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107th Congress 
 2d Session             HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES                 Report
                                                                107-803
_______________________________________________________________________
                                                 Union Calendar No. 504

                     LEGISLATIVE REVIEW ACTIVITIES

                                 OF THE

                  COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

                               __________

                      ONE HUNDRED SEVENTH CONGRESS

                               __________

                                A REPORT

FILED PURSUANT TO SECTION 136 OF THE LEGISLATIVE REORGANIZATION ACT OF 
  1946 (2 U.S.C. 190d), AS AMENDED BY SECTION 118 OF THE LEGISLATIVE 
 REORGANIZATION ACT OF 1970 (PUBLIC LAW 91-510), AS AMENDED BY PUBLIC 
                               LAW 92-136

[GRAPHIC(S) NOT AVAILABLE IN TIFF FORMAT]


January 2, 2003.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed









                  COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
                COMMITTEE MEMBERSHIP 1, 3, 5

                   HENRY J. HYDE, Illinois, Chairman
BENJAMIN A. GILMAN, New York         TOM LANTOS, California
JAMES A. LEACH, Iowa                 HOWARD L. BERMAN, California
DOUG BEREUTER, Nebraska              GARY L. ACKERMAN, New York
CHRISTOPHER H. SMITH, New Jersey     ENI F. H. FALEOMAVAEGA, American 
DAN BURTON, Indiana                      Samoa
ELTON GALLEGLY, California           DONALD M. PAYNE, New Jersey
ILEANA ROS-LEHTINEN, Florida         ROBERT MENENDEZ, New Jersey
CASS BALLENGER, North Carolina       SHERROD BROWN, Ohio
DANA ROHRABACHER, California         CYNTHIA A. McKINNEY, Georgia
EDWARD R. ROYCE, California          EARL F. HILLIARD, Alabama
PETER T. KING, New York              BRAD SHERMAN, California
STEVE CHABOT, Ohio                   ROBERT WEXLER, Florida
AMO HOUGHTON, New York               JIM DAVIS, Florida
JOHN McHUGH, New York                ELIOT L. ENGEL, New York 
JOHN COOKSEY, Louisiana                  2
THOMAS G. TANCREDO, Colorado         WILLIAM D. DELAHUNT, Massachusetts
RON PAUL, Texas                      GREGORY W. MEEKS, New York
NICK SMITH, Michigan                 BARBARA LEE, California
JOSEPH R. PITTS, Pennsylvania        JOSEPH CROWLEY, New York
DARRELL E. ISSA, California          JOSEPH M. HOEFFEL, Pennsylvania
ERIC CANTOR, Virginia                EARL BLUMENAUER, Oregon
JEFF FLAKE, Arizona                  SHELLEY BERKLEY, Nevada
BRIAN D. KERNS, Indiana              GRACE NAPOLITANO, California 
JO ANN DAVIS, Virginia                   4
MARK GREEN, Wisconsin 6   ADAM B. SCHIFF, California
                                     DIANE E. WATSON, California
         Thomas E. Mooney, Sr., Chief of Staff/General Counsel
               Robert R. King, Democratic Staff Director
1 Rep. Rothman resigned from the Committee on 2/7/01.
2 Rep. Engel was appointed to the Committee 2/27/01.
3 Rep. Hastings resigned from the Committee on 6/19/01.
4 Rep. Watson was appointed to the Committee on 6/19/01.
5 Rep. Burr resigned from the Committee on 2/19/02.
6 Rep. Green was appointed to the Committee 2/26/02.













                         LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

                              ----------                              

                          House of Representatives,
                      Committee on International Relations,
                                 Washington, D.C., January 2, 2003.
Hon. Jeff Trandahl,
Clerk of the House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.
    Dear Mr. Trandahl: I enclose herewith a report of the 
Legislative Review Activities of the Committee on International 
Relations for the 107th Congress in accordance with section 136 
of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946, as amended by 
section 118 of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970, as 
amended by Public Law 92-136.
    With best wishes,
            Sincerely,

                                   Henry J. Hyde, Chairman.







                                FOREWORD

                              ----------                              

                          House of Representatives,
                      Committee on International Relations,
                                 Washington, D.C., January 2, 2003.
    Under rule X of the Rules of the House of Representatives 
and section 136 of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1946, 
the Committee on International Relations is authorized to 
exercise continuous surveillance of the execution by the 
executive branch of laws within the committee's jurisdiction. 
The review of ``oversight'' activities of the Committee on 
International Relations was augmented by the adoption of 
section 118 of the Legislative Reorganization Act of 1970 
(Public Law 91-150), as amended by Public Law 92-136. This 
provision requires standing committees of the House and the 
Senate after January 1, 1973, to make reports to their 
respective Houses on their activities in reviewing and studying 
the ``application, administration, and execution of those laws 
or parts of laws, the subject of which is within the 
jurisdiction of that committee.''
    House committees are required to file such reports ``not 
later than January 2 of each odd-numbered year.'' It is in 
fulfillment of the obligation of the Committee on International 
Relations to account to the House for its legislative review 
activities during the 107th Congress that this report has been 
prepared and submitted.
    The report was prepared by Laura L. Rush, Legislative 
Coordinator for the Committee.















                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Foreword.........................................................     V
Letter of Transmittal............................................   III
  I. Introduction: Oversight in the foreign affairs field.............1
          A. Authorities for legislative review..................     1
          B. Oversight developments in the Committee on 
              International Relations............................     3
          C. Oversight activities and criteria...................     5
          D. Oversight Activities of the Committee--107th 
              Congress...........................................     6
 II. General review activities of the committee......................17
          A. Executive branch reports............................    17
          B. Reference documents:
              1. Legislation on Foreign Relations................    17
              2. Legislative Calendar............................    17
          C. Study missions and participation in international 
              conferences and events.............................    18
III. Summaries of legislative activities by the committee............18
 IV. List of hearings and markups by full committee and subcommittees26
          A. Full committee......................................    26
          B. Subcommittee on Africa..............................    32
          C. Subcommittee on East Asia and the Pacific...........    34
          D. Subcommittee on Europe..............................    35
          E. Subcommittee on International Operations and Human 
              Rights.............................................    37
          F. Subcommittee on the Middle East and South Asia......    40
          G. Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere..............    42
          H. Protocol Meetings...................................    43
Appendixes:
  I. Witnesses before full committee and subcommittees during the 107th 
     Congress........................................................49
          A. Congressional.......................................    49
          B. Executive Branch....................................    50
          C. Non-Governmental....................................    55
 II. Committee Origins and History...................................69
III. Members of the subcommittees of the Committee on International 
     Relations (107th Congress)......................................73
 IV. Chairmen of the House International Relations Committee.........75









                                                 Union Calendar No. 504
107th Congress                                                   Report
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 2d Session                                                     107-803
======================================================================
 
                     LEGISLATIVE REVIEW ACTIVITIES

                                _______
                                

January 2, 2003.--Committed to the Committee of the Whole House on the 
              State of the Union and ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Hyde, from the Committee on International Relations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

        I. INTRODUCTION: OVERSIGHT IN THE FOREIGN AFFAIRS FIELD


                 A. Authorities for Legislative Review

    The responsibilities and potentialities of legislative 
review are reflected in the multiple authorities which are 
available to the Committee on International Relations. The most 
prominent is section 118 of the Legislative Reorganization Act 
of 1970 (Public Law 91-510):

 Legislative Review by Standing Committees of the Senate and House of 
                            Representatives

    (a) Scope of assistance.
    In order to assist the Congress in--
          (1) Its analysis, appraisal, and evaluation of the 
        application, administration, and execution of the laws 
        enacted by the Congress, and
          (2) Its formulation, consideration, and enactment of 
        such modifications of or changes in those laws, and of 
        such additional legislation, as may be necessary or 
        appropriate, each standing committee of the Senate and 
        the House of Representatives shall review and study, on 
        a continuing basis, the application, administration, 
        and execution of those laws, or parts of laws, the 
        subject matter of which is within the jurisdiction of 
        that committee. Such committees may carry out the 
        required analysis, appraisals, and evaluation 
        themselves, or by contract, or may require a Government 
        agency to do so and furnish a report thereon to the 
        Congress. Such committees may rely on such techniques 
        as pilot testing, analysis of costs in comparison with 
        benefits, or provision for evaluation after a defined 
        period of time.\1\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \1\ Section 701 of the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Control 
Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-344) amended the original mandate and 
authority of the 1970 act by adding the last two sentences regarding 
program review and evaluation.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    A second type of authority fostering legislative review is 
the special oversight granted by the House Committee Reform 
Amendments of 1974 (H. Res. 988, approved Oct. 8, 1974). 
Special oversight, which is intended to enable committees to 
conduct comprehensive oversight of matters directly bearing 
upon their specified responsibilities even if those matters 
fall within the jurisdiction of other standing committees, 
permits an expansion of the legislative review jurisdiction of 
a committee. The Committee on International Relations currently 
has special oversight jurisdiction in four areas under clause 
3(d) of House Rule X.
          3. (d) The Committee on International Relations shall 
        have the function of reviewing and studying, on a 
        continuing basis, all laws, programs, and Government 
        activities dealing with or involving customs 
        administration, intelligence activities relating to 
        foreign policy, international financial and monetary 
        organizations, and international fishing agreements.
    Frequently reporting requirements in legislation obligate 
various agencies, directly or through the President, to submit 
reports of certain activities to the Committee on International 
Relations to the Speaker of the House, who then transmits them 
to the committee. The House Committee on International 
Relations is the recipient of one of the largest quantities of 
required reports from the executive branch.
    In addition to the authorities noted above, the 
congressional budget process provides the committee with 
another important tool for oversight. Pursuant to section 
301(c) of the Congressional Budget and Impoundment Act of 1974, 
each standing committee of the House is required to submit to 
the Committee on the Budget, no later than March 15 of each 
year, a report containing its views and estimates on the 
President's proposed budget for the coming fiscal year. This 
requirement affords the committee and its subcommittees the 
opportunity to review those items in the President's budget 
which fall under the committee's jurisdiction, and to establish 
possible guidelines for subsequent action on authorizing 
legislation.
    A final authority which can have an impressive oversight 
impact is implicit in the authorization process. Regular and 
frequent reauthorization of programs or agency operations by 
committees presents the opportunity to investigate 
administrative personnel hiring and promotion practices, agency 
organization, employee development and benefit programs, policy 
guidance, and administrative rules and regulations regarding 
the implementation and execution of policy, among other items. 
The authorization process also permits program evaluation, an 
important oversight technique.
    The legislative review activities of the Committee on 
International Relations are sanctioned by various and extensive 
authorities--the basic mandate of the 1970 Legislative 
Reorganization Act, the broadened jurisdiction and special 
oversight provided by the House Committee Reform Amendments of 
1974, statutory reporting requirements, and the authorization 
process.

 B. Oversight Developments in the Committee on International Relations

    During the 95th Congress, the committee received 
jurisdictional authority over export controls involving 
nonproliferation of nuclear technology and nuclear hardware, 
and international commodity agreements involving cooperation in 
the export of nuclear technology and nuclear hardware. This new 
jurisdictional authority was provided for by House Resolution 
5, which passed the House on January 4, 1977.
    In the 96th Congress, the committee's jurisdiction was not 
enlarged. However, the committee in its organization for the 
96th Congress reduced the number of subcommittees from nine to 
eight. Deleted was the Subcommittee on International 
Development whose jurisdiction included: (1) dealing with the 
Agency for International Development and other U.S. 
agencies'operations affecting development; (2) administration of 
foreign assistance; (3) oversight of multilateral assistance programs; 
(4) population and food programs; and (5) legislation and oversight 
with respect to the Peace Corps, which was subsumed by the full 
committee. The subcommittees for the 96th Congress, representing a mix 
of geographical and functional responsibilities, were as follows: 
Subcommittee on International Security and Scientific Affairs; 
Subcommittee on International Operations; Subcommittee on Europe and 
the Middle East; Subcommittee on International Economic Policy and 
Trade; Subcommittee on Asian and Pacific Affairs; Subcommittee on 
Inter-American Affairs; Subcommittee on Africa; and Subcommittee on 
International Organizations.
    In the 97th Congress, the subcommittees remained the same 
with the exception of the Subcommittee on International 
Organizations, whose name was changed to the Subcommittee on 
Human Rights and International Organizations, in order to 
delineate clearly its jurisdiction over the subject of human 
rights.
    In the 98th Congress, the subcommittees remained the same; 
however, the name of the Subcommittee on Inter-American Affairs 
was changed to the Subcommittee on Western Hemisphere Affairs. 
In addition, a special task force was created under the aegis 
of the full committee, the Task Force on International 
Narcotics Control. The purpose of this task force was to 
provide oversight of narcotics-related developments and 
programs over which the committee has jurisdiction pursuant to 
rule X of the Rules of the House, which included the following:
    Narcotics control programs conducted by the Department of 
State; Narcotics-related projects carried out by the Agency for 
International Development (AID); Overseas activities of the 
Drug Enforcement Agency (DEA), the Department of Defense; and 
the U.S. Customs Service; Narcotics control programs carried 
out by international organizations; Intelligence issues related 
to narcotics trafficking and control; Prisoner exchange 
programs and their impact on U.S. narcotics control efforts; 
Narcotics interdiction programs and agreement; Narcotics-
related efforts by the U.S. Information Agency; and 
Relationship between international banking/financial 
transactions and narcotics trafficking.
    Because of the importance of narcotics control issues, the 
Task Force was reconstituted every six months through the 102nd 
Congress.
    Subcommittee structure remained the same for the 99th 
Congress; however, the name of the Subcommittee on 
International Security and Scientific Affairs was changed to 
the Subcommittee on Arms Control, International Security and 
Science. This change was made to reflect the committee's and 
subcommittee's concern over the important issue of arms 
control. The jurisdiction of the subcommittee was redefined in 
the rules of the Committee on Foreign Affairs to read, ``To 
deal with * * * all aspects of arms control and disarmament 
with particular emphasis on the investigation and evaluation of 
arms control and disarmament proposals and concepts; * * *''.
    Under the Rules of the House, the Committee on 
International Relations has jurisdiction over issues involving 
international terrorism pursuant to rule X of the Rules of the 
House, paragraphs (I)(1), (I)(4-10), and (I)(12-16). For the 
99th Congress, two subcommittee jurisdictional changes were 
made to reflect the committee's concern with international 
terrorism. The Subcommittee on Arms Control, International 
Security and Science was given jurisdiction over ``* * * 
international terrorism with special focus on the U.S. 
Government's policies and programs for combating international 
terrorist movements and actions; * * *''. The Subcommittee on 
International Operations jurisdictional responsibility was 
redefined to include ``* * * international terrorism with 
special emphasis on policies and programs relating to the 
enhancement for embassy security and the protection of U.S. 
personnel and institutions abroad; * * *''.
    In addition, two subcommittees had language added to their 
respective definitions providing responsibility for oversight 
of international communication and information policy. Lastly, 
the Subcommittee on Human Rights and International 
Organizations was given the responsibility for international 
law.
    No changes were made in subcommittee structure or 
jurisdiction for the 100th, 101st, or 102nd Congresses.
    In the 103rd Congress, the Committee was required by the 
Rules of the Democratic Caucus to reduce the number of 
subcommittees from eight to six. However, due to concern about 
retaining a subcommittee with exclusive focus on Africa, the 
Committee received a waiver of Rule 35(B) of the Democratic 
Caucus and retained seven subcommittees. The Subcommittee on 
Arms Control, International Security, and Science, and the 
Subcommittee on Human Rights and International Organizations 
were merged to create the Subcommittee on International 
Security, International Organizations, and Human Rights. The 
jurisdiction of that subcommittee was essentially a merger of 
the jurisdictions of the two subcommittees. However, specific 
reference to ``* * * law enforcement issues to include 
terrorism and narcotics control programs and activities * * *'' 
was added to the jurisdiction of the subcommittee, thereby 
consolidating all jurisdiction over narcotics and terrorism in 
one subcommittee. The Committee also added specific reference 
to environmental issues to the jurisdiction of the Subcommittee 
on International Economic Policy and Trade and changed the name 
of the subcommittee to the Subcommittee on Economic Policy, 
Trade, and Environment to reflect that addition. In addition, 
jurisdiction over the operating expenses of the Agency for 
International Development and the Arms Control and Disarmament 
Agency was added to the Subcommittee on International 
Operations. Finally, the Committee made minor conforming 
changes to the names of two of its regional subcommittees.
    In the 104th Congress, pursuant to H. Res. 6, passed 
January 4, 1995, the name of the Committee was changed from 
``Foreign Affairs'' to ``International Relations''. In 
addition, the number of subcommittees was decreased from seven 
to five. The Subcommittee on International Security, 
International Organizations, and Human Rights, and the 
Subcommittee on Europe and the Middle East were dissolved. The 
Europe and Middle East Subcommittee jurisdiction was reabsorbed 
by the full Committee. The Subcommittee on Economic Policy, 
Trade, and Environment dropped ``environment'' from its title, 
returning its name to the ``Subcommittee on International 
Economic Policy and Trade.'' The Subcommittee on International 
Security, International Organizations, and Human Rights and the 
Subcommittee on International Operations were combined, with a 
name change to ``Subcommittee on International Operations and 
Human Rights''.
    No changes were made in subcommittee structure or 
jurisdiction for the 105th or 106th Congresses.
    In the 107th Congress, the Committee on International 
Relations gained a subcommittee, making the total number of 
subcommittees six. Three of the Subcommittees remained the 
same: Africa; International Operations and Human Rights; and 
Western Hemisphere. The three new subcommittees were: East Asia 
and the Pacific; Europe; and Middle East and South Asia.

                  C. Oversight Activities and Criteria

    The oversight activities of the Committee on International 
Relations include a variety of instruments and mechanisms--full 
committee and subcommittee hearings, members' and staff study 
missions abroad, special Congressional Research Service 
studies, and General Accounting Office assistance and reports 
in the field of international relations.
    Committee and subcommittee hearings may be conducted for 
numerous purposes and may simultaneously serve more than one 
function, i.e., oversight, legislation, or public education. 
Thus, oversight may exist even when the hearing is not 
explicitly intended for that purpose. The criteria for 
determining whether a hearing performs the oversight function 
were identified by the House Select Committee on Committees in 
1973 and are as follows: \2\
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    \2\ U.S. Congress, House. Select Committee on Committees. Committee 
Reform Amendments of 1974. Report, 93rd Congress, 2d session, March 21, 
1974 (H. Rept. 93-916, Part II).
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
    (1) To review and control unacceptable forms of 
bureaucratic behavior;
    (2) To ensure that bureaucracy implements the policy 
objectives of the Congress;
    (3) To analyze national and international problems 
requiring Federal action; and
    (4) To determine the effectiveness of legislative programs 
and policies.
    These same purposes help to define other committee activity 
which relates to its legislative review function. It should be 
noted that not all such activity can be included in this 
report. Oversight may occur informally, not only through the 
formal processes and mechanisms noted above. Informal 
discussions between committee members and executive branch 
officials may constitute oversight in certain instances as may 
staff examination of agency activity and behavior and staff 
consultation with agency personnel apart from the normal 
hearing process.
    In summary, the legislative review activities of the House 
Committee on International Relations for the 107th Congress 
rely on extensive authorities embodied in the Legislative 
Reorganization Act of 1970 and reinforced through the 
authorization process, subsequent legislation, and reporting 
requirements.

 D. Oversight Activities of the Committee on International Relations--
                             107th Congress

    The following section is set out in compliance with Clause 
(1)(d)(3) of Rule X.
    Almost all of the Committee's day-to-day activities, 
including hearings and informal meetings, involve oversight of 
the Administration or afford the Committee the opportunity to 
learn of the impact of the Administration's foreign policy on 
foreign nations or the American people.
    The Committee's Oversight Plan is set out below in full. 
Although the Committee did not accomplish each and every 
planned oversight item, most of them were accomplished to some 
degree, some with hearings, others by way of staff work.

(Adopted by the Committee, February 14, 2001)

          Committee on International Relations Oversight Plan

    Rule X, clause 2(d) of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires that each standing Committee adopt an 
oversight plan for the two-year period of the Congress and to 
submit the plan to the Committees on Government Reform and 
House Administration not later than February 15 of the first 
session of the Congress. Rule XI, clause 1(d) requires that the 
Committee report, at the end of each Congress, on the 
recommendations made with respect to its oversight plan and any 
recommendations made or actions taken thereon.
    This is the oversight plan of the Committee on 
International Relations for the 107th Congress. It includes the 
areas in which the Committee hopes to conduct oversight during 
this Congress. As the Committee's priorities change, the 
oversight work of the Committee may change. The fact that an 
issue is listed here does not mean that the Committee will 
necessarily hold a formal meeting devoted solely to that issue. 
The Committee, in the course of its oversight work, may also 
rely on briefings, member and staff travel, and investigations. 
It is the intention of the Committee that, wherever 
practicable, oversight activities will be planned on a 
bipartisan basis.

I. General

    A. Meetings with foreign political leaders. The Committee's 
ongoing program of informal and formal meetings with foreign 
political leaders gives it the opportunity to explore the 
effectiveness of United States foreign policy.
    B. Meetings with Administration officials. The Committee's 
formal and informal meetings with Administration officials 
allows Members and staff to explore the effectiveness of the 
Administration's implementation of foreign policy.

II. International Security/UN/Peacekeeping/General

    A. Oversight of arms transfer procedures and legislation, 
including implementation of previous laws and modifications 
made to the AECA regarding arms transfers. Review of specific 
major proposed arms sales including helicopters to Turkey, and 
F-16s to Chile. Review of the Taiwan Relations Act to ensure 
effective implementation. Review efforts to negotiate 
multilateral ``Code of Conduct'' regarding conventional arms 
transfers. Review newly-enacted law establishing a government-
to-government arms sales end-use monitoring program.
    B. Export Controls--Review of the Administration's efforts 
to promote the Defense Trade and Security Initiative (DTSI) and 
other efforts to promote defense cooperation and integration 
among friendly countries. Review of policies regarding exports 
of supercomputers. Review of munitions control list including 
exports of commercial communication satellites.
    C. Peacekeeping oversight including Administration policy 
implementing existing Presidential Decision Directives on 
peacekeeping; supporting new peacekeeping operations and 
terminating existing missions; U.N. Peacekeeping Reform; 
command and control issues; special attention to the status of 
the international peacekeeping effort in Kosovo, Bosnia, Africa 
(particularly Sierra Leone, Democratic Republic of the Congo, 
Eritrea-Ethiopia), East Timor, and the Middle East.
    D. ``Rogue Regimes''--Review of the problems of security 
threats from so-called ``rogue regimes'' that have or could 
gain the power to create or use weapons of mass destruction, 
including but not limited to Iraq, Iran, and North Korea.
    E. Nunn-Lugar program--Review implementation of program 
aimed at dismantlement and destruction of nuclear, chemical, 
and biological weapons in the former Soviet Union Review of 
National/International Missile Defense and its relationship to 
U.S. relations with allies, Russia, China and others; its 
impact ob long-germ U.S. security and nonproliferation goals 
and other related issues.
    F. National Missile Defense--overall review of foreign 
policy aspects including review of the Anti-Ballistic Missile 
(ABM) Treaty and Demarcation and Multilateralization and other 
proposed amendments to the treaty.
    G. Compliance with existing arms control agreements 
including the Conventional Forces in Europe (CFE) Treaty and 
START treaties and review of agreements to which the U.S. is 
not party including the Comprehensive Test Ban (CTBT) Treaty 
and the Land Mine Ban Treaty.
    H. Review of nonproliferation sanctions regimes.
    I. Other nonproliferation and disarmament topics:
          1. Effectiveness of International Atomic Energy 
        Agency (IAEA), particularly with respect to its role in 
        the Democratic People's Republic of Korea.
          2. Status of Fissile Material Production Ban.
          3. Review effectiveness of existing and proposed 
        nuclear weapon free zones in Latin America, the South 
        Pacific, Africa, South Asia, and Southeast Asia.
          4. Review of bilateral non-proliferation and arms 
        control agreements with Russia and specific oversight 
        of efforts by the U.S. and Russia to curtail exports of 
        sensitive military technologies to Iran and other 
        states; assessment of Iran's nuclear capabilities and a 
        review of the need for legislation to address these 
        problems; implementation of Iran Nonproliferation Act.
          5. Review of programs regarding the disposition and 
        elimination of excess weapons-grade plutonium stores 
        worldwide.
          6. The status of the land mine treaty ban and U.S. 
        efforts to develop alternative landmine technologies.
          7. Implementation of the U.S.-China Nuclear 
        Cooperation Agreement.
          8. Implementation of U.S. sanctions laws regarding 
        weapons of mass destruction and missiles.
          9. Review of South Asia and sanctions issues.
    J. Security Assistance--Review overall effectiveness and 
implementation of security assistance programs including 
foreign military financing (FMF), economic support fund (ESF), 
international military education and training (IMET), anti-
terrorism, and the newly authorized account for non-
proliferation and export control assistance. Review of 
``Reinvention of the Foreign Military Sales (FMS) Program'' by 
DSCA. Specific programs requiring additional oversight include 
security assistance for new NATO member states and Middle East 
states.
    K. Implementation of UN reform/arrearages legislation and 
progress of international organization reform efforts. review 
of U.S. policies promoting the hiring of Americans by the UN 
and other international organizations.
    L. International crime issues:
          1. Russian organized crime, and the international 
        response to it, as well as its impact on American and 
        other investment in the Russia and elsewhere
          2. Impact of U.S. foreign assistance in the rule of 
        law and anticorruption areas on U.S. ability to combat 
        international crime
          3. International criminal organizations in Africa and 
        implementation of plans for an International Law 
        Enforcement Academy for Africa in Botswana.
    M. Oversight of agency implementation of the Government 
Performance and Results Act (``GPRA'').
    N. Narcotics oversight.
          1. The emerging heroin crisis and the 
        Administration's plans for dealing with it.
          2. Source nations strategy, with special attention to 
        Colombia and Peru.
          3. Eradication efforts and their effectiveness; 
        alternative development.
          4. The ``certification process'' and the annual drug 
        certification determinations for the major drug 
        producing and transit nations around the globe.
          5. Plans for riverine interdiction program.
          6. Aggressive oversight of the war on drugs in the 
        hemisphere and of the Administration's implementation 
        of the major portions of H.R. 4300 of the 105th 
        Congress known as ``The Western Hemisphere Drug 
        Elimination Act,'' including a focus on the provision 
        and use of helicopters in Columbia to eradicate opium 
        production.
          7. Efforts to avoid disruption of U.S. 
        counternarcotics operations as a result of the 
        scheduled termination of the U.S. military presence in 
        Panama after December 31, 1999.
    O. Terrorism/espionage oversight.
          1. The AMIA (Buenos Aries Jewish Community building) 
        bombing and the emerging threat of Islamic-
        fundamentalist based terrorism in Latin America.
          2. Effectiveness of the U.S. technological response 
        to terrorism.
          3. Border security programs, to include overseas visa 
        lookout system in the light of the new provisions of 
        law relative to the exclusion of aliens on membership 
        in foreign terrorist organizations.
          4. Security of U.S. government facilities abroad.
          5. Oversight and evaluation of the State Department's 
        post-East Africa terrorist bombings security program 
        plans and expenditure of the monies provided by the 
        105th Congress to increase post security around the 
        globe. This oversight to include review of personnel 
        increases and asset management to minimize cost of 
        property acquisition.
    P. Effectiveness and expansion of Multilateral export 
controls, including international code of conduct for arms 
sales: Role of Waassenar export control arrangement and other 
international fora.
    Q. Monitor U.S. policy position on the 2001 election of the 
UN Secretary General.

