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                                                        Calendar No. 95
107th Congress                                                   Report
                                 SENATE
 1st Session                                                     107-42

======================================================================



 
DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE, JUSTICE, AND STATE, THE JUDICIARY, AND RELATED 
                   AGENCIES APPROPRIATION BILL, 2002

                                _______
                                

                 July 20, 2001.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

          Mr. Hollings, from the Committee on Appropriations, 
                        submitted the following

                              R E P O R T

                         [To accompany S. 1215]

    The Committee on Appropriations reports the bill (S. 1215) 
making appropriations for the Departments of Commerce, Justice, 
and State, the judiciary, and related agencies for the fiscal 
year ending September 30, 2002, and for other purposes, reports 
favorably thereon and recommends that the bill do pass.



Amount in new budget (obligational) authority

Total bill as reported to Senate........................ $41,527,177,000
Amount of appropriations, 2001..........................  39,784,041,000
Amount of budget estimates, 2002, as amended............  40,807,220,000
The bill as reported to the Senate:
    Above the appropriations for 2001...................   1,743,136,000
    Above the estimates for 2002........................         719,957


                            C O N T E N T S

                              ----------                              
                                                                   Page
Background:
    Purpose of the bill..........................................     3
    Hearings.....................................................     3
    Summary of the bill..........................................     3
Budgetary impact of the bill.....................................     5
Title I--Department of Justice...................................     6
Title II--Department of Commerce and related agencies............    76
Title III--The judiciary.........................................   115
Title IV--Department of State and related agency.................   123
Title V--Related agencies:
    Department of Transportation: Maritime Administration........   145
    Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad.   146
    Commission on Civil Rights...................................   147
    Commission on International Religious Freedom................   147
    Commission on Ocean Policy...................................   147
    Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe.............   148
    Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic 
      of China...................................................   148
    Equal Employment Opportunity Commission......................   148
    Federal Communications Commission............................   148
    Federal Maritime Commission..................................   150
    Federal Trade Commission.....................................   150
    Legal Services Corporation...................................   151
    Marine Mammal Commission.....................................   152
    National Veterans' Business Development Corporation..........   152
    Securites and Exchange Commission............................   152
    Small Business Administration................................   153
    State Justice Institute......................................   158
    United States-Canada Alaska Rail Commission..................   158
Title VI--General provisions.....................................   159
Title VII--Rescissions...........................................   161
Compliance with paragraph 7, rule XVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   162
Compliance with paragraph 7(c), rule XXVI of the Standing Rules 
  of the Senate..................................................   162
Compliance with paragraph 12, rule XXVI of the Standing Rules of 
  the Senate.....................................................   163

                               BACKGROUND

                          Purpose of the Bill

    This bill makes appropriations for the functions of the 
Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, the Judiciary and 
Related Agencies for the period October 1, 2001, through 
September 30, 2002. Functional areas include the pay, 
allowances, and support of personnel, operation and 
maintenance, procurement of equipment and systems, and 
research.
    The bill provides funds for fighting crime, enhancing drug 
enforcement, responding to the threat of terrorism, addressing 
the shortcomings of the immigration process, continuing the 
judicial process, conducting commerce within the United States, 
improving State Department operations, and fullfilling the 
needs of various independent agencies.

                                Hearings

    The Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, State, the Judiciary 
and Related Agencies Appropriations began hearings on the 
fiscal year 2002 budget request on April 26, 2001, and 
concluded them on June 28, 2001, after holding 9 separate 
sessions. The subcommittee heard testimony from representatives 
of the Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, and various 
commissions.

                          Summary of the Bill

    The budget estimates for the departments and agencies 
included in the accompanying bill are contained in the budget 
of the United States for fiscal year 2002 submitted on April 9, 
2001 and a budget amendment submitted May 7, 2001.
    The total amount of new budget authority recommended by the 
Committee for fiscal year 2002 is $41,527,177,000. This amount 
is an increase of $1,743,136,000 above appropriations enacted 
for fiscal year 2001 for these departments and agencies. The 
Committee recommendation is $719,957,000 above the budget 
estimates.

            reprogrammings, reorganizations, and relocations

    As in previous years, the Committee is inserting section 
605 under title VI of the general provisions of the bill.
    The Committee directs that both the House and Senate 
chairmen of the Subcommittees on the Departments of Commerce, 
Justice, and State, the judiciary, and related agencies will be 
notified by letter at least 15 days prior to:
  --Reprogramming of funds, whether permanent or temporary, in 
        excess of $500,000 or 10 percent, whichever is less, 
        between programs or activities. In addition, the 
        Committee desires to be notified of reprogramming 
        actions which are less than these amounts if such 
        actions would have the effect of committing the agency 
        to significant funding requirements in future years;
  --Increasing funds or personnel by any means for any project 
        or activity for which funds have been denied or 
        restricted;
  --Creation of new programs, offices, agencies, or 
        commissions, or substantial augmentations of existing 
        programs, offices, agencies, or commissions;
  --Relocations of offices or employees;
  --Reorganization of offices, programs, or activities; and
  --Contracts out or privatizes any functions or activities 
        presently performed by Federal employees.
     The Committee directs each department or agency to notify 
the Committee when the number of political appointees rises 
above 10 percent from either of the previous 2 years or when 
five or more political appointees are added in a given year. 
The Committee should be notified 30 days before either of these 
situations occurs. Similar notification should be provided when 
the same number of personnel positions is converted from 
political appointments to civil service positions.
    In addition, the Committee directs departments or agencies 
funded in the accompanying bill that are planning to conduct a 
reduction in force to notify the Committees by letter 30 days 
in advance of the date of the proposed personnel action. Also, 
the Committee directs that any items which are subject to 
interpretation will be reported.

