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                                                       Calendar No. 597
107th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 2d Session                                                     107-278

======================================================================
 
                AFGHANISTAN FREEDOM SUPPORT ACT OF 2002

                                _______
                                

               September 12, 2002.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

          Mr. Biden, from the Committee on Foreign Relations,
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 2712]

    The Committee on Foreign Relations, to which was referred 
the bill (S. 2712), to authorize economic and democratic 
development assistance for Afghanistan and to authorize 
military assistance for Afghanistan and certain other foreign 
countries, having considered the same, reports favorably 
thereon with an amendment and recommends that the bill as 
amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page

  I. Purpose and Summary..............................................1
 II. Background and Need for Legislation..............................2
III. Committee Action.................................................3
 IV. Section-by-Section Analysis......................................4
  V. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate........................9
 VI. Evaluation of Regulatory Impact.................................11
VII. Changes in Existing Law.........................................11

                         I. Purpose and Summary

    The Afghanistan Freedom Support Act of 2002 (S. 2712) 
commits the United States to the stability, security, 
reconstruction, and democratic development of Afghanistan. In 
addition to $2.5 billion in economic, humanitarian, and 
political assistance authorized over four years in Title I of 
this bill ($2 billion in section 108, $500 million in section 
104), Title II seeks to enhance the security and stability of 
Afghanistan and the region by authorizing $300 million in 
drawdown authority for military and security assistance to 
Afghanistan and to certain other countries, including 
assistance for counter-narcotics, crime control, and police 
training.
    S. 2712 also includes a provision expressing the sense of 
Congress that the International Security Assistance Force 
(ISAF) in Afghanistan should be expanded beyond Kabul. In the 
event such an expansion is pursued, the bill authorizes $500 
million per year for FY2003 and FY2004, for a total of $1 
billion, if the President makes that decision.
    This legislation is similar to H.R. 3994. The House of 
Representatives passed H.R. 3994 on May 21, 2002 by a vote of 
390-22 (see House Report 107-420).

                II. Background and Need for Legislation

    The Afghanistan Freedom Support Act authorizes a broad 
range of political, economic, humanitarian, and security 
assistance for Afghanistan. The Administration's flexibility is 
enhanced through the authorization of a total of $3.8 billion 
over 4 years ($2 billion in section 108, $500 million in 
section 104, $1 billion in section 208, $300 million in section 
202(b)).
    Achieving stability, security, and reconstruction in 
Afghanistan requires sustained American leadership and 
assistance over the next decade. Deputy Secretary of State 
Richard Armitage testified before the Committee on June 26, 
2002 that the long-term costs of reconstruction, humanitarian, 
and security assistance over the next 10 years could reach $10 
billion. Other estimates, including those by World Bank 
economists, place the figure considerably higher.
    A report titled ``U.S. Support for Afghan Women Children, 
and Refugees'' submitted to the Congress by the Department of 
State on June 28, 2002, noted that ``Afghanistan today is only 
beginning to recover from one of the world's worst man-made 
disasters aggravated by an unforgiving natural environment . . 
. in the short term, extraordinary efforts are still necessary 
to respond to the urgent humanitarian needs of the Afghan 
people.''
    The goals of American policy in Afghanistan--including 
prevention of a return of the Taliban and al-Qaeda, pursuing 
counternarcotics efforts, and fostering a stable democratic 
government--are dependent on the establishment of internal 
security. It is in the national interest of the United States, 
therefore, to help establish and maintain the security of 
Afghanistan. Eventually this duty will be carried out by the 
national army and police currently being trained by the United 
States and other nations, but this process is a long-term 
effort. Committee staff learned, during an August 2002 trip to 
Afghanistan, that the program has trained only one guard 
battalion and two half-strength combat battalions in the 3 
months it has been in operation, and the structural impediments 
to more rapid expansion remain in place. In the interim period 
before an Afghan army can ensure stability, the maintenance of 
security relies heavily on the UN-mandated International 
Security Assistance Force (ISAF) within Kabul, and on U.S. 
forces outside the nation's capital. Key U.S. allies have 
stressed the necessity of American military support of ISAF for 
airlift, logistics, intelligence, and other crucial 
requirements. Congress wishes to provide the President with the 
means to effect the expansion of peacekeeping troops outside of 
Kabul, as suggested by Deputy Secretary of Defense Wolfowitz on 
September 5, 2002 in a speech at the Brookings Institution.
    Deputy Secretary Wolfowitz highlighted the linkage between 
economic development and security when he testified before the 
Committee on June 26, 2002 that ``the most important instrument 
that the Afghan Authority and we have to establish a stable 
security situation is the leverage provided by economic 
assistance.''
    Security in Afghanistan is precarious, at best. On July 6, 
2002, assassins killed Haji Abdul Qadir, a Vice President and 
Minister of Public Works in Afghanistan. Soon after, U.S. 
Special Forces were assigned to protect Afghan President Hamid 
Karzai. On September 5, 2002, Karzai himself narrowly escaped 
an assassination attempt in Kandahar; within hours of this 
attack, at least 25 people were killed in two bomb blasts in 
the capital city of Kabul, acts attributed to anti-U.S. warlord 
Gulbuddin Hekmatyar or remnants of the Taliban and al-Qaeda. 
Political conflict among rival warlords, and between warlords 
and the central government, has threatened the Afghan 
government's efforts at unity and military integration.