III. State Department and related agencies operations

    A. Review of smaller international organizations to which 
the U.S. belongs.
    B. Overseas property management, including a hearing on 
management of the Office of Foreign Buildings; expenditures of 
supplemental funds; progress on asset management (property 
disposal and acquisitions); review of supplemental spending 
plan.
    C. Management of the Foreign Affairs agencies' workforce: 
Implementation and development of staffing models, including 
review of the future of the Foreign Service, personnel 
practices, and management of overseas presence; assignment 
process; utilization of the civil service; size of the senior 
foreign service and senior executive service.
    D. American Institute in Taiwan (general oversight).
    E. International Border Commissions.
    F. Hearing with the Secretary of State on the FY 2002 
budget and authorization issues, including GPRA issues, 
supplemental spending plans, public diplomacy and 
reorganization plans etc.
    G. Review of the separation of the International 
Broadcasting function and the organizational structure of the 
newly independent agency. Review language service modernization 
plans. Also review quality control issues of VOA and RFE/RL and 
the Broadcasting Board of Governors responsibility to assure 
broadcasts are of the highest quality.
    H. Review of management of worldwide refugee programs and 
emergency response capability.
    I. Oversight of the jointly managed Diplomatic 
Telecommunications Service and new legislation enacted in the 
106th Congress.
    J. Review practice and procedures for receiving foreign 
parliamentarians.
    K. Review of exchange program issues respecting 
coordination and overlap, competition for management of the 
Fulbright program, mission planning on exchange participants.
    L. Review of the linkage of resources to foreign policy 
objectives.
    M. Review of public diplomacy programs and issues arising 
from the consolidation of now conducted by the United States 
Information Agency.
    N. Review implementation of the Intercountry Adoption Act.
    O. Review Office of Children's Services with emphasis on 
services related to abducted and adopted children.
    P. Progress on modernizing information management systems, 
including connectivity between computer systems within overseas 
mission and between U.S. and overseas systems.
    Q. Review of implementation of key Overseas Presence 
Advisory Panel recommendations.

IV. Foreign Assistance Oversight

    A. Review cost, management, donor coordination and impact 
of U.S. foreign assistance programs. Special emphasis will be 
given to major aid programs in:
          1. Eastern Europe.
          2. The New Independent States of the former Soviet 
        Union.
          3. Drug-producing countries.
          4. Haiti.
          5. Africa.
          6. Activities that are research and promotional in 
        character relating to international cooperation on 
        environmental and other scientific issues.
          7. Review of implementation of the Northern European 
        Initiative and the Northern Europe Cross-Border 
        Cooperation Act, especially environmental issues 
        related to decommissioned Russian nuclear submarines.
    B. Review size, purpose and effectiveness of FY2002 and 
FY2003 International Affairs Function 150 budgets. Special 
emphasis will be given to expected Administration initiatives, 
such as:
          1. Increased aid to the NIS.
          2. Increases in the Economic Support Fund program.
    C. Conduct special review of programs with noted problems 
focusing on activities highlighted in AID Inspector General and 
GAO reports. Special emphasis will be given to AID--
          1. Missions and Operations.
          2. Microenterprise Programs.
          3. AID's New Management System.
          4. Strategic Objectives.
          5. Enterprise Fund Management.
          6. The ``R4'' (``Review of Resources, Requirements, 
        and Results'') process.
          7. Oversight of HIV/AIDS and other infectious disease 
        initiative oversight.
          8. Oversight of ``monetization'' programs.
    D. Special attention will be given to the effectiveness of 
programs that have consumed large amounts of Congressional 
attention in recent years, including:
          1. U.S. participation in and contributions to 
        international population planning activities and 
        related programs and policies.
          2. U.S. participation in and contributions to 
        international child survival activities and related 
        programs and policies.
          3. Review of refugee and migration assistance 
        programs and administrative expenses of the bureau 
        charged with carrying out the purposes of the Migration 
        and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962.
    E. Tour of world-wide progress of democracy; review 
efficiency and effectiveness of USG funded democracy programs; 
review support for the democratic opposition in Iraq.

V. Review of Anticorruption foreign assistance programs and other 
        programs designed to reduce corruption in foreign countries

VI. Europe

    A. Periodic reviews of the region with the Assistant 
Secretary of State for European Affairs.
    B. Review of U.S. policy towards Russia and other states of 
the former Soviet Union.
    C. Oversight of SEED Act assistance programs.
    D. Enterprise Funds in Eastern Europe and the NIS.
    E. Developments in the Baltic Region (to assess U.S. 
interests, policy and events in the Baltic states and the 
surrounding region).
    F. Developments in and U.S. policy toward Serbia & 
Montenegro and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, 
including developments at the International Criminal Tribunal 
for the Former Yugoslavia.
    G. New Independent States:
          1. Oversight of FREEDOM Support Act assistance 
        program, Nunn-Lugar Enhanced Threat Reduction 
        Initiative Assistance program, and other programs of 
        assistance by agencies such as USIA and DOE in the New 
        Independent States.
          2. U.S.-Russian relations.
          3. Democratic reform and the independence of media in 
        Russia.
          4. Assessing Russian foreign policy objectives.
          5. Russian relations with China.
          6. Developments in and examinations of U.S. policy 
        toward the Western New Independent States of the former 
        Soviet Union--Ukraine, Belarus and Moldova.
          7. Developments in Armenia, including the status and 
        policy assessment of the conflict over the region of 
        Nagorono-Karabakh.
          8. Developments in Russia as well as an examination 
        into Russian military deployments in the other New 
        Independent States.
          9. Oversight of debt rescheduling through Paris Club.
          10. Review of NATO Enlargement process and related 
        legislation, as well as other NATO-related issues, 
        including internal restructuring of the Alliance.
    H. U.S.-E.U. relations (political, security, trade and 
financial issues; European monetary union; and the process of 
European integration; unilateral imposition of design standards 
on imports; government enforcement of private regulations 
(``co-regulation''); transparency in European rulemaking and 
legislating).
    I. Review of developments in and U.S. policy toward Bosnia 
and Kosovo.
    J. Review of Cyprus.
    K. Review of Northern Ireland.
    L. Examination of U.S. policy towards the East European 
States.
    M. Examination of U.S. policy towards Southeast Europe: 
Romania, Bulgaria and Macedonia.
    N. Status of British and French war debt.

VII. Middle East/South Asia

    A. Periodic reviews of the region with the Assistant 
Secretary of State for Near Eastern Affairs and the Assistant 
Secretary for South Asia.
    B. Review of U.S. policy toward Iraq, including the 
implementation of the Iraq Liberation Act of 1998 and 
outstanding claims by U.S. nationals against Iraq.
    C. Review of U.S. policy, relations, and sanctions towards 
Iran with focus on the role of the Iran Libya Sanctions Act and 
the issues that need to be addressed in its possible 
reauthorization.
    D. Review of Middle East peace process and related 
assistance, including the need for a program authorizing 
regional people-to-people programs.
    E. Review of Gulf policy (Saudi Arabia and Gulf Cooperation 
Council states).
    F. Review of Iranian foreign policy objectives in the 
Middle East.
    G. Review of U.S. economic assistance to countries in the 
region.
    H. Review of U.S. economic interests, and economic 
development in the Middle East and North.
    I. Review of U.S. military assistance and related programs.
    J. Review of Peace Corps policies and activities.
    K. The future of embassy security in Israel, Lebanon, 
Syria, and Qatar.
    L. Review of potential U.S. involvement in international 
peacekeeping in the Jordan Valley.
    M. Foreign Assistance Oversight--review cost, management, 
donor coordination and impact of U.S. foreign assistance 
programs, with special emphasis on West Bank/Gaza, Jordan, 
Lebanon, and Egypt.
    N. Progress on moving the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to 
Jerusalem.
    O. Oversight of U.S. preparedness against terrorist 
activities directed at US diplomatic and military assets in the 
region.
    P. Preparing for UNIFIL's departure of Southern Lebanon.
    Q. Oversight of AID activities in South Asia and India 
earthquake relief and recovery assistance oversight.
    R. India-Pakistan nuclear stalemate (moved from Asia).
    S. Resource sharing issues between India, Bangladesh, and 
Nepal (moved from Asia).
    T. The future of Afghanistan (moved from Asia).
    U. U.S. interests in the Central Asian republics (moved 
from Asia/Europe).
    V. Intercommunal violence in Sri Lanka. (4)
    W. India's role in Asia. (4)

VIII. Asia

    A. U.S.-China economic and political relations; options for 
U.S. policy toward China; monitor China's implementation of 
bilateral/multilateral trade agreements as it accedes to the 
WTO.
    B. Overview of U.S. interests in East Asia.
    C. AID activities in Asia.
    D. North Korean political instability; KEDO; Foreign Aid to 
North Korea; North-South dialogue; trading with North Korea; 
the Agreed Framework Policy and an assessment of its intended 
effectiveness; North Korean missile proliferation; human rights 
and refugee policy (primarily ``economic migrants'' in 
Northeast China)--protection from forced repatriation.
    E. Military balance across the Taiwan Strait.
    F. Review of POW-MIA issues for both Vietnam and Korea.
    G. U.S.-Burma relations.
    H. U.S.-Indonesia relations; potential instability in 
Indonesia.
    I. Agricultural exports to Asia.
    J. China technology transfer.
    K. East Timor--transition to independence under UN 
authority.
    L. Military-to-military relations in Asia (The U.S. relies 
on a network of relationships to maintain its forward presence 
in Asia; this is supplemented by training and education).
    M. U.S. democracy promotion activities in Asia.
    N. Overview of Hong Kong since Reversion; Macau's Future--
Reversion.
    O. Economic and demographic change in the PRC.
    P. American energy development business potential in Asia.
    Q. The ``Great Power Game'' in Asia: China, Japan, Russia, 
and the U.S.
    R. U.S. and Republic of Korea relations.
    S. Taiwan's relations with the PRC and the Taiwan Relations 
Act.
    T. Democracy and human rights in Cambodia, and developments 
in international tribuanal on Khmer Rouge crimes against 
humanity.
    U. Regional cooperation in Southeast Asia.
    V. Sex trade and child abuse in Asia.
    W. Review of the CINCPAC, East-West Center, Asia-Pacific 
Center, and Joint Task Force Full Accounting.
    X. Chinese nonproliferation practices.
    Y. The Chinese People's Liberation Army: Its goals, 
influence, and commercial ties.
    Z. Taiwan's effort to be admitted to the United Nations and 
other international organizations.
    AA. U.S.-Japan Alliance.
    AB. Human Rights in China and Beijing's Candidacy to host 
the 2008 Olympic Games; Crackdown on the Falun Gong.
    AC. The security relationship between the U.S. and New 
Zealand.
    AD. The security relationship between the U.S. and New 
Zealand.
    AE. The future of ASEAN.
    AF. The impact of U.S. sanctions policy in Asia.
    AG. U.S. and South Asian Relations.
    AH. The various nations economic and military interests in 
the South China Sea.
    AI. Cambodia's fragile government.
    AJ. Democracy and rule of law in China.
    AK. Theater missile defense: The Asian perspective.
    AL. Overview of the Pacific compacts.
    AM. Vietnam--Prospects for closer relations; movement on 
legislation on free trade.
    AN. Human Rights and Beijing's candidacy to host the 2008 
Olympic Games.
    AO. Bejing's reaction to NMD and TMD; implications for 
China's security.
    AP. Monitoring of effectiveness of Seoul's ``sunshine 
policy''; and U.S. policy in the region, including security 
cooperation with the ROK and Japan toward North Korea; 
confidence building measures/family reunions/accountability for 
food aid to North Korea. pp. Monitoring sighs of economic 
reform in North Korea following Kim Jong Il's visit to China.
    AQ. Political stability in the Philippines.
    AR. Elections in Japan.
    AS. Corruption in Asia--catalyst for mass movements.
    AT. Congressional mechanisms for monitoring China human 
rights following passage of PNTR.

IX. Western Hemisphere

    A. In General--U.S. efforts in support of democratic 
institutions, political stability and economic growth in the 
region. Implementation of agreements from the Summit of the 
Americas.
    B. Trade--U.S. efforts to implement the Free Trade Area of 
the Americas (FTAA); Reauthorization of the Andean Trade 
Preferences.
    C. Central America--Regional economic and political 
integration, counter-drug cooperation; Nicaragua (elections, 
property, disaster assistance); El Salvador (disaster 
assistance); Guatemala (disaster assistance, peace process); 
Honduras (disaster assistance).
    D. Security--U.S. counter-narcotics assistance in general 
and U.S. support for Plan Colombia in particular; Criminal and 
terrorist threats in the Andean region (including Panama) and 
the Argentina-Brazil-Paraguay tri-border area; U.S. military 
and police training in the region (Western Hemisphere Institute 
for Security Cooperation).
    E. South America--Argentina (intellectual property rights 
judicial and police reform); Chile (free trade agreement, 
advanced arms sales); Peru (elections; GAO review of U.S. 
democracy assistance); Ecuador (``dollarization,'' stability); 
Colombia (peace process, elections); Bolivia (stability); 
Venezuela (Oil/OPEC, democracy); Paraguay (democracy).
    F. Cuba--internal dissident movements; Cuba broadcasting; 
implementation of Libertad Act.
    G. Mexico--political reforms; Drug cooperation and 
corruption; border issues.
    H. Canada--trade, defense, and border issues.
    I. Haiti--policy review; law enforcement, support for 
democratic institutions; promoting sustainable investment/jobs.
    J. Other Caribbean nations (drug cooperation, economic 
stability).
    K. U.S. relations with the Organization of American States.

X. Africa

    A. Periodic review of the region with the Assistant 
Secretary of State for African Affairs.
    B. Review of African human rights issues and rule of law/
good governance issues, including their relation to trade and 
development.
    C. Review of ongoing democratization efforts in Africa.
    D. Review of African arms proliferation issues including 
small arms trafficking.
    E. U.S. relations with African regional and subregional 
organizations, eg. OAU, COMESA, SADC.
    F. Review of the impact of multilateral and bilateral debt 
of African economies.
    G. Review of US trade and investment in Africa; oversight 
of the African Growth and Opportunity Act; (2) review of non-
tariff trade barriers and their connection to trade, 
corruption, and development.
    H. Oversight of the Administration's efforts to combat HIV/
AIDS.
    I. Review of developments in African countries gripped by 
conflict e.g. Angola, Democratic Republic of Congo, Sierra 
Leone, Guinea, Sudan, etc., and the ongoing conflict resolution 
efforts, including peacekeeping issues in Ethiopia-Eritrea, 
Western Sahara.
    J. Review of worldwide efforts to stem the direct and 
indirect trade of conflict diamonds from Sierra Leone, Angola, 
and the Democratic Republic of Congo and other countries.
    K. Slavery in Africa.
    L. Monitor the problems of corruption and organized crime 
in Africa.
    M. The African Crisis Response Initiative, Operation Focus 
Relief, and other US efforts to provide training, equipment, 
and support for regional peace keeping efforts in Africa.
    N. Review the development of independent radio in Africa.
    O. Review of relations with critical states of South Africa 
and Nigeria.
    P. Review of U.S. policy towards North Africa, with special 
attention to Libya (Moved from Middle East section).
    Q. Impact of higher energy prices on Africa.
    R. Diplomatic presence gaps in Africa.
    S. Special problems with Charles Taylor (Liberia) and 
Robert Mugabe (Zimbabwe).

XI. Human Rights

    A. Review of human rights country reports.
    B. Implementation of the Universal Declaration of Human 
Rights and other internationally recognized human rights.
    C. Torture Victims Relief issues.
    D. Child Labor--Administration efforts to implement 
International Labor Organization child labor conventions; slave 
labor; and related practices.
    E. International refugee protection and resettlement.
    F. International trafficking in women and children--
implementation of Trafficking Victims Protection Act.
    G. Religious persecution--Oversight of implementation of 
the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998.
    H. Review of People's Republic of China (political and 
religious repression, forced abortion and sterilization, forced 
labor, situation of Tibetan and Uighur minorities).
    I. Sudan (slavery, religious and race-based persecution, 
genocide).
    J. Central Africa (human rights and refugee issues in, the 
Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, Congo, and surrounding 
countries).
    K. Vietnam (religious and political persecution, access to 
U.S. resettlement programs, and related issues).

XII. Economic Policy and the Environment

    A. Enterprise Funds.
    B. Overview of global trade situation and implementation of 
International Monetary Fund terms and conditions.
    C. Trade distorting actions by foreign governments 
(bribery, economic espionage, manipulation of customs rules, 
import licensing, skewing health and safety standards, etc.); 
Mutual Recognition Agreements (``MRAs''); efforts by other 
foreign governments to implement the OECD Anti Bribery 
Convention.
    D. OPIC/TDA/EXIM Oversight; Commerce Department trade 
promotion and enforcement activities.
    E. Overview of the Export Administration Act (EAA) and the 
views of the Administration on legislation reauthorizing and 
modernizing its provisions.
    F. Implementation of Iraq, Iran and other sanctions regimes 
by State and Treasury.
    G. Global environmental trends: International instability 
and national security.
    H. The U.S. government position on global warming/Kyoto 
Protocol.
    I. How environmental cooperation can enhance bilateral 
relations and U.S. interests abroad.
    J. Impact on US business of lack of Foreign export credit 
agency environmental standards.
    K. Role of regional trade agreements in promoting a new 
global trade round and global economic growth; progress toward 
a new global trade round.
    L. Foreign government adoption of standards adverse to US 
interests.

             II. General Review Activities of the Committee


                      A. Executive Branch Reports

    Reporting requirements in legislation and the reports 
submitted in response to them constitute one of the oldest 
information systems used by Congress. On every subject which 
Congress covers, required reports offer a way to oversee and 
review the implementation of legislation by the executive 
branch.
    In the foreign policy field, it is particularly important 
to insure that reporting requirements and the resultant reports 
submitted by the executive branch are an efficient mechanism 
for supplying Congresswith information. Information on domestic 
problems is often easier to obtain from sources outside the executive 
branch than information on problems from abroad. Moreover, the 
executive branch has sometimes attempted to shield its activities in 
the foreign policy field from public view and treat it as its exclusive 
domain. The lack of information on foreign policy problems and 
executive branch activities has been one of the major reasons it has 
been more difficult for Congress to play its legitimate role in the 
making of foreign policy, although the Constitution expressly shares 
such powers between Congress and the President.
    For the Committee on International Relations, the 
improvement of the system of required reports offers more than 
tidier housekeeping. It offers another step toward a better 
supply of information that Congress needs to make foreign 
policy decisions. Through the careful placing of reporting 
requirements in legislation, the patient monitoring of the 
reports submitted by the executive branch in response to the 
requirements and utilization of the data supplied in them, 
Congress can improve its capacity for an effective foreign 
policy role.

                         B. Reference Documents

    Periodically the Committee on International Relations 
compiles, prints, and distributes official documents which are 
useful to the membership in exercising the oversight function 
as well as other responsibilities. The following is a listing 
of those compilations for the 107th Congress:
    1. Legislation on Foreign Relations.--This 5 volume set is 
prepared under the direction of the staff of the House 
Committee on International Relations and the Senate Committee 
on Foreign Relations with the assistance of the Foreign Affairs 
and National Defense Division of the Congressional Research 
Service of the Library of Congress. This collection of laws and 
related materials contains texts referred to by the Committee 
on Foreign Affairs, and the Foreign Relations Committee, 
amended to date, and annotated to show pertinent history or 
cross references. The collection includes all laws concerning 
foreign relations, codified and in force, treaties in force, as 
well as executive agreements and orders, State Department 
regulations and State Department delegations of authorities as 
of December 31, 2001.
    2. Legislative Calendar.--This compendium of committee 
legislative information is published at the end of each 
Congressional session. Each volume includes a current listing 
and status of all committee legislation; committee publications 
and reports; executive communications and messages from the 
President referred to the committee; House floor amendments in 
committee legislation; and a legislative progress chart.

 C. Study Missions and Participation in International Conferences and 
                                 Events

    The committee has kept itself informed of the latest 
developments in foreign affairs. The usual frequent conferences 
with high government officials, both civil and military, have 
been augmented by special study missions to various parts of 
the world to obtain firsthand knowledge of the problems of 
foreign countries and the administration of U.S. programs and 
operations falling within the purview of the committee. 
Committee members have also been designated to serve as 
official delegates to a number of international conferences and 
events. The following is a list of interparliamentary exchanges 
that Members of the Committee on International Relations 
participated in during the 107th Congress.
    May 9-14, 2001, Meeting of the U.S.-Mexico 
Interparliamentary Group (40th) in Napa, California.
    May 17-21, 2001, Meeting of the Canada-U.S. 
Interparliamentary Group in the Canadian Rockies.
    May 27-31, 2001, Meeting of the NATO Parliamentary Group in 
Vilnius, Lithuania.
    September 13, 2001, Meeting of the Transatlantic 
Legislators' Dialogue (53rd) in Washington, D.C.
    October 5-9, 2001, Meeting of the NATO Parliamentary Group 
in Ottawa, Canada.
    November 8-11, 2001, Meeting of the British-American 
Parliamentary Group in Charleston, SC.
    February 16-26, 2002, Meeting of the British-American 
Parliamentary Group in London.
    April 12-15, 2002, Meeting of the Transatlantic 
Legislators' Dialogue (54th) in Madrid, Spain.
    May 16-19, 2002, Meeting of the U.S.-Mexico 
Interparliamentary Group (41st) in Guanajuato, Mexico.
    May 16-20, 2002, Meeting of the Canada-U.S. 
Interparliamentary Group in Newport, RI.
    May 24-28, 2002, Meeting of the NATO Parliamentary Group in 
Sofia, Bulgaria.
    November 14-18, 2002, Meeting of the Transatlantic 
Legislators' Dialogue (55th) in Carlsbad, CA.
    November 15-19, 2002, Meeting of the NATO Parliamentary 
Group in Istanbul, Turkey.

       III. Summaries of Legislative Activities by Full Committee


                      Legislation Enacted into Law


Homeland Security Act of 2002 (Armey)--(P.L. 107-296)

    H.R. 5005 Establishes the Department of Homeland Security. 
It was referred to 13 House Committees. On July 10, 2002, the 
Committee on International Relations ordered the bill reported 
(amended) by voice vote to the Select Committee on Homeland 
Security in accordance to H. Res. 449. On July 26, 2002, the 
bill was agreed to in the House by a vote of 318-110. On 
November 19, 2002, the bill was agreed to in the Senate by a 
vote of 90-9. On November 22, 2002, the House agreed to the 
Senate amendment by Unanimous Consent.

To amend the International Organizations Immunities Act (Leach)--(P.L. 
        107-278)

    H.R. 3656 amends the International Organizations Immunities 
Act to provide for the applicability of that Act to the Central 
European Bank. The Committee did not act on the bill before it 
was called up by the House Under Suspension of the Rules on 
September 24, 2002. H.R. 3656 was agreed to by voice vote. On 
October 17, 2002, the bill was agreed to in the Senate by 
Unanimous Consent.

Russian Democracy Act of 2002 (Lantos)--(P.L. 107-246)

    H.R. 2121 makes available funds under the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 to expand democracy, good governance, 
and anti-corruption programs in the Russian Federation in order 
to promote and strengthen democratic government and civil 
society in that country and to support independent media. The 
Committee considered the bill on Nov. 1, 2001. On December 11, 
2001, the bill was called up by the House Under Suspension of 
the Rules and agreed to by a voice vote (amended). The Senate 
agreed to H.R. 2121 (amended) by Unanimous Consent on September 
20, 2002. On October 7, 2002, the House suspended the rules and 
agreed to the Senate amendments, by voice vote.

Sudan Peace Act (Tancredo)--(P.L. 107-245)

    H.R. 5531 facilitates famine relief efforts and a 
comprehensive solution to the war in Sudan. The bill was 
referred to the Committees on International Relations and 
Financial Services. Although the Committee did not act on H.R. 
5531, the Committee did consider H.R. 2052, a similar bill 
which wasalso titled the ``Sudan Peace Act,'' and reported it 
to the House, which then agreed to it by a vote of 422-2. H.R. 2052 
stalled in the Senate. On October 7, 2002, H.R. 5531 was called up by 
the House Under Suspension of the Rules and agreed to by a vote of 359-
8. On October 9, 2002, it was agreed to in the Senate by Unanimous 
Consent.

To authorize the use of United States Armed Forces against Iraq 
        (Hastert)--(P.L. 107-243)

    H.J. Res. 114 authorizes the use of military force against 
Iraq. On October 7, 2002, the Committee reported the joint 
resolution to the House, amended (Rept. No. 107-721). On 
October 10, 2002, H.J. Res. 114 was agreed to in the House by a 
vote of 296-133. On October 11, 2002, it passed the Senate by a 
vote of 77-23.

Irish Peace Process Cultural and Training Program (Walsh)--(P.L. 107-
        234)

    H.R. 4558 extends the Irish Peace Process Cultural and 
Training Program. The bill was referred to the Committees on 
the Judiciary and International Relations. The Committee on 
International Relations did not act on H.R. 4558, and it was 
discharged on July 22, 2002. On July 22, 2002, the bill passed 
the House by voice vote, Under Suspension of the rules. On 
September 18, 2002, the bill passed the Senate by Unanimous 
Consent.

Foreign Relations Authorization Act, FY 02-03 (Hyde)--(P.L. 107-228)

    H.R. 1646 authorizes appropriations for the Deptartment of 
State for fiscal years 2002 and 2003. On May 4, 2001, the 
Committee reported the bill (amended) to the House (H. Rept. 
No. 107-57). The House agreed to the bill (amended) by a vote 
of 352-73 on May 16, 2001. On May 1, 2002, the Senate passed 
the bill (amended) by Unanimous Consent and requested a 
conference. Senate Conferees named: Biden, Sarbanes, Dodd, 
Kerry, Helms, Lugar and Hagel. On September 12, 2002, the House 
disagreed with the Senate amendment by Unanimous Consent, and 
agreed to a conference. House Conferees named: Hyde, Smith 
(NJ), Ros-Lehtinen, Lantos and Berman. The Speaker also named 
conferees from the Committee on the Judiciary. On September 23, 
2002, the conference report was filed (H. Rept. 107-671). On 
September 25, 2002, the House agreed to the conference report 
by voice vote, and on September 26, the Senate agreed to the 
conference report by Unanimous Consent.

Gerald B.H. Solomon Freedom Consolidation Act (Bereuter)--(P.L. 107-
        187)

    H.R. 3167 endorses the vision of further enlargement of the 
NATO alliance articulated by President George W. Bush on June 
15, 2001, and by former President William J. Clinton on October 
22, 1996. On November 5, 2001, the Committee reported the bill 
(amended) to the House (H. Rept. No. 107-266). On November 7, 
2001, the bill was agreed to in the House by a vote of 372-46 
(amended). The Senate agreed to H.R. 3167 by a vote of 85-6 on 
May 17, 2002.

Farm Security Act (Combest)--(P.L. 107-171)

    H.R. 2646 was referred to the Committees on Agriculture and 
International Relations. On September 10, 2001, the Committee 
on International Relations reported the bill (amended) to the 
House (H. Rept. 107-191 part III). On October 5, 2001, the 
House agreed to amendments adopted by the Committee of the 
Whole and the bill passed by a vote of 291-120. On February 13, 
2002, the Senate struck out all after the enacting clause and 
substituted the language of S. 1731 (amended), which passed the 
Senate by a vote of 58-40. The Senate requested a conference 
and named conferees: Harkin, Leahy, Conrad, Daschle, Lugar, 
Helms and Cochran. On February 28, 2002, the House disagreed to 
the Senate amendment and the Speaker appointed conferees from 
the Committees on Agriculture, Budget, Education and Workforce, 
Energy and Commerce, Financial Services, International 
Relations, the Judiciary, Resources, Science and Ways and 
Means. Conferences were held on April 9-10, 2002, and on May 1, 
2002, a report was filed (H. Rept. 107-424). On May 2, 2002, 
the House agreed to the conference report by a vote of 280-141. 
On May 8, 2002, the Senate agreed to the conference report by a 
vote of 64-35.