                                            BUDGETARY IMPACT OF BILL
  PREPARED IN CONSULTATION WITH THE CONGRESSIONAL BUDGET OFFICE PURSUANT TO SEC. 308(a), PUBLIC LAW 93-344, AS
                                                     AMENDED
                                            [In millions of dollars]
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                  Budget authority               Outlays
                                                             ---------------------------------------------------
                                                               Committee    Amount of    Committee    Amount of
                                                               allocation      bill      allocation      bill
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Comparison of amounts in the bill with Committee allocations
 to its subcommittees of amounts in the First Concurrent
 Resolution for 2002: Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, and
 State, the Judiciary, and Related Agencies:
    General purpose, defense................................          604          604           NA           NA
    General purpose, non-defense............................       37,772       37,772           NA           NA
    General purpose, total..................................       38,376       38,376       39,049   \1\ 38,545
    Conservation............................................          384          251          202          202
    Mandatory...............................................          572          627          581          577
Projection of outlays associated with the recommendation:
    2002....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........   \2\ 26,508
    2003....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        7,080
    2004....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        3,972
    2005....................................................  ...........  ...........  ...........        1,693
    2006 and future years...................................  ...........  ...........  ...........          573
Financial assistance to State and local governments for 2002           NA        3,295           NA          467
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ Includes outlays from prior-year budget authority.
\2\ Excludes outlays from prior-year budget authority.

NA: Not applicable.


                     TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

    The Committee has made funding for law enforcement the 
centerpiece of the fiscal year 2002 appropriations bill. The 
Committee recommends $21,532,214,000 in new budget 
(obligational) authority in the accompanying bill for the 
Department of Justice with a strong emphasis on law enforcement 
activities for fiscal year 2002.
    The Committee shares the desire of the House to channel 
most of its inquiries and requests for information and 
assistance through the budget offices or comptroller 
organizations, but reserves the right to call upon all 
organizations throughout the agencies. The Committee continues 
to stress the natural affinity between these offices and the 
Appropriations Committee, which makes such a relationship 
imperative.

                         General Administration


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $88,518,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      93,433,000
Committee recommendation................................      93,433,000

    This account funds the development of policy objectives and 
the overall management of the Department of Justice. The 
Committee recommends an appropriation of $93,433,000. The 
recommendation is identical to the budget request and provides 
for all needed adjustments to base.
    IDENT/IAFIS.--Shortcomings in the INS' Automated Biometric 
Identification System [``IDENT''] database were blamed for the 
release of suspected serial killer Rafael Resendez Ramirez. In 
the wake of Resendez Ramirez's later surrender, Justice 
Management Division [JMD] took over development and integration 
of IDENT and the FBI's Integrated Automated Fingerprint 
Identification System [IAFIS]. That effort has been expanded to 
integrate the INS' Enforcement Case Tracking System 
[``ENFORCE''] with IDENT/IAFIS. The Committee recommendation 
provides a $1,000,000 increase over fiscal year 2001 for 
management of the development and piloting of IDENT/IAFIS. JMD 
is directed to provide the Committees on Appropriations with 
progress reports as needed.
    International Law Enforcement Training Academy/Mexico.--The 
Committee believes a law enforcement training academy, similar 
to the International Law Enforcement Academies (ILEAs) in 
Budapest and Bangkok, should be established in Southern Mexico. 
United States law enforcement agency personnel would manage the 
facility and conduct the courses, and in the process develop 
personal relationships with Mexican law enforcement personnel 
that would be invaluable to future liaison and cooperative 
international law enforcement activities. The Committee directs 
the Attorney General, in consultation and collaboration with 
the Secretary of State, to provide a report to the Committees 
on Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
Senate no later than May 12, 2002 on the feasibility of 
establishing ILEA-Mexico. The Committee expects the report to 
include a timeline, cost analysis, and implementation plan for 
establishing ILEA-Mexico.

                     joint automated booking system

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $15,880,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      15,957,000
Committee recommendation................................      22,500,000

    This account centrally funds development, acquisition, and 
deployment of the joint automated booking system [JABS]. 
Previously, JABS funding was distributed among various Justice 
components.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $22,500,000. 
The recommendation is $6,543,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations, by component, are displayed 
in the following table:

Joint Automated Booking System

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation

Field Acquisition:
    BoP........................................................... 1,496
    DEA........................................................... 3,337
    FBI...........................................................   442
    INS...........................................................   929
    USMS.......................................................... 1,504
JABS Incentive Fund............................................... 7,323
Management, Procurement, Deployment, Installation, Training, & 
    Administration................................................ 7,469
                                                                  ______
      Total, JABS.................................................22,500

    JABS will: (1) standardize booking data, procedures, and 
equipment throughout Justice; (2) save funds by eliminating 
repetitive booking of suspects; and (3) improve public safety 
by identifying repeat offenders and persons with outstanding 
charges or warrants.
    JABS incentive funds are to be distributed to the component 
or components making the best progress in installing and 
operating the system.

                   legal activities office automation

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $68,877,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      18,877,000
Committee recommendation................................      34,600,000

    This account centrally funds acquisition, deployment, and 
maintenance of legal activities office automation [LAOA] 
systems, the largest components of which are the justice 
consolidated network [JCN] and the justice consolidated office 
network [JCON]. Previously, LAOA funding was included under 
``General Legal Activities''. The adoption of a common standard 
and uniform equipment across Justice components has improved 
efficiency and saved money.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $34,600,000. 
The recommendation is $15,723,000 above the budget request. In 
addition, the Committee understands that $17,200,000 in prior 
year funds will be available for LAOA.
    LAOA is the computer modernization program for the legal 
divisions, including the Antitrust Division, the U.S. 
Attorneys, the U.S. Marshals Service, the U.S. Trustees, the 
Executive Office for Immigration Review, the Community 
Relations Service, and the offices funded through the ``General 
Administration'' and ``General Legal Activities'' accounts. The 
JCN will also serve as part of the backbone for the FBI's 
``Trilogy'' program. For years, funding for computer 
modernization at the Department has been neglected. The 
Committee has pushed hard in previous years to increase the 
funds for, and widen the scope of, JCN and JCON to maximize the 
benefits of a common computer system across components. Most 
recently, the U.S. Marshals Service has been incorporated into 
the network. The increase in funding over last year is caused 
by the initial deployment of equipment to the U.S. Attorneys, 
by far the largest of the participants, and inclusion of the 
Marshals, the participating agency with network and office 
suites most in need of modernization.

