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107th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                    107-342

======================================================================



 
MAKING APPROPRIATIONS FOR THE DEPARTMENTS OF LABOR, HEALTH AND HUMAN 
  SERVICES, AND EDUCATION, AND RELATED AGENCIES FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 
  ENDING SEPTEMBER 30, 2002, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES

                                _______
                                

December 19 (legislative day, December 8), 2001.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Regula, from the committee of conference, submitted the following

                           CONFERENCE REPORT

                        [To accompany H.R. 3061]

      The committee of conference on the disagreeing votes of 
the two Houses on the amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 
3061) ``making appropriations for the Departments of Labor, 
Health and Human Services, and Education, and related agencies 
for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for other 
purposes'', having met, after full and free conference, have 
agreed to recommend and do recommend to their respective Houses 
as follows:
      That the House recede from its disagreement to the 
amendment of the Senate, and agree to the same with an 
amendment, as follows:
      In lieu of the matter stricken and inserted by said 
amendment, insert:
That the following sums are appropriated, out of any money in 
the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, for the Departments of 
Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and related 
agencies for the fiscal year ending September 30, 2002, and for 
other purposes, namely:

                      TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

                 Employment and Training Administration


                    training and employment services


    For necessary expenses of the Workforce Investment Act, 
including the purchase and hire of passenger motor vehicles, 
the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and other 
facilities, and the purchase of real property for training 
centers as authorized by the Workforce Investment Act; the 
Women in Apprenticeship and Nontraditional Occupations Act; and 
the National Skill Standards Act of 1994; $3,167,282,000 plus 
reimbursements, of which $1,779,342,000 is available for 
obligation for the period July 1, 2002 through June 30, 2003; 
of which $1,353,065,000 is available for obligation for the 
period April 1, 2002 through June 30, 2003, including 
$1,127,965,000 to carry out chapter 4 of the Workforce 
Investment Act and $225,100,000 to carry out section 169 of 
such Act; and of which $3,500,000 is available for obligation 
October 1, 2001 until expended for carrying out the National 
Skills Standards Act of 1994; and of which $30,375,000 is 
available for the period July 1, 2002 through June 30, 2005 for 
necessary expenses of construction, rehabilitation, and 
acquisition of Job Corps centers: Provided, That $9,098,000 
shall be for carrying out section 172 of the Workforce 
Investment Act: Provided further, That, notwithstanding any 
other provision of law or related regulation, $80,770,000 shall 
be for carrying out section 167 of the Workforce Investment 
Act, including $74,965,000 for formula grants, $4,786,000 for 
migrant and seasonal housing, and $1,019,000 for other 
discretionary purposes: Provided further, That funding provided 
herein under section 166 of the Workforce Investment Act shall 
include $1,711,000 for use under section 166(j)(1) of the Act: 
Provided further, That funds provided to carry out section 
171(d) of the Workforce Investment Act may be used for 
demonstration projects that provide assistance to new entrants 
in the workforce and incumbent workers: Provided further, That 
funding provided to carry out projects under section 171 of the 
Workforce Investment Act that are identified in the Conference 
Agreement, shall not be subject to the requirements of section 
171(b)(2)(B) of such Act, the requirements of section 
171(c)(4)(D) of such Act, or the joint funding requirements of 
sections 171(b)(2)(A) and 171(c)(4)(A) of such Act: Provided 
further, That no funds from any other appropriation shall be 
used to provide meal services at or for Job Corps centers.
    For necessary expenses of the Workforce Investment Act, 
including the purchase and hire of passenger motor vehicles, 
the construction, alteration, and repair of buildings and other 
facilities, and the purchase of real property for training 
centers as authorized by the Workforce Investment Act; 
$2,463,000,000 plus reimbursements, of which $2,363,000,000 is 
available for obligation for the period October 1, 2002 through 
June 30, 2003, and of which $100,000,000 is available for the 
period October 1, 2002 through June 30, 2005, for necessary 
expenses of construction, rehabilitation, and acquisition of 
Job Corps centers.


            community service employment for older americans


    To carry out title V of the Older Americans Act of 1965, as 
amended, $445,100,000.


              federal unemployment benefits and allowances


    For payments during the current fiscal year of trade 
adjustment benefit payments and allowances under part I; and 
for training, allowances for job search and relocation, and 
related State administrative expenses under part II, 
subchapters B and D, chapter 2, title II of the Trade Act of 
1974, as amended, $415,650,000, together with such amounts as 
may be necessary to be charged to the subsequent appropriation 
for payments for any period subsequent to September 15 of the 
current year.


     state unemployment insurance and employment service operations


    For authorized administrative expenses, $163,452,000, 
together with not to exceed $3,237,886,000 (including not to 
exceed $1,228,000 which may be used for amortization payments 
to States which had independent retirement plans in their State 
employment service agencies prior to 1980), which may be 
expended from the Employment Security Administration Account in 
the Unemployment Trust Fund including the cost of administering 
section 51 of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, 
section 7(d) of the Wagner-Peyser Act, as amended, the Trade 
Act of 1974, as amended, the Immigration Act of 1990, and the 
Immigration and Nationality Act, as amended, and of which the 
sums available in the allocation for activities authorized by 
title III of the Social Security Act, as amended (42 U.S.C. 
502-504), and the sums available in the allocation for 
necessary administrative expenses for carrying out 5 U.S.C. 
8501-8523, shall be available for obligation by the States 
through December 31, 2002, except that funds used for 
automation acquisitions shall be available for obligation by 
the States through September 30, 2004; and of which 
$163,452,000, together with not to exceed $773,283,000 of the 
amount which may be expended from said trust fund, shall be 
available for obligation for the period July 1, 2002 through 
June 30, 2003, to fund activities under the Act of June 6, 
1933, as amended, including the cost of penalty mail authorized 
under 39 U.S.C. 3202(a)(1)(E) made available to States in lieu 
of allotments for such purpose: Provided, That to the extent 
that the Average Weekly Insured Unemployment (AWIU) for fiscal 
year 2002 is projected by the Department of Labor to exceed 
2,622,000, an additional $28,600,000 shall be available for 
obligation for every 100,000 increase in the AWIU level 
(including a pro rata amount for any increment less than 
100,000) from the Employment Security Administration Account of 
the Unemployment Trust Fund: Provided further, That funds 
appropriated in this Act which are used to establish a national 
one-stop career center system, or which are used to support the 
national activities of the Federal-State unemployment insurance 
programs, may be obligated in contracts, grants or agreements 
with non-State entities: Provided further, That funds 
appropriated under this Act for activities authorized under the 
Wagner-Peyser Act, as amended, and title III of the Social 
Security Act, may be used by the States to fund integrated 
Employment Service and Unemployment Insurance automation 
efforts, notwithstanding cost allocation principles prescribed 
under Office of Management and Budget Circular A-87: Provided 
further, That notwithstanding any other provisions of law, the 
portion of the funds received by the State of Mississippi in 
the settlement of litigation with a contractor relating to the 
acquisition of an automated system for benefit payments under 
the unemployment compensation program that is attributable to 
the expenditure of Federal grant funds awarded to the State 
shall be transferred to the account under this heading and 
shall be made available by the Department of Labor to the State 
of Mississippi for obligation by the State through fiscal year 
2004 to carry out automation and related activities under the 
unemployment compensation program.


        advances to the unemployment trust fund and other funds


    For repayable advances to the Unemployment Trust Fund as 
authorized by sections 905(d) and 1203 of the Social Security 
Act, as amended, and to the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund as 
authorized by section 9501(c)(1) of the Internal Revenue Code 
of 1954, as amended; and for nonrepayable advances to the 
Unemployment Trust Fund as authorized by section 8509 of title 
5, United States Code, and to the ``Federal unemployment 
benefits and allowances'' account, to remain available until 
September 30, 2003, $464,000,000.
    In addition, for making repayable advances to the Black 
Lung Disability Trust Fund in the current fiscal year after 
September 15, 2002, for costs incurred by the Black Lung 
Disability Trust Fund in the current fiscal year, such sums as 
may be necessary.


                         program administration


    For expenses of administering employment and training 
programs, $113,356,000, including $5,934,000 to administer 
welfare-to-work grants, together with not to exceed 
$48,507,000, which may be expended from the Employment Security 
Administration Account in the Unemployment Trust Fund.

              Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses for the Pension and Welfare Benefits 
Administration, $109,866,000.

                  Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation


               pension benefit guaranty corporation fund


    The Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation is authorized to 
make such expenditures, including financial assistance 
authorized by section 104 of Public Law 96-364, within limits 
of funds and borrowing authority available to such Corporation, 
and in accord with law, and to make such contracts and 
commitments without regard to fiscal year limitations as 
provided by section 104 of the Government Corporation Control 
Act, as amended (31 U.S.C. 9104), as may be necessary in 
carrying out the program through September 30, 2002, for such 
Corporation: Provided, That not to exceed $11,690,000 shall be 
available for administrative expenses of the Corporation: 
Provided further, That expenses of such Corporation in 
connection with the termination of pension plans, for the 
acquisition, protection or management, and investment of trust 
assets, and for benefits administration services shall be 
considered as non-administrative expenses for the purposes 
hereof, and excluded from the above limitation.

                  Employment Standards Administration


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses for the Employment Standards 
Administration, including reimbursement to State, Federal, and 
local agencies and their employees for inspection services 
rendered, $369,220,000, together with $1,981,000 which may be 
expended from the Special Fund in accordance with sections 
39(c), 44(d) and 44(j) of the Longshore and Harbor Workers' 
Compensation Act: Provided, That $2,000,000 shall be for the 
development of an alternative system for the electronic 
submission of reports required to be filed under the Labor-
Management Reporting and Disclosure Act of 1959, as amended, 
and for a computer database of the information for each 
submission by whatever means, that is indexed and easily 
searchable by the public via the Internet: Provided further, 
That the Secretary of Labor is authorized to accept, retain, 
and spend, until expended, in the name of the Department of 
Labor, all sums of money ordered to be paid to the Secretary of 
Labor, in accordance with the terms of the Consent Judgment in 
Civil Action No. 91-0027 of the United States District Court 
for the District of the Northern Mariana Islands (May 21, 
1992): Provided further, That the Secretary of Labor is 
authorized to establish and, in accordance with 31 U.S.C. 3302, 
collect and deposit in the Treasury fees for processing 
applications and issuing certificates under sections 11(d) and 
14 of the Fair Labor Standards Act of 1938, as amended (29 
U.S.C. 211(d) and 214) and for processing applications and 
issuing registrations under title I of the Migrant and Seasonal 
Agricultural Worker Protection Act (29 U.S.C. 1801 et seq.).


                            special benefits


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the payment of compensation, benefits, and expenses 
(except administrative expenses) accruing during the current or 
any prior fiscal year authorized by title 5, chapter 81 of the 
United States Code; continuation of benefits as provided for 
under the heading ``Civilian War Benefits'' in the Federal 
Security Agency Appropriation Act, 1947; the Employees' 
Compensation Commission Appropriation Act, 1944; sections 4(c) 
and 5(f) of the War Claims Act of 1948 (50 U.S.C. App. 2012); 
and 50 percent of the additional compensation and benefits 
required by section 10(h) of the Longshore and Harbor Workers' 
Compensation Act, as amended, $121,000,000 together with such 
amounts as may be necessary to be charged to the subsequent 
year appropriation for the payment of compensation and other 
benefits for any period subsequent to August 15 of the current 
year: Provided, That amounts appropriated may be used under 
section 8104 of title 5, United States Code, by the Secretary 
of Labor to reimburse an employer, who is not the employer at 
the time of injury, for portions of the salary of a reemployed, 
disabled beneficiary: Provided further, That balances of 
reimbursements unobligated on September 30, 2001, shall remain 
available until expended for the payment of compensation, 
benefits, and expenses: Provided further, That in addition 
there shall be transferred to this appropriation from the 
Postal Service and from any other corporation or 
instrumentality required under section 8147(c) of title 5, 
United States Code, to pay an amount for its fair share of the 
cost of administration, such sums as the Secretary determines 
to be the cost of administration for employees of such fair 
share entities through September 30, 2002: Provided further, 
That of those funds transferred to this account from the fair 
share entities to pay the cost of administration of the Federal 
Employees' Compensation Act, $36,696,000 shall be made 
available to the Secretary as follows: (1) for the operation of 
and enhancement to the automated data processing systems, 
including document imaging and conversion to a paperless 
office, $24,522,000; (2) for medical bill review and periodic 
roll management, $11,474,000; (3) for communications redesign, 
$700,000; and (4) the remaining funds shall be paid into the 
Treasury as miscellaneous receipts: Provided further, That the 
Secretary may require that any person filing a notice of injury 
or a claim for benefits under chapter 81 of title 5, United 
States Code, or 33 U.S.C. 901 et seq., provide as part of such 
notice and claim, such identifying information (including 
Social Security account number) as such regulations may 
prescribe.


        energy employees occupational illness compensation fund


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For necessary expenses to administer the Energy Employees 
Occupational Illness Compensation Act, $136,000,000, to remain 
available until expended: Provided, That the Secretary of Labor 
is authorized to transfer to any Executive agency with 
authority under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness 
Compensation Act, including within the Department of Labor, 
such sums as may be necessary in fiscal year 2002 to carry out 
those authorities: Provided further, That the Secretary may 
require that any person filing a claim for benefits under the 
Act provide as part of such claim, such identifying information 
(including Social Security account number) as may be 
prescribed.


                    black lung disability trust fund


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For payments from the Black Lung Disability Trust Fund, 
$1,036,115,000, of which $981,283,000 shall be available until 
September 30, 2003, for payment of all benefits as authorized 
by section 9501(d)(1), (2), (4), and (7) of the Internal 
Revenue Code of 1954, as amended, and interest on advances as 
authorized by section 9501(c)(2) of that Act, and of which 
$31,558,000 shall be available for transfer to Employment 
Standards Administration, Salaries and Expenses, $22,590,000 
for transfer to Departmental Management, Salaries and Expenses, 
$328,000 for transfer to Departmental Management, Office of 
Inspector General, and $356,000 for payment into miscellaneous 
receipts for the expenses of the Department of Treasury, for 
expenses of operation and administration of the Black Lung 
Benefits program as authorized by section 9501(d)(5) of that 
Act: Provided, That, in addition, such amounts as may be 
necessary may be charged to the subsequent year appropriation 
for the payment of compensation, interest, or other benefits 
for any period subsequent to August 15 of the current year.

             Occupational Safety and Health Administration


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses for the Occupational Safety and 
Health Administration, $443,651,000, including not to exceed 
$89,747,000 which shall be the maximum amount available for 
grants to States under section 23(g) of the Occupational Safety 
and Health Act, which grants shall be no less than 50 percent 
of the costs of State occupational safety and health programs 
required to be incurred under plans approved by the Secretary 
under section 18 of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 
1970; and, in addition, notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302, the 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration may retain up to 
$750,000 per fiscal year of training institute course tuition 
fees, otherwise authorized by law to be collected, and may 
utilize such sums for occupational safety and health training 
and education grants: Provided, That, notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 
3302, the Secretary of Labor is authorized, during the fiscal 
year ending September 30, 2002, to collect and retain fees for 
services provided to Nationally Recognized Testing 
Laboratories, and may utilize such sums, in accordance with the 
provisions of 29 U.S.C. 9a, to administer national and 
international laboratory recognition programs that ensure the 
safety of equipment and products used by workers in the 
workplace: Provided further, That none of the funds 
appropriated under this paragraph shall be obligated or 
expended to prescribe, issue, administer, or enforce any 
standard, rule, regulation, or order under the Occupational 
Safety and Health Act of 1970 which is applicable to any person 
who is engaged in a farming operation which does not maintain a 
temporary labor camp and employs 10 or fewer employees: 
Provided further, That no funds appropriated under this 
paragraph shall be obligated or expended to administer or 
enforce any standard, rule, regulation, or order under the 
Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 with respect to any 
employer of 10 or fewer employees who is included within a 
category having an occupational injury lost workday case rate, 
at the most precise Standard Industrial Classification Code for 
which such data are published, less than the national average 
rate as such rates are most recently published by the 
Secretary, acting through the Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 
accordance with section 24 of that Act (29 U.S.C. 673), 
except--
            (1) to provide, as authorized by such Act, 
        consultation, technical assistance, educational and 
        training services, and to conduct surveys and studies;
            (2) to conduct an inspection or investigation in 
        response to an employee complaint, to issue a citation 
        for violations found during such inspection, and to 
        assess a penalty for violations which are not corrected 
        within a reasonable abatement period and for any 
        willful violations found;
            (3) to take any action authorized by such Act with 
        respect to imminent dangers;
            (4) to take any action authorized by such Act with 
        respect to health hazards;
            (5) to take any action authorized by such Act with 
        respect to a report of an employment accident which is 
        fatal to one or more employees or which results in 
        hospitalization of two or more employees, and to take 
        any action pursuant to such investigation authorized by 
        such Act; and
            (6) to take any action authorized by such Act with 
        respect to complaints of discrimination against 
        employees for exercising rights under such Act:

Provided further, That the foregoing proviso shall not apply to 
any person who is engaged in a farming operation which does not 
maintain a temporary labor camp and employs 10 or fewer 
employees.

                 Mine Safety and Health Administration


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses for the Mine Safety and Health 
Administration, $254,768,000, including purchase and bestowal 
of certificates and trophies in connection with mine rescue and 
first-aid work, and the hire of passenger motor vehicles; 
including up to $1,000,000 for mine rescue and recovery 
activities, which shall be available only to the extent that 
fiscal year 2002 obligations for these activities exceed 
$1,000,000; in addition, not to exceed $750,000 may be 
collected by the National Mine Health and Safety Academy for 
room, board, tuition, and the sale of training materials, 
otherwise authorized by law to be collected, to be available 
for mine safety and health education and training activities, 
notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302; and, in addition, the Mine 
Safety and Health Administration may retain up to $1,000,000 
from fees collected for the approval and certification of 
equipment, materials, and explosives for use in mines, and may 
utilize such sums for such activities; the Secretary is 
authorized to accept lands, buildings, equipment, and other 
contributions from public and private sources and to prosecute 
projects in cooperation with other agencies, Federal, State, or 
private; the Mine Safety and Health Administration is 
authorized to promote health and safety education and training 
in the mining community through cooperative programs with 
States, industry, and safety associations; and any funds 
available to the department may be used, with the approval of 
the Secretary, to provide for the costs of mine rescue and 
survival operations in the event of a major disaster.

                       Bureau of Labor Statistics


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses for the Bureau of Labor Statistics, 
including advances or reimbursements to State, Federal, and 
local agencies and their employees for services rendered, 
$397,142,000, together with not to exceed $69,132,000, which 
may be expended from the Employment Security Administration 
Account in the Unemployment Trust Fund; and $10,280,000 which 
shall be available for obligation for the period July 1, 2002 
through June 30, 2003, for Occupational Employment Statistics.

                 Office of Disability Employment Policy


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses for the Office of Disability 
Employment Policy to provide leadership, develop policy and 
initiatives, and award grants furthering the objective of 
eliminating barriers to the training and employment of people 
with disabilities, $38,158,000, of which $2,640,000 shall be 
for the President's Task Force on the Employment of Adults with 
Disabilities.

                        Departmental Management


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses for Departmental Management, 
including the hire of three sedans, and including the 
management or operation, through contracts, grants or other 
arrangements of Departmental activities conducted by or through 
the Bureau of International Labor Affairs, including bilateral 
and multilateral technical assistance and other international 
labor activities, of which the funds designated to carry out 
bilateral assistance under the international child labor 
initiative shall be available for obligation through September 
30, 2003, and $50,000,000, for the acquisition of Departmental 
information technology, architecture, infrastructure, 
equipment, software and related needs which will be allocated 
by the Department's Chief Information Officer in accordance 
with the Department's capital investment management process to 
assure a sound investment strategy; $378,778,000; together with 
not to exceed $310,000, which may be expended from the 
Employment Security Administration Account in the Unemployment 
Trust Fund: Provided, That no funds made available by this Act 
may be used by the Solicitor of Labor to participate in a 
review in any United States court of appeals of any decision 
made by the Benefits Review Board under section 21 of the 
Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation Act (33 U.S.C. 921) 
where such participation is precluded by the decision of the 
United States Supreme Court in Director, Office of Workers' 
Compensation Programs v. Newport News Shipbuilding, 115 S. Ct. 
1278 (1995), notwithstanding any provisions to the contrary 
contained in Rule 15 of the Federal Rules of Appellate 
Procedure: Provided further, That no funds made available by 
this Act may be used by the Secretary of Labor to review a 
decision under the Longshore and Harbor Workers' Compensation 
Act (33 U.S.C. 901 et seq.) that has been appealed and that has 
been pending before the Benefits Review Board for more than 12 
months: Provided further, That any such decision pending a 
review by the Benefits Review Board for more than 1 year shall 
be considered affirmed by the Benefits Review Board on the 1-
year anniversary of the filing of the appeal, and shall be 
considered the final order of the Board for purposes of 
obtaining a review in the United States courts of appeals: 
Provided further, That these provisions shall not be applicable 
to the review or appeal of any decision issued under the Black 
Lung Benefits Act (30 U.S.C. 901 et seq.).


                    veterans employment and training


    Not to exceed $186,903,000 may be derived from the 
Employment Security Administration Account in the Unemployment 
Trust Fund to carry out the provisions of 38 U.S.C. 4100-4110A, 
4212, 4214, and 4321-4327, and Public Law 103-353, and which 
shall be available for obligation by the States through 
December 31, 2002. To carry out the Stewart B. McKinney 
Homeless Assistance Act and section 168 of the Workforce 
Investment Act of 1998, $25,800,000, of which $7,550,000 shall 
be available for obligation for the period July 1, 2002 through 
June 30, 2003.


                      office of inspector general


    For salaries and expenses of the Office of Inspector 
General in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General 
Act of 1978, as amended, $52,182,000, together with not to 
exceed $4,951,000, which may be expended from the Employment 
Security Administration Account in the Unemployment Trust Fund.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 101. None of the funds appropriated in this title for 
the Job Corps shall be used to pay the compensation of an 
individual, either as direct costs or any proration as an 
indirect cost, at a rate in excess of Executive Level II.


                          (transfer of funds)


    Sec. 102. Not to exceed 1 percent of any discretionary 
funds (pursuant to the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985, as amended) which are appropriated for the 
current fiscal year for the Department of Labor in this Act may 
be transferred between appropriations, but no such 
appropriation shall be increased by more than 3 percent by any 
such transfer: Provided, That the Appropriations Committees of 
both Houses of Congress are notified at least 15 days in 
advance of any transfer.
    This title may be cited as the ``Department of Labor 
Appropriations Act, 2002''.

           TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

              Health Resources and Services Administration


                     health resources and services


    For carrying out titles II, III, VII, VIII, X, XII, XIX, 
and XXVI of the Public Health Service Act, section 427(a) of 
the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act, title V and 
sections 1128E and 1820 of the Social Security Act, the Health 
Care Quality Improvement Act of 1986, as amended, the Native 
Hawaiian Health Care Act of 1988, as amended, the Cardiac 
Arrest Survival Act of 2000, and the Poison Control Center 
Enhancement and Awareness Act, $6,081,237,000, of which 
$311,978,000 shall be available for construction and renovation 
of health care and other facilities, and of which $40,000,000 
from general revenues, notwithstanding section 1820(j) of the 
Social Security Act, shall be available for carrying out the 
Medicare rural hospital flexibility grants program under 
section 1820 of such Act: Provided, That of the funds made 
available under this heading, $250,000 shall be available until 
expended for facilities renovations at the Gillis W. Long 
Hansen's Disease Center: Provided further, That in addition to 
fees authorized by section 427(b) of the Health Care Quality 
Improvement Act of 1986, fees shall be collected for the full 
disclosure of information under the Act sufficient to recover 
the full costs of operating the National Practitioner Data 
Bank, and shall remain available until expended to carry out 
that Act: Provided further, That fees collected for the full 
disclosure of information under the ``Health Care Fraud and 
Abuse Data Collection Program'', authorized by section 
1128E(d)(2) of the Social Security Act, shall be sufficient to 
recover the full costs of operating the program, and shall 
remain available until expended to carry out that Act: Provided 
further, That no more than $15,000,000 is available for 
carrying out the provisions of Public Law 104-73: Provided 
further, That of the funds made available under this heading, 
$265,085,000 shall be for the program under title X of the 
Public Health Service Act to provide for voluntary family 
planning projects: Provided further, That amounts provided to 
said projects under such title shall not be expended for 
abortions, that all pregnancy counseling shall be nondirective, 
and that such amounts shall not be expended for any activity 
(including the publication or distribution of literature) that 
in any way tends to promote public support or opposition to any 
legislative proposal or candidate for public office: Provided 
further, That $639,000,000 shall be for State AIDS Drug 
Assistance Programs authorized by section 2616 of the Public 
Health Service Act: Provided further, That of the amount 
provided under this heading, $80,000 shall be for the Wausau 
Health Foundation in Wausau, Wisconsin, for a survey and 
analysis of local health professionals' career paths to better 
understand entry into and exit from health professions, 
$100,000 shall be for the University of San Diego Institute for 
the Advancement of Health Policy to assess through teaching, 
research and delivery of services the impact of public policy 
on families from vulnerable populations, $200,000 shall be for 
the Luna County, New Mexico and the Columbus Volunteer Fire 
Department to provide emergency medical services to immigrants, 
$350,000 shall be for the Clinical Pharmacy Training Program at 
the University of Hawaii at Hilo, $475,000 shall be for the 
American Federation of Negro Affairs, $500,000 shall be for the 
University of Washington Center for Health Workforce Studies in 
Seattle, Washington, for a demonstration project to collect and 
analyze health workforce data, $800,000 shall be for the 
University of Iowa for the training of Certified Registered 
Nurse Anesthetists, $1,000,000 shall be for the Washington 
Health Foundation for a comprehensive demonstration project on 
improving nurse retention, and $1,100,000 shall be for the Iowa 
Department of Public Health to create a Center for Health Care 
Workforce Shortage: Provided further, That, notwithstanding 
section 502(a)(1) of the Social Security Act, not to exceed 
$115,236,000 is available for carrying out special projects of 
regional and national significance pursuant to section 
501(a)(2) of such Act, of which $50,000 is for the Center for 
Great Expectations, Somerville, New Jersey to provide prenatal 
health care, education and counseling for pregnant teens, 
$565,000 is for the Milwaukee Health Department for a pilot 
program providing health care services to at-risk children in 
day care, and $4,000,000 is for the Columbia Hospital for Women 
Medical Center in Washington, D.C., to support community 
outreach programs for women: Provided further, That $10,000,000 
is available for special projects of regional and national 
significance under section 501(a)(2) of the Social Security 
Act, which shall not be counted toward compliance with the 
allocation required in section 502(a)(1) of such Act, and which 
shall be used only for making competitive grants to provide 
abstinence education (as defined in section 510(b)(2) of such 
Act) to adolescents and for evaluations (including longitudinal 
evaluations) of activities under the grants and for Federal 
costs of administering the grants: Provided further, That 
grants under the immediately preceding proviso shall be made 
only to public and private entities which agree that, with 
respect to an adolescent to whom the entities provide 
abstinence education under such grant, the entities will not 
provide to that adolescent any other education regarding sexual 
conduct, except that, in the case of an entity expressly 
required by law to provide health information or services the 
adolescent shall not be precluded from seeking health 
information or services from the entity in a different setting 
than the setting in which the abstinence education was 
provided: Provided further, That the funds expended for such 
evaluations may not exceed 3.5 percent of such amount.


               health education assistance loans program


    Such sums as may be necessary to carry out the purpose of 
the program, as authorized by title VII of the Public Health 
Service Act, as amended. For administrative expenses to carry 
out the guaranteed loan program, including section 709 of the 
Public Health Service Act, $3,792,000.


             vaccine injury compensation program trust fund


    For payments from the Vaccine Injury Compensation Program 
Trust Fund, such sums as may be necessary for claims associated 
with vaccine-related injury or death with respect to vaccines 
administered after September 30, 1988, pursuant to subtitle 2 
of title XXI of the Public Health Service Act, to remain 
available until expended: Provided, That for necessary 
administrative expenses, not to exceed $2,992,000 shall be 
available from the Trust Fund to the Secretary of Health and 
Human Services.

               Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


                disease control, research, and training


    To carry out titles II, III, VII, XI, XV, XVII, XIX, and 
XXVI of the Public Health Service Act, sections 101, 102, 103, 
201, 202, 203, 301, and 501 of the Federal Mine Safety and 
Health Act of 1977, sections 20, 21, and 22 of the Occupational 
Safety and Health Act of 1970, title IV of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act, and section 501 of the Refugee Education 
Assistance Act of 1980; including insurance of official motor 
vehicles in foreign countries; and hire, maintenance, and 
operation of aircraft, $4,293,151,000, of which $250,000,000 
shall remain available until expended for equipment and 
construction and renovation of facilities, and of which 
$143,763,000 for international HIV/AIDS shall remain available 
until September 30, 2003, and in addition, such sums as may be 
derived from authorized user fees, which shall be credited to 
this account: Provided, That in addition to amounts provided 
herein, up to $23,286,000 shall be available from amounts 
available under section 241 of the Public Health Service Act to 
carry out the National Center for Health Statistics surveys: 
Provided further, That none of the funds made available for 
injury prevention and control at the Centers for Disease 
Control and Prevention may be used to advocate or promote gun 
control: Provided further, That the Director may redirect the 
total amount made available under authority of Public Law 101-
502, section 3, dated November 3, 1990, to activities the 
Director may so designate: Provided further, That the Congress 
is to be notified promptly of any such transfer: Provided 
further, That not to exceed $10,000,000 may be available for 
making grants under section 1509 of the Public Health Service 
Act to not more than 15 States: Provided further, That 
notwithstanding any other provision of law, a single contract 
or related contracts for development and construction of 
facilities may be employed which collectively include the full 
scope of the project: Provided further, That the solicitation 
and contract shall contain the clause ``availability of funds'' 
found at 48 CFR 52.232-18.

                     National Institutes of Health


                       national cancer institute


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to cancer, $4,190,405,000.


               national heart, lung, and blood institute


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to cardiovascular, lung, and 
blood diseases, and blood and blood products, $2,576,125,000.


         national institute of dental and craniofacial research


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to dental disease, 
$343,327,000.


    national institute of diabetes and digestive and kidney diseases


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to diabetes and digestive and 
kidney disease, $1,466,833,000.


        national institute of neurological disorders and stroke


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to neurological disorders and 
stroke, $1,328,188,000.


         national institute of allergy and infectious diseases


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to allergy and infectious 
diseases, $2,372,278,000: Provided, That the Director may 
transfer up to $25,000,000 to International Assistance 
Programs, ``Global Fund to Fight HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and 
Tuberculosis'', to remain available until expended.


             national institute of general medical sciences


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to general medical sciences, 
$1,725,263,000.


        national institute of child health and human development


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to child health and human 
development, $1,113,605,000.


                         national eye institute


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to eye diseases and visual 
disorders, $581,366,000.


          national institute of environmental health sciences


    For carrying out sections 301 and 311 and title IV of the 
Public Health Service Act with respect to environmental health 
sciences, $566,639,000.


                      national institute on aging


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to aging, $893,443,000.


 national institute of arthritis and musculoskeletal and skin diseases


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to arthritis and 
musculoskeletal and skin diseases, $448,865,000.


    national institute on deafness and other communication disorders


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to deafness and other 
communication disorders, $342,072,000.


                 national institute of nursing research


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to nursing research, 
$120,451,000.


           national institute on alcohol abuse and alcoholism


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to alcohol abuse and 
alcoholism, $384,238,000.


                    national institute on drug abuse


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to drug abuse, $888,105,000.


                  national institute of mental health


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to mental health, 
$1,248,626,000.


                national human genome research institute


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to human genome research, 
$429,515,000.


      national institute of biomedical imaging and bioengineering


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to biomedical imaging and 
bioengineering research, $111,984,000.


                 national center for research resources


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to research resources and 
general research support grants, $1,011,594,000: Provided, That 
none of these funds shall be used to pay recipients of the 
general research support grants program any amount for indirect 
expenses in connection with such grants: Provided further, That 
$110,000,000 shall be for extramural facilities construction 
grants, of which $5,000,000 shall be for beginning construction 
of facilities for a Chimp Sanctuary system as authorized in 
Public Law 106-551.


       national center for complementary and alternative medicine


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to complementary and 
alternative medicine, $104,644,000.


       national center on minority health and health disparities


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to minority health and health 
disparities research, $157,812,000.


                  john e. fogarty international center


    For carrying out the activities at the John E. Fogarty 
International Center, $56,940,000.


                      national library of medicine


    For carrying out section 301 and title IV of the Public 
Health Service Act with respect to health information 
communications, $277,658,000, of which $4,000,000 shall be 
available until expended for improvement of information 
systems: Provided, That in fiscal year 2002, the Library may 
enter into personal services contracts for the provision of 
services in facilities owned, operated, or constructed under 
the jurisdiction of the National Institutes of Health.


                         office of the director


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For carrying out the responsibilities of the Office of the 
Director, National Institutes of Health, $235,540,000, of which 
$53,540,000 shall be for the Office of AIDS Research: Provided, 
That funding shall be available for the purchase of not to 
exceed 29 passenger motor vehicles for replacement only: 
Provided further, That the Director may direct up to 1 percent 
of the total amount made available in this or any other Act to 
all National Institutes of Health appropriations to activities 
the Director may so designate: Provided further, That no such 
appropriation shall be decreased by more than 1 percent by any 
such transfers and that the Congress is promptly notified of 
the transfer: Provided further, That the National Institutes of 
Health is authorized to collect third party payments for the 
cost of clinical services that are incurred in National 
Institutes of Health research facilities and that such payments 
shall be credited to the National Institutes of Health 
Management Fund: Provided further, That all funds credited to 
the National Institutes of Health Management Fund shall remain 
available for 1 fiscal year after the fiscal year in which they 
are deposited.


                        buildings and facilities


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For the study of, construction of, and acquisition of 
equipment for, facilities of or used by the National Institutes 
of Health, including the acquisition of real property, 
$309,600,000, to remain available until expended, of which 
$26,000,000 shall be for the John Edward Porter Neuroscience 
Research Center: Provided, That notwithstanding any other 
provision of law, single contracts or related contracts, which 
collectively include the full scope of the project, may be 
employed for the development and construction of the first and 
second phases of the John Edward Porter Neuroscience Research 
Center: Provided further, That the solicitations and contracts 
shall contain the clause ``availability of funds'' found at 48 
CFR 52.232-18: Provided further, That the Director may transfer 
up to $75,000,000 to International Assistance Programs, 
``Global Fund to Fight HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis'', 
to remain available until expended.

       Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration


               substance abuse and mental health services


    For carrying out titles V and XIX of the Public Health 
Service Act with respect to substance abuse and mental health 
services, the Protection and Advocacy for Mentally Ill 
Individuals Act of 1986, and section 301 of the Public Health 
Service Act with respect to program management, $3,138,279,000, 
of which $28,721,000 shall be available for the projects and in 
the amounts specified in the statement of the managers on the 
conference report accompanying this Act.

               Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality


                    healthcare research and quality


    For carrying out titles III and IX of the Public Health 
Service Act, and part A of title XI of the Social Security Act, 
$2,600,000; in addition, amounts received from Freedom of 
Information Act fees, reimbursable and interagency agreements, 
and the sale of data shall be credited to this appropriation 
and shall remain available until expended: Provided, That the 
amount made available pursuant to section 926(b) of the Public 
Health Service Act shall not exceed $296,145,000.

               Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services


                     grants to states for medicaid


    For carrying out, except as otherwise provided, titles XI 
and XIX of the Social Security Act, $106,821,882,000, to remain 
available until expended.
    For making, after May 31, 2002, payments to States under 
title XIX of the Social Security Act for the last quarter of 
fiscal year 2002 for unanticipated costs, incurred for the 
current fiscal year, such sums as may be necessary.
    For making payments to States or in the case of section 
1928 on behalf of States under title XIX of the Social Security 
Act for the first quarter of fiscal year 2003, $46,601,937,000, 
to remain available until expended.
    Payment under title XIX may be made for any quarter with 
respect to a State plan or plan amendment in effect during such 
quarter, if submitted in or prior to such quarter and approved 
in that or any subsequent quarter.


                  payments to health care trust funds


    For payment to the Federal Hospital Insurance and the 
Federal Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust Funds, as 
provided under section 1844 of the Social Security Act, 
sections 103(c) and 111(d) of the Social Security Amendments of 
1965, section 278(d) of Public Law 97-248, and for 
administrative expenses incurred pursuant to section 201(g) of 
the Social Security Act, $81,979,200,000.


                           program management


    For carrying out, except as otherwise provided, titles XI, 
XVIII, XIX, and XXI of the Social Security Act, titles XIII and 
XXVII of the Public Health Service Act, and the Clinical 
Laboratory Improvement Amendments of 1988, not to exceed 
$2,440,798,000, to be transferred from the Federal Hospital 
Insurance and the Federal Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust 
Funds, as authorized by section 201(g) of the Social Security 
Act; together with all funds collected in accordance with 
section 353 of the Public Health Service Act and section 
1857(e)(2) of the Social Security Act, and such sums as may be 
collected from authorized user fees and the sale of data, which 
shall remain available until expended, and together with 
administrative fees collected relative to Medicare overpayment 
recovery activities, which shall remain available until 
expended: Provided, That all funds derived in accordance with 
31 U.S.C. 9701 from organizations established under title XIII 
of the Public Health Service Act shall be credited to and 
available for carrying out the purposes of this appropriation: 
Provided further, That $18,200,000 appropriated under this 
heading for the managed care system redesign shall remain 
available until expended: Provided further, That $100,000 of 
the amount available for research, demonstration, and 
evaluation activities shall be awarded to the Regional Nursing 
Centers Consortium in Philadelphia to initiate a demonstration 
project to evaluate 15 nurse-managed health centers in urban 
and rural areas across Pennsylvania: Provided further, That 
$200,000 of the amount available for research, demonstration, 
and evaluation activities shall be awarded to the Madonna 
Rehabilitation Center in Lincoln, Nebraska to create a new 
standard of rehabilitation practice and program design for 
children and adults with disabilities: Provided further, That 
$250,000 of the amount available for research, demonstration, 
and evaluation activities shall be awarded to the Cook County, 
Illinois Bureau of Health for the Asthma Champion Initiative to 
reduce morbidity and mortality from asthma in high prevalence 
areas: Provided further, That $250,000 of the amount available 
for research, demonstration, and evaluation activities shall be 
awarded to the Illinois Primary Health Care Association to 
implement the Shared Integrated Management Information System 
providing centralized case management, reimbursement and 
administrative support services: Provided further, That 
$500,000 of the amount available for research, demonstration, 
and evaluation activities shall be awarded to Project Access in 
Muskegon, Michigan to offer affordable insurance to uninsured 
workers, primarily in small business, and low-income 
individuals: Provided further, That $590,000 of the amount 
available for research, demonstration, and evaluation 
activities shall be awarded to Santa Clara County, California, 
for the outreach and application assistance aspects of its 
Children's Health Initiative, to demonstrate means of expanding 
enrollment of eligible children in Medicaid, SCHIP and other 
available health care programs: Provided further, That $800,000 
of the amount available for research, demonstration, and 
evaluation activities shall be awarded to the Fishing 
Partnership Health Plan, based in Boston, Massachusetts, for a 
demonstration project on the efficacy of using a community-
based health benefit program to provide health care coverage 
for lower-income independently employed workers and their 
families: Provided further, That $800,000 of the amount 
available for research, demonstration, and evaluation 
activities shall be awarded to the Mind-Body Institute of 
Boston, Massachusetts to continue and expand a demonstration 
project: Provided further, That $900,000 of the amount 
available for research, demonstration, and evaluation 
activities shall be awarded to the Children's Hospice 
International demonstration program to provide a continuum of 
care for children with life-threatening conditions and their 
families: Provided further, That $1,500,000 of the amount 
available for research, demonstration, and evaluation 
activities shall be awarded to the Iowa Department of Public 
Health for the continuation of a prescription drug cooperative 
demonstration: Provided further, That $2,000,000 of the amount 
available for research, demonstration, and evaluation 
activities shall be awarded to the AIDS Healthcare Foundation 
in Los Angeles for a demonstration of residential and 
outpatient treatment facilities: Provided further, That the 
Secretary of Health and Human Services is directed to collect 
fees in fiscal year 2002 from Medicare+Choice organizations 
pursuant to section 1857(e)(2) of the Social Security Act and 
from eligible organizations with risk-sharing contracts under 
section 1876 of that Act pursuant to section 1876(k)(4)(D) of 
that Act.


      health maintenance organization loan and loan guarantee fund


    For carrying out subsections (d) and (e) of section 1308 of 
the Public Health Service Act, any amounts received by the 
Secretary in connection with loans and loan guarantees under 
title XIII of the Public Health Service Act, to be available 
without fiscal year limitation for the payment of outstanding 
obligations. During fiscal year 2002, no commitments for direct 
loans or loan guarantees shall be made.

                Administration for Children and Families


  payments to states for child support enforcement and family support 
                                programs


    For making payments to States or other non-Federal entities 
under titles I, IV-D, X, XI, XIV, and XVI of the Social 
Security Act and the Act of July 5, 1960 (24 U.S.C. ch. 9), 
$2,447,800,000, to remain available until expended; and for 
such purposes for the first quarter of fiscal year 2003, 
$1,100,000,000, to remain available until expended.
    For making payments to each State for carrying out the 
program of Aid to Families with Dependent Children under title 
IV-A of the Social Security Act before the effective date of 
the program of Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) 
with respect to such State, such sums as may be necessary: 
Provided, That the sum of the amounts available to a State with 
respect to expenditures under such title IV-A in fiscal year 
1997 under this appropriation and under such title IV-A as 
amended by the Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity 
Reconciliation Act of 1996 shall not exceed the limitations 
under section 116(b) of such Act.
    For making, after May 31 of the current fiscal year, 
payments to States or other non-Federal entities under titles 
I, IV-D, X, XI, XIV, and XVI of the Social Security Act and the 
Act of July 5, 1960 (24 U.S.C. ch. 9), for the last 3 months of 
the current fiscal year for unanticipated costs, incurred for 
the current fiscal year, such sums as may be necessary.


                   low income home energy assistance


    For making payments under title XXVI of the Omnibus Budget 
Reconciliation Act of 1981, $1,700,000,000.
    For making payments under title XXVI of the Omnibus Budget 
Reconciliation Act of 1981, $300,000,000: Provided, That these 
funds are for the unanticipated home energy assistance needs of 
one or more States, as authorized by section 2604(e) of the 
Act: Provided further, That these funds are hereby designated 
by Congress to be emergency requirements pursuant to section 
251(b)(2)(A) of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985: Provided further, That these funds shall 
be made available only after submission to Congress of an 
official budget request by the President that includes 
designation of the entire amount of the request as an emergency 
requirement as defined in the Balanced Budget and Emergency 
Deficit Control Act of 1985.


                     refugee and entrant assistance


    For making payments for refugee and entrant assistance 
activities authorized by title IV of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act and section 501 of the Refugee Education 
Assistance Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-422), $450,203,000: 
Provided, That funds appropriated pursuant to section 414(a) of 
the Immigration and Nationality Act for fiscal year 2002 shall 
be available for the costs of assistance provided and other 
activities through September 30, 2004: Provided further, That 
up to $10,000,000 is available to carry out the Trafficking 
Victims Protection Act of 2000.
    For carrying out section 5 of the Torture Victims Relief 
Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-320), $10,000,000.


   payments to states for the child care and development block grant


    For carrying out sections 658A through 658R of the Omnibus 
Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981 (The Child Care and 
Development Block Grant Act of 1990), $2,099,994,000 shall be 
used to supplement, not supplant state general revenue funds 
for child care assistance for low-income families: Provided, 
That $19,120,000 shall be available for child care resource and 
referral and school-aged child care activities, of which 
$1,000,000 shall be for the Child Care Aware toll free hotline: 
Provided further, That, in addition to the amounts required to 
be reserved by the States under section 658G, $272,672,000 
shall be reserved by the States for activities authorized under 
section 658G, of which $100,000,000 shall be for activities 
that improve the quality of infant and toddler care: Provided 
further, That $10,000,000 shall be for use by the Secretary for 
child care research, demonstration, and evaluation activities.


                      social services block grant


    For making grants to States pursuant to section 2002 of the 
Social Security Act, $1,700,000,000: Provided, That 
notwithstanding subparagraph (B) of section 404(d)(2) of such 
Act, the applicable percent specified under such subparagraph 
for a State to carry out State programs pursuant to title XX of 
such Act shall be 10 percent.


                children and families services programs


                        (including rescissions)


    For carrying out, except as otherwise provided, the Runaway 
and Homeless Youth Act, the Developmental Disabilities 
Assistance and Bill of Rights Act, the Head Start Act, the 
Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act, sections 310 and 316 
of the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act, as amended, 
the Native American Programs Act of 1974, title II of Public 
Law 95-266 (adoption opportunities), the Adoption and Safe 
Families Act of 1997 (Public Law 105-89), sections 1201 and 
1211 of the Children's Health Act of 2000, the Abandoned 
Infants Assistance Act of 1988, the Early Learning 
Opportunities Act, part B(1) of title IV and sections 413, 
429A, 1110, and 1115 of the Social Security Act, and sections 
40155, 40211, and 40241 of Public Law 103-322; for making 
payments under the Community Services Block Grant Act, section 
473A of the Social Security Act, and title IV of Public Law 
105-285, and for necessary administrative expenses to carry out 
said Acts and titles I, IV, X, XI, XIV, XVI, and XX of the 
Social Security Act, the Act of July 5, 1960 (24 U.S.C. ch. 9), 
the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981, title IV of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act, section 501 of the Refugee 
Education Assistance Act of 1980, section 5 of the Torture 
Victims Relief Act of 1998 (Public Law 105-320), sections 
40155, 40211, and 40241 of Public Law 103-322, sections 310 and 
316 of the Family Violence Prevention and Services Act, as 
amended, and section 126 and titles IV and V of Public Law 100-
485, $8,429,183,000, of which $43,000,000, to remain available 
until September 30, 2003, shall be for grants to States for 
adoption incentive payments, as authorized by section 473A of 
title IV of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 670-679) and may 
be made for adoptions completed in fiscal years 2000 and 2001; 
of which $738,821,000 shall be for making payments under the 
Community Services Block Grant Act; and of which $6,537,906,000 
shall be for making payments under the Head Start Act, of which 
$1,400,000,000 shall become available October 1, 2002 and 
remain available through September 30, 2003: Provided, That to 
the extent Community Services Block Grant funds are distributed 
as grant funds by a State to an eligible entity as provided 
under the Act, and have not been expended by such entity, they 
shall remain with such entity for carryover into the next 
fiscal year for expenditure by such entity consistent with 
program purposes: Provided further, That all eligible entities 
currently in good standing in the Community Services Block 
Grant program shall receive an increase in funding 
proportionate to the increase provided in this Act for the 
Community Services Block Grant: Provided further, That 
$88,133,000 shall be for activities authorized by the Runaway 
and Homeless Youth Act, notwithstanding the allocation 
requirements of section 388(a) of such Act, of which 
$39,739,900 is for the transitional living program: Provided 
further, That $30,000,000 is for a compassion capital fund to 
provide grants to charitable organizations to emulate model 
social service programs and to encourage research on the best 
practices of social service organizations: Provided further, 
That the Secretary shall establish procedures regarding the 
disposition of intangible property which permits grant funds, 
or intangible assets acquired with funds authorized under 
section 680 of the Community Services Block Grant Act, as 
amended, to become the sole property of such grantees after a 
period of not more than 12 years after the end of the grant for 
purposes and uses consistent with the original grant: Provided 
further, That funds appropriated for section 680(a)(2) of the 
Community Services Block Grant Act, as amended, shall be 
available for financing construction and rehabilitation and 
loans or investments in private business enterprises owned by 
community development corporations.
    Funds appropriated for fiscal year 2002 under section 
429A(e), part B of title IV of the Social Security Act shall be 
reduced by $6,000,000.
    Funds appropriated for fiscal year 2002 under section 
413(h)(1) of the Social Security Act shall be reduced by 
$15,000,000.


                   promoting safe and stable families


    For carrying out subpart 2 of part B of title IV of the 
Social Security Act, $305,000,000. In addition, for such 
purposes, $70,000,000 to carry out such subpart.


       payments to states for foster care and adoption assistance


    For making payments to States or other non-Federal entities 
under title IV-E of the Social Security Act, $4,885,600,000.
    For making payments to States or other non-Federal entities 
under title IV-E of the Social Security Act, for the first 
quarter of fiscal year 2003, $1,754,000,000.

                        Administration on Aging


                        aging services programs


    For carrying out, to the extent not otherwise provided, the 
Older Americans Act of 1965, as amended, and section 398 of the 
Public Health Service Act, $1,199,814,000, of which $5,000,000 
shall be available for activities regarding medication 
management, screening, and education to prevent incorrect 
medication and adverse drug reactions.

                        Office of the Secretary


                    general departmental management


    For necessary expenses, not otherwise provided, for general 
departmental management, including hire of six sedans, and for 
carrying out titles III, XVII, and XX of the Public Health 
Service Act, and the United States-Mexico Border Health 
Commission Act, $341,703,000, together with $5,851,000, to be 
transferred and expended as authorized by section 201(g)(1) of 
the Social Security Act from the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund 
and the Supplemental Medical Insurance Trust Fund: Provided, 
That of the funds made available under this heading for 
carrying out title XX of the Public Health Service Act, 
$11,885,000 shall be for activities specified under section 
2003(b)(2), of which $10,157,000 shall be for prevention 
service demonstration grants under section 510(b)(2) of title V 
of the Social Security Act, as amended, without application of 
the limitation of section 2010(c) of said title XX: Provided 
further, That of this amount, $50,000,000 is for minority AIDS 
prevention and treatment activities; and $21,998,000 shall be 
for an Information Technology Security and Innovation Fund for 
Department-wide activities involving cybersecurity, information 
technology security, and related innovation projects.


                      office of inspector general


    For expenses necessary for the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act of 
1978, as amended, $35,786,000: Provided, That, of such amount, 
necessary sums are available for providing protective services 
to the Secretary and investigating non-payment of child support 
cases for which non-payment is a Federal offense under 18 
U.S.C. section 228.


                        office for civil rights


    For expenses necessary for the Office for Civil Rights, 
$28,691,000, together with not to exceed $3,314,000, to be 
transferred and expended as authorized by section 201(g)(1) of 
the Social Security Act from the Hospital Insurance Trust Fund 
and the Supplemental Medical Insurance Trust Fund.


                            policy research


    For carrying out, to the extent not otherwise provided, 
research studies under section 1110 of the Social Security Act 
and title III of the Public Health Service Act, $2,500,000: 
Provided, That in addition to amounts provided herein, funds 
from amounts available under section 241 of the Public Health 
Service Act may be used to carry out national health or human 
services research and evaluation activities: Provided further, 
That the expenditure of any funds available under section 241 
of the Public Health Service Act are subject to the 
requirements of section 205 of this Act.


     retirement pay and medical benefits for commissioned officers


    For retirement pay and medical benefits of Public Health 
Service Commissioned Officers as authorized by law, for 
payments under the Retired Serviceman's Family Protection Plan 
and Survivor Benefit Plan, for medical care of dependents and 
retired personnel under the Dependents' Medical Care Act (10 
U.S.C. ch. 55), and for payments pursuant to section 229(b) of 
the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 429(b)), such amounts as may 
be required during the current fiscal year.


            public health and social services emergency fund


    For expenses necessary to support activities related to 
countering potential biological, disease and chemical threats 
to civilian populations, $242,949,000: Provided, That this 
amount is distributed as follows: Centers for Disease Control 
and Prevention, $181,919,000, of which $52,000,000 shall remain 
available until expended for the National Pharmaceutical 
Stockpile; and Office of Emergency Preparedness, $61,030,000.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 201. Funds appropriated in this title shall be 
available for not to exceed $37,000 for official reception and 
representation expenses when specifically approved by the 
Secretary.
    Sec. 202. The Secretary shall make available through 
assignment not more than 60 employees of the Public Health 
Service to assist in child survival activities and to work in 
AIDS programs through and with funds provided by the Agency for 
International Development, the United Nations International 
Children's Emergency Fund or the World Health Organization.
    Sec. 203. None of the funds appropriated under this Act may 
be used to implement section 399L(b) of the Public Health 
Service Act or section 1503 of the National Institutes of 
Health Revitalization Act of 1993, Public Law 103-43.
    Sec. 204. None of the funds appropriated in this Act for 
the National Institutes of Health, the Agency for Healthcare 
Research and Quality, and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health 
Services Administration shall be used to pay the salary of an 
individual, through a grant or other extramural mechanism, at a 
rate in excess of Executive Level I.
    Sec. 205. None of the funds appropriated in this Act may be 
expended pursuant to section 241 of the Public Health Service 
Act, except for funds specifically provided for in this Act, or 
for other taps and assessments made by any office located in 
the Department of Health and Human Services, prior to the 
Secretary's preparation and submission of a report to the 
Committee on Appropriations of the Senate and of the House 
detailing the planned uses of such funds.
    Sec. 206. Notwithstanding section 241(a) of the Public 
Health Service Act, such portion as the Secretary shall 
determine, but not more than 1.25 percent, of any amounts 
appropriated for programs authorized under said Act shall be 
made available for the evaluation (directly, or by grants or 
contracts) of the implementation and effectiveness of such 
programs.