Observer status for Taiwan at the annual summit of the W.H.O. (Brown-
        OH)--(P.L. 107-158)

    H.R. 2739 amends P.L. 107-10 (see below) to require a 
United States plan to endorse and obtain observer status for 
Taiwan at the annual summit of the World Health Assembly in May 
2002, in Geneva, Switzerland. On November 28, 2001, the 
Committee considered the bill, which was favorably reported 
(amended) by voice vote. On December 19, 2001, the House agreed 
to the bill (amended) by voice vote. On March 19, 2002, the 
Senate passed H.R. 2739 by Unanimous Consent.

Radio Free Afghanistan Act (Royce)--(P.L. 107-148)

    H.R. 2998 authorizes the establishment of Radio Free 
Afghanistan. On November 1, 2001, the Committee considered the 
bill, which was favorably reported (amended) by voice vote. On 
November 7, 2001, the bill passed the House by a vote of 405-2 
(amended). On February 7, 2002, the Senate struck all after the 
enacting clause and added the language of S. 1779 (amended), 
which passed the Senate by Unanimous Consent. On February 12, 
2002, the House suspended the rules and passed the bill by a 
vote of 421-2.

George Shultz National Foreign Affairs Training Center (Hyde)--(P.L. 
        107-132)

    H.R. 3348 designates the National Foreign Affairs Training 
Center as the George P. Shultz National Foreign Affairs 
Training Center. On November 28, 2001, the Committee considered 
the bill, which was favorably reported (amended) by voice vote. 
On December 5, 2001, the House Called up the bill Under 
Suspension of the Rules and agreed to it by a vote of 407-0, 
with 2 voting ``present.'' On December 20, 2001, the bill 
passed the Senate by Unanimous Consent.

Zimbabwe Democracy Act (Frist)--(P.L. 107-99)

    S. 494 provides for a transition to democracy and promotes 
economic recovery in Zimbabwe. The bill was referred to the 
Committees on Financial Services and International Relations. 
On August 1, 2001, the bill passed the Senate by Unanimous 
Consent. The Committee on International Relations considered 
the bill on November 28, 2001, and ordered it favorably 
reported (H. Rept. 107-312, part I). On December 4, 2001, the 
bill was called up Under Suspension of the Rules and passed the 
House (amended) by a vote of 396-11. On December 11, 2001, the 
Senate agreed to the House amendment.

Afghan Women and Children Relief Act (Hutchison)--(P.L. 107-81)

    S. 1573 authorizes the provision of educational and health 
care assistance to the women and children of Afghanistan. The 
bill passed the Senate (amended) by Unanimous Consent on 
November 15, 2001. The Committee did not act on the bill and it 
was called up Under Suspension of the Rules on November 27, 
2001, and passed by a voice vote.

Assistance to Pakistan and India (Brownback)--(P.L. 107-57)

    S. 1465 authorizes the President to provide assistance to 
Pakistan and India through September 30, 2003. On October 4, 
2001, the bill was agreed to in the Senate by Unanimous 
Consent. The Committee did not act on the legislation. On 
October 16, 2001, the bill was called up by the House Under 
Suspension of the Rules and it passed by voice vote.

Patriot Act (Sensenbrenner)--(P.L. 107-56)

    H.R. 3162 is a bill to deter and punish terrorist acts in 
the United States and around the world, and to enhance law 
enforcement investigatory tools. The bill was referred to 
several House Committees on October 23, 2001, and on the same 
day was called up by the House Under Suspension of the Rules. 
On October 24, 2001, the bill passed the House by a vote of 
357-66. On October 25, 2001, the bill was agreed to in the 
Senate by a vote of 98-1.

Amending the Admiral James W. Nance and Meg Donovan FRAA FY 00 and 01 
        (Helms)--(P.L. 107-46)

    S. 248 amends the Admiral James W. Nance and Meg Donovan 
FRAA FY 00 and 01, to adjust a condition on the payment of 
arrearages to the United Nations that sets the maximum share of 
any United Nations peacekeepion operation's budget that may be 
assessed of any country. On February 7, 2001, the bill passed 
the Senate by a vote of 99-0. The Committee on International 
Relations did not act on the bill before it was called up Under 
Suspension of the Rules on September 24, 2001. It was agreed to 
in the House by voice vote.

Use of Force Against Terrorists--(P.L. 107-40)

    S.J. Res. 23 (H.J. Res. 64) authorizes the use of the U.S. 
Armed Forces in the fight against terrorism. The Committee did 
not act on this legislation because it was brought up on the 
House Floor the same day that it was introduced, but it was 
under the jurisdiction of the HIRC. On September 14, 2001, the 
House passed H.J. Res. 64, an identical resolution, by a vote 
of 420-1. The Senate passed S.J. Res. 23 by a vote of 98-0.

Tropical Forest Conservation Reauthorization Act (Portman)--(P.L. 107-
        26)

    H.R. 2131 reauthorizes the Tropical Fores Conservation Act 
of 1998 through fiscal year 2004. On June 28, 2001, the 
Committee reported the bill to the House (H. Rept. No. 107-
119). The House agreed to H.R. 2131 by voice vote (amended) on 
July 10, 2001. On July 23, 2001, the bill passed the Senate by 
Unanimous Consent.

ILSA Reauthorization Act (Gilman)--(P.L. 107-24)

    H.R. 1954 extends the authorities of the Iran and Libya 
Sanctions Act of 1996 until 2006. The bill was referred to the 
Committees on International Relations, Financial Services, Ways 
and Means, and Government Reform. The Committee on 
International Relations considered the bill on June 13 and 20, 
2001, and ordered the bill reported favorably to the House by a 
vote of 41-3 (H. Rept. No. 107-107, part I). On July 26, 2001, 
Under Suspension of the Rules, the bill passed the House 
(amended) by a vote of 409-6, with one voting ``present.'' On 
July 27, 2001, the bill was agreed to in the Senate by 
Unanimous Consent.

Paul D. Coverdell Peace Corps Headquarters (Lott)--(P.L. 107-21)

    S. 360 honors the late Senator Paul D. Coverdell. On 
February 15, 2001, the Senate passed the bill by Unanimous 
Consent. The bill was referred to the House Committees on 
International Relations and Education and the Workforce. 
Neither committee acted on the bill before it was called up in 
the House Under Suspension of the Rules on July 17, 2001. The 
bill passed by a vote of 330-61, with 11 voting ``present.''

Taiwan in the World Health Organization (Brown-OH)--(P.L. 107-10)

    H.R. 428 concerns the participation of Taiwan in the World 
Health Organization. The Committee considered the bill on March 
28, 2001, and it passed the House by a vote of 407-0 on April 
24, 2001 (amended). On May 9, 2001, the bill was agreed to in 
the Senate by Unanimous Consent (amended). On May 15, 2002, the 
House suspended the rules and agreed to the Senate amendment by 
a vote of 415-0.

          HIRC Legislation passed by the House and the Senate

    H.R. 4073 (Smith-NJ)--Microenterprise for Self-Reliance Act
    H.R. 2069 (Hyde)--Global Access to HIV/AIDS Prevention, 
Awareness, Education, and Treatment Act of 2001
    H. Con. Res. 69 (Lampson)--International child abduction
    H. Con. Res. 102 (Leach)--Hunger to Harvest Resolution: A 
Decade of Concern for Africa
    H. Con. Res. 139 (Wicker)--Welcoming Supreme Patriarch of 
Armenians
    H. Con. Res. 211 (King)--Commending Daw Aung San Suu Kyi on 
the 10th anniversary of her receiving the Nobel Prize
    H. Con. Res. 264 (Lantos)--Visit of Prime Minister Vajpayee 
to the U.S.
    H. Con. Res. 349 (Millender-McDonald)--Calling for an end 
to the sexual exploitation of refugees
    H. Con. Res. 406 (Radanovich)--Honoring Lao Veterans of 
America for their contribution to the United States
    S. Con. Res. 58--Support for the tenth annual meeting of 
the Asia Pacific Parliamentary Forum

                  HIRC Legislation passed by the House

    H.R. 2272 (Kirk)--Coral Reef and Coastal Marine 
Conservation Act of 2001
    H.R. 2541 (Hyde)--Enhance the authorities of special agents
    H.R. 2602 (Hyde)--EAA extension
    H.R. 2833 (H.R. 2368) (Smith-NJ)--Freedom and democracy in 
Vietnam
    H.R. 2975 (Sensenbrenner)--Deter and punish terrorist acts 
(see H.R. 3162)
    H.R. 3189 (Hyde)--Export Extension Act of 2001
    H.R. 3969 (Hyde)--Freedom Promotion Act/Public Diplomacy
    H.R. 3994 (Hyde)--Afghanistan Freedom Support Act
    H. Con. Res. 15 (Royce)--Sympathy for victims of India 
earthquake in January
    H. Con. Res. 41 (Tom Davis-VA)--El Salvador earthquakes
    H. Con. Res. 77 (Becerra)--Korean Americans reuniting with 
family members in North Korea
    H. Con. Res. 89 (Walden)--Mourning the death of Ron Sander 
by terrorists in Ecuador
    H. Con. Res. 116 (Shimkus)--Recommending the integration of 
Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia into NATO
    H. Con. Res. 117 (Hoekstra)--In Memory of Roni and Charity 
Bowers (Peru shootdown)
    H. Con. Res. 135 (Schaffer)--Welcoming the President of 
Taiwan
    H. Con. Res. 145 (Engel)--Taliban order requiring Hindus to 
be identified
    H. Con. Res. 168 (Ros-Lehtinen)--Support for victims of 
torture
    H. Con. Res. 188 (Ros-Lehtinen)--China should cease 
persecution of Falun Gong
    H. Con. Res. 213 (Royce)--N. Korean refugees detained in 
China and returned to N. Korea to face torture
    H. Con. Res. 217 (Hyde)--Fiftieth anniversary of the ANZUS 
Treaty
    H. Con. Res. 242 (Hyde)--Recognizing Radio Free Europe/
Radio Liberty's success in promoting democracy
    H. Con. Res. 273 (Rohrabacher)--Special relationship 
between the U.S. and Philippines
    H. Con. Res. 280 (Hyde)--Solidarity with Israel in fight 
against terrorism
    H. Con. Res. 313 (Crowley)--Sense of Congress regarding the 
crash of TAME Flight 120 on January 28, 2002
    H. Con. Res. 324 (Pitts)--Commending President Musharraf of 
Pakistan
    H. Con. Res. 394 (Royce)--Concerning the 2002 World Cup co-
hosts Republic of Korea and Japan
    H. Con. Res. 405 (Smith-NJ)--Congratulating East Timor on 
its independence and recommending that the President establish 
diplomatic relations
    H. Con. Res. 437 (Wynn)--Recognizing Turkey for its 
cooperation in the campaign against global terrorism
    H. Con. Res. 479 (Crowley)--Expressing the sense of 
Congress regarding Greece's contributions to the war against 
terrorism
    H. Con. Res. 492 (Rohrabacher)--Welcoming Her Majesty Queen 
Sirikit of Thailand upon her arrival in the United States
    H. Res. 34 (Hyde)--Congratulating Prime Minister-elect 
Sharon in Israel
    H. Res. 56 (Lantos)--U.N. Commission on Human Rights to 
call on PRC to end human rights violations in China and Tibet
    H. Res. 67 (Reyes)--TB awareness
    H. Res. 91 (Smith-NJ)--Human rights situation in Cuba
    H. Res. 99 (Crowley)--Hezbollah should allow Red Cross to 
visit abducted persons
    H. Res. 121 (George Miller)--Condolences to the families of 
Chinese school children killed by fireworks explosion
    H. Res. 160 (Smith-NJ)--China should release American 
scholars
    H. Res. 191 (Kirk)--UN should transfer videotape to Israeli 
Government
    H. Res. 212 (Lantos)--World Conference on Racism
    H. Res. 222 (Schaffer)--Congratulating Ukraine
    H. Res. 233 (Hyde)--U.S.-Mexico relationship
    H. Res. 253 (Stupak)--Recommending the integration of the 
Slovak Republic into NATO
    H. Res. 339 (Slaughter)--Regarding elections in Ukraine
    H. Res. 358 (Hyde)--Expressing support for the Government 
of Colombia
    H. Res. 393 (Crowley)--Anti-Semitism in Europe
    H. Res. 410 (Smith)--Regarding human rights violations in 
Tibet and the need for dialogue between China and the Dalai 
Lama
    H. Res. 468 (Gallegly)--Affirming the importance of NATO, 
supporting continued U.S. participation in NATO, and ensuring 
the enlargement of NATO proceeds in a manner consistent with 
U.S. interests
    H. Res. 513 (Walsh)--Recognizing the historical 
significance and timeliness of the United States-Ireland 
Business Summit
    H. Res. 533 (Gilman)--Welcoming Madame Chen Wu Sue-Jen, the 
first Lady of Taiwan
    H. Res. 549 (Graves)--Appreciation for Prime Minister Tony 
Blair
    H.J. Res. 75 (Graham)--Weapons development in Iraq

                     Unfinished Committee Business

    H.R. 2368 (Smith)--To promote freedom and democracy in 
Vietnam (reported from HIRC 8/1/01; report filed 9/5/01--H. 
Rept. 107-199, part 1) see H.R. 2833
    H.R. 2581 (Gilman)--Provide authority to control exports 
(reported from HIRC 8/1/01; report filed 11/16/01--H. Rept. 
107-297; 11/16/01 jointly referred to Committees on AG/AS/EC/
Jud/WM/Intel)
    H.R. 3169 (Lantos)--International Disability and Victims of 
Landmines, Civil Strife and Warfare Assistance Act of 2001 
(reported from HIRC 11/1/01; report filed 11/5/01--H. Rept. 
107-265)
    H. Con. Res. 73 (Lantos)--2008 Olympics should not be held 
in China (reported, amended, from the Committee on 3/28/01 by a 
vote of 27-8; report filed on 4/4/01--H. Rept. 107-40)
    H. Con. Res. 178 (Ballenger)--Concerning persecution of 
Montagnard peoples in Vietnam (marked up by HIRC on 7/25/01 and 
agreed to seek consideration on the House suspension calendar)
    H. Con. Res. 287 (Boehlert)--Expressing the sense of 
Congress relating to efforts of the Peace Parks Foundation in 
the Republic of South Africa to facilitate the establishment 
and development of transfrontier conservation efforts in 
Southern Africa (marked up by Africa subcommittee and forwarded 
to the Full Committee on 7/23/02)
    H. Con. Res. 290 (Eddie Bernice Johnson)--Expressing the 
sense of the Congress that women throughout the world should 
join together for a week of workshops, forums, and other events 
to speak up for world peace (marked up by HIRC on 3/20/02 and 
agreed to seek consideration on the House suspension calendar)
    H. Con. Res. 327 (Wexler)--Commending the Republic of 
Turkey and the State of Israel for the continued strengthening 
of their political, economic, cultural, and strategic 
partnership and for their actions in support of the war on 
terrorism (Europe subcommittee held markup on 7/24/02 and 
forwarded to the Full Committee, amended, by voice vote)
    H. Con. Res. 351 (McCollum)--Expressing the sense of 
Congress that the United States should condemn the practice of 
execution by stoning as a gross violation of human rights (IOHR 
held markup on 7/25/02 and forwarded to the Full Committee)
    H. Con. Res. 421 (Clayton)--Recognizing the importance of 
inheritance rights of women in Africa (Africa subcommittee held 
markup on 7/23/02 and forwarded to the Full Committee)
    H. Res. 181 (Ballenger)--Congratulating the President-elect 
of Peru (marked up by HIRC on 8/1/01 and agreed to seek 
consideration on the House suspension calendar)

                          Committee Statistics

    During the 107th Congress, the Full Committee held: 55 
hearings and markups, 14 classified briefings; and 24 closed 
briefings. The subcommittees met 76 times. Another important 
function of the Committee is to meet with Heads of State, 
Administration officials, and foreign dignitaries from around 
the world. The Committee held 106 protocol meetings, and 
received 6 delegations, for a total of 281 official meetings. 
The main committee hearing room underwent major renovations in 
2000, and was equipped with state-of-the-art audio and visual 
equipment, enabling the Committee to hold meetings via 
teleconference
    The staff held 377 briefings. A total of 22 bills have been 
signed into law, 32 bills and joint resolutions referred to the 
Committee passed the House, and 50 concurrent and simple 
resolutions referred to the Committee passed the House. 15 
reports were filed. The Committee has published 120 hearings 
and markups, and 6 Committee prints.
    During the 107th Congress, 473 bills and resolutions were 
referred to the Committee; the Full Committee considered 47 
pieces of legislation.

      IV. List of Meetings of the Full Committee and Subcommittees


                       A. Full Committee Hearings

February 14, 2001.--ORGANIZATIONAL MEETING, 2172 Rayburn, 
        witnesses: none.
February 14, 2001.--HEARING: STATE DEPARTMENT: IN THE LEAD ON 
        FOREIGN POLICY? 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Harold 
        Rogers, Member of Congress, (Former Chairman: 
        Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, State and 
        Judiciary); Hon. Frank Carlucci, Chairman, Report of an 
        Independent Task Force: ``State Department Reform''; 
        and Lewis B. Kaden, Chairman, Overseas Presence 
        Advisory Panel.
March 1, 2001.--HEARING: CONDUCTING DIPLOMACY IN A GLOBAL AGE, 
        2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Marc Grossman, Director 
        General of the Foreign Service, and Director of Human 
        Resources, Department of State; Marshall Adair, 
        President, American Foreign Service Association, 
        Department of State; and Gary R. Galloway, Vice 
        President, American Federal Government Employees 
        (AFGE), Department of State.
March 7, 2001.--HEARING: INVIGORATING U.S. FOREIGN POLICY, 2172 
        Rayburn, witness: Hon. Colin Powell, Secretary of 
        State.
March 28, 2001.--MARKUP OF H. RES. 91; H.R. 428; H. RES. 56; 
        AND H. CON. RES. 73, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: none.
May 2, 2001.--MARKUP OF H.R. 1646, THE FOREIGN RELATIONS 
        AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FY 2002-2003, 2172 Rayburn, 
        witnesses: none.
May 23, 2001.--HEARING: THE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION ACT: THE CASE 
        FOR ITS RENEWAL, 2172 Rayburn, witness: Hon. Kenneth I. 
        Juster, Undersecretary, Bureau of Export 
        Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce.
May 24, 2001.--HEARING: ANNUAL REPORT: U.S. COMMISSION ON 
        INTERNATIONAL RELIGIOUS FREEDOM, 2172 Rayburn, 
        witnesses: Hon. Elliott Abrams, Chairman, U.S. 
        Commission on International Religious Freedom, and 
        President, Ethics and Public Policy Center; Rabbi David 
        Saperstein, Commissioner, U.S. Commission on 
        International Religious Freedom, and Director, 
        Religious Action Center of Reform Judaism; Laila Al-
        Marayati, M.D., Commissioner, U.S. Commission on 
        International Religious Freedom, and Past President, 
        Muslim Women's League; and Nina Shea, Commissioner, 
        U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom, and 
        Director, Center for Religious Freedom, Freedom House.
June 6, 2001.--MARKUP OF H.R. 2052, THE SUDAN PEACE ACT; AND H. 
        CON. RES. 145, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: none.
June 7, 2001.--HEARING: U.S. WAR ON AIDS, 2172 Rayburn, 
        witnesses: Hon. Andrew Natsios, Administrator, Agency 
        for International Development; H.E. Mamadou Mansour 
        Seck, Ambassador E. & P., Republic of Senegal; Stephen 
        Hayes, President, Corporate Council on Africa; Rupert 
        Schofield, Executive Director, Foundation for 
        International Community Assistance; Charles Dokmo, 
        President and Chief Executive Officer, Opportunities 
        International-U.S.; and Dr. Paul Zeitz, Co-Director, 
        Global AIDS Alliance.
June 12, 2001.--HEARING: THE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION ACT: THE 
        CASE FOR ITS RENEWAL (PART II), 2172 Rayburn, 
        witnesses: Senator Phil Gramm; Senator Fred Thompson; 
        Congressman Chris Cox; Dr. Richard T. Cupitt, Associate 
        Director, Center for International Trade and Security, 
        University of Georgia; Dr. Paul Freedenberg, Director 
        of Government Relations, AMT, (Representative for the 
        Association of Manufacturing Technology); and Dan 
        Hoydish, Washington Director, UNISYS, (Representative 
        for the Computer Coalition for Responsible Exports).
June 13, 2001.--MARKUP OF H.R. 1954, THE ILSA EXTENSION ACT, 
        2172 Rayburn, witnesses: none.
June 19, 2001.--HEARING: U.S. SCHOLARS DETAINED IN CHINA, 2172 
        Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. James A. Kelly, Assistant 
        Secretary, Bureau of East Asian Affairs, Department of 
        State; Michael Parmly, Deputy Assistant Secretary, 
        Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, 
        Department of State; Jim Thompson, Division Chief, 
        Office of Citizenship Services, Division for East Asia 
        and the Pacific, Bureau of Consular Affairs, Department 
        of State; Liu Yingli, Wife of Li Shaomin; Xue Donghua, 
        Husband of Dr. Gao Zhan; Professor Arthur Waldron, 
        Director of Asian Studies, American Enterprise 
        Institute, Lauder Professor of International Relations, 
        University of Pennsylvania; and Mike Jendrzejczyk, 
        Washington Director, Human Rights Watch/Asia.
June 20, 2001.--MARKUP OF H.R. 2131; H.R. 1954; H. RES. 160; 
        AND H. RES. 99; 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: none.
June 21, 2001.--HEARING: INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION: 
        THE COMMERCE DEPARTMENT'S TRADE POLICY AGENDA, 2172 
        Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Grant D. Aldonas, Under 
        Secretary, International Trade Administration, 
        Department of Commerce; Edmund B. Rice, President, 
        Coalition for Employment through Exports; Franklin J. 
        Vargo, Vice President, International Economic Affairs, 
        National Association of Manufacturers; and Peter Bowe, 
        President, Ellicott Machine Corporation International.
June 27, 2001.--MARKUP OF H.R. 2069; AND H. CON. RES. 168, 2172 
        Rayburn, witnesses: none.
July 11, 2001.--HEARING: THE EXPORT ADMINISTRATION ACT: THE 
        CASE FOR ITS RENEWAL (PART III), 2172 Rayburn, 
        witnesses: Hon. Mike Enzi, United States Senator from 
        Wyoming; Hon. John Bolton, Under Secretary for Arms 
        Control and International Security, Department of 
        State; David Tarbell, Deputy Under Secretary for 
        Technology Security Policy, Department of Defense; 
        Stephen Bryen, President, Jefferson Partners; and Larry 
        Christensen, Vice President, Vastera.
July 25, 2001.--MARKUP OF H.R. 2602; AND H. CON. RES. 178; 2172 
        Rayburn, witnesses: none.
July 25, 2001.--HEARING: THE DAYTON ACCORDS: A VIEW FROM THE 
        GROUND, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: His Eminence Vinko 
        Cardinal Puljic, Archbishop of Sarajevo; His Excellency 
        Most Rev. Dr. Ratko Peric, Bishop of Mostar; and 
        Professor Ejup Ganic, Faculty of Mechanical 
        Engineering, University of Sarajevo, Former President, 
        Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina.
August 1, 2001.--MARKUP OF H.R. 2581; H.R. 2368; H.R. 2541; 
        H.R. 2272; H. RES. 181; H. CON. RES. 188; and H. CON. 
        RES. 89, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses, none.
September 6, 2001.--MARKUP OF H.R. 2646, the Agricultural Act 
        of 2001, Room 2172. Witnesses: none.
October 3, 2001.--HEARING: AL-QAEDA AND THE GLOBAL REACH OF 
        TERRORISM, Room 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: Charles 
        Santos, United Nations; Oliver ``Buck'' Revell, Former 
        FBI Associate Director; and Vincent Cannistraro, 
        Central Intelligence Agency.
October 10, 2001.--HEARING: THE ROLE OF PUBLIC DIPLOMACY IN 
        SUPPORT OF THE ANTI-TERRORISM CAMPAIGN, Room 2172 
        Rayburn. Witnesses: Hon. Charlotte Beers, Department of 
        State; Marc Nathanson, Broadcasting Board of Governors; 
        and Amb. Kenton Keith, Meridian International Center.
October 24, 2001.--HEARING: U.S. DIPLOMATIC EFFORTS IN THE WAR 
        AGAINST TERRORISM, Room 2172 Rayburn. Witness: Hon. 
        Colin Powell, Secretary of State.
November 1, 2001.--HEARING: AMERICA'S ASSISTANCE TO THE AFGHAN 
        PEOPLE, Room 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: Hon. Andrew 
        Natsios, U.S. AID; Hon. Alan Kreczko, Department of 
        State; Charles MacCormack, Save the Children; Andrew 
        Wilder, Save the Children; and Kenneth Bacon, Refugees 
        International.
November 7, 2001.--HEARING: THE FUTURE OF AFGHANISTAN, Room 
        2172. Witnesses: Hon. Pete Tomsen, University of 
        Nebraska at Omaha; Qayum Karzai, Afghans for a Civil 
        Society; Stephen Philip Cohen, Brookings Institution; 
        Dr. Barnett R. Rubin, New York University; Hasan Nouri, 
        International Orphan Care; and Elie Krakowski, Johns 
        Hopkins University.
November 14, 2001.--HEARING: THE MESSAGE IS AMERICA: RETHINKING 
        U.S. PUBLIC POLICY, Room 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: 
        Norman J. Pattiz, Broadcasting Board of Governors; Hon. 
        Edward S. Walker, Jr., Middle East Institute; John W. 
        Leslie, Jr. Weber Shandwick; Robert L. Wehling, 
        Retired, Proctor and Gamble; Mouafac Harb, Al Hayat 
        Newspaper; and John Romano, Producer/Writer.
November 28, 2001.--MARKUP: S. 494, H.R. 3348, S. CON. RES. 58, 
        AND H.R. 2739, Room 2172. Witnesses: none.
November 29, 2001.--HEARING: IMPLEMENTATION OF THE TRAFFICKING 
        VICTIMS PROTECTION ACT, Room 2172. Witnesses: Hon. 
        Paula Dobriansky, Department of State; Hon. Ralph F. 
        Boyd, Department of Justice; Hon. Wade Horn, Department 
        of Health and Human Services; Hon. Janet Ballentine, 
        U.S. AID; Gary Haugen, International Justice Mission; 
        Jessica Neuwirth, Equality Now; ``Maria'' and ``Vi''--
        victims.
December 5, 2001.--HEARING: RUSSIA, IRAQ, AND OTHER POTENTIAL 
        SOURCES OF ANTHRAX, SMALLPOX AND OTHER BIOTERRORIST 
        WEAPONS, Room 2172. Witnesses: Dr. Richard Spertzel, 
        UNSCOM 1994-1998; Dr. Kenneth Alibek, Soviet Offensive 
        Biological Weapons Program; and Elisa D. Harris, 
        University of Maryland.
December 12, 2001.--MARKUP OF H. J. RES. 75 AND H. CON. RES. 
        273, Room 2167 Rayburn. Witnesses: none.
February 6, 2002.--HEARING: THE PRESIDENT'S INTERNATIONAL 
        AFFAIRS BUDGET REQUEST FOR FY 2003, 2172 Rayburn, 
        witness: Hon. Colin Powell, Secretary of State.
February 28, 2002.--MARKUP OF H. RES. 339 FOLLOWED BY HEARING: 
        U.N. CRIMINAL TRIBUNALS FOR YUGOSLAVIA AND RWANDA: 
        INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE OR SHOW OF JUSTICE?, 2172 
        Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Pierre-Richard Prosper, 
        Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes Issues, U.S. 
        Department of State; Prof. Jeremy Rabkin, Department of 
        Government, Cornell University; Larry A. Hammond, 
        Attorney at Law, Osborn Maledon, PA; Hon. Patricia M. 
        Wald, Judge International Criminal Tribunal for Former 
        U.S. Court of Appeals for D.C. Circuit, 1979-1999.
March 7, 2002.--HEARING: U.S. POLICY CONSIDERATIONS IN TIBET, 
        2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Paula Dobriansky, Under 
        Secretary for Global Affairs, U.S. Department of State; 
        Lodi Gyaltsen Gyari, Special Envoy of His Holiness the 
        Dali Lama; Richard Gere, Actor, and Chairman, 
        International Campaign for Tibet.
March 14, 2002.--HEARING: H.R. ______, THE AFGHANISTAN FREEDOM 
        SUPPORT ACT OF 2002, Room 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: Hon. 
        Andrew S. Natsios, U.S. AID; and Hon. Alan P. Larson, 
        Department of State.
March 20, 2002.--MARKUP OF H.R. 3969; H.R. 3656; H. CON. RES. 
        290, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses, none.
April 17, 2002.--HEARING: AIDS ORPHANS AND VULNERABLE CHILDREN 
        IN AFRICA: INDENTIFYING THE BEST PRACTICES FOR CARE, 
        TREATMENT, AND PREVENTION, 2172 Rayburn, Witnesses: 
        Hon. Anne Peterson, Assistant Administrator, Bureau for 
        Global Health, USAID; Fr. Angelo D'Agostino, S.J., 
        M.D., Founder and Medical Director, The Nyumbani 
        Orphanage of Kenya; Nathaniel Dunigan, Director, 
        AIDchild; Ken Casey, Senior Vice President, World 
        Vision International and Special Representative to the 
        President for HIV/AIDS; Leila Gilborn, Program 
        Director, Horizons Global Research on HIV/AIDS Project 
        Population Council.
April 24, 2002.--HEARING: INTERNATIONAL GLOBAL TERRORISM: ITS 
        LINKS WITH ILLICIT DRUGS AS ILLUSTRATED BY THE IRA AND 
        OTHER GROUPS IN COLOMBIA, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. 
        Asa Hutchinson, Administrator, Drug Enforcement 
        Administration; Mark Wong, Deputy Coordinator for 
        Counterrorism, Office of Secretary of State, U.S. 
        Department of State; Gen. Fernando Tapias, Chairman, 
        Joint Chiefs of Staff, Armed Forces of Colombia.
April 25, 2002.--MARKUP: H.R. 4073, H.R. 3969, 2172 Rayburn, 
        witnesses: none.
May 15, 2002.--HEARING: THE ADMINISTRATION'S NATIONAL EXPORT 
        STRATEGY: PROMOTING TRADE AND DEVELOPMENT IN KEY 
        EMERGING MARKETS, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Donald 
        L. Evans, Secretary, U.S. Department of Commerce; Ross 
        J. Connelly, Executive Vice President, Overseas Private 
        Investment Corporation; Eduardo Aguirre, Vice Chairman, 
        Export-Import Bank of the United States; Thelma Askey, 
        Director, Trade and Development Agency; Bill Reinsch, 
        President, National Foreign Trade Council; Edmund B. 
        Rice, Executive Director, Coalition for Employment 
        through Exports, Inc.; James W. Morrison, Ph.D., 
        President, Small Business Exporters Association.
May 22, 2002.--HEARING: INTERNATIONAL ADOPTIONS: PROBLEMS AND 
        SOLUTIONS, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. James W. 
        Ziglar, Commissioner, U.S. Immigration and 
        Naturalization Service; Hon. Mary Ryan, Assistant 
        Secretary for Consular Affairs, U.S. Department of 
        State; Susan Soon-Keum Cox, Vice President of Public 
        Policy and External Services, Holt International 
        Children's Services; Cindy Freidmutter, Executive 
        Director, Evan B. Donaldson Adoption Institute; 
        Kimberly Woulfe.
June 5, 2002.--HEARING: FOLLOWING THE DANFORTH REPORT: DEFINING 
        THE NEXT STEP IN THE PATH TO PEACE IN SUDAN, 2172 
        Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Walter Kansteiner, Assistant 
        Secretary, Bureau of African Affairs, U.S. Department 
        of State; Hon. Roger P. Winter, Assistant 
        Administrator, Bureau of Democracy, Conflict and 
        Humanitarian Assistance, U.S. Agency for International 
        Development; Michael K. Young, Chairman, U.S. 
        Commission on International Religious Freedom; Francis 
        Deng, Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Studies, The 
        Brookings Institution, John Prendergast, Co-Director, 
        Africa Program, International Crisis Group; Ken Isaacs, 
        International Director of Projects, Samaritan's Purse; 
        Eric Reeves, Ph.D., Professor, Smith College.
June 13, 2002.--HEARING: THE DEVELOPING FOOD SECURITY CRISIS IN 
        SOUTHERN AFRICA, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Andrew 
        Natsios, Administrator, U.S. Agency for International 
        Development; James T. Morris, Executive Director, 
        United Nations World Food Programme; Bruce Wilkinson, 
        Senior Vice President for International Programs, World 
        Vision United States.
June 19, 2002.--HEARING: FOREIGN GOVERNMENT COMPLICITY IN HUMAN 
        TRAFFICKING: A REVIEW OF THE STATE DEPARTMENT'S 2002 
        TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS REPORT, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: 
        Hon. Paula Dobriansky, Under Secretary for Global 
        Affairs, U.S. Department of State; Gary Haugen, 
        President, International Justice Mission; Hon. Linda 
        Smith, Founder and Executive Director, Shared Hope 
        International; Maju Poudel, Founder of Daywalka 
        Foundation, Nepali Human Rights/Women's Rights Activist 
        and Social Worker; Donna Hughes, Professor of Carlson 
        Endowed Chair in Women's Studies, University of Rhode 
        Island; Holly Burkhalter, Advocacy Director, Physicians 
        for Human Rights.
June 20, 2002.--HEARING: OIL DIPLOMACY: FACTS AND MYTHS BEHIND 
        FOREIGN OIL DEPENDENCY, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. 
        Spencer Abraham, Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy; 
        Hon. Alan P. Larson, Under Secretary for Economic, 
        Business and Agricultural Affairs, U.S. Department of 
        State; Hon. Stuart E. Eizenstat, Former Deputy 
        Secretary of the Treasury, and Partner, Covington and 
        Burling; Hon. Frank J. Gaffney, Jr., Former Assistant 
        Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy, 
        and President and CEO, Center for Security Policy; 
        Daniel Yergin, Ph.D., Chairman, Cambridge Energy 
        Research Associates.
June 26, 2002.--HEARING: H.R. 5000, THE HOMELAND SECURITY ACT 
        OF 2002, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Marc Grossman, 
        Under Secretary for Political Affairs, U.S. Department 
        of State; Hon. Mary A. Ryan, Assistant Secretary for 
        Consular Affairs, U.S. Department of State.
June 27, 2002.--HEARING: PROMOTING ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN 
        AFRICA THROUGH ACCOUNTABILITY AND GOOD GOVERNANCE, 2172 
        Rayburn, witness: Hon. Paul H. O'Neill, Secretary, U.S. 
        Department of Treasury.
July 10, 2002.--MARK-UP: H.R. 5005, THE HOMELAND SECURITY ACT 
        OF 2002, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: none.
July 24, 2002.--HEARING: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND INTEGRATION 
        AS A CATALYST FOR PEACE: A ``MARSHALL PLAN'' FOR THE 
        MIDDLE EAST, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. George J. 
        Mitchell, Former United States Senate Majority Leader; 
        Rima Khalaf Hunaidi, Ph.D., UN Assistant Secretary-
        General, Assistant Administrator and Regional Director, 
        Regional Bureau for Arab States, United Nations 
        Development Programme; Hernado de Soto, Founder, 
        Institute for Liberty and Democracy, Lima, Peru; Akel 
        Biltaji, Chief Commissioner, Aqaba Special Economic 
        Zone, Jordan; Samir Hulileh, Export Manager, Nasser 
        Investment Group, West Bank; Hiba Husseini, Attorney at 
        Law, Managing Partner, Husseini and Dajani, West Bank; 
        Dina Khayat, Chairman and Managing Director, Lazard 
        Asset Management Egypt, Egypt; Omar Salah, Founder and 
        Chairman of the Board, Century Investment Group, 
        Jordan; Stef Werthheimer, Founder and Chairman, Iscar, 
        Ltd., Israel.
July 25, 2002.--HEARING: LOOSE NUKES, BIOLOGICAL TERRORISM, AND 
        CHEMICAL WARFARE: USING RUSSIAN DEBT TO ENHANCE 
        SECURITY, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Ellen O. 
        Tauscher, Member of Congress from California; Hon. Alan 
        P. Larson, Under Secretary for Economics, Business, and 
        Agricultural Affairs, U.S. Department of State; James 
        L. Fuller, Ph.D., Director, Defense Nuclear Non-
        proliferation Programs, Pacific Northwest Laboratory; 
        Charles B. Curtis, President, The Nuclear Threat 
        Initiative; Constantine Menges, Ph.D., Senior Fellow, 
        Hudson Institute.
September 19, 2002.--HEARING: U.S. POLICY TOWARD IRAQ, 2172 
        Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Richard Perle, Resident 
        Scholar, American Enterprise Institute; Hon. R. James 
        Woolsey, Vice President, Booz Allen Hamilton; Hon. 
        Jessica Tuchman Mathews, President, Carnegie Endowment 
        for International Peace; Gen. Charles G. Boyd, U.S. Air 
        Force (Ret.), President and Chief Executive Officer, 
        Business Executives for National Security.
September 19, 2002.--HEARING: U.S. POLICY TOWARD IRAQ: 
        ADMINISTRATION VIEWS, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. 
        Colin L. Powell, Secretary, U.S. Department of State.
October 2, 2002.--MARKUP: H.J. RES. 114, AUTHORIZATION FOR THE 
        USE OF MILITARY FORCE AGAINST IRAQ, 2172 Rayburn, 
        witnesses: none.
October 3, 2002.--MARKUP: H.J. RES. 114, AUTHORIZATION FOR THE 
        USE OF MILITARY FORCE AGAINST IRAQ, 2172 Rayburn, 
        witnesses: none.

