H. Rept. 107-725 - 107th Congress (2001-2002)
October 07, 2002, As Reported by the Energy and Commerce Committee

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House Report 107-725 - SPORTS AGENT RESPONSIBILITY AND TRUST ACT




[House Report 107-725]
[From the U.S. Government Printing Office]



107th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     107-725

======================================================================



 
               SPORTS AGENT RESPONSIBILITY AND TRUST ACT

                                _______
                                

October 7, 2002.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

 Mr. Tauzin, from the Committee on Energy and Commerce, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                        [To accompany H.R. 4701]

      [Including cost estimate of the Congressional Budget Office]

  The Committee on Energy and Commerce, to whom was referred 
the bill (H.R. 4701) to designate certain conduct by sports 
agents relating to the signing of contracts with student 
athletes as unfair and deceptive acts or practices to be 
regulated by the Federal Trade Commission, having considered 
the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment and 
recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
Amendment........................................................     1
Purpose and Summary..............................................     4
Background and Need for Legislation..............................     4
Hearings.........................................................     5
Committee Consideration..........................................     5
Committee Votes..................................................     5
Committee Oversight Findings.....................................     6
Statement of General Performance Goals and Objectives............     6
New Budget Authority, Entitlement Authority, and Tax Expenditures     6
Committee Cost Estimate..........................................     6
Congressional Budget Office Estimate.............................     6
Federal Mandates Statement.......................................     7
Advisory Committee Statement.....................................     8
Constitutional Authority Statement...............................     8
Applicability to Legislative Branch..............................     8
Section-by-Section Analysis of the Legislation...................     8

                               AMENDMENT

  The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Sports Agent Responsibility and Trust 
Act''.

SEC. 2. DEFINITIONS.

  As used in this Act, the following definitions apply:
          (1) Agency contract.--The term ``agency contract'' means an 
        oral or written agreement in which a student athlete authorizes 
        a person to negotiate or solicit on behalf of the student 
        athlete a professional sports contract or an endorsement 
        contract.
          (2) Athlete agent.--The term ``athlete agent'' means an 
        individual who enters into an agency contract with a student 
        athlete, or directly or indirectly recruits or solicits a 
        student athlete to enter into an agency contract, and does not 
        include a spouse, parent, sibling, grandparent, or guardian of 
        such student athlete, or an individual acting solely on behalf 
        of a professional sports team or professional sports 
        organization.
          (3) Athletic director.--The term ``athletic director'' means 
        an individual responsible for administering the athletic 
        program of an educational institution or, in the case that such 
        program is administered separately, the athletic program for 
        male students or the athletic program for female students, as 
        appropriate.
          (4) Commission.--The term ``Commission'' means the Federal 
        Trade Commission.
          (5) Endorsement contract.--The term ``endorsement contract'' 
        means an agreement under which a student athlete is employed or 
        receives consideration for the use by the other party of that 
        individual's person, name, image, or likeness in the promotion 
        of any product, service, or event.
          (6) Intercollegiate sport.--The term ``intercollegiate 
        sport'' means a sport played at the collegiate level for which 
        eligibility requirements for participation by a student athlete 
        are established by a national association for the promotion or 
        regulation of college athletics.
          (7) Professional sports contract.--The term ``professional 
        sports contract'' means an agreement under which an individual 
        is employed, or agrees to render services, as a player on a 
        professional sports team, with a professional sports 
        organization, or as a professional athlete.
          (8) State.--The term ``State'' includes a State of the United 
        States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the United 
        States Virgin Islands, or any territory or insular possession 
        subject to the jurisdiction of the United States.
          (9) Student athlete.--The term ``student athlete'' means an 
        individual who engages in, is eligible to engage in, or may be 
        eligible in the future to engage in, any intercollegiate sport. 
        An individual who is permanently ineligible to participate in a 
        particular intercollegiate sport is not a student athlete for 
        purposes of that sport.

SEC. 3. REGULATION OF UNFAIR AND DECEPTIVE ACTS AND PRACTICES IN 
                    CONNECTION WITH THE CONTACT BETWEEN AN ATHLETE 
                    AGENT AND A STUDENT ATHLETE.