                          (transfer of funds)


    Sec. 207. Not to exceed 1 percent of any discretionary 
funds (pursuant to the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985, as amended) which are appropriated for the 
current fiscal year for the Department of Health and Human 
Services in this Act may be transferred between appropriations, 
but no such appropriation shall be increased by more than 3 
percent by any such transfer: Provided, That an appropriation 
may be increased by up to an additional 2 percent subject to 
approval by the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations: 
Provided further, That the Appropriations Committees of both 
Houses of Congress are notified at least 15 days in advance of 
any transfer.
    Sec. 208. The Director of the National Institutes of 
Health, jointly with the Director of the Office of AIDS 
Research, may transfer up to 3 percent among institutes, 
centers, and divisions from the total amounts identified by 
these two Directors as funding for research pertaining to the 
human immunodeficiency virus: Provided, That the Congress is 
promptly notified of the transfer.
    Sec. 209. Of the amounts made available in this Act for the 
National Institutes of Health, the amount for research related 
to the human immunodeficiency virus, as jointly determined by 
the Director of the National Institutes of Health and the 
Director of the Office of AIDS Research, shall be made 
available to the ``Office of AIDS Research'' account. The 
Director of the Office of AIDS Research shall transfer from 
such account amounts necessary to carry out section 2353(d)(3) 
of the Public Health Service Act.
    Sec. 210. None of the funds appropriated in this Act may be 
made available to any entity under title X of the Public Health 
Service Act unless the applicant for the award certifies to the 
Secretary that it encourages family participation in the 
decision of minors to seek family planning services and that it 
provides counseling to minors on how to resist attempts to 
coerce minors into engaging in sexual activities.
    Sec. 211. None of the funds appropriated by this Act 
(including funds appropriated to any trust fund) may be used to 
carry out the Medicare+Choice program if the Secretary denies 
participation in such program to an otherwise eligible entity 
(including a Provider Sponsored Organization) because the 
entity informs the Secretary that it will not provide, pay for, 
provide coverage of, or provide referrals for abortions: 
Provided, That the Secretary shall make appropriate prospective 
adjustments to the capitation payment to such an entity (based 
on an actuarially sound estimate of the expected costs of 
providing the service to such entity's enrollees): Provided 
further, That nothing in this section shall be construed to 
change the Medicare program's coverage for such services and a 
Medicare+Choice organization described in this section shall be 
responsible for informing enrollees where to obtain information 
about all Medicare covered services.
    Sec. 212. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, no 
provider of services under title X of the Public Health Service 
Act shall be exempt from any State law requiring notification 
or the reporting of child abuse, child molestation, sexual 
abuse, rape, or incest.
    Sec. 213. The Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and 
Related Programs Appropriations Act, 1990 (Public Law 101-167) 
is amended--
            (1) in section 599D (8 U.S.C. 1157 note)--
                    (A) in subsection (b)(3), by striking 
                ``1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001'' and 
                inserting ``1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, and 
                2002''; and
                    (B) in subsection (e), by striking 
                ``October 1, 2001'' each place it appears and 
                inserting ``October 1, 2002''; and
            (2) in section 599E (8 U.S.C. 1255 note) in 
        subsection (b)(2), by striking ``September 30, 2001'' 
        and inserting ``September 30, 2002''.
    Sec. 214. (a) Except as provided by subsection (e) none of 
the funds appropriated by this Act may be used to withhold 
substance abuse funding from a State pursuant to section 1926 
of the Public Health Service Act (42 U.S.C. 300x-26) if such 
State certifies to the Secretary of Health and Human Services 
by May 1, 2002 that the State will commit additional State 
funds, in accordance with subsection (b), to ensure compliance 
with State laws prohibiting the sale of tobacco products to 
individuals under 18 years of age.
    (b) The amount of funds to be committed by a State under 
subsection (a) shall be equal to 1 percent of such State's 
substance abuse block grant allocation for each percentage 
point by which the State misses the retailer compliance rate 
goal established by the Secretary of Health and Human Services 
under section 1926 of such Act.
    (c) The State is to maintain State expenditures in fiscal 
year 2002 for tobacco prevention programs and for compliance 
activities at a level that is not less than the level of such 
expenditures maintained by the State for fiscal year 2001, and 
adding to that level the additional funds for tobacco 
compliance activities required under subsection (a). The State 
is to submit a report to the Secretary on all fiscal year 2001 
State expenditures and all fiscal year 2002 obligations for 
tobacco prevention and compliance activities by program 
activity by July 31, 2002.
    (d) The Secretary shall exercise discretion in enforcing 
the timing of the State obligation of the additional funds 
required by the certification described in subsection (a) as 
late as July 31, 2002.
    (e) None of the funds appropriated by this Act may be used 
to withhold substance abuse funding pursuant to section 1926 
from a territory that receives less than $1,000,000.
    Sec. 215. In order for the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention to carry out international health activities, 
including HIV/AIDS and other infectious disease, chronic and 
environmental disease, and other health activities abroad 
during fiscal year 2002, the Secretary of Health and Human 
Services is authorized to--
            (1) utilize the authorities contained in subsection 
        2(c) of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
        1956, as amended, and
            (2) utilize the authorities contained in 22 U.S.C. 
        sections 291 and 292 and directly or through contract 
        or cooperative agreement to lease, alter or renovate 
        facilities in foreign countries, to carry out programs 
        supported by this appropriation notwithstanding PHS Act 
        section 307.
    In exercising the authority set forth in (1) and (2), the 
Secretary of Health and Human Services shall consult with the 
Department of State to assure that planned activities are 
within the legal strictures of the State Department Basic 
Authorities Act of 1956, as amended, and other applicable parts 
of U.S.C. Title 22.
    Sec. 216. The Division of Federal Occupational Health may 
utilize personal services contracting to employ professional 
management/administrative and occupational health 
professionals.
    Sec. 217. Notwithstanding any other provision of law 
relating to vacancies in offices for which appointments must be 
made by the President, including any time limitation on serving 
in an acting capacity, the Acting Director of the National 
Institutes of Health as of January 12, 2000, may serve in that 
position until a new Director of the National Institutes of 
Health is confirmed by the Senate.
    Sec. 218. Section 582 of the Public Health Service Act (42 
U.S.C. 290hh-1(f)) is amended by adding at the end the 
following:
    ``(g) Short Title.--This section may be cited as the 
`Donald J. Cohen National Child Traumatic Stress 
Initiative'.''.
    This title may be cited as the ``Department of Health and 
Human Services Appropriations Act, 2002''.

                   TITLE III--DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION


                    education for the disadvantaged


    For carrying out title I of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act of 1965 (``ESEA'') and section 418A of the Higher 
Education Act of 1965, $12,346,900,000, of which $4,777,199,000 
shall become available on July 1, 2002, and shall remain 
available through September 30, 2003, and of which 
$7,383,301,000 shall become available on October 1, 2002, and 
shall remain available through September 30, 2003, for academic 
year 2002-2003: Provided, That $235,000,000 shall be available 
for comprehensive school reform grants under part F of the 
ESEA: Provided further, That $15,000,000 of the amount 
appropriated for title I, part B, subpart 1 shall become 
available October 1, 2001, and shall remain available through 
September 30, 2003, for evaluation and technical assistance: 
Provided further, That the funds provided for title I, part B, 
subpart 2 shall become available October 1, 2001, and shall 
remain available through September 30, 2003: Provided further, 
That $7,172,971,000 shall be available for basic grants under 
section 1124: Provided further, That up to $3,500,000 of these 
funds shall be available to the Secretary of Education on 
October 1, 2001, to obtain updated educational-agency-level 
census poverty data from the Bureau of the Census: Provided 
further, That $1,365,031,000 shall be available for 
concentration grants under section 1124A: Provided further, 
That $1,018,499,000 shall be available for targeted grants 
under section 1125: Provided further, That $793,499,000 shall 
be available for education finance incentive grants under 
section 1125A.


                               impact aid


    For carrying out programs of financial assistance to 
federally affected schools authorized by title VIII of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965, $1,143,500,000, 
of which $982,500,000 shall be for basic support payments under 
section 8003(b), $50,000,000 shall be for payments for children 
with disabilities under section 8003(d), $48,000,000 shall be 
for construction under section 8007 and shall remain available 
through September 30, 2003, $55,000,000 shall be for Federal 
property payments under section 8002, and $8,000,000, to remain 
available until expended, shall be for facilities maintenance 
under section 8008: Provided, That $3,000,000 of the funds for 
section 8007 shall be available for the local educational 
agencies and in the amounts specified in the statement of the 
managers on the conference report accompanying this Act.


                      school improvement programs


    For carrying out school improvement activities authorized 
by titles II, IV, V, VI, and parts B and C of title VII of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965; part B of title 
II of the Higher Education Act; the McKinney-Vento Homeless 
Assistance Act; and the Civil Rights Act of 1964, 
$7,827,473,000, of which $1,717,609,000 shall become available 
October 1, 2001, and shall remain available through September 
30, 2003, of which $2,801,597,000 shall become available on 
July 1, 2002, and remain available through September 30, 2003, 
and of which $1,765,000,000 shall become available on October 
1, 2002, and shall remain available through September 30, 2003, 
for academic year 2002-2003: Provided, That $75,000,000 for 
continuing and new grants to demonstrate effective approaches 
to comprehensive school reform shall be allocated and expended 
in the same manner as the funds provided under the Fund for the 
Improvement of Education for this purpose were allocated and 
expended in fiscal year 2001: Provided further, That 
$142,189,000 shall be available to support the activities 
authorized under subpart 4 of part D of title V of the ESEA, of 
which up to 5 percent shall become available on October 1, 
2001, for evaluation, technical assistance, school networking, 
peer review of applications, and program outreach activities 
and of which not less than 95 percent shall become available on 
July 1, 2002, and remain available through September 30, 2003, 
for grants to local educational agencies: Provided further, 
That funds made available to local educational agencies under 
this subpart shall be used only for activities related to 
establishing smaller learning communities in high schools: 
Provided further, That of the amount made available for subpart 
3, part C, of title II of the ESEA, $2,000,000 shall be used by 
the Center for Civic Education to implement a comprehensive 
program to improve public knowledge, understanding, and support 
of the Congress and the state legislatures: Provided further, 
That $269,906,000 of the funds for subpart 1, part D of title V 
of the ESEA shall be available for the projects and in the 
amounts specified in the statement of the managers on the 
conference report accompanying this Act.


                            indian education


    For expenses necessary to carry out, to the extent not 
otherwise provided, title VII, part A of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act of 1965, $120,368,000.


                   bilingual and immigrant education


    For carrying out title III, part A of the ESEA, 
$665,000,000, of which $415,000,000 shall become available on 
July 1, 2002, and shall remain available through September 30, 
2003.


                           special education


    For carrying out the Individuals with Disabilities 
Education Act, $8,672,804,000, of which $3,315,233,000 shall 
become available for obligation on July 1, 2002, and shall 
remain available through September 30, 2003, and of which 
$5,072,000,000 shall become available on October 1, 2002, and 
shall remain available through September 30, 2003, for academic 
year 2002-2003: Provided, That $9,500,000 shall be for 
Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic to support the 
development, production, and circulation of recorded 
educational materials: Provided further, That $1,500,000 shall 
be for the recipient of funds provided by Public Law 105-78 
under section 687(b)(2)(G) of the Act to provide information on 
diagnosis, intervention, and teaching strategies for children 
with disabilities: Provided further, That the amount for 
section 611(c) of the Act shall be equal to the amount 
available for that section under Public Law 106-554, increased 
by the amount of inflation as specified in section 
611(f)(1)(B)(ii) of the Act: Provided further, That $8,380,000 
of the funds for section 672 of the Act shall be available for 
the projects and in the amounts specified in the statement of 
the managers on the conference report accompanying this Act.


            rehabilitation services and disability research


    For carrying out, to the extent not otherwise provided, the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973, the Assistive Technology Act of 
1998, and the Helen Keller National Center Act, $2,945,813,000, 
of which $56,552,000 shall remain available through September 
30, 2003: Provided, That the funds provided for title I of the 
Assistive Technology Act of 1998 (``the AT Act'') shall be 
allocated notwithstanding section 105(b)(1) of the AT Act: 
Provided further, That in the case of a State that was in the 
third year of a 3-year extension grant made pursuant to section 
101(f) of the Assistive Technology Act of 1998 for fiscal year 
2001, the Secretary of Education shall award under such section 
an additional 1-year extension of the grant to such State for 
fiscal year 2002 in an amount equal to the amount the State 
received under such section for fiscal year 2001: Provided 
further, That each State shall be provided $50,000 for 
activities under section 102 of the AT Act: Provided further, 
That $36,552,000 shall be used to support grants for up to 3 
years to States under title III of the AT Act, of which the 
Federal share shall not exceed 75 percent in the first year, 50 
percent in the second year, and 25 percent in the third year, 
and that the requirements in section 301(c)(2) and section 302 
of that Act shall not apply to such grants: Provided further, 
That $3,746,000 of the funds for section 303 of the 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973 shall be available for the projects 
and in the amounts specified in the statement of the managers 
on the conference report accompanying this Act.

           Special Institutions for Persons With Disabilities


                 american printing house for the blind


    For carrying out the Act of March 3, 1879, as amended (20 
U.S.C. 101 et seq.), $14,000,000.


               national technical institute for the deaf


    For the National Technical Institute for the Deaf under 
titles I and II of the Education of the Deaf Act of 1986 (20 
U.S.C. 4301 et seq.), $55,376,000, of which $5,376,000 shall be 
for construction and shall remain available until expended: 
Provided, That from the total amount available, the Institute 
may at its discretion use funds for the endowment program as 
authorized under section 207.


                          gallaudet university


    For the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School, the Model 
Secondary School for the Deaf, and the partial support of 
Gallaudet University under titles I and II of the Education of 
the Deaf Act of 1986 (20 U.S.C. 4301 et seq.), $96,938,000: 
Provided, That from the total amount available, the University 
may at its discretion use funds for the endowment program as 
authorized under section 207.


                     vocational and adult education


    For carrying out, to the extent not otherwise provided, the 
Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education 
Act, the Adult Education and Family Literacy Act, and title 
VIII-D of the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, and 
Public Law 102-73, $1,934,060,000, of which $1,136,560,000 
shall become available on July 1, 2002 and shall remain 
available through September 30, 2003 and of which $791,000,000 
shall become available on October 1, 2002 and shall remain 
available through September 30, 2003: Provided, That of the 
amounts made available for the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and 
Applied Technology Education Act, $6,500,000 shall be for 
tribally controlled postsecondary vocational and technical 
institutions under section 117: Provided further, That 
notwithstanding any other provision of law or any regulation, 
the Secretary of Education shall not require the use of a 
restricted indirect cost rate for grants issued pursuant to 
section 117 of the Carl D. Perkins Vocational and Applied 
Technology Education Act: Provided further, That $9,500,000 
shall be for carrying out section 118 of such Act: Provided 
further, That of the amounts made available for the Carl D. 
Perkins Vocational and Applied Technology Education Act, 
$5,000,000 shall be for demonstration activities authorized by 
section 207: Provided further, That of the amount provided for 
Adult Education State Grants, $70,000,000 shall be made 
available for integrated English literacy and civics education 
services to immigrants and other limited English proficient 
populations: Provided further, That of the amount reserved for 
integrated English literacy and civics education, 
notwithstanding section 211 of the Adult Education and Family 
Literacy Act, 65 percent shall be allocated to States based on 
a State's absolute need as determined by calculating each 
State's share of a 10-year average of the Immigration and 
Naturalization Service data for immigrants admitted for legal 
permanent residence for the 10 most recent years, and 35 
percent allocated to States that experienced growth as measured 
by the average of the 3 most recent years for which Immigration 
and Naturalization Service data for immigrants admitted for 
legal permanent residence are available, except that no State 
shall be allocated an amount less than $60,000: Provided 
further, That of the amounts made available for the Adult 
Education and Family Literacy Act, $9,500,000 shall be for 
national leadership activities under section 243 and $6,560,000 
shall be for the National Institute for Literacy under section 
242: Provided further, That $22,000,000 shall be for Youth 
Offender Grants, of which $5,000,000 shall be used in 
accordance with section 601 of Public Law 102-73 as that 
section was in effect prior to the enactment of Public Law 105-
220.


                      student financial assistance


    For carrying out subparts 1, 3 and 4 of part A, section 
428K, part C and part E of title IV of the Higher Education Act 
of 1965, as amended, $12,285,500,000, which shall remain 
available through September 30, 2003.
    The maximum Pell Grant for which a student shall be 
eligible during award year 2002-2003 shall be $4,000.


             federal family education loan program account


    For Federal administrative expenses to carry out guaranteed 
student loans authorized by title IV, part B, of the Higher 
Education Act of 1965, as amended, $49,636,000.


                            higher education


    For carrying out, to the extent not otherwise provided, 
section 121 and titles II, III, IV, V, VI, and VII of the 
Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended, section 1543 of the 
Higher Education Amendments of 1992, title VIII of the Higher 
Education Amendments of 1998, and the Mutual Educational and 
Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, $2,031,048,000, of which 
$5,000,000 for interest subsidies authorized by section 121 of 
the Higher Education Act of 1965, shall remain available until 
expended: Provided, That $10,000,000, to remain available 
through September 30, 2003, shall be available to fund 
fellowships for academic year 2003-2004 under part A, subpart 1 
of title VII of said Act, under the terms and conditions of 
part A, subpart 1: Provided further, That $1,000,000 is for 
data collection and evaluation activities for programs under 
the Higher Education Act of 1965, including such activities 
needed to comply with the Government Performance and Results 
Act of 1993: Provided further, That $17,500,000 shall be 
available for tribally controlled colleges and universities 
under section 316 of the Higher Education Act of 1965: Provided 
further, That notwithstanding any other provision of law, funds 
made available in this Act to carry out title VI of the Higher 
Education Act of 1965, as amended, and section 102(b)(6) of the 
Mutual Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961 may be 
used to support visits and study in foreign countries by 
individuals who are participating in advanced foreign language 
training and international studies in areas that are vital to 
United States national security and who plan to apply their 
language skills and knowledge of these countries in the fields 
of government, the professions, or international development: 
Provided further, That up to one percent of the funds referred 
to in the preceding proviso may be used for program evaluation, 
national outreach, and information dissemination activities: 
Provided further, That $149,722,000 of the funds for part B of 
title VII of the Higher Education Act of 1965 shall be 
available for the projects and in the amounts specified in the 
statement of the managers on the conference report accompanying 
this Act.


                           howard university


    For partial support of Howard University (20 U.S.C. 121 et 
seq.), $237,474,000, of which not less than $3,600,000 shall be 
for a matching endowment grant pursuant to the Howard 
University Endowment Act (Public Law 98-480) and shall remain 
available until expended.


         college housing and academic facilities loans program


    For Federal administrative expenses authorized under 
section 121 of the Higher Education Act of 1965, $762,000 to 
carry out activities related to existing facility loans entered 
into under the Higher Education Act of 1965.


  historically black college and university capital financing program 
                                account


    The total amount of bonds insured pursuant to section 344 
of title III, part D of the Higher Education Act of 1965 shall 
not exceed $357,000,000, and the cost, as defined in section 
502 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974, of such bonds 
shall not exceed zero.
    For administrative expenses to carry out the Historically 
Black College and University Capital Financing Program entered 
into pursuant to title III, part D of the Higher Education Act 
of 1965, as amended, $208,000.


             education research, statistics, and assessment


    For carrying out activities authorized by the Educational 
Research, Development, Dissemination, and Improvement Act of 
1994, including part E; the National Education Statistics Act 
of 1994, including sections 411 and 412; section 4 of the No 
Child Left Behind Act of 2001; and title VI, part A of the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act, $443,870,000: Provided, 
That $58,000,000 of the amount available for the national 
education research institutes shall be allocated 
notwithstanding section 912(m)(1)(B-F) and subparagraphs (B) 
and (C) of section 931(c)(2) of Public Law 103-227.

                        Departmental Management


                         program administration


    For carrying out, to the extent not otherwise provided, the 
Department of Education Organization Act, including rental of 
conference rooms in the District of Columbia and hire of two 
passenger motor vehicles, $424,212,000.


                        office for civil rights


    For expenses necessary for the Office for Civil Rights, as 
authorized by section 203 of the Department of Education 
Organization Act, $79,934,000.


                    office of the inspector general


    For expenses necessary for the Office of the Inspector 
General, as authorized by section 212 of the Department of 
Education Organization Act, $38,720,000.

                           GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 301. No funds appropriated in this Act may be used for 
the transportation of students or teachers (or for the purchase 
of equipment for such transportation) in order to overcome 
racial imbalance in any school or school system, or for the 
transportation of students or teachers (or for the purchase of 
equipment for such transportation) in order to carry out a plan 
of racial desegregation of any school or school system.
    Sec. 302. None of the funds contained in this Act shall be 
used to require, directly or indirectly, the transportation of 
any student to a school other than the school which is nearest 
the student's home, except for a student requiring special 
education, to the school offering such special education, in 
order to comply with title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. 
For the purpose of this section an indirect requirement of 
transportation of students includes the transportation of 
students to carry out a plan involving the reorganization of 
the grade structure of schools, the pairing of schools, or the 
clustering of schools, or any combination of grade 
restructuring, pairing or clustering. The prohibition described 
in this section does not include the establishment of magnet 
schools.
    Sec. 303. No funds appropriated under this Act may be used 
to prevent the implementation of programs of voluntary prayer 
and meditation in the public schools.


                          (transfer of funds)


    Sec. 304. Not to exceed 1 percent of any discretionary 
funds (pursuant to the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit 
Control Act of 1985, as amended) which are appropriated for the 
Department of Education in this Act may be transferred between 
appropriations, but no such appropriation shall be increased by 
more than 3 percent by any such transfer: Provided, That the 
Appropriations Committees of both Houses of Congress are 
notified at least 15 days in advance of any transfer.
    Sec. 305. (a) Section 1543(a) of the Higher Education 
Amendments of 1992 (20 U.S.C. 1070 note) is amended by striking 
paragraph (2) and inserting the following:
            ``(2) Award determination.--The amount of the 
        financial assistance provided to an athlete described 
        in paragraph (1) shall be determined in accordance with 
        criteria, and in amounts, specified in the application 
        of the center under subsection (c). Such assistance 
        shall not exceed the athlete's cost of attendance as 
        determined under section 472 of the Higher Education 
        Act of 1965 (20 U.S.C. 1087ll).
            ``(3) Information on distribution of assistance.--
        Each center providing such assistance shall annually 
        report to the Secretary such information as the 
        Secretary may reasonably require on the distribution of 
        such assistance among athletes and institutions of 
        higher education. The Secretary shall compile such 
        reports and submit them to the Committees on Education 
        and the Workforce and Appropriations of the House of 
        Representatives and the Committees on Health, 
        Education, Labor, and Pensions and Appropriations of 
        the Senate.''.
    (b) The amendments made by subsection (a) shall apply with 
respect to any funds appropriated pursuant to section 1543(d) 
of the Higher Education Amendments of 1992, including funds 
appropriated pursuant to that section in fiscal years 2000 and 
2001, that are available for financial assistance under section 
1543 on or after the date of enactment of this Act.
    Sec. 306. (a) Notwithstanding sections 413D, 442, and 488 
of the Higher Education Act of 1965, the Secretary of Education 
may reallocate, from funds made available under the heading 
``Student Financial Assistance'' to carry out part C of title 
IV of that Act, excess allocations for fiscal year 2002 in an 
amount not to exceed $1,000,000 in the aggregate to 
institutions of higher education described in subsection (b) 
for the purposes described in subsection (c). The reallocation 
to each such institution shall be made in accordance with 
subsection (d). Such excess allocations shall remain available 
for obligation until March 31, 2004.
    (b) An institution of higher education may receive a 
reallocation under subsection (a) if the institution--
            (1) is, on the date of enactment of this Act, 
        participating in the Federal Supplemental Educational 
        Opportunity Grant and Federal Work Study programs under 
        subpart 3 of part A, and part C of title IV of that 
        Act, respectively;
            (2) initially began participating in both such 
        programs during or after 1989, but not later than 1999;
            (3) has a current enrollment of not less than 2,000 
        students;
            (4) provides educational programs for which the 
        institution awards baccalaureate and graduate degrees;
            (5) has experienced an actual enrollment increase 
        of 75 percent or more since the institution began 
        participating in such programs; and
            (6) charged, for academic year 2000-2001, in-State 
        tuition and fees for a full-time undergraduate student 
        that were less than such tuition and fees charged by 
        the institution for academic year 1998-1999.
    (c) An institution of higher education that receives a 
reallocation under subsection (a) may use that reallocation for 
Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants or Federal 
Work Study awards.
    (d)(1) A reallocation made under subsection (a) to an 
institution described in subsection (b) shall be determined by 
calculating the difference between--
            (A) the amount (commonly referred to as the ``base 
        guarantee'') that the institution received under 
        section 413D(a) or 442(a) of that Act, as the case may 
        be; and
            (B) the amount that the institution would receive 
        pursuant to section 413D(a)(2)(B)(ii) or 
        442(a)(2)(B)(ii) of that Act, as the case may be, if 
        the institution were beginning its program 
        participation in the 2002-2003 academic year.
    (2) If the amounts available for reallocation under 
subsection (a) are insufficient to fully fund the amounts 
determined under paragraph (1) of this subsection to each 
institution described in subsection (b), then the amount to be 
reallocated to each such institution shall be ratably reduced.
    (e) The Secretary may use such data as he determines 
appropriate in order to carry out this section.
      Sec. 307. If this Act is enacted before H.R. 1, the No 
Child Left Behind Act of 2001, is enacted, then references to 
the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 or to any 
other Acts that would be amended by H.R. 1 shall be read to be 
references to those Acts as they would be amended by H.R. 1 
(including amendments made by H. Con. Res. 289, as passed by 
the House and the Senate).
    This title may be cited as the ``Department of Education 
Appropriations Act, 2002''.

                       TITLE IV--RELATED AGENCIES

                      Armed Forces Retirement Home

    For expenses necessary for the Armed Forces Retirement Home 
to operate and maintain the United States Soldiers' and 
Airmen's Home and the United States Naval Home, to be paid from 
funds available in the Armed Forces Retirement Home Trust Fund, 
$71,440,000, of which $9,812,000 shall remain available until 
expended for construction and renovation of the physical plants 
at the United States Soldiers' and Airmen's Home and the United 
States Naval Home: Provided, That, notwithstanding any other 
provision of law, a single contract or related contracts for 
development and construction, to include construction of a 
long-term care facility at the United States Naval Home, may be 
employed which collectively include the full scope of the 
project: Provided further, That the solicitation and contract 
shall contain the clause ``availability of funds'' found at 48 
CFR 52.232-18 and 252.232-7007, Limitation of Government 
Obligations.

             Corporation for National and Community Service


        domestic volunteer service programs, operating expenses


    For expenses necessary for the Corporation for National and 
Community Service to carry out the provisions of the Domestic 
Volunteer Service Act of 1973, as amended, $328,895,000: 
Provided, That none of the funds made available to the 
Corporation for National and Community Service in this Act for 
activities authorized by part E of title II of the Domestic 
Volunteer Service Act of 1973 shall be used to provide stipends 
or other monetary incentives to volunteers or volunteer leaders 
whose incomes exceed 125 percent of the national poverty level.

                  Corporation for Public Broadcasting

    For payment to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, as 
authorized by the Communications Act of 1934, an amount which 
shall be available within limitations specified by that Act, 
for the fiscal year 2004, $380,000,000: Provided, That no funds 
made available to the Corporation for Public Broadcasting by 
this Act shall be used to pay for receptions, parties, or 
similar forms of entertainment for Government officials or 
employees: Provided further, That none of the funds contained 
in this paragraph shall be available or used to aid or support 
any program or activity from which any person is excluded, or 
is denied benefits, or is discriminated against, on the basis 
of race, color, national origin, religion, or sex: Provided 
further, That in addition to the amounts provided above, 
$25,000,000, for costs related to digital program production, 
development, and distribution, associated with the transition 
of public broadcasting to digital broadcasting, to be awarded 
as determined by the Corporation in consultation with public 
radio and television licensees or permittees, or their 
designated representatives.

               Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service


                         salaries and expenses


    For expenses necessary for the Federal Mediation and 
Conciliation Service to carry out the functions vested in it by 
the Labor Management Relations Act, 1947 (29 U.S.C. 171-180, 
182-183), including hire of passenger motor vehicles; for 
expenses necessary for the Labor-Management Cooperation Act of 
1978 (29 U.S.C. 175a); and for expenses necessary for the 
Service to carry out the functions vested in it by the Civil 
Service Reform Act, Public Law 95-454 (5 U.S.C. ch. 71), 
$39,982,000, including $1,500,000, to remain available through 
September 30, 2003, for activities authorized by the Labor-
Management Cooperation Act of 1978 (29 U.S.C. 175a): Provided, 
That notwithstanding 31 U.S.C. 3302, fees charged, up to full-
cost recovery, for special training activities and other 
conflict resolution services and technical assistance, 
including those provided to foreign governments and 
international organizations, and for arbitration services shall 
be credited to and merged with this account, and shall remain 
available until expended: Provided further, That fees for 
arbitration services shall be available only for education, 
training, and professional development of the agency workforce: 
Provided further, That the Director of the Service is 
authorized to accept and use on behalf of the United States 
gifts of services and real, personal, or other property in the 
aid of any projects or functions within the Director's 
jurisdiction.

            Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission


                         salaries and expenses


    For expenses necessary for the Federal Mine Safety and 
Health Review Commission (30 U.S.C. 801 et seq.), $6,939,000.

                Institute of Museum and Library Services


         office of library services: grants and administration


    For carrying out subtitle B of the Museum and Library 
Services Act, $197,602,000: Provided, That of the amount 
provided, $2,000,000 shall be awarded to the National Museum of 
African American History and Culture Plan for Action 
Presidential Commission, $250,000 shall be awarded to American 
Village Project in Montevallo, Alabama, $20,000 shall be 
awarded to Evergreen-Conecuh Public Library, Alabama, $50,000 
shall be awarded to Gordo Public Library, Pickens County 
Commission, Alabama, $300,000 shall be awarded to Mobile Museum 
of Art, Mobile, Alabama, $1,500,000 shall be awarded to 
National Museum for Women in the Arts, $300,000 shall be 
awarded to Tuskegee Human and Civil Rights Multicultural 
Center, $50,000 shall be awarded to Heard Museum, Phoenix, 
Arizona, $800,000 shall be awarded to Children's Museum of Los 
Angeles, California, $150,000 shall be awarded to Chinese 
American Museum, Los Angeles, California, $750,000 shall be 
awarded to Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, 
California, $290,000 Santa Barbara Maritime Museum, $25,000 
Santa Maria Valley Discovery Museum, California, $1,000,000 
shall be awarded to The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, 
$150,000 shall be awarded to Bethel Public Library, 
Connecticut, $500,000 shall be awarded to Mattatuck Museum in 
Waterbury, Connecticut, $250,000 shall be awarded to Museum of 
Aviation, Warner Robins, Georgia, $700,000 shall be awarded to 
Bishops Museum in Honolulu, Hawaii, $500,000 shall be awarded 
to Grout Museum in Waterloo, Iowa, $61,000 shall be awarded to 
Iowa State Historical Society, $389,000 shall be awarded to The 
National Audobon Society's ARK Museum in Dubuque, Iowa, 
$750,000 shall be awarded to University of Idaho Performance 
and Education Facility, $50,000 shall be awarded to Adler 
Planetarium and Astronomy Museum, $100,000 shall be awarded to 
Johnson County Museum of History, Franklin, Indiana, $125,000 
shall be awarded to Plimoth Plantation, Plymouth, 
Massachusetts, $1,000,000 shall be awarded to Shakespeare Rose 
Theater, $150,000 shall be awarded to Springfield-Greene County 
Library, Springfield, Missouri, $1,160,000 shall be awarded to 
Webster University, St. Louis, Missouri, $850,000 shall be 
awarded to University of Mississippi Foundation, Oxford, 
Mississippi, $350,000 shall be awarded to University of 
Mississippi, Oxford, Mississippi, $132,000 shall be awarded to 
Lois Morgan Edward Memorial Library, Nashville, North Carolina, 
$100,000 shall be awarded to Rocky Mount Children's Museum, 
$100,000 shall be awarded to Confluence Visitor Center in 
Williston, North Dakota and the North Dakota State Historical 
Society, $100,000 shall be awarded to Fort Mandan Visitor's 
Center, $100,000 shall be awarded to Mandan-on-a-Slant Museum, 
$1,000,000 shall be awarded to Franklin Pierce College, 
$160,000 shall be awarded to Monmouth University, West Long 
Branch, New Jersey, $100,000 shall be awarded to Princeton 
Public Library, Mercer County, New Jersey, $125,000 shall be 
awarded to Albany Institute for History and Art, $1,000,000 
shall be awarded to Brooklyn Historical Society, New York, 
$22,500 shall be awarded to Buffalo and Erie County Library 
System, Buffalo, New York, $250,000 shall be awarded to Center 
for Jewish History, New York, New York, $150,000 shall be 
awarded to Children's Museum of Manhattan, New York, $105,000 
shall be awarded to Four County Library System, Vestal, New 
York, $500,000 shall be awarded to Hunter College, New York, 
$200,000 shall be awarded to Long Island Maritime Museum in 
West Sayville, New York, $750,000 shall be awarded to Lower 
East Side Tenement Museum, New York, $1,000,000 shall be 
awarded to New York Hall of Science, $22,500 shall be awarded 
to NIOGA Library System of Niagara and Orleans County, New 
York, $100,000 shall be awarded to The Woodstock Guild of 
Craftsmen, Inc., Woodstock, New York, $100,000 shall be awarded 
to Clark County Historical Museum, $40,000 shall be awarded to 
Cleveland Botanical Garden, Cleveland, Ohio, $500,000 shall be 
awarded to Crawford Museum, Cleveland, Ohio, $42,000 shall be 
awarded to Farmer's Castle Museum in Belpre, $500,000 shall be 
awarded to MAPS Air Museum, Canton Ohio, $44,000 shall be 
awarded to McKinley Museum, Canton, Ohio, $50,000 shall be 
awarded to University of Oregon Museum of Natural History in 
Eugene, Oregon, $150,000 shall be awarded to Academy of Natural 
Sciences in Philadelphia County, $100,000 shall be awarded to 
Beaver Area Memorial Library, Beaver County, Pennsylvania, 
$300,000 shall be awarded to Delaware Valley Historical 
Aircraft Association, $100,000 shall be awarded to Discovery 
Square, Inc. in Erie, Pennsylvania, $200,000 shall be awarded 
to Everhart Museum in Scranton, Pennsylvania, $300,000 shall be 
awarded to National Liberty Museum in Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania, $126,000 shall be awarded to Northland Public 
Library Authority, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, $235,000 shall be 
awarded to Penn Hills Public Library in Pittsburgh, 
Pennsylvania, $250,000 shall be awarded to Philadelphia Zoo, 
$100,000 shall be awarded to Pittsburgh Children's Museum, 
$700,000 shall be awarded to Please Touch Museum at the 
Children's Museum of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, $50,000 shall 
be awarded to Wayne Art Center in Wayne, Pennsylvania, $50,000 
shall be awarded to Bamberg County Library in Bamberg, South 
Carolina, $50,000 shall be awarded to Clarendon County Library 
in Manning, South Carolina, $500,000 shall be awarded to Marion 
Wright Edelman Public Library, Bennettsville, South Carolina, 
$600,000 shall be awarded to The Children's Discovery House, 
Murfreesboro, Tennessee, $150,000 shall be awarded to The 
International Storytelling Center in Jonesborough, Tennessee, 
$500,000 shall be awarded to El Progreso Library, Uvalde, 
Texas, $500,000 shall be awarded to Vietnam Archive Center, 
Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas, $800,000 shall be 
awarded to Children's Museum of Virginia, Portsmouth, Virginia, 
$325,000 shall be awarded to Virginia Living Museum, $100,000 
shall be awarded to Burlington City Arts in Burlington, 
Vermont, $125,000 shall be awarded to Lake Champlain Science 
Center in Burlington, Vermont, $175,000 shall be awarded to 
Vermont Historical Society in Montpelier, Vermont, $100,000 
shall be awarded to Beaver Creek Reserve Education Center, Fall 
Creek, Wisconsin, $500,000 shall be awarded to The Kenosha 
Civil War Museum in Kenosha, Wisconsin, $75,000 shall be 
awarded to Village of Hawkins, Wisconsin, and $500,000 shall be 
awarded to Weis Earth Science Museum in Menasha, Wisconsin.

                  Medicare Payment Advisory Commission


                         salaries and expenses


    For expenses necessary to carry out section 1805 of the 
Social Security Act, $8,250,000, to be transferred to this 
appropriation from the Federal Hospital Insurance and the 
Federal Supplementary Medical Insurance Trust Funds.

        National Commission on Libraries and Information Science


                         salaries and expenses


    For necessary expenses for the National Commission on 
Libraries and Information Science, established by the Act of 
July 20, 1970 (Public Law 91-345, as amended), $1,000,000.

                     National Council on Disability


                         salaries and expenses


    For expenses necessary for the National Council on 
Disability as authorized by title IV of the Rehabilitation Act 
of 1973, as amended, $2,830,000.

                     National Education Goals Panel

    For expenses necessary for costs associated with the 
termination of the National Education Goals Panel, $400,000.

                     National Labor Relations Board


                         salaries and expenses


    For expenses necessary for the National Labor Relations 
Board to carry out the functions vested in it by the Labor-
Management Relations Act, 1947, as amended (29 U.S.C. 141-167), 
and other laws, $226,438,000: Provided, That no part of this 
appropriation shall be available to organize or assist in 
organizing agricultural laborers or used in connection with 
investigations, hearings, directives, or orders concerning 
bargaining units composed of agricultural laborers as referred 
to in section 2(3) of the Act of July 5, 1935 (29 U.S.C. 152), 
and as amended by the Labor-Management Relations Act, 1947, as 
amended, and as defined in section 3(f) of the Act of June 25, 
1938 (29 U.S.C. 203), and including in said definition 
employees engaged in the maintenance and operation of ditches, 
canals, reservoirs, and waterways when maintained or operated 
on a mutual, nonprofit basis and at least 95 percent of the 
water stored or supplied thereby is used for farming purposes.

                        National Mediation Board


                         salaries and expenses


    For expenses necessary to carry out the provisions of the 
Railway Labor Act, as amended (45 U.S.C. 151-188), including 
emergency boards appointed by the President, $10,635,000.

            Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission


                         salaries and expenses


    For expenses necessary for the Occupational Safety and 
Health Review Commission (29 U.S.C. 661), $8,964,000.

                       Railroad Retirement Board


                     dual benefits payments account


    For payment to the Dual Benefits Payments Account, 
authorized under section 15(d) of the Railroad Retirement Act 
of 1974, $146,000,000, which shall include amounts becoming 
available in fiscal year 2002 pursuant to section 224(c)(1)(B) 
of Public Law 98-76; and in addition, an amount, not to exceed 
2 percent of the amount provided herein, shall be available 
proportional to the amount by which the product of recipients 
and the average benefit received exceeds $146,000,000: 
Provided, That the total amount provided herein shall be 
credited in 12 approximately equal amounts on the first day of 
each month in the fiscal year.


          federal payments to the railroad retirement accounts


    For payment to the accounts established in the Treasury for 
the payment of benefits under the Railroad Retirement Act for 
interest earned on unnegotiated checks, $150,000, to remain 
available through September 30, 2003, which shall be the 
maximum amount available for payment pursuant to section 417 of 
Public Law 98-76.


                      limitation on administration


    For necessary expenses for the Railroad Retirement Board 
for administration of the Railroad Retirement Act and the 
Railroad Unemployment Insurance Act, $97,700,000, to be derived 
in such amounts as determined by the Board from the railroad 
retirement accounts and from moneys credited to the railroad 
unemployment insurance administration fund.


             limitation on the office of inspector general


    For expenses necessary for the Office of Inspector General 
for audit, investigatory and review activities, as authorized 
by the Inspector General Act of 1978, as amended, not more than 
$6,261,000, to be derived from the railroad retirement accounts 
and railroad unemployment insurance account: Provided, That 
none of the funds made available in any other paragraph of this 
Act may be transferred to the Office; used to carry out any 
such transfer; used to provide any office space, equipment, 
office supplies, communications facilities or services, 
maintenance services, or administrative services for the 
Office; used to pay any salary, benefit, or award for any 
personnel of the Office; used to pay any other operating 
expense of the Office; or used to reimburse the Office for any 
service provided, or expense incurred, by the Office.

                     Social Security Administration


                payments to social security trust funds


    For payment to the Federal Old-Age and Survivors Insurance 
and the Federal Disability Insurance trust funds, as provided 
under sections 201(m), 217(g), 228(g), and 1131(b)(2) of the 
Social Security Act, $434,400,000.


               special benefits for disabled coal miners


    For carrying out title IV of the Federal Mine Safety and 
Health Act of 1977, $332,840,000, to remain available until 
expended.
    For making, after July 31 of the current fiscal year, 
benefit payments to individuals under title IV of the Federal 
Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977, for costs incurred in the 
current fiscal year, such amounts as may be necessary.
    For making benefit payments under title IV of the Federal 
Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 for the first quarter of 
fiscal year 2003, $108,000,000, to remain available until 
expended.


                  supplemental security income program


    For carrying out titles XI and XVI of the Social Security 
Act, section 401 of Public Law 92-603, section 212 of Public 
Law 93-66, as amended, and section 405 of Public Law 95-216, 
including payment to the Social Security trust funds for 
administrative expenses incurred pursuant to section 201(g)(1) 
of the Social Security Act, $21,277,412,000, to remain 
available until expended: Provided, That any portion of the 
funds provided to a State in the current fiscal year and not 
obligated by the State during that year shall be returned to 
the Treasury.
    In addition, $200,000,000, to remain available until 
September 30, 2003, for payment to the Social Security trust 
funds for administrative expenses for continuing disability 
reviews as authorized by section 103 of Public Law 104-121 and 
section 10203 of Public Law 105-33. The term ``continuing 
disability reviews'' means reviews and redeterminations as 
defined under section 201(g)(1)(A) of the Social Security Act, 
as amended.
    For making, after June 15 of the current fiscal year, 
benefit payments to individuals under title XVI of the Social 
Security Act, for unanticipated costs incurred for the current 
fiscal year, such sums as may be necessary.
    For making benefit payments under title XVI of the Social 
Security Act for the first quarter of fiscal year 2003, 
$10,790,000,000, to remain available until expended.


                 limitation on administrative expenses


    For necessary expenses, including the hire of two passenger 
motor vehicles, and not to exceed $35,000 for official 
reception and representation expenses, not more than 
$7,035,000,000 may be expended, as authorized by section 
201(g)(1) of the Social Security Act, from any one or all of 
the trust funds referred to therein: Provided, That not less 
than $1,800,000 shall be for the Social Security Advisory 
Board: Provided further, That unobligated balances at the end 
of fiscal year 2002 not needed for fiscal year 2002 shall 
remain available until expended to invest in the Social 
Security Administration information technology and 
telecommunications hardware and software infrastructure, 
including related equipment and non-payroll administrative 
expenses associated solely with this information technology and 
telecommunications infrastructure: Provided further, That 
reimbursement to the trust funds under this heading for 
expenditures for official time for employees of the Social 
Security Administration pursuant to section 7131 of title 5, 
United States Code, and for facilities or support services for 
labor organizations pursuant to policies, regulations, or 
procedures referred to in section 7135(b) of such title shall 
be made by the Secretary of the Treasury, with interest, from 
amounts in the general fund not otherwise appropriated, as soon 
as possible after such expenditures are made.
    From funds provided under the first paragraph, not less 
than $200,000,000 shall be available for conducting continuing 
disability reviews.
    In addition to funding already available under this 
heading, and subject to the same terms and conditions, 
$433,000,000, to remain available until September 30, 2003, for 
continuing disability reviews as authorized by section 103 of 
Public Law 104-121 and section 10203 of Public Law 105-33. The 
term ``continuing disability reviews'' means reviews and 
redeterminations as defined under section 201(g)(1)(A) of the 
Social Security Act, as amended.
    In addition, $100,000,000 to be derived from administration 
fees in excess of $5.00 per supplementary payment collected 
pursuant to section 1616(d) of the Social Security Act or 
section 212(b)(3) of Public Law 93-66, which shall remain 
available until expended. To the extent that the amounts 
collected pursuant to such section 1616(d) or 212(b)(3) in 
fiscal year 2002 exceed $100,000,000, the amounts shall be 
available in fiscal year 2003 only to the extent provided in 
advance in appropriations Acts.
    From funds previously appropriated for this purpose, any 
unobligated balances at the end of fiscal year 2001 shall be 
available to continue Federal-State partnerships which will 
evaluate means to promote Medicare buy-in programs targeted to 
elderly and disabled individuals under titles XVIII and XIX of 
the Social Security Act.


                      office of inspector general


                     (including transfer of funds)


    For expenses necessary for the Office of Inspector General 
in carrying out the provisions of the Inspector General Act of 
1978, as amended, $19,000,000, together with not to exceed 
$56,000,000, to be transferred and expended as authorized by 
section 201(g)(1) of the Social Security Act from the Federal 
Old-Age and Survivors Insurance Trust Fund and the Federal 
Disability Insurance Trust Fund.
    In addition, an amount not to exceed 3 percent of the total 
provided in this appropriation may be transferred from the 
``Limitation on Administrative Expenses'', Social Security 
Administration, to be merged with this account, to be available 
for the time and purposes for which this account is available: 
Provided, That notice of such transfers shall be transmitted 
promptly to the Committees on Appropriations of the House and 
Senate.

                    United States Institute of Peace


                           operating expenses


    For necessary expenses of the United States Institute of 
Peace as authorized in the United States Institute of Peace 
Act, $15,104,000.

                      TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    Sec. 501. The Secretaries of Labor, Health and Human 
Services, and Education are authorized to transfer unexpended 
balances of prior appropriations to accounts corresponding to 
current appropriations provided in this Act: Provided, That 
such transferred balances are used for the same purpose, and 
for the same periods of time, for which they were originally 
appropriated.
    Sec. 502. No part of any appropriation contained in this 
Act shall remain available for obligation beyond the current 
fiscal year unless expressly so provided herein.
    Sec. 503. (a) No part of any appropriation contained in 
this Act shall be used, other than for normal and recognized 
executive-legislative relationships, for publicity or 
propaganda purposes, for the preparation, distribution, or use 
of any kit, pamphlet, booklet, publication, radio, television, 
or video presentation designed to support or defeat legislation 
pending before the Congress or any State legislature, except in 
presentation to the Congress or any State legislature itself.
    (b) No part of any appropriation contained in this Act 
shall be used to pay the salary or expenses of any grant or 
contract recipient, or agent acting for such recipient, related 
to any activity designed to influence legislation or 
appropriations pending before the Congress or any State 
legislature.
    Sec. 504. The Secretaries of Labor and Education are 
authorized to make available not to exceed $23,000 and $15,000, 
respectively, from funds available for salaries and expenses 
under titles I and III, respectively, for official reception 
and representation expenses; the Director of the Federal 
Mediation and Conciliation Service is authorized to make 
available for official reception and representation expenses 
not to exceed $2,500 from the funds available for ``Salaries 
and expenses, Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service''; and 
the Chairman of the National Mediation Board is authorized to 
make available for official reception and representation 
expenses not to exceed $2,500 from funds available for 
``Salaries and expenses, National Mediation Board''.
    Sec. 505. Notwithstanding any other provision of this Act, 
no funds appropriated under this Act shall be used to carry out 
any program of distributing sterile needles or syringes for the 
hypodermic injection of any illegal drug.
    Sec. 506. (a) It is the sense of the Congress that, to the 
greatest extent practicable, all equipment and products 
purchased with funds made available in this Act should be 
American-made.
    (b) In providing financial assistance to, or entering into 
any contract with, any entity using funds made available in 
this Act, the head of each Federal agency, to the greatest 
extent practicable, shall provide to such entity a notice 
describing the statement made in subsection (a) by the 
Congress.
    (c) If it has been finally determined by a court or Federal 
agency that any person intentionally affixed a label bearing a 
``Made in America'' inscription, or any inscription with the 
same meaning, to any product sold in or shipped to the United 
States that is not made in the United States, the person shall 
be ineligible to receive any contract or subcontract made with 
funds made available in this Act, pursuant to the debarment, 
suspension, and ineligibility procedures described in sections 
9.400 through 9.409 of title 48, Code of Federal Regulations.
    Sec. 507. When issuing statements, press releases, requests 
for proposals, bid solicitations and other documents describing 
projects or programs funded in whole or in part with Federal 
money, all grantees receiving Federal funds included in this 
Act, including but not limited to State and local governments 
and recipients of Federal research grants, shall clearly state: 
(1) the percentage of the total costs of the program or project 
which will be financed with Federal money; (2) the dollar 
amount of Federal funds for the project or program; and (3) 
percentage and dollar amount of the total costs of the project 
or program that will be financed by non-governmental sources.
    Sec. 508. (a) None of the funds appropriated under this 
Act, and none of the funds in any trust fund to which funds are 
appropriated under this Act, shall be expended for any 
abortion.
    (b) None of the funds appropriated under this Act, and none 
of the funds in any trust fund to which funds are appropriated 
under this Act, shall be expended for health benefits coverage 
that includes coverage of abortion.
    (c) The term ``health benefits coverage'' means the package 
of services covered by a managed care provider or organization 
pursuant to a contract or other arrangement.
    Sec. 509. (a) The limitations established in the preceding 
section shall not apply to an abortion--
            (1) if the pregnancy is the result of an act of 
        rape or incest; or
            (2) in the case where a woman suffers from a 
        physical disorder, physical injury, or physical 
        illness, including a life-endangering physical 
        condition caused by or arising from the pregnancy 
        itself, that would, as certified by a physician, place 
        the woman in danger of death unless an abortion is 
        performed.
    (b) Nothing in the preceding section shall be construed as 
prohibiting the expenditure by a State, locality, entity, or 
private person of State, local, or private funds (other than a 
State's or locality's contribution of Medicaid matching funds).
    (c) Nothing in the preceding section shall be construed as 
restricting the ability of any managed care provider from 
offering abortion coverage or the ability of a State or 
locality to contract separately with such a provider for such 
coverage with State funds (other than a State's or locality's 
contribution of Medicaid matching funds).
    Sec. 510. (a) None of the funds made available in this Act 
may be used for--
            (1) the creation of a human embryo or embryos for 
        research purposes; or
            (2) research in which a human embryo or embryos are 
        destroyed, discarded, or knowingly subjected to risk of 
        injury or death greater than that allowed for research 
        on fetuses in utero under 45 CFR 46.208(a)(2) and 
        section 498(b) of the Public Health Service Act (42 
        U.S.C. 289g(b)).
    (b) For purposes of this section, the term ``human embryo 
or embryos'' includes any organism, not protected as a human 
subject under 45 CFR 46 as of the date of the enactment of this 
Act, that is derived by fertilization, parthenogenesis, 
cloning, or any other means from one or more human gametes or 
human diploid cells.
    Sec. 511. (a) None of the funds made available in this Act 
may be used for any activity that promotes the legalization of 
any drug or other substance included in schedule I of the 
schedules of controlled substances established by section 202 
of the Controlled Substances Act (21 U.S.C. 812).
    (b) The limitation in subsection (a) shall not apply when 
there is significant medical evidence of a therapeutic 
advantage to the use of such drug or other substance or that 
federally sponsored clinical trials are being conducted to 
determine therapeutic advantage.
    Sec. 512. None of the funds made available in this Act may 
be obligated or expended to enter into or renew a contract with 
an entity if--
            (1) such entity is otherwise a contractor with the 
        United States and is subject to the requirement in 
        section 4212(d) of title 38, United States Code, 
        regarding submission of an annual report to the 
        Secretary of Labor concerning employment of certain 
        veterans; and
            (2) such entity has not submitted a report as 
        required by that section for the most recent year for 
        which such requirement was applicable to such entity.
    Sec. 513. None of the funds made available in this Act may 
be used to promulgate or adopt any final standard under section 
1173(b) of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 1320d-2(b)) 
providing for, or providing for the assignment of, a unique 
health identifier for an individual (except in an individual's 
capacity as an employer or a health care provider), until 
legislation is enacted specifically approving the standard.
    Sec. 514. (a) Section 10 of the Native Hawaiian Health Care 
Improvement Act (42 U.S.C. 11709) is amended--
            (1) in subsection (a) in the matter preceding 
        paragraph (1), by striking ``Kamehameha School/Bishop 
        Estate'' and inserting ``Papa Ola Lokahi''; and
            (2) in subsection (b)(1)(C), by striking 
        ``Kamehameha School/Bishop Estate'' and inserting 
        ``Papa Ola Lokahi''.
            (b) Section 338K(a) of the Public Health Service 
        Act (42 U.S.C. 254s(a)) is amended by striking 
        ``Kamehameha School/Bishop Estate'' and inserting 
        ``Papa Ola Lokahi''.
    Sec. 515. (a) In this section the term ``qualified 
magistrate judge'' means any person who--
            (1) retired as a magistrate judge before November 
        15, 1988; and
            (2) on the date of filing an election under 
        subsection (b)--
                    (A) is serving as a recalled magistrate 
                judge on a full-time basis under section 636(h) 
                of title 28, United States Code; and
                    (B) has completed at least 5 years of full-
                time recall service.
    (b) The Director of the Administrative Office of the United 
States Courts may accept the election of a qualified magistrate 
judge to--
            (1) receive an annuity under section 377 of title 
        28, United States Code; and
            (2) come within the purview of section 376 of such 
        title.
    (c) Full-time recall service performed by a qualified 
magistrate judge shall be credited for service in calculating 
an annuity elected under this section.
    (d) The Director of the Administrative Office of the United 
States Courts may promulgate regulations to carry out this 
section.
    Sec. 516. Amounts made available under this Act for the 
administrative and related expenses for departmental management 
for the Department of Labor, the Department of Health and Human 
Services, and the Department of Education, shall be reduced on 
a pro rata basis by $25,000,000:  Provided, That this provision 
shall not apply to the Food and Drug Administration and the 
Indian Health Service: Provided further, That not later than 15 
days after the enactment of this Act, the Director of the 
Office of Management and Budget shall report to the House and 
Senate Committees on Appropriations the accounts subject to the 
pro rata reductions and the amount to be reduced in each 
account.

TITLE VI--EXTENSION OF MARK-TO-MARKET PROGRAM FOR MULTIFAMILY ASSISTED 
                                HOUSING

SEC. 601. SHORT TITLE AND TABLE OF CONTENTS.

    (a) Short Title.--This title may be cited as the ``Mark-to-
Market Extension Act of 2001''.
    (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this 
title is as follows:

 TITLE VI--EXTENSION OF MARK-TO-MARKET PROGRAM FOR MULTIFAMILY ASSISTED 
                                 HOUSING

Sec. 601. Short title and table of contents.
Sec. 602. Purposes.
Sec. 603. Effective date.

 Subtitle A--Multifamily Housing Mortgage and Assistance Restructuring 
                     and Section 8 Contract Renewal

Sec. 611. Definitions.
Sec. 612. Mark-to-market program amendments.
Sec. 613. Consistency of rent levels under enhanced voucher assistance 
          and rent restructurings.
Sec. 614. Eligible inclusions for renewal rents of partially assisted 
          buildings.
Sec. 615. Eligibility of restructuring projects for miscellaneous 
          housing insurance.
Sec. 616. Technical corrections.

   Subtitle B--Office of Multifamily Housing Assistance Restructuring

Sec. 621. Reauthorization of Office and extension of program.
Sec. 622. Appointment of Director.
Sec. 623. Vacancy in position of Director.
Sec. 624. Oversight by Federal Housing Commissioner.
Sec. 625. Limitation on subsequent employment.

          Subtitle C--Miscellaneous Housing Program Amendments

Sec. 631. Extension of CDBG public services cap exception.
Sec. 632. Use of section 8 enhanced vouchers for prepayments.
Sec. 633. Prepayment and refinancing of loans for section 202 supportive 
          housing.
Sec. 634. Technical correction.

SEC. 602. PURPOSES.

      The purposes of this title are--
      (1) to continue the progress of the Multifamily Assisted 
Housing Reform and Affordability Act of 1997 (referred to in 
this section as ``that Act'');
      (2) to ensure that properties that undergo mortgage 
restructurings pursuant to that Act are rehabilitated to a 
standard that allows the properties to meet their long-term 
affordability requirements;
      (3) to ensure that, for properties that undergo mortgage 
restructurings pursuant to that Act, reserves are set at 
adequate levels to allow the properties to meet their long-term 
affordability requirements;
      (4) to ensure that properties that undergo mortgage 
restructurings pursuant to that Act are operated efficiently, 
and that operating expenses are sufficient to ensure the long-
term financial and physical integrity of the properties;
      (5) to ensure that properties that undergo rent 
restructurings have adequate resources to maintain the 
properties in good condition;
      (6) to ensure that the Office of Multifamily Housing 
Assistance Restructuring of the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development continues to focus on the portfolio of properties 
eligible for restructuring under that Act;
            (7) to ensure that the Department of Housing and 
        Urban Development carefully tracks the condition of 
        those properties on an ongoing basis;
            (8) to ensure that tenant groups, nonprofit 
        organizations, and public entities continue to have the 
        resources for building the capacity of tenant 
        organizations in furtherance of the purposes of 
        subtitle A of that Act; and
            (9) to encourage the Office of Multifamily Housing 
        Assistance Restructuring to continue to provide 
        participating administrative entities, including public 
        participating administrative entities, with the 
        flexibility to respond to specific problems that 
        individual cases may present, while ensuring consistent 
        outcomes around the country.

SEC. 603. EFFECTIVE DATE.

    Except as provided in sections 616(a)(2), 633(b), and 
634(b), this title and the amendments made by this title shall 
take effect or are deemed to have taken effect, as appropriate, 
on the earlier of--
            (1) the date of the enactment of this title; or
            (2) September 30, 2001.

 Subtitle A--Multifamily Housing Mortgage and Assistance Restructuring 
                     and Section 8 Contract Renewal

SEC. 611. DEFINITIONS.

    Section 512 of the Multifamily Assisted Housing Reform and 
Affordability Act of 1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) is amended by 
adding at the end the following new paragraph:
            ``(19) Office.--The term `Office' means the Office 
        of Multifamily Housing Assistance Restructuring 
        established under section 571.''.

SEC. 612. MARK-TO-MARKET PROGRAM AMENDMENTS.