                       B. Subcommittee on Africa

March 14, 2001.--HEARING: CONFRONTING LIBERIA, 2172 Rayburn, 
        witnesses: Hon. Russell D. Feingold, United States 
        Senator; Mydea Reeves-Karpeh, National President, The 
        Union of Liberian Associations in the Americas; Timothy 
        Bishop, Regional Director, West Africa Programs, 
        International Rescue Committee; and Sister Stephanie 
        Mertens, Coordinator, Peace and Justice Office, Adorers 
        of the Blood of Christ.
March 28, 2001.--JOINT HEARING: AMERICA'S SUDAN POLICY: A NEW 
        DIRECTION?, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Michael K. Young, 
        Commissioner, U.S. Commission on International 
        Religious Freedom; Eric Reeves, Professor, Smith 
        College; J. Stephen Morrison, Director, Africa Program, 
        Center for Strategic and International Studies; Roger 
        Winter, Executive Director, U.S. Committee for 
        Refugees, Pastor Gary I. Kusunoki, Calvary Chapel, 
        Rancho Santa Margarita.
May 16, 2001.--MARKUP OF H.R. 931, THE SUDAN PEACE ACT, 2172 
        Rayburn, witnesses: none.
May 16. 2001.--HEARING: BRIDGING THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY 
        DIVIDE IN AFRICA, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Lane Smith, 
        Coordinator, USAID Leland Initiative, Bureau for 
        Africa, Office of Sustainable Development, Agency for 
        International Development; Gail Ifshin, Ph.D., 
        Executive Director, Global Education Fund, Discovery 
        Channel; Ernest Wilson, Ph.D., Director, Center for 
        International Development and Conflict Management 
        (Senior Advisor, Global Information Infrastructure 
        Commission, University of Maryland); and Noah Samara, 
        Chairman and CEO, Worldspace Program.
July 12, 2001.--HEARING: AFRICAN CRISIS RESPONSE INITIATIVE: A 
        SECURITY BUILDING BLOCK, 2200 Rayburn, witnesses: 
        William M. Bellamy, Principal Deputy Assistant 
        Secretary, Bureau of African Affairs, Department of 
        State; H.E. Mamadou Mansour Seck, Ambassador 
        Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary, Republic of Senegal; 
        and Michael O'Hanlon, Ph.D., Senior Fellow, Foreign 
        Policy Studies, Brookings Institution.
November 15, 2001.--HEARING: AFRICA AND THE WAR ON GLOBAL 
        TERRORISM, Room 2200 Rayburn. Witnesses: The Honorable 
        Susan E. Rice, Consultant on African Affairs, Former 
        AssistantSecretary of State; Suleiman Nyang, Ph.D., 
Professor, African Studies, Howard University; J. Stephen Morrison, 
Ph.D., Director, Africa Program, Center for Strategic and International 
Studies.
February 28, 2002.--HEARING: ZIMBABWE: ARE `FREE AND FAIR' 
        ELECTIONS POSSIBLE?, Room 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: The 
        Honorable Walter H. Kansteiner, III, Assistant 
        Secretary, Bureau of African Affairs, U.S. Department 
        of State; John Mw Makumbe, Ph.D., Chairman, 
        Transparency International Zimbabwe; Horace Campbell, 
        Ph.D., Professor, Department of African and African 
        American Studies, Syracuse University; Mr. Thomas 
        Bayer, Director of Programs, Africa and the Near East, 
        International Foundation for Election Systems.
April 18, 2002.--HEARING: THE CHAD-CAMEROON PIPELINE: A NEW 
        MODEL FOR NATURAL RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT, Room 2172 
        Rayburn. Witnesses: His Excellency Donald Norland 
        (Ret.), Former U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Chad; 
        His Excellency Ahmedou Ould-Abdallah (Ret.), Executive 
        Director, Global Coalition for Africa; Mr. Tom Walters, 
        Vice President for Development in Africa, Exxon Mobil 
        Corporation; Mr. Peter Rosenblum, Director, Human 
        Rights Program, Harvard Law School.
May 16, 2002.--HEARING: ELECTIONS IN SIERRA LEONE: A STEP 
        TOWARD REGIONAL STABILITY?, Room 2172 Rayburn. 
        Witnesses: Mr. William M. Bellamy, Principal Deputy 
        Assistant Secretary, Bureau of African Affairs, U.S. 
        Department of State; Mr. John Prendergast, Co-Director 
        of the Africa Program, International Crisis Group; Ms. 
        Binaifer Nowrojee, Counsel, Human Rights Watch/Africa; 
        Mr. Dave Peterson, Senior Program Officer for Africa, 
        National Endowment for Democracy.
June 13, 2002.--HEARING: ANGOLA: PROSPECTS FOR DURABLE PEACE 
        AND ECONOMIC RECONSTRUCTION, Room 2172 Rayburn. 
        Witnesses: The Honorable Walter H. Kansteiner, III, 
        Assistant Secretary, Bureau of African Affairs, U.S. 
        Department of State; The Honorable George Chicoti, 
        Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of External 
        Affairs of Angola; Lukamba Paulo Gato, Chairman, UNITA 
        Management Committee; The Reverend Daniel Ntoni-Nzinga, 
        Ph.D., Executive Secretary, Inter-Ecclesiastical 
        Committee for Peace in Angola (COIEPA).
July 23, 2002.--MARKUP: H. CON. RES. 287 AND H. CON. RES. 421, 
        Room 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: none.
September 18, 2002.--HEARING: THE NEW PARTNERSHIP FOR AFRICA'S 
        DEVELOPMENT: AN AFRICAN INITIATIVE, Room 2172 Rayburn. 
        Witnesses: Mr. Aziz Pahad, Deputy Minister of Foreign 
        Affairs, Government of the Republic of South Africa; 
        Mr. Stephen Hayes, President, Corporate Council on 
        Africa; The Honorable Vivian Lowery Derryck, Senior 
        Vice President, Director, Public-Private Partnerships, 
        Academy for Educational Development; Mr. Adotei Akwei, 
        Africa Advocacy Director, Amnesty International USA.

              C. Subcommittee on East Asia and the Pacific

April 25, 2001.--HEARING: AFTER HAINAN: NEXT STEPS FOR U.S.-
        CHINA RELATIONS, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Professor 
        David Shambaugh, Director of the China Policy Program, 
        Elliott School of International Affairs, George 
        Washington University; Professor Nicholas R. Lardy, 
        Interim Director and Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy 
        Studies, Brookings Institution; and Professor Joseph 
        Fewsmith, Department of International Relations, Boston 
        University.
June 12, 2001.--HEARING: U.S. FOREIGN POLICY IN EAST ASIA AND 
        THE PACIFIC: CHALLENGES AND PRIORITIES FOR THE BUSH 
        ADMINISTRATION, 2172 Rayburn, witness: Hon. James A. 
        Kelly, Assistant Secretary, Bureau of East Asian and 
        Pacific Affairs, Department of State.
July 18, 2001.--HEARING: INDONESIA IN TRAINING: IMPLICATION FOR 
        U.S. INTERESTS, 2172 Rayburn, witness: Ralph L. Boyce, 
        Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of East Asian and 
        Pacific Affairs, Department of State.
July 26, 2001.--HEARING: U.S.-NORTH KOREA RELATIONS AFTER THE 
        POLICY REVIEW, 2200 Rayburn, witness: Mr. Charles L. 
        Pritchard, Special Envoy for Korean Peace Talks, U.S. 
        Representative to KEDO, Department of State.
November 15, 2001.: HEARING: NORTHEAST ASIA AFTER 9/11: 
        REGIONAL TRENDS AND U.S. INTERESTS, 2172 Rayburn, 
        witnesses: Ms. Bonnie S. Glaser, Consultant on Asian 
        Affairs; Mr. Victor Cha, Associate Professor, 
        Department of Government and School of Foreign Service, 
        Georgetown University; Ms. Celeste A. Wallander, 
        Director and Senior Fellow, Russia and Eurasia Program, 
        Center for Strategic and International Studies; Mr. 
        Brad Glosserman, Director of Research, Pacific Forum, 
        Center for Strategic and International Studies.
December 12, 2001.--HEARING: SOUTHEAST ASIA AFTER 9/11: 
        REGIONAL TRENDS AND U.S. INTERESTS, 2172 Rayburn, 
        witnesses: Donald K. Emmerson, Ph.D., Senior Fellow, 
        Asia/Pacific Research Center, Stanford University; 
        Robert Hefner, Ph.D., Institute for Religion and World 
        Affairs, Boston University; Angel M. Rabasa, Ph.D., 
        Senior Policy Analyst, RAND; Mike Jendrzejczyk, 
        Washington Director, Human Rights Watch/Asia.
February 14, 2002.--HEARING: U.S. INTERESTS IN EAST ASIA AND 
        THE PACIFIC: PROBLEMS AND PROSPECTS IN THE YEAR OF THE 
        HORSE, 2200 Rayburn, witness: Hon. James A. Kelly, 
        Assistant Secretary, Bureau of East Asian and Pacific 
        Affairs, Department of State.
February 27, 2002.--HEARING: U.S. POLICY IN ASIA AND THE 
        PACIFIC: THE VIEW FROM PACIFIC COMMAND, 2172 Rayburn, 
        witness: Admiral Dennis C. Blair, Commander in Chief, 
        U.S. Pacific Command.
May 2, 2002.--HEARING: NORTH KOREA: HUMANITARIAN AND HUMAN 
        RIGHTS CONCERNS, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Mr. Jasper 
        Becker, Former Beijing Bureau Chief, South China 
        Morning Post; Ms. Sophie Delaunay, North Korean project 
        representative, Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF); Mr. 
        John Powell, Regional Director, World Food Program; Mr. 
        Timothy A. Peters, Founder and Director, Helping Hands/
        Korea and Ton-a-Month Club; Dr. Norbert Vollertsen, 
        Former medical doctor inside North Korea; Mr. Kim Sung-
        min, Director, North Korean Defectors' Volunteer Group, 
        Committee to Help North Korean Refugees; Ms. Lee Soon-
        ok, North Korean prison camp survivor; Mr. Lee Young-
        kook, North Korean prison camp survivor, Former 
        bodygaurd for Chairman Kim Jong Il.
June 12, 2002.--HEARING: RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN BURMA, 2200 
        Rayburn, witnesses: Mr. Matthew Daley, Assistant 
        Secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific Affairs, 
        U.S. Department of State; Janet Ballantyne, Counselor, 
        U.S. Agency for International Development.
July 23, 2002.--HEARING: PACIFIC ISLAND NATIONS: CURRENT ISSUES 
        AND U.S. INTERESTS, 2200 Rayburn, witnesses: Mr. 
        Matthew Daley, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of 
        East Asian and Pacific Affairs, U.S. Department of 
        State; Mary Beth West, Deputy Assistant Secretary, 
        Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental 
        Affairs, U.S. Department of State; Wali M. Osman, 
        Ph.D., Bank of Hawaii Senior Fellow for Pacific 
        Economies, East-West Center.

                        D. Subcommitee on Europe

April 25, 2001.--HEARING: THE U.S.-EUROPEAN RELATIONSHIP: 
        OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: 
        Simon Serfaty, Ph.D., Director, Europe Program, Center 
        for Strategic and International Studies; Charles 
        Kupchan, Ph.D., Director, Europe Studies, Council on 
        Foreign Relations; Willard M. Berry, Ph.D., President, 
        European-American Business Council; Hon.Imelda Read, 
Member, European Parliament; and Hon. Enrique Baron-Crespo, Member, 
European Parliament.
June 13, 2001.--HEARING: U.S. POLICY IN THE EASTERN 
        MEDITERRANEAN: MANAGING THE GREECE, TURKEY, CYPRUS 
        TRIANGLE, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Nelson Ledsky, 
        Senior Analyst, National Democratic Institute, Former 
        Cyprus Negotiator; Ian O. Lesser, Ph.D., Senior 
        Analyst, The RAND Corporation; and John Sitilides, 
        Executive Director, Western Policy Center.
July 11, 2001.--HEARING: THE BALKANS: WHAT HAS BEEN 
        ACCOMPLISHED: WHAT IS THE AGENDA FOR THE NEXT FIVE 
        YEARS?, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. A. Elizabeth 
        Jones, Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of European 
        Affairs, Department of State; Daniel P. Serwer, Ph.D., 
        Director, Balkans Initiative, U.S. Institute of Peace; 
        and James R. Hooper, Managing Director, Public 
        International Law and Policy Group.
August 2, 2001.--MARKUP OF H. RES. 200; H. CON. RES. 131; AND 
        H. CON. RES. 58, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: none.
October 10, 2001.--HEARING: THE CAUCASUS AND CASPIAN REGION: 
        UNDERSTANDING U.S. INTERESTS AND POLICY. Witnesses: 
        Charles H. Fairbanks, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University; 
        Brenda Schaffer, Ph.D., Harvard University; and Ms. 
        Zeyno Baran, CSIS.
February 27, 2002.--MARKUP OF H.J. RES 339, 2172 Rayburn; 
        witnesses: none.
February 27, 2002.--HEARING: U.S.-RUSSIA RELATIONS: AN 
        ASSESSMENT; 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Michael McFaul, 
        Ph.D., Hoover Fellow and Professor of Political 
        Science, Hoover Institute, Stanford University; Celeste 
        A. Wallander, Ph.D., Director and Senior Fellow, Russia 
        and Eurasia Program, Center for Strategic and 
        International Studies; Z. Blake Marshall, Executive 
        Vice-President, U.S.-Russia Business Council.
March 13, 2002.--HEARING: THE U.S. AND EUROPE: THE BUSH 
        ADMINISTRATION AND TRANSATLANTIC RELATIONS. 2200 
        Rayburn; witness: The Honorable A. Elizabeth Jones, 
        Assistant Secretary, Bureau of European and Eurasian 
        Affairs, U.S. Department of State.
April 17, 2002.--HEARING: THE FUTURE OF NATO AND ENLARGEMENT. 
        2172 Rayburn; witnesses: Lieutenant General William E. 
        Odom, U.S. Army [Ret.], Director, National Security 
        Studies and Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute; Jeane J. 
        Kirkpatrick, former U.S. Ambassador to the United 
        Nations; Philip H. Gordon, Senior Fellow, The Brookings 
        Institution; Thomas S. Szayna, Political Scientist, 
        RAND.
May 1, 2002.--HEARING: NATO ENLARGEMENT: A VIEW FROM THE 
        CANDIDATE COUNTRIES. 2172 Rayburn; witnesses: Her 
        Excellency Elena Poptodorova, Ambassador of Bulgaria; 
        His Excellency Fatos Tarifa, Ambassador of Albania; His 
        Excellency Ivan Grdesic, Ambassador of Croatia; His 
        Excellency Sven Jurgenson, Ambassador of Estonia; His 
        Excellency Avis Ronis, Ambassador of Latvia; His 
        Excellency Nikola Dimotrov, Ambassador of Macedonia; 
        His Excellency Sorin Ducaru, Ambassador of Romania; His 
        Excellency Martin Butora, Ambassador of Slovakia; His 
        Excellency Davorin Kracun, Ambassador of Slovenia; His 
        Excellency Vygaudas Usackas, Ambassador of Lithuania.
June 19, 2002.--HEARING: NATO AND ENLARGEMENT: A UNITED STATES 
        AND NATO PERSPECTIVE, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Joseph 
        W. Ralston, USAF, Commander-in-Chief, United States 
        European Command; Robert A. Bradtke, Deputy Assistant 
        Secretary of State, Bureau of European Affairs; Ian 
        Brzezinski, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
        European and NATO Affairs.
July 24, 2002.--MARKUP OF H. CON. RES. 164; H. CON. RES. 437; 
        H. CON. RES. 327. 2255 Rayburn; witnesses: none.
September 25, 2002.--MARKUP OF H. RES. 468; H. CON. RES. 116; 
        H. RES. 253. 2172 Rayburn; witnesses: none.