  (a) Conduct Prohibited.--It is unlawful for an athlete agent to--
          (1) directly or indirectly recruit or solicit a student 
        athlete to enter into an agency contract, by--
                  (A) giving any false or misleading information or 
                making a false promise or representation; or
                  (B) providing anything of value to a student athlete 
                or anyone associated with the student athlete before 
                the student athlete enters into an agency contract;
          (2) enter into an agency contract with a student athlete 
        without providing the student athlete with the disclosure 
        document described in subsection (b); or
          (3) predate or postdate an agency contract.
  (b) Required Disclosure by Athlete Agents to Student Athletes.--
          (1) In general.-- In conjunction with the entering into of an 
        agency contract, an athlete agent shall provide to the student 
        athlete, or, if the student athlete is under the age of 18 to 
        such student athlete's parent or legal guardian, a disclosure 
        document that meets the requirements of this subsection. Such 
        disclosure document is separate from and in addition to any 
        disclosure which may be required under State law.
          (2) Signature of student athlete.--The disclosure document 
        must be signed by the student athlete, or, if the student 
        athlete is under the age of 18 by such student athlete's parent 
        or legal guardian, prior to entering into the agency contract.
          (3) Required language.--The disclosure document must contain, 
        in close proximity to the signature of the student athlete, or, 
        if the student athlete is under the age of 18, the signature of 
        such student athlete's parent or legal guardian, a conspicuous 
        notice in boldface type stating: ``Warning to Student Athlete: 
        If you agree orally or in writing to be represented by an agent 
        now or in the future you may lose your eligibility to compete 
        as a student athlete in your sport. Within 72 hours after 
        entering into this contract or before the next athletic event 
        in which you are eligible to participate, whichever occurs 
        first, both you and the agent by whom you are agreeing to be 
        represented must notify the athletic director of the 
        educational institution at which you are enrolled, or other 
        individual responsible for athletic programs at such 
        educational institution, that you have entered into an agency 
        contract.''.

SEC. 4. ENFORCEMENT.

  (a) Unfair or Deceptive Act or Practice.--A violation of this Act 
shall be treated as a violation of a rule defining an unfair or 
deceptive act or practice prescribed under section 18(a)(1)(B) of the 
Federal Trade Commission Act (15 U.S.C. 57a(a)(1)(B)).
  (b) Actions by the Commission.--The Commission shall enforce this Act 
in the same manner, by the same means, and with the same jurisdiction, 
powers, and duties as though all applicable terms and provisions of the 
Federal Trade Commission Act (15 U.S.C. 41 et seq.) were incorporated 
into and made a part of this Act.

SEC. 5. ACTIONS BY STATES.

  (a) In General.--
          (1) Civil actions.--In any case in which the attorney general 
        of a State has reason to believe that an interest of the 
        residents of that State has been or is threatened or adversely 
        affected by the engagement of any athlete agent in a practice 
        that violates section 3 of this Act, the State may bring a 
        civil action on behalf of the residents of the State in a 
        district court of the United States of appropriate jurisdiction 
        to--
                  (A) enjoin that practice;
                  (B) enforce compliance with this Act;
                  (C) obtain damage, restitution, or other compensation 
                on behalf of residents of the State; or
                  (D) obtain such other relief as the court may 
                consider to be appropriate.
          (2) Notice.--
                  (A) In general.--Before filing an action under 
                paragraph (1), the attorney general of the State 
                involved shall provide to the Commission--
                          (i) written notice of that action; and
                          (ii) a copy of the complaint for that action.
                  (B) Exemption.--Subparagraph (A) shall not apply with 
                respect to the filing of an action by an attorney 
                general of a State under this subsection, if the 
                attorney general determines that it is not feasible to 
                provide the notice described in that subparagraph 
                before filing of the action. In such case, the attorney 
                general of a State shall provide notice and a copy of 
                the complaint to the Commission at the same time as the 
                attorney general files the action.
  (b) Intervention.--
          (1) In general.--On receiving notice under subsection (a)(2), 
        the Commission shall have the right to intervene in the action 
        that is the subject of the notice.
          (2) Effect of intervention.--If the Commission intervenes in 
        an action under subsection (a), it shall have the right--
                  (A) to be heard with respect to any matter that 
                arises in that action; and
                  (B) to file a petition for appeal.
  (c) Construction.--For purposes of bringing any civil action under 
subsection (a), nothing in this title shall be construed to prevent an 
attorney general of a State from exercising the powers conferred on the 
attorney general by the laws of that State to--
          (1) conduct investigations;
          (2) administer oaths or affirmations; or
          (3) compel the attendance of witnesses or the production of 
        documentary and other evidence.
  (d) Actions by the Commission.--In any case in which an action is 
instituted by or on behalf of the Commission for a violation of section 
3, no State may, during the pendency of that action, institute an 
action under subsection (a) against any defendant named in the 
complaint in that action--
  (e) Venue.--Any action brought under subsection (a) may be brought in 
the district court of the United States that meets applicable 
requirements relating to venue under section 1391 of title 28, United 
States Code.
  (f) Service of Process.--In an action brought under subsection (a), 
process may be served in any district in which the defendant--
          (1) is an inhabitant; or
          (2) may be found.