    (a) Funding for Tenant and Nonprofit Participation.--
Section 514(f)(3)(A) of the Multifamily Assisted Housing Reform 
and Affordability Act of 1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) is 
amended--
            (1) by striking ``Secretary may provide not more 
        than $10,000,000 annually in funding'' and inserting 
        ``Secretary shall make available not more than 
        $10,000,000 annually in funding, which amount shall be 
        in addition to any amounts made available under this 
        subparagraph and carried over from previous years,''; 
        and
            (2) by striking ``entities), and for tenant 
        services,'' and inserting ``entities), for tenant 
        services, and for tenant groups, nonprofit 
        organizations, and public entities described in section 
        517(a)(5),''.
    (b) Exception Rents.--Section 514(g)(2)(A) of the 
Multifamily Assisted Housing Reform and Affordability Act of 
1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) is amended by striking 
``restructured mortgages in any fiscal year'' and inserting 
``portfolio restructuring agreements''.
    (c) Notice to Displaced Tenants.--Section 516(d) of the 
Multifamily Assisted Housing Reform and Affordability Act of 
1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) is amended by striking ``Subject 
to'' and inserting the following:
            ``(1) Notice to certain residents.--The Office 
        shall notify any tenant that is residing in a project 
        or receiving assistance under section 8 of the United 
        States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f) at the 
        time of rejection under this section, of such 
        rejection, except that the Office may delegate the 
        responsibility to provide notice under this paragraph 
        to the participating administrative entity.
            ``(2) Assistance and moving expenses.--Subject 
        to''.
    (d) Restructuring Plans for Transfers of Prepayment 
Projects.--The Multifamily Assisted Housing Reform and 
Affordability Act of 1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) is amended--
            (1) in section 524(e), by adding at the end the 
        following new paragraph:
            ``(3) Mortgage restructuring and rental assistance 
        sufficiency plans.--Notwithstanding paragraph (1), the 
        owner of the project may request, and the Secretary may 
        consider, mortgage restructuring and rental assistance 
        sufficiency plans to facilitate sales or transfers of 
        properties under this subtitle, subject to an approved 
        plan of action under the Emergency Low Income Housing 
        Preservation Act of 1987 (12 U.S.C. 1715l note) or the 
        Low-Income Housing Preservation and Resident 
        Homeownership Act of 1990 (12 U.S.C. 4101 et seq.), 
        which plans shall result in a sale or transfer of those 
        properties.''; and
            (2) in the last sentence of section 512(2), by 
        inserting ``, but does include a project described in 
        section 524(e)(3)'' after ``section 524(e)''.
    (e) Addition of Significant Features.--Section 517 of the 
Multifamily Assisted Housing Reform and Affordability Act of 
1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) is amended--
            (1) by striking subsection (c) (except that the 
        striking of such subsection may not be construed to 
        have any effect on the provisions of law amended by 
        such subsection, as such subsection was in effect 
        before the date of the enactment of this Act);
            (2) in subsection (b)--
                    (A) in paragraph (7), by striking ``(7)'' 
                and inserting ``(1)''; and
                    (B) by adding at the end the following new 
                paragraph:
            ``(2) Addition of significant features.--
                    ``(A) Authority.--An approved mortgage 
                restructuring and rental assistance sufficiency 
                plan may require the improvement of the project 
                by the addition of significant features that 
                are not necessary for rehabilitation to the 
                standard provided under paragraph (1), such as 
                air conditioning, an elevator, and additional 
                community space. The Secretary shall establish 
                guidelines regarding the inclusion of 
                requirements regarding such additional 
                significant features under such plans.
                    ``(B) Funding.--Significant features added 
                pursuant to an approved mortgage restructuring 
                and rental assistance sufficiency plan may be 
                paid from the funding sources specified in the 
                first sentence of paragraph (1)(A).
                    ``(C) Limitation on owner contribution.--An 
                owner of a project may not be required to 
                contribute from non-project resources, toward 
                the cost of any additional significant features 
                required pursuant to this paragraph, more than 
                25 percent of the amount of any assistance 
                received for the inclusion of such features.
                    ``(D) Applicability.--This paragraph shall 
                apply to all eligible multifamily housing 
                projects, except projects for which the 
                Secretary and the project owner executed a 
                mortgage restructuring and rental assistance 
                sufficiency plan on or before the date of the 
                enactment of the Mark-to-Market Extension Act 
                of 2001.''; and
            (3) by inserting after paragraph (6) of subsection 
        (b) the following:
    ``(c) Rehabilitation Needs and Addition of Significant 
Features.--''.
    (f) Look-Back Projects.--Section 512(2) of the Multifamily 
Assisted Housing Reform and Affordability Act of 1997 (42 
U.S.C. 1437f note) is amended by adding after the period at the 
end of the last sentence the following: ``Notwithstanding any 
other provision of this title, the Secretary may treat a 
project as an eligible multifamily housing project for purposes 
of this title if (I) the project is assisted pursuant to a 
contract for project-based assistance under section 8 of the 
United States Housing Act of 1937 renewed under section 524 of 
this Act, (II) the owner consents to such treatment, and (III) 
the project met the requirements of the first sentence of this 
paragraph for eligibility as an eligible multifamily housing 
project before the initial renewal of the contract under 
section 524.''.
    (g) Second Mortgages.--Section 517(a) of the Multifamily 
Assisted Housing Reform and Affordability Act of 1997 (42 
U.S.C. 1437f note) is amended--
            (1) in paragraph (1)(B), by striking ``no more than 
        the'' and inserting the following: ``not more than the 
        greater of--
                            ``(i) the full or partial payment 
                        of claim made under this subtitle; or
                            ``(ii) the''; and
            (2) in paragraph (5), by inserting ``of the second 
        mortgage, assign the second mortgage to the acquiring 
        organization or agency,'' after ``terms''.
    (h) Exemptions From Restructuring.--Section 514(h)(2) of 
the Multifamily Assisted Housing Reform and Affordability Act 
of 1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) is amended by inserting before 
the semicolon the following: ``, or refinanced pursuant to 
section 811 of the American Homeownership and Economic 
Opportunity Act of 2000 (12 U.S.C. 1701q note)''.

SEC. 613. CONSISTENCY OF RENT LEVELS UNDER ENHANCED VOUCHER ASSISTANCE 
                    AND RENT RESTRUCTURINGS.

    Subtitle A of the Multifamily Assisted Housing Reform and 
Affordability Act of 1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) is amended by 
adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 525. CONSISTENCY OF RENT LEVELS UNDER ENHANCED VOUCHER 
                    ASSISTANCE AND RENT RESTRUCTURINGS.

    ``(a) In General.--The Secretary shall examine the 
standards and procedures for determining and establishing the 
rent standards described under subsection (b). Pursuant to such 
examination, the Secretary shall establish procedures and 
guidelines that are designed to ensure that the amounts 
determined by the various rent standards for the same dwelling 
units are reasonably consistent and reflect rents for 
comparable unassisted units in the same area as such dwelling 
units.
    ``(b) Rent Standards.--The rent standards described in this 
subsection are as follows:
            ``(1) Enhanced vouchers.--The payment standard for 
        enhanced voucher assistance under section 8(t) of the 
        United States Housing Act of 1937 (42 U.S.C. 1437f(t)).
            ``(2) Mark-to-market.--The rents derived from 
        comparable properties, for purposes of section 514(g) 
        of this Act.
            ``(3) Contract renewal.--The comparable market 
        rents for the market area, for purposes of section 
        524(a)(4) of this Act.''.

SEC. 614. ELIGIBLE INCLUSIONS FOR RENEWAL RENTS OF PARTIALLY ASSISTED 
                    BUILDINGS.

    Section 524(a)(4)(C) of the Multifamily Assisted Housing 
Reform and Affordability Act of 1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) is 
amended by adding after the period at the end the following: 
``Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Secretary 
shall include in such budget-based cost increases costs 
relating to the project as a whole (including costs incurred 
with respect to units not covered by the contract for 
assistance), but only (I) if inclusion of such costs is 
requested by the owner or purchaser of the project, (II) if 
inclusion of such costs will permit capital repairs to the 
project or acquisition of the project by a nonprofit 
organization, and (III) to the extent that inclusion of such 
costs (or a portion thereof) complies with the requirement 
under clause (ii).''.

SEC. 615. ELIGIBILITY OF RESTRUCTURING PROJECTS FOR MISCELLANEOUS 
                    HOUSING INSURANCE.

    Section 223(a)(7) of the National Housing Act (12 U.S.C. 
1715n(a)(7)) is amended--
            (1) by striking ``under this Act: Provided, That 
        the principal'' and inserting the following: ``under 
        this Act, or an existing mortgage held by the Secretary 
        that is subject to a mortgage restructuring and rental 
        assistance sufficiency plan pursuant to the Multifamily 
        Assisted Housing Reform and Affordability Act of 1997 
        (42 U.S.C. 1437f note), provided that--
                    ``(A) the principal'';
            (2) by striking ``except that (A)'' and inserting 
        ``except that (i)'';
            (3) by striking ``(B)'' and inserting ``(ii)'';
            (4) by striking ``(C)'' and inserting ``(iii)'';
            (5) by striking ``(D)'' and inserting ``(iv)'';
            (6) by striking ``: Provided further, That a 
        mortgage'' and inserting the following ``; and
                    ``(B) a mortgage'';
            (7) by striking ``or'' at the end; and
            (8) by adding at the end the following new 
        subparagraph:
                    ``(C) a mortgage that is subject to a 
                mortgage restructuring and rental assistance 
                sufficiency plan pursuant to the Multifamily 
                Assisted Housing Reform and Affordability Act 
                of 1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) and is 
                refinanced under this paragraph may have a term 
                of not more than 30 years; or''.

SEC. 616. TECHNICAL CORRECTIONS.

    (a) Exemptions From Restructuring.--
            (1) In general.--Section 514(h) of the Multifamily 
        Assisted Housing Reform and Affordability Act of 1997 
        (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) is amended to read as if the 
        amendment made by section 531(c) of Public Law 106-74 
        (113 Stat. 1116) were made to ``Section 514(h)(1)'' 
        instead of ``Section 514(h)''.
            (2) Retroactive effect.--The amendment made by 
        paragraph (1) of this subsection is deemed to have 
        taken effect on the date of the enactment of Public Law 
        106-74 (113 Stat. 1109).
    (b) Other.--The Multifamily Assisted Housing Reform and 
Affordability Act of 1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) is amended--
            (1) in section 511(a)(12), by striking ``this Act'' 
        and inserting ``this title'';
            (2) in section 513, by striking ``this Act'' each 
        place such term appears in subsections (a)(2)(I) and 
        (b)(3) and inserting ``this title'';
            (3) in section 514(f)(3)(B), by inserting 
        ``Housing'' after ``Multifamily'';
            (4) in section 515(c)(1)(B), by inserting ``or'' 
        after the semicolon;
            (5) in section 517(b)--
                    (A) in each of paragraphs (1) through (6), 
                by capitalizing the first letter of the first 
                word that follows the paragraph heading;
                    (B) in each of paragraphs (1) through (5), 
                by striking the semicolon at the end and 
                inserting a period; and
                    (C) in paragraph (6), by striking ``; and'' 
                at the end and inserting a period;
            (6) in section 520(b), by striking ``Banking and''; 
        and
            (7) in section 573(d)(2), by striking ``Banking 
        and''.

   Subtitle B--Office of Multifamily Housing Assistance Restructuring

SEC. 621. REAUTHORIZATION OF OFFICE AND EXTENSION OF PROGRAM.

    Section 579 of the Multifamily Assisted Housing Reform and 
Affordability Act of 1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) is amended--
            (1) by striking subsection (a) and inserting the 
        following new subsection:
    ``(a) Repeals.--
            ``(1) Mark-to-market program.--Subtitle A (except 
        for section 524) is repealed effective October 1, 2006.
            ``(2) OMHAR.--Subtitle D (except for this section) 
        is repealed effective October 1, 2004.'';
            (2) in subsection (b), by striking ``October 1, 
        2001'' and inserting ``October 1, 2006'';
            (3) in subsection (c), by striking ``upon September 
        30, 2001'' and inserting ``at the end of September 30, 
        2004''; and
            (4) by striking subsection (d) and inserting the 
        following new subsection:
    ``(d) Transfer of Authority.--Effective upon the repeal of 
subtitle D under subsection (a)(2) of this section, all 
authority and responsibilities to administer the program under 
subtitle A are transferred to the Secretary.''.

SEC. 622. APPOINTMENT OF DIRECTOR.

    (a) In General.--Section 572 of the Multifamily Assisted 
Housing Reform and Affordability Act of 1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f 
note) is amended by striking subsection (a) and inserting the 
following new subsection:
    ``(a) Appointment.--The Office shall be under the 
management of a Director, who shall be appointed by the 
President from among individuals who are citizens of the United 
States and have a demonstrated understanding of financing and 
mortgage restructuring for affordable multifamily housing.''.
    (b) Applicability.--The amendment made by subsection (a) 
shall apply to the first Director of the Office of Multifamily 
Housing Assistance Restructuring of the Department of Housing 
and Urban Development appointed after the date of the enactment 
of this Act, and any such Director appointed thereafter.

SEC. 623. VACANCY IN POSITION OF DIRECTOR.

    (a) In General.--Section 572 of the Multifamily Assisted 
Housing Reform and Affordability Act of 1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f 
note) is amended by striking subsection (b) and inserting the 
following new subsection:
    ``(b) Vacancy.--A vacancy in the position of Director shall 
be filled by appointment in the manner provided under 
subsection (a). The President shall make such an appointment 
not later than 60 days after such position first becomes 
vacant.''.
    (b) Applicability.--The amendment made by subsection (a) 
shall apply to any vacancy in the position of Director of the 
Office of Multifamily Housing Assistance Restructuring of the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development which occurs or 
exists after the date of the enactment of this Act.

SEC. 624. OVERSIGHT BY FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER.

    (a) In General.--Section 578 of the Multifamily Assisted 
Housing Reform and Affordability Act of 1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f 
note) is amended to read as follows:

``SEC. 578. OVERSIGHT BY FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER.

    ``All authority and responsibilities assigned under this 
subtitle to the Secretary shall be carried out through the 
Assistant Secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban 
Development who is the Federal Housing Commissioner.''.
    (b) Report.--The second sentence of section 573(b) of the 
Multifamily Assisted Housing Reform and Affordability Act of 
1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) is amended by striking 
``Secretary'' and inserting ``Assistant Secretary of the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development who is the Federal 
Housing Commissioner''.

SEC. 625. LIMITATION ON SUBSEQUENT EMPLOYMENT.

    Section 576 of the Multifamily Assisted Housing Reform and 
Affordability Act of 1997 (42 U.S.C. 1437f note) is amended by 
striking ``2-year period'' and inserting ``1-year period''.

          Subtitle C--Miscellaneous Housing Program Amendments

SEC. 631. EXTENSION OF CDBG PUBLIC SERVICES CAP EXCEPTION.

    Section 105(a)(8) of the Housing and Community Development 
Act of 1974 (42 U.S.C. 5305(a)(8)) is amended by striking 
``through 2001'' and inserting ``through 2003''.

SEC. 632. USE OF SECTION 8 ENHANCED VOUCHERS FOR PREPAYMENTS.

    Section 8(t)(2) of the United States Housing Act of 1937 
(42 U.S.C. 1437f(t)(2)) is amended by inserting after 
``insurance contract for the mortgage for such housing 
project'' the following: ``(including any such mortgage 
prepayment during fiscal year 1996 or a fiscal year thereafter 
or any insurance contract voluntary termination during fiscal 
year 1996 or a fiscal year thereafter)''.

SEC. 633. PREPAYMENT AND REFINANCING OF LOANS FOR SECTION 202 
                    SUPPORTIVE HOUSING.

    (a) In General.--Section 811 of the American Homeownership 
and Economic Opportunity Act of 2000 (12 U.S.C. 1701q note) is 
amended by striking subsection (e).
    (b) Effectiveness Upon Date of Enactment.--The amendment 
made by subsection (a) of this section shall take effect upon 
the date of the enactment of this Act and the provisions of 
section 811 of the American Homeownership and Economic 
Opportunity Act of 2000 (12 U.S.C. 1701q note), as amended by 
subsection (a) of this section, shall apply as so amended upon 
such date of enactment, notwithstanding--
            (1) any authority of the Secretary of Housing and 
        Urban Development to issue regulations to implement or 
        carry out the amendments made by subsection (a) of this 
        section or the provisions of section 811 of the 
        American Homeownership and Economic Opportunity Act of 
        2000 (12 U.S.C. 1701q note); or
            (2) any failure of the Secretary of Housing and 
        Urban Development to issue any such regulations 
        authorized.

SEC. 634. TECHNICAL CORRECTION.

    (a) In General.--Section 101(a) of Public Law 100-77 (42 
U.S.C. 11301 note) is amended to read as if the amendment made 
by section 1 of Public Law 106-400 (114 Stat. 1675) were made 
to ``Section 101'' instead of ``Section 1''.
    (b) Retroactive Effect.--The amendment made by subsection 
(a) of this section is deemed to have taken effect immediately 
after the enactment of Public Law 106-400 (114 Stat. 1675).

                    TITLE VII--MENTAL HEALTH PARITY

SEC. 701. EXTENSION OF CERTAIN PROVISIONS

      (a) ERISA.--Section 712(f) of the Employee Retirement 
Income Security Act of 1974 (29 U.S.C. 1185a(f)) is amended by 
striking ``September 30, 2001'' and inserting ``December 31, 
2002''.
      (b) PHSA.--Section 2705(f) of the Public Health Service 
Act (42 U.S.C. 300gg-5(f)) is amended by striking ``September 
30, 2001'' and inserting ``December 31, 2002''.
      (c) Internal Revenue Code of 1986.--Section 9812(f) of 
the Internal Revenue Code of 1986 is amended by striking 
``September 30, 2001'' and inserting ``December 31, 2002''.

SEC. 702. CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET ACT.

      Notwithstanding Rule 3 of the Budget Scorekeeping 
Guidelines set forth in the joint explanatory statement of the 
committee of conference accompanying Conference Report 105-217, 
the provisions of this title that would have been estimated by 
the Office of Management and Budget as changing direct spending 
or receipts under section 252 of the Balanced Budget and 
Emergency Deficit Control Act of 1985 were it included in an 
Act other than an appropriations Act shall be treated as direct 
spending or receipts legislation, as appropriate, under section 
252 of the Balanced Budget and Emergency Deficit Control Act of 
1985, and by the Chairmen of the House and Senate Budget 
Committees, as appropriate, under the Congressional Budget Act.
      This Act may be cited as the ``Departments of Labor, 
Health and Human Services, and Education, and Related Agencies 
Appropriations Act, 2002''.
      And the Senate agree to the same.

                                   Ralph Regula,
                                   C.W. Bill Young,
                                   Ernest J. Istook, Jr.,
                                   Dan Miller,
                                   Roger F. Wicker,
                                   Anne M. Northup,
                                   Randy ``Duke'' Cunningham,
                                   Kay Granger,
                                   John E. Peterson,
                                   Don Sherwood,
                                   David Obey,
                                   Steny Hoyer,
                                   Nancy Pelosi,
                                   Nita M. Lowey,
                                   Rosa DeLauro,
                                   Jesse Jackson, Jr.,
                                   Patrick J. Kennedy,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Tom Harkin,
                                   Ernest Hollings,
                                   Daniel Inouye,
                                   Harry Reid,
                                   Herb Kohl,
                                   Patty Murray,
                                   Mary Landrieu,
                                   Robert C. Byrd,
                                   Arlen Specter,
                                   Thad Cochran,
                                   Judd Gregg,
                                   Larry E. Craig,
                                   Ted Stevens,
                                   Kay Bailey Hutchison,
                                   Mike DeWine,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.
       JOINT EXPLANATORY STATEMENT OF THE COMMITTEE OF CONFERENCE

      The managers on the part of the House and Senate at the 
conference on the disagreeing votes of the two Houses on the 
amendment of the Senate to the bill (H.R. 3061) making 
appropriations for the Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
Services, and Education, and Related Agencies for the fiscal 
year ending September 30, 2002, and for other purposes, submit 
the following joint statement of the House and Senate in 
explanation of the effect of the action agreed upon by the 
managers and recommended in the accompanying conference report.
      In implementing this agreement, the Departments and 
agencies should comply with the language and instructions set 
forth in House Report 107-229 and Senate Report 107-84.
      In the case where the language and instructions in either 
report specifically address the allocation of funds, the 
Departments and agencies are to follow the funding levels 
specified in the Congressional budget justifications 
accompanying the fiscal year 2002 budget or the underlying 
authorizing statute and should give full consideration to all 
items, including items allocating specific funding included in 
the House and Senate reports. With respect to the provisions in 
the House and Senate reports that specifically allocate funds, 
each has been reviewed and those that are jointly concurred in 
have been included in this joint statement.
      The conferees specifically endorse the provisions of the 
House Report 105-205 directing ``. . . the Departments of 
Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education, and the Social 
Security Administration and the Railroad Retirement Board to 
submit operating plans with respect to discretionary 
appropriations to the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations. These plans, which are to be submitted within 
30 days of the final passage of the bill, must be signed by the 
respective Departmental Secretaries, the Social Security 
Commissioner and the Chairman of the Railroad Retirement 
Board.''
      The Departments of Labor, Health and Human Services, and 
Education, and Related Agencies Appropriations Act, 2002 
incorporates the following agreements of the managers:

                      TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF LABOR

                 Employment and Training Administration

                    Training and Employment Services

      The conference agreement includes $5,630,282,000 for 
training and employment services instead of $5,583,147,000 as 
proposed by the House and $5,533,281,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Of the amount appropriated, $2,463,000,000 is an 
advance appropriation for fiscal year 2003, as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $1,127,965,000 for 
Youth Training, which is the Senate level. Funding for the 
Youth Opportunity Grants, $225,100,000, provided within the 
total for this activity in the House bill, is provided 
separately in the conference agreement as proposed by the 
Senate. These grants are aimed at increasing the long-term 
employment of youth who live in empowerment zones, enterprise 
communities, and other high-poverty areas.
      The conference agreement includes $1,549,000,000 for the 
Dislocated Worker program, which is the same as the Senate 
level. The conferees intend that 80 percent of the funds 
provided will be used for State formula grants and 20 percent 
for National Emergency Grants as authorized under the Workforce 
Investment Act of 1998 and provided in the House bill.
      The conferees have been informed that the Department 
plans to cut dislocated worker funding in program year 2001 for 
community-based organizations and, therefore, strongly urge the 
Administration to continue, at least at current services 
levels, job training activities for these organizations.
      The conference agreement includes $57,000,000 for Native 
Americans instead of $55,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$57,800,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $80,770,000 for 
activities authorized under Section 167 of the Workforce 
Investment Act, reflected in two separate line items on the 
table accompanying the conference agreement: ``Migrant and 
Seasonal Farmworkers'' and ``National Activities/Other''. Under 
the Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers line item, the conference 
agreement provides $79,751,000. The agreement includes bill 
language directing that $4,786,000 of this amount be used for 
migrant and seasonal farmworker housing grants. The conferees 
agree that the remaining amount should be used for State 
service area grants, including funding grantees in those States 
impacted by formula changes at their comparable 1998 levels. 
Within the National Activities/Other line item, the conference 
agreement includes $1,019,000 to be used for Section 167 
training, technical assistance and related activities, 
including funds for migrant rest center activities. The 
agreement anticipates that the Department will continue 
valuable technical assistance services provided by the 
Association of Farmworker Opportunity Programs.
      The conference agreement includes $1,459,200,000 for Job 
Corps. Within the total, $1,328,825,000 is provided for 
continuing operations of the program and $130,375,000 is for 
renovation and construction of Job Corps centers. The 
additional $10,000,000 above the request in construction and 
renovation is for the first year costs for a minimum of two new 
Job Corps centers. The Secretary is urged to initiate the 
process of selecting and designing these new centers in the 
2002 fiscal year and to include additional required funding in 
subsequent budget requests, beginning with fiscal year 2003.
      The conference agreement includes a citation to the Women 
in Apprenticeship and Nontraditional Occupations Act as 
proposed by the House. The Senate bill did not cite this Act.
      The conference agreement provides that funds for the 
National Skill Standards Board shall become available October 
1, 2001 as proposed by the Senate. The House bill did not 
contain this provision.
      The conferees urge the Secretary to target funds to fill 
vacancies in caring for our nation's elderly and disabled with 
those workers recently unemployed. Training for long-term care 
workers should be a high priority for the use of Workforce 
Investment Act funds both at the federal level and in the 
States.
      The conferees urge the Department of Labor, in 
cooperation with the Health Resources and Services 
Administration, to assess the shortage of frontline caregivers 
in long-term care settings (certified nurse aids, licensed 
practical nurses) and make comprehensive recommendations to 
address the increasing demand of an aging baby-boomer 
generation, and report findings and recommendations to the 
House and Senate Appropriations Committees by June 2002.
      With respect to the projects listed below for pilots and 
demonstrations, the conferees encourage the Department to 
ensure that these projects are coordinated with local Workforce 
Investment Boards. The conferees also encourage the Department 
to ensure that project performance is adequately documented and 
evaluated. The conference agreement includes the following 
amounts for the following projects and activities:

Bristol Bay Native Association vocational job training program  $500,000
Recruitment and retention of Alaska Natives in nursing at 
    University of Alaska in Anchorage.........................   500,000
Center for Textile Training and Apparel Technology at Central 
    Alabama Community College.................................   750,000
Arkansas Enterprise Group's Good Faith Fund to focus on 
    employment training and career path development for low-
    income residents of the Delta Region in Arkansas..........   150,000
University of Arkansas Medical Sciences BioVentures Incubator 
    for equipment needed for wetlabs used in training.........   200,000
California State Polytechnic University, Pomona, CA, to 
    develop technology training programs......................   250,000
City of Compton to support the Compton Youth Succeed 
    Initiative................................................   250,000
Greater Sacramento Urban League, Sacramento, CA, for job 
    training activities.......................................   270,000
Los Medanos College, Pittsburg, CA, for the Brentwood Outreach 
    Center to develop model program to serve low-income 
    minorities................................................   440,000
Pride Industries, Roseville, CA, to create long-term jobs for 
    persons with disabilities and other barriers to employment 1,000,000
Sacramento Housing and Redevelopment Agency for the Sacramento 
    Pre-Apprenticeship Construction Job Training Program......   800,000
Urban League of Metropolitan Denver, CO, for Project Connect 
    Technical Training Program................................   100,000
Asnuntuck Community College, Enfield, CT, to develop skills 
    sets for the manufacturing sector.........................   500,000
Hispanic Center of Greater Danbury, Danbury, CT, to provide 
    career services to minority populations...................  $150,000
National Student Partnerships continuation project for 
    expansion to 10 new sites.................................   550,000
Waterbury Adult Education Technical Center to provide 
    occupational training to workers at small firms...........   400,000
Jobs for America's Grads (JAG) program $1,000,000............. 1,000,000
Florida Agency for Workforce Innovation, Tallahassee, FL, for 
    a pilot program to recruit and train health care workers.. 2,000,000
American Indian Science and Engineering Society for the Rural 
    Computer Utilization Training Program.....................   500,000
Bishops Museum................................................   800,000
High Tech Training--Maui, HI..................................   500,000
Maui Economic Development Board for the Rural Computer 
    Utilization Training Program.............................. 1,000,000
Remote Rural Hawaii Job Training Project...................... 5,000,000
Samoan/Asian Pacific Job Training--Hawaii..................... 3,500,000
Training & Education Opportunities at the University of Hawaii 
    at Maui................................................... 5,000,000
Iowa Policy Project for a study on temporary and contingent 
    workers...................................................   500,000
The Joblinks program.......................................... 1,000,000
University of Northern Iowa's Program for Integrating 
    Immigrants and Refugees into the Workforce................   250,000
Harvey Community Center, Harvey, IL, for a demonstration 
    project to provide job training for low income 
    individuals/families......................................   200,000
Lakeside Community Committee, Chicago, IL, for a job training 
    program targeting the hard core unemployed................   440,000
Opportunity, Inc. in Highland Park, IL to implement a model 
    job training program to integrate workers with 
    disabilities into a manufacturing workplace...............   125,000
Policy Research Action Group in Chicago to train inner-city 
    residents for careers in the automotive industry..........   125,000
Safer Foundation, Chicago, IL to continue the Workplace 
    Acclimation Program for Ex-Offenders......................   400,000
Labor Institute for Training, Indianapolis, IN, to expand and 
    improve services to newly dislocated and incumbent workers   152,000
Career Resources, Inc., Louisville, KY, to establish a 
    workforce computer training program.......................   100,000
Career Vision Inc., Louisville, KY, to establish a distance 
    learning pilot program for computer-based employment 
    skills for youths and adults with disabilities............   100,000
Center for Women and Families, Louisville, KY, to expand 
    technology training and professional education for women 
    affected by domestic violence.............................   700,000
Clifty Heights Community Development Organization, Inc, 
    Science Hill, KY, for program development, operation and 
    equipment.................................................   200,000
Custom Quality Services, Louisville, KY, for training for 
    their disabled employees..................................    30,000
New Vision Enterprises, Louisville, KY, for an employment 
    program for people with disabilities......................   100,000
University of Louisville Center for Supply Chain Workforce 
    Development...............................................   800,000
Louisiana National Guard for the Louisiana Job Challenge 
    Program to fund a trade/skill training program for at-risk 
    teenagers.................................................   200,000
Military Educational Training Enhancement Fund, Carville, LA, 
    for a job challenge program for at risk youth.............   500,000
Kennebec Valley Technical College to develop a Precision 
    Machining Technology Program to address the critical 
    workforce shortage in Maine's metal products industry.....   400,000
United Technologies Center to develop a Photonics Training 
    Pilot Project, to regional technical high school students 
    in the field of photonics.................................   400,000
Focus: HOPE in Detroit, MI to provide training programs to 
    women and minorities through their Information Tech Center   500,000
Michigan Technology Commercialization, Inc., Ann Arbor, MI, 
    for planning activities...................................   350,000
Mott Community College, Flint, MI to develop simulation 
    curriculum in virtual machining........................... 1,000,000
Minnesota Assistance Council for Veterans to support their 
    workforce readiness program for homeless veterans.........   500,000
Northeast Higher Education District (NHED) in Minnesota to 
    design a Rural Telework Center which will provide 
    workforce programs and employment opportunities in IT jobs 1,000,000
Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau, MO, for 
    economic and workforce development........................   900,000
Alcorn Biotechnology Center, Lorman, MS for entrepreneurial 
    training..................................................   150,000
Mississippi Delta Community College Business Services Center..   300,000
Mississippi State Board for Community and Junior Colleges for 
    an automotive workforce training program in Madison 
    County, MS................................................ 5,000,000
Mississippi State University Nursery Assistance...............   800,000
Mississippi State University, Center for Advanced Vehicular 
    Systems, Mississippi State, MS, for automotive engineering 
    training..................................................   200,000
Mississippi Valley Biometric Technology, Itta Bena, MS........   150,000
Minot State University, Minot, ND, for the Minot Job Corps 
    Fellowship Training Program...............................   385,000
Traill County Technology Center at Mayville State University 
    to retain graduates in business in Traill County, ND......   175,000
New Hampshire Motor Transport Association to recruit, train, 
    and retrain truck drivers in Concord, NH..................   375,000
Youth Opportunities in Retailing, Inc., to work in cooperation 
    with schools and community organizations to teach sales 
    and service skills to develop a future workforce..........   200,000
City of Las Vegas for worker initiatives in response to post-
    terrorist attack layoffs.................................. 1,750,000
NevadaWorks to create a job skills training program to help 
    residents meet the employment needs of new businesses in 
    the area..................................................   250,000
Reno/Sparks Chamber of Commerce--Workforce Learning Academy 
    Summit....................................................   150,000
Audrey Cohen College, New York City, for Welfare to Careers 
    Program...................................................   475,000
Healthcare Association of New York State to develop the Center 
    for Health Care Workforce Innovations.....................   150,000
Westchester-Putnam Counties Consortium for Worker Education 
    and Training, Inc., Yonkers, NY, for outreach and training 
    for construction workers..................................   500,000
Eastern Ohio Training Center, Cambridge, OH, for instructional 
    software, training materials, computer hardware and 
    accessories...............................................   300,000
Westside Industrial Retention and Expansion Network to expand 
    metalworking training programs............................   500,000
State Board of Career and Technology Education, Stillwater, 
    OK, to develop and update training modules................   300,000
Altoona Blair County Development Corporation Workforce 
    Initiative................................................   200,000
College Consortium for Workforce and Economic Development to 
    expand training programs in Philadelphia..................   300,000
Community Empowerment Association, Inc. for community re-entry 
    of offenders job training in Allegheny County.............   100,000
Community Loan Fund of Southwestern Pennsylvania to expand its 
    ``Family-Wage Job Initiative''............................   200,000
Economic Growth Connection of Westmoreland, PA, to establish a 
    training network consortium...............................   250,000
Lehigh Valley Workforce Investment Board for the 
    implementation of a training and curriculum program.......   100,000
National Student Partnerships for the opening of drop-in 
    centers at Temple University, establishing staffed centers 
    at the University of Pennsylvania and the University of 
    Pittsburgh, and 18 current sites..........................   150,000
Northwest Pennsylvania Industrial Resources Center, Inc., 
    Erie, PA, for development and distribution of Foundation 
    Skills Curriculum for Wood/Forest Industry................   100,000
Nueva Esperanza for the administration of the Nueva Esparanza 
    Telework Center in Philadelphia...........................   200,000
Ogontz Avenue Revitalization Corporation to provide support 
    services in the community for workers seeking technology 
    training in Philadelphia..................................   100,000
Olde Kensington Redevelopment Corporation in Philadelphia for 
    the establishment of the North Philadelphia Senior 
    Development Project--to maximize seniors' self-sufficiency 
    and independent community residence through technology 
    training..................................................   100,000
Pennsylvania Association of Individuals with Disabilities to 
    develop programs to help disabled individuals to move into 
    the workforce.............................................   500,000
Three Rivers Workforce Investment Board to train workforce in 
    technology occupations in Alleghany County................   200,000
UMWA Career Centers, Inc. to provide training and placement 
    services to dislocated coalminers......................... 2,000,000
University Technology Park/Westchester University to establish 
    a Computer and Internet Training Center...................   200,000
Venango Economic Development Corporation, Oil City, PA, to 
    quantify the need for technology training in rural areas..   200,000
Intertribal Bison Cooperative in Rapid City, SD to provide 
    employment training.......................................   300,000
Midland College, Midland, TX, for training and safety programs 
    for students desiring to work in the oil and gas industry. 1,600,000
Permian Basin Energy Education Project, Midland Community 
    College and Odessa College................................   250,000
Project Quest for innovations to improve program performance 
    in the delivery of training to the unemployed and the 
    underemployed.............................................   440,000
Alexandria /Arlington Workforce Investment Board to increase 
    employment of the disabled................................   300,000
Chantilly Mews Preservation Program, Springfield, VA, to 
    purchase educational equipment and software...............   100,000
Martinsville-Henry County Chamber of Commerce, Martinsville, 
    VA, for Workforce Learning Academies......................    50,000
SERVE, Inc., Manassas, VA, for job training and employment 
    services..................................................   400,000
Southwest Virginia Community College for Work Keys............    70,000
Champlain College in Burlington, VT, for the Vermont 
    Telecommunications Application Center (VTAC) to 
    understand, plan and leverage the opportunities of 
    advanced technology.......................................   250,000
Cyberskills Vermont Workforce Development Initiative in 
    Burlington, VT, to provide community-based job training 
    programs for low and medium income residents..............   200,000
Lake Champlain Life-Long Learning Fund in Burlington, VT, to 
    plan development of a fully integrated academic and 
    technical curriculum for secondary and adult technical 
    education.................................................    50,000
Vermont Department of Employment and Training in Montpelier to 
    develop a Registered Apprenticeship Program designed to 
    provide opportunities to a wider range of individuals who 
    are not bound for college but require instruction in new 
    occupational areas........................................   200,000
Vermont Technical College in Randolph Center to work in 
    collaboration with the Vermont State College System to 
    develop a Vermont Workforce and Training Initiative which 
    will be a regional system for technological and skills 
    development...............................................   300,000
Seattle King County Workforce Development Council, Seattle, 
    WA, for the purpose of retraining displaced Boeing 
    employees.................................................   800,000
Green Bay Area Workforce Development Board in Green Bay, WI, 
    to create a public-private partnership providing training 
    for specific employer needs in the area................... 1,200,000
The Superior-Douglas County Senior Computer Training in 
    Superior, WI, to expand a computer lab used to train the 
    senior workforce for new technologies.....................    32,000
University of Wisconsin-Extension Service for the Northern 
    Economic Development Initiative for baseline analysis, 
    strategic planning and workforce training in northern 
    Wisconsin.................................................   175,000
Workforce Development Board of South Central WI, located in 
    Madison, WI, to create an industry partnership that 
    develops workers for targeted applications................ 1,140,000
West Virginia High Technology Consortium Foundation to expand 
    IT training and establish a pilot curriculum..............   700,000

            Community Service Employment for Older Americans

      The conference agreement appropriates $445,100,000 for 
Community Service Employment for Older Americans, instead of 
$440,200,000 as proposed by the House and $450,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.

              Federal Unemployment Benefits and Allowances

      The conference agreement provides $415,650,000 for 
Federal Unemployment Benefits and Allowances as proposed by the 
House and the Senate. The conferees did not provide these funds 
contingent upon enactment of authorizing legislation as 
proposed by the House. The Senate bill did not include this 
provision.

     State Unemployment Insurance and Employment Service Operations

      The conference agreement provides $3,401,338,000 for 
State Unemployment Insurance and Employment Service Operations 
instead of $3,400,338,000 as proposed by the House and 
$3,430,338,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees include $50,680,000 instead of the 
$49,680,000 proposed by the House and $51,680,000 proposed by 
the Senate for employment service national activities.
      The conferees include $120,000,000 for One-Stop/America's 
Labor Market Information system as proposed by the House, 
instead of $148,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees include a provision directing that funds 
recovered in the settlement of litigation between the State of 
Mississippi and a contractor relating to the acquisition of an 
automated system for benefit payments be transferred from the 
Treasury to the State of Mississippi.

                         Program Administration

      The conference agreement appropriates $161,863,000 for 
Program Administration, the same as the House level. The 
detailed table at the end of this joint statement reflects the 
activity distribution agreed to by the conferees.
      The conferees also include funding, as listed in the 
Senate report, for management and oversight of pilot and 
demonstration projects.

              Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration


                         Salaries and Expenses

      The conference agreement appropriates $109,866,000 for 
the Pension and Welfare Benefits Administration, salaries and 
expenses, as proposed by the House instead of $112,418,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Within the total, $85,525,000 is 
provided for enforcement and compliance, $20,205,000 is 
provided for policy, regulation, and public service, and 
$4,136,000 is included for program oversight.

                  Employment Standards Administration


                         Salaries and Expenses

      The conference agreement appropriates $371,201,000 for 
the Employment Standards Administration, salaries and expenses, 
instead of the $369,631,000 as proposed by the House and 
$377,145,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within the total, 
$156,092,000 is provided for enforcement of wage and hour 
standards, $30,632,000 is provided for the office of labor-
management standards, $77,914,000 for federal contractor EEO 
standards enforcement, $91,356,000 for federal programs for 
worker compensation, and $13,226,000 for program direction and 
support.
      The Senate conferees do not concur with the House report 
language regarding Davis-Bacon wage determination process 
reforms. The conferees request the Department of Labor to 
submit a report not later than June 30, 2002, outlining 
specific changes, which are proposed to modernize the Davis-
Bacon wage determination process under the reengineering 
approach.

        Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Fund

      The conference agreement includes $136,000,000 for the 
administrative expenses related to the processing of claims for 
the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Act, the 
same as both the House and Senate.
      The conferees are aware that a significant number of 
possible beneficiaries reside in West Texas near the Pantex 
facility. The conferees encourage the Secretary to establish a 
full-time resource center in West Texas in order to provide 
sufficient services to those who may qualify for benefits under 
the law.

                    Black Lung Disability Trust Fund

      The conference agreement includes a definite annual 
appropriation of $1,035,759,000 for black lung benefit payments 
and interest payments on advances made to the Trust Fund as 
proposed by the House instead of an indefinite permanent 
appropriation as proposed by the Senate.

             Occupational Safety and Health Administration


                         Salaries and Expenses

      The conference agreement includes $443,651,000 for the 
Occupational Safety and Health Administration instead of 
$435,307,000 as proposed by the House and $450,262,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The detailed table at the end of this 
joint statement reflects the activity distribution agreed to by 
the conferees.

                 Mine Safety and Health Administration


                         Salaries and Expenses

      The conference agreement includes $254,768,000 for the 
Mine Safety and Health Administration instead of $251,725,000 
as proposed by the House and $256,093,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The detailed table at the end of this joint statement 
reflects the activity distribution agreed to by the conferees.

                       Bureau of Labor Statistics


                         Salaries and Expenses

      The conference agreement includes $476,554,000 for the 
Bureau of Labor Statistics rather than $477,108,000 as provided 
by the House and $476,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
detailed table at the end of this joint statement reflects the 
activity distribution agreed to by the conferees.

                 Office of Disability Employment Policy


                         Salaries and Expenses

      The conference agreement includes $38,158,000 for the 
Office of Disability Employment Policy instead of $33,053,000 
as proposed by the House and $43,263,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Within the total, $2,640,000 is specifically for the 
President's Task Force on Employment of Adults with 
Disabilities, the same as in the House bill.
      The conference agreement includes $1,000,000, as provided 
by the Senate, for three pilot programs for Federal employment 
for individuals with significant disabilities from home-based 
workstations. The conferees intend that Federal agencies 
include in these pilots all appropriate positions, whether the 
work is performed in-house, contracted, or outsourced in the 
types of jobs which can be performed from home, such as 
customer service/call contact centers, and claims, loan or 
financial transaction processing operations.

                        Departmental Management


                         Salaries and Expenses

      The conference agreement includes $379,088,000 for 
Departmental Management, salaries and expenses, instead of 
$383,878,000 as proposed by the House and $361,834,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The detailed table at the end of this 
joint statement reflects the activity distribution agreed to by 
the conferees.
      Within the total provided for this account, the 
conference agreement appropriates $50,000,000 for the 
Department-wide information technology crosscut.
      The conference agreement includes $148,282,000 for the 
Bureau of International Labor Affairs (ILAB), instead of 
$147,982,000 as provided in both the House and Senate bills. 
The conference agreement also includes language authorizing the 
expenditure of funds for bilateral and multilateral technical 
assistance and other international labor activities, and 
general grant authority for the agency. Within the total 
provided, $82,000,000 is to assist developing countries with 
the elimination of child labor. Of this amount, $45,000,000 is 
for the International Labor Organization's International 
Programme for the Elimination of Child Labor. In addition, 
$37,000,000 is provided for bilateral assistance, made 
available through September 30, 2003, to improve access to 
basic education in international areas with a high rate of 
abusive and exploitative child labor. The conference agreement 
further includes $20,000,000 for multilateral technical 
assistance and $17,000,000 for bilateral technical assistance. 
These funds help developing countries implement core labor 
standards, strengthen the capacities of Ministries of Labor to 
enforce national labor laws, and protect internationally-
recognized worker rights. The conference agreement further 
includes $5,000,000 for ILAB to build its own permanent 
capacity to monitor and report regularly and in-depth to the 
Congress on the extent to which foreign countries with trade 
and investment agreements with the United States respect 
internationally-recognized worker rights and effectively 
promote core labor standards. The conference agreement also 
includes $10,000,000 for global workplace-based HIV-AIDS 
education and prevention programs. The conferees agree that the 
Secretary may transfer up to 5 percent of ILAB funding, 
exempting child labor protection and monitoring amounts, for 
other unspecified ILAB activities. The conferees also agree 
that no funds shall be transferred from amounts included for 
child labor protection and monitoring activities.
      The conferees also include funding for the following 
activity:
      --$300,000 to the University of Iowa for work on child 
labor.
      Within the total amount provided for ILAB, the conferees 
expect the Department to work with the U.S. Department of State 
to post additional labor attaches overseas. The conferees 
expect the Department to submit a plan detailing the countries 
with which the U.S. has bilateral or regional trade and 
investment agreements and to which it would propose to send 
labor attaches, as well as the entire cost attendant to such 
overseas assignments. The conferees also strongly encourage the 
Secretary to continue the Labor Exchange Program with the State 
Department through which employees throughout the Labor 
Department have the opportunity to serve as labor attaches 
abroad in countries that ILAB and State determine to have 
significant problems with respect to child labor and other core 
labor standards. The conferees expect the Department to submit 
a draft of the plan, developed in collaboration with the 
Department of State, to the Committees on Appropriations no 
later than March 31, 2002.
      The conferees urge ILAB to submit a report by September 
1, 2002 to the Committees on Appropriations on the nature and 
scope of technical assistance funds already appropriated in 
prior fiscal years. Similar language was included in the Senate 
report. In addition, the conferees urge ILAB to report by June 
30, 2002 on the study that was undertaken by the Department 
with regard to regular reporting of working conditions in the 
production of apparel imported into the U.S. The Senate report 
contained similar language.
      The conferees note that the Department had a significant 
lapse in full-time equivalent usage at the end of fiscal year 
2001, particularly in the worker protection programs. The 
conferees recognize that this was partly due to the transition 
from the previous Administration to the current one, as well as 
to some uncertainty regarding the final 2001 budget level. It 
is the conferees' intention that the Department should make 
every effort to ensure that the programs are appropriately 
staffed to perform their mandated responsibilities and meet 
performance goals. The conferees are pleased to note, from the 
data most recently available, that the Department has been able 
to achieve wholly, in part, or exceed over 90 percent of its 
performance objectives. The conference agreement directs the 
Department to prepare a report detailing its hiring plans for 
fiscal year 2002 and to submit the report no later than January 
15, 2002.
      The conferees are aware of the important work the 
Department is doing to encourage small businesses to develop 
alcohol and drug-free workplace programs. Therefore, the 
conferees recommend continuation of the Working Partners 
Program within the Department's Office of Policy.

                    Veterans Employment and Training

      The conferees appropriate $212,703,000 for veterans 
employment and training, instead of the $211,703,000 as 
proposed by the House and $213,703,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Within the funds provided, $18,250,000 is included for 
the homeless veterans program and $7,550,000 is included for 
the veterans workforce investment programs.

                           General Provisions


         Dislocated Worker Assistance to Airport Career Centers

      The conferees delete without prejudice a Sense of the 
Senate provision regarding appropriations to enable airport 
career centers in New York and New Jersey to provide dislocated 
worker employment and training assistance to workers in the 
airline and related industries who have been dislocated as a 
result of the September 11, 2001 attack. The House bill 
contains no similar provision.

                   Vocational Rehabilitative Services

      The conferees delete without prejudice a Sense of the 
Senate provision regarding assistance to individuals with 
disabilities from New York and New Jersey who require 
vocational rehabilitative services as a result of September 11. 
The House bill contains no similar provision.

           TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES


              Health Resources and Services Administration


                     Health Resources and Services

      The conference agreement includes $6,081,237,000 for 
health resources and services instead of $5,691,480,000 as 
proposed by the House and $5,501,343,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement includes bill language 
identifying $311,978,000 for the construction and renovation of 
health care and other facilities instead of $10,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The House bill contained no similar 
provision. These funds are to be used for the following 
projects: Prince George's Hospital Center, Cheverly, Maryland; 
Whitman-Walker Clinic, Inc., Washington, D.C.; ARCH (Adolescent 
Residential Center for Help) Facility, Anchorage, Alaska; 
Southcentral Foundation's Pathways Home Residential Substance 
Abuse Treatment Facility, Anchorage, Alaska; Baptist Health 
Foundation, Inc., Birmingham, Alabama; Pickens County Medical 
Center, Carrollton, Alabama; Thomas Hospital, Fairhope, 
Alabama; University of South Alabama Gulf Coast Cancer Center 
and Research Institute; University of Alabama School of 
Medicine, Huntsville Primary Care Center; Cooper Green Hospital 
in Alabama; Hospice of West Alabama; University of Alabama, 
Birmingham, Interdisciplinary Biomedical Research Institute; 
Arkansas Children's Hospital; Children's Health Fund in 
Arkansas; Advance Care Hospital, Hot Springs, Arkansas; College 
of Nursing, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences; 
Community Healthcare of Douglas, Douglas, Arizona; Copper Queen 
Community Hospital, Bisbee, Arizona; Sierra Vista Health 
Center, Sierra Vista, Arizona; University of Arizona, Tucson, 
Arizona; Cochise County Department of Health, Arizona; Pima 
County Department of Health, Arizona; Santa Cruz County 
Department of Health, Arizona; Yuma County Department of 
Health, Arizona; Maricopa Integrated Health System, Maricopa 
Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona; University of Southern 
California Alfred E. Mann Institute and Biomedical Engineering 
Center; California School of Professional Psychology, Center 
for Innovation in Behavioral Health, San Diego; Children's 
Regional Emergency Care Center at Children's Hospital and 
Health Center, San Diego, California; Sharp Coronado Hospital, 
Coronado, California; Placer County Children's Emergency 
Shelter, Auburn, California; Psychiatric Emergency Services 
Center, San Mateo County, California Health Center; Hartnell 
College, Regional Health Occupations Resource Center, Salinas, 
California; The Children's Hospital of Los Angeles; University 
of Southern California Keck School of Medicine; Paradise Valley 
Hospital, Complementary Medicine Center, National City, 
California; Grossmont College, El Cajon, California; Riverside-
San Bernardino South Clinic, Temecula, California; La Clinica 
de la Raza, Oakland, California; Loma Linda University Medical 
Center, Trauma/Emergency Medical Services Center, Loma Linda, 
California; Los Angeles Eye Institute, Los Angeles, California; 
Touro University School of Osteopathic Medicine, Mare Island, 
California; San Francisco Community Clinic Consortium, San 
Francisco, California; Community Medical Centers, Fresno, 
California; AltaMed Health Services Corporation, Los Angeles, 
California; Pediatric and Family Medical Center, Los Angeles, 
California; East Los Angeles Health Task Force, Los Angeles, 
California; Alliance Medical Center, Healdsburg, California; 
Center Point, Inc., San Rafael, California; Colorado State 
University Bioenvironmental Hazards Level-3 Facility; 
University of Northern Colorado Low-Incidence Disabilities 
Center; The Rocky Mountain Regional Trauma Center at Denver 
Health; National Jewish Medical and Research Center, Denver, 
Colorado; Boys Village Youth and Family Services, Milford, 
Connecticut; John D. Thompson Hospice Institute for Education, 
Training and Research, Branford, Connecticut; Southern 
Connecticut State University, School of Nursing, New Haven, 
Connecticut; Jefferson Senior Citizens Center, Monticello, 
Florida; Northwest Florida Community Hospital; Camillus House, 
Inc., Miami, Florida; Ambulatory Care Center at Miami 
Children's Hospital, Miami, Florida; Economic Opportunity 
Family Health Center, Miami, Florida; Florida Association of 
Community Health Centers; University of Florida College of 
Dentistry; University of Miami School of Medicine, Batchelor 
Children's Health Center; Columbia County Senior Services, Lake 
City Florida; Enrichment Center, Brooksville, Florida; Bridges 
of America, Inc., St. Petersburg, Florida; Community Health 
Centers of Pinellas, Inc., Johnnie Ruth Clark Health Center, 
St. Petersburg, Florida; University of South Florida Health 
Sciences Center and College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida; Paul 
D. Coverdell Building at the Institute of Biomedical and Health 
Sciences at the University of Georgia; Marcus Institute, 
Atlanta, Georgia; West End Medical Centers, Atlanta, Georgia; 
J.P. Carr Human Services Complex in Rockdale County, Georgia; 
Oakhurst Medical Centers, Decatur and Stone Mountain, Georgia; 
Maui Community Health Center; Molokai General Hospital; 
Community Health Care Inc., Davenport, Iowa; Des Moines 
University Osteopathic Medical Center; Grandview Health Center, 
Des Moines, Iowa; Mercy Medical Center, Des Moines, Iowa; 
Neumann College, Aston, Pennsylvania; Palmer Chiropractic 
College, Davenport, Iowa; Peoples Community Health Clinic, 
Waterloo, Iowa; Primary Health Care Inc., Des Moines, Iowa; 
River Hills Community Health Center, Ottumwa, Iowa; Siouxland 
Community Health Center, Sioux City, Iowa; South East Iowa 
Community Health Centers, Burlington, Iowa; University of 
Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls, Iowa; Children's Memorial Hospital, 
Children's Memorial Institute for Education and Research, 
Chicago, Illinois; Loretto Hospital, Chicago, Illinois; 
Prentice Women's Hospital, Northwestern Memorial Hospital, 
Chicago, Illinois; Edward Health Services Women's & Children's 
Pavilion, Naperville, Illinois; La Rabida Children's Hospital, 
Chicago, Illinois; Community Health Care, Inc., Rock Island, 
Illinois; Carl Sandburg College, Galesburg, Illinois; Access 
Community Health Center, Chicago, Illinois; Marklund Children's 
Home, West Chicago, Illinois; Rush-Copley Medical Center, 
Aurora, Illinois; Valley West Community Hospital, Sandwich, 
Illinois; Marklund Children's Home, Bloomingdale, Illinois; 
Chicago Family Health Center, Chicago, Illinois; The Clinic in 
Altgeld, Chicago, Illinois; Condell Medical Center, 
Libertyville, Illinois; Lake County Health Department and 
Community Health Center, Waukegan, Illinois; Edward Hospital, 
Naperville, Illinois; Northwestern University Center for 
Genomics and Molecular Medicine, Evanston, Illinois; Women's 
Health Center at Proctor Hospital in Peoria, Illinois; Southern 
Illinois University School of Medicine, Springfield, Illinois; 
Riverside Medical Center, Kankakee, Illinois; Union Hospital, 
Midwest Center for Rural Health, Terre Haute, Indiana; Indiana 
University Midwest Proton Radiation Institute, Bloomingdale, 
Indiana; Indiana Genomics Initiative, Indiana University School 
of Medicine; Bethany Medical Center, Kansas City, Kansas; 
Kansas University Imaging Facilities; Harrison Memorial 
Hospital Dialysis Center, Cynthiana, Kentucky; Jane Todd 
Crawford Hospital, Greensburg, Kentucky; St. Catharine's 
College, St. Catharine, Kentucky; University of Louisville 
Cardiac Assist Device Center; James Taylor Memorial Nursing 
Home, Louisville, Kentucky; Park DuValle Community Health 
Center, Louisville, Kentucky; Kentucky Communities Economic 
Opportunity Council, Inc., Appalachian Regional Wellness 
Center, Barbourville, Kentucky; Martin County Community Center, 
Inc., Health and Wellness Resource Center, Inez, Kentucky; 
University of Kentucky College of Medicine, Lexington, 
Kentucky; Lake Charles Memorial Hospital, Lake Charles, 
Louisiana; Allied Health Sciences Building at the University of 
Louisiana, Monroe; East Jefferson Community Health Center, 
Jefferson Parish, Louisiana; Innis, Louisiana Community Health 
Center; Louisiana Memorial Hospital, Lake Charles, Louisiana; 
Louisiana State University Pennington Biomedical Center; 
Louisiana State University Health Science Center, Shreveport, 
Louisiana; Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, 
New Orleans, Louisiana; Manet Community Health Center, 
Massachusetts; Jaharis Family Center on Biomedical Research and 
Nutrition; Massachusetts Biologic Laboratories at the 
University of Massachusetts; Northeastern University Bouve 
College of Health Sciences; Caritas Good Samaritan Medical 
Center, Brockton, Massachusetts; J. Joseph Moakley Medical 
Services Building, Boston Medical Center, Boston, 
Massachusetts; Brandeis University National Center for 
Behavioral Genomics, Waltham, Massachusetts; City of Malden, 
Massachusetts, Urgent Care Clinic and Family Health Center at 
Malden Hospital; University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical 
Center, University Campus, Worcester, Massachusetts; Lowell 
Community Health Center, Lowell, Massachusetts; Pioneer Valley 
Life Sciences Joint Venture between the University of 
Massachusetts and Baystate Medical Center; Holyoke Hospital, 
Holyoke, Massachusetts; Jackson Laboratory in Maine; Saginaw 
Cooperative Hospitals, Saginaw, Michigan; Detroit Medical 
Center, Detroit, Michigan; Community Health and Social 
Services, Detroit, Michigan; Samaritan Center, Detroit, 
Michigan; Madonna University, Livonia, Michigan; Charlevoix 
Area Hospital in Traverse City, Michigan; Marquette General 
Health System; Wayne State University and the University of 
Detroit Mercy; Ele's Place Healing Center, Lansing, Michigan; 
Hillsdale Community Health Center, Hillsdale, Michigan; 
American Lung Association of Minnesota, St. Paul, Minnesota; 
Model Cities Health Center, St. Paul, Minnesota; North End 
Health Center, St. Paul, Minnesota; West Side Community Health 
Services Dental Clinic, St. Paul, Minnesota; Fairview 
University Medical Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota; West Side 
Community Health Services Minneapolis Clinic, St. Paul, 
Minnesota; Ozark Tri-County Health Care Consortium Inc., 
Anderson, Missouri; University of Missouri Center for Molecular 
and Cellular Bioengineering Research, Kansas City; Cross Trails 
Medical Center, Bollinger County, Missouri; Douglas County 
Public Health Services Group; Northeast Missouri Health 
Council, Kirksville, Missouri; Samuel U. Rodgers Community 
Health Center, Kansas City, Missouri; Christian Hospital, St. 
Louis, Missouri; Logan College of Chiropractic, Chesterfield, 
Missouri; Operation Breakthrough, Kansas City, Missouri; 
University of Missouri-Kansas City Institute for Biomedical 
Research; Family Care Health Centers, St. Louis, Missouri; 
Kansas City Area Life Sciences Institute, Kansas City, 
Missouri; Center for Delta Health, Stoneville, Mississippi; 
Guyton Building, University of Mississippi Medical Center; 
Mississippi State School of Agriculture/Agromedicine; 
Mississippi State University Social Science Research Center; 
Neshoba County General Hospital, Philadelphia, Mississippi; 
Health and Wellness Center at Jackson State University, 
Jackson, Mississippi; Gilmore Hospital, Amory, Mississippi; 
McLaughlin Animal Facility and Research Laboratories, Great 
Falls, Montana; University of Montana National Center for 
Health Care Informatics; Greene County Health Care, Inc., North 
Carolina; Northeast Medical Center and the Carrabus College of 
Health Sciences, Concord, North Carolina; Ruth and Billy Graham 
Children's Center, Asheville, North Carolina; Durham County 
Hospital Corporation, Durham, North Carolina; McDowell 
Hospital, McDowell County, North Carolina; Education and 
Research Consortium of Western North Carolina, Inc., Asheville, 
North Carolina; University of North Carolina Biomedical 
Research and Teaching Facility; University of North Dakota 
School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, North 
Dakota; Ai Ki Ruti Substance Abuse Treatment Center in 
Winnebago, Nebraska; Boys Town National Research Hospital 
National Learning and Technology Center for Childhood Deafness 
and Vision Disorders, Omaha, Nebraska; Nebraska Health Systems, 
Omaha, Nebraska; University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, 
Nebraska; University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey 
Cancer Institute, New Brunswick, New Jersey; Hunterdon Medical 
Center, Flemington, New Jersey; Child Health Institute of New 
Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey; Leon G. Smith Infectious 
Disease Institute, Saint Michael's Medical Center, Newark, New 
Jersey; Englewood Hospital and Medical Center Advanced Breast 
Care Center, Englewood, New Jersey; Hackensack University 
Medical Center, Hackensack, New Jersey; Holy Name Hospital, 
Teaneck, New Jersey; Cooper Hospital, Camden New Jersey; 
Kessler Rehabilitation Research Institute in West Orange, New 
Jersey; First Choice Community Clinic, Albuquerque, New Mexico; 
New Mexico State University, College of Health and Social 
Services, Las Cruces, New Mexico; University of Nevada, Reno 
Biotechnology and Genomics Center; Huntsman Cancer Institute, 
Salt Lake City, Utah; University Medical Center Neonatal 
Intensive Care Unit, Las Vegas, Nevada; University of Nevada, 
Las Vegas Cancer Institute; North Shore Long Island Jewish 
Health System, Hillside Hospital; Little Falls Hospital and 
Residential Health Care Facility, Little Falls, New York; 
University of Buffalo Bioinformatics Center; New York 
University School of Medicine; The National Center for 
Muskuloskeletal Research at the Hospital for Special Surgery, 
New York, New York; Dominican College Center for Health 
Sciences, Orangeburg, New York; Village of Kiryas Joel, 
Maternal and Infant Health Care Convalescence Center, Monroe, 
New York; Ellenville Regional Hospital, Ellenville, New York; 
Kingston Hospital, Kingston, New York; Putnam Hospital, Camel, 
New York; Nassau University Medical Center, East Meadow, New 
York; Open Door Family Medical Center, Edison School Clinic, 
Port Chester, New York; Mount Sinai Hospital, New York, New 
York; Lewis County General Hospital, Lowville, New York; Albany 
Medical Center, Albany, New York; Joseph P. Addabbo Family 
Health Center, New York, New York; New York University Downtown 
Hospital, New York, New York; State University of New York 
Downstate Medical Center, Advanced Biotechnology Incubator, 
Brooklyn, New York; Children's Hospital, Buffalo, New York; 
North General Hospital, New York, New York; University of 
Rochester Medical Center, Children's Hospital at Strong 
Clinical Genetics Center; Columbia Memorial Hospital, Hudson, 
New York; Glens Falls Hospital, Glens Falls, New York; Mary 
McClellan Hospital, Inc., Cambridge, New York; Kings County 
Hospital Center, Brooklyn, New York; Department of Emergency 
Medicine, State University of New York Upstate Medical 
University, Syracuse, New York; Hospice of Finger Lakes, 
Auburn, New York; National Kidney Foundation of Central New 
York; State University of New York Upstate Medical University; 
St. Joseph Community Center, Lorain, Ohio; Akron Children's 
Hospital; Cincinnati's Children's Hospitals; Columbus 
Children's Hospital; Huron Hospital Emergency Department; Mercy 
Hospital, Hamilton, Ohio; Rainbow Babies' and Children's 
Hospital, Cleveland, Ohio; Stella Maris Detoxification Center, 
Cleveland, Ohio; Hopeland Health Center, Grandview Hospital and 
Medical Center, Dayton, Ohio; Hospice and Health Services of 
Fairfield County, Lancaster, Ohio; Mary Rutan Hospital, 
Bellefontaine, Ohio; Regional Outpatient Cancer Center, 
Springfield, Ohio; Tecumseh YMCA Health and Wellness Center, 
New Carlisle, Ohio; University Hospitals of Cleveland, 
Department of Psychiatry, Center of Excellence for the Care of 
Adolescents and Adults with Bipolar Illness and Other Severe 
Mental Disorders, Cleveland, Ohio; Barnesville Hospital, 
Barnesville, Ohio; Beallsville E-Squad, Beallsville, Ohio; 
Belmont Community Hospital, Bellaire, Ohio; University of 
Findlay, Findlay, Ohio; University of Cincinnati Medical 
Center, Medical Sciences Building; Joel Pomerene Hospital, 
Millersburg, Ohio; Knox Community Hospital, Mt. Vernon, Ohio; 
Ohio State University Biomedical Research and Education Center, 
Columbus, Ohio; Red Center, Massillon, Ohio; Stark State 
College of Technology, Canton, Ohio; Walsh University 
Bioinformatics Laboratory, Medical Sciences Building, North 
Canton, Ohio; Malone College Health and Wellness Center, 
Canton, Ohio; Mercy Hospital, Scranton, Pennsylvania; NorthEast 
Ohio Neighborhood Health Services, Cleveland, Ohio; Family and 
Children's Services, Tulsa, Oklahoma; St Anthony Hospital, 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma; Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation; 
Virginia Garcia Collaborative Health Center in Hillsboro, 
Oregon; Volunteers in Medicine Clinic, Eugene, Oregon; 
Community Outreach, Corvallis, Oregon; Salud Medical Center, 
Woodburn, Oregon; Delaware Valley Community Health, Inc., Maria 
de los Santos Community Health Center, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania; Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, Erie, 
Pennsylvania; United Cerebral Palsy of Southwestern 
Pennsylvania, Washington, Pennsylvania; Brookville Hospital, 
Brookville, Pennsylvania; Bucktail Medical Center, Renova, 
Pennsylvania; Charles Cole Memorial Hospital, Coudersport, 
Pennsylvania; Clarion Hospital, Clarion, Pennsylvania; Jersey 
Shore Hospital, Jersey Shore, Pennsylvania; Kane Community 
Hospital, Kane, Pennsylvania; Punxsutawney Area Hospital, 
Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania; Soldier and Sailors Memorial 
Hospital, Wellsboro, Pennsylvania; Warren General Hospital, 
Warren, Pennsylvania; Philadelphia College of Osteopathic 
Medicine Clinical Learning and Assessment Center; Endless 
Mountains Health Systems, Montrose, Pennsylvania; Memorial 
Hospital Inc., Towanda, Pennsylvania; Moses Taylor Health Care 
System, Scranton, Pennsylvania; Philadelphia College of 
Osteopathic Medicine's Sullivan County Medical Clinic, LaPorte, 
Pennsylvania; Fulton County Medical Center, McConnellsberg, 
Pennsylvania; Albert Einstein Healthcare Network in 
Philadelphia; Carnegie Mellon University; Children's Hospital 
of Pittsburgh; Crozer-Keystone Health System, Philadelphia, 
Pennsylvania; Fox Chase Cancer Center and Lombardi Cancer 
Center at Georgetown University; Inner Harmony Wellness Center, 
Clarks Summit, Pennsylvania; Kidspeace National Outpatient 
Health Center; Magee-Womens Hospital, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania; 
Sacred Heart Hospital, Allentown, Pennsylvania; Shamokin Area 
Community Hospital, Coal Township, Pennsylvania; Susquehanna 
School for the Blind and Vision Impaired; Temple University 
Health System, Episcopal Hospital campus; University of 
Pennsylvania, Comprehensive Cancer Treatment and Research 
Center; Wills Eye Hospital, National Center for Clinical 
Research, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Wistar Institute; 
Children's Health Fund; Caribbean Primate Research Center, 
University of Puerto Rico; Emma Pendleton Bradley Hospital, 
East Providence, Rhode Island; Thundermist Health Associates, 
Woonsocket, Rhode Island; Cancer Prevention Research Center, 
University of Rhode Island, Kingston; Newport Hospital, 
Newport, Rhode Island; Women and Infants Hospital, Providence, 
Rhode Island; Williamsburg Regional Hospital, Kingstree, South 
Carolina; Medical University of South Carolina Oncology Center, 
Charleston, South Carolina; Voorhees College, Center of 
Excellence in Rural and Minority Health; University of South 
Carolina School of Public Health, Columbia, South Carolina; 
Community Memorial Hospital, Redfield, South Dakota; Crow Creek 
Sioux Tribe, Fort Thompson, South Dakota; Ellen Stephen 
Hospice, Kyle, South Dakota; Wakanyeja Pawicayapi, Inc., 
Porcupine, South Carolina; St. Bernard's Hospital, Milbank, 
South Dakota; University of South Dakota, School of Medicine; 
Children's Hospital at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, 
Nashville, Tennessee; East Tennessee State University, Quillen 
College of Medicine, Johnson City, Tennessee; Tennessee Tech, 
School of Nursing, Chattanooga, Tennessee; University of Texas 
M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas; Institute for 
Research and Rehabilitation, Houston, Texas; Val Verde Regional 
Medical Center, Del Rio, Texas; Memorial Hermann The Woodlands 
Hospital, The Woodlands, Texas; Fort Bend Hospital, Missouri 
City, Texas; Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at Cook Children's 
Medical Center, Fort Worth, Texas; University of North Texas 
Health Science Center; Driscoll Children's Hospital, Pediatric 
Clinic, McAllen, Texas; Baylor College of Medicine and Texas 
A&M; University, Michael E. DeBakey Institute; University of 
Texas, Southwestern Comprehensive Stroke Center; Houston County 
Hospital, Crockett, Texas; University of Texas Health Science 
Center, Texas Diabetes Institute, San Antonio; Eastern Virginia 
Medical School, Norfolk, Virginia; Massey Cancer Center, 
Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, Virginia; Medical 
Clinic, Haysi, Virginia; Northwest Community Services, Front 
Royal, Virginia; Our Health, Inc., Winchester, Virginia; 
Rutland Regional Medical Center, Rutland, Vermont; Spectrum 
Youth and Family Services, Burlington, Vermont; Vermont 
Department of Health, Division of Alcohol and Drug Abuse 
Programs, Primary Care Facility; University of Vermont College 
of Medicine and Fletcher Allen Health Care; Northeast 
Washington County Community Health Center, Plainfield, Vermont; 
University of Washington, Life Sciences Facility, Seattle, 
Washington; Lourdes Health Network, Pasco, Washington; Puget 
Sound Blood Center, Seattle, Washington; Memorial Hospital of 
Iowa County, Dodgeville, Wisconsin; Northcentral Technical 
College, Wausau, Wisconsin; Chippewa Valley Technical College 
Health Education Center, Eau Claire, Wisconsin; Marquette 
University School of Dentistry in Milwaukee, Wisconsin; 
Marshfield Clinic, Marshfield, Wisconsin; Marshall University 
Biotechnology Science Center; University of Charleston, 
Riggleman Hall; West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine, 
Ambulatory Care Facility; and Friends-R-Fun, Summersville, West 
Virginia.
      The conferees urge HRSA to give full and fair 
consideration to a proposal from Yeshiva University, Einstein 
Medical College.
      The conference agreement includes bill language to limit 
the amount available for Federal tort claims within community 
health centers funding to not more than $15,000,000 as proposed 
by the House instead of $5,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes bill language 
identifying $265,085,000 for family planning instead of 
$264,170,000 as proposed by the House and $266,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement does not include bill language 
to provide $30,000,000 for abstinence education in fiscal year 
2003 as proposed by the Senate. The House bill contained no 
similar provision. The conferees agree with the President's 
request to fund this program on a current year basis.
      The conference agreement includes $1,343,723,000 for 
community health centers as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$1,318,559,000 as proposed by the House. The conferees concur 
with language contained in the Senate report that not less than 
$7,000,000 be provided for Native Hawaiian health care 
activities.
      The conferees urge HRSA to give full and fair 
consideration to proposals to support expanded services to 
reach priority populations in under-served communities in Kane, 
Marion, Saline, and Will, Illinois counties on the southwest 
side of Chicago and in the AAPI community on the north side of 
Chicago.
      The conferees urge HRSA to give full and fair 
consideration to proposals to support expanded services to 
reach priority populations in under-served communities in 
Greene, Howell, Washington, Benton, Sullivan, Vernon, and Ozark 
counties, Missouri.
      The conference agreement includes $46,511,000 for the 
national health service corps, field placements instead of 
$42,511,000 as proposed by the House and $49,511,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $107,000,000 for 
national health service corps, recruitment instead of 
$100,000,000 as proposed by the House and $104,916,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Within the total provided, $8,000,000 
is for State offices of rural health.
      The conference agreement includes $662,768,000 for health 
professions instead of $669,992,000 as proposed by the House 
and $596,369,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within the total 
provided, $285,000,000 is for children's hospitals graduate 
medical education.
      The conferees provide $2,000,000 to establish a graduate 
psychology education program. These funds are to be used 
consistent with language contained in the House report.
      The conferees provide $8,000,000 to expand graduate 
medical education curriculum in geriatrics. These funds are to 
be used consistent with language contained in the House report.
      In convening the panel to examine the education and 
training requirements for all nursing occupations, as directed 
in the Senate report, the Secretaries of the Department of 
Health and Human Services and the Department of Labor shall 
also collaborate with the American Association of Community 
Colleges, the American Organization of Nurse Executives, and 
the National League for Nursing, and ensure that a 
representative spectrum of views on relevant issues is 
considered.
      The conferees note the value of the Native Hawaiian 
Center of Excellence in Nursing in addressing the nursing 
shortage in Hawaii.
      The conference agreement includes $17,841,000 for 
Hansen's disease services instead of $17,491,000 as proposed by 
the House and $18,391,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within the 
total provided, $350,000 is for the Diabetes Lower Extremity 
Amputation Prevention program at the University of South 
Alabama.
      The conference agreement includes $731,615,000 for the 
maternal and child health block grant instead of $740,000,000 
as proposed by the House and $719,087,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement includes bill language 
designating $115,236,000 of the funds provided for the block 
grant for special projects of regional and national 
significance (SPRANS) instead of $116,145,000 as proposed by 
the House. The Senate bill did not earmark funds for this 
purpose. It is intended that $4,000,000 of the SPRANS amount 
will be used to enhance the sickle cell newborn screening 
program and its locally based outreach and counseling efforts. 
The conferees urge HRSA to give full and fair consideration to 
a proposal by the Sickle Cell Disease Association of America. 
It is also intended that $4,000,000 of the SPRANS amount will 
be used for Columbia Hospital for Women Medical Center in 
Washington, D.C., to support community outreach programs for 
women, $565,000 will be used for the Milwaukee Health 
Department for a pilot program providing health care services 
to at-risk children in day care, and $50,000 will be used for 
the Center for Great Expectations, Somerville, New Jersey to 
provide prenatal health care, education, and counseling for 
pregnant teens.
      Funding for the continuation of the traumatic brain 
injury State demonstration projects is provided as a separate 
line item in the table as proposed by the Senate. The House 
provided funding for this purpose within the SPRANS amount.
      The conference agreement includes $10,000,000 for 
abstinence education as proposed by the House instead of 
$15,000 as proposed by the Senate. This additional funding 
brings the total discretionary amount available for abstinence 
education in fiscal year 2002 to $40,000,000.
      The conference agreement includes $99,000,000 for healthy 
start instead of $102,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$89,996,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conferees urge HRSA 
to give preference to current and former grantees with expiring 
or recently expired project periods, including grantees that 
did not receive renewed funding but whose grant applications 
were approved but not funded during fiscal year 2001.
      The conference agreement includes $51,928,000 for rural 
health outreach grants instead of $51,863,000 as proposed by 
the House and $52,921,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees continue to be concerned about the health 
care needs of those in the Mississippi River Delta region. The 
conferees concur with the budget request and provide $6,800,000 
to continue HRSA's ongoing initiative which is providing 
funding and technical assistance to help underserved rural 
communities identify and better address their health care needs 
and to help small rural hospitals improve their financial and 
operational performance. The conferees recommend that HRSA 
consult with the Delta Regional Authority (DRA), given DRA's 
ongoing relationship with communities in the Delta.
      The conferees include the following amounts for the 
following projects and activities in fiscal year 2002:
      --$75,000 is for Ellen Stephen Hospice in Kyle, South 
Dakota to provide end-of-life care for Native Americans on the 
Pine Ridge Indian Reservation;
      --$100,000 is for the Mississippi Disease State 
Management program at the University of Mississippi School of 
Pharmacy, which focuses on providing information and 
medications to the underserved, particularly those with 
diabetes and asthma;
      --$100,000 is for the Northwest Health Center in Pascoag, 
Rhode Island to support health care services for low-income 
individuals;
      --$100,000 is for the People of Color AIDS Foundation in 
Santa Fe, New Mexico for education, prevention, and HIV testing 
services in northern New Mexico;
      --$200,000 is for the Louisiana Public Health Institute, 
Center for Community Capacity Enhancement to promote community 
partnerships in order to address health improvement priorities;
      --$200,000 is for Health Centers of Northern New Mexico 
in Espanola, San Miguel and Truchas, New Mexico to improve 
service delivery and access to care for low-income families in 
Northern New Mexico;
      --$200,000 is for the Geisinger Health Systems Rural 
Stroke Care Partnership in Danville, Pennsylvania;
      --$200,000 is for the Eastside Neighborhood Center, Inc. 
in Pierre, South Dakota for the Frontier School Health 
Initiative to provide health care services to children in rural 
areas who do not receive regular health care services;
      --$215,000 is for Jefferson Memorial Hospital in Crystal 
City, Missouri for its rural health outreach activities;
      --$250,000 is for the St. Nicholas Free Clinic in 
Paducah, Kentucky to establish health education and wellness 
promotion programs for the working-poor of Ballard, Calloway, 
Carlisle, Fulton, Graves, Hiuskman, Livingston, McCracken, and 
Marshall Counties;
      --$250,000 is for the Buncombe County Medical Society in 
North Carolina for Project Access;
      --$300,000 is for the Western Kentucky University Healthy 
Farm Families Initiative;
      --$300,000 is for the Carolina's Health Care Systems;
      --$300,000 is for the University of Nebraska Medical 
Center, 500 mile medical center;
      --$330,000 is for Mercy Housing health care technical 
support, to provide health care in coordination with affordable 
housing to low income families, seniors, and individuals with 
disabilities;
      --$370,000 is for the Clackamas County, Oregon, Public 
Health Division, for rural outreach activities;
      --$400,000 is for the Red Cliff Band of Lake Superior in 
Bayfield, Wisconsin for dental services;
      --$425,000 is for the Southern University Nurse Managed 
Family Health Center in Baton Rouge for a health clinic on 
campus and a mobile health clinic;
      --$500,000 is for the State of Alaska: ``A Counselor in 
Every Village'' program to train behavioral health counselors 
and provide their services in Alaskan villages; and Alaska 
Native Health Board to expand the Alaska Community Health Aide 
program in rural Alaska and to update training materials;
      --$500,000 is for the Western Kentucky University 
Emergency Medical Services Academy;
      --$500,000 is for the Western Kentucky University Mobile 
Health Screening program;
      --$500,000 is for the Louisiana State University Health 
Science Center in New Orleans to reduce diabetes-related foot 
amputations in a high-risk population;
      --$500,000 is for the Penn State Hershey Medical Center 
to expand access to healthcare in rural areas of central 
Pennsylvania;
      --$500,000 is for the Huntsman Cancer Institute to 
develop a pilot project involving mobile clinics equipped with 
Positron Emission Tomography to educate Native Americans on 
cancer risk, early detection, prevention and treatment;
      --$550,000 is for the Center for Sustainable Health 
Outreach at the University of Southern Mississippi;
      --$800,000 is for the Tennessee Hospital Education 
Research Foundation in Nashville, Tennessee for the Center for 
Health Workforce Planning;
      --$500,000 is for the Cooperative Education Service 
Agency #11 in Turtle Lake, Wisconsin for dental services;
      --$1,000,000 is for the Aberdeen Area Tribal Chairman's 
Health Board in Aberdeen, South Dakota to support the Northern 
Plains Healthy Start project;
      --$1,000,000 is for the Center for Acadiana Genetics and 
Hereditary Health Care at Louisiana State University Medical 
Center to continue and expand the development of the center;
      --$1,200,000 is for Creighton University's Accelerated 
Nursing Program in Omaha, Nebraska; and
      --$1,250,000 is for the Montana Comprehensive Health 
Association in Helena, Montana to develop a demonstration 
program to bring insurance coverage to high-risk individuals.
      The conference agreement includes $16,810,000 for rural 
health research instead of $12,099,000 as proposed by the House 
and $15,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees include the following amounts for the 
following projects and activities in fiscal year 2002:
      --$200,000 is for the University of Pittsburgh at 
Bradford, Center for Rural Health Practices;
      --$250,000 is for the Healthcare Association of New York 
State for a Center for Health Care Workforce Innovations
      --$300,000 is for Bassett Healthcare to develop and 
initiate a comprehensive cardiovascular research initiative to 
demonstrate the effectiveness of an integrated cardiac care 
program in rural New York;
      --$360,000 is for the University of South Dakota to 
establish a cooperative academic Rural Primary Care and Health 
Service Research Center to help define the status of health 
care delivery in South Dakota;
      --$400,000 is for the Texas Tech University Health 
Sciences Center at El Paso and the University of Texas at El 
Paso for joint research and education on the health problems of 
migrant workers;
      --$400,000 is for the University of Vermont, School of 
Nursing in Burlington, Vermont to create a nursing center of 
excellence that will assist policy formulation regarding the 
severe shortage of nurses, especially in rural areas;
      --$1,400,000 is for Avera McKennan Hospital in Sioux 
Falls, South Dakota to develop and apply computerized 
radiography within multiple rural and tertiary level medical 
care settings;
      --$1,500,000 is for the University of North Dakota School 
of Medicine to support its rural health program in preventative 
medicine and behavioral sciences; and
      --$2,000,000 is for the Raleigh County Commission in 
Beckley, West Virginia for an Educational Mall to serve as a 
coordinating and research location for rural health 
initiatives, especially in preventative medicine.
      The conference agreement includes $39,197,000 for 
telehealth instead of $27,609,000 as proposed by the House and 
$5,609,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees include the following amounts for the 
following projects and activities in fiscal year 2002:
      --$45,000 is for the Oregon Community Health Information 
Network for technology upgrades;
      --$75,000 is for the University of South Alabama for the 
Southwest Alabama Network for Education and Telemedicine;
      --$100,000 is for the Oklahoma State Department of 
Health, Oklahoma City for planning and development of a rural 
telemedicine system;
      --$100,000 is for the Coalition for Ultrasound Education 
and Training to develop a comprehensive multi-institution model 
distance learning network for the training of ultrasound 
technologists and medical sonographers;
      --$100,000 is for the University of Pittsburgh School of 
Nursing, Nurse Anesthesia Program and LaRoche College for the 
Nurse Anesthesia Rural and Elderly Expansion project;
      --$200,000 is for the Primary Care Association of Hawaii;
      --$200,000 is for Logan College of Chiropractic in 
Chesterfield, Missouri for a distance learning project;
      --$200,000 is for Clarion University and the Primary Care 
Council of Pennsylvania's State System of Higher Education;
      --$250,000 is for Molokai General Hospital to use the 
latest technology advances to provide health care in rural 
areas;
      --$250,000 is for Greene Memorial Hospital in Xenia, Ohio 
for a Medical Safety Modernization project;
      --$250,000 is for the Pennsylvania School of Optometry in 
Philadelphia to establish a network of urban community-based 
satellite centers to provide access to inner city, underserved 
persons who need vision care;
      --$250,000 is for the Pennsylvania Association of Home 
Health Agencies to conduct a multi-facility examination of 
telehomecare and concurrent development and analysis of the 
Telenursing role as a solution to the nursing shortage, working 
with Penn State University Health Policy and Administration;
      --$300,000 is for the University of Virginia for 
telemedicine projects in southwest Virginia;
      --$350,000 is for Fairview Ridges Hospital for a 
demonstration to reduce maternal and neonatal morbidity using 
technology and communications methodologies;
      --$400,000 is for Deaconess Billings Clinic Northwest 
Area Center for Studies on Aging in Billings, Montana to 
address healthcare problems associated with rural aging, and 
expand access to specialty health care via telemedicine;
      --$400,000 is for the Rocky Mountain Technology 
Foundation in Billings, Montana through Rocky Mountain College 
and Deaconess Billings College to provide telemedicine links to 
rural areas;
      --$400,000 is for the University of Vermont College of 
Medicine and Fletcher Allen Health Care to support its use of 
two-way interactive video telemedicine systems to reduce 
disparities in the clinical care and medical education of 
trauma;
      --$440,000 is for the Telehealth Resource Center at the 
University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, Texas for a 
telehealth initiative;
      --$450,000 is for St. Vincent Hospital in Billings, 
Montana to establish a regional video telecommunications 
network for healthcare providers;
      --$500,000 is for Central Michigan University in Mt. 
Pleasant for the rural telehealth and community education 
network to improve access and quality of health care to 
migrants and underserved in rural populations;
      --$500,000 is for the Alaska Telemedicine Advisory 
Council for an Alaska telemedicine project;
      --$500,000 is for Memorial Medical Center in Springfield, 
Illinois for an automated clinical information system;
      --$500,000 is for the University of Montana, ImProving 
Health Among Rural Montanans project for expansion of existing 
capabilities of the campus-based Drug Information Service;
      --$500,000 is for the New Mexico-Hawaii Telehealth 
Outreach for Unified Community Health (TOUCH) project in remote 
and rural areas;
      --$500,000 is for the Penn State Cancer Institute at 
Hershey Medical Center to develop a digital informatics and 
communications system to provide a virtual work environment 
offering patient services across central and northeastern 
Pennsylvania;
      --$550,000 is for the North Idaho Rural Telehealth 
program to help provide for the logical extension of more 
complete telehealth services to additional, high-priority 
participants and rural areas;
      --$600,000 is for the Institute for Urban Family Health 
in New York, New York for an information technology initiative;
      --$600,000 is for North Dakota State University College 
of Pharmacy to conduct a pilot study testing the safety, cost-
effectiveness and access to health care provided by new 
telepharmacy technology in rural communities;
      --$750,000 is for Susquehanna Health Systems in 
Williamsport, Pennsylvania for an Electronic Medical 
Information and Physician Access project;
      --$750,000 is for the Morehouse School of Medicine to 
develop networking capability at the National Center of Primary 
Care;
      --$800,000 is for the Fairview Lakes Regional Medical 
Center in Wyoming, Minnesota for its telemedicine program;
      --$800,000 is for the University of South Dakota in 
Vermillion to implement a distance learning project to train 
entry-level nursing home workers to become nurses;
      --$850,000 is for the New York Presbyterian Hospital 
telehealth initiative;
      --$900,000 is for South Dakota State University to 
develop and evaluate on-line health tracking to help manage 
chronic conditions in tribal communities;
      --$982,000 is for the Maricopa County, Arizona 
Correctional Health Telemedicine Initiative;
      --$1,000,000 is for Baycare Health Systems in Clearwater, 
Florida for a Medical Information Systems Initiative;
      --$1,000,000 is for Case Western Reserve University in 
Cleveland, Ohio for a Netwellness Internet health program;
      --$1,000,000 is for Beaufort-Jasper-Hampton Comprehensive 
Health Services for Phase II of a telemedicine system to link 
its patients with the research capabilities of the American 
Health Foundation;
      --$1,100,000 is for Northeastern Ohio Universities 
College of Medicine in Rootstown, Ohio for implementation of 
the Medical Education Network Teaching Ohio Region III;
      --$1,500,000 is for the Idaho State University Telehealth 
Integrated Care Center to improve the quality and quantity of 
access to healthcare for people living in Idaho's rural and 
frontier areas by providing consultation and diagnosis over 
long distance;
      --$1,500,000 is for the Northeast Ohio Health Outreach 
Network in Massillon, Ohio for a patient safety pilot program;
      --$1,721,000 is for the University of Nevada, Las Vegas 
for its e-Health program to improve access to specialized and 
high quality health care in rural Nevada;
      --$1,940,000 is for the University of Pittsburgh Medical 
Center for support of the development and deployment of its 
state of the art health care information technology system;
      --$2,000,000 is for the University of South Dakota School 
of Medicine;
      --$2,085,000 is for the Education and Research Consortium 
of Western North Carolina, Inc., Western North Carolina Health 
Care Regional Center to provide computer hardware/software 
acquisition, upgrade and installation as well as training and 
consultation services for medical staff and administrators; and
      --$2,900,000 is for West Virginia University to provide 
medical care to rural communities through the Mountaineer 
Doctor Television (MDTV) program.
      The conference agreement includes $20,000,000 for 
authorized health-related activities of the Denali Commission 
as proposed by the Senate. The House bill contained no similar 
provision.
      The conference agreement includes $18,993,000 for 
emergency medical services for children instead of $19,000,000 
as proposed by the House and $18,986,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $21,210,000 for poison 
control instead of $16,421,000 as proposed by the House and 
$24,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $7,500,000 for 
traumatic brain injury instead of $10,000,000 as proposed by 
the Senate. The House bill provided $5,000,000 for this purpose 
within the maternal and child health block grant SPRANS 
funding. Within the total provided, $1,500,000 is for 
protection and advocacy services. These funds are to be used 
consistent with language contained in the Senate report.
      The conference agreement includes $6,000,000 for black 
lung clinics as proposed by the House instead of $7,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $3,500,000 for trauma 
care instead of $3,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$4,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $10,240,000 for nursing 
loan repayment for shortage area service instead of $2,279,000 
as proposed by the House and $15,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement includes a total of 
$1,910,806,000 for Ryan White programs instead of 
$1,919,609,000 as proposed by the House and $1,883,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Included in this amount is $619,585,000 
for emergency assistance, $977,485,000 for comprehensive care, 
$193,939,000 for early intervention, $70,998,000 for women, 
infants, children, and youth, $13,500,000 for dental services, 
and $35,299,000 for education and training centers.
      The conference agreement includes bill language 
identifying $639,000,000 for the Ryan White Title II State AIDS 
drug assistance programs instead of $649,000,000 as proposed by 
the House and $610,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Within the total provided, $123,200,000 is for the 
Minority HIV/AIDS initiative. These funds are to be used 
consistent with language contained in the House report.
      The conferees concur with House report language under 
title IV regarding the distribution of title IV funds.
      The conferees are concerned about the increasing 
incidence of HIV/AIDS infection in rural regions of the United 
States, and are aware that HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts 
minority communities in underserved rural areas, particularly 
in the Southeast. Therefore, States should utilize funds 
provided under the Minority HIV/AIDS Initiative to fund 
outreach strategies that assist in linking underserved minority 
populations with State ADAPs, primary care, and other HIV/AIDS 
treatment services.
      The conferees are concerned about the formula-based 
distribution of discretionary supplemental ADAP grant awards to 
States with demonstrated need. The conferees encourage HRSA to 
distribute these grant awards to eligible States based on needs 
identified by the States, rather than a formula based solely on 
living AIDS cases. The conferees also encourage HRSA to 
consider capped program enrollment and client waiting lists, in 
conjunction with the eligibility, formulary, and medical 
criteria as among the ADAP access restrictions that may qualify 
a State or territory for these grant awards. The conferees also 
urge HRSA to provide supplemental awards to States with an ADAP 
eligibility limit in excess of 200 percent of the Federal 
poverty level when those States meet any of the statutorily 
defined criteria.
      The conference agreement includes $40,000,000 for rural 
hospital flexibility grants instead of $35,000,000 as proposed 
by the House and $25,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within 
the total provided, $15,000,000 is for a rural hospital 
performance improvement program. These funds would be used for 
the small rural hospital prospective payment systems grant 
program as created in section 409 of the Balanced Budget Relief 
Act of 1999 and authorized in section 1820(g)(3) of the Social 
Security Act. These funds would also be used to help rural 
hospitals comply with provisions of the Health Insurance 
Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 and to reduce 
medical errors and support quality improvement. The funds would 
be geared toward small rural hospitals that are essential 
access points for Medicare and Medicaid beneficiaries.
      The conference agreement includes $4,000,000 for the 
Radiation Exposure Compensation Act instead of $5,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The House bill contained no similar 
provision.
      The conference agreement includes $120,041,000 for the 
community access program as proposed by the House instead of 
$15,041,000 as proposed by the Senate. These funds are to be 
used consistent with language contained in the House report.
      The conference agreement includes $149,154,000 for 
program management instead of $147,049,000 as proposed by the 
House and $135,991,000 as proposed by the Senate. Of the 
increase provided, $2,500,000 is for information technology.
      The conferees are concerned by the recently announced 
plan to abolish the Office for the Advancement of Telehealth 
and reassign these functions to the HIV/AIDS Bureau. The 
conferees have provided sufficient funds to continue the 
operations of this Office as a component of the Office of the 
Administrator.
      The conferees include the following amounts for the 
following projects and activities in fiscal year 2002:
      --$80,000 is for the Wausau Health Foundation in Wausau, 
Wisconsin for a survey and analysis of local health 
professionals' career paths to better understand entry into and 
exit from health professions;
      --$100,000 is for the University of San Diego Institute 
for the Advancement of Health Policy to assess through 
teaching, research and delivery of services the impact of 
public policy on families from vulnerable populations;
      --$200,000 is for Luna County, New Mexico and the 
Columbus Volunteer Fire Department to provide emergency medical 
services to immigrants;
      --$350,000 is for the Clinical Pharmacy Training program 
at the University of Hawaii at Hilo;
      --$475,000 is to support the efforts of the American 
Federation of Negro Affairs Education and Research Fund of 
Philadelphia;
      --$500,000 is for the University of Washington Center for 
Health Workforce Studies in Seattle, Washington for a 
demonstration project to collect and analyze health workforce 
data;
      --$800,000 is for the University of Iowa for the training 
of Certified Registered Nurse Anesthetists;
      --$1,000,000 is for the Washington Health Foundation for 
a comprehensive demonstration project on improving nurse 
retention; and
      --$1,100,000 is for the Iowa Department of Public Health 
to create a Center for Health Care Workforce Shortage.

               Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


                Disease Control, Research, and Training

      The conference agreement includes $4,293,151,000 for 
disease control, research, and training instead of 
$4,077,060,000 as proposed by the House and $4,418,910,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes bill language to 
earmark $250,000,000 for equipment, construction, and 
renovation of facilities as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$175,000,000 as proposed by the House. Within the total 
provided, $6,000,000 is for data storage infrastructure 
hardware and software upgrades to provide for the remote 
mirroring of information between CDC data centers, and provide 
heterogeneous connectivity to existing systems used at CDC, to 
ensure protection, recovery, and availability of critical data 
resources.
      The conference agreement includes bill language to allow 
the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to enter 
into a single contract or related contracts for the full scope 
of development and construction of facilities as proposed by 
the Senate. The House bill contained no similar provision.
      The conference agreement includes bill language to 
earmark $143,763,000 for international HIV/AIDS instead of 
$137,527,000 as proposed by the House and $154,527,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement does not include bill language 
to earmark funds for the National Pharmaceutical Stockpile 
within CDC. The agreement includes bill language for this 
purpose within the Public Health and Social Services Emergency 
Fund.
      The conference agreement includes a total of $126,978,000 
for the National Center for Health Statistics as proposed by 
both the House and the Senate. The agreement also includes bill 
language designating $23,286,000 of the total to be available 
to the Center from the Public Health Service Act evaluation 
set-aside as proposed by the House. The Senate bill contained 
no similar provision.
      The conferees urge CDC to review the Pregnancy Risk 
Assessment Monitoring Survey to explore the feasibility of 
establishing a uniform State and national reporting system of 
pregnancy related complications for women, to provide technical 
assistance to States in examining pregnancy related health 
data, to track interventions and patterns of care received, and 
to conduct research into the causes of and interventions for 
pregnancy complications, especially for complications relating 
to disparities in mother and infant outcomes for different 
racial and ethnic populations.
      The conference agreement includes $90,078,000 for birth 
defects, developmental disabilities, disability and health 
instead of $80,280,000 as proposed by the House and $88,748,000 
as proposed by the Senate.
      Within the total provided, $12,000,000 is for fetal 
alcohol syndrome, $3,000,000 is to support the Christopher 
Reeve Paralysis Foundation, and $2,000,000 is to expand 
surveillance and epidemiological efforts of Duchenne and Becker 
muscular dystrophy in the United States.
      Within the total provided, $2,800,000 is for a Special 
Olympics Healthy Athletes Initiative to help train health 
professionals and sensitize health care systems and 
institutions to the special needs of individuals with mental 
retardation; expand systems to make them accessible for special 
needs individuals; help identify the nature and scope of health 
challenges and health access barriers to persons with mental 
retardation; and create and test models for athlete health 
promotion at the local level.
      Within the total provided, $2,500,000 above the budget 
request is to expand autism and developmental disability 
surveillance activities in additional States and $1,250,000 
above the budget request is to establish an attention deficit/
hyperactivity disorder resource center.
      The conferees support CDC's prevention activities for 
folic acid and urge the agency to expand efforts to enhance 
State and local activities to educate women about this 
effective prevention strategy.
      The conferees include the following amounts for the 
following projects and activities in fiscal year 2002:
      --$100,000 for the Birth Defects Monitoring and 
Prevention Center at the University of South Alabama;
      --$150,000 for the California Teratogen Information 
Center at the University of California, San Diego;
      --$300,000 for the Children and Adults with Attention 
Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (CHADD); and
      --$750,000 for the University of Louisville Craniofacial 
Birth Defects Research Center.
      The conference agreement includes $747,823,000 for 
chronic disease prevention and health promotion instead of 
$722,495,000 as proposed by the House and $701,654,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Programs within this account are funded 
at the following levels:

Arthritis...............................................     $13,896,000
Breast and Cervical Cancer..............................     192,598,000
Cancer Prevention and Control...........................      76,662,000
    Cancer Registries...................................    (40,000,000)
    Colorectal Cancer...................................    (12,000,000)
    Other Cancers.......................................     (4,357,000)
    Ovarian Cancer......................................     (4,596,000)
    Prostate Cancer.....................................    (14,062,000)
    Skin Cancer.........................................     (1,647,000)
Community Health Promotion..............................      15,243,000
Diabetes................................................      61,754,000
Epilepsy................................................       6,527,000
Heart Disease and Stroke................................      37,384,000
Iron Overload...........................................         477,000
National Campaign to Change Children's Health Behaviors.      68,400,000
Nutrition/Physical Activity.............................      27,505,000
Oral Health.............................................      10,839,000
Prevention Centers......................................      26,182,000
Safe Motherhood/Infant Health...........................      50,790,000
School Health...........................................      58,495,000
Tobacco.................................................     101,071,000

      Within the total provided, $68,400,000 is for the 
National Campaign to Change Children's Health Behaviors. These 
funds are to be used consistent with language contained in the 
House report. The conferees do not provide funds to continue 
the Health Resources and Services Administration and the 
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development 
activities.
      The conferees concur with the Senate report language 
encouraging CDC to continue public and professional awareness 
activities with respect to pulmonary hypertension.
      With the additional funding provided for oral health, the 
conferees understand that priority will be given to completing 
the funding of cooperative agreements to strengthen State oral 
disease prevention programs. These programs may include 
projects that will include dental sealant programs for children 
and community fluoridation projects.
      The conferees include the following amounts for the 
following projects and activities in fiscal year 2002:
      Within the total for breast and cervical cancer, $50,000 
is for SHAREing & CAREing, Inc., Astoria, New York for an 
outreach, education and breast cancer screening program; 
$150,000 is for a breast cancer demonstration project at the 
Healthcare Association of New York State; and $250,000 is for 
the Swope Parkway Health Center Breast and Cervical Cancers 
Demonstration and Outreach project in Kansas City, Missouri.
      Within the total for comprehensive cancer control, 
$250,000 is for the Rhode Island Cancer Council in Pawtucket, 
Rhode Island for public education and professional outreach; 
$440,000 is for the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer 
Center in Houston, Texas for a comprehensive cancer control 
program to address minority and medically underserved 
populations; and $500,000 is for the St. Mary's Medical Center 
Comprehensive Cancer Care Center in Long Beach, California.
      Within the total provided for prostate cancer, $290,000 
is for the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas for 
satellite prostate cancer testing centers to carry out programs 
of prevention, education and testing related to prostate 
cancer.
      Within the total provided for community health promotion, 
$2,800,000 is to develop a model project to test the efficacy 
of glaucoma screening using mobile units. The conferees further 
suggest the program establish protocols to conduct outreach, 
identify staffing needs, provide patient education regarding 
glaucoma management, address other eye conditions, and make 
appropriate referrals to eye care professionals.
      Within the total provided for community health promotion, 
$1,200,000 is for the Mind-Body Medical Institute in Boston, 
Massachusetts to continue practice-based assessments, 
identification, and study of promising and heavily used mind/
body practices.
      Within the total provided for community health promotion, 
$225,000 is for the Roger Williams Medical Center Healthlink in 
Providence, Rhode Island for a disease prevention initiative 
for senior retirees; $250,000 is for Valley Children's Hospital 
in California for a mobile asthma care program to reduce the 
incidence of asthma in the region and reduce the related costs 
of hospital-based treatment; $300,000 is for Pikeville College, 
School of Osteopathic Medicine to conduct epidemiological 
studies in the Appalachian Region of Southeastern Kentucky; 
$500,000 is for Community Health Centers in Hawaii for a 
childhood rural asthma project; $500,000 is for the State of 
Alaska for a program to reduce high anemia rates of children in 
the Yukon Delta and the Bristol Bay region; and $1,000,000 is 
for the University of Texas, Dallas for the Southwestern 
Medical Center, National Multiple Sclerosis Training Center.
      Within the total for diabetes prevention, $100,000 is a 
diabetes care program at the Clinica Monsenor Oscar A. Romero 
in Los Angeles, California; $250,000 is for a diabetes and 
diabetic retinopathy demonstration at the Oklahoma Center for 
the Advancement of Science and Technology in Oklahoma City, 
Oklahoma; $440,000 is for the University of Arizona in Tucson 
for a Border Health Initiative; $500,000 is for the Texas Tech 
University Center for Diabetes Prevention and Control; and 
$1,600,000 is for the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and Cheyenne 
Sioux Tribe for the Dakota Plains Diabetes Center.
      Within the total provided for heart disease and stroke, 
$4,500,000 is for the Paul Coverdell National Acute Stroke 
Registry.
      Within the total for heart disease and stroke, $130,000 
is for the Wausau Health Foundation in Wausau, Wisconsin, for a 
school-based program to increase awareness of cardiovascular 
disease and the importance of prevention and to document 
prevalence of cardiovascular disease in youth; $200,000 is for 
a Cardiac Outreach program at HealthReach NY in Flushing, New 
York; and $440,000 is for the Stroke Belt Research and 
Intervention Network at the University of Alabama, Birmingham.
      Within the total provided for nutrition and physical 
activity, $5,000,000 is for efforts to eliminate micronutrient 
malnutrition and $475,000 is for a study by the Institute of 
Medicine on childhood obesity as described in the Senate 
report.
      Within the total for nutrition and physical activity, 
$125,000 is for the Village of Park Forest, Illinois Health 
Department, for preventive health education and screening 
projects in fields such as nutrition, chronic illness, food 
safety, health screening, and hygiene, and nutrition education 
for school children; $200,000 is for the Great South Bay YMCA 
in Bay Shore, New York, for its Fit Kids education and health 
promotion program; $500,000 is for the State of Alaska 
Department of Health and Social Services for an Obesity 
Prevention and Control program; and $2,000,000 is for West 
Virginia University to establish the Center on Obesity.
      Within the total for prevention centers, $250,000 is for 
the Kansas City Area Life Sciences Institute to support 
infectious disease, cancer and cardiovascular disease, and 
prevention research at the Kansas City Proteomics Consortium.
      Within the total for safe motherhood, $2,650,000 is for 
the Lawton and Rhea Chiles Center for Healthy Mothers and 
Babies in Tampa, Florida, of which $1,500,000 is for training 
paraprofessionals in the health-care field.
      Within the total for school health, $225,000 is for the 
School of Optometry at the University of Missouri, St. Louis 
for a program of mobile vision screenings for school children.
      The conference agreement includes $153,753,000 for 
environmental health instead of $146,683,000 as proposed by the 
House and $171,863,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Within the total provided, $37,149,000 is for the 
environmental health laboratory, $33,201,000 is for 
environmental health activities, $35,193,000 is for asthma, and 
$42,140,000 is for lead poisoning.
      Within the total provided, $2,200,000 is to expand the 
physician education and public awareness program for primary 
immune deficiency disease.
      The conferees have included funds for a CDC assessment, 
in conjunction with the Iowa Department of Public Health, on 
the effect of environmental factors on rural health.
      The conferees include the following amounts for the 
following projects and activities in fiscal year 2002:
      --$130,000 is for Environment and Human Health, Inc. in 
North Haven, Connecticut to research and track asthma among the 
school-age population in Connecticut;
      --$300,000 is for the Sustainable Resource Center in 
Minneapolis, Minnesota to focus on lead poisoning remediation 
and education;
      --$300,000 is for Citizens Against Toxic Exposure in 
Pensacola, Florida to locate and screen individuals for health 
problems associated with local toxic pollution and to assist 
those who have been exposed to these environmental toxins;
      --$350,000 is for the Community Lead Education and 
Reduction Corps (CLEARCorps) in St. Louis, Missouri to fight 
childhood lead poisoning;
      --$440,000 is for the San Antonio Metropolitan Health 
District to expand an assessment of human exposure to 
environmental contaminants near Kelly Air Force Base, Texas;
      --$700,000 is for the University of Montana at Missoula, 
Center for Environmental Health Sciences to support research on 
the impact of environmental factors in causing or exacerbating 
human diseases; and
      --$850,000 is for the University of West Florida for an 
environmental health study in Escambia and Santa Rosa Counties.
      The conference agreement includes $80,303,000 for 
epidemic services and response as proposed by the House instead 
of $85,303,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $1,135,532,000 for HIV/
AIDS, STD and TB prevention instead of $1,148,452,000 as 
proposed by the House and $1,121,612,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Included in this amount is $835,293,000 for HIV/AIDS 
activities, of which $143,763,000 is for global HIV/AIDS 
activities; $167,450,000 for STD activities; and $132,789,000 
for TB activities.
      Within the total provided for HIV/AIDS, $96,000,000 is 
for the Minority HIV/AIDS initiative. These funds are to be 
used consistent with language contained in the House report.
      The conferees are concerned about the increasing 
incidence of HIV/AIDS infection in rural regions of the United 
States, and are aware that HIV/AIDS disproportionately impacts 
minority communities in underserved rural areas, particularly 
in the Southeast. Therefore, CDC should develop strategies with 
States to implement interventions targeted to these 
communities.
      Within the total provided for tuberculosis, $500,000 is 
for the State of Alaska for a tuberculosis control and 
prevention program.
      The conference agreement includes $627,895,000 for 
childhood immunization instead of $599,645,000 as proposed by 
the House and $637,145,000 as proposed by the Senate. Included 
in this amount is $223,527,000 for vaccine purchase, 
$200,697,000 for operation/infrastructure activities, 
$107,400,000 for global polio eradication activities, 
$26,388,000 for measles eradication activities, and $69,883,000 
for prevention activities. In addition, the Vaccines for 
Children (VFC) program funded through the Medicaid program is 
expected to provide $795,553,000 in vaccine purchases and 
distribution support in fiscal year 2002, for a total program 
level of $1,423,448,000.
      The conference agreement includes $344,858,000 for 
infectious diseases instead of $343,018,000 as proposed by the 
House and $331,518,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Within the total provided, $4,000,000 above the budget 
request is for a prevention program to control and reduce the 
incidents of hepatitis C. This funding is to develop State-
based programs and demonstrations to learn the most feasible 
approach to integrating hepatitis C and B screening, 
counseling, and referral programs into existing HIV and STD 
State programs. The conferees also urge CDC to more 
aggressively undertake the implementation of the National 
Hepatitis C Prevention Strategy with greater emphasis on 
communication of information about hepatitis C to health care 
professionals, and educate the general public and groups at 
increased risk for infection.
      Within the total provided, $4,000,000 above the budget 
request is to continue planned activities and expand efforts to 
control the West Nile virus.
      Within the total provided, $2,200,000 is to establish a 
comprehensive thalassemia-based blood safety and surveillance 
program.
      Within the total provided, $1,500,000 is for the 
establishment of a national autopsy network for prion disease 
surveillance. These funds are to be used consistent with 
language contained in the House report. The conferees urge CDC 
to give full and fair consideration to a proposal from the 
National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center at Case 
Western Reserve University.
      The conferees encourage CDC to consider funding the 
Pediatric Prevention Network (PPN) and its efforts to improve 
infection control for children. The PPN works to decrease 
health-care acquired infections in hospitalized children, with 
special emphasis on blood stream infections and the 
transmission of resistant organisms.
      It is estimated that 30 million people reside in, or are 
adjacent to, areas considered endemic for the soil organism 
that causes Valley Fever. The conferees encourage CDC to 
support ongoing efforts in the development of a vaccine, 
including appropriate epidemiological and surveillance 
activities.
      The conferees support the implementation of the 
demonstration project developed through the enhancing the 
monitoring of pharmaceutical services and patient safety 
through connectivity project.
      The conferees include the following amounts for the 
following projects and activities in fiscal year 2002:
      --$200,000 for the Border Health Institute in El Paso, 
Texas for research related to infectious diseases and other 
public health problems affecting the U.S.-Mexico border region;
      --$440,000 for the Children's Medical Center of Dallas, 
Center for Infectious Diseases, Advanced Diagnostics, and 
Emerging Pathogens for efforts to improve the early detection, 
prevention and control of meningitis, sepsis, pneumonia and 
myocarditis and for research on the immune responses of at-risk 
populations;
      --$500,000 is for the University of Idaho, Post Falls for 
biomedical sensor electronics development; and
      --$500,000 for the State of Utah Health Department to 
assist local health authorities in ensuring the safety of food 
and to protect against communicable disease outbreaks during 
the 2002 Winter Olympic and Paralympic Games in Salt Lake City.
      The conference agreement includes $149,767,000 for injury 
control instead of $143,655,000 as proposed by the House and 
$146,655,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Within the total provided, $2,000,000 above the budget 
request is to expand current activities to better understand 
the scope of child abuse and neglect and its consequences. 
These activities could include examining child fatality review 
systems, supporting States in their collection of surveillance 
data, improving data collection on the incidence of child 
maltreatment through the development of consensus definitions, 
and supporting the implementation and evaluation of 
interventions aimed at the prevention of child maltreatment.
      Within the total provided, $1,500,000 above the budget 
request is for the National Violent Death Reporting System to 
gather information on the circumstances of violent deaths and 
develop effective methods of prevention and intervention.
      Within the total provided, $125,000 is for the trauma 
information and exchange program.
      The conferees have included funds for the continuation of 
the Iowa Injury Control Center.
      The conferees include the following amounts for the 
following projects and activities in fiscal year 2002:
      --$37,000 for the Save A Life Foundation, Inc. in 
Schiller Park, Illinois to expand the training of its basic 
life supporting first aid program;
      --$100,000 for the Westchester County, New York, 
Department of Emergency Services to develop and implement a 
training program in pediatric trauma for pre-hospital 
providers; and
      --$450,000 for the National SAFE KIDS Campaign, 
Washington DC for its SAFE KIDS AT HOME project to improve 
child health through outreach to public housing and other at-
risk communities.
      The conference agreement includes $276,460,000 for 
occupational safety and health instead of $270,135,000 as 
proposed by the House and $276,135,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      Within the total provided, $2,000,000 is for the 
Education and Research Centers to expand research activities in 
support of implementation of NORA and $2,000,000 is to develop 
an intramural and extramural prevention research program that 
will target all aspects of workplace violence and to coordinate 
its efforts with the Departments of Justice and Labor.
      The conferees have provided sufficient funds for NIOSH to 
carry out research and related activities aimed at protecting 
workers who respond to public health needs in the event of a 
terrorist incident.
      The conferees are aware of the research on construction 
worker safety and health being done by the Center to Protect 
Worker Rights.
      The conferees include the following amounts for the 
following projects and activities in fiscal year 2002:
      --$125,000 for the University of Buffalo, Division of 
Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine for a joint educational 
program with Millard Fillmore Hospital's Sleep Disorder Center 
in Buffalo, New York and Mount St. Mary's Hospital Sleep 
Disorder Center in Lewiston, New York to increase knowledge of 
sleep disorders; and
      --$200,000 is for the Occupational and Environmental 
Health Center of Rhode Island for research, tracking and 
investigation of employment-related disease.
      The conference agreement includes $148,520,000 for public 
health improvement instead of $149,910,000 as proposed by the 
House and $114,910,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Within the total provided, $17,500,000 is for development 
and implementation of a nationwide environmental health 
tracking network and capacity development in environmental 
health at State and local health Departments.
      Within the total provided, $2,500,000 above the budget 
request is for prevention research. These funds are to be used 
consistent with language contained in the Senate report.
      The conferees urge CDC to give full and fair 
consideration to a proposal from the CNA Corporation.
      The conferees include the following amounts for the 
following projects and activities in fiscal year 2002:
      --$60,000 is for the Lawrence-Douglas County Health 
Department in Lawrence, Kansas for assessment, training and 
equipment related to public health information systems 
infrastructure;
      --$150,000 is for the Interstitial Cystitis (IC) 
Association CURE program in Rockville, Maryland for activities 
to broaden the understanding of IC;
      --$350,000 is for the New England Medical Center to 
develop predictive instrument research in technology to reduce 
medical errors;
      --$400,000 is for the University of Vermont College of 
Medicine to support the Vermont Oxford Network and its efforts 
to improve the quality of health care available to children 
born prematurely through the reduction of medical errors;
      --$400,000 is for the Northeast Regional Cancer Institute 
Cancer Epidemiology Research Program in Northeastern 
Pennsylvania;
      --$500,000 is for the Institute for Clinical Evaluation 
for the reduction of medical errors through the development and 
demonstration of virtual reality medical technology simulation 
training for training health care workers in medical 
procedures;
      --$500,000 is for the University of Louisville and Kosair 
Children's Hospital Sleep Medicine Center;
      --$500,000 is for the National Emergency Response and 
Rescue Training Center's Integrated Health and Medical Weapons 
of Mass Destruction Training Program in College Station, Texas;
      --$650,000 is for the University of Georgia to establish 
a Center for Leadership in Education and Applied Research in 
Mass Destruction Defense to train health professionals to 
respond to chemical and biological attacks;
      --$700,000 is for the Kirkwood Community College in Cedar 
Rapids, Iowa for the National Mass Fatalities Institute;
      --$800,000 is to continue the development of the Delaware 
Electronic Reporting Systems (DEERS) to track diseases;
      --$900,000 is for the Center for the Study of 
Bioterrorism and Emerging Infections at the St. Louis 
University School of Public Health;
      --$1,000,000 is for Westchester County, New York to 
conduct readiness assessments of all response systems, 
including emergency response and management systems, hospitals, 
the county health department, equipment needs and 
communications systems, in the development of a comprehensive 
bioterrorism response plan;
      --$1,000,000 is for the University of Kentucky Center for 
Improving Medication-Related Outcomes;
      --$1,000,000 is for the Delta Health and Prevention 
Research Initiative at Delta State University;
      --$1,000,000 is for the Public Health Service Noble 
Training Center for the development of a comprehensive 
bioterrorism curriculum and the conduct of on-site training for 
health care professionals to be done in conjunction with 
appropriate Federal agencies, Auburn University and the 
University of Alabama at Birmingham;
      --$1,000,000 is for Iowa State University for the 
creation of a Center for Food Security and Public Health;
      --$1,000,000 is for the University of Iowa for the 
planning of a Hygienic Lab;
      --$1,000,000 is for the Center for Civilian Biodefense 
Strategies at Johns Hopkins University to improve the nation's 
medical and public health preparedness and response to 
bioterrorism;
      --$1,000,000 is for the University of Texas Medical 
Branch, National Rapid Response Bioterrorism Defense Center;
      --$1,200,000 is for the Oral Vaccine Institute in Las 
Vegas, Nevada for the development of innovative oral vaccine 
delivery alternatives;
      --$1,500,000 is for the University of Louisville Center 
for the Deterrence of Biowarfare and Bioterrorism; and
      --$2,000,000 is for West Virginia University for 
continued development of the virtual medical campus.