      E. Subcommittee on International Operations and Human Rights

February 28, 2001.--HEARING: INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING: ITS 
        MISSION, BUDGET AND FUTURE, 2200 Rayburn. Witness: Marc 
        B. Nathanson, Chairman, Broadcasting Board of 
        Governors.
March 7, 2001.--HEARING: STATE DEPARTMENT COUNTRY REPORTS ON 
        HUMAN RIGHTS PRACTICES--ROAD MAP FOR BUDGETING OF 
        DEMOCRACY AND HUMAN RIGHTS PROGRAMS OF THE STATE 
        DEPARTMENT, 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: Carlos Salinas, 
        Acting Director of Government Relations, Amnesty 
        International; Elisa Massimino, Washington Director, 
        Lawyers Committee for Human Rights; Paul Marshall, 
        Senior Fellow, Center for Religious Freedom, Freedom 
        House; William D. Hartung, President's Fellow, World 
        Policy Institute; Steven Rickard, Director, Robert F. 
        Kennedy Memorial Center for Human Rights; Catherine del 
        Pino, Deputy Director, CNAPS, The Brookings 
        Institution.
March 15, 2001.--HEARING: HUMAN RIGHTS IN NORTHERN IRELAND: 
        PROMISES KEPT OR PROMISES BROKEN?, 2172 Rayburn. 
        Witnesses: Michael Posner, Executive Director, Lawyers 
        Committee for Human Rights; Jane Winter, Director, 
        British Irish Rights Watch, London; Martin O'Brien, 
        Director, Committee on the Administration of Justice, 
        Belfast; and Gavan Kennedy, Executive Director, Irish 
        American Information Service.
March 28, 2001.--JOINT HEARING: AMERICA'S SUDAN POLICY: A NEW 
        DIRECTION?, 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: Michael K. Young, 
        Commissioner, U.S. Commission on International 
        Religious Freedom; Eric Reeves, Professor, Smith 
        College; J. Stephen Morrison, Director, Africa Program, 
        Center for Strategic and International Studies; Roger 
        Winter, Executive Director, U.S. Committee for 
        Refugees, Pastor Gary I. Kusunoki, Calvary Chapel, 
        Rancho Santa Margarita.
May 17, 2001.--HEARING: SUFFERING AND DESPAIR: HUMANITARIAN 
        CRISIS IN THE CONGO, 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: Father 
        Jean-Bosco Bahala, Archbishop of Bukavu; Sulaiman Ali 
        Baldom, Senior Researcher, Africa Division, Human 
        Rights Watch; Les Roberts, M.D., Director, Health 
        Policy, International Rescue Committee; Anne Edgerton, 
        Great Lakes Advocate, Refugees International; and Wayne 
        Madsen, Investigative Reporter (Author of Genocide and 
        Covert Operations in Africa: 1993-99).
June 6, 2001.--HEARING: OPPRESSORS AT THE REIN: HAS THE U.N. 
        COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS LOST ITS COURSE? A REVIEW OF 
        ITS MISSION, OPERATIONS AND STRUCTURE, 2172 Rayburn. 
        Witnesses: Michael E. Parmly, Principal Deputy 
        Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights 
        and Labor, Department of State; William B. Woods, 
        Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of 
        International Organization Affairs, Department of 
        State; Hon. Jeane J. Kirkpatrick, Senior Fellow, 
        Director of Foreign and Defense Policy Studies, 
        American Enterprise Institute, (former U.S. Permanent 
        Representative to the United Nations); Nina Shea, 
        Director, Center for Religious Freedom, Freedom House, 
        (U.S. delegate to the 57th Session of the UN Human 
        Rights Commission); Hon. Mark Palmer, Vice Chairman of 
        the Board of Trustees, Freedom House, (former delegate 
        to the UN Human Rights Commission); and John Ackerly, 
        President, International Campaign for Tibet.
June 27, 2001.--HEARING: ORGANS FOR SALE: CHINA'S GROWING TRADE 
        AND ULTIMATE VIOLATIONS OF PRISONERS' RIGHTS, 2172 
        Rayburn. Witnesses: Michael E. Parmly, Principal Deputy 
        Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights 
        and Labor, Department of State; Thomas Diflo, M.D., 
        Director, Renal Transplant Program, New York University 
        Medical Center; Wang Guoqi, (former doctor at a Chinese 
        People's Liberation Army hospital); Harry Hongda Wu, 
        Executive Director, The Laogai Research Foundation; and 
        Professor Nancy Scheper-Hughes, Project Director, Organ 
        Watch.
July 11, 2001.--HEARING: RELIGIOUS DISCRIMINATION IN WESTERN 
        EUROPE, 2200 Rayburn. Witnesses: Hon. Lorne W. Craner, 
        Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, 
        and Labor, Department of State; Joseph K. Grieboski, 
        President, Institute on Religion and Public Policy; 
        Sameera Fazili, Executive Director, Muslim Women 
        Lawyers Association for Human Rights; Isaac Hayes, 
        Actor/Musician; Patrick Hinojosa, President, Panda 
        Software; and Catherine Bell, Actor.
July 18, 2001.--HEARING: SILENCING CENTRAL ASIA: THE VOICE OF 
        DISSIDENTS, 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: Hon. Michael E. 
        Parmly, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of 
        Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, Department of 
        State; Hon. William B. Taylor, Coordinator of U.S. 
        Assistance to the New Independent States, Department of 
        State; Cassandra Cavanaugh, Ph.D., Assistant Professor 
        of History, College of the Holy Cross, (Former Senior 
        Researcher, Europe and Central Asia Division, Human 
        Rights Watch); Oleg Kviatkovski, Executive Director, 
        TV-Radio Station 31 Channel, Almaty, Kazakhstan; Ariel 
        Cohen, Ph.D., Senior Policy Analyst, The Heritage 
        Foundation; Bigeldin Gabdullin, Journalist; Frank 
        Smyth, Washington Director, Committee to Protect 
        Journalists; and Fiona Hill, Ph.D., Fellow, Brookings 
        Institution.
July 31, 2001.--HEARING: A DISCUSSION ON THE U.N. WORLD 
        CONFERENCE AGAINST RACISM, 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: 
        William B. Wood, Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, 
        Bureau of International Organization Affairs, 
        Department of State; Steven Wagenseil, Director, Office 
        of Multilateral Affairs, Bureau of Democracy, Human 
        Rights, and Labor, Department of State; Rabbi Marvin 
        Hier, Founder and Dean, Simon Wiesenthal Center; 
        Richard D. Heideman, President, B'nai B'rith 
        International; Michael Salberg, Chair, International 
        Education Programs, Anti-Defamation League; Roger 
        Wareham, International Secretariat, December 12th 
        Movement; and Ray Winbush, Ph.D., Benjamin Hooks 
        Professor of Social Justice, Fisk University.
October 3, 2001.--HEARING: THE ROLE OF THE INTERNATIONAL ATOMIC 
        ENERGY AGENCY (IAEA) IN SAFEGUARDING AGAINST ACTS OF 
        TERRORISM, Room 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: Mr. Richard J. 
        Stratford, Department of State; Mr. E. Michael 
        Southwick, Department of State; Mr. Steven K. Black, 
        Department of Energy; and Mr. William Travers, Nuclear 
        Regulatory Commission.
October 31, 2001.--HEARING: AFGHAN PEOPLE VS. THE TALIBAN: THE 
        STRUGGLE FOR FREEDOM INTENSIFIES, Room 2172 Rayburn. 
        Witnesses: Hon. Lorne W. Craner, Department of State; 
        Mr. T. Kumar, Amnesty International; Mr. Haron Amin, 
        Northern Alliance United Front; Mr. A. Quadir Amiryar, 
        Ph.D., George Washington University.
February 13, 2002.--HEARING: COMMUNIST ENTRENCHMENT AND 
        RELIGIOUS PERSECUTION IN CHINA AND VIETNAM, Room 2172 
        Rayburn. Witnesses: Hon. Michael K. Young, U.S. 
        Commission on International Religious Freedom; Mr. Paul 
        Marshall, Freedom House; Mr. John Ackerly, 
        International Campaign for Tibet; Ms. Amy Lee, Falun 
        Gong Practitioner; Ms. Penelope Faulkner, Vietnam 
        Commission for Human Rights; and Mr. Dan Duy-Tu Hoang, 
        Vietnamese-American Public Affairs Committee.
March 6, 2002.--HEARING: A REVIEW OF THE STATE DEPARTMENT'S 
        HUMAN RIGHTS REPORTS FROM THE VICTIM'S PERSPECTIVE, 
        Room 2200 Rayburn. Witnesses: Hon. Lorne W. Craner, 
        Department of State; Ms. Alex Arriaga, Amnesty 
        International; Mr. Humberto Ramon Colas, Founder of the 
        Cuban Independent Libraries; Mr. Y-kin Buonkrong, 
        Montagnard Practitioner and Activist; and Mr. Arsene 
        Kirhero, International Human Rights Law Group.
April 24, 2002.--HEARING: THE U.N. AND THE SEX SLAVE TRADE IN 
        BOSNIA: ISOLATED CASE OR LARGER PROBLEM IN THE U.N. 
        SYSTEM? Room 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: Hon. Nancy Ely-
        Raphel, Department of State; Ms. Martina Vandenberger, 
        J.D., Human Rights Watch; Mr. Ben Johnston, Former 
        DynaCorp Employee; Mr. David Lamb, Former U.N. Human 
        Rights Investigator in Bosnia; and Ms. Nomi Levenkron, 
        Hotline for Migrant Workers in Israel.
June 6, 2002.--HEARING: AN ASSESSMENT OF CUBA BROADCASTING--THE 
        VOICE OF FREEDOM, Room 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: Hon. 
        Dan Fisk, Department of State; Hon. Adolfo Franco, U.S. 
        Agency for International Development; Mr. Brian 
        Conniff, Broadcasting Board of Governors; Mr. Salvador 
        Lew, Broadcasting Board of Governors; Mr. Ernesto Diaz 
        Rodriquez, Former Cuban Political Prisoner; Ms. Berta 
        Mexidor, Founder of Cuban Independent Libraries; Mr. 
        Alfredo Duran, Cuban Committee for Democracy; and Mr. 
        Phil Peters, Lexington Institute.
July 25, 2002.--MARKUP: H. CON. RES. 349 AND H. CON. RES. 351, 
        Room 2200 Rayburn. Witnesses: none.
October 9, 2002.--HEARING: AN EVALUATION OF THE INTERNATIONAL 
        RELIGIOUS FREEDOM REPORT, Room 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: 
        Hon. John Hanford, Department of State; Hon. Felice 
        Gaer, U.S. Commission for International Freedom; Mr. 
        Ghayret Sidik, Uyghur Victim of Religious Persecution 
        in China; Mr. Udit Raj, Buddhist Victim of Religious 
        Persecution in India; Mr. Saikh Waheed Ahmad, Ahmadiyya 
        Muslim Victim of Religious Persecution in Pakistan; Mr. 
        Sayed Mustafa Al-Qazwini, Islamic Educational Center of 
        Orange County; and Mr. Nihad Awad, Council on American 
        Islamic Relations.

           F. Subcommittee on the Middle East and South Asia

March 1, 2001.--HEARING: THE EARTHQUAKE IN INDIA: THE AMERICAN 
        RESPONSE, 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: Hon. Richard F. 
        Celeste, U.S. Ambassador to India (via video 
        conference); Walter North, Mission Director to India, 
        Agency for International Development (via video 
        conference); Alan W. Eastham, Acting Assistant 
        Secretary South Asian Affairs, Department of State; 
        Leonard M. Rogers, Acting Administrator for 
        Humanitarian Response, Agency for International 
        Development; Sean Callahan, Catholic Relief Services/
        India (via video conference); and Thomas Alcedo, CARE/
        India (via video conference).
March 29, 2001.--HEARING: DEVELOPMENTS IN THE MIDDLE EAST, 2172 
        Rayburn. Witness: Hon. Edward Walker, Assistant 
        Secretary, Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs, Department 
        of State.
May 9, 2001.--HEARING: THE ILSA EXTENSION ACT OF 2001, 2172 
        Rayburn. Witnesses: Hon. Alfonse D'Amato, Former U.S. 
        Senator (via video conference); Patrick Clawson, Ph.D., 
        Director for Research, The Washington Institute for 
        Near East Policy; Howard A. Kohr, Executive Director, 
        American Israel Public Affairs Committee; and Hon. 
        William A. Reinsch, President, National Foreign Trade 
        Council, Inc.
June 6, 2001.--HEARING: U.S. POLICY IN CENTRAL ASIA, 2172 
        Rayburn. Witness: Clifford G. Bond, Acting Principal 
        Deputy, Office of the Special Adviser to the Secretary 
        for the New Independent States, Department of State.
July 18, 2001.--HEARING: SILENCING CENTRAL ASIA: THE VOICE OF 
        DISSIDENTS (joint hearing with the Subcommittee on 
        International Operations and Human Rights), Room 2172 
        Rayburn. Witnesses: The Honorable Michael E. Parmly, 
        Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of 
        Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, U.S. Department of 
        State; The Honorable William B. Taylor, Coordinator of 
        U.S. Assistance to the New Independent States U.S. 
        Department of State; Cassandra Cavanaugh, Ph.D., 
        Assistant Professor of History College of the Holy 
        Cross; Mr. Oleg Kviatkovski, Executive Director, TV-
        Radio Station 31 Channel, Almaty, Kazakhstan; Ariel 
        Cohen, Ph.D, Senior Policy Analyst, The Heritage 
        Foundation; Mr. Bigeldin Gabdullin, Journalist; Mr. 
        Frank Smyth, Washington Director, Committee to Protect 
        Journalists; Fiona Hill, Ph.D., Fellow, Brookings 
        Institution.
July 26, 2001.--HEARING: U.S. POLICY TOWARD THE PALESTINIANS--
        PART I, 2172 Rayburn. Witness: Hon. William J. Burns, 
        Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs, 
        Department of State.
September 25, 2001.--HEARING: U.S. POLICY TOWARD THE 
        PALESTINIANS, PART II, Room 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: 
        The Honorable Dennis B. Ross, Counselor/Distinguished 
        Fellow, The Washington Institute for Near East Policy; 
        The Honorable Martin S. Indyk, Senior Fellow, Foreign 
        Policy Studies, The Brookings Institution; The 
        Honorable Edward Walker, President, The Middle East 
        Institute.
October 4, 2001.--HEARING: U.S. POLICY TOWARD IRAQ, Room 2172 
        Rayburn. Witnesses: Mr. Charles Duelfer, Visiting 
        Scholar, Middle East Program, Center for Strategic and 
        International Studies; Mr. Geoffrey Kemp, Director of 
        Regional Strategic Programs, the Nixon Center; and Mr. 
        Gary Milhollin, Director, Wisconsin Project on Nuclear 
        Arms Control.
October 17, 2001.--HEARING: DEVELOPMENTS IN THE MIDDLE EAST, 
        Room 2172 Rayburn. Witness: The Honorable William J. 
        Burns, Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of Near 
        Eastern Affairs, U.S. Department of State.
February 27, 2002.--HEARING: U.S. SECURITY POLICY IN ASIA AND 
        THE PACIFIC: THE VIEW FROM PACIFIC COMMAND (Joint 
        Hearing with EAP), Room 2172 Rayburn. Witness: Admiral 
        Dennis C. Blair, Commander in Chief, U.S. Pacific 
        Command.
April 18, 2002.--HEARING: WORDS HAVE CONSEQUENCES: THE IMPACT 
        OF INCITEMENT, ANTI-AMERICAN AND ANTI-SEMITIC 
        PROPAGANDA ON AMERICAN INTERESTS IN THE MIDDLE EAST, 
        Room 2172. Witnesses: The Honorable Martin S. Indyk, 
        Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Studies, The Brookings 
        Institution; Abraham H. Foxman, National Director, 
        Anti-Defamation League; Yigal Carmon, President, The 
        Middle East Media Research Institute.
May 22, 2002.--HEARING: THE FUTURE OF U.S.-SAUDI RELATIONS, 
        Room 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: Honorable Barney Frank, 
        U.S. House of Representatives; The Honorable R. James 
        Woolsey, Attorney, Shea and Gardner, Former Director of 
        Central Intelligence (1993-1995); The Honorable William 
        Kristol, Editor, The Weekly Standard, Former Chief of 
        Staff to Vice President Quayle (1989-1993); The 
        Honorable Richard W. Murphy, Senior Fellow Middle East, 
        Council on Foreign Relations, Former U.S. Ambassador to 
        Saudi Arabia (1981-1983); Dr. F. Gregory Gause, 
        Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, 
        University of Vermont.
June 6, 2002.--HEARING: THE CURRENT CRISIS IN SOUTH ASIA, Room 
        2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: Mr. Michael Krepon, Founding 
        President, The Henry L. Stimson Center; Mr. Anatol 
        Lieven, Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for 
        International Peace; Mr. Amit A. Pandya, Senior Fellow 
        for South Asia, Institute for Global Democracy.
June 18, 2002.--HEARING: RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN THE MIDDLE 
        EAST, Room 2172. Witness: The Honorable William J. 
        Burns, Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Near Eastern 
        Affairs, U.S. Department of State.
July 11, 2002.--MARKUP: H.R. 1795, THE MIDDLE EAST PEACE 
        COMMITMENTS ACT; H.R. 4693, THE ARAFAT ACCOUNTABILITY 
        ACT, Room 2172 Rayburn. Witnesses: The Honorable Roy 
        Blunt, U.S. House of Representatives; The Honorable 
        David Satterfield, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau 
        of Near Eastern Affairs, U.S. Department of State.
July 18, 2002.--HEARING: RECENT DEVELOPMENTS IN SOUTH ASIA, 
        Room 2172 Rayburn. Witness: The Honorable Christina 
        Rocca, Assistant Secretary, Bureau of South Asian 
        Affairs, U.S. Department of State.
September 18, 2002.--HEARING: U.S. POLICY TOWARD SYRIA, AND 
        H.R. 4483, THE SYRIA ACCOUNTABILITY ACT, Room 2172 
        Rayburn. Witnesses: The Honorable Richard K. Armey, 
        Majority Leader, U.S. House of Representatives; The 
        Honorable Eliot L. Engel, U.S. House of 
        Representatives; The Honorable David Satterfield, 
        Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Near Eastern 
        Affairs, U.S. Department of State; The Honorable Edward 
        M. Gabriel, President, American Task Force for Lebanon; 
        Mr. Matthew A. Levitt, Senior Fellow, Washington 
        Institute for Near East Policy; The Honorable William 
        A. Reinsch, President, National Foreign Trade Council, 
        Inc.; and Elias Saadi, M.D., Council of Lebanese 
        American Organizations.

                         G. Western Hemisphere

March 14, 2001.--MARKUP: H. CON. RES. 41, 2200 Rayburn, 
        witnesses: none.
March 14, 2001.--HEARING: PROSPECTS FOR FREE AND FAIR ELECTIONS 
        IN PERU, 2200 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Luis Lauredo, 
        U.S. Ambassador to the Organization of American States; 
        Susan Westin, Managing Director for International 
        Affairs & Trade, United States General Accounting 
        Office; and Patrick Merloe, Senior Associate for 
        Electoral Processes, National Democratic Institute for 
        International Affairs.
June 28, 2001.--MARKUP OF H. RES. 181, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: 
        none.
June 28, 2001.--HEARING: A REVIEW OF THE ANDEAN INITIATIVE, 
        2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Congressman Benjamin Gilman; 
        James F. Mack, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of 
        International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, 
        Department of State; William R. Brownfield, Deputy 
        Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Western Hemisphere 
        Affairs, Department of State; and Michael Deal, Acting 
        Assistant Administrator, Bureau for Latin America and 
        the Caribbean, U.S. Agency for International 
        Development.
July 12, 2001.--HEARING: THE IMPORTANCE OF THE FREE TRADE AREA 
        OF THE AMERICAS (FTAA) TO U.S. FOREIGN POLICY, 2172 
        Rayburn, witness: Peter F. Allgeier, Ph.D., Associate 
        U.S. Trade Representative for the Western Hemisphere, 
        Office of the U.S. Trade Representative.
October 10, 2001.--HEARING: THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE'S RESPONSE 
        TO THE SEPTEMBER 11, 2001, TERRORIST ATTACK ON THE 
        UNITED STATES, 2200 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Francis X. 
        Taylor, Ambassador-at-Large, Office of the Coordinator 
        for Counterterrorism, Department of State; Hon. Roger 
        Noriega, U.S. Ambassador to the Organization of 
        American States; James F. Mack, Deputy Assistant 
        Secretary, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law 
        Enforcement Affairs, U.S. Department of State; Curt 
        Struble, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Western 
        Hemisphere Affairs, Department of State.
April 11, 2002.--HEARING: U.S. POLICY TOWARD COLOMBIA, 2172 
        Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Otto J. Reich, Assistant 
        Secretary of State, Bureau of Western Hemisphere 
        Affairs, Department of State; Hon. Peter W. Rodman, 
        Assistant Secretary of Defense for International 
        Security Affairs, Department of Defense; Major General 
        Gary D. Speer, Acting Commander-in-Chief, United States 
        Southern Command; Michael Shifter, Vice President for 
        Policy, Inter-American Dialogue; Adam Isaacson, Senior 
        Associate, Center for International Policy.
July 24, 2002.--HEARING: THE COFFEE CRISIS IN THE WESTERN 
        HEMISPHERE, 2200 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. Adolfo 
        Franco, Assistant Administrator for Latin America and 
        the Caribbean, U.S. Agency for International 
        Development; Franklin Lee, Deputy Administrator for 
        Commodity and Marketing Programs, Foreign Agriculture 
        Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture; Gabriel Silva, 
        General Manager, National Federation of Coffee Growers 
        of Colombia; Colleen Crosby, Partner, Santa Cruz Coffee 
        Roasting Company; Robert Nelson, President and CEO, 
        National Coffee Association of U.S.A., Inc.; Ted R. 
        Lingle, Executive Director, Specialty Coffee 
        Association of America.
October 10, 2002.--HEARING: DRUG CORRUPTION IN GUATEMALA AND 
        THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC, 2172 Rayburn, witnesses: Hon. 
        Otto J. Reich, Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Western 
        Hemisphere, Department of State; Hon. Adolfo Franco, 
        Assistant Administrator for Latin America andthe 
Caribbean, U.S. Agency for International Development; Paul Simons, 
Acting Assistant Secretary, Bureau of International Narcotics and Law 
Enforcement Affairs, Department of State; Roger Guevara, Chief of 
Operations, Drug Enforcement Agency; Monica Kladakis, Senior 
Coordinator for Democracy and Human Rights Promotion, Bureau of 
Democracy, Human Rights and Labor, Department of State.

                          H. Protocol Meetings

Afghanistan--H.E. Hamid Karzai, Chairman of the Interim 
        Administration of Afghanistan, full HIRC meeting on 1/
        29/02. H.E. Dr. Abdullah Abdullah, Minister of Foreign 
        Affairs of the Transitional Government of Afghanistan, 
        private meeting on 9/17/02.
Albania--H.E. Ilir Meta, Prime Minister of Albania, private 
        meeting on 5/1/01. Full HIRC meeting with a Delegation 
        from the Albanian Parliament on 5/1/02.
Algeria--H.E. Abdelaziz Bouteflika, President of Algeria, full 
        HIRC meeting on 7/12/01.
Argentina--H.E. Hilda Duhalde, First Lady of Argentina, full 
        HIRC meeting on 4/11/02.
Australia--Hon. Alexander Downer, MP, Minister of Foreign 
        Affairs of Australia, private meeting on 3/21/01. Hon. 
        John Howard, MP, Prime Minister of Australia, full HIRC 
        meeting on 6/12/02.
Bangladesh--H.E. Reaz Rahman, Minister of State for Foreign 
        Affairs of Bangladesh, Subcommittee on Middle East held 
        full HIRC meeting on 11/7/01.
Bolivia--H.E. Gonzalo Sanchez De Lozada, President of Bolivia, 
        private meeting hosted by Subcommittee on Western 
        Hemisphere on 11/12/02.
Bulgaria--H.E. Georgi Parvanov, President of Bulgaria, private 
        meeting on 9/10/02.
Canada--Hon. William Graham, PC, MP, Minister of Foreign 
        Affairs of Canada, private meeting on 2/13/02.
Chile--H.E. Soledad Alvear, Minister of Foreign Affairs of 
        Chile, private meeting on 3/1/01. Hon. Sergio Romero, 
        Hon. Jaime Chazmuri, Senators from Chile, private 
        meeting on 7/11/01.
China--Private meeting with Delegation from the National 
        People's Congress of China on 6/5/02.
Colombia--H.E. Andres Pastrana, President of Colombia, private 
        meeting on 2/26/01 and full HIRC meeting on 4/17/02. 
        H.E. Alvaro Uribe-Velez, President-elect of Colombia, 
        private meeting on 6/19/02. H.E. Alvaro Uribe, 
        President of Colombia, private meeting on 9/24/02.
Costa Rica--H.E. Miguel Angel Rodriguez, President of Costa 
        Rica, full HIRC meeting on 7/12/01.
Cyprus--H.E. Erato Kozakou-Marcoullis, Ambassador of Cyprus, 
        private meeting on 6/14/01. Hon. Nicos Anastasiades, 
        Chairman of the Foreign Affairs Committee of Cyprus, 
        private meeting on 6/11/02
Czech Republic--H.E. Milos Zeman, Prime Minister of the Czech 
        Republic, private meeting on 11/9/01.
Denmark--H.E. Morens Lykketoft, Minister of Foreign Affairs of 
        Denmark, full HIRC meeting on 3/6/01.
East Timor--H.E. Dr. Mari Amude Bin Alkatiri, Prime Minister of 
        East Timor, private meeting on 7/25/02.
Ecuador--H.E. Heinz Moeller, Minister of Foreign Affairs of 
        Ecuador, private meeting on 6/14/01.
Egypt--H.E. Mohammed Hosni Mubarak, President of Egypt, full 
        HIRC meeting on 4/4/01. H.E. Ahmed Maher El Sayed, 
        Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Arab Republic of 
        Egypt, full HIRC meeting on 11/27/01. H.E. Mohamed 
        Hosny Mubarak, President of the Arab Republic of Egypt, 
        full HIRC meeting on 3/6/02.
El Salvador--H.E. Francisco Flores, President of El Salvador, 
        full HIRC meeting on 3/1/01.
Estonia--H.E. Toomas Hendrik Ilves, Minister of Foreign Affairs 
        of Estonia, private meeting on 6/6/01.
European Parliament--Full HIRC meeting w/Members of the 
        European Parliament on 3/6/01. Delegation from the 
        Parliamentary Group of the Party of European 
        Socialists, full HIRC meeting on 4/25/01.
European Union--H.E. Alex Reyn, Amb. of Belgium representing 
        Presidency of the European Union's Council of 
        Ministers, and H.E. Dr. Guenter Burghardt, Head of 
        Delegation of the European Commission, full HIRC 
        meeting on 7/18/01. Full HIRC meeting with EU 
        Ambassadors on 8/2/01. H.E. Chris Patten, EU 
        Commissioner, Subcommittee on Europe held meeting on 9/
        20/01. Private Hyde/Lantos meeting w/EU Ambassadors on 
        2/14/02.
France--H.E. Francois Bujon de l'Estang, Ambassador of France, 
        private meeting on 3/1/01. H.E. Hubert Vedrine, 
        Minister of Foreign Affairs of France, full HIRC 
        meeting on 3/27/01.
Germany--Dr. Gunther Pleuger, State Secretary in the Foreign 
        Office of Germany, private meeting on 3/22/01. Hon. 
        Angela Merkel, MP, Chairman of the CDU Party of 
        Germany, private meeting on 4/24/01. H.E. Joschka 
        Fischer, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Germany, full 
        HIRC meeting on 5/3/01.--H.E. Joschka Fischer, Minister 
        of Foreign Affairs of Germany, private meeting on 5/1/
        02.
Greece--H.E. George Papandreou, Minister of Foreign Affairs of 
        Greece, private meeting on 5/23/01.
Hungary--H.E. Janos Martonyi, Minister of Foreign Affairs of 
        Hungary, full HIRC meeting on 4/30/01.
IAEA--H.E. Mohamed El Baradei, Director General of the 
        International Atomic Energy Agency, full HIRC meeting 
        on 11/13/02.
India--H.E. Lalit Mansigh, Ambassador of India, private meeting 
        on 5/23/01. H.E. Atal Behari Vajpayee, Prime Minister 
        of India, full HIRC meeting on 11/8/01. H.E. Yashwant 
        Sinha, Minister of External Affairs of India, private 
        meeting on 9/10/02.
Indonesia--H.E. Megawati Soekarnoputri, President of Indonesia, 
        full HIRC meeting on 9/20/01.
Ireland--H.E. Brian Cowen, Minister of Foreign Affairs of 
        Ireland, full HIRC meeting on 2/28/01.
Israel--H.E. Michael Melchior, Deputy Minister of Foreign 
        Affairs, full HIRC meeting on 7/18/01. H.E. Benjamin 
        Netanyahu, Former Prime Minister of Israel, full HIRC 
        meeting on 4/10/02. H.E. Ariel Sharon, Prime Minister 
        of Israel, full HIRC meeting on 6/11/02.
Italy--H.E. Ferdinando Salleo, Ambassador of Italy, private 
        meeting on 6/19/01.
Japan--H.E. Shunji Yanai, Ambassador of Japan, private meeting 
        on 3/22/01.
Jordan--H.M. King Abdullah bin Al-Hussein of the Hashemite 
        Kingdom of Jordan, full HIRC meeting on 4/4/01. H.M. 
        King Abdullah II of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan, 
        full HIRC meeting on 5/8/02.
Korea--H.E. Lee Joung-binn, Minister of Foreign Affairs, 
        private meeting on 2/8/01. H.E. Han Seung-soo, Minister 
        of Foreign Affairs and Trade of the Republic of Korea, 
        full HIRC meeting on 6/12/01. H.E. Kim Dong Shin, 
        Minister of Defense of the Republic of Korea, private 
        meeting on 6/20/01. H.E. Sung-chul Yang, Ambassador of 
        Korea, private meeting on 7/17/01. Hon. Le Hoi-Chang, 
        President of the Grand National Party of the Republic 
        of Korea, full HIRC meeting on 1/23/02. H.E. Sung Chul 
        Yang, Ambassador of the Republic of Korea, private 
        meeting on 2/14/02. H.E. Choi Sung-hong, Minister of 
        Foreign Affairs of the Republic of Korea, private 
        meeting on 4/18/02.
Kuwait--Hon. Mohammad Jasem Al-Sager, Chairman of the Foreign 
        Affairs Committee of the National Assembly of Kuwait, 
        full HIRC meeting on 1/29/02.
Lebanon--H.E. Rafik Hariri, Prime Minister of Lebanon, full 
        HIRC meetings on 4/25/01 and 4/18/02.
Macedonia--H.E. Boris Trakovski, President, private meeting on 
        1/31/01. H.E. Boris Trajkovski, President of Macedonia, 
        private meeting on 2/5/02.
Mexico--Hon. Fernando Margain, Hon. Cesar Jauregui Robles, Hon. 
        Lydia Madero Garcia, Senators from Mexico, full HIRC 
        meeting on 2/28/01.
Mongolia--H.E. Nambaryn Enkhbayar, Prime Minister of Mongolia, 
        full HIRC meeting on 11/14/01.
NATO--General Lord George Robertson, Secretary General of NATO, 
        full HIRC meeting on 3/8/01.
Netherlands--H.E. Jozias van Aartsen, Minister of Foreign 
        Affairs of the Netherlands, private meeting on 3/8/01.
Pakistan--H.E. Dr. Maleeha Lodhi, Ambassador of Pakistan, 
        private meeting on 3/14/01. H.E. Abul Sattar, Minister 
        of Foreign Affairs of Pakistan, full HIRC meeting on 6/
        20/01. H.E. Shaukat Aziz, Finance Minister of Pakistan, 
        private meeting on 10/11/01. General Pervez Musharraf, 
        President and Chief Executive of Pakistan, full HIRC 
        meeting on 2/14/02.
Peru--H.E. Alejandro Toledo, President-elect of Peru, full HIRC 
        meeting on 6/27/01.
Portugal--H.E. Jose Manuel Durao Barroso, Prime Minister of 
        Portugal, private meeting on 9/10/02.
Qatar--H.E. Sheikh Hamad Bin Jassim Bin Jabr Al-Thani, Minister 
        of Foreign Affairs of the State of Qatar, full HIRC 
        meetings on 5/1/01 and 9/12/02. H.H. Sheikh Hamad bin 
        Khalifa Al-Thani, Amir of Qatar, full HIRC meeting on 
        10/4/01.
Russian Federation--H.E. Yuri Ushakov, Ambassador of the 
        Russian Federation, private meeting on 6/11/01. Hon. 
        Gennady Sleznev, Chairman of the State Duma of the 
        Russian Federation, full HIRC meeting on 5/1/02. H.E. 
        Dr. Yegor Gaidar, Former Prime Minister of the Russian 
        Federation, private meeting on 6/12/02.
Saudi Arabia--H.R.H. Prince Bandar bin Sultan, Ambassador of 
        Saudi Arabia, private meeting on 9/21/01.
Serbia--H.E. Zoran Djindjic, Prime Minister of Serbia, full 
        HIRC meeting on 11/7/01.
Singapore--H.E. Goh Chok Tong, Prime Minister of Singapore, 
        full HIRC meeting on 6/13/01.
Slovak Republic--H.E. Mikulas Dzurinda, Prime Minister of the 
        Slovak Republic, private meeting on 6/7/01.
Slovenia--H.E. Dr. Dimitrij Rupel, Minister of Foreign Affairs 
        of Slovenia, private meeting on 11/14/01.
Sri Lanka--H.E. Dr. Warnasena Rasaputram, Ambassador of Sri 
        Lanka, private meeting on 10/16/01. H.E. Ranil 
        Wickremesinghe, Prime Minister of Sri Lanka, private 
        meeting on 7/23/02.
Sudan--Mr. John Garang, Chairman and Commander in Chief of the 
        Sudan People's Liberation Movement, private meeting on 
        3/13/02.
Swaziland--H.M. King Mswati III of Swaziland, private meeting 
        on 5/15/01.
Sweden--H.E. Jan Eliasson, Ambassador of Sweden, full HIRC 
        meeting on 2/28/01.
Taiwan--Mr. C.J. Chen, Representative, Taipei Economic and 
        Cultural Representative Office, private meeting on 3/
        13/01. Hon. Chiou l-jen, Secretary General of the 
        Executive Yuan of Taiwan, full HIRC meeting on 12/13/
        01.
Turkey--H.E. Baki Ilkin, Ambassador of Turkey, private meeting 
        on 2/8/01. H.E. Farouk Logoglu, Ambassador of Turkey, 
        private meeting on 3/5/02.
Ukraine--H.E. Viktor Yushchenko, Former Prime Minister of 
        Ukraine, private meeting on 11/7/01.
United Kingdom--H.E. Sir Christopher Meyer, The British 
        Ambassador, private meeting on 1/31/01. Rt. Hon. Robin 
        Cook, MP, British Secretary of State for Foreign & 
        Commonwealth Affairs, full HIRC meeting on 2/7/01. Mr. 
        Gerry Adams, President of Sinn Fein of Northern 
        Ireland, full HIRC meeting on 6/21/01. Rt. Hon. Jack 
        Straw, MP, British Foreign Secretary, private meeting 
        on 7/11/01. Rt. Hon. Jack Straw, British Foreign 
        Secretary, full HIRC meeting on 5/8/02.
United Nations--Hon. Joseph Connor, Undersecretary General for 
        Administration and Management, full HIRC meeting on 2/
        28/01. H.E. Ruud Lubbers, UN High Commissioner for 
        Refugees, private meeting on 3/13/01. H.E. Kofi Annan, 
        Secretary General of the United Nations, full HIRC 
        meeting on 5/24/01. Mr. Peter Piort, Secretary Director 
        of UNAIDS, private meeting on 6/19/01. Mr. James 
        Morris, Executive Director of the UN World Food 
        Program, private meeting on 7/25/02. H.E. Kofi Annan, 
        Secretary General of the United Nations, full HIRC 
        meeting on 11/28/01. H.E. Ruud Lubbers, UN High 
        Commissioner for Refugees, private meeting on 5/7/02.
Uruguay--H.E. Dr. Jorge Batlle Ibanez, President of Uruguay, 
        full HIRC meeting on 2/13/02.
Uzbekistan--H.E. Islam Karimov, President of Uzbekistan, full 
        HIRC meeting on 3/12/02.
                               APPENDIX I

