nutritional Seniors Kitchen;
            $350,000 to NorthStar Varsity Park Redevelopment in 
        Detroit, Michigan for a targeted housing production 
        program;
            $600,000 to the City of Mt. Clemens, Michigan for 
        development and operations of a community recreation 
        center;
            $750,000 for Focus: HOPE of Detroit, Michigan, for 
        facility renovation;
            $750,000 to the National Center for Manufacturing 
        Sciences in Ann Arbor, Michigan for infrastructure 
        costs related to the development and deployment of 
        advanced technologies to the manufacturing base;
            $100,000 to Bemidji State University in Minnesota 
        for construction of the American Indian Cultural 
        Resource Center;
            $100,000 to the Boys and Girls Club of Detroit 
        Lakes, Minnesota for facility needs;
            $240,000 to the National Audubon Society for the 
        Audubon Ark Project in Dubuque, Iowa;
            $300,000 to the Audubon Center of the North Woods 
        in Minnesota for a capital project to increase 
        accessibility;
            $340,000 to Fairview Southdale Hospital in Edina, 
        Minnesota for the Fairview Health Services' ``Healthy 
        Mothers and Babies Technology Demonstration'' 
        initiative;
            $600,000 for the Mesabi Academy and Martin Hughes 
        School of Buhl, Minnesota, for facility renovation and 
        program expansion;
            $600,000 to the Reuben Lindh Family Services in 
        Minneapolis, Minnesota for facilities rehabilitation;
            $175,000 for the American Indian Opportunities 
        Industrial Center in Minneapolis, Minnesota for 
        rehabilitation of facilities;
            $50,000 for Applied Urban Research Institute of 
        Kansas City Missouri for a study to develop a city-wide 
        plan to assist troubled youth;
            $75,000 to the Kansas City, Missouri for 
        redevelopment of the former U.S. Courthouse;
            $240,000 to Logan College of Chiropractic's in 
        Chesterfield, Missouri for the continued development 
        and construction of a Learning Resource Center;
            $250,000 for the City of St. Joseph, Missouri for 
        downtown redevelopment project;
            $250,000 for the Cuba, Missouri Tourism Center for 
        the historic district improvement project;
            $250,000 for the Sparta, Missouri Community 
        Development Organization for the development of an 
        industrial park;
            $250,000 for the Andrew County Museum and 
        Historical Society in Missouri for expansion of their 
        museum;
            $250,000 for Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge 
        in Missouri for construction of an Education 
        Auditorium, boardwalk and outdoor classroom;
            $250,000 for the Missouri Forest Heritage Center in 
        Shannon Co., Missouri for the construction of a forest 
        resource management center;
            $300,000 for the Central Missouri Lake of the 
        Ozarks Convention and Visitor Bureau community center;
            $300,000 for the City of Fayette, Missouri Downtown 
        revitalization project;
            $300,000 for the Perry County, Missouri Industrial 
        Development Authority to renovate building to serve as 
        a Center for Industry and Education;
            $340,000 to the Central Missouri Food Bank in 
        Columbia, Missouri for construction of facilities;
            $450,000 for the Rolla, Missouri Chamber of 
        Commerce for downtown revitalization project;
            $500,000 for Downtown West Plains Inc., for City 
        square renovation and downtown revitalization project 
        of West Plains Missouri;
            $500,000 for North Central Regional Water 
        Commission in Unionville, Missouri for planning and 
        design of water supply reservoir project;
            $500,000 to the University of Missouri-Rolla for 
        research of affordable housing composite materials;
            $500,000 for Operation Breakthrough in Kansas City, 
        Missouri for facility expansion and redevelopment;
            $500,000 for University of Missouri at St. Louis, 
        Missouri for a mobile vision screening program;
            $1,000,000 for the City of Kansas City Missouri for 
        the City Market renovation project;
            $1,000,000 for the Community Development 
        Corporation of Kansas City, Missouri, for continued 
        revitalization of the northwest corner of 63rd and 
        Prospect Avenue;
            $1,000,000 for the University of Missouri-Kansas 
        City for continued development of it's collaborative 
        Life Sciences Initiative;
            $1,250,000 to the City of St. Louis, Missouri for 
        construction of a multi-purpose community center;
            $1,990,000 to Springfield, Missouri for land 
        acquisition within the Jordan Valley redevelopment 
        area;
            $250,000 for Missouri Western State College in St. 
        Joseph, Missouri for planning and renovation of the 
        Agenstein Science and Math Building;
            $50,000 to the City of Jackson, Mississippi for the 
        linking of cultural and entertainment districts through 
        the extension of Oakley Street;
            $150,000 to Mississippi State University in 
        consultation with the Mississippi Mainstreet 
        Association to promote small town revitalization by 
        utilizing the resources of the Small Town Center;
            $200,000 to Community Connections in Mississippi 
        for a pilot low income housing project in Southern 
        Mississippi;
            $200,000 to Leake County, Mississippi for site 
        preparation and infrastructure improvements for an 
        industrial park;
            $200,000 to the City of Carthage, Mississippi to 
        renovate the historic elementary school auditorium;
            $200,000 to the Oktibbeha County Economic 
        Development Authority in Mississippi for the 
        establishment of an industrial park;
            $250,000 to Jackson State University in Jackson, 
        Mississippi for renovations to the Center for the Study 
        of the 20th Century African American;
            $300,000 for the Chickasaw Trails Industrial 
        Authority in Mississippi for preliminary planning and 
        engineering for an industrial park;
            $300,000 for the Stoneville Research and Education 
        Complex in Stoneville, Mississippi for renovation and 
        expansion;
            $450,000 for Jackson State University in Jackson, 
        Mississippi, for the renovation of the Margaret J. 
        Walker Alexander Research Center;
            $500,000 for Harrisburg Arts and Social Services 
        Center in Tupelo, Mississippi for renovation of 
        facilities and program needs;
            $500,000 for Mississippi State University for a 
        state capacity development initiative;
            $500,000 for the City of Madison, Mississippi for 
        main street reconstruction;
            $1,000,000 for Jackson County, Mississippi for the 
        construction of a county community center;
            $1,000,000 for Mississippi State University for the 
        Mississippi Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems and 
        Engineering Extension Facility;
            $2,000,000 for the University of Southern 
        Mississippi for its National Center for Excellence in 
        Economic Development, Education, Research and Community 
        Service;
            $240,000 to the University of Montana Missoula for 
        the research and economic development enterprise;
            $1,000,000 for Great Falls, Montana for the 
        Missouri Riverfront Park Enhancement project;
            $1,000,000 for MSU-Billings for the development of 
        the Billings Technology Training and Technology program 
        as a business incubator;
            $1,000,000 for TechRanch of Bozeman, Montana, for 
        development of a technology incubator for the Gallatin 
        area and Eastern Montana;
            $20,000 to the County of Richmond, North Carolina 
        for the demolition of the Imperial Foods Plant;
            $50,000 to Cumberland County, North Carolina for 
        development of the Fayetteville-Cumberland County Dr. 
        Martin Luther King, Jr. Memorial Park;
            $50,000 to the North Carolina Cultural Center in 
        Robeson County, North Carolina for construction of the 
        center;
            $50,000 to the North Carolina Department of 
        Agriculture for the development of a Centralized 
        Agricultural Cold/Freezer Storage Facility and 
        Processing Center in rural Eastern North Carolina at 
        the Global TransPark;
            $100,000 to the North Carolina Community Land Trust 
        Initiative for capacity building and operational 
        support;
            $100,000 to the North Carolina Fair Housing Center 
        for a consumer education campaign to combat predatory 
        lending;
            $100,000 to the Wilson Family Resource Center in 
        Wilson, North Carolina for rehabilitation of 
        facilities;
            $150,000 to the Discovery Place Museum in 
        Charlotte, North Carolina for renovations needs;
            $150,000 to the North Carolina Institute of 
        Disaster Studies for activities related to the 
        mitigation of natural and technological disasters;
            $220,000 to the Town of Troy, North Carolina for 
        the Rent-to-Own Housing Pilot project;
            $240,000 to the Albemarle Downtown Development 
        Corporation for green space development;
            $250,000 to OPC Mental Health in Carrboro, North 
        Carolina for renovation of a thrift shop;
            $250,000 to Passage Home in Raleigh, North Carolina 
        for neighborhood restoration in the WE CAN Weed and 
        Seed target area of Southeast Raleigh;
            $250,000 to the Burch Avenue Center in Durham, 
        North Carolina for the construction of a multi-purpose 
        community center;
            $300,000 for Western Carolina University of 
        Cullowhee, North Carolina, for Millennial Campus 
        project;
            $300,000 to Alleghany County, North Carolina for 
        construction of a community center as part of the 
        Alleghany Wellness Center;
            $340,000 to Central Piedmont Community College in 
        Charlotte, North Carolina for construction a workforce 
        development training center;
            $400,000 to Self-Help Ventures Fund in Durham, 
        North Carolina for their revolving loan fund;
            $490,000 to the Mayland Community College in Spruce 
        Pine, North Carolina for the Avery Satellite Campus 
        project;
            $700,000 to Wake Forest University and Winston-
        Salem State University in North Carolina for 
        construction of a research facility for the Idealliance 
        program;
            $1,000,000 for Henderson, North Carolina for the 
        construction of the Embassy Cultural Center;
            $100,000 to the City of Rugby, North Dakota for 
        implementation of the Rural Economic Area Partnerships 
        strategic plan;
            $400,000 for Lewis and Clark Community Works of 
        North Dakota, for a rural housing development fund;
            $900,000 for Sitting Bull College in Fort Yates, 
        North Dakota for construction of a new science 
        facility;
            $1,000,000 for the North Central Planning Council, 
        North Dakota, to relocate agricultural structures;
            $1,000,000 for the Rural Economic Area Partnerships 
        (REAP) Zones to build on and leverage economic 
        development opportunities in North Dakota;
            $240,000 to the University of Nebraska at Omaha for 
        the Peter Kiewit Institute and the College of 
        Information Science and Technology to conduct research 
        in the area of computer security;
            $240,000 to Walthill, Nebraska for the Walthill 
        Public Schools for construction and equipping of two 
        science laboratory classrooms and facilities;
            $300,000 for the Northeast Family Center of 
        Lincoln, Nebraska, for facility renovations;
            $490,000 to Doane College in Crete, Nebraska for 
        the rehabilitation of the historic Whitcomb 
        Conservator;
            $500,000 for the Girls and Boys Town USA in Omaha, 
        Nebraska to address the needs of at-risk boys and 
        girls;
            $1,000,000 for the Community Alliance in Omaha, 
        Nebraska for its `Building Homes, Rebuilding Lives' 
        program;
            $40,000 for ``My Friend's Place'' in the City of 
        Dover, New Hampshire for emergency shelter needs;
            $140,000 to the Monadnock Ice Center Association 
        for construction and operation of a year-round ice 
        arena downtown Keene, New Hampshire;
            $180,000 for the Laconia Public Library in New 
        Hampshire for facility improvements;
            $190,000 for the Mt. Washington Valley Economic 
        Council's ``Technology Village Incubator'';
            $240,000 to the University of New Hampshire in 
        Manchester, New Hampshire for the relocation of the 
        Engineering Technology Laboratory;
            $340,000 to Lebanon College of Lebanon, New 
        Hampshire to implement a medical and dental training 
        program;
            $350,000 for the New Hampshire Community Technical 
        College for the Emerging Technology Center at Pease;
            $500,000 for Concord, New Hampshire to cleanup 
        brownfields;
            $500,000 for Keene, New Hampshire to cleanup 
        brownfields;
            $500,000 for Milford, New Hampshire for downtown 
        revitalization;
            $1,000,000 for the City of Nashua, New Hampshire to 
        create housing opportunities;
            $50,000 to Hopewell Township, New Jersey for 
        renovations to the Historic Hunt House;
            $50,000 to South Brunswick, New Jersey for design 
        and construction of a new library;
            $50,000 to the Alice Paul Centennial Foundation for 
        continuation of the Paulside Rehabilitation Project in 
        Mount Laurel, New Jersey;
            $90,000 to Fanwood Township, New Jersey for 
        downtown revitalization;
            $100,000 for Morristown Neighborhood House for the 
        infrastructure improvements to the Manahan Village 
        Resident Center Childcare facility in Morristown, New 
        Jersey;
            $100,000 for the Adults and Children Together 
        Against Violence program for the development of 
        violence prevention programs;
            $100,000 to Brookdale Community College in New 
        Jersey for facilities needs related to the New Jersey 
        Coastal Communiversity;
            $100,000 to Passaic County Community College in 
        Patterson, New Jersey for programming and equipment 
        needs;
            $100,000 to Englewood Hospital and Medical Center 
        in Englewood, New Jersey for Breast Care facilities 
        expansion;
            $100,000 to Holy Name Hospital in Teaneck, New 
        Jersey for dialysis center expansion;
            $140,000 to Burlington County, New Jersey for 
        Fairview Street curb replacement;
            $140,000 to Burlington County, New Jersey for Ark 
        Road sidewalk improvements;
            $200,000 to the Essex County, New Jersey Office of 
        Emergency Management for emergency service needs;
            $200,000 to the Morris County, New Jersey Office of 
        Emergency Management for emergency service needs;
            $200,000 to the Somerset County, New Jersey Office 
        of Emergency Management for emergency service needs;
            $200,000 to the Sussex County, New Jersey Office of 
        Emergency Management for emergency service needs;
            $200,000 to the Urban League of Hudson County, New 
        Jersey for construction related to a workforce 
        development center;
            $240,000 to Mercer County, New Jersey for the 
        KidsBridge Children's Cultural Center;
            $240,000 to the City of North Wildwood, New Jersey 
        for improvements to the beach, boardwalk, and 
        entertainment district of the City;
            $250,000 for the New Jersey Community Development 
        Corporation, of Paterson, New Jersey, for redevelopment 
        of abandoned property;
            $250,000 for the Township of Hamilton, New Jersey, 
        for renovations of a senior center;
            $250,000 to the University Heights Science Park in 
        Newark, New Jersey for historic preservation;
            $290,000 to Mercer County, New Jersey for senior 
        centers in East Windsor and Washington Townships;
            $300,000 for the Borough of Paulsboro, New Jersey, 
        for brownfields redevelopment;
            $490,000 for Valley Hospital's Cancer Care Center 
        in Paramus, New Jersey;
            $300,000 for the Rio Grande Community Development 
        Corporation, of Albuquerque, New Mexico, for 
        construction of the South Valley Economic Development 
        Center;
            $450,000 for Curry County, New Mexico for 
        infrastructure improvements to the Curry County 
        Fairgrounds;
            $490,000 to the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of 
        Albuquerque, New Mexico for the construction of a Job 
        Opportunity Center in Barelas, New Mexico;
            $650,000 for the City of Espanola, New Mexico, to 
        build a veterans memorial;
            $1,000,000 for Albuquerque Health Care for the 
        Homeless to complete renovation of a health care 
        facility for the homeless in Albuquerque, New Mexico;
            $1,000,000 for the City of Las Cruces, New Mexico 
        for the Model Extension Program for Increasing 
        Homeownership conducted by New Mexico State University;
            $1,000,000 for the Santa Fe Rape Crisis Center in 
        New Mexico to construct a new facility to house the 
        center, including outreach planning offices;
            $1,000,000 for the Southern New Mexico Fair and 
        Rodeo in Dona Ana County for infrastructure 
        improvements and to build a multi-purpose event center;
            $500,000 for the Community Pantry of Gallup/
        McKinley County, New Mexico, for facility construction;
            $50,000 for the Reno Veterans Memorial Project, of 
        Reno, Nevada, for construction of a memorial;
            $50,000 to the City of Henderson, Nevada for the 
        expansion of a downtown arts district and heritage 
        preservation;
            $100,000 to the Nevada Science Technology Center in 
        Las Vegas, Nevada, for development assistance;
            $150,000 for Boulder City, Nevada, for renovation, 
        modernization, and expansion of public recreation 
        facilities;
            $250,000 for the Boys and Girls Club of Carson 
        City, Nevada to establish a new community center;
            $250,000 for the Intertribal Council of Nevada to 
        establish a housing division;
            $290,000 to the City of Reno, Nevada for urban 
        development activities in the city's commercial center;
            $700,000 for development of a job training facility 
        for workers in the hospitality industry in Las Vegas, 
        Nevada;
            $750,000 for the Reno, Nevada, housing authority 
        for the Friendship Lane housing revitalization project;
            $750,000 for the Smart Start Child Care Center and 
        Expertise School of Las Vegas, Nevada, for construction 
        of a child care facility;
            $1,000,000 for Sparks, Nevada for the 
        revitalization of the West End community;
            $20,000 to the City of Syracuse, New York for 
        equipment and renovations to the Syracuse Boys and 
        Girls Club;
            $25,000 to the City of Gloversville, New York to 
        establish a memorial to World War II veterans;
            $25,000 to the Clinton County, New York Office of 
        Emergency Services for communications infrastructure 
        improvements that service the Lyon Mountain and Ausable 
        Forks areas of the county;
            $40,000 to Onondaga County, New York for the 
        installation of a water line for the Sentinel Heights 
        Fire Department;
            $50,000 to Safe Haven, Inc., in Oswego, New York 
        for the continued construction of a museum/interpretive 
        center chronicling the Fort Ontario Emergency Refugee;
            $50,000 to the Collins Public Library Board of 
        Trustees for the new Town of Collins, New York Public 
        Library;
            $50,000 to the County of Onondaga, New York for an 
        interpretive center at Baltimore Woods;
            $50,000 to the Hamburg Natural History Society, 
        Inc., for the Penn Dixie Paleontological and Outdoor 
        Education Center in Hamburg, New York;
            $50,000 to the Irish Classical Theatre Company in 
        Buffalo, New York for marketing and expansion of 
        program;
            $50,000 to the Roundabout Theater Company in New 
        York City, New York for facility needs;
            $50,000 to the YMCA of Greater New York for 
        construction of a gym and teen center in Queens, New 
        York;
            $250,000 to the Long Island Aquarium in Bay Shore, 
        New York for facilities needs;
            $70,000 to the Legacies and Landmarks Consortium of 
        Greater Rochester, New York for activities to promote 
        regional tourism;
            $75,000 to the Harbor Child Care Corporation in New 
        Hyde Park, New York for improvements to the existing 
        facility;
            $75,000 to the Jamaica Center for Arts and Learning 
        in New York for renovation of the First Dutch Reformed 
        Church;
            $75,000 to the New York City Department of Parks 
        and Recreation for remediation and restoration of the 
        College Point Sports Complex in Queens, New York;
            $80,000 to the Amherst Museum in Amherst, New York 
        for construction of a boat launch facility;
            $80,000 to the Variety Boys and Girls Club of 
        Queens, New York for the Teen Education for Every 
        Nationality Program;
            $90,000 to Wyoming County, New York to replace a 
        public safety communications tower and related hardware 
        and computer systems;
            $100,000 to Lewis County General Hospital in 
        Lowville, New York for infrastructure repairs and 
        improvements;
            $100,000 to the City of Auburn, New York for a 
        housing market study;
            $100,000 to the City of Buffalo, New York for the 
        provision of shelter and other services to refugees by 
        VIVE La Casa;
            $100,000 to the City of Ogdensburg, New York for 
        reconstruction of Fort LaPresentation;
            $100,000 to the Metropolitan Development 
        Association in Syracuse, New York for the Genesee 
        Street Armory study;
            $100,000 to the Nassau University Medical Center in 
        East Meadow, Long Island, New York for the renovation 
        and repair of its Hempstead Community Health Center;
            $100,000 to the New York City Planning Commission 
        to study the effects of rezoning Staten Island on the 
        growth of development;
            $100,000 to the Schenectady Family Health Services, 
        in Schenectady, New York for facilities expansion;
            $100,000 to the State University of New York at 
        Potsdam for the creation and operation of a Northern 
        New York Travel and Tourism Research Center to be 
        located at the Merwin Rural Services Institute;
            $100,000 to the Staten Island Freedom Memorial Fund 
        for construction of a memorial in the Staten island 
        community of St. George, New York;
            $100,000 to the Village of Green Island, New York 
        for public access and infrastructure needs;
            $115,000 to the Staten Island Catholic Youth 
        Organization Community Center of New York for expansion 
        of facilities to include a new gymnasium;
            $125,000 to the National Lighthouse Center and 
        Museum in St. George, New York for developing and 
        installing exhibits;
            $50,000 to the Village of Tuckahoe, New York for 
        streetscape improvements;
            $500,000 to Take the Field in New York City, New 
        York for a program to rebuild the public school 
        athletic facilities;
            $150,000 to the Abyssinian Development Corporation 
        for rehabilitation needs of the Renaissance Ballroom 
        and Theater Complex in Harlem, New York;
            $150,000 to the Hillside Children's Center in 
        Rochester, New York for the modernization and upgrade 
        of the facility's Monroe Avenue Campus;
            $150,000 to the Long Island Housing Partnership, 
        Long Island for neighborhood revitalization;
            $150,000 to the Mount Morris Park Community 
        Improvement Association in New York for development of 
        the Parkside Inn, a community economic development 
        initiative;
            $150,000 to the New York City Department of Parks 
        and Recreation in New York, New York for the completion 
        of an irrigation system during the third phase of the 
        Joyce Kilmer Park restoration project;
            $150,000 to the Strong Museum in Rochester, New 
        York for expansion and upgrade of museum facilities;
            $150,000 to the Village of Freeport, New York for 
        the downtown revitalization project;
            $125,000 to the WXXI Public Broadcasting Council in 
        Rochester, New York for building renovations necessary 
        to meet health, safety, and occupational requirements, 
        as well as to meet FCC mandated digital broadcasting 
        standards;
            $150,000 to the City of Auburn for renovations and 
        infrastructure improvements to the Merry Go Round 
        Playhouse in Auburn, New York;
            $190,000 to the Cortland County Business 
        Development Corporation for equipment and 
        infrastructure improvements for Wetstone Technologies;
            $190,000 to the Orange County Mental Health 
        Association in Orange County, New York for the ``Home-
        To-Stay'' project;
            $200,000 to Onondaga County, New York for 
        infrastructure improvements to the Village of Tully's 
        Water System;
            $200,000 to the Battle of Plattsburgh Association 
        of Plattsburgh, New York to rehabilitate a building to 
        create an interpretive center;
            $100,000 to the City of Buffalo, New York for the 
        repair and rehabilitation by the Buffalo Philharmonic 
        Orchestra of the Birge Mansion;
            $100,000 to the City of Buffalo, New York for the 
        purchase of audiophones for displays and exhibits at 
        the Buffalo and Erie County Historical Society;
            $200,000 to the City of Cortland, New York for the 
        Cortland Sports Complex;
            $200,000 to the City of Hornell, New York, for 
        restoration of the historic depot;
            $200,000 to the City of Syracuse, New York for 
        building renovations to the Onondaga Historical 
        Association;
            $200,000 to the City of Syracuse, New York for 
        renovations and infrastructure improvements to the 
        Huntington Family Center;
            $100,000 to the City of White Plains, New York for 
        streetscape improvements to Mamaroneck Avenue;
            $200,000 to the State University of New York 
        College of Environmental Science and Forestry for water 
        infrastructure improvements on a portion of Onondaga 
        Creek;
            $150,000 to Fred Daris Underground Theater, Inc. in 
        the South Bronx, New York for the restoration of a 
        theater and the installation of a theater company;
            $225,000 to the Gowanus Canal Community Development 
        Corporation in Brooklyn, New York for development of a 
        comprehensive community development plan;
            $240,000 to Putnam County, New York for a new 
        senior citizens center;
            $250,000 to Covenant House New York for renovation 
        of their crisis center;
            $250,000 to Mary Mitchell Family and Youth Center 
        in the South Bronx, New York for after school and teen 
        programs, improvement of computer lab and family 
        literacy programs, and to increase usage of the center 
        by the local community;
            $250,000 to Onondaga Community College for 
        equipment, training and infrastructure improvements to 
        the Lean Manufacturing Lab;
            $250,000 to Phipps House and We Stay/Nos Quedamos 
        Inc. for the construction of day rooms and gardens at 
        La Casa de Felicidad in the South Bronx, New York;
            $250,000 to the Brooklyn Public Library in New York 
        for construction and renovation of educational and 
        cultural facilities;
            $250,000 to the Central New York Regional Planning 
        and Development Board for the development of the Finger 
        Lakes Open Space and Agricultural Land Conservation 
        Project;
            $250,000 to the City of Hudson, New York for the 
        construction of utility service, boat launch and bulk-
        head along the Hudson River waterfront area;
            $250,000 to the Cornell Agriculture and Food 
        Technology Park--Geneva Station in Ontario County, New 
        York to continue infrastructure development, design and 
        facilities construction;
            $250,000 to the Lesbian and Gay Community Services 
        Center, New York City for infrastructure upgrades;
            $250,000 to the State University of New York 
        College of Environmental Science and Forestry for the 
        Syracuse Southwest Community Environmental Center;
            $250,000 to the Staten Island, New York YMCA for 
        facilities expansion to create a South Shore Center 
        Youth/Teen Annex;
            $250,000 for infrastructure improvements to the 
        Tioughnioga Riverfront Development Project in Cortland 
        County, New York;
            $290,000 to Kaleida Health for the planning and 
        design of facilities for Children's Hospital in 
        Buffalo, New York;
            $300,000 to Onondaga County, New York for 
        redevelopment of the Three Rivers Area in the Town of 
        Clay;
            $200,000 to the Village of Saugerties, New York for 
        streetscape improvements in the historical district;
            $250,000 to Carnegie Hall in New York for 
        continuation of Carnegie Hall's Third Stage Project;
            $250,000 to Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York City 
        for facility construction;
            $200,000 to the University Colleges of Technology 
        at the State University of New York for continued 
        development of a Telecommunications Center for 
        Education;
            $200,000 for research and infrastructure 
        improvements for the Center of Excellence in 
        Nanoelectronics at Albany, New York;
            $500,000 to the Children's Center in Brooklyn, New 
        York for the construction of a facility to house 
        educational and therapeutic programs for disabled 
        children.
            $200,000 to Rensselaer County, New York for safety 
        and guide rail improvements to county highways;
            $340,000 to the Natural History Museum of the 
        Adirondacks in Tupper Lake, New York, for building 
        construction;
            $350,000 to Onondaga County, New York for waterline 
        improvements in the Town of Skaneateles;
            $400,000 to Polytechnic University, Brooklyn for 
        the National Center for E-Commerce;
            $400,000 to the City of Syracuse, New York for 
        renovations to the Sibley Building;
            $450,000 to the Apollo Theater Foundation in 
        Harlem, New York for theater restoration;
            $450,000 to Union College, of Albany, New York for 
        the Union-Schenectady Neighborhood Initiative;
            $490,000 to Madison County, New York for economic 
        development and infrastructure improvements for 
        industrial park sites;
            $490,000 to the City of Rome, New York for site 
        development and infrastructure improvements related to 
        the South Rome Industrial Park;
            $490,000 to the North Shore-Long Island Jewish 
        Health System in New York for an emergency room 
        preparedness program;
            $500,000 to the City of Buffalo, New York for the 
        construction of additional facilities at the 
        Burchfield-Penney Art Center;
            $500,000 to the State University of New York at 
        Albany for continued development of a manufacturing/
        workforce training center;
            $700,000 to the City of Auburn, New York for Phase 
        I of the Owasco Riverfront Park Project;
            $990,000 to St. Bonaventure University of St. 
        Bonaventure, New York for renovations of Delaroche 
        Hall;
            $750,000 to the City of Syracuse, New York for the 
        design, development and construction of an 
        International Tourism Center at the Carousel Center;
            $990,000 to the Cancer Institute of Long Island at 
        Stony Brook University, New York to develop and 
        implement a clinical database of breast and prostate 
        cancer patients;
            $25,000 to the Music Conservatory of Westchester, 
        New York for construction and capital improvements on 
        their new facility;
            $125,000 to the City of Yonkers, New York for 
        renovation of the waterfront area around Riverfront 
        Park;
            $100,000 to the Village of Larchmont, New York for 
        streetscape improvements;
            $100,000 to the Endicott Performing Arts Center in 
        Endicott, New York for restoration of the Lyric 
        Theater;
            $50,000 to the Latino Cultural School of Arts in 
        Lorain, Ohio for facilities needs;
            $100,000 to the Akron, Ohio Zoological Park for 
        development of the Environmental Education Center;
            $135,000 to the Ohio Department of Development for 
        continued development of the Black Swamp rural arts 
        initiative in Ottawa, Lucas, Wood, and Fulton counties;
            $15,000 to the Fulton County, Ohio Commission for 
        rehabilitation of a Civil War memorial;
            $200,000 to the National Interfaith Hospitality 
        Network for expanding local network support services;
            $240,000 to Columbus State Community College in 
        Columbus, Ohio for construction of a new child 
        development center;
            $250,000 to the Rural Health Collaborative of 
        Southern Ohio for a Community Health and Wellness 
        Center Initiative;
            $300,000 to the Dayton-Montgomery County Port 
        Authority in Ohio for urban job creation;
            $300,000 to the Mandel School of Applied Social 
        Sciences' Center for Community Development at Case 
        Western Reserve University for the Louis Stokes Fellow 
        Program in Community Organization and Development;
            $390,000 to Brown County General Hospital for 
        construction and equipment as part of the Community 
        Health and Wellness Center Initiative;
            $390,000 to the University of Cincinnati Medical 
        Center in Cincinnati, Ohio for renovation and expansion 
        of the Medical Sciences Building;
            $400,000 to Clark County, Ohio for infrastructure 
        upgrades for economic development;