                         III. Committee Action

    The Committee held the following hearings on Afghanistan:

 June 26, 2002: ``Afghanistan: Building Stability, 
    Avoiding Chaos''

Witnesses: Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage
Deputy Secretary of Defense Paul Wolfowitz
Brig. Gen. (Ret.) David Grange
The Hon. Peter Tomsen, former Special Envoy to Afghanistan 
    (1989-92)

 December 6, 2001: ``The Political Future of 
    Afghanistan''

Witnesses: The Hon. Richard Haass, Director, Policy Planning, 
    Department of State
The Hon. Christina Rocca, Assistant Secretary of State for 
    South Asian Affairs
Mrs. Fatima Gailani, Advisor, National Islamic Front of 
    Afghanistan
Dr. Thomas Goutierre, Dean of International Studies and 
    Director of the Center for Afghanistan Studies, University 
    of Nebraska-Omaha

 November 15, 2001: ``Humanitarian Crisis: Is Enough 
    Aid Reaching Afghanistan?'' (Subcommittees on Near Eastern 
    and South Asian Affairs/International Operations and 
    Terrorism)

Witnesses: Mr. Alan Kreczko, Acting Assistant Secretary of 
    State, Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration
Mr. Bernard McConnell, Director of Central Asian Task Force, 
    USAID
The Hon. Andrew Natsios, Administrator, USAID
Mr. Leonard Rogers, Acting Assistant Administrator for 
    Humanitarian Response, USAID
Mr. Mark Barolini, vice president of Government Relations, 
    International Rescue Committee
Mr. Joel Charny, Vice President, Refugees International
Mr. George Devendorf, Director of Emergency Operations, Mercy 
    Corps

 October 10, 2001: ``Afghanistan's Humanitarian 
    Crisis'' (Subcommittees on Near Eastern and South Asian 
    Affairs/International Operations and Terrorism)

Witnesses: Mr. Alan Kreczko, Acting Assistant Secretary of 
    State, Bureau of Population, Refugees and Migration
The Hon. Andrew Natsios, Administrator, USAID
The Hon. Christina Rocca, Assistant Secretary of State for 
    South Asian Affairs
Mr. Ken Bacon, President, Refugees International
Dr. Nicolas DeTorrente, Executive Director, Doctors Without 
    Borders
Ms. Eleanor Smeal, President, Feminist Majority

    On July 9, Senator Hagel introduced S. 2712, which was 
referred to the Committee. On August 1, 2002, the Committee 
considered a Senator Hagel substitute amendment to S. 2712, 
pursuant to notice, in open session. The Committee then 
considered, and approved by voice vote three amendments offered 
to the substitute, one by Senator Boxer, one by Senator 
Brownback, and one by Senator Sarbanes. The Committee then 
agreed, by unanimous voice vote, to order the bill reported, as 
amended.

                    IV. Section-by-Section Analysis


Section 1. Short Title

    Section 1 cites the act as the ``Afghanistan Freedom 
Support Act of 2002.''