SEC. 6. PROTECTION OF EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTION.

  (a) Notice Required.--Within 72 hours after entering into an agency 
contract or before the next athletic event in which the student athlete 
may participate, whichever occurs first, the athlete agent and the 
student athlete shall each inform the athletic director of the 
educational institution at which the student athlete is enrolled, or 
other individual responsible for athletic programs at such educational 
institution, that the student athlete has entered into an agency 
contract, and the athlete agent shall provide the athletic director 
with notice in writing of such a contract.
  (b) Civil Remedy.--
          (1) In general.--An educational institution has a right of 
        action against an athlete agent for damages caused by a 
        violation of this Act.
          (2) Damages.--Damages of an educational institution may 
        include losses and expenses incurred because, as a result of 
        the conduct of the athlete agent, the educational institution 
        was injured by a violation of this Act or was penalized, 
        disqualified, or suspended from participation in athletics by a 
        national association for the promotion and regulation of 
        athletics, by an athletic conference, or by reasonable self-
        imposed disciplinary action taken to mitigate actions likely to 
        be imposed by such an association or conference.
          (3) Costs and attorneys fees.--In an action taken under this 
        section, the court may award to the prevailing party costs and 
        reasonable attorneys fees.
          (4) Effect on other rights, remedies and defenses.--This 
        section does not restrict the rights, remedies, or defenses of 
        any person under law or equity.

SEC. 7. SENSE OF CONGRESS.

  It is the sense of Congress that States should enact the Uniform 
Athlete Agents Act of 2000 drafted by the National Conference of 
Commissioners on Uniform State Laws, to protect student athletes and 
the integrity of amateur sports from unscrupulous sports agents. In 
particular, it is the sense of Congress that States should enact the 
provisions relating to the registration of sports agents, the required 
form of contract, the right of the student athlete to cancel an agency 
contract, the disclosure requirements relating to record maintenance, 
reporting, renewal, notice, warning, and security, and the provisions 
for reciprocity among the States.

                          PURPOSE AND SUMMARY

    The purpose of H.R. 4701 is to designate certain conduct by 
sports agents related to the signing of contracts to represent 
student athletes as unfair and deceptive acts or practices to 
be regulated by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). 
Additionally, H.R. 4701 provides the states with the authority 
to bring civil action against violators in a district court and 
provides universities with a right of action against the 
athlete agent for damages resulting from a violation of the 
Act.