            $400,000 to Urbana University in Urbana, Ohio for 
        the renovation of Bailey and Barclay Halls;
            $422,000 to the Richland County, Ohio Emergency 
        Management Agency to purchase electromechanical outdoor 
        warning sirens;
            $490,000 to Heidelberg College in Tiffin, Ohio for 
        construction of facilities for the school's Water 
        Quality Laboratory;
            $490,000 to Lake Metroparks in Concord Township, 
        Ohio for the Environmental Education Center at Camp 
        Klein;
            $500,000 for the City of Cleveland, Ohio for the 
        construction of the Cleveland Intercultural Center;
            $500,000 to John Carroll University in Cleveland, 
        Ohio for the needs related to the Dolan Center for 
        Science and Technology;
            $750,000 to the Ohio State University for the 
        Neighborhood Revitalization Initiative to improve 
        housing opportunities, public safety/crime reduction, 
        and ``Gateway Center'' Facilities;
            $900,000 for Franklin County, Ohio for purchase of 
        park land;
            $1,000,000 for the City of Dayton, Ohio for the 
        revitalization of historic main Street;
            $1,000,000 for Wellsville, Ohio for improvements to 
        a riverside transportation center;
            $1,000,000 to Mount Union College in Alliance, Ohio 
        for a new science facility;
            $1,500,000 to the City of Toledo, Ohio for 
        improvements to the near downtown historic commercial 
        district, and to leverage the potential of not-for-
        profit community and economic development 
        organizations;
            $140,000 to the City of El Reno, Oklahoma for 
        development of a trolley system;
            $300,000 to the City of Oklahoma City for the 
        Oklahoma Land Run Memorial;
            $490,000 to the City of Bennington, Oklahoma for 
        construction of a multipurpose building;
            $1,490,000 to the City of Midwest City, Oklahoma 
        for Phase II of the City's tornado recovery;
            $50,000 to the City of Newberg, Oregon for 
        transition of the Newberg Central School into a 
        community center;
            $50,000 to the City of Portland, Oregon for the 
        North Macadam Greenway initiative;
            $100,000 to the Rural Oregon Continuum of Care 
        (ROCC) consortium for scattered site transitional 
        housing needs;
            $120,000 to the City of The Dalles, Oregon for the 
        Mid-Columbia Veterans Memorial Project;
            $150,000 to the Boys and Girls Club of Albany, 
        Oregon for construction of an addition to existing 
        facilities;
            $300,000 for Dalles, Oregon, for development of the 
        Dalles Fiber Optic Loop;
            $550,000 for the Oregon Food Bank for its food 
        distribution efforts;
            $1,000,000 for Eastern Oregon University for 
        construction of a science center;
            $200,000 for Irvington Covenant CDC in Portland, 
        Oregon to develop affordable housing;
            $20,000 to the Dormont Historical Society in 
        Dormont, Pennsylvania for organizational support;
            $20,000 to the McKeepsport Little Theater in 
        McKeepsport, Pennsylvania for facility renovation;
            $30,000 to the Senior Adult Activities Center of 
        Montgomery, Pennsylvania for facilities renovation;
            $40,000 to Juniata County, Pennsylvania for outdoor 
        recreational facilities;
            $45,000 to the Reading Berks Human Relations 
        Council in Pennsylvania for purposes related to its 
        mission;
            $50,000 to the Armstrong County Commission, 
        Pennsylvania for the horse park at Crooked Creek Lake;
            $70,000 to the Briar Bush Nature Center in 
        Montgomery County, Pennsylvania for restoration of the 
        visitors center, refurbishment of the bird observatory, 
        and education program expansion;
            $90,000 to Bucks County, Pennsylvania for design 
        and engineering costs for a beautification effort along 
        Route 13;
            $90,000 to Bucks County, Pennsylvania for the 
        redevelopment and revitalization of the downtown 
        business district of Bristol Borough, Pennsylvania;
            $100,000 for the Philadelphia Zoo, Pennsylvania to 
        expand construction of Children's Zoo;
            $100,000 Punxsutawney Community Center in 
        Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania for infrastructure 
        improvements and renovation of facilities;
            $100,000 to Bucks County, Pennsylvania for 
        infrastructure and area site improvements at the 
        Stainless Inc. property brownfield site in Perkasie 
        Borough;
            $100,000 to Discovery Square, Erie, Pennsylvania 
        for the construction of an educational and cultural 
        complex;
            $100,000 to the Borough of Frackville, Pennsylvania 
        for Central Business District improvements;
            $100,000 to the Borough of Millerstown, Perry 
        County, Pennsylvania for improvements to the Borough 
        Municipal Building, which will allow the Borough to 
        implement several community programs including 
        substance abuse deterrent programs and clinics, 
        Scouting programs as well as senior informational 
        programs and facilities;
            $100,000 to the Borough of New Hope, Pennsylvania 
        for the James A. Michener Museum to build the 
        infrastructure for a satellite facility in New Hope;
            $100,000 to the Borough of Shenandoah, Pennsylvania 
        for Central Business District economic development 
        activities;
            $100,000 to the OLYMPIA ship of Independence 
        Seaport Museum to provide ship repairs which will 
        contribute to the economic development of the Penn's 
        Landing waterfront area in Philadelphia;
            $100,000 to the Urban Redevelopment Authority of 
        Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for the Bloomfield-Garfield 
        housing revitalization effort;
            $150,000 to Rostraver Township, Pennsylvania for 
        infrastructure improvements related to an economic 
        development initiative;
            $150,000 to the City of Washington, Pennsylvania 
        for construction and operations needs of a recreation 
        and community economic development center;
            $150,000 to the State College Baseball Club, Inc. 
        for the development and operation of a new sports 
        complex for youth baseball and softball in Centre 
        County, Pennsylvania;
            $160,000 to the Borough of Wayensboro, Pennsylvania 
        for infrastructure improvements for an industrial area 
        along Ninth street;
            $200,000 to the Allegheny Housing Authority of 
        Pennsylvania to construct the Groveton Village 
        Computer/Support Services Center;
            $200,000 to the Hiram G. Andrews Center in 
        Johnstown, Pennsylvania for an employment program for 
        students with disabilities targeted at emerging 
        technical markets;
            $200,000 to the Scottdale Community Pool 
        Association in Scottdale, Pennsylvania for the facility 
        needs associated with the continued operations of the 
        former YMCA pool;
            $200,000 to the Urban Redevelopment Authority of 
        Pittsburgh in conjunction with Northside Properties in 
        Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania to acquire the 332 unit, 
        scattered site affordable housing development with 
        project-based Section 8 rental subsidy;
            $200,000 to the People's Emergency Center Community 
        Development Corporation in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
        for implementation of a Neighborhood Transformation and 
        Revitalization Plan in West Philadelphia;
            $200,000 to the Johnstown-Cambria County Airport in 
        Cambria County, Pennsylvania for customer service area 
        renovation needs;
            $240,000 to the Beaver County, Pennsylvania 
        Corporation for Economic Development for the Riverfront 
        Development Project, Bridgewater Crossing;
            $240,000 to the Boys and Girls Club of Erie, 
        Pennsylvania for a facility expansion project;
            $240,000 to the County of Lancaster, Pennsylvania 
        for the Sunnyside Neighborhood Development Project;
            $250,000 to the City of Chester, Pennsylvania for 
        revitalization of its waterfront;
            $250,000 to the City of Scranton, Pennsylvania for 
        the construction of a garage and retail facility at the 
        new hotel/convention center;
            $250,000 to the City of Williamsport of Lycoming 
        County, Pennsylvania for infrastructure development for 
        industrial expansion;
            $250,000 to the Good Shepherd School in Braddock, 
        Pennsylvania for facility renovation;
            $200,000 to the Town of Johnstown, Pennsylvania for 
        the Kernville neighborhood recreation project;
            $250,000 to the City of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
        for assistance to Daggett Street homeowners;
            $300,000 for the expansion of facilities of the Re 
        Place at Good Shepard Home, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania 
        which will provide employment opportunities for persons 
        with mental and physical challenges in sales, business 
        administration, mechanical repair, janitorial skills 
        and computer refurbishing;
            $300,000 to the Ogontz Avenue Revitalization 
        Corporation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to assist with 
        substantial rehabilitation of 40-50 severely 
        deteriorated vacant properties that will be developed 
        as a part of the West Oak Lane community development 
        rebuilding initiative;
            $350,000 for the Urban Development authority of 
        Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania for the Harbor Gardens 
        Greenhouse project;
            $350,000 to the American Cities Foundation in 
        Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for support of the Community 
        Leadership Institute;
            $350,000 to CitiVest in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania 
        for housing and economic development efforts in 
        northeast Pennsylvania;
            $400,000 to the City of Reading, Pennsylvania for 
        the development of the Morgantown Road Industrial Park 
        on what is currently a brownfields site;
            $400,000 to the Please Touch Museum in 
        Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for facilities needs;
            $490,000 to the City of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 
        for the CORRIDORone Regional Rail program of the Modern 
        Transit Partnership in downtown Harrisburg, 
        Pennsylvania;
            $490,000 to the University Technology Park, Inc. in 
        Chester, Pennsylvania for construction of the Institute 
        for Economic Development;
            $500,000 to the Winnie Palmer Nature Reserve in 
        Pennsylvania for development of the reserve;
            $700,000 to the American Cities Foundation in 
        Philadelphia, Pennsylvania for support of the Home 
        Ownership Institute;
            $900,000 to the City of Lancaster, Pennsylvania for 
        the development of an entertainment/retail complex 
        which is intended to enhance the economic development 
        provide hundreds of new jobs;
            $1,400,000 to the County of Cambria, Pennsylvania 
        for the design and construction of the Northern Cambria 
        Recreation Facility;
            $250,000 to UPMC Lee Hospital in Johnstown, 
        Pennsylvania for the Convalescent Garden project;
            $25,000 to West Bay Community Action in Warwick, 
        Rhode Island for programs supporting the elderly, the 
        homeless, and children;
            $25,000 to the Rhode Island Emergency Management 
        Agency for needs of the First Responders Program;
            $50,000 for the City of Providence, Rhode Island, 
        for inner city recreational facilities;
            $50,000 for the Rhode Island Jewish War Veterans 
        for a veterans memorial;
            $100,000 for the Coastal Institute at the 
        University of Rhode Island for development of a 
        sustainable management plan for Narragansett Bay;
            $100,000 for the Institute for the Study and 
        Practice of Nonviolence in Providence, Rhode Island for 
        construction of a community center;
            $100,000 for the South Providence Development 
        Corporation in Providence, Rhode Island for the 
        development of a recycling facility;
            $100,000 to the Woonsocket Fire Department in 
        Woonsocket, Rhode Island for equipment and technology 
        upgrades associated with fire safety and 
        communications;
            $150,000 for Pell-Chafee Performance Center in 
        Providence, Rhode Island to complete construction;
            $200,000 for Cornerstone Adult Services in Warwick, 
        Rhode Island for the construction of an Alzheimer's day 
        center;
            $200,000 for the Boys and Girls Club of Pawtucket, 
        Rhode Island, for development of a new facility;
            $200,000 for the Newport Art Museum in Newport, 
        Rhode Island for historical renovation;
            $275,000 to the town of Smithfield, Rhode Island 
        for continued development and modernization of 
        Deerfield Park, including the expansion of the 
        Smithfield Senior Center;
            $350,000 for the Herreshoff Marine Museum in 
        Bristol, Rhode Island to restore and expand a maritime 
        heritage museum;
            $450,000 for the City of Providence, Rhode Island 
        for the development of a Botanical Center at Roger 
        Williams Park and Zoo;
            $450,000 for the Providence Performing Arts Center 
        for building modernization in Providence, Rhode Island;
            $500,000 for Town of Johnston, Rhode Island for 
        rehabilitation of a senior center;
            $1,000,000 for Traveler's Aid of Rhode Island for 
        relocation and expansion in Providence, Rhode Island;
            $150,000 to the City of Marion, South Carolina for 
        renovations of the Joyner Auditorium, and adjoining 
        space, into a cultural arts center;
            $190,000 to the City of Spartanburg, South Carolina 
        for the Motor Racing Museum of the South;
            $200,000 to South Carolina State University in 
        Orangeburg, South Carolina for planning, engineering, 
        and construction of a multidisciplinary research and 
        conference center;
            $490,000 to the City of Myrtle Beach, South 
        Carolina for a Pavilion Area Master Plan;
            $500,000 for Spoleto Festival, USA, of Charleston, 
        South Carolina, for rehabilitation of the historic 
        Middleton-Pinckney House;
            $500,000 for the City of Charleston, South 
        Carolina's Homeownership Initiative to create 
        affordable housing opportunities;
            $750,000 for infrastructure improvements to the 
        School of the Building Arts in Charleston, South 
        Carolina;
            $825,000 to Marlboro County, South Carolina for 
        costs associated with the construction and equipping of 
        the Marion Wright Edelman Library in Bennettsville, 
        South Carolina;
            $1,000,000 for the Sea Island Comprehensive Health 
        Care Corporation, Inc., of Johns Island, South 
        Carolina, for affordable housing and economic 
        development purposes;
            $150,000 for the City of Tea, South Dakota, to 
        develop a community library;
            $250,000 for the Lake Area Improvement Corporation 
        of Madison, South Dakota, for development of the 
        Madison Technical Center;
            $300,000 for Black Hills Community Development 
        Corporation of Lead, South Dakota, for economic 
        development efforts related to the closure of the 
        Homestake Gold Mine;
            $300,000 for South Dakota School of Mines and 
        Technology of Rapid City, South Dakota, for renovations 
        and rehabilitation related to the development of the 
        Rapid City Children's Science Center;
            $300,000 for the Flandreau Development Corporation 
        of Flandreau, South Dakota, for infrastructure related 
        to the Flandreau industrial park development;
            $300,000 for the Union Gospel Mission in Sioux 
        Falls, South Dakota, for renovations to the historic 
        Farley Lostcher building;
            $400,000 for the City of Brookings, South Dakota, 
        for renovations and rehabilitation to the historic 
        Brookings Middle School;
            $800,000 for the Sioux Falls, South Dakota, 
        Development Foundation for development of a facility 
        that will support technology-based businesses;
            $550,000 for the City of Watertown, South Dakota, 
        for development related to the Hanten Industrial Park;
            $1,750,000 for planning, design, and construction 
        of the Wakpa Sica Reconciliation Place in South Dakota;
            $150,000 for Children's Village in Pine Ridge, 
        South Dakota, for a new facility;
            $150,000 for Wagner, South Dakota, for economic 
        development activities;
            $200,000 for the Aberdeen Business Improvement 
        District of South Dakota for a downtown development 
        revolving loan fund;
            $200,000 for Turning Point/Volunteers of America in 
        Sioux Falls, South Dakota for construction of a youth 
        services facility;
            $50,000 to the Melrose Community Technology Center 
        in the Orange Mound neighborhood of Memphis, Tennessee 
        for reconstruction of the historic Melrose School for 
        use as a new community technology center;
            $100,000 to the Memphis Zoo in Memphis, Tennessee 
        for the Northwest Passage Campaign;
            $500,000 to Hamilton County, Tennessee for the 
        Broadband Economic Development Initiative;
            $740,000 to the Historic Tennessee Theatre 
        Foundation, Inc. for construction and renovation of 
        facilities;
            $950,000 for the City of Chattanooga, Tennessee for 
        the revitalization of the Alton Park neighborhood;
            $1,000,000 for the City of Memphis, Tennessee for 
        the Soulsville Revitalization project;
            $25,000 to the Acres Home Community Development 
        Corporation in Houston, Texas for an athletic complex;
            $50,000 to the Houston Community College in 
        Houston, Texas for development of the 5th Ward 
        Community Technology Center;
            $75,000 to the City of Abilene, Texas for 
        renovation of the historic Wooten Hotel;
            $75,000 to the City of Houston, Texas's Department 
        of Health and Human Services for the Lead Based Paint 
        Hazard Control Program;
            $100,000 to Texas A&M-Kingsville; for construction 
        of the Kingsville Center for Young Children;
            $100,000 to the City of Austin, Texas for the 
        expansion of the SMART Housing Project;
            $100,000 to the Heights Association in Houston, 
        Texas for community beautification initiatives;
            $150,000 to the T.R. Hoover Community Development 
        Corporation in Dallas, Texas for completion of the T.R. 
        Hoover Multipurpose Center and purchase of equipment;
            $175,000 to the City of San Angelo Development 
        Corporation in Texas for the establishment of a 
        regional industrial park;
            $175,000 to the Windsor Elderly and Housing Center 
        in Abilene, Texas for elevator replacement;
            $200,000 to Willacacy County Boys and Girls Club in 
        Willacacy County, Texas for a sports complex;
            $200,000 for a design, engineering and economic 
        feasibility study for the Trinity River Visions project 
        in Fort Worth, Texas;
            $300,000 to the Fort Worth Transportation Authority 
        for the development of a public market in Fort Worth, 
        Texas;
            $350,000 to the City of Waco, Texas for the housing 
        assistance program;
            $500,000 for the City of Wichita Falls, Texas for 
        the restoration of the old Holt Hotel property;
            $500,000 to the Victory Art Center in Fort Worth, 
        Texas for the adaptive use and historic renovation of 
        the old Our Lady of Victory building;
            $740,000 to the Globe of the Great Southwest in 
        Midland, Texas for facilities expansion;
            $740,000 to the Old Red Courthouse Museum in 
        Dallas, Texas for the restoration of facilities to 
        house the Museum of Dallas History and preservation and 
        enhancement of artifacts in the collection;
            $1,000,000 for the City of Fort Worth, Texas for 
        the redevelopment of a residential and commercial 
        center along Hemphill Street;
            $1,000,000 for the Greater El Paso, Texas Chamber 
        of Commerce for a local economic development initiative 
        for the creation of jobs and housing;
            $1,000,000 to Alvin Community College, Texas for 
        the Pearland College Center;
            $1,000,000 to the University of Incarnate Word in 
        San Antonio, Texas for the renovation and expansion of 
        the Science and Engineering Center;
            $490,000 for West Valley City, Utah for the 
        construction of the West Valley City Multi-Cultural 
        Community Center;
            $490,000 to the American West Heritage Foundation 
        in Utah for the planning and design of a cultural and 
        interpretive center;
            $800,000 for the City of West Jordan, Utah for the 
        development of a senior citizens center;
            $1,000,000 for Sevier County, Utah for a multi-
        events center;
            $50,000 to the Town of Boydton, Virginia for 
        economic development activities;
            $70,000 to the Fairfax County Economic Development 
        Authority for the creation and promotion of a video 
        detailing the historical significance of Annandale, 
        Virginia;
            $90,000 to the County of Fairfax, Virginia for the 
        Annandale Community Cultural Arts Center;
            $100,000 to the An Achievable Dream program in 
        Newport News, Virginia for expansion of education 
        programs;
            $100,000 to the Towns of Clarksville and Chase 
        City, Virginia for economic development at their joint 
        industrial park;
            $140,000 to the County of Northampton, Virginia for 
        a Workforce Training and Business Development Center on 
        the Eastern Shore of Virginia;
            $150,000 for the Nelson Center in Lovington, 
        Virginia for renovation and expansion of facilities;
            $150,000 to Winchester County, Virginia for the 
        historic restoration of the Winchester County 
        Courthouse;
            $175,000 to the Arlington Housing Corporation in 
        Arlington, Virginia to improve and expand community 
        centers at low income multifamily properties, and 
        support ongoing affordable housing programs;
            $200,000 to Virginia Highlands Small Business 
        Incubator, Inc. for the development of a regional small 
        business incubator in Southwest Virginia;
            $240,000 to the City of Chesapeake, Virginia for 
        the redevelopment of Campostella Square;
            $240,000 to the Virginia Air and Space Center in 
        Hampton, Virginia for expansion of facilities including 
        the Aviation Gallery and the World's Fair Welcome 
        Center;
            $250,000 to Edgehill Recovery Retreat Center, in 
        Winchester, Virginia for facilities needs;
            $290,000 to the Virginia Holocaust Museum in 
        Richmond, Virginia for facility renovations;
            $400,000 to the Natural Gas Vehicle Association in 
        Arlington, Virginia for continued expansion of the 
        Airport-Alternative Fuel Vehicle Demonstration Project 
        at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport;
            $490,000 to Eastern Mennonite University of 
        Harrisonburg, Virginia for the University Commons 
        project;
            $500,000 to the Glen Burnie Foundation to establish 
        the Museum of the Shenandoah Valley at Glen Burnie in 
        Winchester, Virginia;
            $600,000 to the Arlandria Health Center for Women 
        and Children in Alexandria, Virginia for facilities 
        needs;
            $600,000 for the City of Staunton, Virginia for a 
        local, cultural revitalization initiative;
            $700,000 to the City of Danville and Pittsylvania 
        County, Virginia for the infrastructure improvements 
        for the City/County Cyber Park;
            $1,000,000 for the Christopher Newport University 
        in Newport News, Virginia for the development of the 
        Christopher Newport University Fine Arts Center;
            $1,000,000 to the St. Coletta School in Alexandria, 
        Virginia for facilities needs;
            $50,000 to the Essex Junction Lions Club for design 
        and construction of a veterans memorial in Essex 
        Junction, Vermont;
            $100,000 to the Burlington, Vermont Community Land 
        Trust for the start up of the Vermont Employee 
        Ownership Center;
            $100,000 to the Vermont Housing Conservation Board 
        for the building renovation and construction of a 
        battered women's shelter in St. Albans, Vermont;
            $150,000 for the Haskell Free Library for repairs 
        to this historic building located in Derby Line, 
        Vermont;
            $200,000 to the Vermont Foodbank for food shelf 
        activities;
            $300,000 for the Brattleboro Arts Initiative of 
        Brattleboro, Vermont, for the rehabilitation of the 
        historic Latchis Theatre and Community Arts Center;
            $350,000 for the George D. Aiken Resource 
        Conservation and Development Council of Randolph, 
        Vermont for the purchase of equipment;
            $500,000 for the Kaw Valley Center in Vermont, 
        Kansas for infrastructure and community outreach;
            $500,000 for the Vermont Housing and Conservation 
        Board for development of affordable housing at Macauley 
        Square;
            $750,000 to the Vermont Housing and Conservation 
        Board for the development of affordable housing in 
        Vermont;
            $750,000 to the Vermont Institute of Natural 
        Science of Woodstock, Vermont to support construction 
        of a public education and wildlife rehabilitation 
        facility in Quechee, Vermont;
            $2,000,000 for the Lake Champlain Science Center in 
        Burlington, Vermont for facility construction and 
        rehabilitation;
            $50,000 to the City of Poulsbo, Washington for 
        improvements to the public library;
            $50,000 to the Nooksack Indian Tribe in Washington 
        for expansion of the Youth Leaders Center facility;
            $80,000 to the YWCA in Bremerton, Washington for 
        facilities expansion;
            $90,000 to the City of Duvall, Washington for the 
        renovation and conversion of a city-owned building into 
        a youth center;
            $90,000 to the City of Maple Valley, Washington for 
        the construction of a youth center;
            $90,000 to the Greenwater Mutual Water Association 
        of Washington state for construction of a water system 
        to provide fire and domestic flow to the designated 
        rural business center of Greenwater;
            $100,000 to the City of Seattle, Washington for 
        renovations to the Seattle Center Opera House;
            $200,000 to Pierce County Washington for the 
        establishment of the Gig Harbor Peninsula Historical 
        Society and the creation of a museum and cultural 
        center;
            $240,000 to the City of Black Diamond, Washington 
        for engineering and construction of a replacement water 
        main and improvements to the existing pump station 
        serving the Black Diamond region;
            $250,000 to the University of Washington-Tacoma for 
        development of the Institute of Technology;
            $250,000 to the Valley Boys and Girls Club in 
        Clarkston, Washington for facilities construction;
            $300,000 for the City of Renton, Washington, for 
        the Port Quendall brownfields redevelopment project;
            $500,000 to Whitworth College in Spokane, 
        Washington for construction of the Regional Learning 
        and Resource Center;
            $750,000 to Bates Technical College for upgrade of 
        transmission equipment for KBTC-TV, a PBS affiliate in 
        Tacoma, Washington;
            $1,000,000 for the Port of Ridgefield of 
        Ridgefield, Washington for brownfields redevelopment;
            $1,000,000 for the West Central Community Center of 
        Spokane, Washington, for site acquisition and 
        preparation related to the expansion of childcare 
        facilities;
            $50,000 for the Eau Claire Area Industrial 
        Development Corporation, Wisconsin, for the Chippewa 
        Valley Technology Network;
            $200,000 to the City of Madison, Wisconsin for the 
        Affordable Housing Subdivision project;
            $50,000 to the Medical College of Wisconsin for 
        planning related to a Biomedical Research and 
        Technology Incubator;
            $50,000 to the Urban Open Space Foundation in 
        Madison, Wisconsin for downtown revitalization efforts;
            $80,000 to the Ashland County Sheriff's Department 
        in Ashland, Wisconsin for an Ice Angel Windsled;
            $100,000 for Fairness in Rural Lending in Wisconsin 
        for the Community Lender Partnership Initiative;
            $120,000 to the City of Rhinelander, Wisconsin for 
        construction of a rail spur;
            $275,000 for the African American World Cultural 
        Center in Wisconsin for construction;
            $175,000 for the Centro de la Communidad Unida in 
        Wisconsin for construction of an alternative school for 
        at risk students;
            $200,000 for Adams County, Wisconsin for the 
        construction of an industrial park;
            $200,000 or the City of Beloit, Wisconsin for urban 
        renewal activities;
            $200,000 to the Wausau Kayak/Canoe Corporation in 
        Wausau, Wisconsin for course upgrade;
            $240,000 to St. Norbert College in DePere, 
        Wisconsin for a regional library learning center;
            $300,000 for the City of Appleton, Wisconsin for 
        the reconstruction of College Avenue;
            $300,000 for the City of Sheboygan, Wisconsin to 
        demolish an old manufacturing building;
            $300,000 to Alverno College in Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
        for the modernization of their liberal arts facility 
        for Digital Diagnostic Portfolio Technology;
            $500,000 to Impact 7 for a business development 
        project in Centuria, Wisconsin;
            $1,100,000 to the Northwest Regional Planning 
        Commission in Spooner, Wisconsin for a revolving loan 
        fund to assist storm impacted areas in northwestern 
        Wisconsin;
            $125,000 to the Greenbrier Valley Economic 
        Development Corporation in Lewisburg, West Virginia for 
        a cooperative economic development effort with 4-County 
        Economic Development Authority located in Oakhill, West 
        Virginia;
            $290,000 to Mason County, West Virginia/ Point 
        Pleasant Riverfront Park Committee for a city 
        revitalization project;
            $350,000 for Bethany College in West Virginia to 
        complete work on a health and wellness center;
            $375,000 to Regions 1 and 4 Planning and 
        Development Councils in West Virginia for rebuilding 
        efforts necessitated by flooding;
            $700,000 for the McDowell County Commission to 
        complete the repair and restoration of the Kimball War 
        Memorial in Kimball, West Virginia;
            $900,000 to Concord College in Athens, West 
        Virginia for continued infrastructure development of an 
        information technology training program;
            $1,200,000 to the Mid-Atlantic Aerospace Complex, 
        Inc. for operational needs and to support economic 
        development projects, including facilities 
        construction;
            $2,000,000 for the Webster County Development 
        Authority for construction of a high technology office 
        building and small business incubator in Webster 
        County, West Virginia;
            $2,000,000 for the Wheeling Park Commission in West 
        Virginia to aid in the construction of the National 
        Training Center for Public Facility Managers;
            $2,425,000 to the Institute for Software Research, 
        Inc. for operational and programmatic support and 
        facilities needs;
            $3,000,000 for Shepherd College in Sheperdstown, 
        West Virginia, to complete the renovation of the 
        Scarborough Library;
            $3,600,000 to the West Virginia High Technology 
        Consortium Foundation, Inc. for operations, land 
        acquisition, and development of a high technology 
        business park;
            $1,800,000 for the City of Hinton, West Virginia, 
        for the construction of a high technology office 
        building and small business incubator;
            $1,500,000 for the Appalachian Bible College of 
        Beckley, West Virginia, to complete its student center/
        library;
            $540,000 to the Teton County Housing Authority of 
        Wyoming for equity contributions in the production of 
        affordable housing units in Teton County, Wyoming;
            $2,000,000 for the Girl Scouts of the USA for youth 
        development initiatives in public housing.
      Includes language transferring no less than $13,800,000 
to the Working Capital Fund for development and maintenance of 
information technology systems, instead of $15,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and the Senate.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate making funds 
available for three years instead of two years as proposed by 
the House. The conferees remain concerned by the delay in the 
obligation and expenditure of funds provided for the CDBG 
formula program. HUD is directed to review the matter and to 
provide a report to the Committees on Appropriations no later 
than April 1, 2002 which identifies the average length of time 
used by HUD to obligate CDBG funds to entitlement communities 
and States; the rate at which entitlement communities and 
States expend these funds, including an identification of those 
entities not in compliance with statutory timeliness 
requirements; and recommendations to accelerate the obligation 
and expenditure of these funds.
      The conferees reiterate the direction included in the 
House report requiring HUD to inform State and local 
jurisdictions that people with disabilities must participate in 
developing the Consolidated Plan and to evaluate plans for such 
inclusion.
      The conferees reiterate the direction included in the 
House report requiring HUD to conduct a detailed evaluation of 
HUD's administrative oversight of CDBG targeting requirements 
and to report the evaluation's findings to the Committees on 
Appropriations no later than February 1, 2002.

         COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT LOAN GUARANTEES PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $15,000,000 for costs associated with 
section 108 loan guarantees as proposed by the House and the 
Senate. Includes language making funds available for obligation 
for two years as proposed by the House, instead of one year as 
proposed by the Senate.

                       BROWNFIELDS REDEVELOPMENT

      Appropriates $25,000,000 for brownfields redevelopment as 
proposed by the House and the Senate.

                  HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $1,846,040,000 for the HOME program instead 
of $1,996,040,000 as proposed by the House, and $1,796,040,000 
as proposed by the Senate. Includes language making funds 
available for obligation for three years as proposed by the 
Senate, instead of two years as proposed by the House.
      Includes language designating $50,000,000 for the 
Downpayment Assistance Initiative subject to the enactment of 
authorization legislation, instead of $200,000,000 as proposed 
by the House. Language is included allowing these funds to be 
used for any purpose authorized under the HOME program should 
such authorization legislation not be enacted by June 30, 2002. 
The Senate bill did not include funds for this initiative.
      The conferees believe that housing counseling is a 
critical component of effective homeownership programs, 
including the HOME Downpayment Assistance Initiative. Not only 
is housing counseling important in assisting families and 
individuals to understand homeownership issues, it also helps 
ensure that first-time homebuyers are protected against 
predatory lending practices. The conferees expect HUD to ensure 
that housing counseling is available to all homebuyers 
participating in programs offered under the Downpayment 
Assistance Initiative.

                       HOMELESS ASSISTANCE GRANTS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $1,122,525,000 for homeless assistance 
grants, instead of $1,027,745,000 as proposed by the House and 
$1,022,745,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees have increased funding for this account 
above the amounts proposed by the House and the Senate to 
provide for full funding of Shelter Plus Care renewals within 
this account, instead of providing this funding in a separate 
account as proposed by the Senate. The House bill did not 
include funding for these costs. While funding for these 
renewals has been provided in this account consistent with the 
manner in which funding was provided prior to fiscal year 2001, 
new bill language is included requiring the annual renewal of 
all expiring Shelter Plus Care contracts if the program is 
determined to meet appropriate program requirements and is 
needed under the applicable continuum of care.
      Includes modified language requiring not less than 30 
percent of the funds provided under this account, exclusive of 
amounts for Shelter Plus Care renewals, be used for permanent 
housing as proposed by the Senate, instead of 35 percent as 
proposed by the House. Includes language requiring that all 
funds awarded for services shall be matched by 25 percent in 
funds from each grantee as proposed by the House and the 
Senate.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate providing that 
funds under this account be made available for three years, 
instead of two years as proposed by the House. However, HUD is 
directed to review the obligation rates for funds provided 
under this account and provide a report to the Committees on 
steps being taken to accelerate the grant award and obligation 
process no later than April 1, 2002.
      Includes language providing $2,000,000 for the national 
homeless data analysis project and $6,600,000 for technical 
assistance. Language is also included transferring $5,600,000 
to the Working Capital Fund for the development and maintenance 
of information technology systems, instead of $14,200,000 as 
proposed by the House and the Senate.
      The conferees agree that HUD should use the continuum of 
care process to give preference to communities that use funds 
for permanent housing to end homelessness for chronically 
homeless, disabled people and encourage communities to obtain 
funds for supportive services from non-HUD sources, such as the 
Department of Health and Human Services, the Department of 
Labor, and the Department of Veterans Affairs.
      The conferees reiterate language included in the Senate 
report regarding the need for data and analysis on the extent 
of homelessness and the effectiveness of McKinney-Vento Act 
programs. Specifically, the conferees direct HUD to continue to 
work with local communities on a client reporting system, 
analyze the data within two years, and report to the Committees 
within 90 days of enactment of this Act on its progress.
      In addition, the conferees are also providing $2,000,000 
to continue the Department's national homeless data analysis 
project to document the demographics of homelessness, identify 
patterns in utilization of assistance, and document the 
effectiveness of the systems. The conferees believe that it is 
critical to develop an unduplicated count of the homeless 
population and direct HUD to contract withexperienced academic 
institutions to analyze the data and provide annual reports to the 
Committees on Appropriations.
      The conferees expect that HUD field staff will oversee 
the implementation of homeless programs funded under this 
title. This oversight should include annual site visits and 
desk and field audits of a representative sample of programs in 
each jurisdiction. Using this information, HUD should analyze 
Annual Performance Reports and forward an annual plan for 
addressing problem areas.
      The conferees reiterate and endorse language in the House 
report regarding the Secretary's joint task force with the 
Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) to identify and 
target each agency's roles and responsibilities in addressing 
the needs of the homeless. Recognizing the fact that up to one-
third of the homeless population are veterans, the conferees 
believe that increased coordination is necessary between the 
Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) and HUD to ensure each 
agency is fulfilling its appropriate mission. Therefore, the 
conferees urge the Secretary to include the Secretary of 
Veterans Affairs in its task force discussions. The conferees 
request that the Department keep the Committees apprised of 
these efforts and provide a report, no later than February 15, 
2002, on its findings and recommendations for changes in HUD 
programs.
      Further, the conferees reiterate the language in the 
Senate report concerning the Interagency Council on the 
Homeless (ICH), including placing the Council under the 
Domestic Policy Office; rotating the Chairmanship among the 
Secretaries of HUD, HHS, Labor, and VA; requiring the members 
to meet at least semi-annually; and instructing the Council to 
quantify the number of their mainstream program participants 
who become homeless, preventing homelessness, and describing 
how they assist the homeless.
      The conferees continue to have questions about out-year 
cost data on contract renewals for the permanent housing 
programs for the homeless. Accordingly, the conferees direct 
the Department to include in its fiscal year 2003 budget 
justifications five-year projections, delineated on an annual 
basis, of the costs of renewing the permanent housing component 
of the Supportive Housing Program and separately, the Shelter 
Plus Care program.
      The conferees reiterate language in the Senate report 
directing HUD to ensure that State and local jurisdictions that 
receive homeless assistance funding pass on at least 50 percent 
of all administrative funds to the nonprofits administering the 
homeless assistance programs.

                       SHELTER PLUS CARE RENEWALS

      The conferees have included full funding for Shelter Plus 
Care renewals under the homeless assistance grants account 
instead of providing funds under this separate account as 
proposed by the Senate. The House did not include funding for 
this account.

                            Housing Programs

                    HOUSING FOR SPECIAL POPULATIONS

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $1,024,151,000 for housing for special 
populations as proposed by the House instead of $1,001,009,000 
as proposed by the Senate.
      Includes $783,286,000 for section 202 housing for the 
elderly as proposed by the House and the Senate. Of this 
amount, $50,000,000 is for service coordinators and congregate 
services as proposed by the Senate instead of $49,890,000 as 
proposed by the House; $50,000,000 is for conversion of 
eligible section 202 projects to assisted living as proposed by 
the Senate instead of $49,890,000 as proposed by the House; and 
up to $3,000,000 is for the renewal of expiring project rental 
assistance for up to a one-year term, the same amount proposed 
by the House and the Senate. The conferees direct HUD to issue 
a new NOFA to provide for up to three grants for the conversion 
of unused or underutilized commercial properties into assisted 
living facilities for the elderly from funds provided for 
section 202 conversions.
      Includes $240,865,000 for section 811 housing for the 
disabled as proposed by the House instead of $217,723,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Of this amount, $23,142,000 is for the 
renewal of section 811 tenant-based rental assistance as 
proposed by the House. Bill language is included clarifying the 
authorization of funds under this account for this purpose as 
proposed by the House. The Senate did not propose similar 
language and assumed funds for this purpose would be provided 
under the housing certificate fund account. In addition, up to 
$1,300,000 is provided for the renewal of project rental 
assistance for up to a one-year term as proposed by the House 
and the Senate.
      The conferees reiterate direction included in the House 
report requiring HUD to review and modify procedures to 
simplify the section 811 application and review process.
      Includes modified language transferring no less than 
$1,200,000 to the Working Capital Fund for development and 
maintenance of information technology systems, instead of 
$1,000,000 as proposed by the House and $3,000,000 as proposed 
by the Senate.
      Does not include bill language specifying amounts for 
project rental assistance renewals as proposed by the Senate. 
The House did not designate specific amounts for renewals in 
bill language.

                         FLEXIBLE SUBSIDY FUND

                          (TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Includes language regarding the transfer of excess rental 
charges to this fund as proposed by the House and the Senate.

                  MANUFACTURED HOUSING FEES TRUST FUND

      Appropriates $13,566,000 for authorized activities from 
fees collected in the fund as proposed by the House instead of 
$17,254,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees expect HUD to place a priority on 
monitoring safety inspections of homes and the issuance of 
inspection labels when determining the funding requirements for 
this program during fiscal year 2002. The conferees also 
reiterate the direction included in the Senate report requiring 
the use of all program fees to be fully identified in the 
fiscal year 2003 budget justifications.
      Includes language proposed by the House clarifying that 
fee collections shall fully offset the expenditures from the 
fund. The Senate did not propose similar language.

                     Federal Housing Administration

               MUTUAL MORTGAGE INSURANCE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $336,700,000 for administrative expenses as 
proposed by the Senate instead of $330,888,000 as proposed by 
the House. Transfers $332,678,000 of thisamount to the salaries 
and expenses account as proposed by the Senate, instead of $326,866,000 
as proposed by the House.
      Appropriates $160,000,000 for administrative contract 
expenses as proposed by the Senate instead of $145,000,000 as 
proposed by the House. Includes language allowing up to 
$16,000,000 in additional administrative contract expenses to 
be made available in certain circumstances as proposed by the 
Senate. The House did not propose similar language.
      Transfers no less than $118,400,000 from administrative 
contract expenses under this account to the Working Capital 
Fund for the development and maintenance of information 
technology systems, instead of $96,500,000 as proposed by the 
House. The Senate proposed to transfer $160,000,000 from this 
account and the general and special risk program account but 
did not designate the amounts to be transferred from each 
account.

                GENERAL AND SPECIAL RISK PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $15,000,000 for subsidy costs to support 
certain multifamily and special purpose loan guarantee 
programs. The conferees agree that funding for subsidy costs is 
to be allocated as follows:
      --$6,919,000 for the section 221(d)(3) program;
      --$5,250,000 for the section 241(a) supplemental loans 
for apartments program;
      --$377,000 for the section 242 operating loss loans for 
apartments program;
      --$377,000 for the section 232 operating loss loans 
program; and
      --$2,077,000 for the section 2 property improvements 
program.
      The conferees remind HUD that funds provided are to be 
used only for the programs specified above. The conferees 
direct HUD to improve management and oversight of all programs 
within the general and special risk insurance fund to ensure 
these programs operate in a financially sound manner. HUD is 
reminded that any deviations from the amounts specified above 
for each of these programs is subject to reprogramming 
requirements.
      The conferees are aware that concerns have been raised 
about the calculation of credit subsidy for multifamily 
programs. The conferees understand that pursuant to the Federal 
Credit Reform Act, the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) is 
responsible for developing the risk model used to estimate the 
subsidy costs of all Federal credit programs, including FHA 
programs. Therefore, in lieu of the language included in the 
Senate report addressing this matter, the conferees expect HUD 
to work with the industry to review the technical assumptions 
provided by HUD to OMB for inclusion in the risk model.
      The conferees also expect HUD to upgrade its information 
technology systems for the mutual mortgage insurance program 
account and the general and special risk program account. HUD 
needs to be able to mark each account to market at the end of 
each business day, including the volume of loan business and 
the extent of financial risk and exposure under each FHA 
mortgage insurance program, including the cost of all defaults 
and foreclosures. The conferees remain disappointed that HUD 
has not made the collection of this information a priority 
since, as of January 2001, HUD was responsible for over $500 
billion in insured mortgages. As demand for FHA single-family 
and multifamily mortgage insurance grows, it is imperative that 
HUD understand the magnitude of its financial exposure and the 
extent of risk for loss.
      Appropriates $216,100,000 for administrative expenses as 
proposed by the Senate instead of $211,455,000 as proposed by 
the House. Transfers $197,779,000 of this amount to the 
salaries and expenses account as proposed by the Senate, 
instead of $193,124,000 as proposed by the House.
      Appropriates $144,000,000 for administrative contract 
expenses as proposed by the Senate instead of $139,000,000 as 
proposed by the House. Includes language allowing up to 
$14,400,000 in additional administrative contract expenses to 
be made available in certain circumstances as proposed by the 
Senate. The House did not propose similar language.
      Transfers no less than $41,000,000 from administrative 
contract expenses under this account to the Working Capital 
Fund for the development and maintenance of information 
technology systems, instead of $33,500,000 as proposed by the 
House. The Senate proposed to transfer $160,000,000 from this 
account and the mutual mortgage insurance fund program account 
but did not designate the amounts to be transferred from each 
account.
      The conferees reiterate the direction included in the 
Senate report requiring HUD to immediately amend its Asset 
Control Area discount and appraisal structure so that local 
governments and non-profit purchasers can rehabilitate and 
resell these properties at rates affordable to low-income 
residents. The conferees also reiterate the guidance in the 
Senate report regarding timely demolition of dilapidated homes 
and the payment of demolition costs.
      The conferees reiterate the recommendation in the Senate 
report encouraging HUD to bundle and sell defaulted loans 
through auction in non-Asset Control Areas.

            Government National Mortgage Association (GNMA)

GUARANTEES OF MORTGAGE-BACKED SECURITIES LOAN GUARANTEE PROGRAM ACCOUNT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $9,383,000 for administrative expenses to be 
transferred to the salaries and expenses account as proposed by 
the House and the Senate.

                    Policy Development and Research

                        RESEARCH AND TECHNOLOGY

      Appropriates $50,250,000 for research and technology 
instead of $46,900,000 as proposed by the House and $53,404,000 
as proposed by the Senate.
      Includes $1,500,000 for the Millennial Housing Commission 
as proposed by the House. New language is included to extend 
the reporting and termination dates for this commission. The 
Senate proposed $1,500,000 and similar extension language under 
the salaries and expenses account.
      Includes $1,000,000 for the Commission on Affordable 
Housing and Health Facility Needs for Seniors in the 21st 
Century, and includes new language to extend the reporting and 
termination dates for this commission. The House and the Senate 
did not address this matter.
      Includes $8,750,000 for the Partnership for Advancing 
Technology in Housing Initiative, instead of $7,500,000 as 
proposed by the House and $10,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conferees assume $23,000,000 will be allocated to the 
Housing Survey in fiscal year 2002, the same level proposed by 
the House and Senate.
      The conferees reiterate the direction included in the 
Senate report denying demonstration authority without prior 
congressional approval.
      Language proposed by the Senate designating $3,000,000 
for program evaluation activities is not included.

                   Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity

                        FAIR HOUSING ACTIVITIES

      Appropriates $45,899,000 for the Fair Housing Assistance 
Program (FHAP) and the Fair Housing Initiatives Program (FHIP) 
as proposed by the House and the Senate. Of this amount, 
$20,250,000 is for FHIP, instead of $19,449,000 as proposed by 
the House and $24,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      While overall funding for this account is provided at the 
fiscal year 2001 level, funding is no longer required for the 
Housing Discrimination Survey which received $7,500,000 in 
fiscal year 2001. Rather than reduce the account to reflect 
this change, the conferees have instead agreed to allocate the 
$7,500,000 equally between FHAP and FHIP to augment their 
activities. The conferees expect the additional funds allocated 
to FHAP to be used to reduce the backlog in case processing.
      In lieu of the direction included in the House report, 
the conferees direct HUD to expedite utilization of funds 
provided under this account and to report quarterly on the 
obligation and expenditure of funds provided, by program and 
activity, with the first report due no later than February 15, 
2002.

                     Office of Lead Hazard Control

                         LEAD HAZARD REDUCTION

      Appropriates $109,758,000 for lead hazard reduction, as 
proposed by the House and the Senate.
      Of the amount provided, $3,500,000 is for a one-time 
grant to the National Center for Lead-Safe Housing to develop a 
database coordination project to integrate Federal, State and 
local lead activities, instead of $1,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The House did not propose a similar provision.
      The conferees agree to allocate funds as follows:
      --$6,500,000 for Operation LEAP, a new initiative to 
provide competitive awards to non-profit organizations and the 
private sector for activities which leverage private-sector 
resources for local lead hazard control programs. The conferees 
direct HUD to provide an implementation plan for this new 
initiative to the Committees on Appropriations prior to the 
expenditure of these funds;
      --$80,000,000 for grants to State and local governments, 
and Native American tribes, for lead-based paint abatement in 
private low-income housing;
      --$9,758,000 for technical assistance and support to 
State and local agencies and private property owners; and
      --$10,000,000 for the Healthy Homes Initiative for 
competitive grants for research, standards development, and 
education and outreach activities to address lead-based paint 
poisoning and other housing-related diseases and hazards.
      The conferees reiterate the House report language 
regarding consideration of a proposal by the Alliance to End 
Childhood Lead Poisoning to create a Community Environmental 
Health Resource Center (CEHRC) to provide technical support, 
training, and education and outreach to community-based 
organizations to evaluate and control housing-related and 
community-wide health hazards. While the conferees have not 
included an earmark for the new organization, the conferees 
encourage HUD to evaluate a proposal from the Alliance to 
create the CEHRC and provide a grant if warranted.
      The conferees encourage HUD to work through the Healthy 
Homes Initiative with other appropriate Federal agencies to 
conduct research and public education on health hazards 
associated with mold, excess moisture, and dust.
      The conferees also reiterate the direction included in 
the Senate report requiring HUD to develop a policy to link 
Federal education, outreach, and remediation efforts with 
State, local, non-profit, and private funding.
      Language proposed by the Senate earmarking $750,000 for 
CLEARCorps is not included. The House did not propose a similar 
provision.
      Does not include language proposed by the House making 
technical changes to the Healthy Homes Initiative. The Senate 
did not propose similar changes.

                     Management and Administration

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $1,097,292,000 for salaries and expenses 
instead of $1,076,800,000 as proposed by the House and 
$1,087,257,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Of the total amount provided, $530,457,000 is transferred 
from various FHA administrative funds as proposed by the 
Senate, instead of $520,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      Includes language transferring $35,000 from the Native 
Hawaiian housing loan guarantee fund account as proposed by the 
Senate. The House did not include a similar provision.
      Includes language providing not to exceed $25,000 for 
representation expenses, instead of $7,000 as proposed by the 
House and Senate.
      The conferees agree that funds under this account are to 
be allocated among object classes at the levels specified in 
the budget justifications. HUD is reminded that any deviations 
are subject to reprogramming requirements.
      The conferees reiterate the concerns expressed in the 
House report regarding HUD's approach to utilizing staff 
resources and the continued excessive cost per HUD employee as 
compared to other Federal agencies. Therefore, modified bill 
language is included, similar to language proposed by the 
House, requiring the Secretary to submit a staffing plan to the 
Committees on Appropriations no later than January 15, 2002. 
The conferees expect this staffing plan to be formulated based 
on the Resource Estimation and Allocation Process to match 
staffing requirements with programmatic responsibilities. The 
plan should identify staffing levels for each program 
delineated by headquarters and field offices. The conferees 
also expect this plan to include strategies to reduce the 
average salary cost per employee while reallocating staffing to 
address core mission requirements.
      The conferees reiterate the direction included in the 
House report regarding the annual budget justifications 
submission.
      The conferees reiterate the direction included in the 
Senate report prohibiting HUD from employing more than 77 
schedule C and 20 non-career senior executive service 
employees.
      The conferees note that the inability of HUD to provide 
useful data on program expenditures and performance has been a 
deficiency perennially cited by the Inspector General and 
General Accounting Office (GAO). The conferees remain committed 
to improving HUD's capacity to disseminate useful information 
about the performance of HUD programs to improve the ability of 
HUD and the Congress to assess the effectiveness of programs 
and more accurately determine resource requirements. Therefore, 
the conferees expect that HUD's information technology (IT) 
strategy will prioritize those investments needed to remedy the 
deficiencies identified by the Inspector General and GAO. 
Language has been included in various accounts in title II 
transferring no less than $351,150,000 to the Working Capital 
Fund (WCF) for the development and maintenance of information 
technology systems, an increase of $16,850,000 above the fiscal 
year 2001 level. HUD is directed to provide the Committees on 
Appropriations a fiscal year 2002 spending plan for the WCF no 
later than January 15, 2002, consistent with the format of the 
multi-year IT plan submitted to the Committees on August 22, 
2001.
      The conferees understand that most of the WCF increase 
requested for fiscal year 2002 is for the planning and 
development activities related to the re-competition of the HUD 
Integrated Information Processing Service (HIIPS) contract. To 
this point little information has been provided to the 
Committees about HUD's plans for re-competition of HIIPS and 
the costs associated with implementation of the HIIPS re-
competition. Therefore, HUD is directed to provide a 
comprehensive report on the strategy, status, and out-year 
funding requirements for HIIPS prior to the expenditure of any 
of the increase provided for fiscal year 2002.
      The conferees also reiterate the direction included in 
the House report requiring HUD to submit a multi-year IT plan 
as part of its fiscal year 2003 budget submission. The 
conferees request that the Inspector General review this plan 
and provide its views to the Committees on the ability of this 
plan to improve oversight and management of HUD programs.
      While the conferees do not adopt the language in the 
Senate report related to the Office of Multifamily Housing 
Assistance Restructuring (OMHAR), the conferees are seriously 
concerned with the manner in which OMHAR is currently being 
managed. The conferees are deeply disturbed to learn that 
OMHAR, an office which has enjoyed a unique amount of autonomy 
in the management of its staffing and the allocation of its 
funds, has violated the Anti-Deficiency Act in two out of the 
three years of its existence. As troubling to the conferees is 
the fact that the Committees on Appropriations were not 
notified of these violations sooner. The conferees fully intend 
to investigate the circumstances that led to these violations, 
and will take action at the appropriate time. In the interim, 
the Department is directed to revoke OMHAR's funds allotment 
privileges and provide vigorous financial and management 
oversight of OMHAR.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

      Appropriates $93,898,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General as proposed by the House instead of $88,898,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Of this amount, $5,000,000 is provided 
by transfer from the public housing operating fund account, 
instead of $10,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      Of the amount provided, $5,000,000 is exclusively for 
anti-predatory lending and anti-flipping activities. These 
funds are to augment, not supplant, funds already being devoted 
to such activities. The conferees expect that staff previously 
engaged in Operation Safe Home activities will be redirected to 
support these efforts. The OIG is directed to submit a staffing 
plan to the Committees on Appropriations no later than January 
15, 2002.

                         CONSOLIDATED FEE FUND

                              (RESCISSION)

      Includes a rescission of $6,700,000 from the Fund as 
proposed by the House and the Senate.

             Office of Federal Housing Enterprise Oversight

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $27,000,000 for the Office of Federal 
Housing Enterprise Oversight (OFHEO) to be derived from 
collections available in the Federal Housing Enterprises 
Oversight Fund as proposed by the Senate instead of $23,000,000 
as proposed by the House. Of the amount provided, $4,000,000 is 
for a one-time increase to address information technology 
requirements.
      Includes language requiring OFHEO to submit a staffing 
plan to the Committees on Appropriations by January 30, 2002. 
The conferees expect this staffing plan to prioritize OFHEO's 
activities relative to implementation of the new risk-based 
capital regulation. The conferees are aware that a one-year 
transition period has been provided for implementation of this 
rule. Should additional resources be required to implement this 
rule, the conferees will evaluate such requirements when 
developing the fiscal year 2003 budget.

                       Administrative Provisions

      Includes modified language related to the allocation of 
HOPWA funds for the Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and Raleigh-
Durham, North Carolina metropolitan areas, similar to language 
proposed by the House and the Senate.
      Does not include language proposed by the Senate 
extending section 236 excess income eligibility. The House did 
not include a similar provision.
      Does not include language proposed by the Senate amending 
section 223(d) of the National Housing Act to authorize 
insurance for the purchase of existing hospital facilities. The 
House did not include a similar provision.
      Includes language repealing the authorization sunset 
provisions for certain housing counseling assistance activities 
as proposed by the Senate. The House did not include a similar 
provision.
      Includes language changing the premium structure for 
section 203(k) and section 234 single family loans as proposed 
by the House. The Senate proposed the same changes with minor 
technical language differences related to implementation.
      Includes language authorizing the Secretary to waive the 
40 percent rent ceiling under section 8 for an assisted living 
demonstration project in Michigan as proposed by the House. The 
Senate did not include a similar provision.
      Does not include language proposed by the Senate 
expanding HUD's authority to establish and determine the 
appropriate use of certain mortgage insurance programs for 
hospital facilities. The House did not include a similar 
provision.
      Does not include language proposed by the Senate 
expanding HUD's authority to establish and determine the 
appropriate use of certain mortgage insurance programs for 
nursing home facilities. The House did not include a similar 
provision.
      Includes language authorizing HUD's Credit Watch program 
as proposed by the Senate. The House did not include a similar 
provision. This provision will clarify existing law to ensure 
that HUD has the authority to continue to implement the Credit 
Watch program. This program allows HUD to identify FHA lenders 
that originate a large number of loans that default quickly, 
which can be a key indicator of underwriting problems or fraud, 
and take corrective actions. By eliminating unqualified or 
unscrupulous lenders, the conferees hope HUD can reduce the 
number of foreclosed properties. The conferees also believe 
that further action may be necessary to protect homebuyers and 
communities, and expects HUD to consider additional steps that 
could be taken and report back to the appropriate committees 
with its recommendations.
      Includes language requiring all title II programs to 
comply with the Department of Housing and Urban Development 
Reform Act of 1989 as proposed by the Senate. The House did not 
include a similar provision.
      Includes modified language exempting Alaska, Mississippi, 
and Iowa from the statutory requirement of having a resident on 
the board of a PHA, similar to language proposed by the Senate. 
The House did not include a similar provision. The conferees 
are concerned that barriers continue to exist in some States 
which preclude full implementation of the statutory requirement 
that public housing residents be full participants on PHA 
boards. While language is again included providing exemptions 
to this requirement, the conferees believe that the States 
should take the appropriate actions necessary to remove 
barriers, rather than continuing to seek exemptions from the 
statute. The conferees direct HUD to review the status of 
implementation of this requirement, identify the factors 
precluding full implementation and actions being taken by the 
appropriate State or local entities to remove these barriers, 
and report its findings to the Committees on Appropriations no 
later than May 30, 2002.
      Includes modified language requiring the Secretary to 
maintain section 8 rental assistance for any HUD-owned or HUD-
held property occupied by an elderly or disabled resident, 
similar to language proposed by the Senate. The House did not 
include a similar provision.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate amending the 
National Housing Act to increase the statutory loan limits on 
certain FHA multifamily and single-family programs. The House 
did not include a similar provision.
      Does not include language proposed by the Senate related 
to the construction of a tribal student housing project. The 
House did not include a similar provision.
      Includes language modifying the authorized purposes and 
availability of funds provided to the University of South 
Carolina in Public Law 106-554 as proposed by the Senate. The 
House did not include a similar provision.
      Includes language amending section 247 of the National 
Housing Act to change the definitions and eligibility for 
single-family mortgage insurance on Hawaiian homelands as 
proposed by the Senate. The House did not include a similar 
provision.
      Includes language waiving the environmental review 
procedures for certain HOME projects in Arkansas provided 
certain conditions are met as proposed by the Senate. The House 
did not include a similar provision.
      Includes language proposed by the Senate providing 
flexible use of existing HOPE VI funds awarded for the 
Hollander Ridge project. The House did not include a similar 
provision.
      Does not include language proposed by the Senate to 
change the Fair Housing Act's definition of discrimination 
based on sex from one based on gender to one based upon 
victimization from domestic violence. The House did not include 
a similar provision. The conferees direct HUD to work with PHAs 
to develop plans to protect victims of domestic violence from 
being discriminated against in receiving or maintaining public 
housing because of their victimization.