TITLE I. ECONOMIC AND DEMOCRATIC DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANCE FOR AFGHANISTAN


Sec. 101. Declaration of Policy

    This section includes six declarations outlining general 
categories of assistance for Afghanistan, including support 
for: development of democratic and civil authorities and a 
broad-based, multi-ethnic, gender-sensitive government; 
humanitarian needs and counter-narcotics initiatives; peace and 
security; the objectives of the Bonn conference, including 
Afghanistan's territorial integrity and neutrality in foreign 
affairs and non-interference in Afghanistan's domestic 
politics; the special emergency situation in Afghanistan; and 
efforts to foster stability and democratization and elimination 
of terrorism.

Sec. 102. Purposes of Assistance

    This section describes the purposes of assistance 
authorized in Title I, including: reducing the chance that 
Afghanistan will again be a source of international terrorism; 
supporting the efforts of the United States and the 
international community to address the humanitarian crisis in 
Afghanistan and the region; supporting counter-narcotics 
efforts; helping achieve a broad-based, general-sensitive and 
representative government; encouraging participation of Afghan 
civil society in a new Afghan government; supporting the 
reconstruction of Afghanistan, including clearance of landmines 
and building of roads; and providing resources to the Ministry 
of Women's Affairs of Afghanistan.

Sec. 103. Principles of Assistance

    This section lists the principles that should guide the 
assistance authorized in this title, including: terrorism and 
narcotics control; the role of women; Afghan ownership; 
stability and security in Afghanistan; and coordination of 
international and donor efforts.

Sec. 104. Authorization of Assistance

    This section authorizes assistance for Afghanistan in the 
following areas: urgent humanitarian needs; repatriation and 
resettlement of refugees and internally displaced persons; 
counter-narcotics efforts; reestablishment of food security, 
rehabilitation of the agriculture sector, improvement in health 
conditions, and the reconstruction of basic infrastructure; 
reestablishment of Afghanistan as a viable nation-state 
(including not less than $10 million per year for FY2003-FY2005 
for carrying out a loya jirga and support for elections and 
political party development); market economy; and assistance to 
women and girls (including $15 million per year for the Afghan 
Ministry of Women's Affairs and $5 million per year for the 
National Human Rights Commission of Afghanistan).
    Some of the funds authorized by this title may be provided 
only if the President certifies to Congress with respect to the 
fiscal year involved that ``progress is being made toward 
adopting a constitution and establishing a democratically 
elected government in Afghanistan.'' Recognizing both the 
urgency and uncertainty of the transition process in 
Afghanistan, this section also provides a waiver of this 
limitation ``if the President first determines and certifies to 
Congress that it is important to the national interest of the 
United States to do so.''
    The Committee notes the outstanding work of the Center for 
Afghanistan Studies at the University of Nebraska-Omaha (UNO) 
to re-build Afghanistan's educational system. UNO, working with 
USAID, published over 10.6 million textbooks for Afghan 
students by mid-April 2002. The Committee urges allocation of 
funding for UNO's ``America's Rapid Response to Education Needs 
in Afghanistan (ARRENA)'' project and other UNO initiatives to 
support educational capacity-building, teacher training, and 
primary, secondary, and vocational education in Afghanistan.
    This title also includes authorization of $500 million for 
FY2003-FY2005 for an enterprise fund to encourage private 
sector development and job creation. This sum is in addition 
to, rather than a part of, the $2 billion authorized in section 
108.

Sec. 105. Coordination of Assistance

    This section strongly urges the President to designate a 
coordinator for Afghan policy who, if appointed and confirmed 
by the Senate, will be responsible for strategy development; 
policy coordination among U.S. Government agencies, other 
countries, and international organizations with respect to 
Afghanistan; management and oversight; resolution of policy and 
program disputes among U.S. Government agencies with respect to 
Afghanistan. The coordinator shall hold the rank and status of 
ambassador.

Sec. 106. Administrative Provisions

    This section includes administrative provisions, including, 
to the extent feasible, use of the expertise of Afghan-
Americans, donations of manufacturing and related equipment by 
U.S. businesses, and utilization of research conducted by land 
grant colleges and universities. Amounts made available to 
carry out this title may be made available to a Federal 
department or agency for expenses incurred providing assistance 
under this title. The Comptroller General and the Inspector 
General of the U.S. Agency for International Development shall 
monitor the provision of assistance under this title. The 
Committee urges that to the maximum extent practicable that 
assistance authorized under this title be provided directly to 
the Government of Afghanistan.