                       Narrowband Communications

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $204,549,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     104,606,000
Committee recommendation................................     204,549,000

    This account centrally funds development, acquisition, 
deployment, and operation and maintenance of the Justice 
Department's narrowband wireless communications network. By 
law, all Justice components operating Land Mobile Radio [LMR] 
systems in the VHF band must convert by January 1, 2005.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $204,549,000. 
The recommendation is $99,943,000 above the budget request. 
Previously, narrowband communications compliance funding was 
scattered among various Justice components.
    Troubles noted below have forced the Wireless Management 
Office [WMO] to focus current investments on sustaining legacy 
systems. At the present rate of investment, the Justice 
Department will not meet the narrowband conversion deadline. In 
anticipation that problems described below can be resolved by 
the second quarter of fiscal year 2002, the Committee 
recommendation provides the funds necessary to jump start 
procurement of digital radios.
    The Committee is aware that progress on converting to 
narrowband radios has been considerably slowed due to 
differences among components and the WMO over network 
requirements. Components are demanding network coverage and 
capabilities far in excess of current system performance and 
cost. Though final requirements finally have been established, 
the Committee is very concerned that the system acceptable to 
the collective may be completely unaffordable. The WMO is 
directed to submit a program plan based on the final list of 
system requirements and a breakout, by fiscal year and 
activity, of the total program cost based on the program plan 
not later than December 31, 2001. None of the funds provided 
for Narrowband Communications for fiscal year 2002 may be made 
available until the Committees on Appropriations have approved 
this program plan.
    Central management of narrowband radio investments will, 
when properly enforced: (1) maximize resource sharing; (2) 
ensure system efficiency and interoperability; and (3) sharply 
reduce up front and out year costs Department-wide.

                             port security

Appropriations, 2001....................................................
Budget estimate, 2002...................................................
Committee recommendation................................     $39,950,000

    This account funds the acquisition, deployment, and 
maintenance of port security facilities and equipment for 
federal law enforcement agencies [LEAs]. Previously, such funds 
as were available for port security activities were embedded in 
the accounts of participating LEAs.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $39,950,000. 
The recommendation is $39,950,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee is alarmed by the lax security at U.S. seaports. 
Thousands of vessels, and millions of containers, move in and 
out of ports with almost no inspection of cargo. In terms of 
both counter-terrorism and counter-narcotics, this is an 
enormous gap in the security net we have drawn around our 
borders. The Committee directs the Justice Department, 
specifically the Deputy Attorney General for Combatting 
Terrorism, to develop a nationwide, multi-agency port security 
plan for submission to the Committee not later than February 
14, 2002.

                         Counterterrorism Fund

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $4,989,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       4,989,000
Committee recommendation................................               0

    The Committee does not recommend an appropriation for the 
``Counterterrorism fund'' account. The recommendation is 
$4,989,000 below the request and the fiscal year 2001 
appropriation. The Committee is aware that there will be 
carryover balances available in fiscal year 2002 in excess of 
$41,077,000.
    This fund is under the control and direction of the Deputy 
Attorney General for Combatting Terrorism to: (1) cover the 
costs incurred in reestablishing the operational capability of 
an office or facility which has been damaged or destroyed as a 
result of any domestic or international terrorist incident; (2) 
cover the costs of providing support to counter, investigate, 
or prosecute domestic or international terrorism, including 
payment of rewards in connection with these activities; and (3) 
cover the costs of conducting a terrorism threat assessment of 
Federal agencies and their facilities.
    National Guard.--The Committee's goals include providing 
States with an improved ability to respond to terrorist threats 
or events. This includes training and equipping the first 
responder who will arrive at the scene within 1 hour of an 
attack. The Committee is also aware of the States' Community 
Support Teams that are expected to arrive within 6 to 8 hours 
after an event has occurred. The Committee urges the National 
Guard Bureau (NGB) to significantly reduce this arrival time.
    The Committee is aware of the important work the National 
Guard is doing in preparing for terrorist attacks. Last year, 
the Defense Subcommittee provided funding for counterterrorism 
infrastructure at the NGB. This funding remains available to 
help support the work of the co-coordinators for combatting 
domestic terrorism.