                    TITLE III--INDEPENDENT AGENCIES

                  American Battle Monuments Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      Appropriates $35,466,000 for salaries and expenses as 
proposed by the House instead of $28,466,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Within the appropriated level, $2,000,000 has been 
provided to complete the backlogged maintenance work identified 
prior to fiscal year 1998. The conferees commend ABMC for its 
diligence in identifying, prioritizing, and completing this 
necessary maintenance, and expect the Commission to report to 
the Committees on Appropriations, prior to May 1st of each 
fiscal year, on the current state of maintenance requirements 
throughout the cemetery system.
      The conferees have also provided an additional $5,000,000 
above the budget request for the study, planning, and initial 
construction costs related to a new visitors center at the 
Normandy American Cemetery and Memorial near St. Laurent-sur-
Mer, France. The conferees are cognizant of the unique 
circumstances at the Normandy Cemetery, which is both the 
solemn resting place for 9,387 servicemen and women and a 
tourist destination for in excess of 1,000,000 annual visitors. 
Current visitor facilities are entirely inadequate to properly 
serve those individuals in need of privacy and counseling, as 
well as those who wish to better understand the historical 
perspective of the battles that occurred nearby. The conferees 
intend that in the development of appropriate plans regarding 
the placement, scope, and character of such a new visitor 
center, the Commission consult with a variety of entities, 
including the National Park Service, which may have particular 
expertise with facilities of this nature.

             Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      Appropriates $7,850,000 for salaries and expenses instead 
of $8,000,000 as proposed by the House and $7,621,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Of the amount appropriated, $2,500,000 
is available until September 30, 2003 and $5,350,000 is 
available until September 20, 2002. Bill language has been 
included again this fiscal year which limits the number of 
career Senior Executive Service positions to three.

                       DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY

              Community Development Financial Institutions

   COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS FUND PROGRAM ACCOUNT

      Appropriates $80,000,000 for the Community Development 
Financial Institutions Fund as proposed by the House instead of 
$100,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Includes $5,000,000 for technical assistance designed to 
benefit Native American communities as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $500,000 as proposed by the House. The conferees 
agree that Native Hawaiian and Alaskan Native communities are 
eligible entities for this program.
      Provides $9,500,000 for administrative expenses instead 
of $8,948,000 as proposed by the House and $9,850,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Provides for a limitation on the amount of direct loans 
of $51,800,000 as proposed by the Senate, instead of 
$15,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      The conferees agree with the direction of the Senate 
calling for inclusion of a report on rural lending practices as 
part of the fiscal year 2003 budget submission.

                   Consumer Product Safety Commission

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      Appropriates $55,200,000 for the Consumer Product Safety 
Commission, salaries and expenses, instead of $54,200,000 as 
proposed by the House and $56,200,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The amount provided represents a $1,000,000 increase 
above the budget request to maintain the current level of 
staffing and operational expenses.
      The conferees are aware of public concerns about the 
potential health and safety risks related to the use of 
chromated copper arsenate (CCA) to treat wood playground 
equipment. To this end, the conferees direct CPSC to report to 
the Committees on Appropriations by February 15, 2002, on the 
steps being taken to identify whether there are significant 
health and safety risks to children playing on and around CCA-
treated wood playground equipment. Such report shall also 
include the actions CPSC is taking to keep state and local 
governments, as well as consumers, informed about their 
findings on the health effects associated with CCA-treated wood 
playground equipment.

             Corporation for National and Community Service

       NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE PROGRAMS OPERATING EXPENSES

      Appropriates $401,980,000 for national and community 
service program operating expenses instead of $415,480,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The House did not provide any new funds 
for fiscal year 2002 operations, but did not eliminate the 
agency.
      Limits funds as proposed by the Senate to not more than: 
$31,000,000 for administrative expenses of which $2,000,000 is 
to be for a cost accounting system; $2,500 for official 
reception and representation expenses; $5,000,000 from the 
National Service Trust for national service scholarships for 
high school students performing community service; $240,492,000 
for AmeriCorp grants, of which not to exceed $47,000,000 may be 
for national direct programs and $25,000,000 for E-Corps; 
$43,000,000 for school-based and community-based service 
learning programs; $28,488,000 for quality and innovation 
activities under subtitle H of title I; and $5,000,000 for 
audits and other evaluations.
      The conferees have agreed to the Senate proposal of 
$25,000,000 for the National Civilian Community Corps, an 
increase of $4,000,000 over fiscal year 2001. Additional funds 
are provided to expand the number of AmeriCorps members serving 
at the five campuses currently in operation.
      The conferees deleted without prejudice funding for the 
Veterans Mission for Youth Program as proposed by the Senate 
and agreed to not fund the Silver Scholarship program. The 
conferees believe the authorizing committees of jurisdiction 
shouldevaluate and legislate these programs in the overall 
consideration of the Corporation's reauthorization.
      The conferees direct the Corporation to provide quarterly 
status reports to the Committees, beginning in January 2002, on 
the implementation of the new cost accounting system and on the 
expenditure of awards under the Trust Fund. The Corporation 
should also provide a copy of the Trust Fund award report to 
the IG. The conferees agree to the Senate proposal to provide 
not more than $10,000,000 for the Points of Light Foundation of 
which $2,500,000 may be used for establishment of an endowment; 
authorizes the Points of Light Foundation to use up to 
$2,500,000 of previously appropriated funds for this endowment; 
$7,500,000 for America's Promise; $5,000,000 for Communities In 
Schools; $2,500,000 for the YMCA; $1,000,000 for Teach For 
America; and $1,500,000 for Parents As Teachers. In addition, 
the conferees provide $1,500,000 for the Youth Life Foundation 
(YLF) for the same purposes contained in the fiscal year 2001 
Statement of Managers (House Report 106-988). The conferees 
also expect YLF to continue its effort in coordinating and 
collaborating its activities with America's Promise.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

      Appropriates $5,000,000 for Office of Inspector General 
as proposed by both the House and the Senate.

               U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      Appropriates $13,221,000 for salaries and expenses as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate.

                      DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE--CIVIL

                       Cemeterial Expenses, Army

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      Appropriates $22,537,000 for salaries and expenses as 
proposed by the House instead of $18,437,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The conferees agreed to include funds over the request 
to complete construction of the proposed columbarium.

                DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

                     National Institutes of Health

          NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH SCIENCES

      Appropriates $70,228,000 for the National Institute of 
Environmental Health Sciences as proposed by the House and the 
Senate. Of the appropriated amount, $45,824,000 is for research 
and $24,404,000 is for worker training activities.

            Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry

            TOXIC SUBSTANCES AND ENVIRONMENTAL PUBLIC HEALTH

      Appropriates $78,235,000 for toxic substances and 
environmental public health as proposed by the House and the 
Senate. Bill language has again this year been included which 
permits the Administrator of the Agency for Toxic Substances 
and Disease Registry (ATSDR) to conduct other appropriate 
health studies and evaluations or activities in lieu of health 
assessments pursuant to section 104(i)(6) of the Comprehensive 
Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 
1980, as amended (CERCLA). The language further stipulates that 
in the conduct of such other health assessments, evaluations or 
activities, the ATSDR shall not be bound by the deadlines 
imposed in section 104(i)(6)(A) of CERCLA. Funds provided for 
fiscal year 2002 cannot be used by the ATSDR to conduct in 
excess of 40 toxicological profiles.
      The conferees once again encourage ATSDR to provide 
adequate funds for minority health professions and for the 
ongoing health effects study on the consumption of Great Lakes 
fish.
      Finally, the conferees have again agreed to cap 
administrative costs charged by the CDC at 7.5 percent of the 
amount appropriated herein for the ATSDR.

                    Environmental Protection Agency

                         SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

      Appropriates $698,089,000 for science and technology 
instead of $680,410,000 as proposed by the House and 
$665,672,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees have agreed to the following increases 
above the budget request:
      1. $2,500,000 for EPSCoR;
      2. $4,000,000 for the Water Environment Research 
Foundation;
      3. $5,000,000 for the American Water Works Association 
Research Foundation;
      4. $2,000,000 for the National Decentralized Water 
Resource Capacity Development Project, in coordination with 
EPA, for continued training and research and development 
program;
      5. $750,000 for the Integrated Public/Private Energy and 
Environmental Consortium (IPEC) to develop cost-effective 
environmental technology, improved business practices, and 
technology transfer for the domestic petroleum industry;
      6. $750,000 for the Geothermal Heat Pump Consortium 
(GHP);
      7. $500,000 for the Consortium for Plant Biotechnology 
Research;
      8. $1,000,000 for the Center for the Study of Metals in 
the Environment;
      9. $750,000 for the University of South Alabama, Center 
for Estuarine Research;
      10. $500,000 to the University of California, Riverside 
for continued research of advanced vehicle design, advanced 
transportation systems, vehicle emissions, and atmospheric 
pollution at the CE-CERT facility;
      11. $750,000 for the San Bernardino Valley Municipal 
Water District for research and design (cost evaluation and 
environmental studies) of a mitigation project addressing the 
city's contaminated high groundwater table and dangers 
presented by liquefaction;
      12. $750,000 to the City of San Bernardino Municipal 
Water Department's Enhanced Reliability System of Improvements 
for water distribution and storage in San Bernardino, 
California;
      13. $1,000,000 to improve the transmission, distribution, 
and storage of potable water in the City of Needles, 
California;
      14. $750,000 for planning, design, and development of a 
groundwater storage system in the City of San Bernardino, 
California;
      15. $750,000 to the City of Glendale, California working 
in conjunction with the Utah State University in Logan, Utah, 
the University of Colorado in Boulder, and UCLA for a research 
study and pilot treatment plant focused on the removal of 
chromium 6 from water;
      16. $750,000 to the Central California Air Quality 
Coalition for a California Regional Sacramento and San 
Francisco Bay Air Quality study for ozone;
      17. $1,300,000 for the National Jewish Medical and 
Research Center for research on the relationship between indoor 
and outdoor pollution and the development of respiratory 
diseases;
      18. $1,500,000 for the Connecticut River Airshed-
Watershed Consortium;
      19. $1,250,000 to the University of Miami in Florida for 
the Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science;
      20. $500,000 for the creation of a Center for 
Environmental Science, a joint project of the University of 
Chicago and Argonne National Laboratory;
      21. $1,000,000 for environmental education and research 
at the Turtle Cove Research Station, Louisiana;
      22. $1,000,000 for the Center for Urban Environmental 
Research and Education at the University of Maryland Baltimore 
County;
      23. $250,000 to the University of New England for the 
National Center for Marine Mammal Rehabilitation and Research 
in Biddeford, Maine;
      24. $1,250,000 for the Great Lakes Hydrological Center of 
Excellence partnership by Western Michigan University and the 
Environmental Research Institute of Michigan;
      25. $500,000 for the Missouri River Institute for 
research and outreach;
      26. $3,900,000 for the Mine Waste Technology Program at 
the National Environmental Waste Technology, Testing, and 
Evaluation Center;
      27. $500,000 to the University of North Carolina at 
Greensboro for the Bioterrorism Water Quality Protection 
Program with the aim of developing highly automated and 
inexpensive testing protocols;
      28. $1,500,000 to the University of North Carolina at 
Chapel Hill for the Schools of Public Health and Medicine to 
advance the ``one atmosphere'' approach to determining the 
health effects of air pollution;
      29. $1,200,000 for the Center for Air Toxic Metals at the 
Energy and Environmental Research Center;
      30. $500,000 to the University of Nebraska-Lincoln's 
Water Sciences Laboratory at the Water Center for field and 
laboratory equipment;
      31. $500,000 to the University of New Hampshire for 
groundwater contamination research conducted at the Bedrock 
Bioremediation Center;
      32. $750,000 for the Cancer Institute of New Jersey for 
research of the influence of environmental factors in cancer 
causation;
      33. $1,000,000 for the National Environmental Respiratory 
Center at the Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute;
      34. $100,000 for a study of air quality and noise 
pollution of the neighborhoods surrounding LaGuardia Airport;
      35. $500,000 to Rockland County, New York for an 
assessment of environmental hazards in Rockland county and the 
east side of Manhattan;
      36. $1,000,000 for continuation of the South Bronx Air 
Pollution Study being conducted by New York University;
      37. $1,500,000 to Syracuse University, New York to 
develop alternative approaches to assessing the impact of 
pollutants on environmental systems;
      38. $500,000 to the Syracuse Research Corporation in 
Syracuse, New York for the development of a Probability Risk 
Assessment Center;
      39. $500,000 to the Rivers and Estuaries Center on the 
Hudson in New York for research on river and estuarine 
environments;
      40. $1,257,000 to the Environmental Technology 
Commercialization Center in Cleveland, Ohio for the National 
Environmental Technology Incubator and technology 
commercialization activities;
      41. $1,000,000 to Saint Vincent College in Pennsylvania 
for an environmental education and teacher preparation 
initiative;
      42. $750,000 for a collaborative effort between the 
University of Tennessee, Western Carolina University and Emory 
University for the Air Quality Improvements for the Great Smoky 
Mountains National Park Initiative;
      43. $1,500,000 for the Mickey Leland National Urban Air 
Toxics Research Center;
      44. $1,000,000 for the Gulf Coast Hazardous Substance 
Research Center;
      45. $350,000 to the Texas Institute for Applied 
Environmental Research at Tarleton State University;
      46. $3,500,000 to the University of Houston, Texas for 
the Texas Learning Computation Center's Environmental 
Initiative;
      47. $1,500,000 to the National Environmental Policy 
Institute for implementation of a pilot program to address air 
quality and pollution in a region through the use of telework;
      48. $100,000 for the University of Vermont's Proctor 
Maple Research Center to continue mercury deposition monitoring 
effects;
      49. $250,000 for acid rain research at the University of 
Vermont;
      50. $1,300,000 for the Canaan Valley Institute to 
continue to develop a regional sustainability support center 
and coordinated information system in the Mid-Atlantic 
Highlands;
      51. $970,000 for the Canaan Valley Institute in close 
coordination with the Regional Vulnerability and Assessment 
(ReVA) initiative to develop research andeducational tools 
using integrative technologies to predict future environmental risk and 
support informed, proactive decision-making to be undertaken in 
conjunction with the Highlands action program; and
      52. $500,000 for the National Energy Technology 
Laboratory for continued activities of a comprehensive clean 
water initiative in cooperation with EPA Region III.
      The conferees have provided an additional $68,200 for 
civil enforcement and capacity building activities, bringing 
the fiscal year 2002 funding level for those programs to no 
less than the fiscal year 2001 level.
      The conferees have agreed to reduce funding for hazardous 
waste research $1,494,100 below the budget request level.
      The conferees have agreed to provide $4,000,000 from 
within available funds throughout the Science and Technology 
account, for the research, development, and validation of non-
animal, alternative chemical screening and prioritization 
methods, such as rapid, non-animal screens and Quantitative 
Structure Activity Relationships (QSAR), for potential 
inclusion in EPA's current and future relevant chemical 
evaluation programs. Activities funded in this regard should be 
designed in consultation with the Office of Pollution 
Prevention and Toxic Substances.
      The conferees continue to support the partnership between 
the EPA and the National Technology Transfer Center and expect 
the Agency to continue the cooperative agreement at the fiscal 
year 2001 level.

                 ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS AND MANAGEMENT

      Appropriates $2,054,511,000 for environmental programs 
and management instead of $2,004,599,000 as proposed by the 
House and $2,061,996,200 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees have agreed to the following increases to 
the budget request:
      1. $16,000,000 for rural water technical assistance 
activities and ground water protection with distribution as 
follows: $9,000,000 for the NRWA; $3,500,000 for RCAP; $750,000 
for GWPC; $1,750,000 for Small Flows Clearinghouse; and 
$1,000,000 for the NETC;
      2. $1,000,000 for implementation of the National 
Biosolids Partnership Program;
      3. $2,000,000 for the source water protection program;
      4. $5,000,000 to accelerate the development of new and 
update current IRIS values;
      5. $1,750,000 for Chesapeake Bay small watershed grants, 
to be expended as specified in Senate Report 107-43. This 
increase, along with EPA's redirection of $698,700 in fiscal 
year 2001 EPM funds to the Chesapeake Bay Program for fiscal 
year 2002 will result in a total of $21,267,400 available in 
fiscal year 2002 for the Chesapeake Bay Program. This amount is 
$539,300 above the fiscal year 2001 level;
      6. $537,600 for the Great Lakes National Program Office 
for a total program level of $15,500,000;
      7. $5,500,000 for the National Estuary Program for a 
total program level of $22,553,200. The conferees recommend 
that a minimum of 65 percent of the funds provided for the 
National Estuary Program be reserved for programs in the 
estuaries of national significance for which the Administrator 
has convened a management conference by the date of enactment 
of this appropriation Act pursuant to section 320 of the 
Federal Water Pollution Control Act, as amended, for the 
development and implementation of a comprehensive conservation 
and management plan;
      8. $1,545,200 for the Lake Champlain Basin Program for a 
total program level of $2,500,000;
      9. $2,022,600 for the Long Island Sound Program Office 
for a total program level of $2,500,000;
      10. $2,500,000 for the National Alternative Fuels 
Training Consortium;
      11. $200,000 for the Northeast Waste Management Officials 
Association to continue solid waste, hazardous waste, cleanup 
and pollution prevention programs;
      12. $500,000 for the Kenai River Center for continued 
research on watershed issues;
      13. $1,000,000 for the Columbia Basin Groundwater 
Management Area;
      14. $1,000,000 for the Frank M. Tejeda Center for 
Excellence in Environmental Operations;
      15. $4,700,000 for America's Clean Water Foundation for 
implementation of on-farm environmental assessments for 
livestock operations;
      16. $850,000 for the Southcoast Harbor education and 
monitoring project;
      17. $2,500,000 for the Southwest Center for Environmental 
Research and Policy;
      18. $250,000 for the Northwest Straits Commission;
      19. $4,000,000 for the Small Public Water System 
Technology Centers at Western Kentucky University, the 
University of New Hampshire, the University of Alaska-Sitka; 
Pennsylvania State University, the University of Missouri-
Columbia, Montana State University, the University of Illinois, 
and Mississippi State University, with each Center to receive 
$500,000;
      20. $1,000,000 to the Gas Technology Institute for the 
Agricultural Mixed Waste Thermo-Depolymerization BioRefinery 
Project;
      21. $700,000 for the Alabama Department of Environmental 
Management for the water and wastewater training program;
      22. $500,000 to the Pima County Wastewater Management 
Department for a regional water quality research project in 
Arizona;
      23. $300,000 to Riverside County, California for 
continued work on the Special Area Management Plan portion of 
the Riverside County Integrated Plan;
      24. $500,000 to the San Joaquin River Exchange 
Contractors Authority for the development, planning and design 
of watershed restoration projects;
      25. $750,000 to Ventura County, California for the 
completion and implementation of the Calleguas Creek Watershed 
Management Plan;
      26. $250,000 to establish a Santa Ana River Watershed 
Research and Training Program at the Water Resources Institute 
of California State University, San Bernardino;
      27. $500,000 to the Sacramento County, California 
Regional Sanitation District to continue the Sacramento River 
Toxic Pollutant Control Program and the Sacramento River 
Watershed Program;
      28. $500,000 to the National Park Service/Golden Gate 
National Parks Association for the Crissy Field tidal marsh 
wetlands monitoring and restoration project;
      29. $500,000 for MTBE remedial activities in Santa 
Monica, California;
      30. $500,000 for cross-media and water quality monitoring 
in the Sweetwater River watershed, California;
      31. $500,000 for Gateway Cities, California, diesel 
emissions reduction program;
      32. $250,000 for the Central California ozone study;
      33. $250,000 to Miami-Dade County, Florida for lead 
screening, testing, outreach education and abatement in the 
Liberty City neighborhood;
      34. $200,000 to Miami-Dade County, Florida to expand the 
existing environmental education program;
      35. $500,000 to the Southwest Water Management for 
fishery and habitat restoration in Lake Panasoffkee, Florida;
      36. $850,000 for the University of West Florida to 
determine if a connection exists between elevated levels of 
illness in Northwest Florida and the levels of toxic pollutants 
in the area;
      37. $1,500,000 to Columbus Water Works in Georgia for an 
Advanced Biosolids Flow-Through Thermophilic Treatment Process 
demonstration project;
      38. $100,000 for the American Farmland Trust to continue 
support for the design for the environment for farms program in 
Hawaii and the American Pacific;
      39. $400,000 for the County of Hawaii and the Hawaii 
Island Economic Development Board to establish and implement a 
community development model for renewable resource management 
by upgrading solid waste transfer stations into community 
recycling centers;
      40. $500,000 for the Economic Development Alliance of 
Hawaii to promote biotechnology to reduce pesticide use in 
tropical and subtropical agricultural production;
      41. $250,000 for the County of Maui for the control of 
nuisance seaweed accumulations on the beaches of Kihei, Maui, 
Hawaii;
      42. $1,000,000 to the Water Systems Council to assist in 
the effective delivery of water to rural citizens nationwide;
      43. $750,000 for the painting and coating assistance 
initiative through the University of Northern Iowa;
      44. $750,000 for the Center for Agricultural and Rural 
Development at Iowa State University for the Resource and 
Agricultural Policy Systems program;
      45. $500,000 for the Small Business Pollution Prevention 
Center at the University of Northern Iowa;
      46. $1,000,000 for Boise State University for developing 
multipurpose sensors to detect and analyze environmental 
contaminants;
      47. $900,000 for the Environmental Biotechnology 
Institute at the University of Idaho to develop selenium 
control technologies;
      48. $2,000,000 for the Coeur d'Alene Basin Commission, 
established by the State of Idaho to carry out pilot program 
for environmental response, natural resource restoration and 
related activities;
      49. $500,000 to the Lake County, Illinois Stormwater 
Management Commission for an assessment of natural resources in 
the Upper Des Plaines River watershed;
      50. $500,000 to Raccoon Lake, Centralia, Illinois for 
implementation of a water supply plan including engineering and 
design costs;
      51. $500,000 to Purdue University in Indiana for the 
Contaminant Remediation Optimization Program (CROP);
      52. $200,000 to the City of Shreveport, Louisiana to 
provide technical support for the Mayor's Clean Air Citizens 
Advisory Committee;
      53. $100,000 for a regional water and sewer consolidation 
study in St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana;
      54. $4,000,000 for the Lake Pontchartrain Basin 
Restoration Program;
      55. $200,000 for a study of air quality in the Shreve-
Bossier area of Louisiana;
      56. $500,000 to the University of Maryland for the 
Regional Earth Sciences Center and mapping of wetlands in the 
Chesapeake Bay watershed;
      57. $750,000 for the Maryland Bureau of Mines for an acid 
mine drainage remediation project;
      58. $1,000,000 for projects demonstrating the benefits of 
Low Impact Development along the Anacostia Watershed in 
Montgomery and Prince Georges Counties, Maryland;
      59. $500,000 for the Michigan Biotechnology Institute for 
development and demonstration of environmental cleanup 
technologies;
      60. $500,000 to the Cranbrook Education Community to 
implement a storm water management plan within the Upper Rouge 
River watershed;
      61. $1,000,000 for the Food and Agriculture Policy 
Research Institute's Missouri watershed initiative project;
      62. $500,000 for the City of Lake St. Louis, Missouri for 
a Water Quality study of Peruque Creek Watershed;
      63. $300,000 to Mecklenburg County, North Carolina for 
the continuation and expansion of the Charlotte Surface Water 
Improvement and Management program;
      64. $850,000 for continued activities of the North 
Carolina Central University research initiative;
      65. $400,000 to Wake County, North Carolina for planning, 
environmental analysis and design of a watershed management 
plan;
      66. $250,000 to the Crop Life Foundation for a North 
Carolina Environmental Stewardship Project;
      67. $750,000 to the Town of Rosman, North Carolina for 
the development of engineering plans for addressing the Town's 
wastewater infrastructure needs;
      68. $250,000 to Rowan University in Glassboro, New Jersey 
for the Environmental Community Revitalization and Research 
Initiative as a demonstration program;
      69. $200,000 to the Borough of Rutherford, New Jersey for 
an engineering study of the area's sanitary sewer collection 
system;
      70. $13,600 for the water quality monitoring program 
along the New Jersey-New York shoreline for a total of 
$300,000;
      71. $1,500,000 to continue the sediment decontamination 
technology demonstration in the New York-New Jersey Harbor;
      72. $100,000 for Fallon, Nevada, for arsenic removal 
technologies;
      73. $750,000 to Alfred University of Alfred, New York for 
the Center for Environmental and Energy Research (CEER);
      74. $250,000 to the Town of Babylon, New York for a 
feasibility study on expanding the Southwest Sewer District;
      75. $500,000 for the development of an Environmental 
Leadership Institute at Niagara University, New York;
      76. $250,000 to the Rochester Institute of Technology 
(RIT) to create a National Materials Recovery and Recycling 
Center of Excellence;
      77. $1,500,000 for continued work on the water quality 
management plans for the Central New York watersheds in 
Onondaga and Cayuga counties;
      78. $500,000 to Cornell University in New York for a 
demonstration project in Skaneateles, Otisco and Oneida Lake 
Watersheds to study the effectiveness of biological controls in 
addressing the environmental and ecological problems caused by 
milfoil, waterchestnuts and other aquatic weeds;
      79. $150,000 to the State University of New York's 
Environmental School of Forestry for the Otisco Lake Watershed 
Evaluation Project;
      80. $1,400,000 for the Ohio River Watershed Pollutant 
Reduction Program;
      81. $500,000 for the Integrated Petroleum Environmental 
Consortium;
      82. $100,000 to the City of Altus, Oklahoma to conduct 
environmental engineering studies for the expansion of water 
treatment facilities;
      83. $130,000 to the City of Lancaster, Pennsylvania for 
lead screening, testing, outreach, education and abatement;
      84. $500,000 for the Brazos-Navasota watershed management 
project;
      85. $250,000 for the Envision Utah Project;
      86. $250,000 for the Vermont Department of Agriculture to 
work with conservation districts to reduce non-point source 
pollution run-off to the Poultney-Mettowee watershed;
      87. $500,000 to King County, Washington for the Direct 
Carbonate Fuel Cell Demonstration Project;
      88. $500,000 to Franklin, Grant, and Adams Counties to 
support the Groundwater Management Area in Washington State;
      89. $50,000 to the Lake Washington Technical College--
Redmond campus for the next phase of the environmental 
assessment of a DoD site;
      90. $1,750,000 to the Green Bay Metropolitan Sewerage 
District in Wisconsin for a biosolids treatment demonstration 
project;
      91. $600,000 for a two year study of sewer system 
improvements for Superior, Wisconsin;
      92. $1,230,000 for on-going activities at the Canaan 
Valley Institute, including activities relating to community 
sustainability;
      93. $300,000 for the continued implementation of the 
Potomac River Visions Initiative through the Friends of the 
Potomac;
      94. $200,000 to the Polymer Alliance Zone's MARCEE 
Initiative with oversight being provided by the Office of Solid 
Waste.
      The conferees have also included an increase of 
$8,664,000 for enforcement activities conducted by the EPA 
through the Environmental Programs and Management account. 
Agency-wide, the conferees have restored $15,001,100 for 
enforcement programs and activities conducted through the 
Science and Technology, Hazardous Substance Superfund, and 
Environmental Programs and Management accounts, bringing the 
Agency funding total for enforcement to slightly more than the 
fiscal year 2001 level. The conferees expect the Agency to 
restore federal enforcement positions in accordance with the 
fiscal year 2001 Operating Plan. The conferees recognize that 
restoring these enforcement positions may result in the on-
board personnel level at EPA to exceed 17,500 FTEs.
      The conferees have agreed to the following reductions 
from the budget request:
      1. $1,322,900 from Administrative Services;
      2. $2,097,800 from Direct Public Information and 
Assistance;
      3. $2,298,700 from Public Access programs;
      4. $2,581,200 from Regional Management activities;
      5. $2,896,400 from Reinvention programs;
      6. $3,234,800 from Project XL; and
      7. $11,260,200 as a general reduction.
      The conferees direct the Agency to provide no less than 
the fiscal year 2001 funding level for continuing operation of 
the Environmental Education programs.
      The conferees have, within available funds, provided 
$2,000,000 for the eight Environmental Finance Centers. This 
represents an increase of $751,000 over the budget request for 
this excellent program. Also within available funds, the Agency 
is directed to provide $3,000,000 above the budget request 
level for implementation of the High Production Volume Chemical 
Challenge Program; $200,000 for setting standards and to 
increase awareness of the benefits of ambient temperature glass 
technology; and $500,000 for the Association of Metropolitan 
Sewerage Agencies to provide information to the wastewater 
treatment industry regarding security measures, and to 
facilitate communication and coordination between the 
wastewater treatment industry and relevant governmental 
agencies in order to increase security at wastewater facilities 
throughout the nation.
      Again this year, the Agency is directed to provide no 
less than the budget request levels for Pesticide Registration 
and Re-registration programs. Further, up to $9,000,000 
requested to support 87 FTEs in the re-registration program may 
be used to support tolerance reassessment activities. Bill 
language has again been included in title IV, General 
Provisions, prohibiting funds for use to promulgate a final 
regulation to implement changes in the payment of pesticide 
tolerance processing fees as proposed at 64 Federal Register 
31040, or any similar proposal. Finally, the conferees direct 
the Agency to use $1,500,000 from within available funds (other 
than those funds budgeted and provided specifically for 
registration, re-registration, and tolerance assessment 
activities) to further demonstrate the current, as well as the 
proposed expanded role of the Agency, regarding the expedited 
review and registration of reduced risk pesticides. The Agency 
is urged to provide for the Committees on Appropriations a 
detailed report on the results of this demonstration and any 
specific plans the Agency may have to expand the program.
      The conferees have provided, also from within available 
funds, $2,000,000 for the Administrator to develop and carry 
out a lamp recycling outreach program. In orderto increase 
awareness of proper disposal methods among commercial and industrial 
users of energy efficient mercury-containing lamps, including 
fluorescent and high discharge lamps, this program should be used to 
promote lamp recycling, in compliance with the provisions of Federal 
and State Universal Waste Rules. The program is to be developed jointly 
with State environmental agencies, and with lamp manufacturers and lamp 
recyclers, either as individual companies, or collectively through 
their trade associations.
      The conferees have provided the full budget request for 
the Endocrine Disrupter Screening Program and direct that no 
reductions be proposed in the operating plan submission for 
this important program. In addition, the conferees are 
encouraged that the Agency is establishing the Endocrine 
Disruptor Methods Validation Subcommittee (EDMVS) of the 
National Advisory Council for Environmental Policy (NACEPT). 
The EDMVS will provide a means by which interested parties can 
participate to express their concerns and work to ensure a 
scientifically sound validation process for the animal and non-
animal based screens and tests in the developing program. The 
conferees urge EPA to develop validation processes that 
incorporate the advice of the EDMVS, and the Agency is 
requested to provide a report to the Committees on 
Appropriations on the status of the EDMVS by March 15, 2002.
      The conferees are aware of the extraordinary success the 
military services have achieved in recent years by utilizing 
pulse technology in vehicles and equipment. This technology has 
contributed to significant cost savings in battery management 
programs and has enhanced the ability of the military services 
to increase the effectiveness of their environmental 
responsibilities through the extension of the service life of 
its batteries. In light of this success of the military, the 
conferees expect EPA to actively investigate the environmental 
and monetary benefits that could be realized by encouraging 
government-wide use of pulse technology in the maintenance of 
the federal vehicle fleet and other applicable equipment.
      In August 2000, EPA published an assessment of the state 
of the streams of the Mid-Atlantic Highlands area. Because of 
the importance of the Mid-Atlantic Highlands and the success of 
the aforementioned assessment, the conferees direct the Agency 
to prepare a follow-up report on the state of the Mid-Atlantic 
Highlands as a whole by April 15, 2002. Further, consistent 
with the House Report accompanying H.R. 2620, the Administrator 
is expected to enter into an interagency agreement with other 
federal agencies and cooperative agreements with states, local 
governments and non-governmental organizations to carry out the 
goals of the Mid-Atlantic Highlands program.
      The conferees note that EPA's August 1, 2001, draft 
report on ``The National Costs of the Total Maximum Daily Load 
Program'' does not provide any information on the cost of 
regulatory changes to the TMDL program on small businesses, 
notwithstanding specific language in the statement of managers 
accompanying the fiscal year 2001 appropriations Act directing 
EPA to conduct that analysis. The conferees intend EPA to 
estimate the cost to small businesses from implementation of 
that rule, whether those costs are imposed directly by EPA or 
indirectly by State programs implementing EPA regulations.
      The conferees continue to support efforts being 
undertaken by state energy, environmental, utility and 
transportation agencies to integrate their programs, policies, 
and regulations. The conferees encourage the relevant federal 
agencies to actively support and participate in this effort.
      The conferees are aware that controversy has surrounded 
adoption of EPA's mixture and derived-from rules. In its 
adoption of a final rule in May 2001, EPA expressed its intent 
to continue to pursue actions to provide exemptions for certain 
low-risk wastes as identified through public comments and 
scientific documentation. The conferees expect the Agency to 
expedite the review of any requests for exemptions that may 
result in the management of certain residues and mixtures as 
non-hazardous waste, and to finalize those exemptions only 
where science supports such a determination.
      The conferees agree that unspent funds made available in 
prior year appropriation Acts for certain activities or 
projects in Cortland County, New York may be used to fund 
additional projects specifically in that county.
      The conferees are aware of public concerns about the 
potential health and safety risks related to the use of 
chromated copper arsenate (CCA) to treat wood playground 
equipment. To this end, the conferees direct EPA to report to 
the Committees on Appropriations by February 15, 2002, on the 
steps being taken to identify whether there are significant 
health and safety risks to children playing on and around CCA-
treated wood playground equipment. Such report shall also 
include the actions EPA is taking to keep state and local 
governments, as well as the public, informed about their 
findings on the health effects associated with CCA-treated wood 
playground equipment.
      The conferees are aware of significant and increasing 
water quality and water quantity problems along the Fox River 
watershed in Kane, McHenry, Lake, Kendall, DeKalb, and LaSalle 
Counties, Illinois. The conferees urge that available funds to 
EPA be used to initiate the development of aggregated watershed 
data, a watershed-wide Geographic Information System (GIS), 
overall watershed water quality assessment and modeling, and a 
framework for facilitating a comprehensive watershed management 
plan. Any grants made by EPA for this project should be 
provided to the Illinois EPA.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