Sec. 107. Relationship to Other Authority

    The authority to provide assistance under this title is in 
addition to any other authority to provide assistance to the 
Government of Afghanistan.

Sec. 108. Authorization of Appropriations

    This section provides authorization of appropriations of $2 
billion over years 2002-2005, in addition to $500 million 
authorized for Enterprise Fund for FY2003-FY2005. In order to 
provide flexibility for spending decisions based on local 
absorptive capacity, funds are authorized to remain available 
until expended. This includes sums authorized for FY2002, as 
the legislation was initiated before the close of this fiscal 
year, and it is the intent of Congress that the overall 
authorization not be decreased by delays in the legislative 
schedule.
    In light of the special circumstances of the United States' 
commitment to Afghanistan, expressed by President Bush's 
reference to the Marshall Plan in describing America's role in 
the reconstruction of Afghanistan, the funding authorization in 
this act is intended to supplement--not replace--any additional 
funds devoted to Afghanistan from other accounts. The intent of 
Congress is to authorize up to $3.8 billion in new money, not 
to draw money for Afghanistan's recovery from a static pool of 
international aid.

TITLE II. MILITARY ASSISTANCE FOR AFGHANISTAN AND CERTAIN OTHER FOREIGN 
               COUNTRIES AND INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS


Sec. 201. Support for Security During Transition in Afghanistan

    This section expresses the sense of Congress that the 
United States should support steps that contribute to security 
in Afghanistan during the transition.

Sec. 202. Authorization of Assistance

    This section describes new authorities to provide security 
and military assistance to Afghanistan and other eligible 
foreign countries and international organizations. These new 
authorities are in addition to existing authorities.
    Section 202(a) authorizes the President to exercise his 
authorities under section 506 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
1961 to direct the drawdown of defense articles, services, and 
military education and training, including those that are 
acquired by contract or otherwise, for the Government of 
Afghanistan and eligible foreign countries and international 
organizations.
    Section 202(b) limits the aggregate value of assistance 
provided in subsection (a) to $300 million, except that such 
limitation shall be increased by any amounts appropriated 
pursuant to the authorization of appropriations in section 
204(b)(1).

Section 203. Eligible Foreign Countries and Eligible International 
        Organizations

    This section defines what constitutes an eligible foreign 
country or international organization. Such country or 
organization shall be eligible for assistance under section 202 
if that country or organization is participating in military, 
peacekeeping, or policing operations in Afghanistan, and such 
assistance is provided specifically for such operations in 
Afghanistan.
    No country identified by the Secretary of State as a state 
sponsor of terrorism may receive assistance. The President may 
waive this limitation if the President determines that it is in 
the national security interest of the United States to do so.

Sec. 204. Reimbursement for Assistance

    Assistance provided under section 202(a)(2) shall be made 
available without reimbursement to the Department of Defense 
except to the extent that funds are appropriated pursuant to 
the authorization of appropriations in section 202(b)(1).
    Section (b) authorizes the appropriation to the President 
such sums as may be necessary to reimburse the applicable 
appropriation, fund, or account for the value of assistance 
under section 202(a)(2). Amounts appropriated pursuant to this 
authorization are authorized to remain available until expended 
and are in addition to amounts otherwise available for the 
purposes described in this title.

Sec. 205. Congressional Notification Requirements

    This section subjects assistance to any eligible foreign 
country or international organization to a notification 
procedure. The President must determine that such assistance is 
important to the national security interest of the United 
States, and then notify the Committee on International 
Relations of the House of Representatives and the Committee on 
Foreign Relations of the Senate at least 15 days in advance of 
providing such assistance. The report of notification may be 
submitted in classified or unclassified form.

Sec. 206. Promoting Secure Delivery of Humanitarian and Other 
        Assistance in Afghanistan

    This section includes findings and a statement of policy 
which reads ``It should be the policy of the United States to 
support measures to help meet the immediate security needs of 
Afghanistan in order to promote safe and effective delivery of 
humanitarian and other assistance throughout Afghanistan, 
further the rule of law and civil order, and support the 
formation of a functioning, representative national 
government.''
    The section requires the President to provide a strategy 
for achieving U.S. policy objectives in Afghanistan, not later 
than 45 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, and 
every 6 months thereafter through January 1, 2006, to the 
Committees on International Relations and Appropriations of the 
House of Representatives and the Committees on Foreign 
Relations and Appropriations of the Senate. The President is 
also required to describe the progress of the Government of 
Afghanistan toward the eradication of poppy cultivation, the 
disruption of heroin production, and the reduction of the 
overall supply and demand for illicit narcotics in Afghanistan.
    The initial provision of information shall be a written 
report. Thereafter, this information may be provided in a 
written report or an oral briefing.