        Deputy Attorney General for Combating Domestic Terrorism

    The United States is in the beginning stages of developing 
an organizational structure for leadership in the area of 
terrorism preparedness. A National Coordinator for Security, 
Infrastructure Protection, and Counterterrorism was established 
4 years ago within the National Security Council. Under 
Presidential Decision Directive 62, the National Coordinator 
was tasked with coordinating interagency terrorism policy 
issues and reviewing ongoing terrorism-related activities. 
While the designation of a National Coordinator signaled the 
previous Administration's recognition of the weight of the 
problem, it was not a permanent solution. Responsibility for 
developing national security policy belongs to the President. 
However, it is the responsibility of the Congress to provide 
the means to implement a systematic and synchronized policy 
that will achieve sustainable Federal, State, and local 
cooperation on domestic terrorism issues. Whomever is 
responsible for managing this Nation's activities to combat 
terrorism must be accountable to the American people.
    Despite increased attention to this problem over the last 5 
years, there remains considerable confusion over jurisdiction 
at all levels of government. In order to improve coordination 
and centralize the policy-making structure for domestic 
terrorism within the Department of Justice, the Committee 
recommends the creation of a Deputy Attorney General for 
Combating Domestic Terrorism (DAG-CT). The Committee recommends 
$23,000,000 for this purpose. The DAG-CT shall have as its 
principal duty the overall coordination and implementation of 
policy aimed at preventing, preparing for, and responding to 
terrorist attacks within the United States. This person will be 
directly responsible to the Attorney General. This office will 
be responsible for domestic terrorism policy development and 
coordination and will speak for the Department on and 
coordinate with all of the appropriate agencies for terrorism-
related matters.
    The DAG-CT will be nominated by the President and confirmed 
by the Senate. This person will work with localities across the 
country, all of the States and territories, and all of the 
Federal agencies and departments with responsibility for 
combating terrorism. The DAG-CT will not be in any other chain 
of command within the Department of Justice. The DAG-CT will 
not be considered as a successor to the Attorney General. This 
position is recommended only to address terrorism within the 
United States and should not compete with the present Deputy 
Attorney General position. It shall be the responsibility of 
the DAG-CT to select, appoint, employ, and determine the 
compensation of personnel to carry out the Office's primary 
purpose, to monitor the implementation of the national strategy 
and associated classified and unclassified plans, including 
conducting program and performance audits and evaluations.
    The National Strategy.--The American people, the Congress, 
the President, the Attorney General, and the Director of FEMA 
must be able to look to one strategy to keep this country safe 
from domestic terrorism. In conjunction with the Vice 
President, the DAG-CT and the Deputy Director of the Federal 
Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) shall develop and implement 
a national strategy establishing the policies, objectives, and 
priorities of the Federal Government for preventing, preparing 
for, and responding to domestic terrorist attacks. The strategy 
shall include measurable objectives to be achieved. The 
national strategy shall include a description of the role each 
Federal department and agency and State and local government 
entity performs in combating terrorism, as well as a 
description of Federal training, equipment, exercise, and grant 
programs. The strategy shall rest on four pillars: prevention 
(including detection and deterrence), preparedness, crisis 
management, and consequence management (including long term 
response).
    A comprehensive national strategy is benign unless its 
custodian has the tools to implement it. The DAG-CT and Deputy 
Director of FEMA will thus be responsible for advising the 
President and Vice-President on ways to ensure that agencies' 
and departments' programs and policies complement the national 
strategy. The DAG-CT and Deputy Director of FEMA must be kept 
appraised of any changes in the organization, management, or 
budgets of the Federal departments and agencies as they relate 
to combating domestic terrorism. The Committee therefore 
directs all agencies and departments involved in combating 
domestic terrorism to participate in an annual review process 
that the DAG-CT and Deputy Director of FEMA will coordinate for 
the President and Vice-President. In conducting their review, 
the DAG-CT and Deputy Director of FEMA shall consult with the 
appropriate entities. The purpose of the review is to allow the 
DAG-CT and Deputy Director of FEMA to better coordinate 
agencies' policies, programs, and budgets for combating 
domestic terrorism and monitor their progress in implementing 
the national strategy.
    The DAG-CT and Deputy Director of FEMA shall provide the 
Committees on Appropriations a plan for implementing the 
national strategy. The DAG-CT and Deputy Director of FEMA 
together shall develop a strategy and plan in consultation with 
the department and agency heads involved in combating domestic 
terrorism, the Congress, and the State and Local Advisory 
Group. They shall submit the strategy and plan through the 
Attorney General and the Director of FEMA to the Congress, 
President, and Vice-President.
    Risk and Threat Assessments.--A rigorous and continuous 
assessment of risk will help ensure that training, equipment, 
and other safeguards are justified and targeted. Decisions must 
be based on a threat, the level of uncertainty regarding that 
threat, vulnerability to attack, and the criticality of assets. 
They should not be based solely on the worst-case, but rather 
on a range of plausible threat scenarios. These scenarios 
should, to the extent possible, be developed with reference to 
past incidents, U.S. program experience, and current 
intelligence. Regularly scheduled exercises such as TOPOFF will 
serve to demonstrate and refine the national strategy. 
Continually updated intelligence and law enforcement input, 
therefore, is crucial to the process. A multidisciplinary team 
of experts selected by the DAG-CT and Deputy Director of FEMA 
will generate these objectives and a plan for ensuring their 
currency. This plan should be provided to the Committees on 
Appropriations no later than May 1 of each year.
    Reorganization.--The National Domestic Preparedness Office 
(NDPO), currently under the FBI, will be transferred to the 
DAG-CT. The NDPO is directed to provide support to the FEMA, 
which has been given the responsibility of serving as a single 
point of contact for State and local governments by the 
President. The Office of State and Local Domestic Preparedness 
Support (OSLDPS), formerly under the Office of Justice Programs 
(OJP), will also be transferred to the DAG-CT. The OJP will 
continue to administer grants involving counterterrorism 
equipment, training, and preparedness activities. However the 
DAG-CT, through OSLDPS, will be responsible for the 
programmatic development of these grant programs and will have 
final approval authority. The Committee also believes that 
certain other national security policy entities within the 
Department of Justice should report to the DAG-CT, including 
the Executive Office of National Security. Finally, funding for 
terrorism-related research, development, test, and evaluate 
(RDT&E;) programs within the Department of Justice will pass 
through the National Institute of Justice (NIJ) with direction 
from the DAG-CT as to how funds will be spent.
    Budget Approval.--The Committee directs the DAG-CT and 
Deputy Director of FEMA to develop for each fiscal year a 
government-wide budget to implement the national strategy. They 
shall do so in consultation with the Vice-President, the Office 
of Management and Budget, and the departments and agencies and 
program managers with responsibility for combating domestic 
terrorism. The DAG-CT and Deputy Director of FEMA shall advise 
all such departments and agencies in preparation of their 
budgets prior to submission. The Attorney General and Director 
of FEMA shall transmit one consolidated budget proposal with 
revised requests to the President simultaneous to submission to 
the OMB. The DAG-CT shall generate reprogrammings within the 
Department of Justice under section 605 for that funding 
available for the implementation of the national strategy.

               Telecommunications Carrier Compliance Fund

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $200,976,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................................
Committee recommendation................................................

    No funds are requested or recommended, because the 
Committee provided the funds necessary to fully capitalize the 
fund in fiscal year 2001.

                   Administrative Review and Appeals

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $160,708,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     178,499,000
Committee recommendation................................      45,813,000

    The Executive Office for Immigration Review [EOIR] includes 
the Board of Immigration Appeals, immigration judges, and 
administrative law judges who decide through administrative 
hearings whether to admit or exclude aliens seeking to enter 
the country, and whether to deport or adjust the status of 
aliens whose status has been challenged. This account also 
funds the Office of the Pardon Attorney which receives, 
investigates, and considers petitions for all forms of 
executive clemency.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $45,813,000. 
The recommendation is $132,686,000 below the budget request. 
The recommendation assumes that $127,834,000 in funds from the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service ``immigration 
examinations fee'' account will be made available for EOIR 
operations, including $1,200,000 for contract court interpreter 
services for immigration court proceedings. Exam fees may be 
used for expenses in providing immigration adjudication.