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  WITNESSES BEFORE FULL COMMITTEE AND SUBCOMMITTEES DURING THE 107TH 
                                CONGRESS

    During the 107th Congress, the Full Committee and its 
subcommittees took testimony from witnesses in legislative and 
consultative hearings. Witnesses were drawn from the executive 
branch, Members of Congress, and private citizens with 
particular expertise. In addition, the Full Committee and 
subcommittees received distinguished visitors from other 
countries.
    The key to abbreviations is as follows:
    SubIOHR--Subcommittee on International Operations and Human 
Rights.
    SubAF--Subcommittee on Africa.
    SubEAP--Subcommittee on East Asia and the Pacific.
    SubE--Subcommittee on Europe.
    SubMESA--Subcommittee on the Middle East and South Asia.
    SubWH--Subcommittee on the Western Hemisphere.

                       A. Congressional Witnesses

Armey, Richard K., Majority Leader, Member of Congress, hearing 
        before the SubMESA, September 17, 2002 (Policy toward 
        Syria)
Blunt, Roy, Member of Congress, hearing before the SubMESA, 
        July 11, 2002 (Middle East Peace)
Cox, Chris, Member of Congress, hearing before the full 
        committee, June 12, 2001 (Export Administration Act)
Engel, Eliot L. Member of Congress, hearing before the SubMESA, 
        September 17, 2002 (Policy toward Syria)
Enzi, Mike, Member of Congress, hearing before the full 
        committee, July 11, 2001 (Export Administration Act).
Feingold, Hon. Russell D., U.S. Senate, hearing before the 
        SubAF, March 14, 2001 (Liberia)
Frank, Barney, Member of Congress, hearing before the SubMESA, 
        May 22, 2002 (U.S.--Saudi Relations)
Gilman, Hon. Benjamin A., U.S. Congress, hearing before the 
        SubWH, June 28, 2001 (Andean Initiative)
Gramm, Phil, Member of Congress, hearing before the full 
        committee, June 12, 2001 (Export Administration Act)
Menendez, Robert, Member of Congress, hearing before the 
        SubMESA, July 11, 2002 (Middle East Peace)
Rogers, Harold, Member of Congress, hearing before the full 
        committee, February14, 2001 (State Department; Foreign 
        Policy)
Tauscher, Ellen O., Member of Congress from California, hearing 
        before the full committee, July 25, 2002 (Russia)
Thompson, Hon. Fred, U.S. Senator, hearing before the full 
        committee, June 12, 2001 (Export Administration Act)

                     B. Executive Branch Witnesses

Abraham, Spencer, Secretary, U.S. Department of Energy; hearing 
        before the full committee, June 20, 2002 (Foreign Oil)
Adair, Marshall, President, American Foreign Service 
        Association, Department of State, hearing before the 
        full committee, March 1, 2001, (Diplomacy)
Aldonas, Grant D., Under Secretary, International Trade 
        Administration, Department of Commerce, hearing before 
        the full committee, June 21, 2001 (Trade)
Allgeier, Dr. Peter F., Associate U.S. Trade Rep. For the W. 
        Hemisphere, Office of the USTR, hearing before the 
        SubWH, July 12, 2001 (FTAA)
Ballantyne, Hon. Janet, U.S. AID, hearing before the full 
        committee, November 29, 2001 (Trafficking Victims 
        Protection Act)
Beers, Hon. Charlotte, Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy and 
        Public Affairs, U.S. Department of State, hearing 
        before the full committee, October 10, 2001 (Public 
        Diplomacy)
Bellamy, William M., Principle Deputy Assistant Secretary, 
        Bureau of African Affairs, U.S. Department of State, 
        hearing before the SubAF, July 12, 2001 (ACRI); hearing 
        before SubA, May 16, 2002 (Sierra Leone)
Black, Steven K., Assistant Deputy Administrator, Office of 
        Arms Control and Nonproliferation, U.S. Department of 
        Energy, hearing before SubIOHR, October 3, 2001 (IAEA 
        and terrorism)
Blair, Dennis C., Commander-in-Chief, U.S. Pacific Command 
        (Admiral, USN) hearing before the SubEAP, February 27, 
        2002 (U.S. Security in Asia)
Bolton, John, Under Secretary for Arms Control and 
        International Security, Department of State, hearing 
        before the full committee, July 11, 2001 (Export 
        Administration Act)
Bond, Clifford G., Acting Principal Deputy, Office of the 
        Special Adviser to the Secretary for the New 
        Independent States, U.S. Department of State, hearing 
        before the SubMESA, June 6, 2001 (Central Asia)
Boyce, Ralph L., Dep. Asst. Sec., Bureau of East Asian and 
        Pacific Affairs, U.S. Department of State, hearing 
        before the SubEAP, July 18, 2001 (Indonesia)
Boyd, Hon. Ralph F., U.S. Department of Justice, hearing before 
        the full committee, November 29, 2001 (Trafficking 
        Victims Protection Act)
Bradtke, Robert A., Deputy Assistant Secretary of State for 
        European Affairs, U.S. Department of State, hearing 
        before the SubE, June 19, 2002 (NATO enlargement)
Brzezinski, Ian, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
        European and NATO Affairs, U.S. Department of Defense, 
        hearing before the SubE, June 19, 2002 (NATO 
        enlargement)
Burns, William J, Assistant Secretary for Near Eastern Affairs, 
        U.S. Department of State, hearing before the SubMESA, 
        July 26, 2001 (U.S. policy toward Palestinians); 
        hearing before the SubMESA, October 17, 2001 
        (developments in Middle East); hearing before the 
        Subcommittee on Middle East and South Asia, June 18, 
        2002 (Middle East Developments)
Celeste, Hon. Richard F., U.S. Ambassador to India, hearing 
        before the SubMESA March 1, 2001 (India Earthquake)
Conniff, Brian, Director, Office of the International 
        Broadcasting Bureau, Broadcasting Board of Governors, 
        hearing before SubIOHR, June 6, 2002 (Cuba 
        broadcasting)
Craner, Lorne W., Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Democracy, 
        Human Rights and Labor, U.S. Department of State, 
        hearing before the SubIOHR, July 11, 2001 (Religious 
        Discrimination in W. Europe); hearing before the 
        SubIOHR, October 31, 2001 (Afghanistan); hearing before 
        SubIOHR, March 6, 2002 (Human Rights Reports)
Daley, Matthew, Assistant Secretary of State for East Asian and 
        Pacific Affairs, U.S. Department of State, hearing 
        before the SubEAP, June 19, 2002 (Developments in 
        Burma); hearing before the Subcommittee on East Asia 
        and Pacific, July 23, 2002 (Pacific Island Nations)
Deal, Michael, Acting Asst. Administrator, Bureau for Latin 
        America and the Caribbean, U.S. Department of State, 
        hearing before the SubWH, June 28, 2001 (Andean 
        Initiative)
Dobriansky, Paula, Under Secretary for Global Affairs, U.S. 
        Department of State, hearing before the full committee, 
        November 29, 2001 (Trafficking Victims Protection Act); 
        hearing before the full committee, March 7, 2002 
        (Tibet); hearing before the Subcommittee on 
        International Operations and Human Rights, June 4, 2002 
        (Human Trafficking); hearing before the full committee, 
        June 19, 2002 (Human Trafficking)
Eastham, Alan W., Acting Asst. Sec. S. Asian Affairs, Dept. of 
        State, hearing before the SubMESA March 1, 2001 (India 
        Earthquake)
Ely-Raphel, Nancy, Director, Office to Monitor and Combat 
        Trafficking, U.S. Department of State, hearing before 
        the SubIOHR, April 24, 2002 (Sex trade in Bosnia)
Evans, Donald L., Secretary, Department of Commerce, hearing 
        before the full committee, May 15, 2002 (Trade)
Fisk, Dan, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Western 
        Hemisphere Affairs, U.S. Department of State, hearing 
        before SubIOHR, June 6, 2002 (Cuba broadcasting)
Franco, Adolfo, Assistant Administrator, Bureau for Latin 
        America and the Caribbean, U.S. Agency for 
        International Development, hearing before SubIOHR, June 
        6, 2002 (Cuba broadcasting); hearing before the SubWH, 
        July 24, 2002 (Coffee Crisis); hearing before SubWH, 
        October 10, 2002 (Drug Corruption)
Galloway, Gary R., Vice President, American Federal Government 
        Employees (AFGE), Department of State, hearing before 
        the full committee, March 1, 2001 (Diplomacy)
Grossman, Marc, Director General of Foreign Service and 
        Director of Human Resources, Department of State, 
        hearing before the full committee, March 1, 2001 
        (Diplomacy); Under Secretary for Political Affairs, 
        U.S. Department of State, hearing before the full 
        committee, June 26, 2002 (Homeland Security)
Guevara, Roger, Chief of Operations, Drug Enforcement 
        Administration, hearing before SubWH, October 10, 2002 
        (Drug Corruption)
Hanford, John, Ambassador at Large for International Religious 
        Freedom, U.S. Department of State, hearing before the 
        Subcommittee on International Operations and Human 
        Rights, October 9, 2002 (International Religious 
        Freedom Report)
Horn, Hon. Wade, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 
        hearing before the full committee, November 29, 2001 
        (Trafficking Victims Protection Act)
Hutchinson, Hon. Asa, Administrator, DEA, hearing before the 
        full committee, April 24, 2002 (Int'l Global Terrorism)
Jones, A. Elizabeth, Assistant Secretary for European and 
        Eurasian Affairs, U.S. Department of State, hearing 
        before the SubE, July 11, 2001 (Balkans); hearing 
        before the SubE, March 13, 2002 (U.S. and Europe)
Juster, Kenneth I., Undersecretary, Bureau of Export 
        Administration, Department of Commerce, May 23, 2001 
        (Export Administration Act)
Kansteiner III, Walter H., Assistant Secretary, Bureau of 
        African Affairs, U.S. Department of State, hearing 
        before SubAF, February 28, 2002 (Zimbabwe); hearing 
        before the full committee, June 5, 2002 (Sudan); 
        hearing before SubAF, June 13, 2002 (Angola)
Kelly, James A., Assistant Secretary, Bureau of East Asian 
        Affairs, Department of State, hearing before the 
        SubEAP, June 12, 2001; hearing before the full 
        committee, June 19, 2001 (Detainees); hearing before 
        SubEAP, February 14, 2002 (U.S. Interests in East Asia)
Kladakis, Monika Vegas, Senior Coordinator for Democracy and 
        Human Rights Promotion, Bureau of Democracy, Human 
        Rights and Labor, U.S. Department of State, hearing 
        before SubWH, October 10, 2002 (Drug Corruption)
Kreczko, Hon. Alan, Acting Asst. Sec. Bureau of Population, 
        Refugees and Migration, U.S. Department of State, 
        hearing before the full committee, November 1, 2001 
        (Afghan assistance)
Larson, Hon. Alan P., Under Secretary for Economic, Business 
        and Agricultural Affairs, U.S. Department of State, 
        hearing before the full committee, March 14, 2002 
        (Afghanistan Freedom Support Act); hearing before the 
        full committee, June 20, 2002 (Foreign Oil); hearing 
        before the full committee, July 25, 2002 (Russia)
Lauredo, Hon. Luis, U.S. Amb. to the OAS, hearing March 14, 
        2001 before the SubWH (Peru elections)
Lee, Franklin, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, hearing before the 
        SubWH, July 24, 2002 (Coffee Crisis)
Lew, Salvador, Director, Office of Cuba Broadcasting, 
        Broadcasting Board of Governors, hearing before 
        SubIOHR, June 6, 2002 (Cuba broadcasting)
Mack, Amb. James, F., Deputy Asst. Secretary, Bureau of Int'l 
        Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, U.S. Department 
        of State, hearing before the SubWH, June 28, 2001 
        (Andean Initiative); hearing before the SubWH, October 
        10, 2001 (W. Hemisphere's Response to 9/11)
Nathanson, Marc B., Chairman, Broadcasting Board of Governors, 
        hearing before the SubIOHR February 28, 2001 
        (International Broadcasting); hearing before the full 
        committee, October 10, 2001 (Public Diplomacy)
Natsios, Andrew, Administrator, U.S. AID, hearing before the 
        full committee, June 7, 2001 (AIDS); hearing before the 
        full committee, November 1, 2001 (Afghan assistance); 
        hearing before the full committee, March 14, 2002 
        (Afghanistan Freedom Support Act); hearing before the 
        full committee, June 13, 2002 (Africa)
Noriega, Hon. Roger, U.S. Ambassador to OAS, hearing before the 
        SubWH, October 10, 2001 (W. Hemisphere's Response to 9/
        11)
Norland, Donald, Former U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Chad 
        (Ret), hearing before the SubAF, April 18, 2002 (Chad-
        Cameroon Pipeline)
North, Walter, Mission Director to India, U.S. AID, hearing 
        before the SubMESA March 1, 2001 (India Earthquake)
ONeill, Paul H., Secretary, U.S. Department of Treasury, 
        hearing before the full committee, June 27, 2002 
        (Africa).
Parmly, Michael, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of 
        Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, Department of 
        State, hearing before the SubIOHR, June 6, 2001 (UN 
        Commission on Human Rights); hearing before the full 
        committee, June 19, 2001 (Detainees); hearing before 
        the SubIOHR, June 27, 2001 (Human organs for sale in 
        China); joint hearing before the SubIOHR/SubMESA, July 
        18, 2001 (Central Asia dissidents)
Peterson, Anne, Assistant Administrator, Bureau for Global 
        Health, U.S. AID, hearing before the full committee, 
        April 17, 2002 (AIDS)
Powell, Colin, Secretary, Department of State, hearing before 
        the full committee, March 7, 2001 (Foreign Policy); 
        hearing before the full committee, October 24, 2001 
        (War on Terrorism); hearing before the full committee, 
        February 6, 2002, (Budget); hearing before the full 
        committee, September 19, 2002 (Iraq)
Pritchard, Charles L., Special Envoy for Korean Peace Talks, 
        U.S. Rep. To KEDO, U.S. Department of State, hearing 
        before the SubEAP, July 26, 2001 (U.S.-N. Korea 
        relations)
Prosper, Pierre-Richard, Ambassador-at-Large for War Crimes 
        Issues at Department of State, hearing before the full 
        committee, February 28, 2002 (Criminal Tribunals)
Ralston, Joseph W., Commander-in-Chief, United States European 
        Command, USAF, hearing before the SubE, June 19, 2002 
        (NATO enlargement)
Reich, Otto J., Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of Western 
        Hemisphere Affairs, U.S. Department of State, hearing 
        before SubWH, April 11, 2002 (Colombia); hearing before 
        SubWH, October 10, 2002 (Drug Corruption)
Rocca, Christina, Assistant Secretary, Bureau of South Asian 
        Affairs, U.S. Department of State, hearing before 
        SubMESA, Sept. 6, 2001 (US policy towards East Asia); 
        hearing before SubMESA, July 18, 2002 (Recent 
        Developments in South Asia)
Rodman, Peter W., Assistant Secretary of Defense for 
        International Security Affairs, U.S. Department of 
        Defense, hearing before SubWH, April 11, 2002 
        (Colombia)
Rogers, Leonard, Acting Admin. For Humanitarian Response, U.S. 
        AID, hearing before the SubMESA March 1, 2001 (India 
        Earthquake)
Ryan, Mary, Assistant Secretary for Consular Affairs, U.S. 
        Department of State, hearing before the full committee, 
        May 22, 2002 (Adoptions), hearing before the full 
        committee, June 26, 2002 (Homeland Security)
Saperstein, David, Rabbi, Commissioner, U.S. Commission on 
        International Religious Freedom, Director, Religious 
        Action Center of Reform Judaism, hearing before the 
        full committee, May 24, 2001 (Annual Report: Commission 
        on International Religious Freedom)
Satterfield, David, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Near 
        Eastern Affairs, U.S. Department of State, hearing 
        before the SubMESA, July 9, 2002 (Middle East Peace); 
        hearing before the SubMESA, September 17, 2002 (Policy 
        toward Syria)
Simons, Paul, Acting Assistant Secretary, Bureau of 
        International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, 
        U.S. Department of State, hearing before SubWH, October 
        10, 2002 (Drug Corruption)
Smith, Lane, U.S. AID, hearing before the SubAF, May 16, 2001 
        (Sudan)
Southwick, E. Michael, Deputy Assistant Secretary, Bureau of 
        International Organization, U.S. Department of State, 
        hearing before SubIOHR, October 3, 2001 (IAEA and 
        terrorism)
Speer, Gary D., Acting Commander in Chief, U.S. Southern 
        Command, hearing before SubWH, April 11, 2002 
        (Colombia)
Stratford, Richard J., Acting Assistant Secretary, Bureau of 
        Nonproliferation, U.S. Department of State, hearing 
        before SubIOHR, October 3, 2001 (IAEA and terrorism)
Struble, Curt, Dep. Asst. Sec. Bureau of S. Hemisphere Affairs, 
        U.S. Department of State, hearing before the SubWH, 
        October 10, 2001 (W. Hemisphere's Response to 9/11)
Tarbell, David, Deputy Under Secretary for Technology Security 
        Policy, Department of Defense, hearing before the full 
        committee, July 11, 2001 (Export Administration Act)
Taylor, Hon. Francis X., Ambassador-at-Large, U.S. Department 
        of State, hearing before the SubWH, October 10, 2001 
        (W. Hemisphere's Response to 9/11)
Taylor, Hon. William B., Coordinator of U.S. Assistance to the 
        New Independent States, U.S. Department of State, joint 
        hearing before the SubIOHR/SubMESA, July 18, 2001 
        (Central Asia dissidents)
Thompson, Jim, Division Chief, Office of Citizenship Services, 
        Division for East Asia and the Pacific, Bureau of 
        Consular Affairs, Department of State, hearing before 
        the full committee, June 19, 2001 (Detainees)
Travers, William, Executive Director for Operations, Nuclear 
        Regulatory Commission, hearing before SubIOHR, October 
        3, 2001 (IAEA and terrorism)
Turner, Karen, Deputy Assistant Administrator for Asia and Near 
        East, U.S. Agency for International Development, 
        hearing before the SubEAP, June 19, 2002 (Developments 
        in Burma)
Wagenseil, Steven, Director, Office of Multilateral Affairs, 
        U.S. Department of State, hearing before the SubIOHR, 
        July 31, 2001 (UN World Conference on Racism)
Wald, Patricia M., Judge International Criminal Tribunal for 
        Former U.S. Court of Appeals for DC Circuit, 1979-1999, 
        hearing before the full committee, February 28, 2002 
        (Criminal Tribunals).
Walker, Hon. Edward, Asst. Sec. Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs, 
        Dept. of State, hearing before the SubMESA March 29, 
        2001 (Middle East)
West, Mary Beth, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Oceans and 
        International Environmental Scientific Affairs, U.S. 
        Department of State, hearing before the Subcommittee on 
        East Asia and Pacific, July 23, 2002 (Pacific Island 
        Nations)
Westin, Susan, U.S. GAO, hearing March 14, 2001 before the 
        SubWH (Peru elections)
Winter, Roger P., Assistant Administrator, Bureau of Democracy, 
        Conflict and Humanitarian Assistance, U.S. AID, hearing 
        before the full committee, June 5, 2002 (Adoptions)
Wong, Mark, Deputy Coordinator for Counterrorism , Office of 
        Secretary of State, Department of State, hearing before 
        the full committee, April 24, 2002 (Terrorism)
Wood, William B., Principal Deputy Asst. Sec., Bureau of Org. 
        Affairs, Dept. of State, hearing before the SubIOHR, 
        June 6, 2001 (UN Commission on Human Rights); hearing 
        before the SubIOHR, July 31, 2001 (UN World Conference 
        on Racism)
Young, Michael K., Commissioner, U.S. Commission on 
        International Religious Freedom, joint hearing before 
        the SubAF/IOHR March 28, 2001 (Sudan); hearing before 
        the SubIOHR, February 13, 2002 (Religious Persecution 
        in China and Vietnam); hearing before the full 
        committee, June 5, 2002 (Adoptions)
Ziglar, James W., Commissioner U.S. Immigration and 
        Naturalization Service, hearing before the full 
        committee, May 22, 2002 (Adoptions)