      Appropriates $34,019,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General as proposed by the House and the Senate. In addition to 
amounts appropriated directly to the OIG, $11,867,000 is also 
available by transfer from funds appropriated for Hazardous 
Substance Superfund.

                        buildings and facilities

      Appropriates $25,318,000 for buildings and facilities as 
proposed by the House.

                     hazardous substance superfund

                     (including transfers of funds)

      Appropriates $1,270,000,000 for hazardous substance 
superfund as proposed by the House instead of $1,274,645,560 as 
proposed by the Senate. Bill language provides that 
$635,000,000 of the appropriated amount is to be derived from 
the Superfund Trust Fund, while the remaining $635,000,000 is 
to be derived from General Revenues of the Treasury. Additional 
language provides for the transfer of $11,867,000 to the Office 
of Inspector General, and for the transfer of $36,891,000 to 
the Science and Technology account as proposed by the House 
instead of $36,890,500 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees have agreed to the following fiscal year 
2002 funding levels:
      1. $910,070,000 for Superfund response and cleanup 
activities.
      2. $139,346,000 for enforcement activities.
      3. $133,000,000 for management and support.
      4. $11,867,000 for transfer to the Office of Inspector 
General.
      5. $36,891,000 for research and development activities, 
to be transferred to the Science and Technology account.
      6. $38,826,000 for reimbursable interagency activities, 
including $28,150,000 for the Department of Justice and 
$10,676,000 for OSHA, FEMA, NOAA, the United States Coast 
Guard, and the Department of the Interior.
      The conferees have agreed to provide the budget request 
level of $97,651,600 for the Brownfields program, which 
includes funding from various programs within the Hazardous 
Substance Superfund account (totaling $94,977,400) and the 
Environmental Programs and Management account. The conferees 
further agree that the fiscal year 2001 funding levels for the 
SITE program and for the hazardous substance research centers 
be maintained for fiscal year 2002.
      Once again this year, the conferees support the national 
pilot worker training program which recruits and trains young 
persons who live near hazardous waste sites or in communities 
at risk of exposure to contaminated properties for work in the 
environmental field. The conferees direct EPA to continue 
funding this effort in cooperation and collaboration with the 
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences.
      The conferees agree that $100,000,000 of the appropriated 
amount shall not become available until September 1, 2002.

                leaking underground storage tank program

      Appropriates $73,000,000 for the leaking underground 
storage tank program instead of $79,200,000 as proposed by the 
House and $71,947,400 as proposed by the Senate.

                           oil spill response

      Appropriates $15,000,000 for oil spill response as 
proposed by the House instead of $14,986,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.