                           Detention Trustee

Appropriations, 2001....................................        $998,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       1,718,000
Committee recommendation................................      88,884,000

    The Detention Trustee oversees Federal detainees. The 
Committee recommends an appropriation of $88,884,000. The 
recommendation is $87,166,000 above the budget request.
    The Trustee has management responsibility for detention, 
but funding remains under the control of the various 
components. Without control of funds, the Trustee is powerless. 
Noting this weakness last year, the conferees directed that 
detention funds be consolidated under the Trustee in fiscal 
year 2002. The Department ignored this direction.
    Nevertheless, the Committee is determined to make use of 
this new position. Therefore, the Committee recommendation 
centralizes funding for prisoner movements under the Detention 
Trustee. Management of the Justice Prisoner and Alien 
Transportation System [JPATS] is precisely the sort of task 
that should be undertaken by the Detention Trustee. Endless 
disputes between JPATS ``customers'' are distracting managers 
from the complex task of operating an airline in a high 
security environment. As an impartial arbiter with control of 
program funding, the Trustee should be able to quickly resolve 
most of the disagreements affecting JPATS. The Trustee should 
also be able to rally the necessary support at the Department 
level to put JPATS on a sound financial footing.
    In addition, the Committee directs the Justice Department 
to centralize detention funding under the Trustee as part of 
the fiscal year 2003 budget request.

                      Office of Inspector General

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $41,484,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      45,495,000
Committee recommendation................................      46,006,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $46,006,000. 
The recommendation is $511,000 above the budget request.
    Base restoration.--The erosion of base funding over time 
has had a negative effect on Justice Department components. 
Chronic budget shortfalls have led to ``hollow workyears'', 
``rent holes'', and ``run to failure'' replacement cycles that 
have undermined the efficiency and effectiveness of Federal law 
enforcement. The Committee is intent on putting Justice 
Department agencies on a sound financial footing. Therefore, 
the recommendation fully funds the Inspector General's true 
base requirements. This adjustment should be treated as a 
permanent increase to the base.
    INS fees.--In keeping with agreements made in previous 
years, no INS fees shall be available to the IG. The 
recommendation substitutes direct appropriations for fees to 
maintain the current level of IG audit activity.

                         U.S. Parole Commission


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $8,836,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      10,862,000
Committee recommendation................................       8,836,000

    This Commission is an independent body within the 
Department of Justice which makes decisions regarding requests 
for parole and supervision of Federal prisoners.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $8,836,000. 
The recommendation is $2,026,000 below the budget request.
    The Parole Commission is scheduled to be phased out in 2002 
as a result of the creation of sentencing guidelines. The 
Committee recommendation ensures timely close out of the 
Commission's operations. In particular, the District of 
Columbia parole caseload has been returned to the jurisdiction 
of the District.
    Close out process.--The Committee is aware that it will 
take at least 6 months to shut down operations at the Parole 
Commission. To minimize the cost and inconvenience of this 
process, the Commission should begin to wind down operations 
immediately. In particular, the Commission, in cooperation with 
the Justice Department, should aggressively pursue outplacing 
of employees to avoid layoffs when the Commission ceases 
operation. Also, the Commission, with the help of the General 
Services Administration, should begin discussions with Federal 
agencies willing and able to assume the Commission's lease. 
Finally, preparation of files for shipment to various archives 
should be pursued with diligence. Justice should continue to 
make available as many details as are necessary to support the 
Commission's work during this final transition period. Manpower 
from the legal divisions would be especially valuable in this 
regard. The Department is directed to report quarterly to the 
Committee on the resources it has lent to the Commission.

                            Legal Activities


                        general legal activities

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $534,592,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     566,822,000
Committee recommendation................................     527,543,000

    This appropriation funds the establishment of litigation 
policy, conduct of litigation, and various other legal 
responsibilities, through the Office of the Solicitor General, 
the Tax Division, the Criminal Division, the Civil Division, 
the Environmental and Natural Resources Division, the Civil 
Rights Division, the Office of Legal Counsel, and Interpol.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $527,543,000. 
The recommendation is $39,279,000 below the budget request. The 
reduction is due, in part, to the establishment of ``Legal 
Activities Office Automation'' as a separate account.
    The Committee recommendations, by division or office, are 
displayed in the following table:

                        General Legal Activities

                        [In thousands of dollars]

Office of the Solicitor General...............................     7,093
Tax Division:
    Civil Trial...............................................    37,758
    Civil Appellate...........................................     8,716
    Criminal Enforcement......................................    16,337
    Management & Administration...............................     8,425
    Office of the Assistant Attorney General..................       919
    Office of Review..........................................     1,277
Criminal Division:
    Organized Crime and Narcotics:
        Narcotics and Dangerous Drug Section..................     8,085
        Organized Crime and Racketeering Section..............     5,524
    White Collar Crime:
        Child Exploitation and Obscenity Section..............     4,455
        Computer Crime and Intellectual Property Section......     7,090
        Public Integrity Section..............................     8,297
        Fraud Section.........................................    12,073
    International:
        Terrorism and Violent Crime Section...................     6,878
        Office of International Affairs.......................    11,099
        Internal Security Section.............................     2,924
        Office of Special Investigations......................     6,149
    Litigation Support:
        Appellate Section.....................................     3,953
        Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Section.........     6,519
        Office of Enforcement Operations......................    12,949
        Office of Policy and Legislation......................     1,497
    Management and Administration:
        Office of Assistant Attorney General..................     3,996
        Office of Administration..............................    10,610
Civil Division:
    Federal Appellate Activity................................    11,530
    Torts Litigation:
        Aviation & Admiralty..................................    10,241
        Federal Torts Claims Act..............................     7,970
        Environmental Torts...................................     5,715
        Constitutional & Specialized Torts....................     3,744
        All Other Torts.......................................     1,857
    Commercial Litigation.....................................    62,102
    Federal Programs..........................................    19,217
    Consumer Litigation.......................................     5,796
    Immigration Litigation....................................    16,873
    Management & Administration...............................    12,172
Environment and Natural Resources Division:
    Appellate & Policy:
        Appellate Section.....................................     4,204
        Policy, Legislation, & Special Litigation Section.....     1,631
    Environmental Protection:
        Environmental Crimes Section..........................     3,399
        Environmental Defense Section.........................    10,033
        Environmental Enforcement Section.....................    20,003
    Natural Resources:
        General Litigation Section............................    12,112
        Indian Resources Section..............................     2,221
        Land Acquisition Section..............................     4,564
        Wildlife & Marine Resources Section...................     2,314
    Management & Administration:
        Executive Office......................................     4,773
        Office of the Assistant Attorney General..............     1,346
Office of Legal Counsel.......................................     4,971
Civil Rights Division:
    Appellate Section.........................................     4,010
    Coordination & Review Section.............................     3,525
    Civil Rights Prosecution Section..........................    10,909
    Disability Rights Section.................................    15,273
    Education Opportunities Section...........................     4,298
    Employment Litigation Section.............................     7,215
    Housing & Civil Enforcement Section.......................    13,163
    Office of Special Counsel for Immigration-Related Unfair 
      Employment Practices....................................     6,573
    Special Litigation Section................................     7,420
    Voting Section............................................    12,742
    Administrative Management Section.........................    10,702
Interpol--USNCB...............................................     7,360
Courtroom Technology..........................................     2,612
Office of Dispute Resolution..................................       330
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Total...................................................   527,543