                     C. Non-Governmental Witnesses

Abrams, Elliott, Chairman, U.S. Commission on International 
        Religious Freedom, President, Ethics and Public Policy 
        Center, hearing before the full committee, May 24, 2001 
        (Annual Report: Commission on Religious Freedom)
Ackerly, John, International Campaign for Tibet, hearing before 
        the SubIOHR, June 6, 2001 (UN Commission on Human 
        Rights); hearing before the SubIOHR, February 13, 2002 
        (Religious Persecution in China and Vietnam)
Aguirre, Eduardo, Vice Chairman, Export-Import Bank of the 
        United States, hearing before the full committee, May 
        15, 2002 (Trade)
Ahmad, Saikh Waheed, Ahmadiyya Muslim Victim of Religious 
        Persecution in Pakistan, hearing before the 
        Subcommittee on International Operations and Human 
        Rights, October 9, 2002 (International Religious 
        Freedom Report)
Akwei, Adotei, Africa Advocacy Director, hearing before the 
        Subcommittee on Africa, September 18, 2002 (African 
        Development)
Alcedo, Thomas, CARE/India, hearing before the SubMESA March 1, 
        2001 (India Earthquake)
Alibek, Dr. Kenneth, Hadron, Inc., hearing before the full 
        committee, December 5, 2001 (Bioterrorism)
Al-Marrayati, Laila, Commissioner, U.S. Commission on 
        International Religious Freedom, Past President, Muslim 
        Women's League, hearing before the full committee, May 
        24, 2001 (Annual Report: Commission on International 
        Religious Freedom)
Al-Qazwini, Sayed Mustafa, Founding Imam and Director, Islamic 
        Educational Center of Orange County, hearing before the 
        Subcommittee on International Operations and Human 
        Rights, October 9, 2002 (International Religious 
        Freedom Report)
Amin, Haron, Special Representative/Spokesman, United Front 
        (Northern Alliance), hearing before the SubIOHR, 
        October 31, 2001 (Afghanistan)
Amiryar, A. Quadir, Executive Director, Central Asia Research 
        and Development Center, George Washington University, 
        hearing before the SubIOHR, October 31, 2001 
        (Afghanistan)
Arriaga, Alex, Director of Government Relations, Amnesty 
        International USA, hearing before SubIOHR, March 6, 
        2002 (Human Rights Reports)
Askey, Thelma, Director, Trade and Development Agency, hearing 
        before the full committee, May 15, 2002 (Trade)
Awad, Nihad, Executive Director, Council on American-Islamic 
        Relations, hearing before the Subcommittee on 
        International Operations and Human Rights, October 9, 
        2002 (International Religious Freedom Report)
Bacon, Kenneth, Refugees International, hearing before the full 
        committee, November 1, 2001 (Afghan assistance)
Bahala, Fr. Jean-Bosco, Archbishop of Bukavu, hearing before 
        the SubIOHR, May 17, 2001 (Congo)
Baldo, Sulaiman Ali, Human Rights Watch, hearing before the 
        SubIOHR, May 17, 2001 (Congo)
Baran, Zeyno, Director, Georgia Forum, Center for Strategic and 
        International Studies, hearing before the SubE, October 
        10, 2001 (Caucasus and Caspian Region)
Baran-Crespo, Enrique, Member, European Parliament, hearing 
        before the SubE, April 25, 2001 (U.S.-Europe)
Bayer, Thomas, Director of Programs, Africa and the Near East, 
        International Foundation for Election Systems, hearing 
        before SubAF, February 28, 2002 (Zimbabwe)
Becker, Jasper, Former Beijing Bureau Chief, South China 
        Morning Post, hearing before the SubEAP, May 2, 2002 
        (North Korea)
Bell, Catherine, Actor, hearing before the SubIOHR, July 11, 
        2001 (Religious Discrimination in W. Europe)
Bergsten, C. Fred, director, Institute for International 
        Economics, hearing before SubEAP, November 15, 2001 
        (Northeast Asia after 9/11)
Berry, Dr. Willard M., European-American Business Council, 
        hearing before the SubE, April 25, 2001 (U.S.-Europe)
Biltaji, Akel, Chief Commissioner, Aqaba Special Economic Zone, 
        Jordan, hearing before the full committee, July 24, 
        2002 (Middle East)
Bishop, Timothy, International Rescue Committee, hearing before 
        the SubAF, March 14, 2001 (Liberia)
Bowe, Peter, President, Ellicott Machine Corporation 
        International, hearing before the full committee, June 
        21, 2001 (Trade)
Boyd, Charles G., U.S. Air Force (Ret.), President and Chief 
        Executive Officer, Business Executives for National 
        Security, hearing before the full committee, September 
        19, 2002 (Iraq)
Bryen, Stephen, President, Jefferson Partners, hearing before 
        the full committee, July 11, 2001 (Export 
        Administration Act)
Buonkrong, Y-kin, Montagnard Practitioner and Activist, hearing 
        before SubIOHR, March 6, 2002 (Human Rights Reports)
Burkhalter, Holly, Advocacy Director, Physicians for Human 
        Rights, hearing before the full committee, June 19, 
        2002 (Human Trafficking)
Butora, Marin, Ambassador of Slovakia, hearing before the SubE, 
        May, 1 2002 (NATO Enlargement)
Callahan, Sean, Catholic Relief Services/India, hearing before 
        the SubMESA March 1, 2001 (India Earthquake)
Cannistraro, Vincent, Former CIA Chief of Counterterrorism 
        Operations, hearing before the full committee, October 
        3, 2001 (Al-Qaeda)
Carlucci, Frank, Chairman, Report of an Independent Task Force, 
        hearing before the full committee, January 14, 2001 
        (State Department, Foreign Policy)
Carmon, Yigal, President, The Middle East Media Research 
        Institute, hearing before the SubMESA, April 18, 2002 
        (anti-semitism in Middle East)
Casey, Ken, Senior Vice President , World Vision International 
        and Special Representative to the President for HIV/
        AIDS, hearing before the full committee April 17, 2002 
        (AIDS)
Cavanaugh, Dr. Cassandra, College of the Holy Cross, joint 
        hearing before the SubIOHR/SubMESA, July 18, 2001 
        (Central Asia dissidents)
Cha, Victor, Associate Professor, Department of Government and 
        School of Foreign Service, Georgetown University, 
        hearing before SubEAP, November 15, 2001 (Northeast 
        Asia after 9/11)
Chicoti, George, Vice-Minister of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of 
        External Affairs of Angola, hearing before SubAF, June 
        13, 2002 (Angola)
Christiansen, Larry, Vice President, Vastera, hearing before 
        the full committee, July 11, 2001, (Export 
        Administration Act)
Clawson, Dr. Patrick, Washington Institute for Near East 
        Policy, hearing before the SubMESA, May 9, 2001 (ILSA)
Cohen, Dr. Ariel, Heritage Foundation, joint hearing before the 
        SubIOHR/SubMESA, July 18, 2001 (Central Asia 
        dissidents)
Cohen, Stephen Philip, Brookings, hearing before the full 
        committee, November 7, 2001 (Afghanistan)
Colas, Humberto Ramon, Former Political Prisoner, founder of 
        the Cuban Independent Libraries, hearing before 
        SubIOHR, March 6, 2002 (Human Rights Reports)
Connelly, Ross J., Executive Vice President, Overseas Private 
        Investment Corporation, hearing before the full 
        committee, May 15, 2002 (Trade)
Cox, Susan Soon-Cox, Vice President of Public Policy and 
        External Services, Holt International Children's 
        Services, hearing before the full committee, May 22, 
        2002 (Adoptions)
Crosby, Colleen, Partner, Santa Cruz Coffee Roasting Company, 
        hearing before the SubWH, July 24, 2002 (Coffee Crisis)
Cupitt, Richard T., Associate Director, Center for 
        International Trade and Security, University of 
        Georgia, hearing before the full committee, June 7, 
        2001 (Export Administration Act).
Curtis, Charles B., President, The Nuclear Threat Initiative, 
        hearing before the full committee, July 25, 2002 
        (Russia)
D'Agostino, Angelo, Fr., Founder and Medical Director, The 
        Nyumbani Orphanage of Kenya, hearing before the full 
        committee, April 17, 2002 (AIDS)
D'Amato, Hon. Alfonse, former U.S. Senator, hearing before the 
        SubMESA, May 9, 2001 (ILSA) (via videoconference)
de Soto, Herando, Founder, Institute for Liberty and Democracy, 
        Lima, Peru, hearing before the full committee, July 24, 
        2002 (Middle East)
Delaunay, Sophie, North Korean project representative, Medecins 
        Sans Frontieres (MSF) hearing before the SubEAP, May 2, 
        2002 (North Korea)
del Pino, Catherine, Deputy Director, CNAPS, Brookings 
        Institution, hearing before SubIOHR March 7, 2001 
        (State Department Country Reports on Human Rights)
Deng, Francis, Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Studies, The 
        Brookings Institution, hearing before the full 
        committee, June 5, 2002 (Adoptions)
Derryck, Vivian Lowery, Senior Vice President, Academy for 
        Educational Development, hearing before the 
        Subcommittee on Africa, September 18, 2002 (African 
        Development)
Diflo, Dr. Thomas, NY University Medical Center, hearing before 
        the SubIOHR, June 27, 2001 (Human organs for sale in 
        China)
Dimotrov, Nikola, Ambassador of Macedonia, hearing before the 
        SubE, May, 1 2002 (NATO Enlargement)
Dokmo, Charles, President and Chief Executive Officer, 
        Opportunities International-U.S., hearing before the 
        full committee, June 7, 2001 (AIDS)
Donghua, Xue, Husband of Dr. Gao Zhan, hearing before the full 
        committee, June 19, 2001, (Detainees).
Ducaru, Sorin, Ambassador of Romania, hearing before the SubE, 
        May, 1 2002 (NATO Enlargement)
Duelfer, Charles, Visiting Scholar, Middle East Program, Center 
        for Strategic and International Studies, hearing before 
        SubMESA, October 4, 2001 (U.S. Policy Toward Iraq)
Dunigan, Nathaniel, Director, AIDchild, hearing before the full 
        committee, April 17, 2002 (AIDS).
Duran, Alfredo, Cuban Committee for Democracy, hearing before 
        SubIOHR, June 6, 2002 (Cuba broadcasting)
Edgerton, Anne, Refugees International, hearing before the 
        SubIOHR, May 17, 2001 (Congo)
Eizenstat, Stuart E., Former Deputy Secretary of the Treasury, 
        Partner, Covington and Burling; hearing before the full 
        committee, June 20, 2002 (Foreign Oil)
Emmerson, Donald K., Senior Fellow, Asia/Pacific Research 
        Center, Stanford University, hearing before the SubEAP, 
        December 12, 2001 (Southeast Asia after 9/11)
Fairbanks, Charles H., Director, Central-Asia Caucasus 
        Institute, School of Advanced International Studies, 
        Johns Hopkins University, hearing before the SubE, 
        October 10, 2001 (Caucasus and Caspian Region)
Faulkner, Penelope, Vietnam Commission for Human Rights, 
        hearing before the SubIOHR, February 13, 2002 
        (Religious Persecution in China and Vietnam)
Fazili, Sameera, Muslim Women Lawyers Association for Human 
        Rights, hearing before the SubIOHR, July 11, 2001 
        (Religious Discrimination in W. Europe)
Fewsmith, Prof. Joseph, Boston University, hearing before the 
        SubEAP, April 25, 2001 (U.S.-China Relations)
Foxman, Abraham H., National Director, Anti-Defamation League, 
        hearing before the SubMESA, April 18, 2002 (anti-
        semitism in Middle East)
Freedenberg, Paul, Director of Government Relations, AMT, 
        Representative for Association of Manufacturing 
        Technology, hearing before the full committee, June 12, 
        2001 (Export Administration Act)
Freidmutter, Cindy, Executive Director, Evan B. Donaldson 
        Adoption Institute, hearing before the full committee, 
        May 22, 2002 (Adoptions)
Fuller, James L., Director, Defense Nuclear Non-proliferation 
        Programs, Pacific Northwest Laboratory; hearing before 
        the full committee, July 25, 2002 (Russia)
Gabdullin, Bigeldin, Journalist, joint hearing before the 
        SubIOHR/SubMESA, July 18, 2001 (Central Asia 
        dissidents)
Gabriel, Edward M., President, American Task Force for Lebanon, 
        hearing before the SubMESA, September 17, 2002 (Policy 
        toward Syria)
Gaer, Felice, Chair U.S. Commission on International Religious 
        Freedom, hearing before the Subcommittee on 
        International Operations and Human Rights, October 9, 
        2002 (International Religious Freedom Report)
Gaffney, Jr., Frank J., Former Assistant Secretary of Defense 
        for International Security Policy, President and CEO, 
        Center for Security Policy; hearing before the full 
        committee, June 20, 2002 (Foreign Oil)
Ganic, Ejup, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, University of 
        Sarajevo, Former President, Federation of Bosnia and 
        Herzegovina, hearing before the full committee, July 
        25, 2001, (Dayton Accords).
Gato, Lukamba Paulo, Chairman, UNITA Management Committee, 
        hearing before SubAF, June 13, 2002 (Angola)
Gause, F. Gregory, Associate Professor, University of Vermont, 
        hearing before the SubMESA, May 22, 2002 (U.S.-Saudi 
        Relations)
Gere, Richard, Actor, Chairman, International Campaign for 
        Tibet, hearing before the full committee, March 7, 2002 
        (Tibet).
Gilborn, Leila, Program Director, Horizons Global Research on 
        HIV/AIDS Project Population Council, hearing before the 
        full committee, April 17, 2002 (AIDS).
Glaser, Bonnie S., consultant on African Affairs, hearing 
        before SubEAP, November 15, 2001 (Northeast Asia after 
        9/11)
Glosserman, Brad, Director of Research, Pacific Forum, Center 
        for Strategic and International Studies, hearing before 
        SubEAP, November 15, 2001 (Northeast Asia after 9/11)
Gordon, Philip, Director, Center on the United States and 
        France and Senior Fellow, Brookings Institution, 
        hearing before the SubE, April 17, 2002 (NATO 
        Enlargement)
Grdesic, Ivan, Ambassador of Croatia, hearing before the SubE, 
        May 1, 2002 (NATO Enlargement)
Grieboski, Joseph K., Institute on Religion and Public Policy, 
        hearing before the SubIOHR, July 11, 2001 (Religious 
        Discrimination in W. Europe)
Guy, Josephine, America 21, hearing before the full committee, 
        October 17, 2001 (Coercive Population Control in China)
Gyari, Lodi Gyaltsen, Special Envoy of His Holiness the Dali 
        Lama, hearing before the full committee, March 7, 2002 
        (Tibet).
Hammond, Larry A., Attorney at Law, Osborn Maledon, PA, hearing 
        before the full committee, February 28, 2002 (Criminal 
        Tribunals)
Harb, Mouafac, Al Hayat Newspaper, hearing before the full 
        committee, November 14, 2001 (Public Diplomacy)
Harris, Elisa D., University of Maryland, hearing before the 
        full committee, December 5, 2001 (Bioterrorism)
Hartung, William D., World Policy Institute, hearing before 
        SubIOHR March 7, 2001 (State Department Country Reports 
        on Human Rights)
Haugen, Gary, President, International Justice Mission, hearing 
        before the full committee, November 29, 2001 
        (Trafficking Victims Protection Act); hearing before 
        the full committee, June 19, 2002 (Human Trafficking)
Hayes, Isaac, Actor/Musician, hearing before the SubIOHR, July 
        11, 2001 (Religious Discrimination in W. Europe)
Hayes, Stephen, President, Corporate Council on Africa, hearing 
        before the full committee, June 7, 2001 (AIDS); hearing 
        before the Subcommittee on Africa, September 18, 2002 
        (African Development)
Hefner, Robert, Institute for Religion and World Affairs, 
        Boston University, hearing before the SubEAP, December 
        12, 2001 (Southeast Asia after 9/11)
Heideman, Richard D., B'nai B'rith International, hearing 
        before the SubIOHR, July 31, 2001 (UN World Conference 
        on Racism)
Hier, Rabbi Marvin, Simon Wiesenthal Center, hearing before the 
        SubIOHR, July 31, 2001 (UN World Conference on Racism)
Hill, Dr. Fiona, Brookings, joint hearing before the SubIOHR/
        SubMESA, July 18, 2001 (Central Asia dissidents)
Hinojosa, Patrick, Panda Software, hearing before the SubIOHR, 
        July 11, 2001 (Religious Discrimination in W. Europe)
Hoang, Dan Duy-Tu, Vice President of Public Relations, 
        Vietnamese-American Public Affairs Committee, hearing 
        before the SubIOHR, February 13, 2002 (Religious 
        Persecution in China and Vietnam)
Hooper, James R., Public International Law and Policy Group, 
        hearing before the SubE, July 11, 2001 (Balkans)
Houng, Dan Duy-Tu, Vietnamese-American Public Affairs 
        Committee, hearing before the SubIOHR, February 13, 
        2002 (Religious Persecution in China and Vietnam)
Hoydish, Dan, Washington Director, UNISYS, Representative for 
        the Computer Coalition for Responsible Exports, hearing 
        before the full committee, June 12, 2001 (Export 
        Administration Act)
Hughes, Donna, Professor of Carlson Endowed Chair in Women's 
        Studies, University of Rhode Island, hearing before the 
        full committee, June 19, 2002 (Human Trafficking)
Hulileh, Samir, Export Manager, Nasser Investment Group, West 
        Bank, hearing before the full committee, July 24, 2002 
        (Middle East)
Hunaidi, Rima Khalaf, UN Assistant Secretary-General, Assistant 
        Administrator and Regional Director, Regional Bureau 
        for Arab States, United Nations Development Programme, 
        hearing before the full committee, July 24, 2002 
        (Middle East)
Husseini, Hiba, Attorney at Law, Managing Partner, Husseini and 
        Dajani, West Bank, hearing before the full committee, 
        July 24, 2002 (Middle East)
Ifshin, Dr. Gail, Discovery Channel, hearing before the SubAF, 
        May 16, 2001 (Sudan)
Indyk, Martin S., Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy Studies, The 
        Brookings Institution, hearing before the Subcommittee 
        on the Middle East and South Asia, September 20, 2001 
        (Policy towards the Palestinians); hearing before the 
        SubMESA, April 18, 2002 (anti-semitism in Middle East)
Isaacs, Ken, International Director of Projects, Samaritan's 
        Purse, hearing before the full committee, June 5, 2002 
        (Adoptions)
Isacson, Adam, Senior Associate, Center for International 
        Policy, hearing before SubWH, April 11, 2002 (Colombia)
Jendrezjczyk, Mike, Washington Director, Human Rights Watch/
        Asia, hearing before the full committee, June 19, 2001 
        (Detainees); hearing before the SubEAP, December 12, 
        2001 (Southeast Asia after 9/11)
Johnston, Ben, former DynCorp Employee, hearing before the 
        SubIOHR, April 24, 2002 (Sex trade in Bosnia)
Jurgenson, Sven, Ambassador of Estonia, hearing before the 
        SubE, May, 1 2002 (NATO Enlargement)
Kaden, Lewis B., Chairman, Overseas Presence Advisory Panel, 
        hearing before the full committee, January 14, 2001 
        (State Department; Foreign Policy)
Karzai, Qayum, Afghans for a Civil Society, hearing before the 
        full committee, November 7, 2001 (Afghanistan)
Keith, Amb. Kenton, Meridian Int'l Center, hearing before the 
        full committee, October 10, 2001 (Public Diplomacy)
Kemp, Geoffrey, Director of Regional Strategic Programs, The 
        Nixon Center, hearing before SubMESA, October 4, 2001 
        (U.S. Policy Toward Iraq)
Kennedy, Gavan, Irish American Information Service, hearing 
        before the SubIOHR March 15, 2001 (N. Ireland)
Khayat, Dina, Chairman and Managing Director, Lazard Asset 
        Management Egypt, Egypt, hearing before the full 
        committee, July 24, 2002 (Middle East)
Kim, Sung-min, North Korean defector, hearing before the 
        SubEAP, April 25, 2002 (North Korea)
Kirhero, Arsene, Interim Program Coordinator, International 
        Human Rights Law Group, hearing before SubIOHR, March 
        6, 2002 (Human Rights Reports)
Kirkpatrick, Jeane J., Director, Foreign and Defense Policy 
        Studies and Senior Fellow, American Enterprise 
        Institute; hearing before the SubIOHR, June 6, 2001 (UN 
        Commission on Human Rights); hearing before the SubE, 
        April 17, 2002 (NATO Enlargement)
Kohr, Howard A., AIPAC, hearing before the SubMESA, May 9, 2001 
        (ILSA)
Kracun, Davorin, Ambassador of Slovenia, hearing before the 
        SubE, May, 1 2002 (NATO Enlargement)
Krakowski, Elie, Johns Hopkins University, hearing before the 
        full committee, November 7, 2001 (Afghanistan)
Krepon, Michael, Founding President, Henry L. Stimson Center, 
        hearing before SubMESA, June 6, 2002 (Crisis in South 
        Asia)
Kristol, William, Editor, The Weekly Standard, hearing before 
        the SubMESA, May 22, 2002 (U.S.-Saudi Relations)
Kumar, T., Advocacy Director for Asia, Amnesty International 
        USA, hearing before the SubIOHR, October 31, 2001 
        (Afghanistan)
Kupchan, Dr. Charles, Council on Foreign Relations, hearing 
        before the SubE, April 25, 2001 (U.S.-Europe)
Kusunoki, Pastor Gary I., Rancho Santa Maria Calvary Chapel, 
        joint hearing before the SubAF/IOHR March 28, 2001 
        (Sudan)
Kviatkovski, Oleg, Kazakhstan, joint hearing before the 
        SubIOHR/SubMESA, July 18, 2001 (Central Asia 
        dissidents)
Lamb, David, former U.N. Human Rights Investigator in Bosnia, 
        hearing before the SubIOHR, April 24, 2002 (Sex trade 
        in Bosnia)
Lardy, Prof. Nicholas, Brookings, hearing before the SubEAP, 
        April 25, 2001 (U.S.-China Relations)
Ledsky, Hon. Nelson, NDI, hearing before the SubE, June 13, 
        2001 (U.S. Policy in Mediterranean)
Lee, Amy, Falun Gong Practitioner, hearing before the SubIOHR, 
        February 13, 2002 (Religious Persecution in China and 
        Vietnam)
Lee, Franklin, Deputy Administrator, U.S. Department of 
        Agriculture, hearing before the SubWH, July 22, 2002 
        (Coffee Crisis)
Lee, Soon-ok, North Korean prison camp survivor, hearing before 
        the SubEAP, May 2, 2002 (North Korea)
Lee, Young-kook, North Korean prison camp survivor and Former 
        bodyguard for Chairman Kim Jong Il, hearing before the 
        SubEAP, May 2, 2002 (North Korea)
Leslie, John W., Jr., Weber Shandwick, hearing before the full 
        committee, November 14, 2001 (Public Diplomacy)
Lesser, Dr. Ian O., RAND, hearing before the SubE, June 13, 
        2001 (U.S. Policy in Mediterranean)
Levenkron, Nomi, Head of Legal Department, Hotline for Migrant 
        workers in Israel, hearing before the SubIOHR, April 
        24, 2002 (Sex trade in Bosnia)
Levitt, Matthew A., Senior Fellow, Washington Institute for 
        Near East Policy, hearing before the SubMESA, September 
        17, 2002 (Policy toward Syria)
Lieven, Anatol, Senior Associate, Carnegie Endowment for 
        International Peace, hearing before SubMESA, June 6, 
        2002 (Crisis in South Asia)
Lingle, Ted R., Executive Director, Specialty Coffee 
        Association of America, hearing before the SubWH, July 
        24, 2002 (Coffee Crisis)
MacCormack, Charles, Save the Children, hearing before the full 
        committee, November 1, 2001 (Afghan assistance)
Madsen, Wayne, Investigative Reporter, hearing before the 
        SubIOHR, May 17, 2001 (Congo)
Makumbe, John Mw, Chairman, Transparency International 
        Zimbabwe, hearing before SubAF, February 28, 2002 
        (Zimbabwe)
Marshal, Z. Blake, Executive Vice President, U.S.-Russia 
        Business Council, hearing before the SubE, October 16, 
        2001 (US-Russia Relations)
Marshall, Paul, Freedom House, hearing before SubIOHR March 7, 
        2001 (State Department Country Reports on Human 
        Rights); hearing before the SubIOHR, February 13, 2002 
        (Religious Persecution in China and Vietnam)
Marshall, Z. Blake, Executive Vice President, U.S.-Russia 
        Business Council, hearing before the SubE, February 27, 
        2002 (U.S.-Russia Relations)
Massimino, Elisa, Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, hearing 
        before SubIOHR March 7, 2001 (State Department Country 
        Reports on Human Rights)
McFaul, Michael, Hoover Fellow and Professor of Political 
        Scientist, Stanford University, hearing before the 
        SubE, February 27, 2002 (U.S.-Russia Relations)
McFaul, Michael, Research Fellow, Hoover Institute, Stanford 
        University, hearing before the SubE, October 16, 2001 
        (U.S.-Russia Relations)
Menges, Constantine, Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute, hearing 
        before the full committee, July 25, 2002 (Russia)
Merloe, Patrick, NDI, hearing March 14, 2001 before the SubWH 
        (Peru elections)
Mertens, Sister Stephanie, hearing before the SubAF, March 14, 
        2001 (Liberia)
Mexidor, Berta, Founder of Cuban Independent Libraries, hearing 
        before SubIOHR, June 6, 2002 (Cuba broadcasting)
Milhollin, Gary, Director, Wisconsin Project on Nuclear Arms 
        Control, hearing before SubMESA, October 4, 2001 (U.S. 
        Policy Toward Iraq)
Mitchell, George J., Former United States Senate Majority 
        Leader, hearing before the full committee, July 24, 
        2002 (Middle East)
Morris, James T., Executive Director, United Nations World Food 
        Programme, hearing before the full committee, June 13, 
        2002 (Africa)
Morrison, J. Stephen, Director, Africa Program, Center for 
        Strategic and International Studies, joint hearing 
        before the SubAF/IOHR March 28, 2001 (Sudan); hearing 
        before SubAF, November 15, 2001 (Africa and Terrorism)
Morrison, James W., President, Small Business Exporters 
        Association, hearing before the full committee, May 15, 
        2002 (Trade)
Mosher, Stephen W., Population Research Institute, hearing 
        before the full committee, October 17, 2001 (Coercive 
        Population Control in China)
Murphy, Richard W., Senior Fellow Middle East, Council on 
        Foreign Relations, hearing before the SubMESA, May 22, 
        2002 (U.S.-Saudi Relations)
Nelson, Robert, President and CEO, National Coffee Association 
        of U.S.A., Inc., hearing before the SubWH, July 24, 
        2002 (Coffee Crisis)
Neuwirth, Jessica, Equality Now, hearing before the full 
        committee, November 29, 2001 (Trafficking Victims 
        Protection Act)
Norland, H.E. Donald, former U.S. Ambassador to Chad, hearing 
        before the SubAF, April 18, 2002 (Chad-Cameroon 
        Pipeline)
Nowrojee, Binaifer, Counsel, Human Rights Watch/Africa, hearing 
        before SubAF, May 16, 2002 (Sierra Leone)
Nouri, M. Hasan, Int'l Orphan Care, hearing before the full 
        committee, November 7, 2001 (Afghanistan)
Ntoni-Nzinga, Daniel Executive Secretary, Inter-Ecclesiastical 
        Committee for Peace in Angola (COIEPA), hearing before 
        SubAF, June 13, 2002 (Angola)
Nyang, Suleiman, Professor, African Studies, Howard University, 
        hearing before SubAF, November 15, 2001 (Africa and 
        Terrorism)
O'Brien, Martin, Committee of the Administration of Justice, 
        Belfast, hearing before the SubIOHR March 15, 2001 (N. 
        Ireland)
Odom, William E., Director, National Security Studies and 
        Senior Fellow, Hudson Institute, Lieutenant General, 
        U.S. Army (Ret.), hearing before the SubE, April 17, 
        2002 (NATO Enlargement)
O'Hanlon, Dr. Michael, Brookings, hearing before the SubAF, 
        July 12, 2001 (ACRI)
Osman, Wali M, Bank of Hawaii Senior Fellow for Pacific 
        Economies, East West Center, hearing before the 
        Subcommittee on East Asia and Pacific, July 23, 2002 
        (Pacific Island Nations)
Ould-Abdallah, Ahmedou, Executive Director, Global Coalition 
        for Africa, hearing before the SubAF, April 18, 2002 
        (Chad-Cameroon Pipeline)
Pahad, Aziz, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs, Government of 
        the Republic of South Africa, hearing before the 
        Subcommittee on Africa, September 18, 2002 (African 
        Development)
Pandya, Amit A., Senior Fellow for South Asia, Institute for 
        Global Democracy, hearing before SubMESA, June 6, 2002 
        (Crisis in South Asia)
Palmer, Hon. Mark, Freedom House, hearing before the SubIOHR, 
        June 6, 2001 (UN Commission on Human Rights)
Pattiz, Norman J., Member, Broadcasting Board of Governors, 
        hearing before the full committee, November 14, 2001 
        (Public Diplomacy)
Peric, Ratko, Rev., Bishop of Mostar, hearing before the full 
        committee, July 25, 2001 (Dayton Accords)
Perle, Richard, Resident Scholar, American Enterprise 
        Institute, hearing before the full committee, September 
        19, 2002 (Iraq)
Peters, Phil, Lexington Institute, hearing before SubIOHR, June 
        6, 2002 (Cuba broadcasting)
Peters, Timothy A., Founder and Director, Helping Hands/Korea 
        and Ton-a-Month Club, hearing before the SubEAP, May 2, 
        2002 (North Korea)
Poptodorova, Elena, Ambassador of Bulgaria, hearing before the 
        SubE, May, 1 2002 (NATO Enlargement)
Posner, Michael, Lawyers Committee for Human Rights, hearing 
        before the SubIOHR March 15, 2001 (N. Ireland)
Poudel, Maju, Founder of Daywalka Foundation, Nepali Human 
        Rights/Women's Rights Activist and Social Worker, 
        hearing before the full committee, June 19, 2002 (Human 
        Trafficking)
Powell, John, Regional Director, World Food Program, hearing 
        before the SubEAP, May 2, 2002 (North Korea)
Prendergast, John, Co-Director of the Africa Program, 
        International Crisis Group, hearing before SubAF, 
        February 28, 2002 (Zimbabwe); hearing before SubAF, May 
        16, 2002 (Sierra Leone); hearing before the full 
        committee, June 5, 2002 (Adoptions)
Puljic, Vinko, Cardinal, Archbishop of Sarajevo, hearing before 
        the full committee, July 25, 2001 (Dayton Accords)
Rabkin, Jeremy, Department of Government, Cornell University, 
        hearing before the full committee, February 28, 2002 
        (Criminal Tribunals)
Raj, Udit, Buddhist Victim of Religious Persecution in India, 
        hearing before the Subcommittee on International 
        Operations and Human Rights, October 9, 2002 
        (International Religious Freedom Report)
Read, Imelda, Member, European Parliament, hearing before the 
        SubE, April 25, 2001 (U.S.-Europe)
Reeves, Eric, Professor, Smith College, joint hearing before 
        the SubAF/IOHR March 28, 2001 (Sudan); hearing before 
        the full committee, June 5, 2002 (Adoptions)
Reeves-Karpeh, Mydea, Union of Liberian Associations in the 
        Americas, hearing before the SubAF, March 14, 2001 
        (Liberia)
Reinsch, William A., President, National Foreign Trade Council, 
        Inc., hearing before the SubMESA, May 9, 2001 (ILSA); 
        hearing before the full committee, May 15, 2002 
        (Trade); hearing before the SubMESA, September 17, 2002 
        (Policy toward Syria)
Revell, Oliver ``Buck'', Former FBI Agent, hearing before the 
        full committee, October 3, 2001 (Al-Qaeda)
Rice, Edmund B., President, Coalition for Employment through 
        Exports, hearing before the full committee, June 21, 
        2001 (Trade), hearing before the full committee, May 
        15, 2002 (Trade)
Rice, Susan E., Consultant on African Affairs, former Assistant 
        Secretary of State, hearing before SubAF, November 15, 
        2001 (Africa and Terrorism)
Rickard, Steven, Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Center for Human 
        Rights, hearing before SubIOHR March 7, 2001 (State 
        Department Country Reports on Human Rights)
Roberts, Dr. Les, International Rescue Committee, hearing 
        before the SubIOHR, May 17, 2001 (Congo)
Rodriguez, Ernesto Diaz, Former Cuban Political Prisoner, 
        hearing before SubIOHR, June 6, 2002 (Cuba 
        broadcasting)
Romano, John, Producer/Writer, hearing before the full 
        committee, November 14, 2001 (Public Diplomacy)
Ronis, Avis, Ambassador of Latvia, hearing before the SubE, May 
        1, 2002 (NATO Enlargement)
Rosenblum, Peter, Director, Human Rights Program, Harvard Law 
        School, hearing before the SubAF, April 18, 2002 (Chad-
        Cameroon Pipeline)
Ross, Dennis B., Counselor/Distinguished Fellow, The Washington 
        Institute for Near East Policy, hearing before the 
        Subcommittee on the Middle East and South Asia, 
        September 20, 2001 (Policy towards the Palestinians)
Rubin, Dr. Barnett R., NY University, hearing before the full 
        committee, November 7, 2001 (Afghanistan)
Salah, Omar, Founder and Chairman of the Board, Century 
        Investment Group, Jordan, hearing before the full 
        committee, July 24, 2002 (Middle East)
Salinas, Carlos, Amnesty International, hearing before SubIOHR 
        March 7, 2001 (State Department Country Reports on 
        Human Rights)
Samara, Noah A., Worldspace Corporation, hearing before the 
        SubAF, May 16, 2001 (Sudan)
Santos, Charles, Former Special Assistant, United Nations, 
        hearing before the full committee, October 3, 2001 (Al-
        Qaeda)
Scheper-Hughes, Prof. Nancy, Organ Watch, hearing before the 
        SubIOHR, June 27, 2001 (Human organs for sale in China)
Schofield, Rupert, Executive Director, Foundation for 
        International Community Assistance, hearing before the 
        full committee, June 7, 2001 (AIDS)
Seck, H.E. Mamadou Mansour, Ambassador E. & P., Republic of 
        Senegal, hearing before the full committee, June 7, 
        2001 (AIDS); hearing before the SubAF, July 12, 2001 
        (ACRI)
Serfaty, Dr. Simon, CSIS, hearing before the SubE, April 25, 
        2001 (U.S.-Europe)
Serwar, Dr. Daniel P., U.S. Institute of Peace, hearing before 
        the SubE, July 11, 2001 (Balkans)
Shaffer, Brenda, Research Director, Caspian Studies Program, 
        Harvard University, hearing before the SubE, October 
        10, 2001 (Caucasus and Caspian Region)
Shambaugh, Prof. David, George Washington University, hearing 
        before the SubEAP, April 25, 2001 (U.S.-China 
        Relations)
Shea, Nina, Commissioner, U.S. Commission on International 
        Religious Freedom, Director, Center for Religious 
        Freedom, Freedom House, hearing before the full 
        committee, May 24, 2001 (Annual Report: Commission on 
        International Religious Freedom); hearing before the 
        SubIOHR, June 6, 2001 (UN Commission on Human Rights); 
        February 13, 2002 (Religious Persecution in China and 
        Vietnam)
Shifter, Michael, Vice President for Policy, Inter-American 
        Dialogue, hearing before SubWH, April 11, 2002 
        (Colombia)
Sidik, Ghayret, Uyghur Victim of Religious Persecution in 
        China, hearing before the Subcommittee on International 
        Operations and Human Rights, October 9, 2002 
        (International Religious Freedom Report)
Silva, Gabriel, General Manager, National Federation of Coffee 
        Growers of Colombia, hearing before the SubWH, July 24, 
        2002 (Coffee Crisis)
Smith, Linda, Founder and Executive Director, Shared Hope 
        International, hearing before the full committee, June 
        19, 2002 (Human Trafficking)
Smyth, Frank, Committee to Protect Journalists, joint hearing 
        before the SubIOHR/SubMESA, July 18, 2001 (Central Asia 
        dissidents)
Sitilides, Western Policy Center, hearing before the SubE, June 
        13, 2001 (U.S. Policy in Mediterranean)
Spertzel, Dr. Richard, UNSCOM 1994-1998, hearing before the 
        full committee, December 5, 2001 (Bioterrorism)
Sung-min, Kim, hearing before the SubEAP, May 2, 2002 (North 
        Korea)
Szayna, Thomas, Political Scientist, RAND, hearing before the 
        SubE, April 17, 2002 (NATO Enlargement)
Tapias, Fernando, Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Armed Forces 
        of Colombia, hearing before the full committee, April 
        24, 2002 (Terrorism)
Tarifa, Fatos, Ambassador of Albania, hearing before the SubE, 
        May 1, 2002 (NATO Enlargement)
Tomsen, Hon. Pete, University of Nebraska, hearing before the 
        full committee, November 7, 2001 (Afghanistan)
Tuchman Mathews, Jessica, President, Carnegie Endowment for 
        International Peace, hearing before the full committee, 
        September 19, 2002 (Iraq)
Usackas, Vygaudas, Ambassador of Lithuania, hearing before the 
        SubE, May 1, 2002 (NATO Enlargement)
Vandenberger, Martina, Europe Researcher, Women's Rights 
        Division, Human Rights Watch, hearing before the 
        SubIOHR, April 24, 2002 (Sex trade in Bosnia)
Vargo, Franklin J., Vice President, International Economic 
        Affairs, National Association of Manufacturers, hearing 
        before the full committee, June 21, 2001 (Trade)
Vollertsen, Norbert, Former medical doctor inside North Korea, 
        hearing before the SubEAP, May 2, 2002 (North Korea)
Waldron, Arthur, Director of Asian Studies, American Enterprise 
        Institute, Lauder Professor of International Relations, 
        University of Pennsylvania, hearing before the full 
        committee, June 19, 2001 (Detainees)
Walker, Edward, President, The Middle East Institute, hearing 
        before the Subcommittee on the Middle East and South 
        Asia, September 20, 2001 (Policy towards the 
        Palestinians); hearing before the full committee, 
        November 14, 2001 (Public Diplomacy)
Wallander, Celeste A., Director and Senior Fellow, Russian and 
        Eurasia Program, Center for Strategic and International 
        Studies, hearing before the SubE, October 16, 2001 (US-
        Russia Relations); hearing before SubEAP, November 15, 
        2001 (Northeast Asia after 9/11); hearing before the 
        SubE, February 27, 2002 (U.S.-Russia Relations)
Walters, Tom, Vice President for Development in Africa, Exxon 
        Mobil Corporation, hearing before the SubAF, April 18, 
        2002 (Chad-Cameroon Pipeline)
Wareham, Roger, December 12th Movement, hearing before the 
        SubIOHR, July 31, 2001 (UN World Conference on Racism)
Wehling, Robert L., Retired, Proctor and Gamble, hearing before 
        the full committee, November 14, 2001 (Public 
        Diplomacy)
Werthheimer, Stef, Founder and Chairman, Iscar, Ltd., Israel, 
        hearing before the full committee, July 24, 2002 
        (Middle East)
Wilder, Andrew, Save the Children, hearing before the full 
        committee, November 1, 2001 (Afghan assistance) (via 
        digital videoconference)
Wilkinson, Bruce, Senior Vice President for International 
        Programs, World Vision United States, hearing before 
        the full committee, June 13, 2002 (Africa)
Wilson, Dr. Ernest, Center for International Development and 
        Conflict Management, hearing before the SubAF, May 16, 
        2001 (Sudan)
Winbush, Dr. Ray, Fisk University, hearing before the SubIOHR, 
        July 31, 2001 (UN World Conference on Racism)
Winter, Jane, British/Irish Rights Watch, hearing before the 
        SubIOHR March 15, 2001 (N. Ireland)
Winter, Roger, U.S. Committee for Refugees, joint hearing 
        before the SubAF/IOHR March 28, 2001 (Sudan)
Woolsey, R. James, Attorney, Shea and Gardner, Former Director 
        of Central Intelligence (1993-1995), hearing before the 
        SubMESA, May 22, 2002 (U.S.-Saudi Relations); hearing 
        before the full committee, September 19, 2002 (Iraq)
Woulfe, Kimberly, hearing before the full committee, May 22, 
        2002 (Adoptions)
Wu, Harry Hongda, Laogai Research Foundation, hearing before 
        the SubIOHR, June 27, 2001 (Human organs for sale in 
        China); hearing before the full committee, October 17, 
        2001 (Coercive Population Control in China)
Yaqub, Daoud, Executive Director, The Afghanistan Foundation, 
        Representative for the Former Afghan King Mohammad 
        Zahir Shah, hearing before the SubIOHR, October 31, 
        2001 (Afghanistan)
Yergin, Daniel, Chairman, Cambridge Energy Research Associates, 
        hearing before the full committee, June 20, 2002 
        (Foreign Oil)
Yingli, Liu, wife of Li Shaomin, hearing before the full 
        committee, June 19, 2001 (Detainees)
Zeitz, Paul, Co-Director, Global AIDS Alliance, hearing before 
        the full committee, June 7, 2001 (AIDS)
                              APPENDIX II