Sec. 207. Relationship to Other Authority

    The authority to provide assistance under this title is in 
addition to any other authority to provide assistance to the 
Government of Afghanistan. Assistance under this title may be 
provided notwithstanding any other provision of law.

Sec. 208. Sense of Congress Regarding Expansion of the International 
        Security Assistance Force; Authorization of Appropriations

    This section expresses the sense of the Congress urging the 
President to use the full diplomatic influence of the United 
States to expand the International Security Assistance Force 
(ISAF) beyond Kabul by sponsoring a UN Security Council 
resolution authorizing such an expansion; enlisting our 
European and other allies to provide forces for an expanded 
ISAF; providing financial and military assistance, including 
personnel, as the President considers necessary to achieve the 
expansion of the ISAF. There is authorized to be appropriated 
to the President $500 million for each of the fiscal years 2003 
and 2004.
    On September 5, 2002, in a speech at the Brookings 
Institution, Deputy Defense Secretary Paul Wolfowitz endorsed 
deploying peacekeepers outside of Kabul, and called on the 
international community ``to provide the leadership and 
resources necessary'' to expand ISAF. On September 8, 2002, 
Vice President Richard Cheney said that while a viable Afghan 
national army was the long-term solution, ``in the interim, we 
may need to expand ISAF, and we're open to suggestions'' (Meet 
the Press, NBC News). The Committee is encouraged that the 
Administration has reconsidered its position. It is the intent 
of Congress to provide the President with the full resources 
necessary to accomplish the mission of supporting the expansion 
of ISAF.

Sec. 209. Sunset

    The authority of this title shall expire after September 
30, 2005

              V. Congressional Budget Office Cost Estimate

    In accordance with rule XXVI, paragraph 11(a) of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee provides the 
following estimate of the cost of this legislation prepared by 
the Congressional Budget Office:
                                     U.S. Congress,
                               Congressional Budget Office,
                                   Washington, DC, August 28, 2002.

Hon. Joseph R. Biden Jr., Chairman,
United States Senate,
Committee on Foreign Relations,
Washington, DC.

    Dear Mr. Chairman:

    The Congressional Budget Office has prepared the enclosed 
cost estimate for S. 2712, the Afghanistan Freedom Support Act 
of 2002.
    If you wish further details on this estimate, we will be 
pleased to provide them. The CBO staff contact is Joseph C. 
Whitehill.
            Sincerely,
                                  Dan L. Crippen, Director.

Enclosure.

                AFGHANISTAN FREEDOM SUPPORT ACT OF 2002

Summary

    S. 2712 would authorize economic and military assistance to 
the government of Afghanistan for 2002 through 2005. The bill 
would authorize the appropriation of $2.5 billion for 
humanitarian and economic assistance over the 2002-2005 period 
and $1 billion for the International Security Assistance Force 
in the 2003-2004 period. In addition, the bill would authorize 
the President to use up to $300 million from the resources of 
the Department of Defense to provide defense articles, defense 
services, and military education and training services to 
Afghanistan or to countries participating in military, 
peacekeeping, or policing operations in Afghanistan. CBO 
estimates that implementing S. 2712 would cost $2.5 billion 
over the 2003-2007 period, assuming the appropriation of the 
necessary amounts. Because the bill would not affect direct 
spending or receipts, pay-as-you-go procedures would not apply.
    S. 2712 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in the Unfunded Mandates Reform Act (UMRA) 
and would not affect the budgets of state, local, or tribal 
governments.

Estimated Cost to the Federal Government

    The estimated budgetary impact of S. 2712 is shown in the 
following table. This estimate assumes the legislation will be 
enacted near the beginning of fiscal year 2003 and that amounts 
authorized for 2003, 2004, and 2005 will be provided in annual 
appropriation acts near the start of each fiscal year. Except 
as discussed below, we assume that outlays will follow 
historical spending patterns. While the bill would authorize 
$500 million for 2002, we assume that no additional funding 
will be provided in 2002 above the $250 million provided in 
Public Law 107-206, Emergency Supplemental Appropriations and 
Rescissions Act, 2002. The costs of this legislation fall 
within budget function 150 (international affairs).