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan for fiscal year 2002. No funds 
are provided for the Joint Center for Strategic Environmental 
Enforcement.
    Courtroom technology.--Federal attorneys have been 
experimenting with portable, off-the-shelf video and computer 
equipment for courtroom proceedings. These attorneys found that 
the equipment substantially improved the presentation of 
evidence, as well as rapidly accelerating the pace of trials. 
Users found that they saved the equivalent of one trial day in 
every five using video and computer equipment. The Committee 
recommendation provides $2,612,000 for courtroom technology to 
be distributed among the divisions on the basis of need. The 
Committee expects the legal divisions to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations on their courtroom technology 
efforts not later than February 1, 2002.
    Drug labs in Federal parklands.--Last year, a record 452 
methamphetamine labs or dumps were seized in national forests. 
The environmental threat posed by these labs and dumps is 
severe. The by-products of methamphetamine production: 
anhydrous ammonia, ether, sulfuric acid, and other toxins, are 
volatile, corrosive, and poisonous. Often, lab operators dump 
these materials in rivers and streams to eliminate evidence. 
Within available resources, the Committee recommendation 
provides $262,000 for prosecuting the operators of drug labs 
hidden in national parks and forests, including such sums as 
are necessary for litigation support.
    Poaching on Federal lands.--The theft of plant and animal 
species from public lands is reaching alarming proportions. 
Driven by everything from the landscaping needs of a booming 
housing market to the renewed interest in traditional 
medicines, poachers are despoiling parks and forests by 
stealing species such as barrel cactus, black bears, and sea 
sponges. Ironically, the very protection afforded endangered 
species on public lands has resulted in bigger, healthier, and 
more common examples of these species, making them prime 
targets for thieves. Within available resources, the Committee 
recommendation provides $525,000 for prosecuting traffickers 
arrested for looting plants and animals from Federal lands, 
including such sums as are necessary for litigation support.

               the national childhood vaccine injury act

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $4,019,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       4,028,000
Committee recommendation................................       4,028,000

    This account covers Justice Department expenses associated 
with litigating cases under the National Childhood Vaccine 
Injury Act of 1986. The Committee recommends a reimbursement of 
$4,028,000 for legal costs. The recommendation is identical to 
the budget request.

                           Antitrust Division


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $120,572,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     140,973,000
Committee recommendation (including carryover)..........     130,791,000

    The Antitrust Division investigates potential violations of 
Federal antitrust laws, represents the interests of the United 
States in cases brought under these laws, acts on antitrust 
cases before the Supreme Court, and reviews decisions of 
regulatory commissions relating to antitrust law.
    The Committee recommendation assumes a total of 
$130,791,000 in budget (obligational) authority. The 
recommendation is $10,182,999 below the budget request. The 
amount provided fully funds base requirements.
    Workload.--The Committee is concerned that the merger 
frenzy gripping increasingly massive industrial combines 
threatens to overwhelm the ability of the Antitrust division to 
keep pace with complex merger proposals. The value of merger 
activity in the United States jumped from $959,000,000,000 in 
fiscal year 1997 to $1,830,000,000,000 in fiscal year 2000. 
Furthermore, recent market conditions will likely spark an 
increase in merger activity. The collapse of high technology 
stocks, and the resultant downward pressure on all stock 
prices, has created ``fire sale'' opportunities for cash-rich 
corporations to acquire undervalued companies. The Committee 
recommendation includes an increase of $3,617,000 over fiscal 
year 2001 to ensure the timely review of merger filings.

                             U.S. Attorneys


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $1,247,631,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   1,346,289,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,260,353,000