                   state and tribal assistance grants

      Appropriates $3,733,276,000 for state and tribal 
assistance grants instead of $3,436,899,000 as proposed by the 
House and $3,603,015,900 as proposed by the Senate. Bill 
language specifically provides $1,350,000,000 for Clean Water 
State Revolving Fund (SRF) capitalization grants; $850,000,000 
for Safe Drinking Water SRF capitalization grants; $75,000,000 
for the United States-Mexico Border program; $40,000,000 for 
grants to address drinking water and wastewater infrastructure 
needs in rural and Alaska Native communities; $1,074,376,000 
for categorical grants to the states and tribes; $343,900,000 
for cost-shared grants for construction of water and wastewater 
treatment facilities and infrastructure and for groundwater 
protection infrastructure; and $25,000,000 for a new 
Environmental Information Exchange Network grant program.
      The conferees have included bill language which, for 
fiscal year 2002, authorizes the Administrator of the EPA to 
use funds appropriated pursuant to the Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act (FWPCA) to make grants to Indian tribes pursuant to 
section 319(h) and 518(e) of FWPCA. In addition, bill language 
has been adopted which, (1) will permit the states to include 
as principal amounts considered to be the cost of administering 
SRF loans to eligible borrowers, with certain limitations; (2) 
permits the Administrator to reserve up to 1\1/2\ percent of 
the funds appropriated for the SRF under title VI of the FWPCA 
for grants under section 518(c) of that Act; (3) for fiscal 
year 2002, authorizes the states to transfer funds between the 
Clean Water and Safe Drinking Water SRF programs; and (4) 
stipulates that no funds provided in the Act to address water 
infrastructure needs of colonias within the United States along 
the United States-Mexico border shall be made available to a 
county or municipal government unless that governmental entity 
has established an enforceable ordinance or rule which prevents 
the development or construction of any additional colonia 
areas, or the development within an existing colonia of any new 
home, business, or other structure which lacks water, 
wastewater, or other necessary infrastructure.
      As in previous years, the conferees have included bill 
language which stipulates that none of the funds provided in 
this or any previous years' Act for the Safe Drinking Water SRF 
may be reserved by the Administrator for health effects studies 
on drinking water contaminants. The conferees have instead 
provided significant resources for such studies within EPA's 
Science and Technology account.
      The conferees have included bill language which will 
allow the Agency to use undesignated funds appropriated in 
prior years for specific water and wastewater grants approved 
for fiscal year 2002, but have not included a provision 
authorizing the expenditure of funds for a new State 
Enforcement Grant program. Although the conferees are generally 
supportive of state grant programs, it is believed that 
additional time is needed for the Agency to review and refine 
this proposal for inclusion in a futurebudget submission. The 
conferees note that this action to disapprove inclusion of this new 
program has been taken without prejudice.
      Of the funds provided for the United States-Mexico Border 
program, $7,000,000 is for the El Paso desalination and water 
supply project, and $2,000,000 is for the Brownsville, Texas 
water supply project.
      Of the amount provided through categorical grants for air 
resource assistance grants under sections 103 and 105 of the 
Clean Air Act, as amended, $10,000,000, an increase of 
$5,000,000 above the budget request, is for section 103 grants 
to the states to develop regional haze programs under title I, 
part C of the Clean Air Act. It is the intention of the 
conferees that these funds be used to aid states in the 
development of emissions inventories, quantification of natural 
visibility conditions, monitoring and other data necessary to 
define reasonable progress and develop control strategies, and 
to support the states' participation in regional efforts to 
coordinate their strategies, where necessary, and at the 
election of the individual states. The conferees direct the 
Agency to disburse the funds for the regional haze program to 
the States' regional planning organizations within 30 days of 
receipt of completed grant applications.
      In addition, the conferees have provided $8,000,000 above 
the budget request for section 105 air resource assistance 
grants, $22,593,600 above the budget submission for section 106 
water pollution grants and $8,000,000 above the budget 
submission for the new Beach Environmental Assessment and 
Coastal Health Act (BEACH) grant program. The conferees have 
agreed to provide the budget request level for section 319 non-
point source pollution grants.
      The conferees agree that the $343,900,000, together with 
unallocated funds made available in prior appropriations Acts 
for communities or other governmental entities for construction 
of water and wastewater treatment facilities and infrastructure 
and for groundwater protection infrastructure, shall be 
accompanied by a cost-share requirement whereby 45 percent of a 
project's cost is to be the responsibility of the community or 
entity consistent with long-standing guidelines of the Agency. 
These guidelines also offer flexibility in the application of 
the cost-share requirement for those few circumstances when 
meeting the 45 percent requirement is not financially possible. 
The Agency is commended for its past efforts in working with 
communities and other entities to resolve problems in this 
regard, and it is expected that this high level of effort and 
flexibility will continue throughout fiscal year 2002. In 
addition, the conferees agree that unspent water and wastewater 
infrastructure funds totaling approximately $164,000 provided 
in a prior appropriation Act for Franklin County, Pennsylvania 
may be spent for other such water and wastewater infrastructure 
projects in that county.
      The distribution of funds under this program is as 
follows:
      1. $1,800,000 of the Ketchikan Gateway Borough, Alaska 
for sewer and water improvements;
      2. $1,000,000 for Pelican, Alaska water and sewer 
improvements;
      3. $1,800,000 for Petersburg, Alaska for water and sewer 
upgrades;
      4. $3,000,000 for the Girdwood, Alaska water extension;
      5. $3,000,000 for addressing above ground leaking fuel 
tanks in Alaska;
      6. $1,500,000 for Wasilla, Alaska water and sewer 
improvements;
      7. $900,000 to the City of Sitka, Alaska for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements for the Sawmill Cove 
Industrial Park;
      8. $500,000 to Tuscaloosa County, Alabama for countywide 
water and sewer facilities;
      9. $1,000,000 for the Southeast Alabama Regional Water 
Authority for a water facility project;
      10. $600,000 for Grant, Alabama for wastewater collection 
and treatment facilities;
      11. $1,000,000 for the City of Jackson, Alabama for water 
system improvements;
      12. $450,000 to Blount County, Alabama for a wastewater 
treatment and collection systems;
      13. $1,900,000 to Rainsville, Alabama for a wastewater 
treatment facility upgrade and expansion;
      14. $500,000 to Arab, Alabama for sewer infrastructure 
improvements;
      15. $300,000 to Guin, Alabama for sewer infrastructure 
improvements;
      16. $250,000 to Franklin County, Alabama for water 
infrastructure improvements;
      17. $300,000 to Sumiton, Alabama for water system 
infrastructure improvements;
      18. $350,000 to Sardis City, Alabama for sewer 
infrastructure improvements;
      19. $900,000 to Shelby County, Alabama for wastewater 
infrastructure improvements;
      20. $2,500,000 to the Alabama Regional Water Authority 
for the Southwest Alabama Rural/Municipal Water System;
      21. $1,000,000 to the Town of Citronelle, Alabama South 
Alabama Utilities for water infrastructure improvements in 
Mobile County;
      22. $500,000 to the City of Jackson, Alabama for 
construction of a water treatment facility;
      23. $250,000 to the Town of Fulton, Alabama for 
wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      24. $500,000 to the Mobile County Water, Sewer and Fire 
Protection Authority for construction of new facilities and 
upgrades to existing facilities;
      25. $750,000 to the City of Brewton, Alabama for drainage 
infrastructure improvements;
      26. $1,000,000 to the City of Huntsville, Alabama for 
water system improvements;
      27. $1,000,000 to Hartselle Utilities for wastewater 
infrastructure in the City of Hartselle, Alabama;
      28. $1,000,000 to the City of Tuscumbia, Alabama for 
drinking water infrastructure improvements;
      29. $500,000 to the Limestone County Water and Sewer 
Authority for drinking water infrastructure improvements;
      30. $500,000 to the West Morgan-East Lawrence Water 
Authority for drinking water infrastructure improvements;
      31. $115,000 to the City of Luverne, Alabama for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      32. $485,000 to the Clay County, Alabama Water Authority 
for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      33. $2,000,000 for Union County, Arkansas for a community 
drinking water system;
      34. $250,000 to the City of Menifee, Arkansas for 
wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      35. $1,000,000 for the State of Arizona Water 
Infrastructure Finance Authority for making a loan to the City 
of Safford, Arizona to address the city's wastewater needs, 
which will be repaid by the city to the Arizona Clean Water 
Revolving Fund under title VI of the Federal Water Pollution 
Control Act, as amended;
      36. $500,000 for the Santa Rosa, California, drinking 
water infrastructure needs;
      37. $500,000 for the Los Banos, California, wastewater 
and drinking water infrastructure project;
      38. $500,000 for Compton, California, sewer 
infrastructure needs;
      39. $1,175,000 for Sacramento, California, combined sewer 
system improvements;
      40. $850,000 for the Placer County, California, 
wastewater treatment project;
      41. $500,000 for Lake County, California, for the Clear 
Lake Basin 2000 project;
      42. $2,800,000 for the Olivenhain, California drinking 
water project;
      43. $500,000 for Oxnard, California, area drinking water 
infrastructure needs;
      44. $400,000 to the City of Colton, California for storm 
drain improvements;
      45. $900,000 to the Mission Springs Water District in 
California to protect groundwater in the City of Desert Hot 
Springs;
      46. $250,000 to the City of Modesto, California for 
replacement of the 9th Street storm drain;
      47. $900,000 to the City of Laguna Beach, Orange County, 
California for water and wastewater infrastructure 
improvements;
      48. $100,000 to the Calaveras County Water District, 
California for water infrastructure improvements at the West 
Point Water System;
      49. $150,000 to the Tuolumne Utilities District of 
Tuolumne County, California for water supply infrastructure 
improvements and a canal optimization study;
      50. $1,800,000 to the Cities of Arcadia and Sierra Madre, 
California for seismic infrastructure upgrades to the drinking-
water delivery system;
      51. $485,000 to the Metropolitan Water District of 
Southern California for the Desalination Research and 
Innovation Partnership project;
      52. $485,000 to the City of Redding, California for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements for the Stillwater 
Industrial Park;
      53. $900,000 to the City of Bellflower, California for a 
water infrastructure project;
      54. $500,000 for the continuation of water infrastructure 
improvements in Twentynine Palms, California;
      55. $250,000 for the Warren Valley Basin Recharge/Reuse 
project in Yucca Valley, California;
      56. $500,000 for the Lower Owens River Project in Inyo 
County, California;
      57. $500,000 for the completion of water infrastructure 
improvements in the Yucaipa Valley Water District in Yucaipa, 
California;
      58. $250,000 for the development of a water master plan 
to serve the water infrastructure needs of the City of 
Hesperia, California;
      59. $500,000 for planning and design of a sewage 
treatment and water reclamation facility in Apple Valley, 
California;
      60. $500,000 for environmental engineering and 
preliminary design of a regional water recycling facility in 
Victorville, California;
      61. $485,000 to the City of Compton, California for the 
Willowbrook Water Main Infrastructure project;
      62. $675,000 to the City of Brea, California for 
wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      63. $250,000 to the City of Pico Rivera, California for 
repairs and upgrades of the sewage system;
      64. $540,000 to the City of Lathrop, California to 
address contamination of the Sharp Depot well;
      65. $250,000 to Mariposa County, California for 
infrastructure improvements to the Yosemite West wastewater 
treatment and disposal facility;
      66. $900,000 to the City of Huntington Beach, California 
for the Huntington Beach Environmental Infrastructure Project;
      67. $675,000 to the City of South Gate, California for 
wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      68. $350,000 to the City of Garden Grove, California for 
construction of the Yockey/Newland Storm Drain;
      69. $485,000 to the City of Santa Rosa, California for 
the Santa Rosa Geysers Reclaimed Water project;
      70. $250,000 to the County of Ventura, California for 
wastewater infrastructure needs in El Rio;
      71. $1,485,000 for the Towns of Naturita and Nucia, 
Colorado for drinking water infrastructure improvements;
      72. $1,000,000 for the City of Montrose, Colorado for the 
Montrose Wastewater Inflow and Infiltration project;
      73. $2,400,000 to the City of New Britain, Connecticut 
for water and sewer infrastructure needs;
      74. $485,000 to the Central Naugatuck Valley Council of 
Governments for water and wastewater infrastructure 
improvements in the towns of Waterbury, Wolcott, and 
Middlebury, Connecticut;
      75. $1,800,000 to the District of Columbia Water and 
Sewer Authority to mitigate combined sewer overflows into the 
Anacostia and Potomac Rivers;
      76. $2,000,000 for the Town of Millsboro, Delaware, for 
wastewater infrastructure needs;
      77. $2,000,000 for Eastern Orange and Seminole Counties, 
Florida, for wastewater treatment upgrades;
      78. $900,000 to the City of Clearwater, Florida for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      79. $485,000 to St Johns County, Florida for septic tank 
replacement in the West Augustine community;
      80. $250,000 to the City of Jacksonville, Florida for 
extension of public water hookups;
      81. $485,000 to Hillsborough County, Florida for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      82. $4,000,000 to Miami-Dade County, Florida for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      83. $675,000 to the City of West Palm Beach, Florida for 
completion of the IPR/Renaissance project, a wetlands-based 
indirect potable water and wastewater reuse program;
      84. $250,000 for the Central Florida Artificial 
Enhancement Program/Lake Marden Recharge Project;
      85. $800,000 to the City of Opa-locka, Florida for 
drinking water, wastewater and sewer infrastructure 
improvements;
      86. $500,000 to the City of North Miami, Florida for 
drinking water, wastewater and sewer infrastructure 
improvements;
      87. $500,000 to the City of North Miami Beach, Florida 
for drinking water, wastewater and sewer infrastructure 
improvements in the Highland Village neighborhood;
      88. $500,000 to the City of South Miami, Florida for 
drinking water, wastewater and sewer infrastructure 
improvements;
      89. $900,000 to Sarasota County, Florida for the 
Phillippi Creek Septic Tank replacement project;
      90. $900,000 to the City of Boca Raton, Florida for 
upgrades to the water treatment plant;
      91. $485,000 to fund the Central Florida Aquifer Recharge 
Enhancement Program--Surface Water Recharge Projects;
      92. $9,650,000 to the Florida Department of Environmental 
Protection for the Tampa Bay, Florida regional reservoir 
infrastructure project;
      93. $2,000,000 for the City of Roswell, Georgia, Big 
Creek Watershed drinking water and sewer infrastructure needs;
      94. $900,000 to Paulding County, Georgia for the Richland 
Creek Reservoir Project;
      95. $500,000 to the Guam Waterworks Authority for 
upgrades to the ground water chlorination system;
      96. $1,000,000 for the County of Hawaii to upgrade its 
drinking water system;
      97. $1,985,000 for the City of Des Moines, Iowa for 
wastewater and stormwater infrastructure improvements;
      98. $2,400,000 to the City of Mason City, Iowa for 
upgrades to its water treatment facilities;
      99. $750,000 for the City of Bancroft, Idaho, for water 
system upgrades;
      100. $750,000 for the City of Burley, Idaho, to continue 
work on a wastewater treatment system project;
      101. $250,000 to the Bayview Water and Sewer District in 
Idaho for the Cape Horn Area Clean Water Compliance Project;
      102. $250,000 to the City of Filner, Idaho for 
construction of a municipal water system;
      103. $500,000 for Rock Falls, Illinois, wastewater 
treatment improvements;
      104. $500,000 for Illinois' Clark-Edgar Rural Water 
District drinking water project;
      105. $500,000 for the Monmouth, Illinois, storm sewer 
project;
      106. $985,000 for Galena, Illinois, wastewater treatment 
improvements;
      107. $500,000 for the City of Paris, Illinois, for 
drinking water infrastructure needs;
      108. $500,000 for the City of Macomb, Illinois, for 
drinking water infrastructure needs;
      109. $1,000,000 for the City of Lawrenceville, Illinois 
for a wastewater treatment facility;
      110. $485,000 to the Village of Orland Park, Illinois for 
wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      111. $485,000 to the City of Moline, Illinois for the 
City's Water Improvement Project;
      112. $1,800,000 to the City of Aurora, Illinois for a 
combined sewer overflow project;
      113. $250,000 to the City of Sandwich, Illinois for 
wastewater and stormwater infrastructure improvements;
      114. $900,000 to the Village of Carol Stream, Illinois 
for expansion of the Carol Stream Reclamation Center;
      115. $485,000 to the City of Chrisman, Illinois for 
construction of a new sewage treatment plant;
      116. $900,000 to the Village of Metamora, Illinois for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      117. $250,000 to the Village of Justice, Illinois for a 
water infrastructure improvement project at the Wesley Fields 
water system;
      118. $485,000 to the Village of Johnsburg, Illinois for 
construction of a wastewater conveyance and treatment system;
      119. $900,000 for the City of Fort Wayne, Indiana for a 
model sewer improvement and stormwater retention project;
      120. $630,000 to the Town of Westfield, Indiana for a 
sewer system improvement project;
      121. $300,000 to the City of Carmel, Indiana for 
infrastructure improvements and an ultraviolet disinfection 
system;
      122. $485,000 to Merrillville Conservancy District in 
Merrillville, Indiana for wastewater infrastructure 
improvements;
      123. $1,000,000 for the City of Hays, Kansas for the 
South Russell County Water Project;
      124. $485,000 to the City of Ottawa, Kansas for the 
engineering and design of a new wastewater treatment facility;
      125. $500,000 to the City of Wichita, Kansas for 
wastewater infrastructure rehabilitation;
      126. $1,000,000 for Daviess County, Kentucky, for 
drainage improvements;
      127. $485,000 to Bluegrass PRIDE of Kentucky for cleanup 
of Bluegrass Rivers and Streams;
      128. $300,000 to the City of Lawrenceburg, Kentucky for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      129. $200,000 to the City of Irvine, Kentucky for the 
Irvine Sewer Rehabilitation in Estill County;
      130. $600,000 to the City of Hodgenville, Kentucky for 
modernization of the sewer system;
      131. $400,000 to the City of Mount Washington, Kentucky 
for extension of water and wastewater infrastructure for an 
industrial park;
      132. $250,000 to the City of Owenton, Kentucky for 
extension of sanitary wastewater collection systems;
      133. $3,600,000 to the City of Somerset, Kentucky for 
wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      134. $1,400,000 to the City of London, Kentucky for 
wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      135. $485,000 to Ohio County, Kentucky for the Regional 
Wastewater project;
      136. $2,000,000 for the Orleans Parish, Louisiana, 
sanitary sewer inflow infiltration project;
      137. $500,000 for East Baton Rouge Parish, Louisiana, 
water and sewer infrastructure needs;
      138. $485,000 to the City of Denham Springs, Louisiana 
for wastewater infrastructure upgrades at the Livingston Parish 
sewer districts Nos. 1 and 2;
      139. $900,000 to St. Charles Parish, Louisiana to address 
noncompliance issues regarding Luling Oxidation Pond;
      140. $200,000 to St. John the Baptist Parish, Louisiana 
for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      141. $900,000 to St. Bernard Parish, Louisiana for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      142. $300,000 to the City of New Iberia, Louisiana for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      143. $100,000 to St. James Parish, Louisiana for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      144. $200,000 to the Bayou Lafourche Freshwater District 
for drinking water improvements and saltwater intrusion 
prevention;
      145. $100,000 to the City of Thibodaux, Louisiana for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      146. $2,000,000 for the Bristol County, Massachusetts, 
combined sewer overflow projects;
      147. $350,000 to the City of Lowell, Massachusetts for 
combined sewer overflow infrastructure support;
      148. $485,000 to the Pioneer Valley Planning Commission 
for mitigation of combined sewer overflows along the 
Connecticut River;
      149. $4,800,000 for biological nutrient removal upgrades 
at the City of Salisbury, Maryland, wastewater treatment plant;
      150. $500,000 for biological nutrient removal upgrades at 
the Conococheague wastewater treatment plant, Washington 
County, Maryland;
      151. $485,000 to the Hartford County, Maryland Division 
of Water and Sewer for a water and wastewater extension for the 
Oaklyn Manor and Manorville Road communities;
      152. $900,000 to the City of Cambridge, Maryland for a 
Biological Nutrient Removal upgrade project and a combined 
sewer overflow project;
      153. $2,000,000 for Vinalhaven, Maine for wastewater 
infrastructure improvements;
      154. $500,000 for the City of Calais, Maine to develop a 
safe drinking water system;
      155. $3,000,000 for the City of Negaunee, Michigan, for 
wastewater treatment upgrades;
      156. $1,000,000 for the Genesee County, Michigan, 
wastewater treatment project;
      157. $900,000 to the City of Bad Axe, Michigan for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      158. $1,800,000 for continuation of the Rouge River 
National Wet Weather Demonstration Project;
      159. $900,000 to the City of Grand Rapids, Michigan for 
combined sewer overflow infrastructure improvements for the 
National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System;
      160. $675,000 to the Village of Almont, Michigan for 
mitigation of combined sewer overflows and sanitary sewer 
overflows into the north branch of the Clinton River;
      161. $485,000 to the Detroit, Michigan Water and Sewerage 
Department for water and wastewater infrastructure 
improvements;
      162. $2,175,000 to Oakland County, Michigan for 
infrastructure improvements within the George W. Kuhn Drainage 
District;
      163. $1,500,000 to the City of Farmington, Michigan to 
reline a wastewater pipeline;
      164. $1,000,000 for wastewater infrastructure needs of 
Minnesota's Mille Lacs regional wastewater treatment plant;
      165. $2,000,000 for West Bottoms, Missouri, stormwater 
improvements;
      166. $250,000 for wastewater treatment planning for South 
Two-Mile Prairie, Missouri;
      167. $1,500,000 for the City of Lebanon, Missouri, for 
wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      168. $400,000 for Bates County Commission, Missouri, to 
coordinate and implement efforts to assist local municipalities 
address their drinking water needs;
      169. $1,500,000 for Camden County Missouri Public Waste 
Water facility for sewer and water improvements;
      170. $1,500,000 for the City of Cape Girardeau, Missouri 
for waste water and sewer improvements;
      171. $2,000,000 for the City of St Louis, Missouri 
Metropolitan Sewer District for ongoing improvements;
      172. $2,000,000 for the City of Kansas City, Missouri for 
Phase II stormwater sewer system in the Central Industrial 
District;
      173. $2,000,000 for the Table Rock Lake Wastewater 
Initiative in Missouri as a National Community Decentralized 
Demonstration Project;
      174. $585,000 to the Clarence Cannon Wholesale Water 
Commission of Northeast Missouri for water infrastructure 
improvements;
      175. $4,000,000 for Jefferson County, Mississippi for a 
water and sewer improvements project;
      176. $3,000,000 for the City of Ocean Springs, 
Mississippi for wastewater improvements;
      177. $900,000 to the City of Columbus, Mississippi for 
wastewater treatment infrastructure improvements;
      178. $485,000 to the City of Jackson, Mississippi for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      179. $585,000 to the City of Picayune, Mississippi for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      180. $900,000 to the City of Tupelo, Mississippi for 
wastewater improvements;
      181. $1,500,000 for Lewis and Clark County, Montana for a 
wastewater development project;
      182. $200,000 for Deer Lodge, Montana, sewer 
infrastructure needs;
      183. $500,000 for the Galen Campus sewer upgrade project 
in Anaconda, Montana;
      184. $2,000,000 for the City of Florence, Montana, for 
wastewater treatment improvements;
      185. $1,485,000 for Henderson, North Carolina for the 
second phase rehabilitation and expansion of the water 
treatment facilities of the Kerr Lake Regional Water System;
      186. $485,000 to the Town of Mooresville, North Carolina 
Water Treatment Plant for infrastructure improvements;
      187. $675,000 to the County of Union, North Carolina for 
water infrastructure improvements;
      188. $1,000,000 to the Town of Pittsboro in Chatham 
County, North Carolina for a water reuse pumping station;
      189. $1,300,000 to Cherokee County, North Carolina for 
the interconnection of the water distribution systems of the 
Towns of Andrews and Murphy;
      190. $500,000 to the Town of Burnsville, North Carolina 
for wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      191. $1,000,000 for the Grand Forks, North Dakota, water 
treatment plant;
      192. $2,000,000 for the Williston, North Dakota, drinking 
water infrastructure project;
      193. $1,000,000 for Lincoln, Nebraska for wastewater 
management;
      194. $1,250,000 to the City of Omaha, Nebraska to upgrade 
sewer and sanitary water infrastructure;
      195. $1,500,000 for the City of Berlin, New Hampshire for 
water infrastructure improvements;
      196. $500,000 for Salem, New Hampshire to remediate the 
contamination of private wells;
      197. $1,000,000 for Jaffrey, New Hampshire, for a 
wastewater treatment facility;
      198. $900,000 to the City of Nashua, New Hampshire for a 
combined sewer overflow program;
      199. $3,500,000 to the City of Manchester, New Hampshire 
for a combined sewer overflow project;
      200. $1,000,000 for Vernon Township, New Jersey, for 
wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      201. $1,000,000 for Camden, New Jersey, sewer 
infrastructure needs;
      202. $400,000 to Fanwood Township, New Jersey for sewage 
system sanitary improvements;
      203. $2,500,000 to the Passaic Valley Sewerage Commission 
for continued work on wastewater treatment program;
      204. $2,000,000 to the Musconetcong Sewerage Authority in 
New Jersey to assist the plant in accommodating sewage from 
Hopatcong and Jefferson Township;
      205. $485,000 for wastewater infrastructure improvements 
for Strawbridge Lake in Moorestown, New Jersey;
      206. $1,200,000 for the Dona Ana Mutual Domestic Water 
Consumers Association of New Mexico to upgrade water systems;
      207. $750,000 for the City of Gallup, New Mexico, to 
upgrade its wastewater treatment plant;
      208. $3,800,000 for the North and South Valley of the 
City of Albuquerque and the County of Bernalillo, New Mexico 
for a regional and wastewater project;
      209. $1,350,000 to the City of Bayard, Village of Santa 
Clara & Ft. Bayard State Hospital in New Mexico for the 
regional effluent re-use plan;
      210. $1,350,000 to the Village of Ruidoso, New Mexico for 
the water infrastructure expansion plan;
      211. $900,000 to the City of Belen, New Mexico for the 
wastewater facilities improvements program;
      212. $300,000 to Santa Fe County, New Mexico to assist in 
the development of their Small Community Water Systems;
      213. $300,000 to the Town of Bernalillo, New Mexico for a 
wastewater system improvement project;
      214. $200,000 to the City of Moriarity, New Mexico for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      215. $100,000 to the Acequia Madre De Carnuel of New 
Mexico for the creation of a community water system in the 
Community of Carnuel, Tijeras, New Mexico;
      216. $4,500,000 for the City of Fallon, Nevada for 
drinking water facility construction;
      217. $485,000 to the City of Fallon, Nevada for 
construction of an arsenic treatment facility;
      218. $300,000 to the City of Henderson, Nevada for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      219. $1,000,000 for drinking water infrastructure needs 
in the New York City watershed;
      220. $485,000 to the Village of Whitney Point, New York 
for the Whitney Point Wastewater Collection and Treatment 
System Project;
      221. $900,000 to Rockland County, New York for extension 
of water and wastewater infrastructure of the Western Ramapo 
Sewer District;
      222. $35,000 to the Narrowsburg Water and Sewer District 
to replace two sand filter beds servicing the Town of Tusten, 
Sullivan County, New York;
      223. $675,000 to the Town of East Fishkill, New York for 
drinking water infrastructure improvements;
      224. $675,000 to the Town of New Windsor, New York for 
upgrades to the existing sewage treatment plant;
      225. $900,000 to the Town and Village of Harrison, New 
York for water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      226. $300,000 to the Village of Larchmont, New York for 
storm water regulation compliance as a member of the Long 
Island Sound Watershed Intermunicipal Council;
      227. $250,000 to the Village of Hewlett Harbor, New York 
for drainage improvements;
      228. $100,000 to the Village of Antwerp, New York to 
develop a municipal water system;
      229. $200,000 to the Village of Sloan, New York for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      230. $1,350,000 to the City of Buffalo, New York 
Department of Public Works for replacement of water lines;
      231. $1,800,000 to the Town of Clarence, New York for 
wastewater treatment infrastructure improvements in the area of 
Clarence Hollow;
      232. $485,000 to Saratoga County, New York for additional 
sewer lines for the Town of Halfmoon, New York;
      233. $10,000,000 for continued clean water improvements 
for Onondaga Lake, New York;
      234. $1,500,000 to the Town of Owasco, New York for sewer 
wastewater improvements;
      235. $2,000,000 for drinking water infrastructure needs 
in the New York City watershed;
      236. $4,000,000 for water quality infrastructure 
improvements for Long Island Sound, New York;
      237. $1,500,000 to the Cayuga County, New York Water and 
Sewer Authority for sewage and wastewater treatment facility 
improvements;
      238. $500,000 for the Village of Akron, New York for 
expansion of the wastewater treatment plant;
      239. $500,000 for Byesville, Ohio for the Byesville Water 
Treatment Plan;
      240. $1,000,000 for the City of Akron, Ohio for its 
combined sewer overflow long-term plan;
      241. $485,000 to the City of Akron, Ohio for the 
mitigation of combined sewer overflows through Cuyahoga Valley 
National Park;
      242. $500,000 for the City of Port Clinton, Ohio for its 
wastewater treatment plan;
      243. $480,000 to the City of Delphos, Ohio for 
construction of a regional reservoir;
      244. $743,000 to the City of Lancaster, Ohio for a sewer 
infrastructure extension project;
      245. $1,800,000 to Clark County, Ohio for water 
infrastructure upgrades;
      246. $200,000 to the City of Urbana, Ohio for water 
infrastructure upgrades;
      247. $1,300,000 to the City of Toledo, Ohio for ongoing 
efforts to upgrade its wastewater treatment infrastructure;
      248. $700,000 to Fulton County, Ohio for the extension of 
public water and sewer lines to the Village of Tedrow from 
Wauseon, Ohio;
      249. $750,000 to the Village of Luckey, Ohio for 
wastewater and combined sewer overflow infrastructure 
improvements;
      250. $750,000 to Ottawa County, Ohio for sanitary sewer 
infrastructure improvements for the Village of Clay Center;
      251. $500,000 to the City of Bowling Green, Ohio for 
sewer treatment plant infrastructure improvements;
      252. $900,000 to the Northeast Ohio Regional Sewer 
District for the Doan Brook Watershed Area in Ohio for 
continued development of a storm water abatement system in the 
Doan Brook Watershed Area of Ohio;
      253. $720,000 to the City of Martins Ferry, Ohio to 
provide a water pump to extend the water system;
      254. $765,000 to Harrison County, Ohio for a water tank 
and lines in the county industrial park;
      255. $387,625 to the Village of Laurelville, Ohio for 
improvements at the wastewater treatment facility;
      256. $485,000 to Trumbell County, Ohio for wastewater 
infrastructure improvements to the Belmont Avenue Sanitary 
Sewer System;
      257. $2,000,000 for the City of Lawton, Oklahoma for the 
rehabilitation of its wastewater infrastructure;
      258. $900,000 to the City of Normon, Oklahoma for 
expansion of wastewater treatment facilities;
      259. $1,000,000 for the Lower John Day Region in Oregon 
for a water and wastewater treatment facilities;
      260. $1,250,000 for the City of Portland, Oregon wet 
weather demonstration project;
      261. $485,000 to Clackamas County, Oregon for surface 
water infrastructure improvements;
      262. $385,000 to the City of Medford, Oregon for 
construction of water and wastewater treatment facilities and 
groundwater protection infrastructure project program;
      263. $1,000,000 for the Coudersport Borough, Eulalia 
Township and Sweden Township in Potter County, Pennsylvania for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      264. $2,900,000 for the Three Rivers Wet Weather 
Demonstration program in the greater Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 
area;
      265. $1,000,000 for the Upper Milford Township Sewer 
Project in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania;
      266. $485,000 to Robinson Township, Pennsylvania for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      267. $900,000 to the City of Corry, Pennsylvania for 
mitigation of combined sewer overflows;
      268. $485,000 to the Borough of Big Beaver, Pennsylvania 
for construction of a pump station and sewer lines;
      269. $900,000 to the Wyoming Valley Sanitary Authority to 
address combined sewer overflow problems along the Susquehanna 
River in Pennsylvania;
      270. $250,000 to the Authority of the Borough of 
Charleroi, Pennsylvania for water infrastructure improvements;
      271. $900,000 to the City of Titusville, Pennsylvania to 
mitigate combined sewer overflows;
      272. $485,000 to the York City Sewer Authority of 
Pennsylvania for a wastewater construction project and 
demonstration;
      273. $485,000 to Lackawanna County, Pennsylvania for 
construction and repair of a centralized sewer system serving 
Jefferson Township;
      274. $150,000 to Pocono Jackson Point Water Authority for 
extension and upgrade of the authority's drinking water system 
serving Monroe County, Pennsylvania;
      275. $100,000 to Pike County, Pennsylvania for the 
engineering and design of a centralized sewer system in the 
Borough of Matamoras;
      276. $500,000 to the Municipality of Guanica, Puerto Rico 
for wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      277. $3,250,000 for the Narragansett Bay Commission, 
Rhode Island, for the combined sewer overflow project;
      278. $500,000 for the Town of Warren, Rhode Island, for 
sewer infrastructure needs;
      279. $485,000 to the Town of Cumberland, Rhode Island for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      280. $2,000,000 for West Georgetown, South Carolina, 
regional wastewater treatment system;
      281. $1,000,000 for the Laurens, South Carolina, water 
and sewer commission;
      282. $900,000 to the Laurens County, South Carolina Water 
and Sewer Commission for relocation of water lines as part of 
the SC Route 72 corridor multilane widening project;
      283. $1,000,000 for a Gravity Wastewater Collection 
System in the Snowden and 6-Mile Communities in Charleston 
County, South Carolina;
      284. $485,000 to Berkeley County, South Carolina for a 
water extension project to Cross Community Schools;
      285. $900,000 to the City of Florence, South Carolina for 
the Pee Dee River surface water facility;
      286. $2,000,000 to the Greenville Water System of South 
Carolina for infrastructure needs related to high levels of 
uranium in the water supply;
      287. $900,000 for North Sioux City, South Dakota, water 
and sewer infrastructure needs;
      288. $2,000,000 for Aberdeen, South Dakota, drinking 
water facility improvements;
      289. $1,200,000 for Hill City, South Dakota, water and 
sewer infrastructure needs;
      290. $535,000 to North Valley and Summer City Utility 
Districts for to extend water service to Bledsoe County, 
Tennessee;
      291. $200,000 to Sequachie County, Tennessee for the City 
of Dunlap's continuing rural waterline infrastructure 
development;
      292. $900,000 to the Watauga River Authority in Carter 
County, Tennessee for a water infrastructure project;
      293. $250,000 to the Tamina Water Supply and Sewer 
Service Corporation in Montgomery County, Texas for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements in the community of 
Tamina;
      294. $675,000 to Bosque County, Texas for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      295. $485,000 to the City of Beaumont, Texas for water 
and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      296. $700,000 for the Jordan Valley Water Conservancy 
District, Utah for a groundwater extraction treatment remedial 
project;
      297. $1,000,000 for Sandy, Utah for water and sewer 
infrastructure improvements;
      298. $1,000,000 for the Ogden, Utah for final phase of 
sewer improvements at the former Defense Depot Ogden;
      299. $200,000 to the City of Ogden, Utah for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      300. $400,000 for Tooele City, Utah for water and 
wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      301. $720,000 to Logan City, Utah for the wetlands 
development project;
      302. $250,000 to Sandy City, Utah for infrastructure 
needs related to usable water lines and storm drainage;
      303. $500,000 for the City of Norfolk, Virginia, to 
update wastewater pumping stations;
      304. $700,000 for the Caroline County Dawn Sewer project 
in Bowling Green, Virginia;
      305. $675,000 to Smyth County, Virginia for wastewater 
infrastructure improvements in the Allison's Gap community;
      306. $1,800,000 to Prince William County, Virginia for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      307. $1,840,000 to the Town of South Boston, Virginia for 
the Sanitary Sewer Overflow Abatement project;
      308. $200,000 to Franklin County, Virginia for 
preliminary engineering for a water project;
      309. $1,743,000 to Virginia's Heartland Partnership for 
expansion of the wastewater treatment plant to the Virginia's 
Heartland Regional Industrial Park located in Keysville, 
Virginia;
      310. $200,000 to Fluvanna County, Virginia for 
wastewater, drinking water and water distribution system 
infrastructure improvements;
      311. $1,350,000 to Richmond, Virginia for continued 
development of combined sewer overflow improvements;
      312. $1,350,000 to Lynchburg, Virginia for continued 
development of combined sewer overflow improvements;
      313. $900,000 to the City of Alexandria, Virginia for the 
sanitary and stormwater sewer reconstruction and extension 
project to mitigate overflows polluting Four Mile Run Creek;
      314. $485,000 to the County of Northampton, Virginia for 
wastewater treatment systems improvement and development;
      315. $485,000 to the City of Norfolk, Virginia Utility 
Department for upgrades to the water distribution system in the 
Haynes Tract area;
      316. $500,000 to the Government of the Virgin Islands for 
water and wastewater infrastructure improvements;
      317. $2,500,000 for the Pownal, Vermont, wastewater 
treatment project;
      318. $1,000,000 for East St Johnsbury, Vermont, 
wastewater treatment project;
      319. $2,000,000 for the City of Bremerton, Washington, 
combined sewer overflow project;
      320. $1,500,000 for the Wahkiakum County Public Utility 
District, Washington, drinking water facility project;
      321. $1,800,000 to the City of Bremerton, Washington for 
the combined sewer overflow treatment plant;
      322. $485,000 to Dallesport Industrial Park in Klickitat 
County, Washington for construction of a wastewater treatment 
facility;
      323. $250,000 to the City of Everett, Washington for pre-
design and facilities planning of combined sewer overflow 
treatment sites;
      324. $2,000,000 for the Milwaukee, Wisconsin Sewerage 
District for continued renovations and repairs to the sewer 
system;
      325. $1,000,000 for the City of Racine, Wisconsin, 
drinking water treatment project;
      326. $1,900,000 to the Village of Marathon City, 
Wisconsin for debt repayment on water and wastewater 
infrastructure;
      327. $1,000,000 for the City of Brokaw, Wisconsin for the 
extension and expansion of the sewer and water system;
      328. $675,000 to the Inwood Watershed Committee and the 
Eastern Panhandle Soil Conservation District of West Virginia 
for the Inwood Storm Water/Water Quality Management Project;
      329. $1,000,000 to the Ohio County PSD, West Virginia for 
water and sewer infrastructure needs in the West Liberty, West 
Virginia area;
      330. $2,500,000 to the City of Wheeling, West Virginia 
for water and sewer infrastructure needs;
      331. $5,000,000 to the Hancock County Commission, West 
Virginia for water and sewer infrastructure needs;
      332. $350,000 for the City of New Martinsville, West 
Virginia for water and sewer infrastructure needs;
      333. $182,000 for the National Corrections and Law 
Enforcement Training and Technology Center, Inc. (NCLETTC) for 
water and sewer infrastructure needs;
      334. $317,000 for the Barbour County Development 
Authority in West Virginia for water and sewer infrastructure 
needs;
      335. $1,041,000 for the Mid-Atlantic Aerospace Complex 
(MAAC) for water and sewer infrastructure needs;
      336. $250,000 for the Jefferson County Sewer Authority, 
Missouri for ongoing sewer infrastructure modernization;
      337. $235,000 for Dekalb, Illinois for drinking water 
infrastructure improvements.
      The conferees expect the Agency to develop a broad 
working group to review and address the spectrum of wastewater 
issues as outlined in the House Report accompanying H.R. 2620, 
request that the Committees on Appropriations be kept apprised 
of all activities of the working group, and further request 
that the working group, with the assistance of the Agency, 
prepare and submit to the Committees on Appropriations by July 
15, 2002 a report addressing all matters as outlined in the 
House Report as well as those additional issues determined 
appropriate by the working group.

                       ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS

      The conferees have included an administrative provision 
proposed by the House and the Senate which permits the 
Administrator, in carrying out environmental programs required 
or authorized by law in the absence of an acceptable tribal 
program, to award cooperative agreements to federally 
authorized intertribal groups to assist the Administrator in 
implementing federal environmental programs for tribes. Funds 
designated for State financial assistance agreements may not be 
used for such cooperative agreements.
      The conferees have also included an administrative 
provision proposed by the House and modified by the conferees 
which authorizes for fiscal year 2002 EPA's Pesticide 
Maintenance Program, including the collection of up to 
$17,000,000 for operation of the registration, re-registration, 
and tolerance assessment programs.

                   Executive Office of the President

                OFFICE OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY

      Appropriates $5,267,000 as proposed by both the House and 
Senate.
      The conferees agree that the Office of Science and 
Technology Policy should make the clarification of the 
International Traffic in Arms Regulation a high priority for 
resolution. The conferees expect the President's Science 
Advisor to address and resolve the matter by February 1, 2002.

  COUNCIL ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY AND OFFICE OF ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

      Appropriates $2,974,000 for the Council on Environmental 
Quality and Office of Environmental Quality as proposed by the 
House and the Senate. The conferees have again this year 
included language proposed by the House and the Senate which 
authorizes the Council to operate with one member, that member 
acting as chairman of the Council.
      Language proposed by the Senate prohibiting CEQ and OEQ 
from using funds other than those appropriated under this 
heading has not been included. In lieu of this statutory 
prohibition, the conferees direct that the CEQ provide, on a 
quarterly basis beginning January 1, 2002, a brief report 
outlining the specific use of non-CEQ federal employees. Such 
report should include, at a minimum, the number of non-CEQ 
employees utilized for specific programs or projects by the 
CEQ, the home office of each such employee, the program or 
project for which the non-CEQ employee is being utilized by 
CEQ, and the duration each such employee is expected to be 
involved with such program or project.
      Finally, language has been included which provides a 
representation allowance of up to $750 for the Chairman of the 
CEQ.

                 Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

      Appropriates $33,660,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General, the same amount as included in both the House and 
Senate bill. Funds for this account are derived from the Bank 
Insurance Fund, the Savings and Loan Insurance Fund, and the 
FSLIC Resolution Fund and are therefore not reflected in either 
the budget authority or budget outlay totals.

                  Federal Emergency Management Agency

                            DISASTER RELIEF

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $664,000,000 for disaster relief, instead of 
$1,369,399,000 as proposed by the House and $359,399,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. In addition, appropriates 
$1,500,000,000 in contingent emergency funding for disaster 
relief instead of $1,300,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$2,000,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Includes language 
proposed by both the House and Senate providing for the 
transfer of $2,900,000 to the emergency management planning and 
assistance account for the consolidated emergency management 
performance grants program. The conferees have included two new 
provisions, neither of which was included in either bill, to 
allow for the transfer of amounts from the disaster relief 
account to other program accounts. First, $25,000,000 is 
available for transfer to the emergency management planning and 
assistance account for pre-disaster mitigation activities. 
Second, $25,000,000 is available for transfer to the flood map 
modernization fund and available for expenditure in fiscal year 
2002.
      The conferees are aware that on March 1, 2001 FEMA issued 
its ``Clarification on SHMPH `Immediate Occupancy' Requirement 
for using SHMPH Funding to Seismically Upgrade Existing 
Buildings.'' This Clarification defined parameters for the 
determination of when the ``immediate occupancy'' requirement 
in the Seismic Hazard Mitigation Program for Hospitals (the 
SHMPH Program) would be met by a subgrantee. The conferees urge 
FEMA to recognize that prior to the announcement of the 
clarification, many subgrantees in the SHMPH program worked 
diligently to move forward with their designs and construction 
in the belief that their plans met the undefined immediate 
occupancy requirement in the SHMPH program. Theconferees urge 
FEMA to work closely with these subgrantees to ensure no disruption in 
their design or building schedule as a result of this program 
announcement.

            DISASTER ASSISTANCE DIRECT LOAN PROGRAM ACCOUNT

      The conferees agree to provide a limitation of 
$25,000,000 on direct loans, a cost of $405,000 for direct 
loans, and a limitation on administrative expenses of $543,000 
for the disaster assistance direct loan program account. The 
foregoing are the same as provided by both the House and the 
Senate.

                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

      Appropriates $233,801,000 for salaries and expenses as 
proposed by the Senate instead of $227,900,000 as proposed by 
the House. The amount provided does not include the reduction 
to Preparedness, Training and Exercises as proposed by the 
House. The amount provided includes $11,000,000 for FEMA's role 
in consequence management associated with the 2002 Olympics and 
Paralympics as requested in the budget submission. The 
conferees have not included any funding for an Office of 
National Preparedness at FEMA. The conferees will entertain 
such funding in the future when it has had an opportunity to 
evaluate a comprehensive plan outlining FEMA's role in dealing 
with terrorism and its consequences.

                      OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

      Appropriates $10,303,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General, the same amount as included in both the House and the 
Senate bills.

              EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLANNING AND ASSISTANCE

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFER OF FUNDS)

      Appropriates $404,623,000 for emergency management 
planning and assistance as proposed by the House instead of 
$429,623,000 as proposed by the Senate. The amount provided 
includes $150,000,000 to carry out the Federal Fire Prevention 
and Control Act of 1974, as amended by Public Law 106-398. The 
conferees have included bill language which provides that up to 
five percent of the funds may be transferred to Salaries and 
Expenses for administrative expenses associated with the 
program. The conferees are pleased that FEMA was able to 
implement expeditiously the provision of this program and meet 
the deadline of September 30, 2001 for completion of the first 
round of grants. The conferees believe that this success was 
due in no small part to the structure of the program and the 
decision to limit the program to only six categories of grants 
rather than the fourteen categories approved in the 
authorization legislation. The conferees believe that FEMA 
should consider making grants in the area of emergency medical 
services, but expansion into other categories should be 
considered only after substantial progress has been made in 
addressing the needs associated with fire prevention, 
firefighting equipment, personal protective equipment, 
training, vehicles, and wellness and fitness programs.
      The conferees also expect states and localities to 
maintain their current level of funding support for local fire 
departments and companies and that any Federal grant funds are 
to be used solely to enhance local firefighting capacity, 
equipment needs, vehicles, and fire prevention programs as well 
as any other eligible uses.
      FEMA is encouraged to undertake an on-going evaluation of 
the application process for the fire grant program to ensure 
the widest participation in the program. The conferees are 
particularly concerned that smaller entities with limited 
resources may not be able to participate fully and FEMA should 
consider their circumstances as it evaluates the effectiveness 
of the program.
      The conferees urge FEMA to continue efforts to simplify 
and streamline the fire grant application process and direct 
FEMA to establish an independent advisory committee comprised 
of professional and volunteer firefighters to provide policy 
and technical guidance on implementation and administration of 
the fire grant program.
      In addition, the conferees have agreed to provide 
$25,000,000 by transfer from the disaster relief account for 
pre-disaster mitigation activities.
      The conferees are aware of the heightened importance of 
bringing technology applications to the local, state, and 
Federal levels of the emergency management community for the 
purpose of reducing the impact of both natural disasters and 
terrorist attacks. Therefore, the conferees continue to support 
the partnership between the National Technology Transfer Center 
(NTTC) and FEMA and direct continuation of the cooperative 
agreement at the current level of effort. Additionally, NTTC 
shall submit a report no later than July 1, 2002 that outlines 
the progress made on the commercialization endeavors and the 
cooperation between NTTC and FEMA.
      The conferees direct FEMA to maintain the current level 
of support for the Administrative and Resource Planning 
Directorate efforts to archive key agency documents by 
digitization to optical disks.
      The conferees believe that many of the nation's 
universities are vulnerable to disaster and urges FEMA to 
continue its Disaster Resistant University program and expand 
the scope to include safeguarding university assets from acts 
of terrorism.
      The conferees direct FEMA to ensure the full and complete 
integration of the American Red Cross into all emergency 
preparedness planning, training and response activities. 
Further, during times of disaster, FEMA and agencies signatory 
to the Federal Response Plan are to support fully the work of 
the American Red Cross. Support shall include, but not be 
limited to the following, means of transportation; appropriate 
security clearances; access to disaster sites and threat 
information briefings; and planning for continuity of 
operations of the American Red Cross National Headquarters.
      The conferees are concerned that accurate and timely 
information is not available to the general public and all 
relevant government officials during and following an act of 
terrorism. In an effort to improve communication, the conferees 
urge the Director of FEMA to work with the Nation's governors 
and the Mayor of the District of Columbia (DC) to designate a 
lead intergovernmental and public affairs official in each 
state and DC to serve as the central coordinator for 
information coming from Federal and local governments and the 
central source of information for the public regarding 
terrorism-related incidents.

                RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS FUND

      Provides for the receipt and expenditure of fees 
collected as authorized by Public Law 106-377. Both the House 
and the Senate included this provision in their respective 
bills.

                   EMERGENCY FOOD AND SHELTER PROGRAM

      Appropriates $140,000,000 for the emergency food and 
shelter program as proposed by the House instead of 
$139,692,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                      FLOOD MAP MODERNIZATION FUND

      Appropriates no new funding under this heading for flood 
map modernization. The conferees have included authority within 
the disaster relief account to transfer $25,000,000 to this 
account for flood map modernization activities.

                     NATIONAL FLOOD INSURANCE FUND

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      The conferees agree to include bill language which 
authorizes the National Flood Insurance Program through 
December 31, 2002. Both the House and Senate had addressed this 
issue, but there were technical differences between the 
respective bills. In addition, the conferees agree to provide 
for salaries and expenses of up to $28,798,000, $76,381,000 for 
flood mitigation activities, a limitation of $55,000,000 for 
operating expenses, $536,750,000 for agents' commissions and 
taxes, and $30,000,000 for interest on Treasury borrowings. 
Finally, the conferees agree that up to $20,000,000 may be 
transferred for expenses under section 1366 of the National 
Flood Insurance Act.

                     NATIONAL FLOOD MITIGATION FUND

      The conferees agree to provide for the transfer of up to 
$20,000,000 from the National Flood Insurance Fund to the 
National Flood Mitigation Fund as proposed by both the House 
and the Senate. The conferees further agree that $2,500,000 of 
the funds provided in this program shall be used to buy-out 
flood prone properties in Austin, Minnesota.

                    General Services Administration

                FEDERAL CONSUMER INFORMATION CENTER FUND

      Appropriates $7,276,000 as proposed by both the House and 
Senate.
      The conferees are very supportive of the Federal Consumer 
Information Center (FCIC) and their efforts to provide the 
public with important information on government services and 
publications. The conferees are concerned that a change to the 
organization, administrative location, or the current function 
or mission mandate of FCIC could potentially compromise the 
outstanding services that FCIC currently provides. Therefore, 
the conferees direct that any such change be clearly outlined 
in a proposal submitted to the Committees on Appropriations for 
30 days of review. Such a proposal shall include the 
justification for such action, a description of all planned 
organizational realignments, the anticipated staffing or 
personnel changes, an assessment of the effect on the current 
operations of FCIC, and estimates of the proposed changes on 
future funding needs.

             NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION

      Of the amounts approved by the conferees in this 
agreement, NASA must limit reprogramming of funds between 
programs and activities to not more than $500,000 without prior 
notification to the Committees on Appropriations of the House 
and Senate. Any activity or program cited in this report shall 
be construed as the position of the conferees and should not be 
subject to reductions or reprogramming without prior approval. 
NASA shall provide outyear implications of all reprogrammings 
and operating plan changes should the Committees request the 
information.

                           HUMAN SPACE FLIGHT

                     (INCLUDING TRANSFERS OF FUNDS)

      The conferees agree to provide $6,912,400,000 for human 
space flight instead of $6,868,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate and $7,047,400,000 as proposed by the House. The House 
had also proposed an additional $275,000,000 for development of 
a crew return vehicle for the international space station ISS. 
The funding provided includes a reduction of $50,000,000 
associated with the cancellation of the Electric Auxiliary 
Power Unit upgrade which has experienced technical 
difficulties, an increase of $20,000,000 for high priority 
safety upgrades for a total of $207,000,000, an increase of 
$25,000,000 for the repair/replacement of doors on the Vehicle 
Assembly Building at the Kennedy Space Center, a reduction of 
$20,000,000 from the Human Exploration and Development of Space 
program, and a general reduction of $75,000,000 from the ISS 
program. The conferees have not provided any additional funding 
for the Crew Return Vehicle, for which the House had proposed 
$275,000,000. The funding level also reflects the transfer of 
$283,600,000 for ISS research from the human space flight 
account to the science, aeronautics and technology account.
      The conferees are in agreement with the ISS Management 
and Cost Evaluation report that in order to establish a 
credible ISS program that achieves maximum research potential, 
it is necessary to keep enhancements viable. for this reason, 
the conferees direct that NASA should provide no less than 
$40,000,000 for the X-38 vehicle.
      The conferees direct that not less than $207,000,000 be 
made available for Space Shuttle Safety Upgrades, unless NASA 
outlines in a fiscal year 2002 Operating Plan adjustment, 
agreed to by the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations, 
reallocations from this level necessary to preserve balance in 
NASA's stated priority goals for the Shuttle Program, as 
follows: (1) fly safely; (2) meet the flight manifest; (3) 
improve supportability; and (4) improve the system. The 
conferees agree that further clarification on NASA's shuttle 
upgrade program is required, including how the program relates 
to future shuttle alternatives and infrastructure needs. NASA 
is directed to submit a report addressing these issues by March 
15, 2002.
      The conferees are in agreement that the ISS shall be 
funded at no more than $1,963,600,000 in fiscal year 2002, 
including civil service compensation.
      When the House and the Senate drafted their respective 
bills, the Administration had recently proposed dramatic 
changes to the ISS program in light of a purported shortfall of 
over $4,000,000,000. The redesigned station was dubbed ``U.S. 
Core Complete'' and included elimination of the Crew Return 
Vehicle, the Habitation Module, the Propulsion Module, a 37 
percent reduction in ISS science, and undefined ``management 
efficiencies'' and better cost estimating. It was the position 
of the House at that time that such changes could not be 
endorsed given the limited amount of information available to 
the Congress. It was this lack of information which led the 
House to conclude that termination of the Crew Return Vehicle 
was premature, that NASA should be encouraged to pursue an 
international barter arrangement for development and 
construction of a habitation module, and that a significant 
add-back to the ISS science program was warranted. In the hope 
of getting more information, the House initiated an 
investigation into the ISS program with the goal of answering 
basic questions with regard to the real cost of the program, 
the underlying cause of cost increases, lapses in oversight and 
the causes thereof, and the extent to which previously 
identified problems or concerns were not addressed.
      The initial stages of the House investigation have been 
completed with the conclusion being that the concept of ``U.S. 
Core Complete'' is ill-defined, that the science program needs 
to be more rigorously evaluated, that all options for enhancing 
crew time for research need to be fully explored, and that 
international agreements need to be evaluated and compliance 
with such agreements needs to be clarified. It is also the 
initial conclusion of the House investigation that NASA's lack 
of an integrated financial management system impedes its 
ability to determine the status of contract execution and 
provide program managers with necessary financial information.
      The conferees are in agreement that first and foremost 
the Director of the Office of Management and Budget and the 
Administrator of NASA shall submit a report to the Committees 
on Appropriations of the House and the Senate which defines in 
specific detail the U.S. Core Complete configuration of the ISS 
and provides a ten-year total funding profile for that 
configuration; clearly defines the content and scope of the 
research science program; and provides costs and schedule to 
develop the Crew Return Vehicle. The conferees are aware of 
ongoing negotiations between NASA and the Italian Space Agency 
concerning a stretch version of the Multi-Purpose Logistics 
Module as a substitute for the habitation module. The conferees 
see the utility of using a proven platform and encourage NASA 
to move with all deliberate speed, subject to an appropriate 
and cost-effective barter arrangement.
      The conferees are in agreement that the Director of OMB 
shall certify and report such certification to the Committees 
on Appropriations of the House and the Senate, that any 
proposal to enhance the ISS design above the content planned 
for U.S. Core Complete, is (1) necessary and of the highest 
priority to enhance the goal of world class research in space 
aboard the International Space Station; (2) within acceptable 
risk levels, having no major unresolved technical issues and a 
high confidence in independently validated cost and schedule 
estimates; and (3) affordable within the multi-year funding 
available to the ISS program as defined above or, if exceeds 
such amounts, the additional resources are not achieved through 
any funding reduction to programs contained in Space Science, 
Earth Science, and Aeronautics.
      The conferees are aware of a study being conducted by the 
National Research Council per the direction of the House 
Committee on Science and the Senate Committee on Commerce, 
Science and Transportation to address the station research 
program. If possible, the conferees would like the National 
Research Council to expand that study to compare and evaluate 
the research programs of the ISS which can be accomplished with 
a crew of three and a crew of six; and, an assessment of the 
probable cost-benefit ratios of those programs, compared with 
earthbound research which could be funded in lieu of research 
conducted on the ISS.
      The conferees agree with the direction contained in the 
Senate report for NASA to empanel a task force to study all 
options, together with their costs, for enhancing crew research 
time on the U.S. Core Complete ISS.
      The conferees are concerned that NASA lacks an integrated 
financial management system and therefore can not adequately 
manage its programs. NASA is directed to place the highest 
priority on correcting this fundamental management deficiency, 
a deficiency which should have been corrected many years ago.
      Finally, the conferees direct the Secretary of State, the 
Director of the Office of Management and Budget, and the 
Administrator of NASA to submit a joint explanation of how the 
United States is fulfilling its written commitments to its ISS 
international partners. This report is due no later than July 
15, 2002.
      With regard to the decision by the conferees to reduce 
the ISS budget by $75,000,000 in fiscal year 2002, the 
conferees note that the Post-Assembly Operations Cost Estimates 
(November 1999) and a report on ISS Operations Architecture 
(August 2000) both called for significant reductions in 
personnel associated with the program. Yet NASA and the ISS 
program management refuse to implement the provisions of these 
two reports for no apparent reason other than the desire to 
maintain a standing army of personnel. The conferees have 
reached the conclusion that the only way management will 
actually manage the program, and thereby get its costs under 
control, is through being forced to live with less. The 
conferees are reluctant to take this approach, but find that 
the intransient management cannot be trusted to make the tough 
decisions on their own and must be forced to make decisions 
which are in the long-term interest of the program. NASA is 
directed to submit to the Committees on Appropriations of the 
House and the Senate a report, concurrent with submission of 
the fiscal year 2003 budget, which describes its plans for 
managing and operating the ISS over the life of the station, to 
include specific manpower and financial needs for operation and 
support.

                  science, aeronautics, and technology

                     (including transfer of funds)

Space Science
      The conferees have agreed to provide $2,848,937,000 for 
space science programs, an increase of $62,575,000 to the 
budget request.
      The conferees agree with the House that by merging the 
budgets for aeronautics and space into a single ``aerospace 
technology'' program element several years ago, NASA has made 
it virtually impossible to account for the current investment 
in aeronautics. For this reason, the conferees direct NASA to 
reestablish a consolidated aeronautics line in the fiscal year 
2003 budget submission that comprehensively covers all research 
base, focused, and advanced technology programs, and related 
test facilities and civil service costs. NASA should also 
provide a clear budget crosscut identifying all aeronautics 
programmatic activities in the current budget structure in its 
initial fiscal year 2002 operating plan.
      The conferees recognize the need for maintaining core 
capabilities at NASA centers with responsibility for space 
science missions and operations. As a result, the conferees 
will support permitting the Europa Orbiter (EO) mission to be 
sole sourced intramurally, provided that the NASA Administrator 
certifies to the Committees on Appropriations of the House and 
the Senate in the fiscal year 2002 operating plan that such 
action is essential to maintain said core capabilities. The 
conferees expect that in making any such determination, the 
Administrator will guarantee that there is a specific and 
demonstrable plan to ensure that sufficient core and focused 
program outer planetary Advanced Technology Development (ATD) 
funds will be available to extramural entities in industry and 
academia through full and open competition, with the five-year 
profile for this competition specified in the fiscal year 2003 
budget submission. NASA should proceed with the selection of 
Europa science instruments as planned and shall cap the total 
EO program costs (ATD and execution of all phases A/E) at 
$1,000,000,000. No reduction for EO instrument support to the 
selected science teams should be made in fiscal year 2002.
      The conferees have not accepted the Senate proposal to 
reduce NASA's space operations budget by $25,000,000 by 
transferring Telecommunication and Mission Operations 
Directorate (TMOD) functions at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory 
to the Consolidated Space Operations Contract (CSOC). The 
conferees note that NASA has transferred some non-critical 
positions to the CSOC contract and direct NASA to continue this 
effort by transferring no less than five percent of the non-
critical positions to CSOC and work toward increasing this 
percentage in future years if warranted. In addition, the 
conferees transfer TMOD to the Office of Space Science and 
direct that any savings resulting from the transfer of TMOD 
positions be reinvested in science missions.
      The conferees agree to the following changes to the 
budget request:
      1. An increase of $1,675,000 for the Center for Space 
Sciences at Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas.
      2. An increase of $3,000,000 for space solar power.
      3. An increase of $1,900,000 for the Mid-American 
Geospatial Information Center based at the University of Texas 
at Austin, Center for Space Research.
      4. The conferees direct $22,000,000 be used to continue 
the construction of the Propulsion Research Laboratory at the 
Marshall Space Flight Center, of which $13,000,000 is derived 
from the Office of Space Science in-space propulsion 
augmentation and $9,000,000 is derived from the Office of 
Aerospace Technology in-space propulsion program. The funds 
remaining in the Office of Space Science in-space propulsion 
program are to be used for advanced technology development for 
planetary exploration and shall be competed on the same basis 
as other advanced technology development programs.
      5. An increase of $3,000,000 for the Sun-Earth 
Connections program for Solar Probe. NASA should consolidate 
management for this mission with its existing SEC/Living With a 
Star program in lieu of the proposed termination.
      6. An increase of $10,000,000 for the Sun-Earth 
Connections program for Living With a Star (LWS) program for a 
total of $50,200,000 in fiscal year 2002. The conferees believe 
that understanding solar variability and its effect on earth 
and mankind is of paramount importance as we strive to 
understand our galaxy. Increasing our knowledge of the effects 
of solar variability and disturbances on terrestrial climate 
change and being able to provide advanced warning of energetic 
particle events that affect the safety of humans and space 
flight are also of particular importance. The proposed funding 
restoration will allow LWS to proceed on the original NASA plan 
of Sun-Earth connected System Science whereby both the Solar 
Dynamics Observatory and the Geospace Missions Network will 
proceed in a coordinated manner to attain the program 
objectives. All LWS and SEC program funds in 2002 should be 
used exclusively for relevant ATD, science support and 
spacecraft development activities. Any capital projects to 
support the program, apart from the standard de minimis 
facility renovations under $500,000 should be requested in 
subsequent years through the standard construction of 
facilities program element. This LWS funding augmentation is in 
addition to the $8,900,000 provided for future solar 
terrestrial probes as requested in the budget.
      7. An increase of $3,000,000 for the Center on Life in 
Extreme Environments at Montana State University.
      8. An increase of $1,000,000 for the development of 
advanced materials for batteries and fuel cells, to be 
conducted by Virginia Commonwealth University.
      9. An increase of $30,000,000 for the Pluto Kuiper Belt 
(PKB) mission. The conferees direct NASA to proceed with its 
plan for source selection, but recognize the launch dates may 
be altered due to delays in the source selection process. Funds 
provided should be used to initiate appropriate spacecraft and 
science instrument development as well as launch vehicle 
procurement. The conferees direct NASA to consolidate PKB 
development funds within the Outer Planets line beginning in 
fiscal year 2003.
      The conferees have provided the budget request of 
$92,100,000 for advanced technology development related to the 
Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) and expect NASA to 
vigorously pursue the development of the NGST and submit an 
out-year budget plan, concurrent with the submission of the 
fiscal year 2003 budget, for soliciting development and 
management proposals with the goal of a launch in 2007. If 
technical and budgetary constraints preclude thelaunch of NGST 
by 2007, the conferees wish to underscore their strong desire that 
there should be no gap between the end of the operations for the Hubble 
Space Telescope (HST) and the onset of operations for NGST. As part of 
the out-year budget plan, NASA should outline its transition plan to 
guarantee uninterrupted continuity between HST and NGST.
      The conferees agree to provide the full budget request 
for the Mars program. NASA is directed to prepare a detailed 
plan, to be submitted to the Committees on Appropriations of 
the House and Senate concurrently with the submission of the 
President's fiscal year 2003 budget request, on future Mars 
missions beyond the proposed 2007 mission. The plan should have 
a detailed definition on the program's content, five-year 
budget forecast, and schedule, and shall include a five-year 
profile to make significant advanced technology funding 
available to extramural partners.
Biological and Physical Research
      The conferees have agreed to provide $714,370,000 for 
biological and physical research programs, an increase of 
$353,450,000 to the budget request.
      The conferees have agreed to transfer a total of 
$283,600,000 from the Human Space Flight account into this 
program for research activities associated with the 
International Space Station. The conferees have not included a 
transfer from Human Space Flight of civil service and other 
costs associated with these activities and directs NASA to make 
such a transfer as part of the operating plan to the extent 
such a transfer is needed.
      The conferees agree to the following changes to the 
budget request:
      1. An increase of $338,600,000 for space station research 
consisting of a transfer of $283,600,000 from Human Space 
Flight, and an increase of $55,000,000 for the Fluids and 
Combustion Facility and other priority space station research 
and equipment.
      2. An increase of $2,750,000 for the Space Radiation 
program at Loma Linda University Hospital.
      3. An increase of $1,750,000 for Earth University to 
research Chagas disease.
      4. An increase of $1,450,000 for the development of 
machine/bio-interface devices to provide advanced diagnosis and 
countermeasures at the University of Louisville.
      5. An increase of $400,000 for the Center for Research 
and Training in gravitational biology at North Carolina State 
University.
      6. An increase of $1,000,000 for the New Jersey NASA 
Specialized Center of Research and Training. The conferees 
commend the work of this organization and its application not 
only to long-duration space missions but its impact on the 
agricultural and environmental business sectors. The conferees 
encourage NASA to continue funding these vital efforts and 
recommends the agency create a technology development and 
demonstration center in New Jersey focusing on life support 
issues in closed environments.
      7. An increase of $1,000,000 for high definition 
telemedicine technology development at Florida Atlantic 
University.
      8. An increase of $1,000,000 for Southern Methodist 
University's life sciences program.
      9. An increase of $2,000,000 for multi-user scientific 
equipment for the Life Sciences Center at the University of 
Missouri-Columbia.
      10. An increase of $1,500,000 to fund research at the 
University of Missouri's Center for Gender Physiology in the 
area of gender-related issues in space flight crews.
      11. An increase of $2,000,000 to fund research at the 
University of Missouri-Columbia in physical, biological, and 
biomedical areas which address NASA strategic objectives.
Earth Science
      The conferees have agreed to provide $1,573,413,000 for 
earth science programs, an increase of $58,435,000 to the 
budget request.
      The conferees agree to the following changes to the 
budget request:
      1. An increase of $1,200,000 for the Advanced Tropical 
Remote Sensing Center of the National Center for Tropical 
Remote Sensing Applications and resources at the Rosenstiel 
School of Marine and Atmospheric Science.
      2. An increase of $428,000 for continuation of emerging 
research that applies remote sensing technologies to forest 
management practices at the State University of New York, 
College of Environmental Sciences and Forestry.
      3. An increase of $1,425,000 for NASA's Regional 
Application Center for the Northeast.
      4. An increase of $812,000 for operations of the 
applications center for remote sensing at Fulton-Montgomery 
Community College, Johnston, New York.
      5. An increase of $14,350,000 for the Institute of 
Software Research for development and construction of research 
facilities.
      6. An increase of $750,000 for on-going activities at the 
Goddard Institute for Systems, Software, and Technology 
Research, including UAV and remote sensing technology research.
      7. An increase of $750,000 for the Clustering and 
Advanced Visual Environments initiative.
      8. An increase of $4,750,000 for data storage back-up and 
recovery services at the Goddard Space Flight Center.
      9. An increase of $1,000,000 for the Triana Science Team 
to continue its work in preparation for future launch. The 
conferees recognize that the Triana mission, as reviewed 
andendorsed by the National Academy of Sciences, is complete and ready 
for launch. However, due to Shuttle manifest conflicts, Triana has been 
placed in storage until launch accommodations can be established. The 
conferees understand that NASA is exploring all launch possibilities 
for the Triana spacecraft, including potential options involving 
foreign launch vehicles. The conferees recognize the important 
scientific contributions to be made by Triana and, if NASA were to 
identify a suitable launch opportunity for Triana, the conferees would 
be receptive to NASA's reprogramming resources within available fiscal 
year 2002 Earth Science funding toward the costs of necessary 
spacecraft modification and launch integration efforts to accomplish 
such a launch.
      10. An increase of $750,000 for next generation sensing 
equipment, to be operated by Ben Gurion University for use in 
correlating measurements taken by aircraft and satellites in 
support of programs under the auspices of the Goddard Space 
Flight Center.
      11. An increase of $3,000,000 from the NASA Earth Science 
Enterprise to be transferred to the Air Force Research 
Laboratory (PE 602204F Aerospace Sensors) to develop dual-use 
lightweight space radar technology. The conferees expect the 
Air Force to work closely with NASA to identify mutually 
beneficial technologies.
      12. An increase of $1,425,000 for the United States 
portion of a joint U.S./Italian satellite development program 
to remotely observe forest fires.
      13. An increase of $23,500,000 for the Synergy program to 
develop additional end uses for EOS data.
      14. An increase of $6,000,000 for the EOSDIS Core System 
to expand its data processing and distribution capacity.
      15. An increase of $2,000,000 for weather and ocean 
research at the University of Alaska and the University of 
Massachusetts.
      16. An increase of $3,500,000 for the University of 
Montana for an International Earth Observing System Natural 
Resource Training and Data Center.
      17. An increase of $500,000 for the Morehead State 
University Space Science Center for the reconstruction of the 
ADAS satellite tracking system.
      18. An increase of $2,000,000 for the University of 
Mississippi Geoinformatics Center.
      19. An increase of $1,500,000 for George Mason University 
Center for Earth Observing and Space Research.
      20. An increase of $3,000,000 for the University of South 
Mississippi for research into remotely sensed data for coastal 
management.
      21. An increase of $1,000,000 for the Mid-America 
Geospatial Information Center at the University of Texas.
      22. An increase of $1,500,000 for Idaho State University 
for the Temporal Landscape Change Research program.
      23. An increase of $500,000 for Utah State University to 
develop an Inter-mountain Region Digital Image Archive and 
Processing Center for Landscape Analysis, Planning and 
Monitoring.
      24. A general reduction of $17,205,000.
      The conferees expect NASA to continue to pursue options 
for commercial data purchase approaches on all Earth Science 
Enterprise program Announcements of Opportunity.
Aero-Space Technology
      The conferees have agreed to provide $2,489,570,000 for 
aerospace programs, an increase of $113,830,000 to the budget 
request.
      The conferees agree to the following changes to the 
budget request:
      1. An increase of $10,000,000 for the Ultra Efficient 
Engine Technology for a total budget of $50,000,000 in fiscal 
year 2002.
      2. An increase of $2,850,000 for the Earth Alert project 
at the Goddard Space Flight Center.
      3. An increase of $2,375,000 for the NASA-Illinois 
Technology Commercialization Center at DuPage County Research 
Park.
      4. An increase of $190,000 for the Rural Technology 
Transfer and Commercialization Center of Durant, Oklahoma.
      5. An increase of $1,900,000 for the University of New 
Orleans Composites Research Center for Excellence at Michoud, 
Louisiana.
      6. An increase of $522,000 for the fractional ownership 
test program.
      7. An increase of $1,425,000 for the Glennan Microsystem 
Initiative.
      8. An increase of $2,850,000 for the Polymer Energy 
Rechargeable System.
      9. An increase of $475,000 for continued development of 
nickel metal hydride battery technology.
      10. An increase of $1,900,000 for Wayne State University 
for its emerging technology and aerospace programs.
      11. An increase of $950,000 for the University of 
Alabama, Huntsville, Aviation Safety Laboratory.
      12. An increase of $950,000 to be used for continued 
development of an electric/diesel hybrid engine at Bowling 
Green University.
      13. The following programs are to be funded within the 
Aviation System Capacity program: $4,200,000 for the HITS 
multilateration sensor and surveillance server for Airport 
Surface Detection and Management System, $1,200,000 for the 
development of the Dynamic Runway Occupancy Measurement System, 
$1,400,000 for development of a Runway Taxi Route Detection and 
Conformance Monitoring System, and $5,000,000 for Project 
SOCRATES.
      14. An increase of $2,850,000 to expand the Space 
Alliance Technology Outreach Program, including NASA business 
incubators, in Florida and New York.
      15. An increase of $950,000 for the Advanced Interactive 
Discovery Environment engineering research program at Syracuse 
University.
      16. An increase of $7,600,000 for the National Center of 
Excellence in Photonics and Microsystems in New York.
      17. An increase of $2,375,000 for the Virtual 
Collaboration Center at the North Carolina GigaPop.
      18. An increase of $1,900,000 for the Garrett Morgan 
Commercialization Initiative in Ohio.
      19. An increase of $750,000 for research at Marshall 
Space Flight Center in the area of interstellar propulsion.
      20. An increase of $1,693,000 for the Dryden Flight 
Research Center Intelligent Flight Control System research 
project.
      21. An increase of $950,000 for development of advanced 
composite materials for a super lightweight prototype structure 
and a generic carrier for the space shuttle orbiter.
      22. An increase of $8,125,000 for hydrogen research being 
conducted by the Florida State University System.
      23. An increase of $4,750,000 for space biotechnology 
research and commercial applications to be conducted at the 
University of Florida.
      24. An increase of $2,000,000 from the NASA Space Launch 
Initiative be transferred to the Air Force Research Laboratory 
(PE 602204F Aerospace Sensors) to install a baseline Silent 
Sentry System at Kennedy Space Center and for AFRL to conduct 
an evaluation of the ability for Silent Sentry to replace 
current range safety infrastructure.
      25. An increase of $2,000,000 for the National Technology 
Transfer Center.
      26. An increase of $500,000 for aerospace projects being 
accomplished by the Montana Aerospace Development Corporation.
      27. An increase of $7,500,000 for subsonic transport 
technology research.
      28. An increase of $7,500,000 for the advanced aircraft 
program, equally divided between flight research and propulsion 
and power research.
      29. An increase of $12,500,000 for NASA's rotocraft 
program, including funding for the NASA-Army university centers 
component.
      30. An increase of $2,500,000 for the Hubble Telescope 
Project, Composite Technology Institute at Bridgeport, West 
Virginia.
      31. An increase of $15,000,000 for aviation safety. The 
conferees agree that NASA should evaluate the use of retinal 
scanning displays in the Synthetic Visual Project, which seeks 
to improve general aviation safety through incorporation of new 
technologies.
      32. An increase of $2,000,000 for a study of NASA's 
aeronautical test and evaluation facilities.
      33. An increase of $2,000,000 for advanced research in 
opto-electronics at Montana State University.
      34. An increase of $2,500,000 for the Delaware Aerospace 
Education Foundation in Kent County, Delaware.
      35. An increase of $1,500,000 for Tulane University 
Institute for Macromolecular Engineering and Sciences, New 
Orleans, Louisiana.
      36. An increase of $6,500,000 for the Stennis Space 
Center E-complex propulsion test facilities, of which 
$1,500,000 is for completion of the Test Operations Building.
      37. An increase of $3,500,000 for an addition to the main 
administration building at the Stennis Space Center. NASA is 
directed to work with the Department of Defense to ensure that 
the Department contributes to the construction of facilities 
unique to its requirements.
      38. An increase of $1,700,000 for the Independent 
Verification and Validation Facility in Fairmont, West 
Virginia.
      39. An increase of $2,000,000 for non-destructive 
evaluation research at Iowa State University.
      40. An increase of $1,000,000 for polymer research at 
Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana.
      41. An increase of $2,000,000 for photonics research at 
the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.
      42. An increase of $3,000,000 for nanotechnology programs 
at Purdue University.
      43. An increase of $3,000,000 for the purchase of two 
upgraded jet engines which require limited configuration 
changes to the
DP-2 vectored thrust testbed aircraft. The remaining funds 
shall be expended as appropriate for airflow analysis research, 
flight control research, and flight testing. NASA is directed 
to provide a long-range research and development plan for the 
DP-2 vectored thrust program to the Congress by April 15, 2002.
      44. An increase of $1,500,000 for a visitor's center at 
Langley Flight Research Center.
      45. The conferees agree that NASA needs to increase its 
investment in facilities at the Wallops Island Flight facility 
and therefore direct NASA to spend an additional $10,000,000 
from within existing funds for infrastructure improvement and 
technology upgrades to ensure the Wallops facility remains a 
viable asset for NASA's use and report to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House and Senate no later than March 1, 
2002 on a strategic plan for Wallops future including NASA 
missions and other business opportunities.
      46. A decrease of $6,200,000 from the Aviation System 
Capacity program. The goal of the Aviation System Capacity 
(ASC) program is to enable safe increases in the capacity of US 
and international airspace and airports. The conferees believe 
that Aviation System Technology Advanced Research (AvSTAR) will 
help develop new operational concepts and better understand the 
benefits of new technologies for reducing aviation system 
congestion and delays while improving safety. The conferees 
support the request for Virtual Airspace Modeling as a 
precursor to AvSTAR.
      47. A decrease of $10,000,000 from the Space Launch 
Initiative.
      48. A decrease of $10,000,000 from the in-space 
propulsion program.
Academic Programs
      Within the Academic programs portion of this account, the 
conferees recommend a total funding level of $230,810,000, a 
net increase of $77,110,000 to the budget request. The 
conferees agree that Lincoln and Cheney Universities in 
Pennsylvania should be full participants in NASA's Minority 
University Research and Education Program. The Conferees 
recommend the following adjustments to the budget request:
      1. An increase of $475,000 for the Richland School 
District One Aeronautics Education Laboratory, located in 
Columbia, South Carolina.
      2. An increase of $475,000 for the NASA Educator Resource 
Center at South East Missouri State University.
      3. An increase of $950,000 for the Carl Sagan Discovery 
Science Center at the Children's Hospital at Montefiore Medical 
Center to implement the educational programming for this 
science learning project.
      4. An increase of $2,375,000 for the JASON Foundation.
      5. An increase of $3,500,000 for continuation of programs 
at the American Museum of Natural History.
      6. An increase of $950,000 for the Sci-Port Discovery 
Center at Shreveport, Louisiana.
      7. An increase of $1,900,000 for the NASA Glenn ``Gateway 
to the Future: Ohio Pilot'' project.
      8. An increase of $475,000 for the Challenger Learning 
Center of Kansas.
      9. An increase of $475,000 for Challenger Learning 
Centers in Illinois.
      10. An increase of $475,000 for the Challenger Learning 
Center at Wheeling Jesuit University.
      11. An increase of $1,900,000 for the Alan B. Shepard 
Discovery Center in New Hampshire.
      12. An increase of $3,000,000 to the U.S. Space and 
Rocket Center for an Educational Training Center.
      13. An increase of $570,000 for academic and 
infrastructure needs at St. Thomas University in Miami, 
Florida.
      14. An increase of $950,000 for the Ohio View Consortium.
      15. An increase of $1,900,000 for the Von Braun 
Scholarship program.
      16. An increase of $3,000,000 for the Alabama Math, 
Science, and Technology initiative.
      17. An increase of $2,925,000 for the Sci-Quest Hands-on 
Science Center.
      18. An increase of $1,650,000 for the Alabama 
Supercomputer Educational Outreach program.
      19. An increase of $1,900,000 to the Educational 
Advancement Alliance to support the Alliance's math, science, 
and technology enrichment program.
      20. An increase of $5,000,000 for the National Space 
Grant College and Fellowship program.
      21. An increase of $475,000 for the Science, Engineering, 
Math and Aerospace Academy programs at Central Arizona College.
      22. An increase of $340,000 to enhance K-12 science 
education through a program of the Middle Tennessee State 
University.
      23. An increase of $5,400,000 for the EPSCoR program.
      24. An increase of $5,000,000 for a planetarium at the 
Clay Center of Arts and Sciences in Charleston, West Virginia.
      25. An increase of $2,000,000 for the Northern Great 
Plains Space Science and Technology Center at the University of 
North Dakota.
      26. An increase of $1,500,000 for flight communications 
technology at the University of Connecticut.
      27. An increase $1,500,000 for the Science Discovery 
Outreach Center at the University of North Carolina in Chapel 
Hill, North Carolina.
      28. An increase of $1,000,000 for the Chabot Observatory 
and Science Center in Oakland, California.
      29. An increase of $750,000 for the Des Moines Science 
Center in Des Moines, Iowa.
      30. An increase of $4,000,000 for infrastructure needs at 
Mauna Kea Astronomy Education Center at the University of 
Hawaii, Hilo.
      31. An increase of $1,000,000 for the NASA/Bishop Museum 
partnership in Honolulu, Hawaii.
      32. An increase of $1,500,000 for the Wisconsin 
Initiative for Math, Science, and Technology education at the 
University of Wisconsin, Green Bay.
      33. An increase of $250,000 for St. Mary's County Public 
School Technology Center, St. Mary's County, Maryland.
      34. An increase of $3,000,000 for construction of a life 
sciences facility at Brown University.
      35. An increase of $2,000,000 for instrumentation and 
laboratory development at Rowan University in New Jersey.
      36. An increase of $5,000,000 for infrastructure 
improvements at the School of Science and Mathematics at the 
College of Charleston in South Carolina.
      37. An increase of $1,500,000 for Muhlenberg College in 
Lehigh County, Pennsylvania to develop a national model for 
using NASA data and technologies in the k-12 and higher 
education classroom.
      38. An increase of $750,000 for the Texas Engineering 
Experiment Center at Texas A&M; University to support the Space 
Engineering Institute.
      39. An increase of $3,000,000 for the Challenger Learning 
Center in Kenai, Alaska for the final phase of dormitory 
construction.
      40. An increase of $500,000 for the Southeast Missouri 
State University NASA Educator Resource Center.
      41. An increase of $1,000,000 for a Challenger Learning 
Center in Ferguson/Florissant, Missouri.
      42. An increase of $800,000 for the Science, Engineering, 
Math and Aerospace Academy programs in Dade County, Florida.