                     National Institutes of Health

                       National Cancer Institute

      The conference agreement includes $4,190,405,000 for the 
National Cancer Institute instead of $4,146,291,000 as proposed 
by the House and $4,258,516,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees urge NCI to continue supporting cancer 
genomics projects with the goal of identifying potential cancer 
therapies.

                National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute

      The conference agreement includes $2,576,125,000 for the 
National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute instead of 
$2,547,675,000 as proposed by the House and $2,618,966,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.

         National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

      The conference agreement includes $343,327,000 for the 
National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research instead 
of $339,268,000 as proposed by the House and $348,767,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.

    National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases

      The conference agreement includes $1,466,833,000 for the 
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney 
Diseases instead of $1,446,705,000 as proposed by the House and 
$1,501,476,000 as proposed by the Senate.

        National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

      The conference agreement includes $1,328,188,000 for the 
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke instead 
of $1,306,321,000 as proposed by the House and $1,352,055,000 
as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees understand that over two million Americans 
suffer from epilepsy, with one million suffering from 
uncontrolled seizures. The conferees are interested in the 
acceleration of epilepsy research and encourage NINDS to take 
steps to jumpstart promising epilepsy research areas. In 
particular, the conferees urge NINDS to establish an annual 
lectureship in the epilepsy research field to provide the 
intellectual stimulation to prompt new findings in both the 
NINDS intramural program and the extramural community. The 
conferees request that NINDS consider naming the lectureship in 
memory of Judith Hoyer. Mrs. Hoyer had epilepsy; she spent her 
life helping families dealing with the condition and promoting 
research into a cure and a better quality of life for those 
with epilepsy. Such a lectureship would continue her legacy of 
stimulating important epilepsy research.

         National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases

      The conference agreement includes $2,372,278,000 for the 
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases instead 
of $2,337,204,000 as proposed by the House and $2,375,836,000 
as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes bill language to give 
the Director discretion to transfer up to $25,000,000 to 
International Assistance Programs, Global Fund to Fight HIV/
AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis as proposed by the House. The 
Senate bill included a general provision to transfer this 
amount to the Global Fund.

             National Institute of General Medical Sciences

      The conference agreement includes $1,725,263,000 for the 
National Institute of General Medical Sciences instead of 
$1,706,968,000 as proposed by the House and $1,753,465,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.

        National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

      The conference agreement includes $1,113,605,000 for the 
National Institute of Child Health and Human Development 
instead of $1,088,208,000 as proposed by the House and 
$1,123,692,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees note the achievements of the NICHD Study of 
Early Child Care and Youth Development and urge its 
continuation, including its program of data collection and 
dissemination of findings.
      The conferees are pleased to hear that over the past 
year, NICHD has begun to plan a major initiative on stillbirth. 
In March, the Institute convened scientific and medical experts 
from around the country to explore the available information 
about the incidence of stillbirth, its varying causes, and the 
opportunities for research. The conferees urge NICHD to build 
upon this knowledge by planning for a prospective investigation 
of the scope and causes of stillbirth nationally and 
internationally. The conferees also encourage NICHD to work 
with professional organizations on this issue to assess current 
knowledge and develop research opportunities in the management 
of stillbirth.

                         National Eye Institute

      The conference agreement includes $581,366,000 for the 
National Eye Institute instead of $566,725,000 as proposed by 
the House and $614,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.

          National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences

      The conference agreement includes $566,639,000 for the 
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences instead of 
$557,435,000 as proposed by the House and $585,946,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.

                      National Institute on Aging

      The conference agreement includes $893,443,000 for the 
National Institute on Aging instead of $873,186,000 as proposed 
by the House and $909,174,000 as proposed by the Senate.

 National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

      The conference agreement includes $448,865,000 for the 
National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin 
Diseases instead of $440,144,000 as proposed by the House and 
$460,202,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Eosinophilia-myalgia syndrome is a multi-systemic 
disorder that was first recognized in 1989. The conferees 
encourage NIAMS to enhance research efforts to identify the 
cause of this disease and develop a better understanding of the 
characterization of pathophysiological events leading to the 
chronic phase of the disease.

    National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders

      The conference agreement includes $342,072,000 for the 
National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication 
Disorders instead of $334,161,000 as proposed by the House and 
$349,983,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees continue to support the expansion of 
NIDCD's research on the efficacy of new hearing screening 
technologies through all available mechanisms, as appropriate, 
including clinical studies on screening methodologies and 
studies on the efficacy of intervention and follow-up, and 
related research.

                 National Institute of Nursing Research

      The conference agreement includes $120,451,000 for the 
National Institute of Nursing Research instead of $116,773,000 
as proposed by the House and $125,659,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.

           National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism

      The conference agreement includes $384,238,000 for the 
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism instead of 
$379,026,000 as proposed by the House and $390,761,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.

                    National Institute on Drug Abuse

      The conference agreement includes $888,105,000 for the 
National Institute on Drug Abuse instead of $900,389,000 as 
proposed by the House and $902,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.

                  National Institute of Mental Health

      The conference agreement includes $1,248,626,000 for the 
National Institute of Mental Health instead of $1,228,780,000 
as proposed by the House and $1,279,383,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.

                National Human Genome Research Institute

      The conference agreement includes $429,515,000 for the 
National Human Genome Research Institute instead of 
$423,454,000 as proposed by the House and $440,448,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.

      National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering

      The conference agreement includes $111,984,000 for the 
National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering 
instead of $39,896,000 as proposed by the House and 
$140,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees commend NIH for agreeing to establish a 
task force comprising both NIH staff and representatives of the 
extramural research community to review all current imaging and 
bioengineering grants and identify those that are appropriate 
for transfer to the newly-established National Institute of 
Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB). Toward that end, 
the conferees support the agreement to create a nine-member 
task force that includes representatives of NIH (three 
members), the extramural imaging community (three members), and 
the bioengineering community (three members), with 
representatives of the outside groups to be appointed by the 
appropriate professional organizations in those fields. The 
conferees direct the task force to establish criteria to be 
applied consistently to all grants under consideration. The 
conferees urge that these criteria ensure that research 
projects with applications to multiple disease processes or 
organ systems should generally reside in NIBIB in accordance 
with the intent of Congress in creating the new Institute. The 
Director of the NIH shall submit a report on the findings of 
the task force to the House and Senate Appropriations 
Committees by March 31, 2002.
      While the conferees are pleased that progress has been 
achieved in implementing the legislation that created NIBIB, 
they have been concerned that the amount of research grants 
proposed by the NIH for transfer to the new Institute falls 
short of previous assessments of NIH support for basic 
biomedical imaging and bioengineering as expressed in NIH 
statements to the Congress. Creation of the joint NIH-
extramural task force should help to ensure that all parties 
have confidence in the process.

                 National Center for Research Resources

      The conference agreement includes $1,011,594,000 for the 
National Center for Research Resources instead of $966,541,000 
as proposed by the House and $1,014,044,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement includes bill language to 
earmark $110,000,000 for extramural facilities construction 
grants instead of $97,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$125,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The agreement also 
includes bill language to earmark $5,000,000 of these funds to 
begin construction of facilities for a Chimp Sanctuary as 
proposed by the House. The Senate bill contained no similar 
provision.
      Within the total provided, $160,000,000 is for the 
Institutional Development Awards program and $271,580,000 is 
for the General Clinical Research Centers.

       National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine

      The conference agreement includes $104,644,000 for the 
National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine 
instead of $99,288,000 as proposed by the House and 
$110,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.

       National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities

      The conference agreement includes $157,812,000 for the 
National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities 
instead of $157,204,000 as proposed by the House and 
$158,421,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees concur with language contained in the House 
report regarding the newly established National Center for 
Minority Health and Health Disparities. The conferees encourage 
the Center to move forward in implementing the Research 
Endowment and Centers of Excellence programs as ongoing 
initiatives.

                  John E. Fogarty International Center

      The conference agreement includes $56,940,000 for the 
John E. Fogarty International Center instead of $56,021,000 as 
proposed by the House and $57,874,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.

                      National Library of Medicine

      The conference agreement includes $277,658,000 for the 
National Library of Medicine instead of $273,610,000 as 
proposed by the House and $281,584,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.

                         Office of the Director

                     (Including Transfer of Funds)

      The conference agreement includes $235,540,000 for the 
Office of the Director instead of $232,098,000 as proposed by 
the House and $236,408,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
agreement includes a designation in bill language of 
$53,540,000 for the operations of the Office of AIDS Research.
      Within the total provided, $10,341,000 is for the Office 
of Rare Diseases and $17,000,000 is for the Office of Dietary 
Supplements.
      The conferees are agreed that NIH should continue to 
allocate funds for biomedical research on the basis of 
scientific opportunity, taking into consideration the many 
other factors identified by NIH as being relevant to funding 
decisions, such as the infectious nature of a disease, the 
number of cases and deaths associated with a disease, the costs 
of disease treatment, and/or other costs associated with a 
disease. The conferees also expect NIH to carefully consider 
the language in the House and Senate reports and give it 
appropriate weight when determining funding allocations across 
disease areas. Regarding the cases in which the House or Senate 
reports reference funding levels for a specific disease, the 
conferees are agreed that these are intended only to express 
relative priority and are not funding earmarks.
      The conferees concur with language contained in the 
Senate report regarding the pediatric research initiative.
      The conferees recognize the significance of child abuse 
and neglect as a serious public health problem. The conferees 
commend the efforts of NIH, under the leadership of NIMH, for 
convening a working group of organizations and relevant Federal 
agencies to facilitate collaborative and cooperative efforts on 
child abuse and neglect research. The conferees encourage NIH 
to continue to address this public health problem and request 
that the Director of NIH be prepared to report on the progress 
of this research at the fiscal year 2003 appropriations 
hearing.
      The conferees are concerned about the impact of Tropical 
Storm Allison on the research programs and institutions located 
in Houston, Texas, in particular Baylor College of Medicine and 
the University of Texas at Houston Health Sciences Center. The 
conferees recognize the efforts of NIH to extend application 
deadlines and provide administrative supplements to affected 
grantees. The conferees strongly encourage NIH to continue this 
practice and, to the extent practicable, provide one-year 
extensions for those investigators who need them.
      The conferees recognize the association between religion 
and positive health outcomes. This may be the result of the 
emphasis of some religions on healthy behaviors. For example, 
the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, also known as 
the Mormon religion, encourages members to adopt health-
promoting behaviors and proscribes behaviors associated with 
poor health outcomes, such as smoking or substance abuse. The 
conferees encourage NIH to examine further the association 
between religion and health outcomes and how some religious 
organizations effectively promote healthy behaviors among their 
members.
      The conferees continue to be very interested in matching 
the increased needs of researchers, particularly NIH grantees, 
as well as intramural and university-based researchers, who 
rely upon human tissues and organs to study human diseases and 
to search for cures. The conferees are aware that NIH is in the 
process of encouraging the Institutes and Centers to expand 
support for NDRI and urge NIH to submit a written progress 
report to the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations no 
later than February 1, 2002.

                        Buildings and Facilities

      The conference agreement includes $309,600,000 for 
buildings and facilities instead of $311,600,000 as proposed by 
the House and $306,600,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes bill language to give 
the Director discretion to transfer up to $75,000,000 to 
International Assistance Programs, Global Fund to Fight HIV/
AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis as proposed by the House. The 
Senate bill included a general provision to transfer 
$70,000,000 to the Global Fund.

       Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration

               Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services

      The conference agreement includes $3,138,279,000 for 
substance abuse and mental health services instead of 
$3,131,558,000 as proposed by the House and $3,088,456,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement does not include bill language 
as proposed by the Senate to earmark funds to carry out 
subtitle C of title XXXVI of the Children's Health Act of 2000. 
The House bill contained no similar provision. The conferees 
provide funding for this purpose within the Center for 
Substance Abuse Prevention.
      The conference agreement does not include bill language 
to earmark funds for mental health providers serving public 
safety workers affected by disasters of national significance. 
The House bill contained no similar provision. The conferees 
provide funding for this purpose within the Center for Mental 
Health Services.
Center for Mental Health Services
      The conference agreement includes $433,000,000 for the 
mental health block grant instead of $440,000,000 as proposed 
by the House and $420,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $96,694,000 for 
children's mental health instead of $97,694,000 as proposed by 
the House and $91,694,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $32,500,000 for 
protection and advocacy instead of $33,000,000 as proposed by 
the House and $32,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $230,067,000 for 
programs of regional and national significance instead of 
$223,499,000 as proposed by the House and $208,599,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Within the total provided, $95,000,000 is for 
continuation and expansion of youth violence prevention 
programs.
      Within the total provided, $20,000,000 is provided under 
section 582 of the Public Health Service Act to support grants 
to local mental health providers for the purposes of developing 
knowledge of best practices and providing mental health 
services to children and youth suffering from post-traumatic 
stress disorder as a result of having witnessed or experienced 
a traumatic event.
      Within the total provided, $7,000,000 is for the Minority 
HIV/AIDS initiative. These funds are to be used consistent with 
language contained in the House report.
      Within the total provided, $5,000,000 is to provide 
mental health outreach and treatment to the elderly.
      Within the total provided, $4,000,000 is for grants to 
develop and implement programs to divert individuals with a 
mental health illness from the criminal justice system to 
community-based services and for related training and technical 
assistance as authorized by section 520G of the Public Health 
Service Act.
      Within the total provided, $3,000,000 is to establish a 
National Suicide Prevention Resource Center to provide 
technical assistance in developing, implementing, and 
evaluating effective suicide prevention programs. These funds 
are to be used consistent with language contained in the Senate 
report.
      Within the total provided, $2,500,000 is for mental 
health providers serving public safety workers affected by 
disasters of national significance.
      The conferees include the following amounts for the 
following projects and activities in fiscal year 2002:
      --$46,000 for Leo N. Levi Memorial Hospital Association, 
Hot Springs, Arkansas for a school-based student/family 
psychotherapy program;
      --$50,000 is for the Wisconsin Primary Healthcare 
Association in Madison, Wisconsin to provide mental health 
services to farm families affected by economic problems related 
to agriculture;
      --$100,000 is for American Trauma Society's 2nd Trauma 
Program;
      --$150,000 is for the Weingart Center in Los Angeles, 
California to develop and expand mental health support and 
long-term case management within transitional housing and 
clinical programs;
      --$160,000 is for the Hispanic Counseling Center in 
Hempstead, New York for mental health, alcoholism, and 
substance abuse treatment services;
      --$172,000 is for Family Communications Inc. in 
Pittsburgh for an antiviolence program entitled the National 
Preschool Anger Management Project;
      --$200,000 is for the Bert Nash Community Mental Health 
Center in Lawrence, Kansas to provide mental health services in 
schools and other settings to prevent juvenile crime and 
substance abuse among high-risk youth;
      --$200,000 is for the Concord-Assabet Family Services 
Center for a model transitional living program for troubled 
youth;
      --$250,000 is for the further development, testing, and 
implementation of the computerization of the Texas Medication 
Algorithm Project (T-MAP) in Tarrent County, Texas;
      --$250,000 is for the Texas Department of Mental Health 
and Retardation for further development of Texas Medication 
Algorithm Project (T-MAP)
      --$350,000 is for Casa Myrna Vazquez in Boston to support 
domestic violence services and related services;
      --$350,000 is for Emma Pendleton Bradley Hospital in East 
Providence, Rhode Island for a school-based adolescent mental 
health initiative;
      --$400,000 is for the Corporation for Supportive Housing, 
New York, New York to advise and assist supportive housing 
organizations in providing mental health and substance abuse 
services;
      --$490,000 is for Pacific Clinics in Arcadia, California 
to support a school-based mental health demonstration program 
for Latina adolescents;
      --$500,000 is for the Life Quest Community Mental Health 
Center for its program for treatment of co-occurring disorders 
among the population of Mat-Su Valley;
      --$500,000 is for the University of Alabama in 
Tuscaloosa, Alabama for the Geriatric Mental Health Research 
Center;
      --$650,000 is for the University of Connecticut for an 
urban health initiative, jointly with Yale University, to 
improve mental health services to underserved, high-risk urban 
residents;
      --$700,000 is for the Providence Center for Counseling 
and Psychiatric Services in Providence, Rhode Island for an 
early intervention preschool and parent training program;
      --$800,000 is for the Mentally Ill Offender Crime 
Reduction demonstration in Ventura County, California;
      --$800,000 is for the Yale University, Child Study Center 
to support collaborative programs aimed at addressing the needs 
of children exposed to violence and based on the Child 
Development-Community Policing program model;
      --$850,000 is for the Iowa State University extension for 
the training of rural mental health providers; and
      --$1,000,000 is for the Ch'eghutsen comprehensive mental 
health services program for children in Interior Alaska.
Center for Substance Abuse Treatment
      The conference agreement includes $291,572,000 for 
programs of regional and national significance instead of 
$305,122,000 as proposed by the House and $276,122,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Within the total provided, $57,000,000 is for the 
Minority HIV/AIDS initiative. These funds are to be used 
consistent with language contained in the House report.
      Within the total provided, $9,000,000 above last year's 
level is for grants to develop and expand mental health and 
substance abuse treatment services for homeless individuals as 
authorized by section 506 of the Public Health Service Act. The 
intent of this section was to permit grants to be made to 
projects which provide either mental health services, substance 
abuse services, or services in both fields. This allows 
communities greater flexibility to provide the services they 
believe to be the most urgent. While the resources have been 
included within the Center for Substance Abuse Treatment 
(CSAT), the conferees believe that the most effective outcomes 
will be achieved in addressing the multiple needs of homeless 
individuals if CSAT and the Center for Mental Health Services 
work cooperatively. The conferees further intend that these 
funds could be used in conjunction with permanent supportive 
housing programs for homeless people in support of the 
Secretary's initiative to reduce chronic homelessness.
      Within the total provided, $10,000,000 is to expand 
support of clinically based treatment and related services for 
adult, juvenile, and family drug courts and individuals 
returning to the community who are on probation, parole, or 
unsupervised release.
      Within the total provided, $3,000,000 is for the 
Addiction and Technology Transfer Center program. These funds 
are to be used consistent with language contained in the House 
report.
      The conferees urge SAMHSA to give full and fair 
consideration to a proposal by the National Center on Addiction 
and Substance Abuse at Columbia University.
      The conferees include the following amounts for the 
following projects and activities in fiscal year 2002:
      --$50,000 is for Recovery House in Wallingford, Vermont 
to develop a day treatment program for substance abuse 
counseling and other support services for pregnant women and 
women with dependent children;
      --$100,000 is for Haymarket West in Schaumburg, Illinois 
to expand its comprehensive substance abuse treatment and 
related services;
      --$100,000 is for Treatment Alternatives for Safe 
Communities in Chicago, Illinois for a substance abuse 
treatment program;
      --$100,000 is for ThedaCare Behavioral Health in Menasha, 
Wisconsin to establish pilot models for expanded regional 
substance abuse prevention and treatment services for youth and 
families;
      --$200,000 is for the Dimock Community Health Center to 
support inpatient detoxification and behavioral health 
programs;
      --$200,000 is for the Vinland Center in Loretto, 
Minnesota to offer specialized residential treatment programs 
for adults with cognitive and functional impairments;
      --$200,000 is for the Vermont Department of Health, 
Division of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs for long-term 
residential treatment services for adolescents with significant 
substance abuse problems in Bradford, Vermont;
      --$200,000 is for Lutheran Social Services in Appleton, 
Wisconsin to expand alcohol abuse prevention programs for older 
adults in northern Wisconsin;
      --$250,000 is for the Pennington County Detention Center 
in South Dakota for mental health and substance abuse treatment 
services;
      --$400,000 is for the WestCare Foundation, Inc. in Las 
Vegas, Nevada to demonstrate and evaluate the Batterers 
Intervention Demonstration project;
      --$500,000 is for the Cook Inlet Tribal Council to treat 
women and children with substance abuse problems in Kenai;
      --$500,000 is for the Vermont Department of Health, 
Division of Alcohol and Drug Abuse Programs to establish pilot 
projects in Rutland and Burlington that will develop prevention 
and treatment strategies for combating substance abuse problems 
in urban and rural settings;
      --$500,000 is for the United Community Center/Centro de 
la Comunidad to establish a demonstration project integrating 
substance abuse treatment programs into domestic violence 
intervention and outreach programs geared toward Hispanic 
women;
      --$750,000 is for the Cook Inlet Tribal Council's Ernie 
Turner Center to provide outpatient substance abuse treatment;
      --$750,000 is for the Fairbanks Native Association's 
Lifegivers program;
      --$750,000 is for the Southcentral Foundation's Pathways 
Home Residential Treatment Center for Adolescent Substance 
Abusers;
      --$800,000 is for Diversion Alternatives, Inc. in Ft. 
Worth, Texas for a comprehensive outpatient substance abuse 
treatment program;
      --$1,000,000 is for the San Francisco Department of 
Public Health, for its model substance abuse treatment on 
demand initiative; and
      --$2,500,000 is for the City of Baltimore, Maryland to 
expand its drug treatment services.
Center for Substance Abuse Prevention
      The conference agreement includes $198,140,000 for 
programs of regional and national significance instead of 
$187,215,000 as proposed by the House and $199,013,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      Within the total provided, $38,100,000 is for the 
Minority HIV/AIDS initiative. These funds are to be used 
consistent with language contained in the House report.
      Within the total provided, $12,500,000 is to expand 
efforts to identify, disseminate, and implement effective fetal 
alcohol syndrome prevention and treatment programs.
      Within the total provided, $5,000,000 is to carry out the 
Ecstasy Anti-Proliferation Act of 2000.
      Within the total provided, $5,000,000 is for grants to 
public and nonprofit entities to carry out school-based and 
community-based programs concerning the dangers of 
methamphetamine abuse and addiction.
      The conferees urge SAMHSA to give full and fair 
consideration to a proposal by the National Center on Addiction 
and Substance Abuse at Columbia University.
      The conferees include the following amounts for the 
following projects and activities in fiscal year 2002:
      --$75,000 is for the Start S.M.A.R.T. Foundation in 
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania for the development of a pilot project 
to examine the optimal ways of distributing ``QED,'' a new 
saliva alcohol test;
      --$100,000 is for the Syracuse University for the Twelve 
Point for Substance Abuse Prevention program;
      --$100,000 is for the Rock Island County Council on 
Addictions in East Moline, Illinois for its Healthy Youth 
Prevention Program;
      --$150,000 is for the Palm Beach County Community 
Services Department for the Free to Grow Program that provides 
drug prevention services to families of pre-schoolers;
      --$150,000 is for the State University of New York 
Upstate Medical University for the Developmental Exposure 
Alcohol Research Center;
      --$250,000 is for the Northwestern Community Services 
Board in Front Royal, Virginia for a Warren County Drug 
Initiative;
      --$300,000 is for the Orleans Parish, SE Louisiana Drug 
Prevention Education program for student drug testing 
assessment, counseling, treatment, drug education, outreach 
services and program evaluation;
      --$400,000 is for the Institute for Research, Education, 
and Training in Addictions in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at St. 
Francis Health System to facilitate the coordination of 
approaches to research, treatment and health policy 
development;
      --$500,000 is for Coalition for Safe and Drug Free St. 
Petersburg, Inc. in St. Petersburg, Florida for a demonstration 
project;
      --$600,000 is for Chrysalis House, Inc. in Fayette 
County, Kentucky for substance abuse prevention programs;
      --$750,000 is for the Anchorage Department of Health for 
drug and alcohol prevention programs to reach 50 percent of 
Alaska's population;
      --$800,000 is for Fenway Community Health in Boston, 
Massachusetts to expand its HIV prevention, mental health, and 
substance abuse programs;
      --$1,200,000 is for the Ohio Prevention in Education 
Resource Center in Cincinnati, Ohio for the Bridgebuilders 
project; and
      --$1,250,000 is for Community Health Centers in the Big 
Island of Hawaii for a youth anti-drug program.
Program Management
      The conference agreement includes $91,451,000 for program 
management instead of $80,173,000 as proposed by the House and 
$96,173,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Within the total provided, $3,278,000 is to continue 
testing the effectiveness of Community Assessment and 
Intervention Centers in providing integrated mental health and 
substance abuse services to troubled and at-risk children and 
youth, and their families in four Florida communities. Building 
upon successful juvenile programs, this effort responds 
directly to nationwide concerns about youth violence, substance 
abuse, declining levels of service availability and the 
inability of certain communities to respond to the needs of 
their youth in a coordinated manner.

               Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality

                    Healthcare Research and Quality

      The conference agreement includes $2,600,000 in 
appropriated funds instead of $168,435,000 as proposed by the 
House and $291,245,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement designates $296,145,000 to be 
available to the agency under the Public Health Service Act one 
percent evaluation set-aside instead of $137,810,000 as 
proposed by the House. The Senate bill contained no similar 
provision.
      Within the total provided, $55,000,000 is to determine 
ways to reduce medical errors.

               Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

                           Program Management

      The conference agreement includes $2,440,798,000 for 
program management instead of $2,361,158,000 as proposed by the 
House and $2,464,658,000 as proposed by the Senate. An 
additional appropriation of $700,000,000 has been provided for 
the Medicare Integrity Program through the Health Insurance 
Portability and Accountability Act of 1996.
Research, Demonstration, and Evaluation
      The conference agreement includes $118,201,000 for 
research, demonstration, and evaluation instead of $55,311,000 
as proposed by the House and $125,311,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      Within the total provided, $40,000,000 is for Real Choice 
Systems Change Grants to States. These funds are to be used 
consistent with language contained in the Senate report.
      Within the total provided, $15,000,000 is to continue the 
Nursing Home Transition Initiative.
      The conferees do not concur with the Senate report 
language regarding the extension of Disease State Management 
Programs to Medicare demonstration projects.
      The conferees have included sufficient funds to continue 
a Medicare demonstration project to test the effectiveness of 
using lifestyle changes to treat heart disease.
      The agreement includes bill language for the following 
projects and activities for fiscal year 2002:
      --$100,000 is for the Regional Nursing Centers Consortium 
in Philadelphia to initiate a demonstration project to evaluate 
15 nurse-managed health centers in urban and rural areas across 
Pennsylvania;
      --$200,000 is for the Madonna Rehabilitation Center in 
Lincoln, Nebraska to create a new standard of rehabilitation 
practice and program design for children and adults with 
disabilities;
      --$250,000 is for the Cook County, Illinois Bureau of 
Health for the Asthma Champion Initiative to reduce morbidity 
and mortality from asthma in high prevalence areas;
      --$250,000 is for the Illinois Primary Health Care 
Association to implement the Shared Integrated Management 
Information System providing centralized case management, 
reimbursement and administrative support services;
      --$500,000 is for Project Access in Muskegon, Michigan to 
offer affordable insurance to uninsured workers, primarily in 
small business, and low-income individuals;
      --$590,000 is for Santa Clara County, California for the 
outreach and application assistance aspects of its Children's 
Health Initiative, to demonstrate means of expanding enrollment 
of eligible children in Medicaid, SCHIP and other available 
health care programs;
      --$800,000 is for the Fishing Partnership Health Plan, 
based in Boston, Massachusetts for a demonstration project on 
the efficacy of using a community-based health benefit program 
to provide health care coverage for lower-income independently 
employed workers and their families;
      --$800,000 is to continue a demonstration project being 
conducted at the Mind-Body Institute of Boston, Massachusetts, 
and expand the demonstration so that eligible patients shall 
also include those who have undergone coronary bypass surgery 
or angioplasty and do not have reduced blood flow to the heart, 
and/or angina;
      --$900,000 is for the Children's Hospice International 
demonstration program to provide a continuum of care for 
children with life-threatening conditions and their families;
      --$1,500,000 is for the Iowa Department of Public Health 
for the continuation of a prescription drug cooperative 
demonstration; and
      --$2,000,000 is for the AIDS Healthcare Foundation in Los 
Angeles for a demonstration of residential and outpatient 
treatment facilities.
Medicare Contractors
      The conference agreement includes $1,534,500,000 for 
Medicare contractors instead of $1,522,000,000 as proposed by 
the House and $1,547,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      Within the total provided, $52,000,000 is for the 
Medicare+Choice information campaign and $12,500,000 is to 
support grants for State Health Insurance Counseling and 
Assistance programs.
State Survey and Certification
      The conference agreement includes $256,397,000 for State 
survey and certification instead of $252,147,000 as proposed by 
the House and $260,647,000 as proposed by the Senate.
Federal Administration
      The conference agreement includes $531,700,000 for 
Federal administration as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate.
      The conferees understand that CMS is developing a 
comprehensive regulation establishing a new fee schedule for 
ambulance payments as required by the Balanced Budget Act of 
1997. The conferees believe it is equally important to 
implement condition codes and urge CMS to do so simultaneously 
with the new fee schedule.
      The conferees are aware of underpayment to certain 
hospitals that treat newborns with life threatening respiratory 
diseases and encourage CMS to implement a methodology to 
reimburse hospitals for inhaled nitric oxide treatment for 
neonatal hypoxic respiratory failure.
      The conferees strongly concur with Senate report language 
regarding the Medicaid upper payment limit agreement that was 
included in the Omnibus Consolidated and Emergency Supplemental 
Appropriations Act for Fiscal Year 2001.

                Administration for Children and Families

                   Low Income Home Energy Assistance

      The conference agreement specifies that the contingency 
funds are for the unanticipated home energy assistance needs of 
one or more States, consistent with language contained in the 
House bill. The Senate bill did not include such a provision.
      The conference agreement specifies that the contingency 
funds shall be made available only after submission to the 
Congress of an official budget request as proposed by the 
Senate, instead of a formal budget request as proposed by the 
House.
      The conferees note that the amount provided by the 
Congress in the Supplemental Appropriations Act of 2001 was 
$150,000,000 more than requested by the Administration because 
of serious concerns about low-income households which had 
experienced significant increases in their home heating costs 
during the harsh winter of the past year. In addition, many 
States exhausted their LIHEAP allocations as the program served 
one million households more than it had in the previous year. 
The conferees are concerned that the combination of 
circumstances, according to objective data sources, has left 
many low income households with utility debts at levels 
considerably higher than the previous year, while applications 
for this coming heating season are coming in at rates 
significantly higher than last year. Therefore, the conferees 
encourage the Administration to release funds to reduce the 
energy burden on low income households throughout the nation. 
The conferees recognize that the contingency fund was 
authorized to meet the additional home energy assistance needs 
of one or more States arising from a natural disaster or other 
emergency, which includes a significant increase in the cost of 
home energy, a significant increase in home energy 
disconnections or a significant increase in unemployment, 
layoffs, or the number of households applying for unemployment 
benefits. The conferees understand that the latest Department 
of Labor employment data indicate the unemployment rate has 
risen almost one full percentage point in the last two months, 
while payroll employment has fallen by almost 800,000.

                     Refugee and Entrant Assistance

      The conference agreement appropriates $460,203,000, 
instead of $460,224,000 as proposed by the House and 
$445,224,000 proposed by the Senate. Within this amount, for 
Social Services, the agreement provides $158,600,000 instead of 
$156,621,000 as proposed by the House and $143,621,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees specify that funds for section 414 of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act shall be available for three 
fiscal years, as proposed by the House.
      The conference agreement includes $15,000,000 that is to 
be used under social services to increase educational support 
to schools with a significant proportion of refugee children, 
consistent with language contained in the House report.
      The agreement also includes $19,000,000 for increased 
support to communities with large concentrations of refugees 
whose cultural differences make assimilation especially 
difficult justifying a more intense level and longer duration 
of Federal assistance, consistent with language contained in 
the House report.

                 Child Care and Development Block Grant

      The conference agreement includes $2,099,994,000 for the 
Child Care and Development Block Grant, instead of 
$2,199,987,000 as proposed by the House and $2,000,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Within the funds provided for child 
care resources and referrals, the agreement also includes 
$1,000,000 for the Child-Care Aware toll-free hotline operated 
by the National Association of Child Care Resource and Referral 
Agencies.

                      Social Services Block Grant

      The conference agreement provides that States may 
transfer up to 10 percent of TANF funds to SSBG as proposed by 
the House. The Senate proposed a transfer amount of 5.7 
percent.

                Children and Families Services Programs

                        (including rescissions)

      The conference agreement includes $8,429,183,000 for 
children and families services programs instead of 
$8,275,442,000 as proposed by the House and $8,592,496,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. In addition, the agreement rescinds 
$21,000,000 from permanent appropriations as proposed by both 
the House and the Senate.
Head Start
      The conference agreement includes $6,537,906,000 for Head 
Start instead of $6,475,812,000 as proposed by the House and 
$6,600,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The agreement 
includes an advance appropriation of $1,400,000,000 for Head 
Start for fiscal year 2003 as proposed by both the House and 
the Senate.
Runaway Youth
      The conference agreement includes $88,133,000 for runaway 
youth instead of $105,133,000 as proposed by the Senate and 
$71,133,000 as proposed by the House. Within the funds 
provided, $39,739,900 is available for the transitional living 
program (TLP). The conference agreement includes these 
additional resources to meet the needs of young people in need 
of services.
      The Administration proposed $33,000,000 for a separate 
transitional living program designed to serve pregnant and 
parenting youth. The conferees are aware of the need for and 
share the Administration's interest in funding residential 
services for young mothers and their children who are unable to 
live with their own families because of abuse, neglect, or 
other circumstances. The conferees also recognize the need for 
and value of expanding transitional living opportunities for 
all homeless youth. Therefore, the conferees seek to preserve 
the flexibility afforded in current law to respond to the needs 
of the young people who are most at-risk and in greatest need 
of transitional living opportunities in their communities by 
providing additional resources to consolidated runaway and 
homeless youth act programs.
      It is the conferees' expectation that current and future 
TLP grantees will continue to provide transitional living 
opportunities and supports to pregnant and parenting homeless 
youth, as is their current practice. To further ensure that 
pregnant and parenting homeless youth are able to access 
transitional living opportunities and supports in their 
communities, the conferees encourage the Secretary, acting 
through the network of federally-funded runaway and homeless 
youth training and technical assistance providers, to offer 
guidance to grantees and others on the programmatic 
modifications required to address the unique needs of pregnant 
and parenting youth and on the various sources of funding 
available for residential services to this population.
Child abuse
      The conference agreement includes $22,013,000 for child 
abuse state grants, instead of $23,000,000 as proposed by the 
House and $21,026,000 as proposed by the Senate. The agreement 
also includes $26,178,000 for child abuse discretionary 
programs instead of $19,978,000 as proposed by the House and 
$33,717,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within the funds 
provided for child abuse prevention programs, the agreement 
includes the following items:

Agape of Central Alabama, Inc., Montgomery, AL, for their work 
    with the children in need.................................   $45,000
Alameda County Social Services Agency for the Alternative 
    Response System...........................................   440,000
Alaska Native Health Board and the State of Alaska to develop 
    and implement statewide child abuse prevention and 
    treatment plan for Alaska Native children and parents.....   450,000
Center for Women and Families, Louisville, KY, for child abuse 
    prevention................................................   300,000
Child Advocacy Center of the Ozarks, Inc., Monett, MO, for 
    equipment.................................................    50,000
Cornerstone Advocacy Service in Bloomington, MN, to provide 
    prevention and education services to children and adults 
    who are survivors of domestic violence....................   300,000
Family and Children's Services for a child abuse prevention 
    program...................................................   400,000
Family social service provider in Yellowstone County, MT, to 
    deliver early intervention services to at-risk families 
    including the provision of family social services.........   400,000
Farm Resource Center, Mound City, IL, for mental health and 
    substance abuse outreach to farm families.................   600,000
Healthy Families/Better Beginnings home visiting program for 
    State of AK and regional Native non-profit organizations.. 2,000,000
Little Flower Children Services facility, Wading, NY, for a 
    comprehensive child abuse prevention and remediation 
    program...................................................   800,000
Missouri Bootheel Healthy Start to implement community-based 
    education interventions...................................   500,000
Ohel Family Services in Brooklyn, NY, to provide intensive 
    treatment, crisis intervention, in-home support and 
    rehabilitation services to abused and neglected children 
    in foster care............................................   275,000
Prevent Child Abuse Louisiana to train teachers in the Greater 
    New Orleans area on how to recognize and report child 
    abuse cases among their students..........................   200,000
Project SafePlace in Louisville to conduct a demonstration 
    project serving at-risk youth in Kentucky.................   150,000
Safe Harbor Crisis Nursery, Kennewick, WA, for child abuse 
    prevention................................................   200,000
University of Notre Dame to develop model intervention effort 
    to help prevent child neglect and abuse...................   220,000

      The conference agreement includes $7,498,000 for child 
welfare training, instead of $6,998,000 as proposed by the 
House and $7,998,000 as proposed by the Senate.
Adoption Awareness
      The conference agreement includes $12,906,000 for 
adoption awareness as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$9,906,000 as proposed by the House. The conference agreement 
includes $3,000,000 above the budget request to implement the 
Special Needs Awareness Campaign in fiscal year 2002.
Compassion Capital Fund
      The conference agreement includes $30,000,000 for the 
compassion capital fund as proposed by the House instead of 
$89,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. This new program is part 
of the Administration's Faith Based Initiative. Funds available 
for this program will be used for grants to public/private 
partnerships that help small faith-based and community-based 
organizations replicate or expand model social services 
programs. The conferees also intend that funding be used to 
support and promote rigorous evaluations on the ``best 
practices'' among charitable organizations so that successful 
models can be emulated and expanded by other entities. The 
conferees expect funds made available through this program to 
supplement and not supplant private resources and encourage the 
Secretary to require private resources to match grant funding 
provided to public/private partnerships.
Social Services and Income Maintenance Research
      The conference agreement includes $31,250,000 for social 
services and income maintenance research instead of $27,000,000 
as proposed by the House and $27,426,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The conferees continue to support the agency's efforts 
to assist States in meeting the complex information and systems 
reporting requirements of TANF and have provided $1,000,000 to 
continue this initiative. The State Information Technology 
Consortium is coordinating this effort. Given the success of 
this effort, the conferees believe that there can be better 
coordination of child support enforcement activities. The flow 
of information between Federal and State agencies and the court 
system continues to be a critical factor in the success of the 
Child Support Enforcement program. While some States have 
succeeded in implementing seamless, cost-effective processes 
for information-sharing among their human service agencies and 
the courts, others have not. The conferees have included 
$2,000,000 to expand this ongoing initiative so that the State 
Information Technology Consortium can identify and widely 
disseminate methods for improving the flow of information 
between agencies and the court system. The conferees also 
provide sufficient funding for the following:

Metropolitan Family Services for a demonstration project 
    encouraging more involved fathers.........................  $400,000
Montana Child Care Financing Demonstration....................   200,000
National Center for Appropriate Technology in Butte, MT.......   150,000
University of Georgia to evaluate the feasibility of creating 
    a commission to carry out a comprehensive program of 
    economic and human resource development in the Southern 
    Black Belt................................................   250,000
University of Louisville Research Foundation, Inc., for a 
    National Center on Child Welfare Training Evaluation......   250,000
Community Services
      The conference agreement includes $33,417,000 for 
community based resource centers, instead of $34,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and $32,834,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      For Developmental Disabilities, the conference agreement 
includes $35,000,000 for protection and advocacy services as 
proposed by the Senate instead of $34,000,000 as proposed by 
the House. It also includes $11,734,000 for special projects as 
proposed by the Senate instead of $10,734,000 as proposed by 
the House. For university affiliated programs, the agreement 
includes $24,000,000 as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$21,800,000 as proposed by the House.
      The conference agreement includes $45,946,000 for Native 
Americans, instead of $44,396,000 as proposed by the House and 
$45,996,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conferees recommend 
that the Administration on Native Americans increase support 
for Native Hawaiian educational programs which enhance their 
ability to participate effectively in the governmental process. 
Within the total the conferees provide funding for the 
following:

Cook Inlet Tribal Council, Inc................................  $350,000
Kawerak, Inc..................................................   150,000
Tanana Chiefs Conference in interior Alaska...................   250,000

      The conference agreement includes $650,000,000 for the 
community services block grant instead of $620,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and $675,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The conference agreement includes bill language 
stipulating that all local entities that are in good standing 
in the community services block grant program shall receive an 
increase in funding for the next program year that is 
proportionate to the overall increase in the appropriation 
provided for the block grant. The conference agreement also 
includes bill language proposed by the Senate that clarifies 
that the community economic development grant funds may be used 
to finance construction and rehabilitation.
      The conference agreement also includes $32,517,000 for 
economic development, instead of $30,034,000 as proposed by the 
House and $35,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conferees 
also set aside $5,500,000 within the community economic 
development program for the job creation demonstration 
authorized under the Family Support Act. The conference 
agreement also includes $7,000,000 for the rural community 
facilities program described in the House and Senate reports, 
as proposed by the Senate, instead of $5,321,000 as proposed by 
the House.
      For National Youth Sports, the agreement includes 
$17,000,000 as proposed by the House instead of $16,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. For the community food program, the 
agreement includes $7,314,000 as proposed by the Senate instead 
of $6,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      The conference agreement also includes $124,459,000 for 
Battered Women's Shelters instead of $126,918,000 as proposed 
by the House and $122,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. For 
the Early Learning Fund, the agreement includes $25,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The House bill did not include funding 
for this program. The agreement also includes $1,500,000 for 
the Faith Based Center instead of $3,000,000 as proposed by the 
House. The Senate bill did not include funding for this 
program.

                   promoting safe and stable families

      The conference agreement appropriates funds for promoting 
safe and stable families under subpart 2 of part B of title IV 
of the Social Security Act, as proposed by the House. The 
Senate proposed providing funds under section 430 of the Social 
Security Act.

       payments to states for foster care and adoption assistance

      The conference agreement includes $6,621,500,000 as 
proposed by the House instead of $6,621,100,000 as proposed by 
the Senate.

                        Administration on Aging

                        aging services programs

      The conference agreement includes $1,199,814,000 for 
aging services programs instead of $1,144,832,000 as proposed 
by the House and $1,209,756,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $357,000,000 for 
supportive centers, instead of $327,075,000 as proposed by the 
House and $366,500,000 as proposed by the Senate. The agreement 
also includes $21,123,000 for preventive health services as 
proposed by the House instead of $22,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The conferees intend that $5,000,000 be made available 
from preventive health services for activities regarding 
medication management, screening, and education to prevent 
incorrect medication and adverse drug reactions.
      The conference agreement also includes $17,681,000 for 
ombusdsman/elder abuse prevention activities, instead of 
$14,181,000 as proposed by the House and $18,181,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The agreement also includes 
$141,500,000 for family caregivers, instead of $137,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and $146,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. Within the funds provided for family caregivers, the 
agreement includes $5,500,000 for Native American caregivers. 
The Senate bill provided $6,000,000 for this purpose.
      The conference agreement includes $390,000,000 for 
congregate meals, instead of $396,000,000 as proposed by the 
House and $384,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
conference agreement includes $176,500,000 for home delivered 
meals, instead of $176,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$177,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The agreement also 
includes $25,729,000 for grants to Indians instead of 
$25,457,000 as proposed by the House and $26,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The agreement includes $38,280,000 for aging research and 
demonstrations instead of $19,100,000 as proposed by the House 
and $36,574,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within the funds, 
the conferees have included sufficient funding for an 
osteoporosis prevention education program aimed at post-
menopausal women. The conferees also include the following 
amounts under aging research and training:

Adult Day Care of Winchester, Winchester, VA, to provide adult 
    day care for individuals with Alzheimer's disease.........  $150,000
Allegheny County Homestead Apartments LIFE Center.............   300,000
Alzheimer's Family Day Center, Falls Church, VA, to provide 
    adult day care for individuals with Alzheimer's disease...   250,000
Area Agency on Aging of Southeast Arkansas, Inc., for 
    demonstration project for non-Medicaid eligible elderly...   500,000
Area Agency on Aging of Southwest Arkansas for family care-
    giving research project...................................   231,000
Champlain Senior Center in Burlington, VT, to support its 
    efforts to help low-income seniors remain independent and 
    active for as long as possible through the use of 
    technology................................................   100,000
Civic Ventures for Experience Corps initiative for older 
    adults to mentor young people.............................   800,000
Coalition of Wisconsin Aging Groups in Madison, WI, to provide 
    assistance and education to the legal community and the 
    public about elder financial abuse........................   136,000
Comprehensive Housing Assistance, Inc., Baltimore, MD, for 
    demonstration project on Naturally Occurring Retirement 
    Communities to the Baltimore Jewish Naturally Occurring 
    Retirement Community...................................... 1,000,000
Council of Senior Centers and Services of NYC for ACCESS to 
    BENE*FITS Demonstration Project...........................    75,000
DuPage County Human Services Department, Wheaton, IL, ``Elder 
    Abuse and Neglect Program''...............................   100,000
Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, for Anne and 
    Louis Green Alzheimer's Care and Research Center.......... 1,000,000
Florida International University, Miami, FL, National Policy 
    and Research Center on Nutrition and Aging ``Nutrition 
    2030 program''............................................   500,000
Garrett County Area Agency on Aging to increase access to 
    nutrition services for rural seniors......................    25,000
Guadelupe Community Center, Los Angeles, CA, for a 
    demonstration project on delivery of outreach services to 
    the elderly, including non-English speaking seniors.......   440,000
Hmong Mutual Assistance Association in La Crosse, WI, to 
    provide employment, social, economic and educational 
    assistance to elder Hmong refugees........................   127,000
Institute for Music and Neurologic Function, Bronx, NY, for 
    research involving the use of music to assist individuals 
    suffering from stroke, dementia, Alzheimer's..............   500,000
INTEGRIS health system in Oklahoma for technology centers that 
    seniors could utilize for health education and community 
    interaction...............................................   100,000
Iowa Department of Elder Affairs Seamless System to integrate 
    senior programs. In administering this award, the AoA and 
    CMS should provide the technical assistance and related 
    support necessary to develop and implement program changes 1,500,000
Iowa State University, Ames, IA, for the universal kitchen 
    design project to develop technologies for independent 
    living for individuals with disabilities..................   200,000
Jewish Association on Aging, Pittsburgh, for a demonstration 
    project on Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities.....   200,000
Jewish Family and Children's Service of Greater Philadelphia 
    for a demonstration project on Naturally Occurring 
    Retirement Communities....................................   200,000
Jewish Federation of St. Louis to establish a Naturally 
    Occurring Retirement Communities (NORCs) demonstration 
    project providing supportive services to seniors.......... 1,280,000
Mecklenburg County, NC, Nutrition 2000 program to help provide 
    nutritional care for homebound frail senior citizens...... 1,000,000
National Center for Seniors' Housing Research to enable the 
    elderly to live independently.............................   475,000
Naturally Occurring Retirement Communities, Cleveland, OH, for 
    a demonstration program................................... 1,000,000
Oregon Health Sciences University for Healthy Aging Project...   450,000
Rebuilding Together with Christmas in April to rehabilitate 
    the homes of the low income elderly.......................   500,000
Senior Community Centers of San Diego for the Health 
    Promotion/Harm Reduction Demonstration Project............    90,000
Senior Specialists Agency on Aging of West Central Arkansas 
    for research on services to the aging.....................   455,000
Social Research into Alzheimer's disease care options, best 
    practices and other Alzheimer's research priorities as 
    specified in the House Report............................. 3,685,000
SPRY Foundation to develop web-based resources and training 
    programs to help seniors access high-quality information 
    and caregiver support services............................   367,000
Texas Tech Institute University Health Sciences Center, 
    Lubbock, TX, for the Institute for Healthy Aging.......... 1,000,000
The Motion Picture and Television Fund, in partnership with 
    the University of Southern California's Andrus School of 
    Gerontology, for the Eden Alternative demonstration 
    project that seeks to improve quality of care and life for 
    seniors residing in nursing homes and assisted living 
    facilities................................................   100,000
Tri-County Community Action Program, Berlin, NH, for 
    demonstration project.....................................    50,000
Wayne County, MI, demonstration project to enhance services to 
    the elderly, including dementia patients, and to serve 
    ethnic groups.............................................   800,000
Westchester County Department of Senior Programs and Services 
    for a Senior Outreach to Senior program...................    20,000

                        Office of the Secretary

                    general departmental management

      The conference agreement includes $347,554,000 for 
general departmental management instead of $338,887,000 as 
proposed by the House and $422,212,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. In addition, the agreement provides $21,552,000 in 
program evaluation funds as proposed by the House. The Senate 
did not provide for evaluation funds in this account.
      Within the total provided, $4,000,000 is for the United 
States-Mexico Border Health Commission as proposed by the 
Senate. The House did not specify an amount for the Commission.
      The conference agreement includes $500,000 for the 
National Academy of Sciences and Institute of Medicine (NAS/
IOM) to develop a cost-effective strategy for reducing and 
preventing underage drinking. The House had included funds for 
a similar purpose within the appropriation for the Substance 
Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, while the 
Senate bill included funds for this purpose in this account.
      To help develop a cost-effective strategy for reducing 
and preventing underage drinking, the NAS/IOM shall review 
existing Federal, State and non-governmental programs, 
including media-based programs, designed to change the 
attitudes and health behaviors of youth. Based on its review, 
the NAS/IOM shall produce a strategy designed to prevent and 
reduce underage drinking including: an outline and 
implementation strategy, message points that will be effective 
in changing the attitudes and health behaviors of youth 
concerning underage drinking, target audience identification, 
goals and objectives of the campaign, and the estimated costs 
of development and implementation. The review and 
recommendations of the NAS/IOM shall be reported to the 
Committees on Appropriations of the Congress, the Secretary of 
Health and Human Services, the Secretary of Education, and the 
U.S. Attorney General no later than nine months after the date 
of enactment of this Act.
      The conferees have heard concerns from state and local 
health departments and community-based organizations about the 
lack of availability of rapid HIV tests to identify individuals 
with HIV disease. Rapid HIV tests are needed for increasing the 
number of HIV-infected individuals who know they are infected; 
for screening pregnant women in labor to prevent transmission 
to their infants; for screening potential recipients of 
smallpox or other live-virus vaccines against potential agents 
of bioterrorism; and for emergency screening of blood 
transfusions in the event of large-scale terrorist attack. The 
conferees strongly encourage the Secretary to expedite approval 
and make available simple, rapid HIV diagnostic tests for use 
by a variety of health and community-based personnel.
      The conferees concur with language in the House report 
regarding the coordination of men's health activities.
      The conferees concur with language in the Senate report 
regarding the ongoing research supported by the Office of 
Dietary Supplements (ODS) at the National Institutes of Health 
concerning ephedra and the corresponding language relating to 
FDA rulemaking. The conferees urge the Secretary to work with 
FDA and ODS to resolve this rulemaking matter expeditiously so 
that the millions of Americans who use these weight loss 
products can continue to do so responsibly. Several states, 
such as Ohio in 1997 and Nebraska as recently as 2001, have 
already taken action to put in place clear and science-based 
regulatory parameters in an effort to preserve consumer access 
and safeguard public health by precluding the sale of ephedrine 
products marketed as street drug alternatives. The conferees 
urge the Secretary to work with industry and to take an active 
role in this regulatory process and to ensure that any interim 
actions as well as the final rule establish appropriate rules 
based on science. The conferees also urge industry to share 
with the Department all data from clinical studies with 
ephedra.
      The conferees are concerned about the growing shortages 
of qualified healthcare workers, particularly in underserved 
rural and urban areas. The problem is at once an educational 
issue, a labor issue, and a healthcare issue. The conferees 
urge the Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary of Labor 
and the Secretary of Education, to convene a high level task 
force to develop both immediate and longer-term solutions to 
these shortages. The conferees expect the Secretary to be 
prepared to discuss this issue and the status of the task force 
during the fiscal year 2003 budget hearings.
      The conferees are aware that patients who suffer terminal 
illnesses face severe and excruciating pain. For such patients, 
palliative care is essential. The conferees are concerned that, 
although palliative care is well-established in many other 
countries, most of the American public and many health care 
professionals still know little about it. The conferees urge 
the Secretary to work with organizations like the American 
Medical Association and the American Board of Hospice and 
Palliative Medicine, to disseminate appropriate information to 
health care professionals and the public.
      The conferees note that it has been seven years since 
enactment of the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act 
and the Department has yet to promulgate good manufacturing 
practices regulations as called for under the Act. These 
regulations are crucial for consumer protection. The conferees 
strongly urge the Secretary to publish these regulations within 
15 days of enactment of this Act.
      The conference agreement includes $500,000 to augment the 
resources of the Office of General Counsel for enforcement of 
violations of DSHEA's labeling and content requirements as 
recommended by the Senate. The House had no similar provision.
      The conferees understand the White House Commission on 
Complementary and Alternative Medicine will release its final 
report early in 2002. The conferees urge the Secretary to form 
a coordinating unit to review the Commission's report and 
implement ways to better coordinate the Department's many CAM-
related activities.
      Within the total, the agreement includes funds above the 
request for the Department's Information Collection Review and 
Analysis System as proposed by the House.
      The conference agreement includes $1,000,000 to launch a 
public awareness campaign to inform Americans about the 
existence of spare embryos and options for couples to adopt an 
embryo or embryos in order to bear children, as proposed by the 
Senate. The House had no similar provision. The conferees 
further direct that the Secretary prepare and submit a report 
to the Committees on Appropriations by April 1, 2002, outlining 
the Department's plans and timeline to launch this campaign.
      The conferees encourage the Secretary, in conjunction 
with the CDC and relevant NIH institutes, to work with 
interested members of the physician community to provide 
nationwide access to a physician-only multi-media internet 
site. The conferees are aware of such sites with webcast 
experience, media response capability, and original content 
developed by nationally recognized medical faculty. Access to 
this web-based technology, which should function in conjunction 
with Federal health agencies' information systems, will allow 
the nation's primary care providers to receive important 
Federal health news and alerts as well as up to date 
information on treatment protocols for biological threats.
      The conferees are aware of a proposal to develop a 
Prescription Drug Surveillance System using independent, real-
time pharmaceutical transaction data. The conferees encourage 
the Secretary to consider this proposal.
      It has come to the conferees' attention that a number of 
experts believe that more needs to be done in the area of 
tissue engineering, including the development of a national 
strategy. The conferees urge the Secretary to consider 
developing such a national strategy, one that includes 
collaborative research and entrepreneurship. The conferees 
further urge the Secretary to consider using the scientific 
expertise at the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and 
Bioengineering to execute the strategy and encourage 
consideration of the establishment of a Center for Tissue 
Engineering and Regenerative Medicine through the Institute's 
extramural research program.
      The agreement provides $28,931,000 for the adolescent 
family life program instead of $27,862,000 as proposed by the 
House and $30,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The agreement 
includes bill language earmarking $11,885,000 under the 
adolescent family life program for activities specified under 
section 2003(b)(2) of the Public Health Service Act, of which 
$10,157,000 shall be for prevention grants under section 
510(b)(2) of Title V of the Social Security Act, without 
application of the limitation of section 2010(c) of Title XX of 
the Public Health Service Act. The conference agreement 
includes funds above the request to expand efforts in providing 
care services.
      The agreement provides $49,584,000 for minority health, 
instead of $43,084,000 as proposed by the House and the Senate. 
The conferees urge the Secretary, where appropriate, to 
incorporate the out-year costs of fiscal year 2002 program 
initiatives in the operating divisions as recommended by the 
House.
      The conferees concur with the House recommendation 
regarding the importance of OMH partnerships with minority 
health professions institutions. Specifically, the conferees 
urge the Office to continue its successful cooperative 
agreement with Meharry Medical College. In addition, the 
conferees urge the OMH to give priority consideration to 
partnering with the Morehouse School of Medicine. In addition, 
the conferees urge the Office to retain Central State 
University as the managing institution for the Family Community 
Violence Prevention program. Also, the conferees encourage the 
Office of Minority Health to work with Morehouse College of 
Atlanta, Georgia and a consortium of historically black 
colleges and universities to undertake the planning and design 
phase of the National Minority Male Project. The conferees also 
urge that during the implementation phase of the project, the 
Office reach out and involve as many interested minority 
institutions as possible.
      The agreement provides $26,819,000 for the office of 
women's health instead of $26,769,000 as proposed by the House 
and $27,396,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conferees urge 
the Secretary, where appropriate, to incorporate the out-year 
costs of fiscal year 2002 program initiatives in the operating 
divisions as recommended by the House.
      The agreement includes $1,000,000 to commission a Surgeon 
General's report on osteoporosis and related bone diseases, 
detailing the burden bone disease places on society and 
highlighting preventive measures to improve and maintain bone 
health throughout life as proposed by the Senate. The House 
included no similar provision.
      The agreement does not include $68,700,000 for 
bioterrorism within this account as proposed by the Senate. 
Instead, funds for bioterrorism preparedness and response are 
provided within the Public Health and Social Services Emergency 
Fund as proposed by the House.
      Within the total provided, $50,000,000 is for minority 
HIV/AIDS Initiative as proposed by the House and Senate. The 
conferees concur with the House report regarding the purposes 
and uses of these funds. The agreement deletes bill language 
included by the House requiring the Secretary to submit an 
operating plan prior to the obligation of these funds, because 
the conferees expect this information to be included in the 
general operating plan to be submitted by the Department. The 
Senate had no similar provision.
      The agreement includes $21,998,000 for the IT Security 
and Innovation Fund, instead of $25,000,000 as proposed by the 
House and $15,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees include the amounts for the following 
projects and activities in fiscal year 2002 listed below. The 
conferees direct that none of these project funds be 
transferred to either the National Institutes of Health or the 
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

For the Community Transportation Association of America to 
    provide technical assistance to human services 
    transportation providers on ADA requirements..............$1,000,000
For the ARCH National Resource Center on Respite and Crisis 
    Services in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, to expand 
    training, technical assistance, evaluation and networking 
    expertise in respite care.................................   200,000
Within the Office of Minority Health for Access Community 
    Health Network in Maywood/Chicago Heights IL to expand its 
    women's health programs...................................   100,000
Within the Office of Minority Health for Padres Contra El 
    Cancer in Los Angeles to expand patient education programs 
    and family support services for Latino children with 
    cancer....................................................   200,000
Within the Office of Minority Health for Sisters Network, Inc. 
    in Houston, Texas, for an educational and outreach program 
    on breast cancer targeted to African-American women.......   150,000
Within the Office of Minority Health for the Baltimore City 
    Health Department to provide HIV/AIDS testing, counseling, 
    and prevention programs for high-risk persons.............   500,000
Within the Office of Minority Health for the San Francisco 
    Department of Public Health, to expand and support San 
    Francisco General Hospital's capacity to provide HIV care 
    and related services with an emphasis on providing care 
    for women and minorities..................................   650,000
Within the Office of Minority Health for the Cleveland Clinic 
    Foundation, Cleveland, OH, for the development of 
    community-based programs and support of public education 
    and outreach activities on sarcoidosis and minority health 2,000,000
Within the Office of Minority Health for the AIDS Foundation 
    of Chicago, Illinois, for projects related to HIV/AIDS 
    prevention and treatment in minority and disadvantaged 
    communities...............................................   500,000
Within the Office of Minority Health for the Thomas Jefferson 
    University Hospital in Philadelphia, to create a Chinese 
    language and culture Primary Health Care Center where 
    members of the community can gain access to desperately 
    needed linguistically competent and culturally sensitive 
    health care services...................................... 1,500,000
Within the Office of Minority Health for the Glaucoma Caucus 
    Foundation to provide glaucoma screening and outreach 
    activities................................................   500,000
Within the Office of Minority Health for the University of 
    Medicine and Dentistry in NJ to focus research on key 
    health areas that disproportionately affect minority 
    populations, and to educate and train minority health 
    providers.................................................   200,000
Within the Office of Minority Health for the County of San 
    Diego to provide treatment to TB patients along the 
    Mexican border with California............................   200,000
Within the Office of Women's Health for the Adelphi Breast 
    Cancer Hotline and Support Program for counseling services 
    and to address psycho-social issues associated with breast 
    cancer....................................................    50,000

                      Office of Inspector General

      The conference agreement includes $35,786,000 for the 
Office of Inspector General as proposed by the House and 
Senate. The conferees do not include language proposed by the 
House to limit the amount of funds available to the Inspector 
General in fiscal year 2002 under the Health Insurance 
Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) to not more 
than $130,000,000. The Senate bill contained no similar 
provision.
      The conference agreement deletes language proposed by the 
Senate authorizing the use of funds for the hire of vehicles 
for investigations. The House bill had no similar provision. In 
addition, the agreement deletes language proposed by the Senate 
permanently authorizing the use of funds to provide protective 
services to the Secretary and to investigate non-payment of 
child support cases for which non-payment is a federal offense. 
Like the House bill, the agreement includes language providing 
this authority for one year.
      The conferees request the Inspector General to conduct an 
audit of all federal amounts and activities allocated for AIDS 
prevention programs in the Act and to report its findings to 
the Congress.