                  BACKGROUND AND NEED FOR LEGISLATION

    The multimillion-dollar value of professional athlete 
salaries, signing bonuses, and endorsement contracts has 
resulted in a proliferation of unscrupulous practices by some 
sports agents. Unscrupulous agents, or their representatives, 
are willing to break the rules in order to sign promising 
student athletes to an agency contract. Agents are willing to 
do this because the fees that accompany the representation of a 
professional athlete are considerable, and the consequences 
that the agent will suffer in comparison to the athlete or 
school are limited or non-existent.
    Motivated largely by financial gain, unscrupulous agents 
have gone to extreme measures to represent promising student 
athletes with even a remote chance of becoming a professional 
athlete. These agents, or their cohorts--often known as 
``runners''--will use tactics including secret payments to the 
athlete, undisclosed payments to the family or friends of the 
athlete who may be in a position to influence the athlete, 
unrealistic promises, and even pressuring the athlete. In some 
cases, these agents have made the secret payments to student 
athletes or their families, and then black-mailed them into 
signing a contract with the threat that they would disclose the 
infraction of collegiate rules and threaten the student 
athlete's eligibility. These egregious acts go unpunished due 
to the lack of a Federal law, disparate and sometime 
ineffective state laws, and the absence of any laws in many 
states.
    The effect of a student athlete entering into an agency 
contract is generally a forfeiture of collegiate eligibility. 
The college or university may also be subject to various 
sanctions for violation of competition rules if contests were 
played with ineligible athletes. If this occurs, the economic 
impact to the school and the athlete can be substantial. Not 
only can a student athlete lose a scholarship, the university 
can be sanctioned with monetary penalties, loss of 
scholarships, forfeiture of contests, and loss of television 
revenue.
    Currently there is no Federal law that directly addresses 
the actions of these agents. However, a majority of the states 
have a law to regulate athlete agents and/or their conduct, but 
to varying degrees and specificity. Most recently the National 
Conference of Commissioners on Uniform State Laws passed the 
Uniform Athlete's Agent Act (UAAA) in 2000 to provide uniform 
state laws addressing the conduct and practices of athlete 
agents, including registration of agents. It has since been 
adopted by sixteen states and introduced in the legislatures of 
twelve others. Of the states that have not enacted the UAAA, 18 
have existing athlete agent laws while sixteen have no law that 
directly addresses athlete agent conduct. H.R. 4701 will 
provide remedies to protect student athletes and the 
educational institutions, particularly in those states with no 
existing law addressing athlete agent conduct.

                                HEARINGS

    The Subcommittee on Commerce, Trade, and Consumer 
Protection held a hearing on H.R. 4701 on June 5, 2002. The 
Subcommittee received testimony from: The Honorable Tom 
Osborne, U.S. House of Representatives; Mr. Howard Beales, 
Director, Bureau of Consumer Protection, Federal Trade 
Commission; Mr. James Donnelly, Athletic Director, Middle 
Tennessee State University; and Mr. Bill Saum, Director of 
Agent, Gambling, and Amateurism Activities, National Collegiate 
Athletic Association.

                        COMMITTEE CONSIDERATION

    On Wednesday, July 17, 2002, the Subcommittee on Commerce, 
Trade, and Consumer Protection met in open markup session and 
approved H.R. 4701, as amended, for Full Committee 
consideration, by a voice vote, a quorum being present. On 
Wednesday, September 25, 2002, the Full Committee met in open 
markup session and ordered H.R. 4701 favorably reported to the 
House, as amended, by a voice vote, a quorum being present.

                            COMMITTEE VOTES

    Clause 3(b) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires the Committee to list the record votes 
on the motion to report legislation and amendments thereto. 
There were no record votes taken in connection with ordering 
H.R. 4701 reported. A motion by Mr. Tauzin to order H.R. 4701 
reported to the House, as amended, was agreed to by a voice 
vote.

                      COMMITTEE OVERSIGHT FINDINGS

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee held a legislative 
hearing and made findings that are reflected in this report.

         STATEMENT OF GENERAL PERFORMANCE GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

    The goal of H.R. 4701 is to define the prohibited conduct 
employed by individuals to entice or solicit student athletes 
to enter into an agency contract, whether it is a written or 
oral agreement, as well as require written disclosure to the 
student athlete prior to signing a contract and to the 
educational institution after a contract has been entered.

   NEW BUDGET AUTHORITY, ENTITLEMENT AUTHORITY, AND TAX EXPENDITURES

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee finds that H.R. 
4701, the Sports Agent Responsibility and Trust Act, would 
result in no new or increased budget authority, entitlement 
authority, or tax expenditures or revenues.