                                    [By Fiscal Year, in Millions of Dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                        2002      2003      2004      2005      2006      2007
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                                        SPENDING SUBJECT TO APPROPRIATION

Spending Under Current Law for Afghanistan: \1\
  Estimated Authorization Level.....................       548        80        40        40         0         0
  Estimated Outlays.................................       443       315       150        84        38        13

Proposed Changes:
  Estimated Authorization Level.....................         0     1,400     1,200       650         0         0
  Estimated Outlays.................................         0       327       737       721       467       249

Spending Under S. 2712 for Afghanistan:
  Estimated Authorization Level.....................       548     1,480     1,240       690         0         0
  Estimated Outlays.................................       443       642       887       805       505       262

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ The 2002 level is the amount appropriated for that year. The estimated outlays include spending from an
  additional $298 million transferred from the Emargency Response Fund for programs in Afghanistan. The
  estimated authorization level for 2003 through 2005 is for food aid to Afghanistan.


Basis of Estimate

    Title I would authorize the appropriation of $500 million a 
year for 2003 and 2004 for economic assistance to Afghanistan. 
The funds may be used for urgent humanitarian needs, for 
repatriating and resettling refugees and internally displaced 
persons, for narcotics control programs, and for programs to 
establish a viable nation-state with a market economy. The mix 
of programs that might be funded with the authorized amounts is 
not specified in the bill. Rather, the determination of the 
programs and spending levels would be left to the President 
based on policy choices that have not yet been made. For this 
estimate, CBO assumes that in 2003 through 2005 the mix of 
programs will shift from the fast-disbursing humanitarian 
relief programs executed in 2002 to slower-spending economic 
assistance efforts.
    The bill also would authorize the appropriation of $500 
million over the 2003-2005 period for an enterprise fund for 
Afghanistan, the largest ever undertaken. Enterprise funds are 
suppose to promote the private sector. Afghanistan is a very 
poor country with economic and security conditions inhospitable 
for large-scale private investment. Based on the experience of 
other enterprise funds, CBO estimates that it would take more 
than one year to establish the fund and that only one-tenth of 
the authorized amounts would be invested.
    Title II would authorize the President to provide defense 
articles, defense services, and military education and training 
services to Afghanistan on such terms and conditions as he may 
determine but does not authorize a specific amount for this 
military assistance. CBO assumes that funding for this 
assistance would total $300 million over the 2002-2003 period, 
an amount equal to the drawdown limit set by the bill, 
including the $50 million provided in the emergency 
supplemental appropriation for Afghanistan.
    Title II also would authorize the appropriation of $500 
million in 2003 and 2004 to expand the territory of operation 
of the International Security Assistance Force beyond Kabul. 
CBO assumes that enlarging the force would take up to six 
months and that the funds would be used for relatively rapid 
disbursing operations and maintenance activities necessary to 
keep an enlarged force in the field.

Pay-as-you-go Considerations

    None.

Intergovernmental and Private-sector Impact

    S. 2712 contains no intergovernmental or private-sector 
mandates as defined in UMRA and would not affect the budgets of 
state, local, or tribal governments.

Comparison With Other Estimates

    On April 16, 2002, CBO transmitted an estimate of H.R. 
3994, the Afghanistan Freedom Support Act of 2002, as ordered 
reported by the House Committee on International Relations on 
March 20, 2002. The differences between the two estimates arise 
from different authorization amounts, a later assumed enactment 
date, and enactment of the Emergency Supplemental 
Appropriations and Rescissions Act, 2002.
    Estimate prepared by: Federal Costs: Joseph C. Whitehill. 
Impact on state, local, and tribal governments: Greg Waring. 
Impact on the private sector: Paige Piper/Bach.
    Estimate approved by: Peter H. Fontaine, Assistant Director 
for Budget Analysis.

                  VI. Evaluation of Regulatory Impact

    In accordance with rule XXVI, paragraph 11(b) of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee has concluded that 
there is no regulatory impact from this legislation.

                      VII. Changes in Existing Law

    In compliance with paragraph 12 of Rule XXVI of the 
Standing Rules of the Senate, the Committee notes that no 
changes are made by this bill.