                      office of inspector general

      The conferees agree to appropriate $23,700,000 for the 
Office of Inspector General as proposed by both the House and 
the Senate.

                       administrative provisions

      The conferees have included three administrative 
provisions which have been carried in prior-year appropriations 
acts and were included by both the House and the Senate. A 
fourth provision, prohibiting establishment of a non-
governmental organization for the International Space Station 
as proposed by the House, has been included in the conference 
agreement. The conferees look forward to receiving a 
comprehensive proposal for managing the ISS science program at 
which time it will re-evaluate the foregoing prohibition.

                  National Credit Union Administration

                       central liquidity facility

                     (including transfer of funds)

      The conferees have allowed the cap on the Central 
Liquidity Facility (CLF) lending activities from borrowed funds 
to remain at the fiscal year 2001 level of $1,500,000,000. As 
part of the Committees' oversight function, the conferees 
direct that NCUA provide quarterly reports for fiscal year 2002 
to the Committees on Appropriations detailing CLF lending 
activities.
      The conferees have provided $1,000,000 to the Community 
Development Revolving Loan Fund (CDRLF) as proposed by both the 
House and Senate. The conferees have agreed to set aside 
$300,000 specifically for technical assistance grants for 
fiscal year 2002 as proposed by the Senate.
      For the first time, $350,000 was provided in fiscal year 
2001 specifically for technical assistance grants. Prior to 
fiscal year 2001, technical assistance grants were funded 
solely from interest collected from the revolving loan program. 
The conferees recognize that the technical assistance grant 
program is oversubscribed and have agreed to augment the 
available funds with appropriations again in fiscal year 2002. 
Additionally, the conferees support the revolving loan program 
and recognize that demand for loans to assist low-income credit 
unions remains strong. In order to provide the maximum benefit 
to both programs from available funds, the conferees have 
supported both programs by making available the majority of 
funds for the revolving loan program recognizing that interest 
accrued on these loans will increase the funds available for 
technical assistance for low-income credit unions in the 
future.
      While the conferees are supportive of the CDRLF, the 
conferees find that the budget submission for the CDRLF lacks 
the appropriate information for the Committees to base future 
funding decisions. For fiscal year 2003, and thereafter, the 
conferees direct that the National Credit Union Administration 
(NCUA) provide detailed budget justifications for the loan 
program and technical assistance grant program. The budget 
justification should include a description of the program 
including the allowable purposes of loans and grants, the 
expected number and average amount of loans and grants to be 
awarded during the fiscal year, an estimate for the balance of 
the CDRLF, and estimates of future funding needs.

                      National Science Foundation

                    research and related activities

      Appropriates $3,598,340,000 for research and related 
activities instead of $3,642,340,000 as proposed by the House 
and $3,514,481,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conferees 
have included bill language which provides up to $300,000,000 
for polar research and operations support and $75,000,000 for a 
comprehensive research initiative on plant genomes for 
economically significant crops.
      The conference agreement provides specific funding levels 
for each of NSF's research activities as follows:
      1. $508,980,000 for Biological Sciences. Of this amount, 
$75,000,000 has been provided for plant genome research on 
economically significant crops, including an initiative which 
invests in high-throughput sequencing (such as full-length cDNA 
sequencing) of economically important crops.
      2. $515,800,000 for Computer and Information Science and 
Engineering. Up to $10,000,000 of the appropriated level may be 
used for operational support of the two terascale facilities.
      3. $467,510,000 for Engineering.
      4. $610,650,000 for Geosciences.
      5. $922,190,000 for Mathematical and Physical Sciences. 
Of the appropriated amount, $4,000,000 is provided for the 
Telescope Systems Instrumentation Program (TSIP) and $5,000,000 
has been provided for astronomical sciences to augment 
individual investigator support. The conferees expect NSF to 
continue its program of upgrading, on a priority basis, its 
astronomical facilities and equipment, including the Greenbank 
Observatory and Robert C. Byrd Telescope in West Virginia, and 
the Very Large Array radio telescope in New Mexico. The 
conferees have also placed a high priority on mathematics 
research within the amounts provided for this activity.
      6. $168,900,000 for Social, Behavioral and Economic 
Sciences.
      7. $229,730,000 for U.S. Polar Research Programs.
      8. $68,070,000 for U.S. Antarctic Logistical Support 
Activities.
      9. $106,510,000 for Integrative Activities, including 
$4,000,000 for the Science and Technology Policy Institute, 
$26,610,000 for the Science and Technology Centers, and 
$75,900,000 for Major Research Instrumentation (MRI). NSF is 
expected to continue its ongoing MRI program with developing 
institutions.
      The conference agreement increases the budget request 
level for all directorates, and provides specific increases of 
$25,000,000 for information technology research, $25,000,000 
for nanotechnology, and $12,500,000 for increased energy and 
fuel costs in the polar and ocean sciences as well as national 
facilities in physics and materials. The conference agreement 
also directs NSF to undertake a study to determine its 
appropriate role in support of regional innovation activities.
      The conferees have not included funds from within the NSF 
appropriation for maintaining the integrity of the Homestake 
Mine site in Lead, South Dakota and instead have provided 
funding from within the Community Development Fund under title 
II of this Act. While the conferees acknowledge the role NSF 
and the National Science Board will play in determining whether 
the mine is a suitable facility for proposed research, aswell 
as whether such proposed research should be a priority for the NSF, it 
is not appropriate for NSF to maintain the mine until such 
determinations are made.
      In presenting the Budget Estimates and Justification 
Materials for fiscal year 2003 and beyond, the conferees direct 
the Foundation to provide five-year plans for all multi-
disciplinary programs which specify, among other details, the 
funding level and justification for each program or project.

          major research equipment and facilities construction

      Appropriates $138,800,000 for major research equipment 
and facilities construction instead of $135,300,000 as proposed 
by the House and $108,832,000 as proposed by the Senate. 
Included within the appropriated amount is $16,900,000 for the 
Large Hadron Collider; $24,400,000 for the Network for 
Earthquake Engineering Simulation; $35,000,000 for continued 
development, production, and instrumentation of the High-
Performance Instrumented Airborne Platform for Environmental 
Research (HIAPER); $35,000,000 for Terascale Computing Systems; 
$15,000,000 for start-up costs of the IceCube Neutrino 
Detection project; and $12,500,000 for initial construction of 
the Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) radio telescope.
      The conferees note that the amount provided for Terascale 
Computing Systems represents the initial segment of a three-
year program expected to cost no less than the budget request 
of $55,000,000. While the conferees remain committed to this 
program as outlined by the Foundation, it was determined that 
funding the program on an annual basis made it possible to 
provide adequate resources to other priority projects.
      The conferees are aware that the NSF Inspector General 
has found that funds associated with the construction of large 
scale research facilities have also come from other NSF 
appropriation accounts. This obscures the full cost of these 
projects. The conferees agree that the renamed major research 
equipment and facilities construction (MREFC) account is to 
provide resources for the acquisition, construction and 
commissioning of large scale research facilities. Planning, 
design, operations, and maintenance costs are contained within 
the research and related activities account. The conferees also 
remain concerned about the implementation of NSF's Large 
Facility Projects Management & Oversight Plan, dated September 
2001.
      The conferees have directed NSF to provide a report 
regarding the full life-cycle cost of each of the projects or 
facilities funded through this account since its inception. The 
conferees have taken the unusual step of including this 
statutory requirement due to its continuing concerns for the 
expenditure of resources for major research equipment projects 
and current senior management's ability to adequately address 
this issue.
      The report should identify, for each project and by 
fiscal year appropriation account used, the costs of planning, 
design, and development; acquisition, construction, and 
commissioning; and operations, management, and maintenance. 
This report, which should also demonstrate significant 
implementation of the large facility management and oversight 
plan, is to be provided to the Committees on Appropriations no 
later than February 28, 2002.
      The conferees further direct the Foundation to provide, 
in its annual budget submission to the Congress, a detailed 
priority-based description, multi-year budget, and milestone 
plan for all projects funded or proposed to be funded through 
the MREFC account, including those projects currently in the 
formal planning and development phase prior to National Science 
Board approval.
      The conferees have changed the name of the account to 
Major Research Equipment and Facilities Construction to better 
reflect the mission to be accomplished with appropriations made 
available through this account.

                     education and human resources

      Appropriates $875,000,000 for education and human 
resources instead of $885,720,000 as proposed by the House and 
$872,407,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conferees agree to 
the following funding levels within this account:
      1. $80,000,000 for EPSCoR. In addition to funds provided 
through the EHR account for EPSCoR, the conferees expect the 
NSF to provide an additional $30,000,000 from within the 
Research and Related Activities account for research to be 
conducted at EPSCoR institutions, bringing the total NSF EPSCoR 
effort to $110,000,000.
      2. $28,000,000 for the Louis Stokes Alliances for 
Minority Participation program.
      3. $17,000,000 for the HBCU Undergraduate Program.
      4. $160,000,000 for the Math and Science Partnership 
program. The conferees have agreed to provide significant 
funding for this new program despite limited details provided 
through the budget submission. The Foundation is strongly urged 
to provide regular, detailed information to the Committees on 
Appropriations regarding the planning and execution of this new 
initiative.
      5. $5,000,000 for Noyce Scholarships consistent with the 
provisions of H.R. 1858 as reported to the House of 
Representatives.
      6. $11,000,000 for the Office of Innovation Partnerships.
      7. $5,000,000 for a new undergraduate workforce 
initiative, which is to include a new, merit-based, competitive 
grants program for colleges and universities for increasing the 
number of undergraduate degree recipients in science and 
engineering, consistent with the provisions of S. 1549.
      8. $105,500,000, an increase of $10,000,000 above the 
budget request, has been provided to increase graduate level 
stipends for the research and teaching fellowship programs and 
the trainee program administered by the Foundation through its 
Graduate Education subactivity. The conferees support 
increasing the graduate stipend level to $21,500 during fiscal 
year 2002 if funding permits.
      9. $2,600,000 above the budget request for the Human 
Resource Development subactivity has been provided to establish 
an initiative that will stimulate the competitive research 
capacity of Historically Black Colleges and Universities which 
offer doctoral degrees in science and engineering.

                         salaries and expenses

      Appropriates $170,040,000 for salaries and expenses as 
proposed by the House and the Senate.

                      office of inspector general

      Appropriates $6,760,000 for the Office of Inspector 
General as proposed by the House and the Senate.

                 Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation

          payment to the neighborhood reinvestment corporation

      The conferees agree to provide $105,000,000 for the 
Neighborhood Reinvestment Corporation as proposed by the House 
instead of $100,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Language is included in the bill which designates 
$10,000,000 to support the Corporation's section 8 
homeownership program, as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate.
      The conferees remain concerned about the shortage of 
available, affordable rental housing across the Nation. The 
Corporation has been successfully producing mixed-income 
affordable rental housing through the use of ``mutual 
housing'', acquisition and preservation of existing units, and 
a focus on asset management. Accordingly, the conferees agree 
to provide $5,000,000 above the budget request to the 
Corporation to support additional mixed-income affordable 
rental developments. The conferees direct the Corporation to 
include details on how many additional affordable, rental 
housing units have been created through this set-aside in its 
fiscal year 2003 budget justifications. The Corporation should 
also include information on the number of families served that 
have incomes below 30 percent of the area median income. There 
is a substantial shortage of available, affordable housing for 
these extremely low-income families throughout the Nation, and 
the conferees urge the Corporation to continue its efforts to 
meet the housing needs of these families. The conferees also 
direct the Corporation to increase its efforts in smaller 
metropolitan areas and rural areas where very serious housing 
problems exist.

                        Selective Service System

                         salaries and expenses

      Appropriates $25,003,000 for salaries and expenses as 
proposed by both the House and the Senate. The conferees agree 
to limit reception and representation expenses to $750 instead 
of $500 as proposed by the House and $1,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.

                      TITLE IV--GENERAL PROVISIONS

      Retains twenty general provisions proposed by both the 
House and the Senate and which were included in the fiscal year 
2001 Act.
      Modifies language proposed by the Senate prohibiting HUD 
from spending funds for any activity in excess of amounts 
described in the budget justification unless otherwise provided 
for in this Act or through a reprogramming of funds.
      Retains language proposed by the House prohibiting EPA 
from using funds to implement the Registration Fee system 
codified in 40 CFR subpart U if the authority to collect fees 
authorized in FIFRA is extended for one year beyond September 
30, 2001.
      Retains language proposed by the House amending the Cerro 
Grande Fire Assistance Act to read ``within 120 days after the 
Director issues the report required by subsection (n) in 2002 
and 2003.''
      Retains language proposed by the House prohibiting VA 
from using funds to implement the proposed requirement that 
military retirees must choose either VA's or TRICARE's health 
care system.
      The conferees have included modified language related to 
a national primary drinking water standard for arsenic as 
published in the Federal Register on January 22, 2001, instead 
of language proposed by the House and the Senate. The language 
adopted by the conferees prohibits a delay in setting a new 
regulation other than that prescribed in the final rule of 
January 22, 2001, which includes an arsenic standard of 10 
parts per billion (ppb).
      In adopting this legislative provision, the conferees 
acknowledge that an arsenic standard of 10 ppb will likely pose 
significant financial costs on many small communities, and many 
of these communities may find it impossible, because of the 
financial burden, to be in compliance by 2006 as the rule 
requires. The conferees are concerned that, because of their 
complexity, the current waiver and exemption provisions found 
in sections 1415 and 1416 of the Safe Drinking Water Act, as 
amended, may not provide sufficient flexibility for the small 
communities to receive additional time to reach compliance. As 
a result, the conferees are very concerned that numerous small 
community water systems may not be in compliance by 2006, and 
that some very small communities may abandon their municipal 
systems in favor of untreated and unregulated private wells 
which could create significant other health risks for these 
communities. The conferees agree that the Congress and the 
Administration must act swiftly to provide both the time and 
the means for many small communities to meet the new 10 ppb 
standard.
      To this end, the conferees direct the Administrator of 
EPA to begin immediately to review the Agency's affordability 
criteria and how small system variance and exemption programs 
should be implemented for arsenic. In addition, the 
Administrator should recommend procedures to grant an extension 
of time in meeting the compliance requirement for small 
communities when a community can show to the satisfaction of 
the Administrator that being in compliance by 2006 poses an 
undue economic hardship on that community. In developing these 
procedures, the Administrator should consider those actions 
which can be taken administratively by the Agency and those 
which will require the enactment of legislation. The conferees 
do not intend to create loopholes in the Safe Drinking Water 
Act for compliance to a national arsenic standard. Rather, the 
conferees wish to emphasize that they expect the Agency to 
adopt without delay all appropriate available administrative 
actions permitted under existing law to facilitate reasonable 
extensions of time for compliance of these communities.
      The Agency is directed to report to the Congress by March 
1, 2002 on its review of the affordability criteria and the 
administrative actions undertaken or planned to be undertaken 
by the Agency, as well as potential funding mechanisms for 
small community compliance and other legislative actions, 
which, if taken by the Congress, would best achieve appropriate 
extensions of time for small communities while also 
guaranteeing maximum compliance.
      Retains language proposed by the House establishing the 
Minority Emergency Preparedness Demonstration Program at FEMA.
      Deletes language proposed by the House prohibiting the VA 
from implementing the ``Plan for the Development of a 25-Year 
General Use Plan for Department of Veterans Affairs West Los 
Angeles Health Care Center.'' The conferees have instead 
included report language in medical care urging the development 
of a reasonabledevelopment plan which is suitable for the 
community and improves access to VA services.
      Modifies language proposed by the House prohibiting funds 
to be used to implement or enforce the community service 
requirement of the United States Housing Act of 1937 except for 
residents of projects funded under HOPE VI.
      Deletes language proposed by the House prohibiting 
funding of any person or entity convicted of the Buy American 
Act.
      Retains language proposed by the Senate requiring HUD to 
submit a report by January 8, 2002, detailing obligations and 
expenditures of title II funds for technical assistance, 
training or management improvement activities.
      Deletes language proposed by the Senate amending section 
70113(f) of title 49.
      Deletes language proposed by the Senate regarding 
playground equipment. The conferees have instead included 
report language under EPA and CPSC directing those agencies to 
submit reports regarding chromated copper arsenate-treated wood 
playground equipment.
      Deletes language proposed by the Senate providing 
$115,000,000 from NSF funds for EPSCoR, which includes 
$25,000,000 in co-funding.
      Deletes language proposed by the Senate expressing the 
Sense of the Senate that the Committee on Environment and 
Public Works needs to address the State Water Pollution Control 
Revolving Fund.
      Inserts language clarifying the use of funds available to 
NASA from timber sales.
      New language is included to facilitate the use of funds 
provided through HUD's Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) 
program to aid in the recovery of New York City from the 
September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks. The conferees are aware 
funds appropriated to the President in Public Law 107-38 have 
been set aside to be provided to the State of New York for 
assistance to New York City for properties and businesses 
affected by the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 and to 
assist in the City's overall economic recovery. Given the 
extraordinary level of damage to New York City caused by the 
terrorist attacks and the unique circumstances affecting the 
economic recovery of the area, the conferees have included 
language authorizing the one-time waiver of requirements as the 
Secretary deems appropriate to facilitate this recovery.
      Prior to the release of funds, the conferees expect the 
State of New York to submit and to secure approval from the 
Secretary of a plan that would allocate these funds to the 
highest priority economic development needs to address the 
emergency situation pursuant to the terrorist attacks of 
September 11, 2001. Language is also included requiring certain 
notification requirements on the use of these funds and 
relevant waivers being granted. The conferees request that HUD 
provide quarterly reports to the Committees on Appropriations 
on the obligation and expenditure of these funds.
      The conferees do not expect these funds to be used to 
compensate or otherwise reimburse insurance companies for 
losses related to the terrorist attacks. The conferees 
understand that issues related to insurance costs and the 
terrorist attacks are currently under review by the relevant 
House and Senate authorization committees.

                   CONFERENCE TOTAL--WITH COMPARISONS

      The total new budget (obligational) authority for the 
fiscal year 2002 recommended by the Committee of Conference, 
with comparisons to the fiscal year 2001 amount, the 2002 
budget estimates, and the House and Senate bills for 2002 
follow:

                        [In thousands of dollars]

New budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 2001...    $108,346,441
Budget estimates of new (obligational) authority, fiscal 
    year 2002...........................................     110,671,650
House bill, fiscal year 2002............................     112,742,553
Senate bill, fiscal year 2002...........................     113,351,308
Conference agreement, fiscal year 2002..................     112,742,537
Conference agreement compared with:
    New budget (obligational) authority, fiscal year 
      2001..............................................      +4,396,096
    Budget estimates of new (obligational) authority, 
      fiscal year 2002..................................      +2,070,887
    House bill, fiscal year 2002........................             -16
    Senate bill, fiscal year 2002.......................        -608,771

                                   James T. Walsh,
                                   Tom DeLay,
                                   David L. Hobson,
                                   Joe Knollenberg,
                                   Rodney P. Frelinghuysen,
                                   Anne M. Northup,
                                   John E. Sununu,
                                   Virgil Goode, Jr.,
                                   Robert B. Aderholt,
                                   Bill Young,
                                   Alan B. Mollohan,
                                   Marcy Kaptur,
                                   Carrie P. Meek,
                                   David Price,
                                   Robert E. Cramer, Jr.,
                                   Chaka Fattah,
                                   David Obey,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Barbara A. Mikulski,
                                   Patrick J. Leahy,
                                   Tom Harkin,
                                   Robert C. Byrd,
                                   Herb Kohl,
                                   Tim Johnson,
                                   Ernest F. Hollings,
                                   Daniel K. Inouye,
                                   Christopher S. Bond,
                                   Conrad Burns,
                                   Richard C. Shelby,
                                   Larry Craig,
                                           (except for general 
                                               provision on arsenic),
                                   Pete V. Domenici,
                                           (except for general 
                                               provision on arsenic),
                                   Mike DeWine,
                                   Ted Stevens,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.