                              ----------                              


                     COMMITTEE ORIGINS AND HISTORY

    The Committee on Foreign Affairs traces its origins to 
November 29, 1775. It was on that date that the Continental 
Congress by resolution created a committee ``for the sole 
purposes of corresponding with our friends in Great Britain, 
Ireland, and other parts of the world.'' The members chosen for 
this committee were Benjamin Franklin--who served as chairman 
and guiding spirit--Benjamin Harrison, Thomas Johnson, Jr., 
John Dickinson, and John Jay. Known at first as the Committee 
of Correspondence, the committee itself soon changed its name 
to the Committee of Secret Correspondence.
    That committee was the first institution created to 
represent the United States in the foreign affairs field. The 
Committee on International Relations (as well as the Senate 
Foreign Relations Committee) is a lineal descendant of the 
Committee of Correspondence.
    Franklin's committee quickly entered into communication 
with various persons in Europe for the purpose of ascertaining 
sentiment there toward the Colonies and obtaining any other 
information which might be useful in the struggle with England. 
It even designated its own secret agents abroad.
    By the spring of 1777, the specialized nature of the 
committee's work had been recognized and its title changed to 
``Committee for Foreign Affairs.'' Special problems in foreign 
relations, however, were sometimes dealt with by select or 
temporary committees appointed for the purpose.
    After the Congress of the United States was organized under 
the Constitution, select committees to deal with foreign 
affairs were appointed. In 1807, during the Jefferson 
Presidency, a House committee was established in response to 
predatory actions by both the French and British against 
American commercial shipping. Following the seizure and search 
of the U.S. frigate Chesapeake 10 miles off the Virginia coast 
by a British ship, the House appointed a special Foreign 
Relations Committee which was also known as the Aggression 
Committee. That committee had an active role in foreign policy 
considerations through the War of 1812 and in 1822, renamed the 
Committee on Foreign Affairs, was designated a standing 
committee of the House with a membership of seven. The 150th 
anniversary of that event was celebrated by the committee in 
1972.
    Because the House is the organ of National Government 
closest to the citizenry, the Committee on Foreign Affairs may 
truly be said to have been the voice of the American people on 
issues of international significance for more than a century 
and a half. Although this important role has remained the same, 
the name of the committee was changed on March 19, 1975, by a 
resolution (House Resolution 163) sponsored by 22 members of 
the committee to the Committee on International Relations. The 
change resulted from the extensive discussions by the members 
that were undertaken in relation to the reorganization of the 
subcommittee structure of the committee. It was the consensus 
that the change in the name of the full committee would more 
accurately reflect the organization of the committee as it had 
been agreed upon by its own members at that time. Subsequently, 
at the beginning of the 96th Congress, the committee again 
reorganized its subcommittee structure and agreed to the 
introduction of House Resolution 89, sponsored by 30 Members, 
to return to the committee's original name, ``The Committee on 
Foreign Affairs.'' The resolution was agreed to on February 5, 
1979. At the beginning of the 104th Congress, the House changed 
the names of many committees, and the ``Committee on Foreign 
Affairs'' was again changed to the ``Committee on International 
Relations''.
    Throughout its history, the committee has been composed of 
some of America's most able legislators and statesmen. Two 
American Presidents have served on it: James K. Polk, from 1827 
to 1831, and John Quincy Adams, who became chairman in 1842 
after he returned to the House following his term as the Chief 
Executive.
    Many former chairmen of the committee have written their 
names into the history books. Among them was Edward Everett of 
Massachusetts, chairman in the 20th Congress, who also served 
as Secretary of State, was a Whig Vice Presidential candidate 
in 1860, and is remembered as one of America's greatest 
orators. Francis W. Pickens, who chaired the committee from 
1839 to 1841, later became Governor of South Carolina and 
authorized the firing on Fort Sumter which precipitated the 
Civil War.
    Serving as chairman in the aftermath of World War I, 
Stephen G. Porter of Pennsylvania came to be one of the most 
influential figures in the determination of American foreign 
policy in the early 1920's. Former Chairman Sol Bloom of New 
York and James P. Richards of South Carolina have been 
recognized for their contributions to America's leadership in 
the immediate post-World War II period. In more recent times, 
J. Danforth Quayle, former Vice President, served on the 
Committee in the 96th Congress. The longest tenure as chairman 
in the history of the committee was that of Hon. Thomas E. 
Morgan of Pennsylvania who served in that position from 1959 
until the end of the 94th Congress.
    Other former members of the Committee on International 
Relations--Tom Connally of Texas, Champ Clark of Iowa, and J. 
William Fulbright of Arkansas, Mike Mansfield of Montana, Jacob 
Javits of New York, and Abraham Ribicoff of Connecticut. Eight 
current members of the U.S. Senate are former members of the 
Committee: Robert C. Byrd from West Virginia; Olympia Snowe 
from Maine; Charles Schumer from New York; Mike DeWine from 
Ohio; Sam Brownback from Kansas; Harry Reid from Nevada; Maria 
Cantwell from Washington; and John McCain from Arizona.
    Moreover, committee experience has provided a beginning for 
numerous individuals who have gone on to distinguish themselves 
in the diplomatic service of the country. Among them was Perry 
Belmont, chairman in the 49th and 50th Congresses, who was U.S. 
Minister of Spain in 1888-89 and a noted author of work on 
international policies. His successor as chairman in the 51st 
Congress was Robert R. Hitt of Ohio who was chief of the U.S. 
Delegation in Paris from 1874 to 1881 and subsequently was 
appointed Assistant Secretary of State. Christian A. Herter, 
who served as Secretary of State during the Eisenhower 
administration, was a committee member in the 82d Congress. 
More recent examples are: Chester Bowles, former Under 
Secretary of State; James W. Wadsworth, former U.S. 
Representative of the United Nations; F. Bradford Morse, United 
Nations Development Programs; E. Ross Adair, former Ambassador 
to Ethiopia; William S. Mailliard, former Ambassador to the 
Organization of American States; and J. Danforth Quayle, former 
Vice President of the United States.
                              APPENDIX III

                              ----------                              


  (MEMBERSHIP OF THE SUBCOMMITTEES OF THE COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL 
                       RELATIONS, 107TH CONGRESS)

                       MIDDLE EAST AND SOUTH ASIA

                    Benjamin A. Gilman, NY, Chairman

Dan Burton, IN                      Gary L. Ackerman, NY
Steve Chabot, OH                    Howard L. Berman, CA
John M. McHugh, NY                  Brad Sherman, CA
Joseph R. Pitts, PA                 Robert Wexler, FL
Darrell E. Issa, CA                 Eliot L. Engel, NY
Eric Cantor, VA                     Joseph Crowley, NY
Jo Ann Davis, VA                    Joseph M. Hoeffel, PA
Dana Rohrabacher, CA                Shelley Berkley, NV
Peter T. King, NY                   Adam B. Schiff, CA
John Cooksey, LA

                       EAST ASIA AND THE PACIFIC

                      James A. Leach, IA, Chairman

Dana Rohrabacher, CA                Eni F.H. Faleomavaega, AS
Brian D. Kerns, IN                  Sherrod Brown, OH
Christopher H. Smith, NJ            Jim Davis, FL
Edward R. Royce, CA                 Earl Blumenauer, OR
Steve Chabot, OH                    Gary L. Ackerman, NY
Darrell E. Issa, CA                 Gregory W. Meeks, NY
Jeff Flake, AZ                      Diane E. Watson, CA
Mark Green, WI

                                 EUROPE

                      Elton Gallegly, CA, Chairman

Doug Bereuter, NE                   Earl F. Hilliard, AL
Peter T. King, NY                   Brad Sherman, CA
John Cooksey, LA                    Robert Wexler, FL
Nick Smith, MI                      Jim Davis, FL
Benjamin A. Gilman, NY              Eliot L. Engel, NY
James A. Leach, IA                  William D. Delahunt, MA
Dan Burton, IN                      Barbara Lee, CA
Eric Cantor, VA                     Joseph Crowley, NY
Mark Green,WI

               INTERNATIONAL OPERATIONS AND HUMAN RIGHTS

                  Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, FL, Chairperson

Christopher H. Smith, NJ            Cynthia A. McKinney, GA
Ron Paul, TX                        Robert Menendez, NJ
Cass Ballenger, NC                  Grace F. Napolitano, CA
Thomas G. Tancredo, CO              Adam B. Schiff, CA
Joseph R. Pitts, PA

                                 AFRICA

                     Edward R. Royce, CA, Chairman

Amo Houghton, NY                    Donald M. Payne, NJ
Thomas G. Tancredo, CO              Gregory W. Meeks, NY
Jeff Flake, AZ                      Barbara Lee, CA
Brian D. Kerns, IN                  Earl F. Hilliard, AL

                           WESTERN HEMISPHERE

                      Cass Ballenger, NC, Chairman

Elton Gallegly, CA                  Robert Menendez, NJ
Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, FL             William D. Delahunt, MA
Ron Paul, TX                        Grace F. Napolitano, CA
Nick Smith, MI                      Eni F.H. Faleomavaega, AS
Jo Ann Davis, VA                    Donald M. Payne, NJ
                              APPENDIX IV

                              ----------                              


         CHAIRMEN OF THE HOUSE INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS COMMITTEE
------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Congress                  Dates           Congressman
------------------------------------------------------------------------
17th...............................      1821-23  Jonathon Russell
18th...............................      1823-25  John Forsyth
19th...............................      1825-27  Do.
20th...............................      1827-29  Edward Everett
21st...............................      1829-31  William S. Archer
22nd...............................      1831-33  Do.
23d................................      1833-35  William S. Archer (1st
                                                   sess.)
                                                  James M. Wayne (2nd
                                                   sess.)
24th...............................      1835-37  John Y. Mason (1st
                                                   sess.)
25th...............................      1837-39  Benjamin Howard
26th...............................      1839-41  Francis Pickens
27th...............................      1841-43  Cabel Cushing (1st
                                                   sess.)
                                                  John Quincy Adams (2d/
                                                   3d)
28th...............................      1843-45  Charles J. Ingersoll.
29th...............................      1845-47  Do.
30th...............................      1847-49  Truman Smith
31st...............................      1849-51  John Mclernand
32nd...............................      1851-53  Thomas H. Bayly
33d................................      1853-55  Do.
34th...............................      1855-57  Alex C.M. Pennington
35th...............................      1857-59  Thomas L. Clingman
                                                   (1st sess.)
                                                  George W. Hopkins (2d
                                                   sess.)
36th...............................      1859-61  Thomas Corwin
37th...............................      1861-63  John J. Crittenden
38th...............................      1863-65  Henry Winter Davis
39th...............................      1865-67  Nathaniel Banks
40th...............................      1867-69  Do.
41st...............................      1869-71  Do.
42nd...............................      1871-73  Do.
43d................................      1873-75  Godlove S. Orth
44th...............................      1875-77  Thomas Swann
45th...............................      1877-79  Do.
46th...............................      1879-81  Samuel Cox
47th...............................      1881-83  C.G. Williams
48th...............................      1883-85  Andrew Curtin
49th...............................      1885-87  Perry Belmont
50th...............................      1887-89  Perry Belmont (1st
                                                   sess.)
                                                  James B. McCreary (2d.
                                                   sess.)
51st...............................      1889-91  Robert Hitt
52nd...............................      1891-93  James Blount
53d................................      1893-95  James B. McCreary
54th...............................      1895-97  Robert Hitt
55th...............................      1897-99  Do.
56th...............................    1899-1901  Do.
57th...............................      1901-03  Do.
58th...............................      1903-05  Do.
59th...............................      1905-07  Robert R. Hitt (1st
                                                   sess.)
                                                  Robert G. Cousins (2d
                                                   sess).
61st...............................      1909-11  James Breck Perkins
                                                   (\1/2\ sess.)
                                                  David J. Foster (3d
                                                   sess).
62nd...............................      1911-12  William Sulzer
63d................................      1913-15  Henry D. Flood
64th...............................      1915-17  Do.
65th...............................      1917-19  Do.
66th...............................      1919-21  Stephen G. Porter
67th...............................      1921-23  Do.
68th...............................      1923-25  Do.
69th...............................      1925-27  Do.
70th...............................      1927-29  Do.
71st...............................      1929-31  Stephen G. Porter (\1/
                                                   2\ sess.)
                                                  Henry W. Temple (3d
                                                   sess.)
72nd...............................      1931-33  J. Charles Linthicum
                                                   (1st sess)
                                                  Sam D. McReynolds (2nd
                                                   sess).
73d................................      1933-34  Sam D. McReynolds
74th...............................      1935-36  Do.
75th...............................      1937-38  Do.
76th...............................      1939-41  Sam D. McReynolds (\1/
                                                   2\. sess)
                                                  Sol Bloom (3d sess).
77th...............................      1941-42  Sol Bloom
78th...............................      1943-44  Do.
79th...............................      1945-46  Do.
80th...............................      1947-48  Charles A. Eaton
81st...............................      1949-51  Sol Bloom (\1/2\
                                                   sess.)
81st...............................      1949-51  John Kee (2d sess.)
                                                   \3\
82d................................      1951-52  John Kee (1st sess)
83d................................      1953-54  Robert B. Chiperfield
84st...............................      1955-56  James P. Richards
85th...............................      1957-58  Thomas S. Gordon
86th...............................      1959-60  Thomas E. Morgan
87th...............................      1961-62  Do.
88th...............................      1963-64  Do.
89th...............................      1965-66  Do.
90th...............................      1967-68  Do.
91st...............................      1969-70  Do.
92nd...............................      1971-72  Do.
93d................................      1973-74  Do.
94th...............................      1975-76  Do.
95th...............................      1977-78  Clement J. Zablocki
96th...............................      1979-80  Do.
97th...............................      1981-82  Do.
98th...............................      1983-84  Clement J. Zablocki (1
                                                   sess)
                                                  Dante B. Fascell (2
                                                   sess)
99th...............................      1985-86  Dante B. Fascell
100th..............................      1987-88  Do.
101st..............................      1989-90  Do.
102nd..............................      1991-92  Do.
103d...............................      1993-94  Lee H. Hamilton
104th..............................      1995-96  Benjamin A. Gilman
105th..............................      1997-98  Do.
106th..............................      1999-00  Do.
107th..............................      2001-02  Henry J. Hyde
------------------------------------------------------------------------
\3\ Hon. John Kee died on May 8, 1951. Hon. James P. Richards became
  chairman for remainder of 82nd Congress.
Note--The data is taken from collections of congressional directories in
  the Library of Congress, Department of State, Supreme Court and the
  National Archives. The following volumes are missing from all
  collections: 34th Congress 3d session, 37th Congress 1st and 3d
  session, 40th Congress 1st session, 55th Congress 1st session, 58th
  Congress 1st session, 75th Congress 2nd session, and 76th Congress 2nd
  session.
Party designations are taken from biographical dictionary of the
  American Congress, and are unavoidably subject to error in the early
  period, due to the vagueness of party lines and frequent shifting of
  men from one party to another on critical issues. In instances where
  the Biographical Directory incorrectly refers to Democratic
  Republicans as Democrats the designation have been changed.