                        COMMITTEE COST ESTIMATE

    The Committee adopts as its own the cost estimate prepared 
by the Director of the Congressional Budget Office pursuant to 
section 402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974.

                  CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE ESTIMATE

    Pursuant to clause 3(c)(3) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the following is the cost estimate 
provided by the Congressional Budget Office pursuant to section 
402 of the Congressional Budget Act of 1974:

                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                   Washington, DC, October 4, 2002.
Hon. W.J. ``Billy'' Tauzin,
Chairman, Committee on Energy and Commerce,
House of Representatives, Washington, DC.
    Dear Mr. Chairman: The Congressional Budget Office has 
prepared the enclosed cost estimate for H.R. 4701, the Sports 
Agent Responsibility and Trust Act.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contacts are Ken Johnson 
(for federal costs), Angela Seitz (for the state and local 
impact), and Paige Piper/Bach (for the private-sector impact).
            Sincerely,
                                          Barry B. Anderson
                                    (For Dan L. Crippen, Director).
    Enclosure.

H.R. 4701--Sports Agent Responsibility and Trust Act

    H.R. 4701 would impose certain restrictions on contracts 
between sports agents and student athletes. For example, the 
bill would prohibit sports agents from making false promises or 
offering gifts to solicit such a contract. These new rules 
would be enforced by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) through 
civil penalties and by the states.
    CBO estimates that enacting H.R. 4701 would not have a 
significant impact on the federal budget. Based on information 
from the FTC, CBO expects that enforcing H.R. 4701 would take 
place mostly at the state level. Therefore, CBO expects that 
any increase in civil penalties resulting from the enactment of 
H.R. 4701 would be insignificant. (Such penalties are recorded 
in the budget as revenues.) Similarly, we estimate that 
implementing H.R. 4701 would increase the FTC's costs by less 
than $500,000 annually, assuming the availability of 
appropriations.
    H.R. 4701 contains no intergovernmental mandates as defined 
in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) and would impose no 
costs on state, local, or tribal governments.
    H.R. 4701 would impose private-sector mandates, as defined 
by UMRA, on certain sports agents and student athletes. CBO 
estimates that the direct costs of the mandates would fall well 
below the annual threshold established by UMRA for private-
sector mandates ($115 million in 2002, adjusted annually for 
inflation).
    In general, H.R. 4701 would prohibit sports agents from 
recruiting or soliciting a student athlete by giving any false 
or misleading information or making a false promise or 
representation. H.R. 4701 would prohibit a sports agent from 
providing anything of value to a student athlete or anyone 
associated with the athlete before entering into a contract. An 
agent also would be required to provide a student athlete with 
a specific disclosure document before entering into an agency 
contract and could not predate or postdate such a contract. The 
bill also would require a student athlete, or the athlete's 
parents or legal guardian if the student is under the age of 
18, to sign the disclosure document prior to entering into an 
agency contract. In addition, the bill would require the sports 
agent and student athlete to each inform the student's 
educational institution within a specific time that the athlete 
has entered into an agency contract. Based on information from 
government sources, CBO estimates that the direct cost of the 
mandates would fall well below the annual threshold established 
by UMRA for private-sector mandates.
    The CBO staff contacts for this estimate are Ken Johnson 
(for federal costs), Angela Seitz (for the state and local 
impact), and Paige Piper/Bach (for the private-sector impact). 
The estimate was approved by Peter H. Fontaine, Deputy 
Assistant Director for Budget Analysis.

                       FEDERAL MANDATES STATEMENT

    The Committee adopts as its own the estimate of Federal 
mandates prepared by the Director of the Congressional Budget 
Office pursuant to section 423 of the Unfunded Mandates Reform 
Act.

                      ADVISORY COMMITTEE STATEMENT

    No advisory committees within the meaning of section 5(b) 
of the Federal Advisory Committee Act were created by this 
legislation.

                   CONSTITUTIONAL AUTHORITY STATEMENT

    Pursuant to clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee finds that the 
Constitutional authority for this legislation is provided in 
Article I, section 8, clause 3, which grants Congress the power 
to regulate commerce with foreign nations, among the several 
States, and with the Indian tribes.