                            Policy Research

      The conference agreement includes $2,500,000 for policy 
research as proposed by the House, instead of $20,500,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The agreement also includes language 
proposed by the House providing authority to the Secretary to 
utilize evaluation funds available under section 241 of the 
Public Health Service Act. The conferees understand that this 
authority, along with the $2,500,000 in appropriated funds, 
will yield a program level of at least $20,500,000 in fiscal 
year 2002.
      The conference agreement also includes language proposed 
by the House requiring the Secretary to comply with section 205 
of this Act before utilizing section 241 funds to support 
Policy Research activities. The Senate bill contained no 
similar provision. In addition, the conferees are aware that 
the national poverty center grant expired on June 30, 2001, and 
expect the Secretary to hold a national competition to award a 
new five-year grant or grants. This agreement includes 
sufficient funds to continue to support one or more national 
poverty research centers on a competitive basis.
      Within the funds available, $7,125,000 is to continue to 
study the outcomes of welfare reform and to assess the impacts 
of policy changes on the low-income population. The conferees 
recommend that this effort include the collection and use of 
state-specific surveys, state and federal administration data, 
and data administratively linking the National Database of New 
Hires, other child support enforcement data, TANF and Medicaid 
records together. These studies should focus on assessing the 
well-being of the low income population, developing and 
reporting reliable and comparable state-by-state measures of 
family hardship and well-being, the utilization of other 
support programs and the impact of child support enforcement 
efforts. These studies should continue to measure outcomes for 
a broad population of current, former and potential welfare 
recipients, as well as other special populations affected by 
state TANF policies. The conferees further expect these studies 
to analyze how the earnings of custodial and non-custodial 
parents who are, or have had children who are, current or 
former welfare recipients have changed over time and whether 
the pattern is significantly different among states. The 
conferees request a report on these topics to be submitted to 
House and Senate Appropriations Committees by May 1, 2002.

            PUBLIC HEALTH AND SOCIAL SERVICES EMERGENCY FUND

      The conference agreement includes $242,949,000 for the 
Public Health and Social Services Emergency Fund instead of 
$300,619,000 as proposed by the House. The Senate provided 
$181,919,000 within the Centers for Disease Control and 
Prevention and $68,700,000 within General Departmental 
Management for these activities.
      The amount provided includes $181,919,000 for the Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention for the following 
bioterrorism and related activities:
      --$2,000,000 to continue to discover, develop, and 
transition anti-infective agents to combat emerging diseases;
      --$18,040,000 for the third year of a collaborative 
research program on the anthrax vaccine;
      --$34,000,000 for a national health alert network; and
      --$127,879,000 for all other activities.
      The remaining $61,030,000 is for the Office of Emergency 
Preparedness for bioterrorism-related activities.

                           General Provisions

                       NIH and SAMHSA Salary Cap

      The conference agreement includes a modified provision 
limiting the use of the National Institutes of Health, the 
Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, and the Substance 
Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration funds to pay 
the salary of an individual, through a grant or other 
extramural mechanism, at a rate in excess of Level I of the 
Executive Schedule.

                             Evaluation Tap

      The conference agreement includes a provision to allow 
for not more than a 1.25 percent evaluation tap pursuant to 
section 241 of the Public Health Service Act. The House bill 
contained a provision to allow for a one percent evaluation tap 
and the Senate bill contained a provision to allow for an 
evaluation tap of not more than two percent.

                           Transfer Authority

      The conference agreement includes modified language to 
provide general transfer authority for the Department of Health 
and Human Services. The language limits the amount an 
appropriation can be increased by a transfer to not more than 
three percent as proposed by the Senate instead of ten percent 
as proposed by the House. The language also allows an 
appropriation to be increased by an additional two percent 
subject to approval by the House and Senate Committees on 
Appropriations.

              Extension of Certain Adjudication Provisions

      The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
the Senate to extend the refugee status for persecuted 
religious groups. The House bill contained no similar 
provision.

                      CDC International Authority

      The conference agreement includes a modified provision to 
provide authority to support CDC carrying out international 
HIV/AIDS and other infectious and chronic disease activities 
abroad.

                Division of Federal Occupational Health

      The conference agreement includes a provision to allow 
the Division of Federal Occupational Health to use personal 
services contracting to employ professional management/
administrative and occupational health professionals as a 
general provision as proposed by the House. The Senate bill 
contained a similar provision within the Health Resources and 
Services Administration.

                            NIH Obligations

      The conference agreement does not include a provision 
proposed by the House to limit NIH obligations. The Senate bill 
contained no similar provision.

                          NIH Acting Director

      The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
the Senate to allow the NIH Acting Director to remain in that 
position until a new Director of NIH is confirmed by the 
Senate. The House bill contained no similar provision.

                     Global HIV/AIDS Transfer Fund

      The conference agreement does not include a provision 
proposed by the Senate to transfer funds from the National 
Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases and NIH Buildings 
and Facilities to International Assistance Programs, ``Global 
Fund to Fight HIV/AIDS, Malaria, and Tuberculosis'' as a 
general provision. The agreement provides for this transfer 
within the individual accounts as proposed by the House.

Enforcement of Labeling Provisions of the Dietary Supplement Health and 
                         Education Act of 1994

      The conference agreement does not include a provision 
proposed by the Senate to earmark funds for the Office of the 
General Counsel to provide legal support for enforcement of the 
labeling provisions of the Dietary Supplement Health and 
Education Act of 1994. The House bill contained no similar 
provision. The agreement addresses this issue under General 
Departmental Management.

       Sense of the Senate Regarding Good Manufacturing Practices

      The conferees delete without prejudice a Sense of the 
Senate provision regarding good manufacturing practices. The 
House bill contained no similar provision.

                  Federal Use of AIDS Prevention Funds

      The conference agreement does not include a provision 
proposed by the Senate to require the Inspector General to 
audit all Federal amounts allocated to AIDS Prevention 
programs. The House bill contained no similar provision.

          Sense of the Senate Regarding Hospital Reimbursement

      The conferees delete without prejudice a Sense of the 
Senate provision regarding reimbursement of certain hospitals 
testing and treating individuals for exposure to anthrax. The 
House bill contained no similar provision. The conferees 
encourage the Department to assist and fairly compensate 
hospitals and other health providers that respond to emergency 
public health threats.

  Sense of the Senate Regarding Lead Poisoning Screening and Medicaid

      The conferees delete without prejudice a Sense of the 
Senate provision regarding lead poisoning screenings and 
treatments under the Medicaid program. The House bill contained 
no similar provision. The conferees encourage CMS to work with 
medical providers to ensure that all eligible children receive 
a lead poison screening and appropriate treatment as required 
by the Medicaid program.

    Sense of the Senate Regarding Lead Poisoning Screening and SCHIP

      The conferees delete without prejudice a Sense of the 
Senate provision regarding lead poisoning screenings and 
treatments under the SCHIP program. The House bill contained no 
similar provision. The conferees encourage the Department to 
consider expanding SCHIP to allow funds to be used for lead 
poison screenings.

         Sense of the Senate Regarding Childhood Lead Screening

      The conferees delete without prejudice a Sense of the 
Senate provision regarding the establishment of a bonus program 
for improvement of childhood lead screening rates. The House 
bill contained no similar provision. The conferees encourage 
the Department to consider establishing such a program.

                  Radiation Exposure Compensation Act

      The conference agreement does not include a provision 
proposed by the Senate to earmark funds for cancer prevention 
and screening programs under section 471C of the Public Health 
Service Act. The House bill contained no similar provision. The 
agreement addresses this issue within the Health Resources and 
Services Administration.

                            TANF Rescission

      The conference agreement does not include a provision 
proposed by the Senate to rescind $200,000,000 of TANF funds. 
The House bill contained no similar provision.

  Sense of the Senate Regarding Post-Abortion Depression and Psychosis

      The conferees delete without prejudice a Sense of the 
Senate provision regarding research on, and services for, 
individuals with post-abortion depression and psychosis. The 
House bill contained no similar provision.

                  Children's Traumatic Stress Program

      The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
the Senate to rename section 582 of the Public Health Service 
Act. The House bill contained no similar provision.

                   TITLE III--DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

                    EDUCATION FOR THE DISADVANTAGED

      The conference agreement includes $12,346,900,000 for 
Education for the Disadvantaged instead of $12,571,400,000 as 
proposed by the House and $11,926,400,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The agreement includes advance funding for this account 
of $7,383,301,000 instead of $6,758,300,000 as proposed by the 
House and $6,953,300,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      For Grants to Local Educational Agencies (LEAs) the 
agreement provides $10,350,000,000 instead of $10,500,000,000 
as proposed by the House and $10,200,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The conference agreement includes $7,172,971,000 for 
basic grants and $1,365,031,000 for concentration grants. The 
agreement also includes $1,018,499,000 for targeted grants, and 
$793,499,000 for education finance incentive grants. Both 
targeted and education finance incentive grants are authorized 
distributions of the title I formula that have not previously 
been funded. For targeted grants, funds are distributed based 
on a weighted count of the number of poor children within the 
state. Distribution for education finance incentive grants is 
based on the total number of poor children within the State 
multiplied by the per pupil expenditure, a state effort factor 
and a state equity factor. There is a within-state allocation 
for education finance incentive grants which is based on 
variations of the targeted grant formula with the greatest 
targeting on high poverty school districts in the states where 
the equity factor is lowest. Concentration grants, targeted 
grants, and incentive grants are all provided on an advance-
funded basis.
      The House bill proposed $8,037,000,000 for basic grants, 
$1,684,000,000 for concentration grants, and $779,000,000 for 
targeted grants. The Senate bill proposed $7,172,690,000 for 
basic grants, $1,365,031,000 for concentration grants, 
$1,000,000,000 for targeted grants, and $662,279,000 for 
education finance incentive grants.
      The conference agreement also provides $3,500,000 for 
updated census poverty data from the Bureau of the Census, as 
proposed by the Senate. The House bill contained no similar 
provision.
      The conference agreement includes $250,000,000 for the 
Even Start program instead of $260,000,000 as proposed by the 
House and $200,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement also includes $12,500,000 for 
Literacy through School Libraries instead of $25,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The House bill did not provide funding 
for this program. This program is designed to improve literacy 
skills and academic achievement of students by providing 
students with increased access to up-to-date school library 
materials, a well-equipped, technologically advanced school 
library media center, and well-trained, professionally 
certified school library media specialists.
      The conference agreement includes $396,000,000 for the 
migrant education program instead of $410,000,000 as proposed 
by the House and $405,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
agreement also includes $48,000,000 for neglected and 
delinquent youth instead of $46,000,000 as proposed by the 
House and $50,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $235,000,000 for grants 
to local educational agencies for comprehensive school reform, 
compared to $310,000,000 as proposed by the House. The Senate 
bill did not include funds for this activity. The conference 
agreement permits up to 3 percent of these funds to be used for 
quality improvement initiatives, as authorized.
      The conference agreement also includes $10,000,000 for 
dropout prevention programs, instead of $15,000,000 as proposed 
by the Senate. The House bill did not provide funding for this 
program.
      The conference agreement includes $1,500,000 for the 
Close Up Foundation as proposed by the House instead of 
$2,500,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                               IMPACT AID

      The conference agreement includes $1,143,500,000 for the 
Impact Aid programs instead of $1,130,500,000 as proposed by 
both the House and the Senate. Within this amount, $48,000,000 
is provided for construction instead of $35,000,000 as proposed 
by both the House and the Senate.
      Sufficient funding is provided within the account for 
construction for the following:

Killeen Independent School District, Texas, for capital 
    improvements..............................................$2,000,000
Ronan School District in Ronan, Montana to facilitate the 
    construction of a new middle school....................... 1,000,000

                      SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT PROGRAMS

      The conference agreement includes $7,827,473,000 for 
School Improvement Programs instead of $7,673,584,000 as 
proposed by the House and $8,751,514,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The agreement provides $6,062,423,000 in fiscal year 
2002 and $1,765,000,000 in fiscal year 2003 funding for this 
account.
Improving teacher quality
      The conference agreement includes $2,850,000,000 for 
state grants for improving teacher quality, instead of 
$3,175,000,000 as proposed by the House and $3,039,834,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Of this amount, $1,150,000,000 is 
provided as a fiscal year 2003 advance as proposed by the 
Senate instead of $1,345,000,000 as proposed by the House. 
Grants for Improving Teacher Quality consolidates and 
streamlines the Eisenhower Professional Development program and 
the Class Size Reduction program to allow greater flexibility 
for local school districts. The purpose of this part is to 
provide grants to States, school districts, State agencies for 
higher education, and eligible partnerships to: (1) increase 
student academic achievement through such strategies as 
improving teacher and principal quality and increasing the 
number of highly qualified teachers in the classroom and highly 
qualified principals and assistant principals in schools; (2) 
hold districts and schools accountable for improvements in 
student academic achievement; and (3) hold districts and 
schools accountable so that all teachers teaching core academic 
subjects in public elementary schools and secondary schools are 
highly qualified.
      The conferees understand that the Eisenhower Professional 
Development program, which has been consolidated into a larger 
State Teacher Quality Improvement Grant program under the 
reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary School Act, was 
funded at $485,000,000 in fiscal year 2001. The Eisenhower 
program required that a minimum of $250,000,000 be dedicated to 
math and science professional development activities; however, 
the conferees understand that as much as $375,000,000 was 
actually expended on math and science in fiscal year 2001. The 
conferees believe that providing high-quality math and science 
instruction is of critical importance to our Nation's future 
competitiveness, and agree that math and science professional 
development opportunities should be expanded. The conferees 
therefore strongly urge the Secretary and the States to 
continue to fund math and science activities within the Teacher 
Quality Grant program at a comparable level in fiscal year 
2002.
      The conference agreement also includes $12,500,000 for 
math and science partnerships, instead of $25,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Math and science partnerships are 
intended to improve the performance of students in the areas of 
mathematics and science by encouraging States, institutions of 
higher education, districts, elementary schools, and secondary 
schools to participate in programs that: (1) improve and 
upgrade the status and stature of mathematics and science 
teaching by encouraging institutions of higher education to 
assume greater responsibility for improving mathematics and 
science teacher education; (2) focus on education of 
mathematics and science teachers as a career-long process; (3) 
bring mathematics and science teachers together with 
scientists, mathematicians, and engineers to improve their 
teaching skills; and (4) develop more rigorous mathematics and 
science curricula that are aligned with State and local 
academic achievement standards expected for postsecondary study 
in engineering, mathematics, and science.
      The conferees note that, although this is a separate 
program designed specifically for the development of high 
quality math and science professional development 
opportunities, in no way do the conferees intend to discourage 
the Secretary and States from using other federal funding for 
math and science instructional improvement programs. The 
conferees strongly urge the Secretary and States to utilize 
funding provided by the Teacher Quality Grant program, as well 
as other programs funded by the federal government, to 
strengthen math and science education programs across the 
Nation.
      The conference agreement includes $88,000,000 for 
activities designed to recruit and train new teachers. The 
House bill proposed $50,000,000 for Troops to Teachers and 
Transition to Teaching programs, while the Senate proposed 
$95,000,000 for these activities as well as for a variety of 
other national teacher improvement activities.
      The conference agreement includes $53,000,000 for the 
Troops-to-Teachers and Transition-to-Teaching programs 
authorized under part C of title II of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act, as amended. Of this amount, 
$18,000,000 is available to the Secretary to transfer to the 
Department of Defense for Troops-to-Teachers and not less than 
$35,000,000 shall be available for Transition-to-Teaching. The 
conference agreement increases by six times the amount made 
available for Troops-to-Teachers compared to last year. The 
conferees are aware of the tremendous interest in the 
Transition-to-Teaching initiative that is aimed at recruiting 
and supporting mid-career professionals and talented, recent 
college graduates to become teachers. In FY 2001, 172 
applications requesting over $220,000,000 in federal funds were 
submitted--seven times more than the $31,000,000 available for 
awards. As a result, many grantees received awards 
substantially less than requested and other applicants were not 
funded at all. The conferees intend that the Department use a 
portion of the additional resources for Transition-to-Teaching 
to make supplemental awards to current national grantees to 
enable them to accelerate multi-state teacher recruitment 
efforts.
      The conference agreement also includes $10,000,000 for 
the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, as 
proposed by the House and the Senate and $15,000,000 for the 
early childhood educator professional development grants 
program, as proposed by the Senate. The agreement also includes 
$10,000,000 for principal recruitment. The House bill did not 
include funding for these activities.
National writing project
      The agreement also includes $14,000,000 for the National 
Writing Project instead of $12,000,000 as proposed by the House 
and $15,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
Civic education
      For Cooperative Education Exchanges, formerly the 
International Education Exchange program, the conference 
agreement includes $11,500,000, instead of $12,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The House bill did not fund this 
program. Within the total, $4,300,000 is included for the 
Center for Civic Education and $4,300,000 is for the National 
Council on Economic Education for economics education to 
continue the work these organizations are doing in Central and 
Eastern Europe and the newly independent states of the former 
Soviet Union, as well as to expand significantly the economic 
education and civic education programs already underway in 
Russia. Also included is $2,900,000 for competitive grants in 
economics and civics and/or government education.
      For Civic Education, the conference agreement includes 
$15,500,000 instead of $12,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$15,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The conferees support 
allocating $1,500,000 of the total amount for a continuation of 
the violence prevention demonstration program, and $500,000 of 
the total amount for the Native American civic education 
initiative. Further, the conferees intend that $2,000,000 be 
allocated for a cooperative project among the Center for Civic 
Education, the Center on Congress at Indiana University, and 
the Trust for Representative Democracy at the National 
Conference of State Legislatures to implement a comprehensive 
program to improve public knowledge, understanding, and support 
of American democratic institutions.
Teaching of traditional American history
      The conference agreement includes $100,000,000 for the 
teaching of traditional American history, as proposed by the 
Senate in the LIFE fund. The House bill did not propose 
separate funding for this program.
Innovative education program strategies
      For innovative education program strategies, the 
education block grant, the conference agreement includes 
$385,000,000 as proposed by the House instead of $410,000,000 
as proposed by the Senate.
School renovation
      The conference agreement does not include funding for 
grants to local educational agencies for emergency school 
renovation and repair activities. The House bill provided no 
funding for this activity. The Senate bill provided 
$925,000,000 for this purpose.
Education technology
      The conference agreement includes $700,500,000 for 
education technology state grants, instead of $1,000,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and $712,146,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act consolidates several technology programs 
(including the Technology Literacy Challenge Fund and Local 
Innovation Challenge Grants) into a State-based technology 
grant program that sends more money to schools. In doing so, it 
will facilitate comprehensive and integrated education 
technology strategies that target the specific needs of 
individual schools. Uses of funds include: (1) promoting 
innovative State and local initiatives using technology to 
increase academic achievement; (2) increasing access to 
technology, especially for high-need schools; and (3) improving 
and expanding teacher professional development in technology.
      The conference agreement also includes $62,500,000 for 
teacher training in technology, instead of $125,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The House bill did not include separate 
funding for this activity.
      The agreement also includes $22,000,000 for Ready to 
Learn Television, instead of $16,000,000 as proposed by the 
House and $24,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
Safe and Drug Free Schools
      The conference agreement includes $644,250,000 for the 
Safe and Drug Free Schools and Communities Act as proposed by 
both the House and the Senate.
      Included within this amount is $472,017,000 for state 
grants instead of $527,250,000 as proposed by the House and 
$444,250,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The agreement also includes $172,233,000 for national 
programs instead of $117,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$150,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within this amount, the 
conferees include $100,000,000 to support the Safe Schools/
Healthy Students initiative.
      Of the amount provided for Safe and Drug Free Schools 
National programs, the conferees also agree that up to 
$1,000,000 is available to the Secretary of Education, in 
consultation with the Secretary of Health and Human Services, 
to develop and disseminate recommendations and models to assist 
communities in implementing emergency response, evacuation and 
parental notification plans for schools and other community 
facilities where children gather, and coordinating these plans 
with local law enforcement, public safety, health and mental 
health agencies. Further, the conferees agree that $9,000,000 
is available for grants to enable local educational agencies to 
improve and strengthen emergency response and crisis management 
plans, including training school personnel, students and 
parents in emergency response procedures and coordinating with 
local law enforcement, public safety, health and mental health 
agencies. The conferees intend that these funds shall be 
available only to local educational agencies that demonstrate a 
significant need for emergency preparedness improvements and a 
lack of fiscal capacity to implement these improvements. The 
conferees have provided extended availability of funding for 
these two activities through September 30, 2003.
      Within the funds for national programs, the agreement 
also provides $37,500,000 to fund coordinators. The conferees 
understand that in the reauthorization of the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act, this program has been expanded to 
serve schools at all education levels.
Mentoring, community service, and alcohol abuse reduction programs
      The conference agreement includes $17,500,000 for 
mentoring programs, instead of $30,000,000 as proposed by the 
House and $5,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The agreement 
also includes $50,000,000 for grants for community service for 
expelled or suspended students and $25,000,000 for grants to 
reduce alcohol abuse as proposed by the Senate. The House bill 
did not propose separate funding for these programs.
State assessments
      The conference agreement includes $387,000,000 for 
assessments instead of $400,000,000 as proposed by the House 
and $352,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The new assessment 
provisions in H.R. 1 require States to implement annual reading 
and math assessments for grades 3-8, to hold states and local 
school districts that use federal funds accountable for 
improving student academic achievement. Annual reading and math 
assessments are intended to provide parents with the 
information they need to know how well their child is doing in 
school, and how well the school is educating their child. 
States may select and design assessments of their choosing. 
However, State assessments must be aligned with State academic 
standards, allow student achievement to be comparable from year 
to year, be of objective knowledge, be based on measurable, 
verifiable and widely accepted professional assessment 
standards, and not evaluate or assess personal or family 
beliefs and attitudes. States will have until the 2005-2006 
school year to develop and implement these assessments.
      The conferees understand that funding provided above the 
trigger set in the authorizing law for state assessments will 
be used for enhanced assessment instruments.
Public school choice
      The conference agreement includes $25,000,000 to support 
voluntary public school choice programs, instead of $50,000,000 
as proposed by the Senate. The House bill did not provide 
funding for this program.
Magnet schools
      The conferees concur with language in the House report 
directing the Secretary, when allocating magnet schools 
assistance funds, to give priority for funding to the highest-
quality applications remaining from the previous year's 
competition before funding applications approved in a new 
competition. The conferees also note that no funds are included 
for a new competition in innovative programs, since this 
program is no longer authorized.
Education for Homeless Children and Youth
      The conference agreement includes $50,000,000 for 
Education for Homeless Children and Youth as proposed by the 
House instead of $36,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
Education of Native Hawaiians
      The conference agreement includes $30,500,000 for the 
Education of Native Hawaiians instead of $33,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate and $28,000,000 as proposed by the 
House. The conferees urge the Department to provide $1,000,000 
for construction and co-location, $7,000,000 for curriculum 
development, $2,100,000 for community-based learning centers, 
$3,500,000 for higher education, $1,250,000 for gifted and 
talented, $3,100,000 for special education, $500,000 for Native 
Hawaiian education councils; and $12,050,000 for family-based 
education centers.
Alaska Native Educational Equity
      The conference agreement includes $24,000,000 for the 
Alaska Native Educational Equity program instead of $33,000,000 
as proposed by the Senate and $15,000,000 as proposed by the 
House.
Rural education
      The conference agreement includes $162,500,000 for rural 
education programs, instead of $200,000,000 as proposed by the 
House and $125,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. This program 
is intended to address the unique needs of rural school 
districts that frequently: (1) lack the personnel and resources 
needed to compete effectively for federal competitive grants; 
and (2) receive formula grant allocations in amounts too small 
to be effective in meeting their intended purposes. The program 
consists of two parts:
      Subpart 1--Small, Rural School Achievement Program--Under 
subpart 1, a school district is able to combine funds under 
various formula grant programs to carry out local activities 
intended to improve the academic achievement of elementary and 
secondary school students and the quality of instruction 
provided to these students. In addition, grants under this 
subpart would be awarded to eligible districts based on the 
number of students in average daily attendance less the amount 
they received from consolidated formula grant programs.
      Subpart 2--Rural and Low-Income School Program--If a 
district did not qualify for funding under subpart 1, it would 
be eligible for funding under subpart 2. Funds awarded to 
districts or made available to schools under subpart 2 can be 
used to carry out local activities intended to improve the 
academic achievement of elementary and secondary school 
students and the quality of instruction provided for these 
students.
      The conferees intend that the funds provided for rural 
education programs be distributed equally between subpart 1 and 
subpart 2, as authorized.
Fund for the Improvement of Education (FIE)
      The conference agreement includes $832,889,000 for the 
Fund for the Improvement of Education. This program has 
consolidated a number of programs that had previously been 
funded as separate line items.
      Within the total for FIE, the conference agreement 
includes $32,500,000 for the elementary school counseling 
program, instead of $30,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$35,000,000 as proposed by the Senate within the Local 
Innovations for Education (LIFE) fund.
      The conference agreement includes $25,000,000 for the 
partnership in character education program under the Fund for 
the Improvement of Education. The House bill recommended 
$25,000,000 for this purpose as a separate program, while the 
Senate bill included funding for this purpose under the LIFE 
fund. The conferees encourage the Secretary to consider funding 
projects that sensitize students to the painful effects of 
bullying, ridicule and other forms of disrespect--behaviors 
that frequently lie at the root of emotional and physical 
injury that children inflict upon one another. The conferees 
are supportive of such projects that help teachers and students 
create a respectful, compassionate and ridicule-free 
environment that nurtures both the emotional/social and 
academic growth of students.
      The conference agreement includes $142,189,000 for small, 
safe and successful high schools, instead of $200,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and $100,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The bill provides the funds on a forward funding basis. 
The conferees concur in the direction in House Report 107-229 
concerning this activity.
      For the Reading is Fundamental program, the conference 
agreement provides $24,000,000 instead of $23,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and $25,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement also includes $11,250,000 for 
Javits Gifted and Talented Education, instead of $7,500,000 as 
proposed by the House and $15,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The agreement includes $27,520,000 for Star Schools 
instead of $59,300,000 as proposed by the Senate in the LIFE 
fund. The House bill did not provide separate funding for this 
program.
      The agreement also includes $12,000,000 for the Ready to 
Teach program, instead of $15,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The House bill did not include separate funding for 
this activity. Funds may be used to develop high-quality, 
curriculum-based digital content and a national 
telecommunications-based program to improve the teaching of 
core academic subjects.
      The agreement also provides $14,000,000 for foreign 
language assistance instead of $16,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The House bill did not include separate funding for 
this activity.
      For the Carol M. White Physical Education for Progress 
program, the conference agreement includes $50,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The House bill did not propose funding 
for this program. The agreement also includes $32,475,000 for 
community based technology centers instead of $64,950,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The House bill did not propose funding 
for this program.
      The conference agreement includes $5,000,000 for a 
program to promote educational, cultural, apprenticeship and 
exchange programs for Alaska Natives, Native Hawaiians, and 
their historical whaling and trading partners in Massachusetts.
      For Arts in Education, the conference agreement includes 
$30,000,000 as proposed by both the House and the Senate. The 
conferees provide that within this total, $8,650,000 is for 
Very Special Arts, $6,000,000 is for the John F. Kennedy Center 
for the Performing Arts, and $2,000,000 is to be used to 
continue a youth violence prevention initiative. The conferees 
agree that of the funds provided to Very Special Arts, 
$1,650,000 is for planning for the 2004 International Festival. 
In addition, $2,000,000 is for model professional development 
programs for music educators and $4,000,000 is for activities 
authorized under subpart 2 of the Arts in Education program.
      The conference agreement includes $40,000,000 for 
parental assistance and local family information centers 
instead of $45,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The House 
bill did not propose funding for this program. The conference 
agreement also includes $3,000,000 for the Women's Educational 
Equity Act as proposed by both the House and the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $75,000,000 for 
continuing and new grants to local educational agencies for 
comprehensive school reform. The House and Senate bills did not 
include funds for this activity. The bill includes language 
specifying that these funds shall be allocated and expended in 
the same manner as in FY 2001 and provides the funds on a 
forward funding basis. The conference agreement includes funds 
to continue all existing grants and contracts for comprehensive 
school reform capacity and dissemination activities, including 
the national clearinghouse for comprehensive school reform.
      The conferees have included additional funds in this line 
item for the Secretary to support programs and projects that 
address national priorities in K-12 education. The conferees 
note that projects to promote economic education are authorized 
under this program and encourage the Secretary to utilize funds 
to support these activities.
      Within the total for FIE, the following amounts are 
provided:

American Airlines Travel Academy, Fort Worth, Texas, for a 
    demonstration project to implement a school-to-work 
    education curriculum focused on careers in the travel and 
    tourism industry in up to 10 school districts in New 
    Jersey serving predominantly low-income Hispanic students.  $600,000
North Syracuse Central School, Cicero, New York for technology   200,000
University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida, for a model 
    teacher preparation program...............................   440,000
White Plains School District, New York, for after school and 
    summer academic programs serving at-risk elementary 
    students..................................................   260,000
``Project Promotion,'' a project of the Southern Penobscot 
    Regional Program for Children with Exceptionalities 
    (SPRPCE) and Eastern Maine Technical College for 
    Paraprofessional Educators to pursue a two-year college 
    degree....................................................   200,000
24 Challenge and Jumping Levels to continue the empirical 
    study of the math program in Philadelphia County..........    50,000
Alabama School of Mathematics and Science Foundation, Mobile, 
    AL, for program development and equipment.................   300,000
Alaska Department of Education and Early Development for 
    Alyeska Central School, to prepare students in small rural 
    schools for the Alaska High School Qualifying exam through 
    distance delivery of core courses.........................   500,000
Alaska Department of Education for a remedial summer tutoring 
    program...................................................   800,000
Alaska Department of Education for its ``Qualified Teachers 
    for Alaska'' program...................................... 2,000,000
Alaska Geographic Alliance to work with the Library of 
    Congress to incorporate its ``Meeting of the Frontiers'' 
    work into the Alaska school history and geography 
    curriculum................................................   250,000
Alaska Mentoring Demonstration Project, Big Brothers/Big 
    Sisters agencies in Anchorage, Fairbanks and Juneau and 
    other partners to extend the proven benefits of mentoring 
    at-risk youth.............................................   500,000
Albuquerque Public Schools to expand child and family 
    development services in the South Valley area of 
    Albuquerque...............................................   200,000
Alliance for the Arts, New York City, for arts education 
    programs..................................................   600,000
Alliance Neighborhood Center, Alliance, OH, for after-school 
    program...................................................   250,000
American Film Institute Screen Education Center and Initiative 
    for arts education curriculum development and teacher 
    training..................................................   650,000
Amer-I-can program to assist at-risk youth with developing 
    life management skills, goals and self-esteem necessary to 
    acquire gainful employment................................ 1,000,000
American Theater Arts for Youth, Inc., Philadelphia, PA, for a 
    Mississippi Arts in Education program.....................   150,000
American Theater Arts For Youth, Inc., for an Arts in 
    Education Program.........................................    25,000
American Theater Arts for Youth, San Diego, CA, for 
    educational assistance in music and arts for students.....   100,000
American Theater Arts for Youth, Spokane, WA, for educational 
    assistance in music and arts for students in Spokane, WA..    50,000
AMISTAD America, Inc. to coordinate with school districts and 
    schools to provide students free admission, tours and 
    history lessons on the schooner Amistad vessel when it 
    visits various ports in the United States.................   810,000
Anchorage Community Theater School after school program in the 
    performing arts for grades K-12...........................    50,000
Appalachian Center for Economic Networks, Athens, Ohio, to 
    expand a computer entrepreneurship project................ 1,200,000
Art Share Los Angeles, California, for equipment and 
    programmatic support to expand a technology instructional 
    program for at-risk youth.................................   150,000
Arts and Education in Concert, Centreville, VA, for violence 
    prevention programs.......................................   250,000
Auburn City Board of Education, Auburn, AL, for technology....    38,000
Audubon Institute of New Orleans, LA to expand after-school 
    programs that offer safe, positive alternatives for at-
    risk students in kindergarten through 8th grade...........   100,000
Augusta Public School District, Augusta, KS, for staff 
    development in technology curriculum......................   250,000
Babyland Family Services, Newark, New Jersey for technology 
    training and extended learning opportunities for students, 
    parents and teachers......................................   200,000
Baltimore City Public School System to help complete wiring 
    schools to the Internet................................... 1,500,000
Bay County School District, Florida, for technology equipment, 
    supplies, teacher training, and student transportation for 
    a science education project in partnership with ZooWorld..    26,000
Beaver Local School District, Lisbon, OH, for educational 
    programming...............................................    40,000
Belmont-Harrison Vocational School District, St. Clairsville, 
    OH, for educational programming...........................    40,000
Bibb County Board of Education, Centreville, AL, for 
    technology................................................    38,000
Bloom Township High School District 206, Chicago Heights, 
    Illinois, to establish a work-study cooperative program...   450,000
Blue Springs Youth Outreach Unit, Blue Springs, MO, for 
    educational training in combating Goth culture............   273,000
Board of Education, Albertville City, AL, for technology 
    enhancements..............................................    30,000
Board of Education, Arab City, AL, for technology enhancements    30,000
Board of Education, Attalla City, AL, for technology 
    enhancements..............................................    30,000
Board of Education, Cullman City, AL, for technology 
    enhancements..............................................    30,000
Board of Education, Fort Payne City, AL, for technology 
    enhancements..............................................    30,000
Board of Education, Gadsdene City, AL, for technology 
    enhancements..............................................    30,000
Board of Education, Guntersville City, AL, for technology 
    enhancements..............................................    30,000
Board of Education, Haleyville City, AL, for technology 
    enhancements..............................................    30,000
Board of Education, Jasper City, AL, for technology 
    enhancements..............................................    30,000
Board of Education, Oneonta City, AL, for technology 
    enhancements..............................................    30,000
Board of Education, Russellville City, AL, for technology 
    enhancements..............................................    30,000
Board of Education, Winfield City, AL, for technology 
    enhancements..............................................    30,000
Boys and Girls Club of El Dorado, Arkansas, for after school 
    programs for at-risk youth................................    14,000
Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Washington, D.C., Silver 
    Spring, MD for after school programs for at-risk youth....   825,000
Boys and Girls Clubs of Philadelphia to develop a school based 
    mentoring program.........................................    75,000
Bridgeport Exempted Village School District, Bridgeport, OH, 
    for educational programming...............................    40,000
Brooke High School, Wellsburg, WV, for educational programming    40,000
Brooklawn Youth Services, Louisville, KY, for comprehensive 
    care treatment and education for children with serious 
    emotional disabilities....................................    50,000
Brown University's Northeast and Islands Regional Educational 
    Laboratory to support the Knowledge Loom web site that 
    provides enrichment resources for educators...............   100,000
Buckeye Local School District, Rayland, OH, for educational 
    programming...............................................    40,000
Bushnell Center for the Performing Arts in Hartford, CT to 
    expand the arts-in-education program......................   440,000
Calhoun County Board of Education, Anniston, AL, for 
    technology................................................    38,000
Camp Fire Boys and Girls--First Texas Council, Ft. Worth, TX, 
    for an early childhood violence reduction program.........   700,000
Canaan Community Development Corporation, Louisville, KY, 
    after school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programs 
    for at-risk students......................................    60,000
Centennial School District, Bucks County, PA, for activities 
    authorized by title V, part D, subpart 20 of ESEA.........   500,000
Centennial School District, Circle Pines, Minnesota, for an 
    after school program......................................   293,000
Center for Community Transformation, Chicago, IL, to support 
    student fellowships and ongoing secular educational 
    activities in community leadership transformation, 
    including curriculum development..........................   200,000
Central Florida Community College, Ocala, FL, for Education 
    Training Consortium for teacher training, recruitment and 
    retention.................................................   800,000
Challenger Learning Center at SciTrek, Atlanta, GA to use a 
    simulated mission control station and space laboratory to 
    create a dynamic learning environment for students in the 
    areas of science and technology...........................   350,000
Chambers County Board of Education, LaFayette, AL, for 
    technology................................................    38,000
Champions of Caring programs that encourage young people to 
    take an active role in their communities..................    50,000
CHAR High School-to-work vocational training program..........   100,000
Charter School Development Corporation in Las Vegas, Nevada to 
    focus on technology and college preparation............... 1,500,000
Chicago Children's Choir, Illinois, to support arts-integrated 
    academic curriculum development, musical equipment, 
    textbooks, and learning aids for the Choir Academy........   225,000
Chicago Public Schools, Illinois, for after school programs...   100,000
Chicago State University for an innovative project designed to 
    support teacher training and expand technology............   200,000
Children's Land Alliance Supporting Schools (CLASS)...........   200,000
Children's Literacy Initiative to supplement Head Start's 
    distance learning program as well as a teacher education 
    program...................................................   100,000
Chilton County Board of Education, Clanton, AL, for technology    38,000
Chippewa Falls Unified School District, WI, for after school 
    programs..................................................   950,000
Choteau Elementary School in Choteau, Montana for an e-
    learning pilot program....................................   500,000
Cincinnati Arts School, Inc., Cincinnati, OH, for development 
    of the school's academic and artistic curricula........... 1,000,000
City of Boston for after-school programs......................   200,000
City of Salt Lake, Utah, for the YouthCity Empowerment project 
    to establish after school centers......................... 1,200,000
Clark County School District, Las Vegas, Nevada, to expand 
    after school programs for drop out prevention.............   440,000
Clark County, NV School District for a School-to-Work Program 
    to provide students who do not plan to attend college with 
    instruction in nursing and home health aid................   160,000
Classika Theatre, Arlington, Virginia, to expand the ARTsmarts 
    and SS VETA arts education initiatives in Arlington and 
    Alexandria, Virginia schools..............................   500,000
Clay County Board of Education, Ashland, AL, for technology...    38,000
Cleburne County Board of Education, Heflin, AL, for technology    38,000
Coffeyville Public School District, Coffeyville, KS, for 
    technology................................................   250,000
Columbia College in Chicago to establish a mentoring program 
    designed to improve minority student educational success 
    and retention.............................................   200,000
Columbiana County Career Center, Lisbon, OH, for educational 
    programming...............................................    40,000
Communities in Schools of East Texas, Inc., Marshall, Texas, 
    for educational services to at-risk students..............   240,000
Communities in Schools of Northeast Texas, Inc., Mount 
    Pleasant, Texas, for educational services to at-risk 
    students..................................................   240,000
Concord College Technology Center to equip new teachers with 
    the technical skills essential for the utilization of 
    information technologies in the classroom................. 1,000,000
Continuation and expansion of the Iowa Communications Network 
    statewide fiber optic demonstration....................... 3,000,000
Cooperative Educational Services Agency #9, WI, for after 
    school programs........................................... 1,200,000
Coosa County Board of Education, Rockford, AL, for technology.    38,000
Council Bluffs Community Schools in Iowa for a demonstration 
    on testing software.......................................   500,000
D.C. Everest School District, WI, for a history day project...   200,000
Dardanelle School District, Dardanelle, Arkansas, to establish 
    a center to use technology to enhance English, academic 
    and parenting skills for Hispanic students and adults.....    50,000
Daycare Literacy Project in Salem, Oregon.....................    20,000
Depaul School, Louisville, KY, for technology needs...........    45,000
Detroit Science Center, Detroit, Michigan, to develop science 
    education programs and exhibits to introduce students to 
    science, technology, and engineering......................   500,000
Discovery Place, North Carolina, for development of exhibits 
    and science education programs............................   440,000
Do Something, Inc., New York, New York, to implement the 
    ``Community Coaches'' leadership and citizenship program 
    at up to 20 schools in the Chicago metropolitan area......   125,000
Dowling High School Project Intercept--mentoring and tutoring 
    program for low-income youth..............................   300,000
Drop out prevention program in the Pendleton school district, 
    Oregon....................................................   125,000
Drug Free Pennsylvania to implement a demonstration project in 
    Dauphin County............................................    50,000
Early Reading Success Institute in Connecticut to broaden the 
    training of professionals in best practices in the 
    delivery of reading instruction...........................   800,000
East Liverpool School District, East Liverpool, OH, for 
    educational programming...................................    40,000
East Los Angeles Classic Theatre, East Los Angeles, California 
    for the ``Beyond Borders: Literacy Through Performing 
    Arts'' literacy program...................................    50,000
East Los Angeles College, Monterey Park, California, for 
    ``APPLES Project'' to provide early childhood curriculum 
    development, professional development, parental 
    instruction and program dissemination.....................   230,000
East Providence School District, Rhode Island, for music 
    curriculum development, teacher recruitment and equipment 
    purchases.................................................   400,000
Eastern College for computers, printers, computer cables, 
    telecommunications equipment and laboratory equipment for 
    the Center for Information, Science and Learning Resources 
    in St Davids, Pennsylvania................................   100,000
Edison Local School District, Hammondsville, OH, for 
    educational programming...................................    40,000
Education Service District 117 in Wenatchee, WA to equip a 
    community technology center to expand technology-based 
    training..................................................   250,000
Educational Advancement Alliance of Philadelphia, 
    Pennsylvania, to establish computer centers in high 
    schools and education centers.............................   500,000
Educational Service District 112, Vancouver, Washington, to 
    implement the Help One Student to Succeed (HOSTS) reading 
    program in elementary schools.............................   167,000
Eisenhower Foundation for a demonstration of full-service 
    schools in Iowa...........................................   500,000
El Dorado Public School District, El Dorado, KS, for PROJECT 
    CONNECT...................................................   250,000
Electronic Data Systems Project to create a database that 
    would improve the acquisition, analysis and sharing of 
    student information....................................... 1,000,000
Ellijay Wildlife Rehabilitation Sanctuary, Ellijay, GA, to 
    provide educational programs for at-risk youth............   500,000
Ernie Pyle Middle School, Albuquerque, NM, for a middle school 
    initiative................................................    50,000
Eufaula Independent School District Number 1, Oklahoma, for 
    instructional materials and teacher-related expenses......   250,000
Everybody Wins! In New York, NY to promote children's literacy 
    and love of learning through mentoring programs with 
    adults.................................................... 1,000,000
Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA, Bridging the 
    Digital Divide............................................   150,000
Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA, for educator-to-
    educator training.........................................   260,000
Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA, Institute for 
    Student Achievement.......................................   270,000
Fairfax County Public Schools, Fairfax, VA, Pre-Delinquent and 
    Delinquent Prevention Program.............................    40,000
Faith Academy Child Development Center, Hamlet, NC, for after 
    school program............................................   100,000
Father Maloney's Boys' Haven, Louisville, Kentucky, for 
    technology................................................    20,000
Federation of Independent Illinois Colleges and University for 
    telecommunications equipment and for training programs 
    necessary to link educational institutions to a high 
    bandwidth network.........................................   200,000
Ferris State University, Big Rapids, MI, for curriculum 
    development and outreach..................................   500,000
First Gethsemane Center for Family Development, Louisville, 
    KY, after school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment 
    programs for at-risk students.............................    60,000
Five Towns Community Center, Nassau County, New York for after 
    school programs...........................................   500,000
Florida 4-H Foundation Inc., Gainesville, Florida, for 
    personnel and other expenses to provide educational 
    programs for youth participants...........................   100,000
Florida Institute of Education, Jacksonville, FL, for Florida 
    Network of Readiness Hubs.................................   500,000
Fort Lewis College Child Development Center to serve young 
    children and their families, students, faculty and 
    community in the Four Corners Regions..................... 1,500,000
Foundation for the Improvement of Mathematics and Education in 
    San Diego, CA to improve math and science testing scores 
    through the advancement of curriculum and improvements in 
    teacher/administrator education...........................   150,000
Freedom Theatre: to provide greater access to its training 
    program for talented African Americans in Philadelphia....    25,000
Fresno At-Risk Youth Services to address the problems of at-
    risk youths by coordinating the city's efforts through an 
    education program coordinator, working with targeted 
    groups, and making peer counselors available to students..   200,000
Fresno Unified School District, in partnership with the City 
    of Fresno, California, for after school programs for 
    middle schools in disadvantaged communities...............   225,000
Friends of the Children in Portland, Oregon...................   100,000
Friends of the Children, providing full-time, paid adult 
    mentors to at-risk children, in Chester, Pennsylvania.....    50,000
Futures for Children, Albuquerque, New Mexico, to expand its 
    educational services to Native American children.......... 1,000,000
Galena School district and other partners to assist Alaska 
    Native students attending boarding schools and colleges 
    make the transition from rural village life to educational 
    residence facility........................................   250,000
Galena School District for alternative education programs.....   750,000
Garfield Middle School, Albuquerque, NM, ``Accelerated Reader 
    Program''.................................................    50,000
General George S. Patton School District 133, Riverdale, 
    Illinois, for computer lab equipment and professional 
    development for school reform initiatives.................   150,000
Georgia Project, Inc. in Dalton, GA to support the academic 
    and social needs of Hispanic children and their families 
    in northern Georgia.......................................   650,000
Girard Community Committee Incorporated, Girard, OH, for 
    educational programming...................................   700,000
Glendale Unified School District in La Crescenta, California, 
    to expand after school programs at Valley View Elementary 
    School, Monte Vista Elementary School and Mountain Avenue 
    Elementary School.........................................    40,000
GlennOaks Therapeutic Day School, Addison, IL, to upgrade 
    technology and improve student safety for children with 
    emotional and behavioral problems.........................   200,000
GRAMMY Foundation, Santa Monica, California, for music 
    education programs........................................ 1,200,000
Grand Valley State University Teacher Academy in Allendale, 
    MI, to train a cadre of master teachers who will develop 
    curriculum and will mentor pre-service and novice science 
    and math teachers.........................................   200,000
Great Projects Film Company to produce ``Educating America,'' 
    a documentary T.V. series and multi-media project about 
    challenges facing public schools..........................    50,000
Greater Minneapolis Day Care Council, Minnesota, for a 
    demonstration initiative to improve early learning and 
    after school programs.....................................   350,000
Green Bay Area School District in Green Bay, Wisconsin to 
    implement a district-wide technology plan.................   750,000
Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center, Mobile, AL, to staff and 
    support science activities................................   400,000
Hackensack Public School District, Hackensack, New Jersey, to 
    establish an after school program at Jackson Avenue School    75,000
Hamcock County Schools, New Cumberland, WV, for educational 
    programming...............................................    40,000
Hampshire Educational Collaborative at Northampton, 
    Massachusetts for implementation of internet-based 
    professional development for K-12 teachers and early child 
    care providers............................................   400,000
Hands Across Cultures Corporation, Espanola, New Mexico, for 
    after school programs at the Espanola and Pojoaque Valley 
    School Districts..........................................   500,000
Harrison Middle School, Albuquerque, NM, for an after-school 
    program...................................................    50,000
Hawthorne Elementary Junior High School in Hawthorne, NV for 
    the One-on-one Laptop Computer Program....................   420,000
Hazel Crest School District 152.5, Hazel Crest, Illinois, to 
    implement a comprehensive professional development program 
    for teachers and administrators to improve student 
    achievement...............................................   100,000
Healthy Foundation in Murrieta, CA to conduct a study of the 
    impact of vitamin intake and the school performance of at-
    risk youth................................................   500,000
Helen Keller Worldwide to expand the ChildSight Vision 
    Screening Program and provide eyeglasses to additional 
    children whose educational performance may be hindered 
    because of poor vision.................................... 1,000,000
Henry, Highlands, Glades and Okeechobee county school 
    districts in Florida for technology upgrades..............   500,000
Holy Redeemer Health System in Philadelphia for after-school 
    programs for at-risk children.............................   250,000
Illinois Challenger Learning Center, Bloomington-Normal, IL, 
    for science and math programs.............................   250,000
Illinois Department of Education, Improving Reading 
    Achievement for Grades 7-12 program for Peoria School 
    District #150.............................................    50,000
Illinois Department of Education, Improving Reading 
    Achievement for Grades 7-12 program for Springfield School 
    District #186.............................................    50,000
Illinois Math and Science Academy ``21st Century Information 
    Fluency Program''.........................................   900,000
Illinois State Board of Education ``Improving Reading 
    Achievement for grades 7-12'' for Kankakee District #111 
    and Champaign District #4.................................   200,000
Illinois State Board of Education for Downers Grove School 
    District #99 ``Teacher Helping Teachers'' and Joliet 
    Public School District #86 ``Helping Hands Lead to 
    Success'' mentoring programs..............................   500,000
Illinois State Board of Education for Induction and Mentoring 
    Model Districts Program at Elgin, Illinois #46............   150,000
Illinois State Board of Education for the At Risk Student 
    Program at Aurora Illinois East 131 School District.......   200,000
Illinois State Board of Education, ``Illinois Virtual High 
    School''.................................................. 1,500,000
Illinois State Board of Education, for curriculum development, 
    materials, and professional development activities to 
    improve math achievement in the middle grades in Decatur 
    School District 61........................................   300,000
Illinois State Board of Education, Freeport School District 
    #16 for a Reading Improvement Achievement Pilot Program 
    for grades 7-12...........................................   250,000
Illinois State Board of Education, Rockford School District 
    #205 for a Reading Improvement Achievement Pilot Program 
    for grades 7-12...........................................   250,000
Illinois State Board of Education, to provide alternative 
    learning opportunities for at risk students in the Mt. 
    Vernon Township High School District #201, Christopher 
    Unit #99, and Grayville Community Unit School District #1.   400,000
Illinois State Board of Education/Boys and Girls Clubs of 
    America, Springfield, IL, for Community Technology Centers   300,000
Independence Public School District, Independence, KS, for 
    teacher training and curriculum development...............   250,000
Independent School District 834, Minnesota, for an after 
    school program............................................   227,000
Indian Creek School District, Wintersville, OH, for 
    educational programming...................................    40,000
Indiana University-Purdue University, Ft. Wayne, IN, to 
    enhance educational and cultural programming through the 
    development of ``Teleplex''...............................   650,000
Infinity Project at Southern Methodist University.............   500,000
Ingham County Intermediate School District, Mason, MI, for 
    Technology Enhancements for Capital Area Career Center....   200,000
Innovative Directions, an Educational Alliance, Bronx County, 
    New York, for after school and summer academic enrichment 
    programs..................................................    75,000
Institute for International Sport at the University of Rhode 
    Island to address issues of sportsmanship between athletes 
    and their parents, coaches and teachers...................   100,000
Institute for Student Achievement in Lake Success, NY to 
    expand its intervention program that provides academic 
    enrichment and counseling support for students performing 
    in the lowest quartile in their middle or high schools....   200,000
Institute for Student Achievement, Manhasset, New York for 
    educational programs for at-risk students in the Mount 
    Vernon school district....................................   250,000
International Music Products Association, Carlsbad, CA, for 
    school music programs.....................................   100,000
Invent Iowa to encourage kids to invent and hold fairs to 
    display those inventions..................................   100,000
Iowa Department of Education for additional bilingual and 
    English as a Second Language training in rapid growth 
    areas of Iowa............................................. 1,055,000
Iowa Online AP Academy to continue and expand the online 
    advanced placement demonstration.......................... 2,000,000
Iowa School Board Association Lighthouse for School Reform for 
    the training of school board members on education issues..   500,000
Isaac Stern Education Legacy in New York, NY to integrate 
    distance learning and educational technology with music 
    education programs........................................ 2,000,000
Jacksonville City Board of Education, Jacksonville, AL, for 
    technology................................................    38,000
James MacGregor Burns Academy of Leadership, College Park, 
    Maryland, for a National Youth Leadership Institute for K-
    12 students...............................................   250,000
Jefferson County Joint Vocational School, Bloomingdale, OH, 
    for educational programming...............................    40,000
Jewish Family and Community Service in Chicago, IL for its 
    therapeutic program.......................................   100,000
Jobs for Youth of Boston, Massachusetts for technical 
    assistance and training related to standards based 
    education.................................................   500,000
Junior Achievement of Delaware Valley, Inc. for a youth 
    mentoring initiative......................................   150,000
Kennedy Krieger Institute in Baltimore, MD, to complete the 
    school-to-work instructional model for its Career and 
    Technology High School....................................   440,000
Kenosha Unified School District, Kenosha, WI, for after-school 
    programs..................................................   300,000
Kent State University, Kent, OH, to develop a replicable model 
    for supporting GED graduates in higher education..........   500,000
Kentucky Opera, Louisville, KY, for educational outreach 
    programs..................................................    50,000
Kenyon College, Gambier, OH, for technology and science 
    improvements and upgrade.................................. 1,000,000
Kids Voting South Dakota in Pierre, South Dakota, to expand 
    the program in the state, primarily to the nine Indian 
    Reservations..............................................   100,000
Kids Voting USA, Tempe, Arizona for a civics program to 
    educate children about the importance of voting...........   380,000
La Crosse Medical Health Science Consortium in La Crosse, 
    Wisconsin to expand reading remediation services to 
    literacy-impaired adolescents.............................   375,000
Lake Metroparks, Concord, OH, for equipment................... 1,000,000
Lawrence County School District, Mississippi, for a Parents as 
    Teachers program..........................................   400,000
Lawrence Public Schools, Lawrence, Kansas, for after school 
    programs in the New York and East Heights elementary 
    schools...................................................   100,000
Learning Collaborative Inc., Milford, Connecticut, for the 
    ``Pebbles Project'' to demonstrate innovative technology 
    to deliver educational services to children medically 
    unable to attend school...................................   870,000
Lee County Board of Education, Opelika, AL, for technology....    38,000
Lee's Summit Education Foundation in Missouri, for Parents as 
    Teachers..................................................   500,000
Lewiston-Auburn College/University of Southern Maine TEAMS 
    program to prepare teachers to meet the demands of Maine's 
    21st century elementary and middle schools at Sherwood 
    Heights Elementary School in Auburn and Lewiston Middle 
    School in Lewiston........................................    50,000
Lincoln Center, New York City, for the Louis Armstrong Jazz 
    Curriculum project to provide arts education professional 
    development to teachers across the country................   250,000
Livingston Technical Academy, Howell, MI, for Technology 
    Enhancements..............................................   150,000
Local Initiative Support Corporation Child Care Education.....   400,000
Long Island Works Coalition to provide school-to-career 
    partnerships for students, and to provide them with the 
    skills necessary for successful employment................   100,000
Los Angeles County Office of Education, Downey, California, 
    for the Early Advantage Initiative to provide preschool 
    and family learning activities, and training for parents, 
    child care providers and community members................   440,000
Loudonville Golden Center, Loudonville, OH, to develop a 
    technology, training and youth mentoring program for 
    seniors and youths........................................   130,000
Louisiana Arts and Sciences Center, Baton Rouge, LA, for 
    professional development..................................   300,000
Louisiana Department of Education to implement an early 
    childhood development program for at risk children........   300,000
Louisiana Department of Education to implement the Voyager 
    Universal Literacy System in Louisiana....................   700,000
Louisiana District Attorney's Office, The Orleans Parish, 
    Louisiana for a School-Based Drug Awareness program.......   100,000
Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA, ``Project Catalyst''...   400,000
Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA, ``Project LIFE 
    (Laboratory Investigations and Field Experience'')........   400,000
Lyons Township High School District 204, Illinois, for a 
    Quality Teacher Recruitment Model Program.................   440,000
Macomb County Intermediate School District, Michigan for the 
    ``Kids Klub'' after school program........................   600,000
Macon County Board of Education, Tuskegee, AL, for technology.    38,000
Madison County School District's School Needs Assessment in 
    Madison County, MS to conduct an impact study of the 
    sudden influx of a large number of new students in the 
    school district...........................................   500,000
Maine School Administrative District #58 in Kingfield, Maine, 
    for Pathway Partners rural education program, to help 
    connect young people to fundamental resources such as 
    caring adults and safe places.............................   200,000
Maine School Administrative District Number 64, East Corinth, 
    Maine, for the STAR technology teacher training project...   100,000
Malverne Afterschool Center, Malverne, NY, to expand an after 
    school program............................................   100,000
Marshfield School District, WI, for computers, library books, 
    and supplies for a new elementary school..................    75,000
Martins Ferry School District, Martins Ferry, OH, for 
    educational programming...................................    40,000
Maryhurst Inc., Louisville, Kentucky, for an educational 
    program...................................................    50,000
Math, Science and Technology Education Partnership K-12 
    cluster pilot program in Albuquerque public schools....... 1,250,000
Mehlville School District, St. Louis, Missouri, to implement a 
    new reading technology program............................    75,000
Mellen School District, WI, for after school programs.........   340,000
MENC (Music Education and Technology Advancement) to establish 
    and support standard music education and creativity, 
    instructional technology and professional development for 
    approximately 4000 K-12 public schools....................    50,000
Meredith-Dunn School, Louisville, KY, technology 
    infrastructure for children with learning disabilities....    60,000
Mid-American Regional Council in Kansas City, Missouri to 
    establish the Finance CIRCLE demonstration initiative to 
    improve financing for early learning and after-school 
    programs..................................................   250,000
Midland School District, Midland, PA, for educational 
    programming...............................................    40,000
Military Heritage Foundation, Carlisle, PA, Army Heritage and 
    Education Center to establish educational programs and 
    materials.................................................   150,000
Millikin University to assist inner-city and rural high school 
    students prepare for college..............................   200,000
Milton Eisenhower Foundation, Washington, DC for a full-
    service community school demonstration project in up to 
    five locations............................................   450,000
Milwaukee Public Schools, Milwaukee, Wisconsin to expand 
    programs to recruit, prepare and retain a diverse, 
    effective, innovative teaching force......................   350,000
Milwaukee Public Schools, Wisconsin, for after school programs   400,000
Milwaukee Public Schools, Wisconsin, for the Bradley School 
    for Technology and Trade High School for technology 
    training and curriculum implementation....................   200,000
Mississippi Delta Education Initiative for teacher 
    recruitment, Delta University.............................   900,000
Murray State University, Murray, KY, Center for Teaching 
    Excellence in Science and Mathematics.....................   800,000
Museum of Modern Art in New York, NY to expand its distance 
    learning program to give students and teachers access to 
    their collection..........................................   220,000
Mystic Seaport Museum, Mystic, CT, to develop an Onboard and 
    Online Program............................................   350,000
National Center for Youth Issues, Chattanooga, TN, to provide 
    Internet based resource in character education............ 1,000,000
New Mexico Department of Education to provide on-line courses 
    aligned with state academic standards and curriculum to 
    students in rural and remote areas........................   200,000
New York City Public Schools, New York to expand the New York 
    City Teaching Fellows Program to attract and retain 
    certified teachers in New York City Schools that need 
    qualified teachers........................................   500,000
New York Hall of Science, Corona Park, New York, to expand the 
    Science Career Ladder and After-School Science Club 
    programs for middle school students.......................   300,000
New Zion Community Development Foundation, Louisville, KY, 
    after school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programs 
    for at-risk students......................................    30,000
Newport Public Schools, Newport, Rhode Island, for early 
    childhood programs, specialized teacher recruitment and 
    professional development..................................   750,000
Newton Public School District, Newton, KS, to help incorporate 
    technology into the math curriculum.......................   250,000
Nicholls State University to train faculty, reading 
    specialists and families in order to identify the reading 
    disabilities of children and adults in the Southern Gulf 
    Coast region of Louisiana.................................   500,000
North Carolina Aquarium Society for development of 
    environmental education exhibits and distance learning 
    programs for students.....................................   440,000
North Carolina Electronics and Information Technologies 
    Association Education Foundation, for a technology 
    demonstration project in rural and underserved school 
    districts.................................................   250,000
North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, North Carolina for arts 
    and environmental education programs......................   100,000
North Carolina Museum of Life and Science for development of 
    BioQuest exhibits.........................................   150,000
North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina to 
    expand regional satellite centers to provide science and 
    math education to rural schools through the Science House.   600,000
Northwest Museum of Arts and Culture, Spokane, WA, ``Star 
    Nations Program''.........................................   450,000
Northwood School District in Minong, Wisconsin to complete 
    their distance education project that enhances learning 
    opportunities and provides useful skill development.......    62,000
Nosotros, Hollywood, California to implement music education 
    activities, including purchasing instruments for low-
    income students, for the Mariachi Plaza after school 
    program...................................................   100,000
Oakland Unified School District, California, for teacher 
    professional development..................................   440,000
Ohio Arts Council, Columbus, OH, to expand the Council's 
    international programming................................. 1,200,000
Ohio Center of Science and Industry, Columbus, OH, for the 
    development of a statewide science and math education 
    service program........................................... 5,000,000
Ohio Department of Education, Columbus, OH, ``Troops to 
    Teachers Ohio Demonstration''............................. 2,500,000
Oklahoma State Department of Education, Oklahoma City, OK, for 
    a handheld computing initiative to be coordinated with the 
    University of Central Oklahoma in Edmund, OK.............. 1,000,000
Olympic Park Institute to expand its scholarship fund to allow 
    more disadvantaged students to attend its environmental 
    education programs........................................   250,000
Onondaga Community College, Syracuse, NY, for technology and 
    personnel.................................................   500,000
Opelika City Board of Education, Opelika, AL, for technology..    38,000
Operation Get Ahead, Hempstead, New York, for an Early 
    Awareness for College program for disadvantaged youth.....   200,000
Our Hope For Youth, Delaware, for an anti-school violence 
    education media program on in-school educational networks.   500,000
Oxford City Board of Education, Oxford, AL, for technology....    38,000
Pacific Islands Center for Educational Development in American 
    Samoa.....................................................   400,000
Pacific Science Center in Seattle, Washington to develop a 
    hands-on genetics exhibit to explain basic concepts of 
    genetics and the human genome project.....................   250,000
Paleontological Research Institute, Ithaca, New York, for the 
    development of earth science educational programs.........   100,000
PARENTS, Inc., Anchorage, Alaska, for creation of a full-
    working parent matching, mentoring and home visit system 
    to support parents of children with disabilities for the 
    state of Alaska...........................................   500,000
PARENTS, Inc., Anchorage, Alaska, for implementation and 
    expansion of their projects to train teachers, specialists 
    and parents in the use of technology to assist students 
    with disabilities......................................... 1,000,000
Phenix City Board of Education, Phenix City, AL, for 
    technology................................................    38,000
Philadelphia Opera Sounds of Learning.........................   100,000
Piedmont City Board of Education, Piedmont, AL, for technology    38,000
Pima Community College, Arizona, for an Achieving a College 
    Education initiative to help low-income and minority 
    students attend college...................................   185,000
Pinellas County Florida School District, St. Petersburg, FL, 
    for technology for Title I schools........................ 3,587,000
Pittsburgh Zoo and Aquarium...................................   200,000
Plymouth Community Renewal Center, Louisville, KY, after 
    school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programs for at-
    risk students.............................................    40,000
Pomona Unified School District, Pomona, CA, for a Literacy 
    Technology Center......................................... 1,000,000
Port Chester-Rye Union Free School District, New York, for an 
    after school program at Thomas Edison Elementary School...   260,000
Potter Park Zoological Society, Lansing, MI, Expanding 
    Educational Programming ``The BIG Zoo Lesson''............   100,000
Prairie Lakes Education Cooperative in Madison, SD to advance 
    distance learning for Native Americans in BIA and tribal 
    schools...................................................   500,000
Prime Time Family Reading Time to continue its family literacy 
    programs in Louisiana.....................................   100,000
Prince William County, VA, Bilingual Literacy Extended 
    Kindergarten Program......................................   140,000
Prince William County, VA, for assistance to Special Need 
    Middle School Students....................................   100,000
Prince William County, VA, Mathematics Intervention Program...    90,000
Project Intercept to identify and intercept youth who display 
    early-stage problems, implement mentoring programs and 
    offer sensitivity training to teachers, principals and 
    parents...................................................   100,000
Project STARS (Strategies to Accelerate Reading Success) in 
    Clark County, NV to provide literacy intervention for 
    students..................................................   900,000
Ramapo College of New Jersey, Mahwah, NJ, for ``Center for 
    International Education and Entrepreneurship''............   800,000
Randolph County Board of Education, Wedowee, AL, for 
    technology................................................    38,000
Reading Alabama, Inc. in Montgomery, Alabama..................   150,000
Reading Evaluation and Assessment Demonstration, Today 
    Foundation in Dallas, Texas...............................   200,000
Reading Together USA Program at the University of North 
    Carolina at Greensboro for tutoring program expansion.....   800,000
ReadNet Foundation, New York, NY, to fully implement web-based 
    simulation educational program............................   600,000
Red Bluff Joint Union High School District, Red Bluff, CA, for 
    technology................................................   180,000
Resource Area for Teachers, San Jose, California, to provide 
    classroom learning materials and teacher training in use 
    of interactive materials..................................   340,000
Rhode Island Department of Elementary and Secondary Education 
    Forces of Change Collaborative Exhibit....................   200,000
Rio Linda Union School District, Rio Linda, CA, for technology   350,000
Riverside Community College District, Riverside, CA, for 
    curriculum development and related costs for the Riverside 
    School for the Arts.......................................   500,000
Robbie Valentine Stars Club Education Program, Louisville, KY, 
    after school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programs 
    for at-risk students......................................    50,000
Rock and Roll Hall of Fame and Museum, Cleveland, Ohio, for 
    curriculum development, educational materials, and 
    outreach activities to expand the ``Rockin' the Schools'' 
    music education program to reach additional students......   200,000
Rockford Public School District #205, Rockford, IL, for a 
    magnet schools program.................................... 1,200,000
Rosa and Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development in 
    Detroit, Michigan to expand Pathways to Freedom and 
    Learning Center programs..................................   200,000
Russell County Board of Education, Phenix City, AL, for 
    technology................................................    38,000
Rutgers University Law School to support a scholarship fund, 
    public interest activities, and its work with the LEAP 
    Academy Charter School, including the purchase of books 
    and equipment.............................................   540,000
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, Rutgers, New 
    Jersey for the RUNet 2000 to expand its innovative voice-
    video-data communications system to bring the resources of 
    the university to more K-12 teachers and students......... 2,000,000
San Diego Natural History Museum, San Diego, CA, for a 
    distance learning project.................................   150,000
San Diego Unified School District in CA, for ``The Blueprint 
    for Student Success in a Standards-Based System''......... 1,000,000
San Luis Obispo County Office of Education, California, to 
    develop, maintain and distribute school violence emergency 
    response kits.............................................    75,000
Santa Barbara High School District, California, to develop a 
    health careers academy at San Marcos High School..........    50,000
School District of Bruce, WI, for after school programs.......   400,000
School District of Palm Beach County, Florida, to provide 
    after school and evening supplemental bilingual language 
    instruction for immigrant students and their parents......   600,000
School District of Rhinelander, WI, for after school programs. 1,000,000
Schoolcraft College, Livonia, MI, VistaTech Center for 
    development and technological equipment to provide 
    extensive connectivity to the Internet.................... 1,000,000
Schurz Elementary School in Schurz, NV for the One-on-one 
    Laptop Computer Program...................................   249,000
Science and Math Teacher Academy University of North Texas and 
    Paul Quinn College........................................   200,000
Science Applications International Corporation, King of 
    Prussia, PA, for HUBS Education Program...................   200,000
ScienceSouth, Inc., Florence, South Carolina, for science 
    education programming, a science traveling exhibit, and 
    outreach activities.......................................   500,000
Shake-A-Leg Miami to develop curriculum and provide equipment 
    for its educational programs including its Marine Trade 
    Sea School and marine environmental education programs for 
    students with and without disabilities from Miami-Dade 
    County public schools.....................................   150,000
Shawnee Gardens Tenants Association, Louisville, KY, for after 
    school programs...........................................    35,000
Shiloh Baptist Church Community Renewal Center, Louisville, 
    KY, after school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment 
    programs for at-risk students.............................    50,000
South Cook Education Consortium in Hazel Crest, IL, to support 
    computer laboratory facilitators, equipment and technology 
    support for community technology centers serving eight 
    elementary school districts in South Cook County, Illinois   400,000
South Dakota Department of Education and Cultural Affairs for 
    the Distance Education Alliance to advance distance 
    learning for South Dakota Schools......................... 2,000,000
South Side School District, Hookstown, PA, for educational 
    programming...............................................    40,000
Southeast Associated Ministries, Inc., Louisville, Kentucky, 
    for an after school program...............................    20,000
Southeast Missouri State University's NASA Educator Resource 
    Center in Cape Girardeau, MO to make available to K-12 
    schools, teachers and students a wide variety of 
    educational materials related to science, mathematics and 
    space-science education...................................   170,000
Southeastern Environmental Education Alliance (SEEL) to 
    improve science and math education at the elementary and 
    middle school level.......................................   200,000
Southern Local School District, Salineville, OH, for 
    educational programming...................................    40,000
Southern Star Development Corporation, Louisville, KY, after 
    school tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programs for at-
    risk students.............................................    40,000
Southwest Texas State University Center for School Improvement   250,000
Space Education Initiatives Inc., Green Bay, WI, for 
    professional development programs and technology..........   250,000
Spelman College Teacher as Leader Educational Initiative in 
    Atlanta, GA to provide early intervention and academic 
    support through the for at-risk, disadvantaged children 
    and their families........................................   500,000
Springfield School District, for the Schools Plus initiative 
    to provide after school services for elementary school 
    students..................................................   440,000
St. Clair County Board of Education, Ashville, AL, for 
    technology................................................    38,000
St. Clair County Educational Cooperative Board of Control, 
    Belleville, Illinois, for the development of hands-on 
    learning activities about the Mississippi River...........   700,000
St. Clair County Intermediate School District, Michigan for 
    the ``Kids Klub'' after school program....................   400,000
St. Joseph's Indian School of Chamberlain, South Dakota, for 
    after-school programs, educational outreach, mentoring, 
    equipment and educational materials.......................   800,000
St. Stephens Family Life Center, Louisville, KY, after school 
    tutoring, mentoring and enrichment programs for at-risk 
    students..................................................    75,000
Stark County Parks, Canton, OH, for an Electronic Gateway 
    Project................................................... 1,000,000
State of Alaska for Right Start extended-day kindergarten 
    program................................................... 1,000,000
State of Louisiana for ``Louisiana Online''................... 1,000,000
Steps to Success of Louisiana to expand its efforts to provide 
    parents of children from birth to three years of age with 
    the information and support necessary for their 
    development...............................................   250,000
Steubenville City Schools, Steubenville, OH, for educational 
    programming...............................................    40,000
Sylacauga City Board of Education, Sylacauga, AL, for 
    technology................................................    38,000
Synopsys Silicon Valley Science and Technology Outreach 
    Foundation, Mountain View, California, to support project-
    based science and math education at elementary, middle and 
    high schools in Santa Clara County, California............   100,000
Talladega County Board of Education, Talladega, AL, for 
    technology................................................    38,000
Tallapoosa County Board of Education, Dadeville, AL, for 
    technology................................................    38,000
Teaneck Public School District, Teaneck, New Jersey, to 
    establish ``Project Lighthouse'' after school programs at 
    Benjamin Franklin and Thomas Jefferson Middle Schools.....    75,000
TELACU Education Foundation in Los Angeles to provide 
    interactive computer literacy and tutoring to economically 
    disadvantaged Latino students............................. 1,800,000
The Boston History Collaborative to develop educational 
    programs on the history of Boston.........................   100,000
The Field Museum, Chicago, IL, for teacher training 
    initiatives and curriculum development....................   250,000
The Imaginarium in Anchorage to provide coursework, teaching 
    materials and teacher training in science and math to 
    benefit students in rural Alaska who do not have access to 
    such courses and teachers.................................   100,000
The Professional Partnership Laboratory School at Roger 
    Williams University in Bristol, Rhode Island to provide an 
    innovative learning environment for K-12 students in the 
    Bristol-Warren Regional School District...................   850,000
YMCAs of Sarasota, St. Petersburg, and Clearwater for 
    expansion of YMCA Character Development Schools which 
    address school behavior problems through family 
    partnerships, counseling, case management, parenting 
    classes, and positive behavior modification intervention..   250,000
THINK Together, Santa Ana, California for after school 
    programs for low-income students in Orange County, CA.....   440,000
Thirteenth Place Youth and Family Services in Gadsden, AL, 
    after-school program......................................    10,000
Three Rivers Connect in Pittsburgh............................   100,000
Tides Foundation to provide assistance in supporting McKelvey 
    entrepreneurial college scholarships to rural, low income 
    Pennsylvania high school graduates. Funds shall be used 
    for screening of applicants, computers, books and other 
    educational tools, and outreach to inform students of the 
    scholarship program.......................................   250,000
Toronto School District, Toronto, OH, for educational 
    programming...............................................    40,000
Trinity Family Life Center, Inc., Louisville, Kentucky, for an 
    after school programs.....................................    10,000
University of Akron, Akron, OH, for the ``Exercise in Hard 
    Choices''.................................................   500,000
University of Akron, Ohio, for curriculum development, teacher 
    training and technology enhancements for the K-12 Urban 
    School Project............................................   200,000
University of Alaska and Alaska Department of Education to 
    establish the Alaska Center for Excellence in Schools at 
    the University of Alaska..................................   500,000
University of Arkansas Little Rock to offer high school 
    students a web-based math course with the goal of reducing 
    the number of entering freshmen who need math remediation.   200,000
University of Iowa for a demonstration in Iowa of a 
    computerized reading program..............................   500,000
University of Nebraska, Kearney, Nebraska, for Minority Access 
    to Higher Education Program to help teachers to address 
    the special need of minority populations from grades K-12.   900,000
University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, ``Mathematics and 
    Science Teacher Academy'' for professional development....   850,000
University of New Orleans Millennium School Project to 
    establish a charter school district and redesign teacher 
    education to support school restructuring................. 1,000,000
University of Northern Iowa in collaboration with the Waterloo 
    Community Schools for the expansion of an early childhood 
    development center........................................   600,000
University of Northern Iowa's National Center for Public and 
    Private School Foundations................................   200,000
University of Southern Maine, Orono, Maine, for the Electronic 
    Learning Marketplace to expand K-12 professional 
    development and improve educational standards and 
    assessments statewide.....................................   440,000
University of Southern Mississippi Gifted Center..............   100,000
University of Wisconsin in Milwaukee, Wisconsin for the Urban 
    Educator Corps Partnership initiative.....................   500,000
University of Wisconsin-Extension's School Readiness Project 
    to provide training and technical assistance to its 
    partners in preparing children for learning in school.....   200,000
Urban League of Metropolitan Denver, Colorado for an after 
    school program for at-risk youth in Aurora and northeast 
    Denver....................................................   300,000
Utah Literacy Project to support the Utah Reading Excellence 
    Act in providing reading and training materials to rural 
    schools...................................................   600,000
Utah State Office of Education to help school districts test 
    effectiveness of administering yearly assessment using 
    computers.................................................   700,000
Vermont Higher Education Council in Essex Junction to develop 
    universal early learning programs to ensure that at least 
    one certified teacher will be available in center-based 
    child care programs.......................................   200,000
Village of Riverdale, Illinois, to provide mentoring, conflict 
    resolution, and other intervention services for at-risk 
    youth.....................................................   100,000
Vocational Technical Center, New Cumberland, WV, for 
    educational programming...................................    40,000
Walnut Street Theater: For its Educational and Outreach 
    program for area K-12 schools, which includes an 
    apprenticeship program, an adopt a school program, and a 
    summer camp...............................................    25,000
Washington and Jefferson College: To support professional 
    development and quality education initiatives at the K-12 
    in the Southwest Region of Pennsylvania...................   200,000
Washington Association of Career and Technical Education to 
    update training technology to ensure that it meets 
    industry standards........................................   250,000
Washington Virtual Classroom Consortium to establish 
    interconnectivity between rural schools to create expanded 
    learning opportunities....................................   750,000
Watertown Public Schools, Watertown, SD, to integrate 
    technology in the classroom by expanding wireless labs and 
    computers.................................................   220,000
Watts Learning Center, Los Angeles, California for 
    instructional programming in reading and language arts....   285,000
Wausau School District, WI, for after school programs in 
    middle schools............................................   850,000
Wellington Public School District, Wellington, KS, for teacher 
    training..................................................   250,000
Wellsville Local School District, Wellsville, OH, for 
    educational programming...................................    40,000
West Allis/West Milwaukee School District, Wisconsin, for 
    after school centers serving low-income elementary 
    students..................................................   200,000
West Ed Eisenhower Regional Consortium for Science and 
    Mathematics, San Francisco, CA, for 24 Challenge and 
    Jumping Levels Math.......................................   300,000
Westchester Philharmonic, Hartsdale, NY for the ``Philharmonic 
    Alive'' after school music and arts education pilot 
    project...................................................    50,000
Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI, Joint 
    Demonstration Project for the ``Study of Wireless 
    Technology in Education''.................................   500,000
Wheeling Jesuit University NASA Center for Educational 
    Technologies to provide technology training to all 
    elementary and secondary West Virginia math and science 
    teachers.................................................. 3,600,000
Wheeling Park High School, Wheeling, WV, for educational 
    programming...............................................    40,000
Winston-Salem/Forsyth County Schools, Winston-Salem, NC, for 
    ``Winston Net''...........................................   100,000
Wisconsin Educational Partnership Initiative in Chippewa 
    Falls, Wisconsin for a professional development initiative   350,000
Wisconsin Rapids Area Public School District, WI, for after 
    school programs...........................................   700,000
WNVT/KidzOnline, Falls Church, VA, for online K-12 programming   800,000
Working in the Schools, Chicago to expand tutoring and 
    mentoring programs in the Chicago public schools..........   100,000
WQED Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, to provide math and science 
    education through its Learning Center.....................   205,000
Yell County Schools in Arkansas to expand their bilingual 
    programs to address needs of a growing Hispanic population   150,000
YMCA of Metropolitan Chattanooga, Chattanooga, TN, for 
    Community Action Program..................................   300,000
YMCA for a demonstration of youth mentoring and after school 
    activities in Iowa........................................   770,000
YMCA of Central Stark County, Canton, OH, to implement a pilot 
    project to work with middle school youth during after 
    school hours..............................................   200,000
YMCA of Greater Seattle to expand their teen development 
    activities................................................   500,000
YMCA of Metropolitan Milwaukee, Wisconsin to expand its Teen 
    Agenda to serve at-risk teenage youth..................... 1,000,000
YMCA of Seattle-King County-Snohomish County to support women 
    and families through an at-risk youth center and other 
    family supports...........................................   250,000
Yosemite National Institutes, Sausalito, CA, to develop 
    outreach programs targeted toward minority, disadvantaged 
    students..................................................   500,000
Youth Alive, Inc., Louisville, KY, after school tutoring, 
    mentoring and enrichment programs for at-risk students....    30,000
YWCA of Anchorage for after-school enrichment programs to 
    benefit at-risk Anchorage schoolchildren and their 
    mothers...................................................   500,000
Zero to Five Foundation, Los Angeles, California, to develop 
    an early childhood education and parenting project at the 
    Los Angeles Elementary School.............................   340,000
Big Brothers/Big Sisters national program to double the number 
    children served in school-based mentoring.................   250,000
CAPE/PETE Net: to continue to develop its national 
    demonstration program for distance learning with 105 
    Pennsylvania universities and colleges....................   550,000
Cheyney University: to create a pilot ``Collaborative Center 
    for Teacher Preparation'' program by partnering with area 
    school districts..........................................   100,000
College of Physicians of Philadelphia: to expand its 
    educational outreach to all students in the Philadelphia 
    School District through a medical science museum-based 
    experimental learning program.............................    50,000
Communities In Schools of the Lehigh Valley: to further 
    develop in-school and after school programs for at-risk 
    middle school and high school students....................    50,000
Eisenhower Foundation: to replicate the full community school 
    program that emphasizes the school as the central point of 
    the community.............................................   100,000
Indiana University of Pennsylvania: to establish a K-12 
    computer services center for area school districts........    50,000
Microsociety: to further develop and disseminate the 
    MICROSOCIETY whole school model of comprehensive school 
    reform in Philadelphia....................................   200,000
Pennsylvania Ballet: for ``Accent on Dance'' program for 
    elementary and secondary school students for in-school and 
    after school programs.....................................    75,000
Philadelphia Orchestra: to allow the Orchestra to expand its 5 
    educational programs to reach broader and more diverse 
    audiences.................................................   175,000
Pittsburgh Technology Council: provide computer training to 
    teachers in school districts in the 13 county area........    50,000
Project 2000: to expand the existing program to the adjoining 
    housing project in Washington, DC.........................   125,000
SEPCHE in Philadelphia to develop ``global curriculum'' to 
    challenge students to develop their knowledge of foreign 
    languages and culture, recognize relationships between 
    history and current issues, and collaborate with peers on 
    oral and written presentations............................   750,000
The National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship to 
    expand the program to Philadelphia........................    50,000
Do Something, Inc., New York, New York, to implement the 
    ``Community Coaches'' leadership and citizenship program..   200,000
      --$20,000,000 is included for a grant to the Commonwealth 
of Pennsylvania Department of Education to provide assistance 
to low-performing school districts that are slated for 
potential takeover and/or on the Education Empowerment List as 
prescribed by Pennsylvania State Law. The initiative is 
intended to improve the management and operations of the school 
districts; assist with curriculum development; provide after-
school, summer and weekend programs; offer teacher and 
principal professional development and promote the acquisition 
and effective use of instructional technology and equipment.
      --$50,000,000 is included for a grant to the Iowa 
Department of Education to expand the Iowa School Construction 
Demonstration Project. The funds will be used to build and 
repair public schools in Iowa.
      --$18,000,000 for Project GRAD-USA Inc., in Houston, 
Texas for continued support and expansion of the successful 
school reform program.
      --$9,000,000 for I CAN LEARN
      --$2,000,000 for Reach Out and Read.
      It has been brought to the conferees' attention that 
Tesoro High School Knowledge Center in Las Flores, California 
is establishing an electronic communications demonstration 
project to customize storage, retrieval and dissemination of 
information throughout the school. The project will consist of 
state-of-the-art computers, networked within labs both inside 
and outside of the school, with the capability to do on-line 
research, multi-media development, video microfiche research 
and desktop presentation. The conferees strongly encourage the 
Department to consider funding this initiative.
      It has been brought to the conferees' attention that the 
Freedoms Foundation in Valley Forge, Pennsylvania conducts 
educational programs for teachers and students in history, 
constitutional rights, citizen's responsibilities, core values 
and the private enterprise system. The conferees strongly 
encourage the Department to consider funding this initiative.
Charter Schools Homestead
      The conference agreement does not include funding for 
Charter Schools Homestead fund. The Senate bill proposed 
$50,000,000 for this program; the House bill did not include 
funding for it.

                            indian education

      The conference agreement includes $120,368,000 for Indian 
Education instead of $123,235,000 as proposed by the House and 
$117,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within the totals, 
$97,133,000 is provided for grants to LEAs, instead of 
$100,000,000 as proposed by the House and $94,265,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. The agreement also includes $3,235,000 
for national activities as proposed by the House instead of 
$2,735,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                   bilingual and immigrant education

      The conference agreement includes $665,000,000 for 
Bilingual and Immigrant Education programs instead of 
$700,000,000 as proposed by the House and $600,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. H.R. 1 consolidates the Bilingual 
Education Act with the Emergency Immigrant Education Program. 
Reform of existing law will focus existing programs on teaching 
English to limited English proficient children (LEP), including 
immigrant children and youth, and holding states accountable 
for their LEP students attaining English. H.R. 1 eliminates the 
requirement that 75 percent of federal bilingual education 
funds are to be used for programs that use a child's native 
language in instruction and also requires that 95 percent of 
funds must go to the local level to teach LEP children.

                           Special Education

      The conference agreement includes $8,672,804,000 for 
Special Education instead of $8,860,076,000 as proposed by the 
House and $8,439,643,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
agreement provides $3,600,804,000 in fiscal year 2002 and 
$5,072,000,000 in fiscal year 2003 funding for this account.
      Included in these funds is $7,528,533,000 for Grants to 
States part b instead of $7,714,685,000 as proposed by the 
House and $7,339,685,000 as proposed by the Senate. This 
funding level provides nearly an additional $1,200,000,000 to 
assist the States in meeting the additional per pupil costs of 
services to special education students.
      The conference agreement includes $417,000,000 for Grants 
for Infants and Families instead of $430,000,000 as proposed by 
the House and $383,567,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $51,700,000 for state 
program improvement grants instead of $54,200,000 as proposed 
by the House and $49,200,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
agreement includes $78,380,000 for research and innovation 
instead of $70,000,000 as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate. Within the amounts provided for Special Education 
Research and Innovation, the conference agreement includes 
funding for the following:

2002 Paralympic Winter Games for the Salt Lake City Organizing 
    Committees or to a government agency or a not-for-profit 
    organization, to support venue operations, spectator 
    services, broadcast support, and ceremonies...............  $850,000
Best Buddies International, Inc. in Miami, FL to enhance the 
    lives of people with mental retardation by providing 
    opportunities for one-to-one friendships and integrated 
    employment................................................   500,000
Center for Discovery International Family Institute, Sullivan 
    County, NY, to develop a program initiative directed 
    toward acquisition, synthesis and application of 
    information about disabilities............................   500,000
Center for Literacy and Assessment, University of Southern 
    Mississippi...............................................   850,000
Easter Seals' Delta Project...................................   100,000
Fraser Child and Family Center, Richfield, Minnesota, for 
    research, technology, personnel development, and parent 
    training to improve services to children with 
    neurological, emotional and behavioral disorders..........   200,000
Hebrew Academy for Special Children, New York City for a 
    demonstration project to enhance academic and social 
    outcomes of developmentally disabled children and adults..   540,000
Iowa Parent Training Information Center for pilot on referral 
    and legal advice..........................................   100,000
Kennedy Krieger Institute, Baltimore, MD for computer 
    technology to expand distance learning opportunities for 
    disabled students and to provide professional development. 1,700,000
Lady B. Ranch, Apple Valley, CA, for direct services related 
    to the Therapeutic Horseback Riding Program...............   150,000
Norman Howard School, Rochester, NY, for the Community 
    Learning Resource Initiative for children with learning 
    disabilities..............................................   400,000
Puget Sound Educational Service District, Burien, Washington 
    for a pilot program to improve special education services 
    and teacher training......................................   490,000
Rainbows United, Wichita, KS, for research efforts and staff 
    development in special education programs.................   500,000
Spokane Guilds' School and Neuromuscular Center, Spokane, WA, 
    to evaluate the effectiveness of type of care provided at 
    the center................................................   500,000
University of Kentucky Special Education Instructional 
    Technology Initiative..................................... 1,000,000

      The agreement also includes $36,210,000 for technology 
and media services as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$31,710,000 as proposed by the House. The agreement includes 
$9,500,000 for Recording for the Blind and Dyslexic for the 
purposes described in both the House and Senate reports.
      The agreement also includes $1,500,000 for Public 
Telecommunications Information and Training Dissemination as 
proposed by the Senate. The House bill did not contain funds 
for this activity.

            rehabilitation services and disability research

      The conference agreement includes $2,945,813,000 for 
Rehabilitation Services and Disability Research instead of 
$2,942,117,000 as proposed by the House and $2,932,617,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees agree that, in reallocating any FY 2002 
funds that become available for reallocation to states under 
the reallotment process authorized under section 110(b)(1) of 
the Rehabilitation Act, the Department accord priority to 
states that received a formula allocation providing less than a 
full cost-of-living adjustment in FY 2002 and to the early 
implementation states under the Ticket to Work and Self 
Sufficiency Program that have experienced an increase in the 
number of eligible applicants as a result of the implementation 
of this program.
      The conference agreement includes $11,897,000 for client 
assistance state grants instead of $12,147,000 as proposed by 
the Senate and $11,647,000 as proposed by the House. The 
agreement also includes $21,238,000 for demonstration and 
training programs instead of $16,492,000 as proposed by both 
the House and the Senate. The conference agreement includes 
$1,000,000 above the budget request to support programs 
designed to improve the quality of applied orthotic and 
prosthetic research and help meet the increasing demand for 
provider services. Within the amounts provided for vocational 
rehabilitation demonstration and training programs, the 
conference agreement includes funding for the following 
activities:

American Foundation for the Blind, for a National Literacy 
    Center for the Visually Impaired in Atlanta, Georgia......  $266,000
Apple Patch Community Inc., Crestwood, KY, for vocational 
    training for adults with mental retardation...............    45,000
Cabrillo College Stroke Center, Santa Cruz, California, for a 
    demonstration project on classroom-based approaches to 
    long-term rehabilitation..................................   200,000
Cerebral Palsy Research Foundation's Rehabilitation Research 
    and Training Center and Wichita State University to 
    continue to help people with disabilities obtain self-
    sufficient employment.....................................   500,000
Darden Rehabilitation Foundation in Gadsden, AL, for 
    vocational evaluation, employment preparation services and 
    job development...........................................   275,000
George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, Learning Disability 
    Research and Training at Krasnow Institute for 
    continuation of learning disability research..............   400,000
Hot Springs Rehabilitation Center to expand their welding 
    training program so individuals with disabilities gain the 
    vocational skills needed to lead productive and 
    independent lives.........................................   160,000
Lighthouse for the Blind to expand services that help deaf-
    blind clients with daily tasks, to purchase adaptive 
    computer equipment and to provide interpreter services....   500,000
Oakland Community College, Michigan, for a sign language 
    instruction interpreter training program, in conjunction 
    with Deaf Community Advocacy Network, to serve deaf and 
    hard-of-hearing individuals...............................   100,000
Orange County Public Schools, Maitland, FL, for the Virtual 
    Reality-Based Education & Training for the Deaf program...   800,000
Wisconsin Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, Madison, 
    Wisconsin, for the Tech Works project to train individuals 
    with disabilities for high-skill jobs in the information 
    technology sector.........................................   500,000

      The conference agreement includes $15,200,000 for 
Protection and Advocacy of Individual Rights instead of 
$16,000,000 as proposed by the House and $14,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $62,500,000 for 
Independent Living Centers instead of $63,000,000 as proposed 
by the House and $60,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
agreement also includes $25,000,000 for services for older 
blind individuals as proposed by the House instead of 
$20,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes language which allows 
states in their third year of a three-year assistive technology 
extension grant to continue to receive an award in fiscal year 
2002. This language is provided to allow time for the 
authorizing committees to review the Assistive Technology 
program, as it now operates in the new policy landscape that 
includes the Olmstead decision, final section 508 guidelines, 
and the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act. 
This language was not included in either the House or Senate 
bills. However, the Senate bill included language providing 
minimum grants of $500,000 for each state and $150,000 for 
outlying areas.
      The conferees also have included bill language contained 
in the House bill to provide minimum grants of $50,000 to each 
state for activities relating to protection and advocacy 
systems. The Senate bill included language providing minimum 
grants of $100,000 for states and $50,000 for outlying areas 
for this purpose.
      The conferees recommend that the Department of Education 
reconsider whether there might be any circumstances under which 
a placement in an extended employment setting should be 
considered an acceptable outcome.

           Special Institutions for Persons with Disabilities

                 American Printing House for the Blind

      The conference agreement includes $14,000,000 for 
American Printing House for the Blind as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $13,000,000 as proposed by the House.

               National Technical Institute for the Deaf

      The conference agreement includes $55,376,000 for the 
National Technical Institute for the Deaf as proposed by the 
House instead of $54,976,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                          Gallaudet University

      The conference agreement includes $96,938,000 for 
Gallaudet University instead of $95,600,000 as proposed by the 
House and $97,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                     Vocational and Adult Education

      The conference agreement includes $1,934,060,000 for 
Vocational and Adult Education instead of $2,006,060,000 as 
proposed by the House and $1,818,060,000 as proposed by the 
Senate. The agreement provides $1,143,060,000 in fiscal year 
2002 and $791,000,000 in fiscal year 2003 funding for this 
account.
      The conference agreement includes $1,180,000,000 for 
Vocational Education basic state grants instead of 
$1,250,000,000 as proposed by the House and $1,100,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $108,000,000 for Tech 
Prep, instead of $110,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$106,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $6,500,000 for Tribally 
Controlled Postsecondary Vocational Institutions instead of 
$7,000,000 as proposed by the Senate and $6,000,000 as proposed 
by the House.
      The conferees remain interested in the distribution of 
funds available under section 117 Perkins Act, and request that 
the Department report no later than August 1, 2002 on how it is 
distributing funds as set out in the law. The conferees further 
request that this report include the per capita data used by 
the Department in distributing these funds.
      The conference agreement includes bill language allowing 
grantees under section 117 of the Perkins Act to be exempt from 
indirect cost rate requirements imposed by this program. The 
conferees have included this bill language because they 
recognize that there are certain circumstances in which 
grantees might require additional flexibility not provided 
under current law or regulation. However, the conferees remain 
committed to maximizing federal resources for direct 
educational services, as opposed to paying for administrative 
and other indirect costs that do not increase access to high 
quality vocational and technical post secondary education 
programs for students served through this program. Therefore, 
the conferees urge the Secretary to report to the Committees on 
Appropriations and Education and the Workforce of the House and 
the Committees on Appropriations and Health, Education, Labor 
and Pensions of the Senate on the indirect cost rates of 
grantees participating in this program, including a 
justification for any grantee that has an indirect cost rate 
considerably greater than those allowed under current law and 
regulation.
      The agreement also includes $9,500,000 to continue the 
occupational and employment information program instead of 
$10,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The House bill did not 
include funding for this activity.
      The conference agreement includes $5,000,000 for the 
tech-prep education demonstration authorized under section 207 
of the Perkins Act as proposed by the Senate. The House did not 
provide funding for this activity. The agreement also includes 
$22,000,000 for State Grants for Incarcerated Youth as proposed 
by the Senate instead of $17,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      The conference agreement includes $575,000,000 for adult 
education state grants instead of $595,000,000 as proposed by 
the House and $540,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.

                      Student Financial Assistance

      The conference agreement includes $12,285,500,000 for 
Student Financial Assistance instead of $12,410,100,000 as 
proposed by the House and $12,284,100,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The agreement provides a program level of $10,314,000,000 
for Pell Grants as proposed by the Senate instead of 
$10,458,100,000 as proposed by the House. The conferees note 
that this is the largest increase in appropriations in the Pell 
Grant program's history, bringing the total number of students 
served to 4.3 million, the highest level in the program's 
history. The Pell Grant program is of great importance in a 
declining economy because it enables people to develop new job 
skills so they can become more marketable in highly competitive 
workplaces. The conferees strongly support an increased maximum 
in the Pell Grant program and have accordingly retained the 
maximum Pell Grant for academic year 2002-2003 at $4,000 as set 
in both the House and Senate bills.
      The conferees are aware that the Department of Education 
is currently projecting a funding shortfall of $716,000,000 in 
the Pell Grant program for academic year 2001-2002. This 
shortfall is the result of a larger-than-expected increase in 
the number of independent students applying and qualifying for 
the Pell Grant program in a worsening economy and was 
exacerbated by the terrorist attacks on September 11, 2001. As 
such, the shortfall was not anticipated in either the budget 
request or the House and Senate bills. The increase in funding 
provided in the conference report will retire this shortfall 
for academic year 2001-2002; however, the conferees are aware 
that the Pell Grant program will experience an additional 
shortfall in academic year 2002-2003 at the $4,000 maximum 
award level and strongly recommend that the Administration 
propose a supplemental budget request to begin to retire this 
shortfall in fiscal year 2002.
      The conference agreement includes $725,000,000 for 
Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants as proposed by the 
House instead of $713,100,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
agreement also includes $67,500,000 for Perkins Loan 
cancellations instead of $60,000,000 as proposed by the House 
and $75,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The agreement also 
includes $67,000,000 for Leveraging Educational Assistance 
Partnerships (LEAP) instead of $55,000,000 as proposed by the 
House and $70,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees support continuing funding for work 
colleges, authorized in section 448 of the Higher Education Act 
of 1965. These funds help support comprehensive work-service-
learning programs at seven work colleges, and cooperative 
efforts among the work colleges to expose other institutions of 
higher education to the work college concept. Of the funds 
provided, the conference agreement includes $4,000,000 to 
continue and expand the work colleges program.

                            Higher Education

      The conference agreement includes $2,031,048,000 for 
Higher Education instead of $1,908,151,000 as proposed by the 
House and $1,826,223,000 as proposed by the Senate.
Aid for Institutional Development
      The conference agreement includes $73,625,000 for 
strengthening institutions instead of $73,000,000 as proposed 
by the House and $74,250,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
agreement also includes $86,000,000 for Hispanic Serving 
Institutions instead of $81,500,000 as proposed by the House 
and $77,750,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $206,000,000 for 
Strengthening Historically Black Colleges and Universities 
instead of $215,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$197,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $49,000,000 for 
Historically Black Graduate Institutions instead of $50,000,000 
as proposed by the House and $48,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $6,500,000 for Alaska 
and Native Hawaiian Institutions instead of $7,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate and $6,000,000 as proposed by the House.
      The conference agreement includes $17,500,000 for 
Strengthening Tribal Colleges instead of $18,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate and $17,000,000 as proposed by the 
House. The conference agreement provides that the additional 
funds for Strengthening Tribal Colleges and Universities for 
fiscal year 2002 shall only be for grants for renovation and 
construction of facilities, to help address urgently needed 
facilities repair and expansion.
Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education
      The conference agreement includes $180,922,000 for the 
Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education instead of 
$52,400,000 as proposed by the House and $51,200,000 as 
proposed by the Senate. Within the amounts provided for the 
Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education, the 
conference agreement includes funding for the following:

Los Angeles Trade-Technical College, California to upgrade and 
    purchase equipment for automotive and culinary training 
    programs..................................................  $350,000
Purchase College, NY to develop academic programs and 
    implement a computerized academic advising system.........   500,000
Africa-America Institute for the African Workforce and Market 
    Development Initiative which will employ new information 
    technologies to deliver education and training from 
    American universities to Africa...........................   500,000
AIB College of Business, Des Moines, IA, to train court 
    reporting students in captioning..........................   800,000
Alabama A&M; University Research Institute, Huntsville, 
    Alabama, for continuation of research activities and 
    operations................................................   400,000
Albany Technical College in Albany, GA to reach out to rural 
    communities through the Interactive Distance Learning 
    program and give citizens the opportunity to improve their 
    basic and technical skills................................   500,000
Alfred State College of Technology Court and Real-time 
    Reporting program, Alfred, NY, to train close-caption 
    reporters.................................................   800,000
Alverno College, Wisconsin, for technology equipment and 
    upgrades..................................................   500,000
Amistad Research Center at Tulane University, New Orleans, 
    Louisiana, for education outreach and to develop an 
    African American curatorship program......................   225,000
Arkansas State University Mountain Home Hearing Healthcare 
    Degree program to utilize distance learning technology to 
    develop and offer a new degree program for hearing health 
    care practitioners........................................   140,000
Assumption College in Worcester, Mass. for technology 
    infrastructure, training and support......................   200,000
Auburn University at Montgomery for instructional technology 
    lab equipment.............................................   100,000
Bakersfield College, Bakersfield, CA, for science center 
    technology, equipment and personnel....................... 1,000,000
Ball State University in Muncie, IN, technology education 
    project...................................................   600,000
Bay Mills Community College, Brimley, Michigan for instruction 
    equipment and technology infrastructure...................   200,000
Ben Franklin Technology Partners of Southeastern Pennsylvania, 
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to develop an associates 
    degree program in nanotechnology at four community 
    colleges in southeastern Pennsylvania and to establish 
    outreach programs in local high schools...................   600,000
Beville State Community College in Sumiton, AL, for technology 
    upgrades..................................................   500,000
Bloomsburg University: to provide computer wiring, computers 
    and training for teachers in the 25 surrounding school 
    districts.................................................   100,000
Brookdale's Community College for design, acquisition and 
    installation of the technology component of ``New Jersey 
    Coastal Communiversity''..................................   500,000
Buena Vista University, Storm Lake, IA, for equipment......... 1,000,000
Cal State, San Marcos, CA, Center for the Study of Books in 
    Spanish...................................................   300,000
Caldwell College, Caldwell, NJ, ``Center of Excellence in 
    Teaching'' to develop academic programs and workshops and 
    to purchase technology.................................... 1,000,000
California State University Monterey Bay, for student support 
    services..................................................   200,000
California State University, Monterey Bay, California, for a 
    cooperative project with Western Michigan University for a 
    study of wireless technology in education and industry....    75,000
California State University, San Bernardino, CA, for 
    telecommunications and equipment..........................   500,000
California State University, Stanislaus, California, for 
    laboratories, curriculum development, faculty and 
    scholarships for a pre-licensure nursing program..........   225,000
Cameron County Jr./Sr. High School, Emporium, PA, for 
    technology infrastructure.................................   100,000
Canisius College, Buffalo, New York, to enhance distance 
    learning programs.........................................   210,000
Cardinal Stritch University in Milwaukee, Wisconsin to expand 
    programs that address workforce development needs in the 
    teaching and nursing professions..........................   800,000
Center for International Trade, Oklahoma State University, 
    Stillwater, OK, for educational programs..................   300,000
Central College, Pella, Iowa, for teacher training in 
    technology and for distance education programs............ 1,000,000
Centre County AVTS, Pleasant Gap, PA, for technology 
    infrastructure............................................   100,000
Chattanooga State Technical Community College, Chattanooga, 
    TN, to support real time captioning training..............   700,000
City College of San Francisco, California, for the National 
    Articulation and Transfer Network.........................   800,000
Clarion County Career Center, Shippenville, PA, for technology 
    infrastructure............................................   100,000
Clark State Community College, Springfield, OH, to train and 
    recruit students in closed-captioning.....................   250,000
Clemson University College of Health's ``Call Me MISTER'' 
    program, designed to recruit minority males as teachers in 
    public schools............................................   500,000
Clemson University Extension Service's Digital Divide program, 
    to partner with local communities, agencies, and 
    organizations to make information accessible to those who 
    live in South Carolina's least developed areas............   250,000
Clemson University's Strom Thurmond Institute, to address the 
    effect of increased funding on education..................   250,000
Cleveland State University, College of Education, Cleveland, 
    OH, for technology........................................ 1,000,000
College of Charleston School of Sciences and Mathematics for 
    scientific and audio/visual equipment and 
    telecommunications systems................................   500,000
College of Southern Maryland, in conjunction with the 
    Technical Career Institute in New York City, to implement 
    a Women in Technology demonstration program...............   250,000
Columbia River Estuary Research Program at Oregon Graduate 
    Institute School of Science and Engineering certificate 
    and degree programs in Environmental Information 
    Technology................................................    50,000
Columbia University Teachers College, New York City, NY to 
    expand teacher professional development and mentoring in 
    high need schools.........................................   430,000
Columbia University, New York, for a joint project with the 
    Hostos Community College of the City University of New 
    York, New York, for a distance learning initiative to 
    train minority students in foreign policy disciplines.....   100,000
Community College of Allegheny and the Orleans Technical 
    Institute to train captioners.............................   200,000
Contra Costa Community College, California, for the Bridge to 
    the Future pilot project to increase the enrollment of 
    low-income students.......................................   400,000
Coudersport Area Jr/Sr. High School, Coudersport, PA, for 
    technology infrastructure.................................   100,000
Darton College, Albany, Georgia, for personnel, curriculum 
    development, technology equipment and support for a rural 
    technology network........................................   440,000
Daytona Beach Community College, Daytona, FL, for high 
    technology instructional equipment and technology 
    infrastructure............................................   250,000
Delta State University's Delta Education Initiative in 
    Cleveland, MS, to improve birth through 12th grade 
    education in the impoverished Mississippi Delta...........   500,000
Dominican University of California to develop a center for 
    science and technology to serve as a national model for 
    the education of female and minority scientists, nurse 
    training and the use of technology in education and 
    outreach..................................................   300,000
D'Youville College, Buffalo, New York, to enhance distance 
    learning programs.........................................   210,000
Early childhood leadership training initiative at Oregon State 
    University in Corvallis...................................    75,000
East Stroudsburg University, East Stroudsburg, PA, for science 
    center equipment..........................................   500,000
Eastern College, St Davids, PA, for telecommunications 
    equipment.................................................   200,000
Eastern Oregon University, LaGrande, OR, for technology 
    equipment.................................................   500,000
Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA, for purchase of 
    equipment................................................. 1,000,000
Edmonds Community College to enhance programs related to child 
    care for students and staff, parent training courses and 
    training for early childhood educators, including the 
    acquisition of equipment..................................   250,000
Edward Waters College, Jacksonville, Florida, to upgrade 
    computer technology and telecommunications................   225,000
Elgin Community College, Elgin, IL, for Integrated Systems 
    Technology Program........................................   250,000
Emerson College in Boston, Mass. for curriculum development in 
    the performing arts....................................... 1,000,000
Emmanuel College in Boston, MA to improve academic programs 
    including technology improvements.........................   850,000
Encore Series Inc. in Philadelphia for Music Education and 
    Community Outreach........................................   100,000
Enterprise Center in West Philadelphia to provide resources 
    for entrepreneurial education.............................   250,000
Florida Campus Compact, Tallahassee, Florida, to enhance 
    service learning on college campuses throughout Florida...   400,000
Florida Gulf Coast University, Ft. Myers, FL, for curriculum 
    development and planning.................................. 1,000,000
Forsyth Technical Community College, Winston-Salem, NC, for an 
    Informational Technology Education Center.................   100,000
Franklin Pierce College computer upgrades..................... 1,000,000
Franklin Pierce College distance learning initiative.......... 1,000,000
Gadsden State Community College, Gadsden, AL, to recruit and 
    train individuals in performing real-time captioning 
    services..................................................   425,000
Gateway Technical College, Kenosha, WI, for equipment.........   500,000
George J. Mitchell Scholarship Research Institute in Portland, 
    Maine to provide scholarships that allow students 
    attending public high schools in Maine to continue their 
    education................................................. 1,000,000
Glendale Community College, Glendale, California, for 
    equipment and technology upgrades for the Cimmarusti 
    Science Center............................................   400,000
Glenville State College, Glenville, West Virginia, for 
    faculty, curriculum development and equipment to establish 
    a computer science program................................   200,000
Grambling State University to equip a Lifelong Learning and 
    Technology complex........................................   500,000
Green River Community College's Communications Access Realtime 
    Translation (CART) Services Training to provide 
    curriculum, distance learning, scholarships and job 
    placement in the area of closed captioning................   250,000
Hartwick College, Oneonta, NY, for equipment..................   250,000
Heidelburg College, Tiffin, OH, for technology and equipment 
    for science buildings..................................... 1,500,000
Higher Education Learning Center in Des Moines, Iowa for 
    curriculum development....................................   200,000
Hillsborough Community College, Tampa, FL, ``Teacher 
    Development Initiative''.................................. 1,000,000
Hofstra University, New York, for technology enhancements.....   200,000
Holyoke Community College for technology education programs at 
    the College's Business and Technology Center..............   350,000
Hood River Integrated Technology Center in Hood River, Oregon.   150,000
Huntingdon College for Training Teachers in Technology in 
    Montgomery, Alabama.......................................   200,000
Huntingdon College, Montgomery, AL, Super Sport Program for 
    research and equipment....................................   686,000
Illinois Community College Board ``Illinois Community College 
    Online initiative'' to purchase equipment to implement 
    statewide online degree model............................. 1,000,000
Indian Hills College in Ottumwa, Iowa for technology upgrades 
    and equipment at the Bioprocess Training Center...........   800,000
Indiana University of Pennsylvania Center for Corrections 
    Education, Indiana, PA, for technology, curriculum 
    development, scholarships and outreach activities.........   600,000
Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana, to continue and 
    expand Project TEAM to recruit talented minority students 
    into the field of teaching................................   675,000
Information Technology Infrastructure, Alabama A&M; in Normal, 
    Alabama...................................................   100,000
Institute of American History and Democracy, College of 
    William and Mary, Williamsburg, VA, for curriculum 
    development...............................................   500,000
Iowa State University Center for Technology in Learning and 
    Teaching and the Center for Excellence in Science and Math 
    Education.................................................   150,000
Iowa Student Aid Commission to continue a program of loan 
    forgiveness for teachers.................................. 2,000,000
Ivy Tech State College, Indiana, to establish a machine tool 
    training apprenticeship program at campuses in South Bend 
    and East Chicago, Indiana.................................   220,000
Ivy Tech State College-Northeast Region, Ft. Wayne, IN, for 
    equipment.................................................   150,000
Jack C. Davis Observatory, Western Nevada Community College to 
    procure educational materials and technology related to 
    the observatory's academic offerings......................   300,000
Jackson State University, Jackson, Mississippi, to establish 
    an e-Center focused on electronic-based teaching and 
    learning, research and community outreach and services....   200,000
Jacksonville State University, Jacksonville, AL, for Little 
    River Canyon Field School program development and 
    technology................................................   412,000
Jefferson College, Hillsboro, Missouri, for the Instructional 
    Support Center to provide technology training and distance 
    learning programs in collaboration with the Gateway 
    Community College Consortium..............................   450,000
Jefferson County-Dubois AVTS, Reynoldsville, PA for technology 
    infrastructure............................................   100,000
Kean University, Union, NJ, Global University Studies 
    Internship Program........................................   800,000
Kent State University, Kent, OH, for Institute for 
    Computational Science for the development of 
    interdisciplinary and outreach activities in research and 
    education................................................. 1,200,000
Keystone Central AVTS, Lock Haven, PA, for technology 
    infrastructure............................................   100,000
Keystone Central School District in Pennsylvania, in 
    collaboration with Lock Haven University, to continue a 
    model alternative school..................................   750,000
Keystone College, LaPlume, PA, for technology upgrade.........   150,000
Kishwaukee College, IL, for Computer Technology Center to 
    purchase computers and equipment..........................   400,000
La Roche College, Pacem In Terris Institute, Pittsburgh, PA, 
    for technology............................................   600,000
LaGuardia Community College, Long Island City, New York, for 
    technology-based teacher training initiatives.............   600,000
Lake Area Technical Institute in Watertown, SD to integrate 
    interactive learning in technical education programs 
    through the use of technology.............................    80,000
Lake Superior State University to develop and implement a new 
    degree program to meet industry's increasing demand for 
    skilled trades workers trained in new technologies........   200,000
Lakeshore Technical College in Cleveland, Wisconsin to provide 
    training, distance learning, education and job placement 
    services for court reporters and captioners...............   500,000
Landmark College in Putney, VT to develop a model 
    implementation system for improving access to public 
    school and college classrooms through the use of assistive 
    technology................................................   350,000
Lees-McRae College, Banner Elk, NC, ``Applied Mathematics 
    Program''.................................................   650,000
Lehman College, New York City, New York for a distance 
    learning initiative to connect pre-service teachers with 
    experienced classroom teachers............................   440,000
Lewis and Clark Community College, Illinois for programmatic 
    activities related to study of aquatic and terrestrial 
    ecosystems at the Great Rivers Research and Education 
    Center....................................................   100,000
Lincoln University to purchase laboratory and computer 
    equipment to provide a six-week summer workshop for 
    teachers within the Philadelphia School District..........   100,000
Lorain County Community College, Elyria, Ohio for technology 
    upgrades for distance learning programs and advanced 
    placement programs........................................   480,000
Los Angeles Community College District, California, for the 
    Vocational Instructor Recruitment Initiative..............   315,000
Los Angeles Harbor College, Wilmington, CA, for equipment, 
    personnel and curriculum development for the Television 
    Network distance learning project.........................   800,000
Lourdes College, Sylvania, Ohio to upgrade laboratory 
    equipment and programs at the Life Lab for Natural and 
    Environmental Sciences....................................   200,000
Macon State College, Macon, GA, for technology and faculty at 
    the Regional Center for Information Technology and 
    Workforce Development.....................................   400,000
Madison Area Technical College in Madison, Wisconsin to 
    provide training, distance learning, education and job 
    placement services for court reporters and captioners.....   500,000
Madonna University, Livonia, Michigan for technology..........   175,000
Maricopa Community College District, Phoenix, Arizona, for the 
    Hispanic Nursing Fellows Program..........................   400,000
Maryland Association of Community Colleges to reinforce 
    community colleges' ability to educate and train the 
    Information Technology workforce throughout Maryland...... 1,250,000
Maryland Institute for Minority Achievement and Urban 
    Education, University of Maryland, College Park, MD to 
    develop, evaluate, and implement promising practices for 
    improving minority student achievement and urban education   750,000
Mathematics, Engineering and Science Achievement Program, 
    University of California, Oakland, California to develop 
    strategies to prepare and support students for nursing 
    careers...................................................   200,000
Midstate College in Peoria, IL, to establish a real-time 
    captioning training program...............................   100,000
Minnesota State Colleges and Universities for Emerging 
    Curriculum for the 21st Century Program................... 1,000,000
Minnesota State Colleges and Universities, St. Paul, MN for 
    development of an e-monitoring environment................ 1,000,000
Minority Math, Jackson State University.......................   550,000
Minot State University to develop an Institute for Rural Human 
    Services that will study systems designed to meet the 
    unique needs of persons with disabilities living in rural 
    communities...............................................   250,000
Mohawk Valley Community College, Utica Campus, Utica, NY, for 
    technology................................................   500,000
Montana State University--Northern in Havre, MT to develop 
    curricula and educational materials related to rural 
    development programs......................................   250,000
Montana State University-Bozeman distance learning 
    opportunities for rural and remote populations............   500,000
Montana State University-Bozeman to launch a Coalition for 
    Establishing a National Teacher Enhancement Network.......   500,000
Montclair State University, New Jersey, for the Center for 
    Teacher Preparation and Learning Technology to expand 
    teacher training programs.................................   750,000
Morris Brown College, Atlanta, GA, for computer and technology 
    equipment................................................. 2,000,000
Mount St. Clare College, Clinton, IA, to create, test and 
    implement a technology-based undergraduate and graduate 
    teacher training program.................................. 1,000,000
Mt. Vernon Nazarene College, Mt. Vernon, OH, equipment, 
    technology upgrades of the Natural Sciences and Social 
    Sciences facility.........................................   500,000
Murray State University's Telecommunications Training and 
    Learning Center to assist Western Kentucky public schools 
    in exploring new technologies.............................   300,000
National Association of Student Personnel Administrators, 
    Washington, D.C., for a minority undergraduate fellows 
    program to increase minorities in higher education........   250,000
National Aviary Conservation Education Technology Integration 
    in Pittsburgh.............................................   250,000
New Jersey Institute of Technology to provide technological 
    equipment for expansion of their teacher training programs   350,000
Niagara University, Lewiston, New York, to enhance distance 
    learning programs.........................................   210,000
Nicholls State University, Thibodaux, LA for their 
    International Program to support staffing, curriculum 
    development and equipment acquisition.....................   650,000
North Carolina Community College System for information 
    technology upgrades.......................................   250,000
North Central State Community College, Mansfield, OH, for 
    equipment and professional development....................   100,000
North Dakota State University for the Tech-Based Industry 
    Traineeship Program designed to enhance student 
    postsecondary experiences while providing innovative 
    solutions to small business needs.........................   350,000
Northeastern State University, Tahlequah, OK, for rural 
    education programs at the Center for Rural Development....   250,000
Northern Essex Community College, Haverhill, Massachusetts, 
    for technology equipment for its Technology Training 
    Center....................................................   600,000
Northern Illinois University for the Lab for Structural 
    Analysis and Computer Modeling to purchase equipment......   500,000
Northern Illinois University for the Nanoscale Science, 
    Engineering, and Technology Laboratory to purchase 
    equipment................................................. 2,000,000
Northern Kentucky University for the Institute for Freedom 
    Studies to promote understanding of the Underground 
    Railroad..................................................   920,000
Northern Potter Jr/Sr. High School, Ulysses, PA, for 
    technology infrastructure.................................   100,000
Northwestern Michigan College, Traverse City, Michigan, for 
    programmatic activities, including equipment, for the 
    Lifelong Learning Center on the West Bay campus...........   500,000
Norwalk Community College, Norwalk, CT, for technology and 
    equipment.................................................   500,000
Oklahoma Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City, OK, for 
    distance learning expansion............................... 1,000,000
Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, for technology in 
    coordination with other state and local telecommunications 
    projects, including the Ponca City broadband project and 
    the Oklahoma Municipal League's Telecommunications project   350,000
Oregon Health and Science University's Institute for 
    Excellence in Nursing in Portland, Oregon.................   250,000
Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR, for course 
    development and equipment.................................   300,000
Peirce College in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, for technology 
    enhancements, course development, faculty training, and 
    outreach activities to expand Peirce Online...............   400,000
Philadelphia University, Pennsylvania, for technology 
    equipment and upgrades....................................   600,000
Pittsburgh Digital Greenhouse.................................   250,000
Portland State University, Oregon, to recruit, prepare and 
    support secondary school administrators...................   440,000
Portland State University, Portland, Oregon, to support public 
    service programs at the Mark O. Hatfield School of 
    Government in the College of Urban and Public Affairs.....   250,000
Research and evaluation agenda for health care delivery in 
    Alaska centered at the University of Alaska in Fairbanks..   750,000
Rose State College, Midwest City, OK, for a closed-captioning 
    pilot program............................................. 1,000,000
Salve Regina University, Newport, RI, to expand and update its 
    distance education efforts to serve a larger potential 
    student market via web links and interactive communication   100,000
Salve Regina University, Newport, Rhode Island, to develop and 
    expand a nursing education and minority workforce training 
    program................................................... 1,000,000
San Bernardino Community College District, San Bernardino, CA, 
    to support the expansion of distance telecourse 
    broadcasting.............................................. 1,000,000
Santa Clarita Community College District, Santa Clarita, CA, 
    for equipment, personnel for the University Center........   800,000
Science Education Technology initiative at University of 
    Alabama...................................................   440,000
Scott County LifeLong Learning Center, Scottsburg, Indiana, 
    for the purchase of industrial training equipment to 
    support training programs that focus on the development of 
    transferable technical skills.............................   808,000
Seminole State College, Seminole, OK, for technology and 
    academic programming......................................   200,000
Seneca Highlands AVTS, Port Allegany, PA, for technology 
    infrastructure............................................   100,000
Sheldon-Jackson College Center for Life Long Learning for 
    teacher training to address the shortage of teachers in 
    rural Alaska.............................................. 2,000,000
Shelton State Community College Electronics and Technology 
    Training in Tuscaloosa, Alabama...........................   100,000
Shenandoah University, Winchester, VA, ``Loudoun Higher 
    Education Initiative''....................................    20,000
Shenandoah University, Winchester, VA, for a teacher 
    technology initiative.....................................   380,000
Shippensburg University: for computer wiring and computers for 
    the Performing Arts Center................................   200,000
Shriver Peace Worker Program, Inc. to establish the Sargent 
    Shriver Peace Center......................................10,000,000
South Dakota State University in Brookings to enhance the 
    programs offered by the Polytechnic Center of Excellence 
    in the College of Engineering.............................   640,000
South Florida Community College, Avon Park, FL, for equipment.   500,000
South Suburban College, South Holland, Illinois, for 
    personnel, curriculum development, training and 
    administrative expenses to implement Project Higher 
    Education aviation and aerospace educational initiatives..   250,000
Southeast Missouri State University in Cape Girardeau, MO, to 
    utilize advanced communication and computer technology to 
    improve curricula and programs offered by its School of 
    Visual and Performing Arts................................   900,000
Southeast Missouri State University, Cape Girardeau, MO, River 
    Campus Initiative.........................................   850,000
Southern Illinois University, Carbondale in Peoria, IL, to 
    establish a real-time captioning training program.........    25,000
Southern Methodist University, Texas, for a program to 
    increase enrollment and graduation of engineering students   800,000
Southern New England School of Law, North Dartmouth, 
    Massachusetts, to support faculty, staff and student 
    stipends for the establishment of an immigration law 
    clinic....................................................   100,000
Southern New Hampshire University, to support expansion of a 
    distance learning program.................................   625,000
Southern University Center for Community Development, Baton 
    Rouge to coordinate the university's community outreach 
    efforts...................................................    75,000
Spelman College, Atlanta, Georgia, in partnership with the 
    Atlanta Public Schools, for a teacher training project to 
    support urban education...................................   267,000
Spring Arbor University teaching consortium of higher 
    education institutions to develop voluntary standards to 
    improve teacher instruction of technology in the classroom   125,000
St. John University, Oakdale, New York for the Institute for 
    Minority Teacher Development and Training to improve math 
    and science education in low-performing school districts 
    and develop a ``future teachers'' project in middle and 
    high schools..............................................   800,000
St. Louis Community College at Meramac (Kirkwood, MO) to train 
    real-time captioners to provide closed captioning to the 
    deaf and hard-of-hearing..................................   200,000
St. Mary Area Senior High School, St. Marys, PA, for 
    technology infrastructure.................................   100,000
St. Norbert College in DePere, Wisconsin to enhance and expand 
    a field-based teacher training program....................   400,000
St. Petersburg College, St. Petersburg, FL, for an EPICENTER.. 2,000,000
St. Petersburg College, St. Petersburg, FL, for equipment, 
    technology, curriculum development and educational program 
    planning for students training in museum services......... 1,000,000
St. Thomas University, Miami, FL, for computer and science 
    laboratory equipment......................................   500,000
Stark State College of Technology, North Canton, OH, 
    Integrated Systems Technology.............................   990,000
State University of New York Empire State College for distance 
    learning project..........................................   250,000
Stetson University, Deland, FL, for a scientific 
    instrumentation, technology and infrastructure project.... 2,500,000
Stevens Institute of Technology, Hoboken, NJ, for the 
    expansion and enhancement of ocean-based science and 
    mathematics education project.............................   500,000
Stillman College, Zelpha Wells Cultural Education Center......    50,000
Suffolk University, Boston, Massachusetts, to establish and 
    operate the Moakley Archives and the Moakley Institute....   750,000
Sun Area Career Training Center, New Berlin, PA, for 
    technology infrastructure.................................   100,000
Surry Community College ``Viticulture Technology Program'' for 
    tools, equipment, resource materials, instructional staff, 
    lab supplies..............................................   300,000
Tarleton State University, Stephenville, Texas, for equipment 
    for the optical observatory and for science education 
    programs..................................................   500,000
Technology Innovation Challenge Grants for Tupelo Public 
    Schools................................................... 1,000,000
Texas A&M; University-Kingsville, Kingsville, TX, for 
    technology................................................   930,000
The Benjamin L. Hooks Institute for Social Change in Memphis, 
    TN, to pursue a broad academic agenda that emphasizes the 
    continued importance of the Civil Rights Movement and 
    encourages academic research and community outreach.......   835,000
The Education and Research Consortium of Western North 
    Carolina, Inc., Asheville, NC, for technology.............    40,000
The Research Foundation of the State University of New York, 
    Buffalo, NY, for technology...............................   600,000
The Technology Center at Mountain State University in Beckley, 
    WV, to provide telecommunications equipment, including 
    wiring for interactive classrooms and tools to train 
    students to create their own electronic business 
    opportunities............................................. 1,500,000
Tougaloo College, Mississippi, for establishment of the 
    Leadership Institute to address socioeconomic disparities 
    within the Mississippi Delta..............................   440,000
Trident Technical College, Charleston, South Carolina, to 
    equip the information technology center, electro-
    mechanical skills laboratory, and the hospitality, tourism 
    and culinary arts program.................................   400,000
Union County College in Elizabeth, NJ to expand their program 
    that connects unemployed and underemployed older youth and 
    adults to the College's lifelong learning, literacy and 
    occupational training programs through the use of network 
    technology................................................   250,000
University of Dubuque for the creation of a teacher training 
    program focused on environmental science..................   800,000
University of Alabama Science Education Technology Initiative 
    in Tuscaloosa, Alabama....................................   200,000
University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL, for computer network 
    and computer security upgrades............................   400,000
University of Alaska and State of Alaska to create the Alaska 
    Digital Archives and Digital Library......................   500,000
University of Arizona for training and curriculum development 
    at the Program in Integrative Medicine....................   500,000
University of California at Santa Barbara, California, for the 
    Walter H. Capps Center for the Study of Religion and 
    Public Life for research, fellowships, lecture series and 
    community outreach........................................   500,000
University of Charleston, in cooperation with the Clay Center 
    for the Arts and Sciences, for technology equipment 
    related to arts and science education as well as outreach. 1,000,000
University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, CO, for the ATLAS 
    (Alliance for Technology, Learning and Society) Project 
    for technology enhancement................................ 1,000,000
University of Hawaii at Manoa for the Globalization Network 
    program...................................................   300,000
University of Houston, Texas, for the Great Cities' 
    Universities Skills Enhancement Partnership Initiative to 
    provide high skill and professional training programs.....   440,000
University of Idaho Advanced Computing and Modeling Laboratory 
    to provide independent technical expertise and applied 
    research..................................................   700,000
University of Louisville-Northern Kentucky University's Urban 
    University Partnership for Math and Science Teaching...... 1,500,000
University of Massachusetts Schools for Marine Science and 
    Technology to improve marine science research programs, 
    including technology upgrades and equipment...............   600,000
University of Michigan Gerald R. Ford School of Public Policy, 
    Ann Arbor, Michigan, for curriculum development and 
    training.................................................. 2,000,000
University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, to expand 
    software education and training programs, and curriculum 
    development...............................................   800,000
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, 
    OK, for technology........................................   300,000
University of Redlands, Redlands, CA, for technology.......... 1,000,000
University of Saint Francis, Fort Wayne, Indiana, to upgrade 
    information technology equipment and infrastructure 
    campus-wide...............................................   500,000
University of South Alabama Preparatory Music Program in 
    Mobile, Alabama...........................................    50,000
University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, for a ``Globalization 
    Research Network''........................................ 2,000,000
University of Texas-Pan American, Edinburg, TX, for technology 1,732,000
University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, for Governmental 
    Studies ``Youth Leadership Initiative''................... 1,200,000
University of Washington, Tacoma, Washington, for faculty, 
    curriculum development and equipment acquisition to 
    establish a technology institute..........................   100,000
University of West Alabama Electronic Campus in Livingston, 
    Alabama...................................................   100,000
University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire for a collaborative effort 
    to develop a curriculum for social workers serving 
    primarily rural, impoverished, and vulnerable adults......   213,000
University of Wisconsin-Platteville, Wisconsin for the 
    Wisconsin Agricultural Stewardship Initiative to develop 
    and disseminate environmentally-friendly practices and 
    policies for production agriculture, and related distance 
    learning programs.........................................   380,000
Upper Great Lakes Educational Technologies Inc., Marquette, 
    Michigan, for personnel, technology and support costs to 
    design, coordinate and implement ``Operation UP Link''....   300,000
Urban College of Boston in Massachusetts to support higher 
    education program serving low-income and minority students 1,000,000
Venango County AVTS, Oil City, PA, for technology 
    infrastructure............................................   100,000
Wallace Community College, Dothan AL, for new equipment.......   114,000
Wallace Community College, Selma, Alabama for biology and 
    chemistry laboratory equipment and to incorporate science 
    technology into instruction...............................    70,000
Warren County AVTS, Warren, PA, for technology infrastructure.   100,000
Waukesha County Technical College in Waukesha, Wisconsin and 
    Marquette University to develop a joint curriculum and 
    transfer program targeted to underserved populations in 
    the fields of nursing and engineering.....................   700,000
Weber State University in Ogden, Utah, to assist the Dumke 
    College of Health Professions for computer technology.....   150,000
Wellsboro Area High School, Wellsboro, PA, for technology 
    infrastructure............................................   100,000
West Virginia High Technology Consortium Foundation, Fairmont, 
    West Virginia, to support a collaborative effort with 
    Fairmont State College and DSD Laboratories of West 
    Virginia to develop a computer security curriculum and to 
    strengthen an information assurance center of excellence..   300,000
Western Governors University in Salt Lake City, UT to improve 
    distance learning education programs, including upgrades 
    in technology............................................. 1,800,000
Western Kentucky University Technology Innovation Challenge 
    Program...................................................   500,000
Westminster College, Fulton, MO, ``Winston Churchill Center 
    for Leadership Service'' for communications upgrades, 
    recruitment of staff and academic program development and 
    implementation............................................   800,000
Widener University, Chester, PA, for technological 
    infrastructure improvements to educational entities.......   400,000
Widener University, Center for Social Work Education, 
    Harrisburg, PA, for curriculum development................   350,000
William Tyndale College, Farmington Hills MI, to expand and 
    enhance its curriculum....................................   850,000
Wilson College to expand and develop the ``Women with Children 
    Program,'' which assists single women with children in 
    earning a degree, becoming financially independent, and 
    raising the children's aspirations for educational 
    accomplishment............................................   200,000
Wireless Computer Laboratory, East Central Community College, 
    Ellisville, Mississippi...................................    50,000
Wisconsin Association of Independent Colleges and Universities 
    for a collaboration project to consolidate administrative 
    operations and information technology.....................   800,000
World Learning, Brattleboro, VT for foreign language training 
    programs..................................................   200,000
Army War College: to develop a major educational center to 
    provide a joint research and teaching opportunities in 
    military and social history...............................    25,000
Cabrini College: for equipment and programmatic funding for 
    the new Center for Science, Education, and Technology, 
    which will provide a model elementary education classroom.   200,000
Keystone Virtual University: to establish a Pennsylvania 
    University ``online'' university..........................   250,000
Lehigh University: for the Center for Promoting Healthy 
    Development for Individuals with Disabilities for research 
    to develop strategies that can improve the healthy 
    development of individuals with disabilities..............   500,000
Military Heritage Foundation, Carlisle, PA, for Military 
    History Institute to provide joint research and teaching 
    opportunities in military and social history..............   175,000
Temple University for the Center for Research in Human 
    Development and Education for the development of 
    innovative models to address teacher recruitment, training 
    and mentoring.............................................   500,000
International Education
      The conference agreement provides $98,500,000 for Title 
VI and Fulbright-Hays International Education programs instead 
of $93,000,000 as proposed by the House and $78,022,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees find that our national security, stability 
and economic vitality depend, in part, on American experts who 
have sophisticated language skills and cultural knowledge about 
the various areas of the world. An urgent need exists to 
enhance the nation's in-depth knowledge of world areas and 
transnational issues, and fluency of U.S. citizens in languages 
relevant to understanding societies where Islamic and/or Muslim 
culture, politics, religion, and economy are a significant 
factor.
      Therefore, the conferees have included an increase of 
$20,478,000 for the Title VI/Fulbright-Hays programs to 
increase the number of international experts (including those 
entering government service and various professional 
disciplines) with in-depth expertise and high-level language 
proficiency in the targeted world areas of Central and South 
Asia, the Middle East, Russia, and the Independent States of 
the former Soviet Union. A portion of these funds is intended 
to enhance the capacity of U.S. higher education institutions 
to sustain these initiatives over time.
      The conferees intend that these additional funds be used 
for priority initiatives within existing Title VI/Fulbright-
Hays mechanisms, but with increased flexibility to address new 
challenges. Within the amount included in the bill, $5,409,000 
is provided to double the number of Title VI Foreign Language 
and Area Studies (FLAS) fellowships to students pursuing 
advanced training in Arabic, Azeri, Persian/Dari, Pashto, 
Tajik, Uzbek, Urdu and other languages spoken in the critical 
world regions of Central and South Asia, the Middle East, and 
Russia/Eastern Europe. All current FLAS institutions are 
eligible to receive supplemental awards if they offer language 
training in these areas. The bill also includes $3,448,000 to 
increase the amount of FLAS fellowships from $21,000 to $25,000 
as a first step toward making these awards more competitive and 
to encourage more students to pursue advanced language 
training, particularly in areas important to national security. 
The conferees encourage the award of Title VI fellowships to 
talented students pursuing masters degrees who may be more 
likely to pursue government service, and the use of these 
fellowships for immersion foreign language training abroad.
      Within the total amount in the bill, $3,368,000 is 
provided for supplemental awards to existing Title VI national 
resource centers (NRCs) specializing in Central and South Asia, 
the Middle East, and Russia/Eastern Europe and to establish 
four new centers, with FLAS fellowships allocations, focused on 
these world regions from high quality, unfunded applications 
from the most recent NRC and FLAS competitions. The conferees 
encourage the creation of distance learning initiatives to 
provide more universal access to language training, summer 
language institutes abroad, one-on-one language tutoring to 
accelerate student progress to the highest levels of 
proficiency, engaging the language resources of local heritage 
communities where appropriate, and increased collaboration with 
the Title VI language resource centers, the centers for 
international business education and research, and the American 
overseas research centers with a focus on the least commonly 
taught languages and areas and underrepresented professional 
disciplines. The conference agreement includes $1,000,000 to 
establish three new language resource centers, each 
specializing in either Central Asia, the Middle East, or South 
Asia, to develop the resources needed to improve foreign 
language teacher training for less commonly taught languages, 
including research, curriculum and other instructional 
materials, and language pedagogical strategies. The conferees 
encourage the development of up-to-date, interactive multi-
media material specifically tailored for targeted language 
instructional needs.
      Further, the conference agreement includes an increase of 
$4,975,000 for all other Title VI activities, including the 
development of innovative techniques, including electronic 
technologies, to collect, organize, preserve and disseminate 
materials focused on the least commonly taught languages, and 
for centers and programs focused on international business, 
economic competitiveness and security issues, undergraduate 
education, and research.
      The conferees intend that $1,800,000 be used to expand 
Fulbright-Hays overseas programs in targeted world areas to 
increase opportunities for scholars and faculty to enhance 
their language skills and cultural studies by conducting 
research and training abroad. The conference agreement includes 
bill language allowing section 102(b)(6) funds to be used to 
support individuals planning to apply their advanced language 
skills in fields outside of teaching, including government, 
professional fields, or international development, and language 
permitting up to one percent of the Title VI/Fulbright-Hays 
funds provided to the Department to be used for program 
evaluation, national outreach, and information dissemination 
activities.
      The conference agreement also provides $1,500,000 for the 
Institute of International Public Policy.
TRIO
      The conference agreement includes $802,500,000 for TRIO 
instead of $800,000,000 as proposed by the House and 
$805,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
Teacher Quality Enhancement Grants
      The conference agreement also includes $90,000,000 for 
Teacher Quality Enhancement Grants, instead of $100,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and $54,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
Demonstrations in Disability
      The agreement also includes $7,000,000 for Demonstrations 
in Disability as proposed by the Senate instead of $6,000,000 
as proposed by the House. The conferees are aware that, 
although minorities comprise a significant number of students 
with learning disabilities enrolled in postsecondary 
institutions, no Historically Black Colleges or Universities 
(HBCU) have been funded since the inception of this 
demonstration program. The conferees note that subsection 
762(c)(3) of the Higher Education Act requires the Secretary to 
consider a range of types of institutions of higher education 
when making awards under this program. Therefore, the conferees 
strongly urge the Secretary to comply with this requirement of 
the law by providing due consideration to qualified 
applications from HBCUs, as well as Hispanic Serving 
Institutions.
Other higher education programs
      The conference agreement includes $2,000,000 for the 
Underground Railroad Educational and Cultural Program as 
proposed by the Senate instead of $1,750,000 as proposed by the 
House. The agreement also includes $1,000,000 for GPRA data and 
program evaluations as proposed by the House instead of 
$1,500,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement also includes $4,000,000 for 
Thurgood Marshall Scholarships instead of $5,000,000 as 
proposed by the House, and $1,000,000 for B.J. Stupak Olympic 
Scholarships as proposed by the House. The Senate bill did not 
provide funding for these activities.
      The conferees are concerned that fiscal year 2001 funding 
for the Child Care Access Means Parents in School program was 
not fully expended. The conferees provided additional funds 
last year because of the understanding that a lack of 
convenient and affordable childcare services is a significant 
barrier preventing low-income parents from pursuing 
postsecondary education. Therefore, the conferees encourage the 
Department to work with colleges and universities and relevant 
organizations to heighten awareness and increase utilization of 
the financial assistance available through this program.

                           HOWARD UNIVERSITY

      The conference agreement includes $237,474,000 for Howard 
University instead of $242,474,000 as proposed by the House and 
$232,474,000 as proposed by the Senate.

             EDUCATION RESEARCH, STATISTICS AND ASSESSMENT

      The conference agreement includes $443,870,000 for 
Education Research, Statistics and Assessment instead of 
$421,620,000 as proposed by the House and $389,567,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees provide $121,817,000 for research instead 
of $147,567,000 as proposed by the House and $120,567,000 as 
proposed by the Senate.
      The conferees provide $85,000,000 for statistics as 
proposed by the House instead of $80,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement includes $67,500,000 for 
regional educational labs instead of $70,000,000 as proposed by 
the House and $65,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. The 
conferees have provided this increase to address the increased 
demand for technical assistance in comprehensive school reform. 
The conferees intend that regional educational laboratory funds 
shall be obligated and distributed on the same basis as the 
fiscal year 2001 allocations not later than January 31, 2002.
      The conference agreement includes $107,500,000 for the 
National Assessment for Educational Progress as proposed by the 
House instead of $105,000,000 as proposed by the Senate. Within 
this total, $2,500,000 is included for a trial urban assessment 
study as proposed by the House. The agreement also includes 
$4,053,000 for the National Assessment Governing Board as 
proposed by the House instead of $4,000,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conference agreement also includes $58,000,000 to 
continue multi-year grants and contracts for Comprehensive 
Regional Assistance Centers, Regional Math and Science 
Education Consortia, the Math and Science Clearinghouse, and 
Technology-based technical assistance.

                        DEPARTMENTAL MANAGEMENT

      The conference agreement includes $424,212,000 for 
Departmental program administration as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $427,212,000 as proposed by the House.
      The conferees are very concerned that the Department has 
made the decision in several programs to provide the full grant 
amount of multiyear awards in the first year (front loaded), 
rather than following the traditional practice of providing 
funding one year at a time. This practice was adopted for 
several programs during fiscal year 2001 without prior 
notification to Congress and, in many cases, represented a 
significant departure from the proposed program implementation 
outlined in the Department's Justifications of Appropriation 
Estimates to the Congress. The conferees believe that this 
practice should be limited and utilized only when justified by 
programmatic considerations. Moreover, the conferees have a 
strong interest in receiving complete and accurate information 
from the Department about the proposed use of appropriations. 
Therefore, the conferees direct the Secretary to provide 
notification and justification to the Committees on 
Appropriations of the House and Senate not later than 30 days 
prior to release of any grant opportunities or notices inviting 
applications that propose front-loaded grant awards or that 
express funding priorities or competitive preferences for 
funding availability significantly different from what is 
proposed in Justifications of Appropriation Estimates to the 
Congress, the House and Senate Committee reports accompanying 
Department of Education appropriations bills or the Statement 
of the Managers accompanying Department of Education 
Appropriations Acts.
      The conferees note that the legislation reauthorizing the 
Elementary and Secondary Education Act has adopted many of the 
Administration's proposals to consolidate a number of 
categorical programs into teacher quality, technology, 
bilingual and innovative education state grants. The conferees 
expect that as a result of this legislation, the Department 
will reassign personnel slots previously needed to administer 
categorical programs to new program priorities. The conferees 
are concerned that the International Education and Graduate 
Programs Service has been understaffed and has additional 
program responsibilities.
      The conferees urge the Department to review the 
organizational structures within the Department to (1) 
strengthen the staff and support systems as international 
education programs and responsibilities grow; (2) increase 
outreach activities and information about funding 
opportunities; (3) provide greater national accessibility by 
government agencies, businesses, the media, and education 
institutions to the expertise and knowledge these programs 
produce; and (4) increase coordination among all international 
education activities and programs within the Department. The 
conferees direct the Department to submit a letter report to 
the House and Senate Committees on Appropriations by February 
1, 2002 describing steps taken and planned to address these 
program and management needs.

                           General Provisions

                    B.J. STUPAK OLYMPIC SCHOLARSHIPS

      The conference agreement includes an amendment which 
makes changes to the award determinations for the B.J. Stupak 
Olympic Scholarship program. This language was not included by 
either the House or the Senate.

                           SCHOOL RENOVATION

      The conference agreement does not include language 
proposed by the Senate relating to school renovation.

                   STUDENT LOANS FOR FOREIGN SCHOOLS

      The conference agreement does not include language 
proposed by the Senate relating to student loans for students 
attending foreign schools.
      The conferees are concerned about reports of students 
obtaining Federal Family Education Loans by fraudulently 
claiming to attend foreign schools. Since 1995, at least 25 
individuals have been convicted of cashing student loan checks 
without ever attending the foreign institution at which they 
claimed to be students. Accordingly, the conferees direct the 
General Accounting Office to examine and report on the extent 
of fraud, waste, and abuse related to loans for students 
attending foreign schools, steps taken by the Department of 
Education to curb such abuses, and possible additional steps, 
such as tighter disbursement controls, that may be needed to 
solve this problem.

                              LEAP PROGRAM

      The conference agreement does not include language 
proposed by the Senate relating to the maintenance of effort 
requirement in the LEAP program.

                           college work study

      The conference agreement includes language that allows 
the Secretary to reallocate funds under the College Work Study 
program to certain institutions. Neither the House nor the 
Senate bills contained this language.

        references to the elementary and secondary education act

      The conference agreement includes language clarifying 
that references made in this Act to the Elementary and 
Secondary Education Act are to be interpreted as referring to 
the Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 as it was 
amended by H.R. 1, the ``No Child Left Behind Act of 2001.'' 
Neither the House nor the Senate bills contained this language.

                       TITLE IV--RELATED AGENCIES

             Corporation for National and Community Service

        DOMESTIC VOLUNTEER SERVICE PROGRAMS, OPERATING EXPENSES

      The conference agreement includes $328,895,000 for the 
Domestic Volunteer Service programs instead of $324,450,000 as 
proposed by the House and $321,276,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA)
      The conference agreement includes $85,287,000 for VISTA 
instead of $83,074,000 as proposed by the House and $86,500,000 
as proposed by the Senate.
Volunteers in Homeland Security
      The conference agreement includes $5,000,000 for 
Volunteers in Homeland Security, a new activity authorized 
under Section 122 of the Domestic Volunteer Service Act which 
was not included in either the House or the Senate bills. These 
funds would be used to place senior and other volunteers in 
community activities that are targeted specifically at 
contributing to homeland defense. Grants will be made to states 
and community organizations on a competitive basis and will 
support public and nonprofit agencies' efforts in the areas of 
public safety, public health, and disaster relief and 
preparedness.
      Since September 11, hundreds of volunteers have been 
actively engaged in supporting relief efforts. Building on this 
record, the Corporation will use these funds to place 
additional volunteers in assignments targeted specifically at 
mitigating the effects of the attacks and in enhancing homeland 
security.
National Senior Volunteer Corps
      The conference agreement includes $106,700,000 for the 
Foster Grandparent Program (FGP) instead of $109,468,000 as 
proposed by the House and $102,868,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conferees have provided sufficient funds to allow for 
a stipend increase of ten cents per hour for participants in 
both the Foster Grandparent and the Senior Companion Programs. 
The conferees direct the Corporation to provide such a stipend 
increase to these two programs.
      One-third of the increases provided for the FGP, SCP, and 
RSVP programs shall be used to fund Programs of National 
Significance expansion grants to allow existing FGP, RSVP and 
SCP programs to expand the number of volunteers serving in 
areas of critical need as identified by Congress in the 
Domestic Volunteer Service Act.
      Sufficient funding has been included to provide a 2 
percent increase for administrative costs realized by all 
current grantees in the FGP and SCP programs, and a 4 percent 
increase for administrative costs realized by all current 
grantees in the RSVP program. Funds remaining above these 
amounts should be used to begin new FGP, RSVP and SCP programs 
in geographic areas currently unserved. The conferees expect 
these projects to be awarded via a nationwide competition among 
potential community-based sponsors.
      The Corporation for National and Community Service shall 
comply with the directive that use of funding increases in the 
Foster Grandparent Program, Retired and Senior Volunteer 
Program and VISTA not be restricted to America Reads 
activities. The conferees further direct that the Corporation 
shall not stipulate a minimum or maximum amount for PNS grant 
augmentations.
      The conference agreement includes $400,000 for senior 
demonstration activities as proposed by both the House and the 
Senate. These funds are to be used solely to carry out 
evaluations and to provide recruitment, training, and technical 
assistance to local projects as described in the budget 
request. No new demonstration projects may be begun with these 
funds. None of the increases provided for FGP, SCP, or RSVP in 
fiscal year 2002 may be used for demonstration activities. The 
conferees further expect that all future demonstration 
activities will be funded through allocations made through Part 
E of the Domestic Volunteer Service Act.
      Funds appropriated for fiscal year 2002 may not be used 
to implement or support service collaboration agreements or any 
other changes in the administration and/or governance of 
national service programs prior to passage of a bill by the 
authorizing committees of jurisdiction specifying such changes.

                  CORPORATION FOR PUBLIC BROADCASTING

      The conference agreement provides $380,000,000 in funding 
for fiscal year 2004, instead of $365,000,000 as proposed by 
the House and $395,000,000 as proposed by the Senate.
      The conference agreement also includes $25,000,000 for 
equipment and facilities to enable public broadcasters to meet 
the statutory deadline for digital conversion as proposed by 
the Senate. The conference agreement does not provide these 
funds contingent upon authorization as proposed by the House.

               FEDERAL MEDIATION AND CONCILIATION SERVICE

      The conference agreement includes $39,982,000 for the 
Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service instead of 
$40,482,000 as proposed by the Senate and $39,482,000 as 
proposed by the House.
      The conference agreement includes funds for FMCS to 
continue their work to prevent youth violence by teaching 
students mediation and conflict resolution techniques.

                INSTITUTE OF MUSEUM AND LIBRARY SERVICES

      The conference agreement provides $197,602,000 for the 
Institute of Museum and Library Services instead of 
$168,078,000 as proposed by the House and the Senate. Within 
the amount provided, the conference agreement specifies 
$2,941,000 for library services to Native Americans and Native 
Hawaiians as proposed by the Senate. The conference agreement 
also specifies funding for the following:

National Museum of African American History and Culture Plan 
    for Action Presidential Commission........................$2,000,000
American Village Project in Montevallo, Alabama...............   250,000
Evergreen-Conecuh Public Library, Alabama.....................    20,000
Gordo Public Library, Pickens County Commission, Alabama......    50,000
Mobile Museum of Art, Mobile, AL, for systems and technology 
    upgrades..................................................   300,000
National Museum for Women in the Arts......................... 1,500,000
Tuskegee Human and Civil Rights Multicultural Center..........   300,000
Heard Museum, Phoenix, Arizona, to develop exhibits and 
    educational programs about the historic Phoenix Indian 
    School and the Native Americans who attended the school...    50,000
Children's Museum of Los Angeles, California, for development 
    of exhibits and educational programs......................   800,000
Chinese American Museum, Los Angeles, California to complete 
    and install the ``Family and Community'' exhibit and for 
    related educational outreach programs.....................   150,000
Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, California, for 
    equipment and to develop exhibits and educational 
    materials for the Julian C. Dixon Institute for Cultural 
    Studies...................................................   750,000
Santa Barbara Maritime Museum for the installation of an 
    environmental exhibit.....................................   290,000
Santa Maria Valley Discovery Museum, California, for the 
    development of exhibits and educational materials.........    25,000
The Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco to expand model arts 
    education programs at the de Young Museum................. 1,000,000
Bethel Public Library, Connecticut, for technology upgrades 
    and collections...........................................   150,000
Mattatuck Museum in Waterbury, Connecticut to plan and develop 
    a history of Waterbury exhibit............................   500,000
Museum of Aviation, Warner Robins, GA, to expand outreach and 
    educational activities and programs.......................   250,000
Bishops Museum in Honolulu, Hawaii............................   700,000
Grout Museum in Waterloo, Iowa for exhibits on the Sullivan 
    brothers..................................................   500,000
Iowa State Historical Society to catalogue and archive the 
    history of workers in Iowa................................    61,000
The National Audobon Society's ARK Museum in Dubuque, Iowa for 
    creation of exhibits and public education.................   389,000
University of Idaho Performance and Education Facility to 
    preserve the history of jazz and teach it to future 
    generations...............................................   750,000
Adler Planetarium and Astronomy Museum........................    50,000
Johnson County Museum of History, Franklin, IN, for personnel, 
    supplies and equipment....................................   100,000
Plimoth Plantation, Plymouth, Massachusetts, for equipment for 
    the Online Education Center to provide distance learning 
    programs..................................................   125,000
Shakespeare Rose Theater to enhance the educational and 
    cultural programs in language, literacy and the arts for 
    students and the general public........................... 1,000,000
Springfield-Greene County Library, Springfield, MO, for 
    education and training....................................   150,000
Webster University, St. Louis, Missouri, for technology 
    enhancements for the Global Access Library................ 1,160,000
University of Mississippi Foundation, Oxford, MS, for 
    educational and preservation programs at Rowan Oak, the 
    home of William Faulkner..................................   850,000
University of Mississippi, Oxford, MS, for digitization of the 
    National Library of the Accounting Profession.............   350,000
Lois Morgan Edward Memorial Library, Nashville, NC, for 
    furniture, equipment, automation and materials............   132,000
Rocky Mount Children's Museum, North Carolina.................   100,000
Confluence Visitor Center in Williston, ND and the North 
    Dakota State Historical Society for Lewis and Clark 
    exhibits..................................................   100,000
Fort Mandan Visitor's Center for exhibits and other 
    interpretation related to the Lewis and Clark Bicentennial 
    Commemoration.............................................   100,000
Mandan-on-a-Slant Museum to replace exhibits that preserve the 
    Mandan Indian Heritage....................................   100,000
Life Center library project at Franklin Pierce College, New 
    Hampshire................................................. 1,000,000
Monmouth University, West Long Branch, NJ, for collections and 
    technology equipment for the Guggenheim Memorial Library..   160,000
Princeton Public Library, Mercer County, NJ, for library 
    security, inventory and circulation system, and technology 
    enhancements to support digital library initiatives.......   100,000
Albany Institute for History and Art for a two-part technology 
    project that will broaden public access to its collections 
    and improve services to its on-site and off-site 
    constituencies............................................   125,000
Brooklyn Historical Society, NY, for structural repairs and 
    environmental upgrades to preserve collections and for 
    education programs and exhibits........................... 1,000,000
Buffalo and Erie County Library System, Buffalo, NY, for 
    technology equipment......................................    22,500
Center for Jewish History, New York, NY, to support 
    educational and cultural programs and exhibits to 
    facilitate the study of Jewish history....................   250,000
Children's Museum of Manhattan, NY, to develop exhibits on the 
    Harlem Renaissance........................................   150,000
Four County Library System, Vestal, NY, for technology 
    enhancements for a distance learning initiative...........   105,000
Hunter College, NY, to identify, preserve and archive research 
    collections of the Center for Puerto Rican Studies, and 
    develop a website.........................................   500,000
Long Island Maritime Museum in West Sayville, NY for archival 
    and educational programs..................................   200,000
Lower East Side Tenement Museum, NY, for its collections 
    management program to make collections available to the 
    public, and for the development and implementation of 
    educational programs......................................   750,000
New York Hall of Science to develop, expand, and display 
    science-related educational materials..................... 1,000,000
NIOGA Library System of Niagara and Orleans County, NY for 
    technology improvements...................................    22,500
The Woodstock Guild of Craftsmen, Inc., Woodstock, NY for the 
    development and promotion of the Byrdcliffe Centennial 
    Exhibition................................................   100,000
Clark County Historical Museum for development, 
    implementation, and enhancement of cultural education 
    exhibits, Ohio............................................   100,000
Cleveland Botanical Garden, Cleveland, OH, to develop 
    educational exhibits and materials........................    40,000
Crawford Museum, Cleveland, OH, for planning and educational 
    programming...............................................   500,000
Farmer's Castle Museum in Belpre, to assist with technical 
    components that will enhance the visitors' experience.....    42,000
MAPS Air Museum, Canton OH, for equipment and education.......   500,000
McKinley Museum, Canton, OH, for technology improvement to the 
    Ramsayer Research Library.................................    44,000
University of Oregon Museum of Natural History in Eugene, OR..    50,000
Academy of Natural Sciences in Philadelphia County for the 
    preservation of the Academy's collection of more than 22 
    million natural sciences specimens, for the development 
    and delivery of natural sciences educational programming 
    for children and the general public and for environmental 
    research..................................................   150,000
Beaver Area Memorial Library, Beaver County, PA, for equipment   100,000
Delaware Valley Historical Aircraft Association...............   300,000
Discovery Square, Inc. in Erie, PA for exhibit development....   100,000
Everhart Museum in Scranton, PA...............................   200,000
National Liberty Museum in Philadelphia, PA...................   300,000
Northland Public Library Authority, Pittsburgh, PA, for 
    digitization..............................................   126,000
Penn Hills Public Library in Pittsburgh, PA, to purchase 
    library materials and upgrade technology..................   235,000
Philadelphia Zoo..............................................   250,000
Pittsburgh Children's Museum: to develop educational exhibits 
    and programs for area K-12 schools........................   100,000
Please Touch Museum at the Children's Museum of Philadelphia, 
    PA, to provide hands-on learning experiences for children.   700,000
Wayne Art Center in Wayne, PA.................................    50,000
Bamberg County Library in Bamberg, SC, for books and materials    50,000
Clarendon County Library in Manning, SC, for books and 
    materials.................................................    50,000
Marion Wright Edelman Public Library, Bennettsville, SC, for 
    library collections and technology........................   500,000
The Children's Discovery House, Murfreesboro, TN, for the 
    development of hands-on and interactive exhibits and 
    educational programs......................................   600,000
The International Storytelling Center in Jonesborough, TN.....   150,000
El Progreso Library, Uvalde, TX, for computers, equipment.....   500,000
Vietnam Archive Center, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX, 
    for digitization..........................................   500,000
Children's Museum of Virginia, Portsmouth, VA, for new 
    programs and exhibits, educational training opportunities 
    for children and teachers.................................   800,000
Virginia Living Museum........................................   325,000
Burlington City Arts in Burlington, VT for the creation of 
    exhibits, displays and programming at the Firehouse Center 
    for the Visual Arts.......................................   100,000
Lake Champlain Science Center in Burlington, VT for displays 
    and education.............................................   125,000
Vermont Historical Society in Montpelier, VT, to expand 
    displays, exhibits and programming........................   175,000
Beaver Creek Reserve Education Center, Fall Creek, WI, for 
    environmental and conservation education programs for 
    elementary and secondary students.........................   100,000
The Kenosha Civil War Museum in Kenosha, WI for exhibits and 
    programming related to the Civil War......................   500,000
Village of Hawkins, WI, for library technology programs, 
    including equipment.......................................    75,000
Weis Earth Science Museum in Menasha, WI for educational 
    exhibits, including interactive videos, simulated mine 
    tunnels and paleontological specimens.....................   500,000

                  Medicare Payment Advisory Commission

      The conference agreement includes $8,250,000 for the 
Medicare payment advisory commission, instead of $8,000,000 as 
proposed by the House, and $8,500,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.
      The conferees are concerned about the reported impact of 
the Medicare Part B payment reduction scheduled to take effect 
in 2002. The conferees urge MedPAC to study replacing the 
sustainable growth rate (SGR) as a factor in determining the 
update for Medicare Part B payments with a factor that more 
fully accounts for the changes in the unit costs of providing 
physicians' services and report back its findings and 
recommendations to the Committees on Appropriations and 
authorizing committees not later than March 1, 2002.

        National Commission on Libraries and Information Science

      The conference agreement provides $1,000,000 for the 
National Commission on Libraries and Information Science as 
proposed by the House, instead of $1,495,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.

                     National Education Goals Panel

      The conference agreement provides $400,000 for close-out 
costs associated with the termination of the National Education 
Goals Panel. The Senate provided $2,000,000 for on-going 
activities. The House did not propose funding for this agency. 
The conferees note that this panel was not reauthorized in the 
recent reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary 
Education Act.

                     National Labor Relations Board

      The conference agreement provides $226,438,000 for the 
National Labor Relations Board as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $221,438,000 as proposed by the House.

                       Railroad Retirement Board

             LIMITATION ON THE OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL

      The conference agreement includes a limitation on 
transfers from the railroad trust funds of $6,261,000 for 
administrative expenses of the Office of Inspector General 
instead of $6,480,000 as proposed by the Senate and $6,042,000 
as proposed by the House.

                     Social Security Administration

                  SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME PROGRAM

      The conference agreement includes $21,277,412,000 for the 
Supplemental Security Income Program as proposed by the Senate 
instead of $21,270,412,000 as proposed by the House. Within the 
funds provided, the conference agreement includes $7,000,000 as 
proposed by the Senate for outreach efforts to identify 
individuals who may be eligible for payment of the cost of 
Medicare cost sharing under the Medicaid program. The House 
report contained no similar provision.

                    United States Institute of Peace

      The conference agreement provides $15,104,000 for the 
United States Institute of Peace, instead of $15,000,000 as 
proposed by the House and $15,207,000 as proposed by the 
Senate.

                      TITLE V--GENERAL PROVISIONS

                           OFFICIAL EXPENSES

      The conference agreement includes language to provide an 
additional $3,000 from funds made available to the Department 
of Labor in salaries and expenses accounts for official 
receptions and representation expenses.

                    Distribution of Sterile Needles

      The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
the House that prohibits the use of funds in this Act to carry 
out any program of distributing sterile needles or syringes for 
the hypodermic injection of any illegal drug. The Senate bill 
contained a similar provision except that it would have allowed 
for such a program if the Secretary of Health and Human 
Services determines that these programs are effective in 
preventing the spread of HIV and do not encourage the use of 
illegal drugs.

                            Buy American Act

      The conference agreement deletes without prejudice a 
provision proposed by the House to prohibit any funds made 
available in this Act to any person or entity that violates the 
Buy American Act. The Senate bill contained no similar 
provision. The agreement includes a Sense of the Congress 
provision regarding this issue that was proposed in both the 
House and the Senate bills.

                         NIH License Agreements

      The conference agreement does not include a provision 
proposed by the House regarding NIH license agreements. The 
Senate bill contained no similar provision.

               Congressional Notification of Grant Awards

      The conference agreement does not include a provision 
proposed by the Senate to prohibit the Departments of Labor, 
Health and Human Services, and Education from making a grant 
award totaling more than $500,000 unless the House and Senate 
Committees on Appropriations are notified. The House bill 
contained no similar provision.

                        Secure Rural Schools Act

      The conference agreement does not include a provision 
proposed by the Senate to establish certain requirements 
related to maintenance of effort for State expenditures on 
public education. The House bill contained no similar 
provision.

    Sense of the Senate Regarding Low-Income Home Energy Assistance

      The conferees delete without prejudice a Sense of the 
Senate provision regarding Low-Income Home Energy Assistance. 
The House bill contained no similar provision.

              Native Hawaiian Health Care Improvement Act

      The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
the Senate to change the names of eligible organizations named 
in the Native Hawaiian Health Care Improvement Act. The House 
bill contained no similar provision.

        GAO Study Regarding Implementation of HIPAA Regulations

      The conference agreement does not include a provision 
proposed by the Senate to require GAO to report on the State 
and local impacts of the administrative simplification 
requirements of HIPAA. The House bill contained no similar 
provision.

         Election of an Annuity for Qualified Magistrate Judges

      The conference agreement includes a provision proposed by 
the Senate to provide for an election of an annuity under 
section 377 of title 28, United States Code, for any qualified 
magistrate judge. The House bill contained no similar 
provision.

                        Interior Appropriations

      The conference agreement does not include a provision 
proposed by the Senate to modify language contained in H.R. 
2217, the Interior Appropriations bill. The House bill 
contained no similar provision.

     Across-the-Board Administrative and Related Expenses Reduction

      The conference agreement includes a modified provision 
proposed by the Senate to reduce administrative and related 
expenses of the Departments of Labor, Health and Human 
Services, and Education. The House bill contained no similar 
provision.

                    TITLE VII--MENTAL HEALTH PARITY

      The conference agreement modifies language proposed by 
the Senate amending the Public Health Service Act and the 
Employee Retirement Income Security Act with respect to 
equitable treatment in insurance coverage of mental illnesses. 
The Senate amendment had expanded the provisions in the 
respective Acts concerning parity in mental health coverage. 
The conference agreement instead extends for one year the 
previously expired mental health parity provisions in the 
Public Health Service Act, the Employee Retirement Income 
Security Act, and the Internal Revenue Code of 1986.
      The conferees recognize the devastating impact of mental 
illnesses on Americans from every walk of life and widespread 
bipartisan support of mental health parity legislation in both 
houses of Congress. The conferees strongly urge the committees 
of jurisdiction in the House and the Senate to convene early 
hearings and undertake swift consideration of legislation to 
extend and improve mental health parity protections during the 
second session of 107th Congress.

                  INFORMATION ON PASSENGERS AND CARGO

      The conference agreement does not include a provision 
proposed by the Senate to require advance electronic 
information for air cargo and passengers entering the United 
States. The House bill contained no similar provision.

                          Conference Agreement

      The following table displays the amounts agreed to for 
each program, project or activity with appropriate comparisons:


                                   Ralph Regula,
                                   C.W. Bill Young,
                                   Ernest J. Istook, Jr.,
                                   Dan Miller,
                                   Roger F. Wicker,
                                   Anne M. Northup,
                                   Randy ``Duke'' Cunningham,
                                   Kay Granger,
                                   John E. Peterson,
                                   Don Sherwood,
                                   David Obey,
                                   Steny Hoyer,
                                   Nancy Pelosi,
                                   Nita M. Lowey,
                                   Rosa DeLauro,
                                   Jesse Jackson, Jr.,
                                   Patrick J. Kennedy,
                                 Managers on the Part of the House.

                                   Tom Harkin,
                                   Ernest Hollings,
                                   Daniel Inouye,
                                   Harry Reid,
                                   Herb Kohl,
                                   Patty Murray,
                                   Mary Landrieu,
                                   Robert C. Byrd,
                                   Arlen Specter,
                                   Thad Cochran,
                                   Judd Gregg,
                                   Larry E. Craig,
                                   Ted Stevens,
                                   Kay Bailey Hutchison,
                                   Mike DeWine,
                                Managers on the Part of the Senate.