                  APPLICABILITY TO LEGISLATIVE BRANCH

    The Committee finds that the legislation does not relate to 
the terms and conditions of employment or access to public 
services or accommodations within the meaning of section 
102(b)(3) of the Congressional Accountability Act.

             SECTION-BY-SECTION ANALYSIS OF THE LEGISLATION

Section 1. Short title

    Section 1 designates the legislation as the ``Sports Agents 
Trust and Responsibility Act of 2002.''

Section 2. Definitions

    Section 2 provides definitions for terms incorporated 
throughout H.R. 4701.

Section 3. Regulation of unfair and deceptive acts and practices in 
        connection with the contact between an athlete agent and a 
        student athlete

    Section 3 provides for the regulation of conduct between an 
athlete agent and a student athlete. Subsection (a) defines 
prohibited conduct for an athlete agent to engage in order to 
solicit or recruit a student athlete to enter into an agency 
contract. The legislation makes it unlawful for the athlete 
agent to give materially false or misleading information, to 
make materially false promises or representations, or to 
provide anything of value to the student athlete or anyone 
associated with the student athlete before he or she signs an 
agency contract. Additionally, an athlete agent is prohibited 
from entering into an agency contract with the student athlete 
without providing the student the written disclosure proscribed 
by the Act and from either predating or postdating the 
contract.
    Subsection (b) proscribes the terms of the disclosure 
requirements the athlete agent must provide to the student 
athlete, or to the student athlete's parent or guardian, and 
requires the signature of the student athlete, or the student 
athlete's parent or guardian, prior to entering into the agency 
contract.
    Subsection (b)(3) provides the required language of the 
disclosure document.

Section 4. Enforcement

    Section 4 authorizes the FTC to treat a violation of the 
Act as a violation of FTC rules defining an unfair and 
deceptive act or practice under section 18(a)(1)(B) of the FTC 
Act. This section authorizes the FTC to enforce the Act in the 
same manner and with the same powers and duties it has under 
the FTC Act.

Section 5. Actions by states

    Section 5 provides the authority and parameters for a state 
to bring civil action against a violator of the Act. A state 
attorney general may bring civil action against any person in 
practice that violates any regulation of the Commission 
prescribed under section 3 of this Act in Federal district 
court in order to: (1) enjoin that practice; (2) enforce 
compliance with the regulation; (3) obtain damage, restitution, 
or other compensation; or (4) obtain other relief as the court 
may consider appropriate.
    An attorney of the state filing an action under this Act 
must first provide a written notice of the action and a copy of 
the complaint to the FTC, unless it is not feasible in which 
case it must be provided to the FTC at the same time as the 
action is filed.
    Subsection (b) provides the FTC with the authority to 
intervene in any action brought by a state under this Act. If 
the Commission intervenes, it maintains the right to be heard 
and the right to file a petition for appeal.
    Subsection (c) provides that an action brought under 
subsection (a) by an attorney general shall not prevent the 
attorney general from exercising the powers provided by any 
other laws of the state.
    Subsection (d) stipulates that no state may institute an 
action under subsection (a) while an action instituted by or on 
behalf of the Commission is pending.
    Subsection (e) provides that an action brought by an 
attorney general of a state under subsection (a) may be brought 
in a district court of the United States that meets the venue 
requirements.
    Subsection (f) provides the terms under which process may 
be served in an action brought under subsection (a).

Section 6. Protection of the educational institution

    Section 6 provides safeguards and remedies for educational 
institutions.
    Subsection (a) provides for written notification by the 
student athlete, and the athlete agent, to the athletic 
director or appropriate individual responsible for athletic 
programs of the educational institution. The notification that 
an agency contract has been entered into must be within 72 
hours after entering into the contract or before the next 
athletic contest in which the student athlete may participate, 
whichever occurs first.
    Subsection (b) provides an educational institution with 
civil remedy, including a right of action against an athlete 
agent for damages resulting from a violation of this Act.

Section 7. Sense of Congress

    Section 7 expresses the sense of Congress that the States 
should enact the Uniform Athlete Agent Act of 2000 to protect 
student athletes and the integrity of amateur sports from 
unscrupulous sports agents.