    This account supports the Executive Office for U.S. 
Attorneys [EOUSA] and the 94 U.S. attorneys offices throughout 
the United States and its territories. The U.S. attorneys serve 
as the principal litigators for the U.S. Government for 
criminal and civil matters.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$1,260,353,000. The recommendation is $85,936,000 below the 
budget request. The Committee is aware that the U.S. Attorneys 
will receive $142,017,000 in reimbursements in fiscal year 
2002. As in the past, Committee recommendations focus the 
efforts of the U.S. Attorneys on those crimes where the unique 
resources, expertise, or jurisdiction of the Federal Government 
can, or must, be most effective.
    Fundamental reform.--For the past several years, the 
Committee has attempted to fix the U.S. Attorney's resource 
allocation process. That process has resulted in wide 
disparities in caseload between districts. Assistant U.S. 
Attorneys [AUSAs] in the busiest districts are responsible for 
almost 10 times the number of criminal prosecutions and almost 
14 times the number of civil prosecutions as AUSAs in the 
sleepiest districts. The Committee has pursued several methods 
to better match resources to changing patterns of crime. First, 
the Committee tried to influence the division of spoils process 
conducted by the EOUSA at the beginning of each year. Next, it 
suggested using term appointments for new hires to allow 
attorneys and support staff to be plugged in and pulled out of 
over-or under-worked districts as needed. Finally, the 
Committee directed that specific numbers of personnel be 
transferred to and from specific offices to better align 
capability with need. Exercising unusual political muscle, 
presidentially-appointed U.S. Attorneys were successful in 
defeating all of these initiatives. As a result, the 
disparities in caseload between districts have grown worse.
    The Committee is prepared to give headquarters the tools to 
reform the U.S. Attorneys. All previous congressional guidance 
to the U.S. Attorneys regarding initiatives and the designation 
of funds is waived. The EOUSA is free to distribute manpower 
and funding among the district offices for the purposes, and to 
the places, it feels best serve the interests of the American 
people. The EOUSA may coordinate with the heads of the various 
investigatory agencies as it sees fit. The EOUSA shall submit a 
report on its proposed reforms to the Committees on 
Appropriations not later than March 17, 2002.
    Gun Prosecutions.--Within available resources and manpower 
ceilings, the Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$5,000,000 over fiscal year 2001 for the existing gun 
prosecution initiative in Pennsylvania and $500,000 over fiscal 
year 2001 for the existing gun prosecution initiative in 
Colorado.
    Gun Surveillance Technology.--The Committee is aware of 
commercially off-the-shelf technology consisting of acoustic 
sensors and telecommunication networks connected to police 
dispatch centers allowing for the location of a gunshot to be 
accurately located within seconds. With this technology, 
dispatchers can direct officers rapidly to the precise gunshot 
location. The Committee recommends $6,000,000 for a pilot 
initiative, ``Project CeaseFire'', to deploy a gunshot location 
system in four cities: Las Vegas, NV; St. Louis, MO; 
Charleston, SC; and Kansas City, KS.
    Courtroom technology.--In a recent report to the Committee, 
the U.S. Attorneys extolled the virtues of their courtroom 
technology pilot. Using portable, off-the-shelf video and 
computer equipment for courtroom proceedings, the Attorneys 
found that the equipment substantially improved the 
presentation of evidence and rapidly accelerated the pace of 
trials. The pilot having validated the concept, the U.S. 
Attorneys are prepared to expand the courtroom technology 
program nationwide. The Committee recommendation provides 
$5,224,000 for courtroom technology activities, including 
standardization of hardware and software, training, equipment 
purchases, and operation of a pilot regional center. The 
Committee expects the U.S. Attorneys to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations on the distribution of these 
resources not later than February 1, 2002.
    Computer and Telecommunications Coordinators [CTC].--Over 
the last 5 years, the Department established a network of 
prosecutors trained to investigate and prosecute high-
technology crimes. Each office appointed a CTC to serve as a 
resident consultant on high technology issues who coordinates 
with other offices and is the legal consultant to agents, 
prosecutors, and the private sector for high technology cases. 
The Committee provides $297,000 for equipment ($180,000) and 
annual training ($117,000) for each CTC position.
    Cyber Crime and Intellectual Property Enforcement.--The 
Committee recommends $10,000,000, 100 positions, and 50 FTE, 
including 55 attorneys, to augment the investigation and 
prosecution of intellectual property crimes, including software 
counterfeiting crimes and crimes identified in the No 
Electronic Theft (NET) Act. The Committee directs the U.S. 
Attorneys to vigorously prosecute violations of Federal 
copyright law. Appropriations that are not used to fund these 
positions shall be used by the Computer Crimes and Intellectual 
Property Section to reimburse regional offices for the 
resources spent by regional office personnel on intellectual 
property investigations. The U.S. Attorneys shall report to the 
Committee not later than April 30, 2002 on the number of 
copyright law prosecutions undertaken in the preceding year, 
including those under Public Law 105-147, by type and location.
    Legal education.--Within available resources and manpower 
ceilings, the Committee recommendation provides $17,741,000 for 
legal education at the National Advocacy Center [NAC] as 
requested by the Administration. If merited, the NAC may expand 
cybercrime, cyberpiracy, and counterfeiting classes. In 
addition, also within available resources, the Committee 
recommendation provides $1,000,000 to continue the 
establishment of a distance learning facility at the NAC. NAC 
State and local training funds are provided under the Office of 
Justice Programs.
    Violent crime task forces.--Last year, the Conferees 
provided $1,000,000 to a violent crime task force to 
investigate and prosecute perpetrators of Internet sexual 
exploitation of children as well as to initiate an 
investigation into the participation of motor cycle gangs in 
drug running and other criminal activity. The Committee 
recommends an additional $1,000,000 within available resources 
to continue and expand this effort under the auspices of 
Operation Streetsweeper.

                        U.S. trustee system fund

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $125,720,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     154,044,000
Committee recommendation................................     154,044,000

    The U.S. trustee system provides administrative support to 
expeditiously move bankruptcy cases through the bankruptcy 
process and ensures accountability of private trustees 
appointed to administer bankruptcy estates.
    The Committee recommends a total of $154,044,000 in budget 
authority. The recommendation is identical to the budget 
request. The Committee notes that workload increases associated 
with bankruptcy reform have not been factored into the amount 
requested for, or provided to, the Trustees.
    The Committee recommendation includes $750,000 for the 
Bankruptcy Training Center at the National Advocacy Center. The 
Committee supports the Trustees' continuing education program.

                  foreign claims settlement commission

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $1,105,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       1,130,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,130,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,130,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request and fully 
provides for the adjudication of claims against: Germany 
relating to World War II; Cuba relating to the Castro regime; 
and Iraq relating to the U.S.S. Stark incident and Desert 
Shield/Storm.
    The Foreign Claims Settlement Commission settles claims of 
American citizens arising from nationalization, expropriation, 
or other takings of their properties and interests by foreign 
governments.

                         U.S. Marshals Service


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $571,435,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     619,818,000
Committee recommendation................................     644,746,000

    The U.S. Marshals Service is made up of 94 offices with the 
responsibility for the apprehension of fugitives, protection of 
the Federal judiciary, protection of witnesses, execution of 
warrants and court orders, and the custody and transportation 
of the accused and unsentenced prisoners.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $644,746,000. 
The recommendation is $24,928,000 above the budget request.
    Base restoration.--The erosion of base funding over time 
has had a negative effect on Justice Department components. 
Chronic budget shortfalls have led to ``hollow workyears'', 
``rent holes'', and ``run to failure'' replacement cycles that 
have undermined the efficiency and effectiveness of Federal law 
enforcement. The Committee is intent on putting Justice 
Department agencies on a sound financial footing. Therefore, 
the recommendation fully funds the Marshals Service's true 
mandatory and core base requirements, the latter including 
$1,000,000 for Special Operations Group training, equipment, 
and facilities maintenance.
    Also included in the Committee recommendation are 
$1,766,000 (excluding a $230,000 transfer from the Justice 
Detainee Information System) to improve and maintain the 
Warrant Information Network and to continue subscriptions to 
various government and private networks and on-line services 
and $1,400,000 for Electronic Surveillance Unit recurring 
costs. The recommendation also transfers $852,000 in base 
resources from Human Resources to the Central Courthouse 
Management Group to implement the Marshals' safety and health 
program.
    Courthouse Security Personnel.--The conversion of 1811 
slots to detention enforcement officer and 082 slots allows the 
Marshals to add to its rolls without increasing costs. The 
additional personnel that result from this restructuring 
process should cover unmet requirements on the Southwest border 
and at newly opening courthouses.
    Courthouse security equipment.--This account funds security 
equipment, furnishings, relocations, and telephone systems and 
cabling. The Committee recommendation provides $18,145,000 for 
courthouse security equipment. This equipment will outfit newly 
opening courthouses in the following locations:

                   USMS Courthouse Security Equipment

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation

Detainee Facilities:
    Fort Smith, AR................................................   200
    El Centro, CA.................................................   315
    San Francisco, CA.............................................   200
    Denver, CO.................................................... 1,090
    Washington, DC................................................    75
    Jacksonville, FL.............................................. 1,065
    Dublin, GA....................................................   432
    Moscow, ID....................................................    50
    Bowling Green, KY.............................................   330
    Bay City, MI..................................................   175
    Detroit, MI...................................................   450
    Cape Girardeau, MO............................................    75
    East St. Louis, MO............................................    10
    Greenville, MS................................................   645
    Gulfport, MS..................................................   540
    Hattiesburg, MS...............................................   590
    Oxford, MS.................................................... 1,095
    Newark, NJ....................................................   300
    Brooklyn, NY.................................................. 1,966
    Columbus, OH..................................................   300
    Muskogee, OK..................................................   920
    Florence, SC..................................................   321
    Spartanburg, SC...............................................   555
    Columbia, TN..................................................   195
    Amarillo, TX..................................................   450
    Houston, TX................................................... 1,063
    Laredo, TX....................................................   700
    Waco, TX......................................................   423
    Cheyenne, WY..................................................   800
Minor Repair......................................................   375
Justice Federal Protective Officers............................... 1,617
Engineering Services..............................................   643
Security Survey...................................................   180
                                                                  ______
      Total, USMS Security Equipment..............................18,145

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan for fiscal year 2002.
    Fugitive apprehensions.--At any given moment, 25,000 to 
30,000 fugitives are prowling America's streets. With nothing 
to lose, these fugitives are particularly prone to violent 
crime. The Committee is aware that resources dedicated to 
fugitive apprehension are often diverted to courthouse 
security. Therefore, the Committee directs the Marshals to 
establish task forces in New York City and Los Angeles 
dedicated full-time to the pursuit of the most dangerous 
fugitives on the eastern and western seaboard. The task forces 
shall answer only to the Director or the Associate Director for 
Operations. Each team shall be made up of not less than a total 
of 12 supervisors, DUSMs, surveillance specialists, analysts, 
and support staff. To the degree possible, team members should 
be drawn from DUSMs serving on the Special Operations Group 
[SOG] as a collateral duty. The Committee recommendation 
includes $5,882,000 for the task forces, of which $2,497,000 is 
for the full year costs of 1811s and support staff on the task 
forces, $2,177,000 is for outfitting, training, and housing the 
task forces, $53,000 is for travel, and $1,155,000 is for 
permanent change of station moves (capped at $55,000 per move). 
In addition, the Committee recommendation provides an increase 
of $4,553,000 over the fiscal year 2002 request for electronic 
surveillance unit [ESU] personnel, training, and equipment, 
including funding for surveillance vans and light aircraft, 
bucket trucks, a central signal collection system, secure 
communications equipment, various tracking systems, and night 
vision equipment.
    Terrorism.--The World Trade Center bombing trials and a 
number of other high threat or special assignments have been a 
continuing, and unfunded, drain on the resources of the 
Marshals. The Committee recommendation includes an increase of 
$2,500,000 over fiscal year 2001 for 24 hour protection of 
World Trade Center bombing trial judges and for other 
extraordinary costs associated with these trials. In addition, 
the recommendation includes an increase of $3,300,000 over 
fiscal year 2001 for permanent change of station moves. This 
will reduce the number of costly temporary duty assignments 
required to staff high threat and special assignments and will 
provide the Marshals with the flexibility to transfer deputies 
between districts as workload dictates. As noted above, both 
amounts should be treated as permanent increases to the base.
    Radios.--The Marshals have dedicated inadequate manpower to 
the narrowband conversion process. At present, only one person 
is handling the transition from analog to digital systems. The 
Marshals are directed to establish a wireless group of not less 
than 10 communications officers that is dedicated to narrowband 
conversion full time and that only answers to headquarters. 
Members of the group shall be culled from the ranks on the 
basis of their radio expertise. The Committee expects regular 
updates on the group's progress.

                              Construction

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $18,088,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       6,621,000
Committee recommendation................................      25,812,000

    This account funds construction, security, and furniture at 
existing courthouses. The Committee recommends an appropriation 
of $25,812,000. The recommendation is $19,191,000 above the 
budget request. The request for this account verges on the 
irresponsible.
    The Committee is aware that a recently-conducted national 
survey of Federal courthouses revealed that 95 percent of 
prisoner holding and transit facilities have serious security 
deficiencies. Of 392 courthouses surveyed: 84 percent lack 
enough courtroom holding cells; 78 percent do not have secure 
prison elevators; 74 percent do not have enclosed sallyports; 
72 percent lack enough interview rooms; 57 percent do not have 
adequate cellblock space; and 38 percent lack cameras, 
monitors, and alarms.
    Years of neglect have created this deplorable situation, 
posing risks to the judicial family, the public, and the 
Marshals themselves. The Committee is intent on remedying 
courthouse deficiencies before a tragedy occurs. The Committee 
recommendations, by project, are displayed in the following 
table:

                           USMS Construction

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation
Detainee Facilities:
    Construction:
        Birmingham, AL............................................   580
        Hot Springs, AR........................................... 1,328
        Prescott, AZ..............................................   550
        San Diego, CA............................................. 1,800
        Grand Junction, CO........................................   450
        Key West, FL.............................................. 1,200
        Agana, Guam...............................................   100
        Davenport, IA.............................................   856
        Sioux City, IA............................................   100
        Moscow, ID................................................   200
        Rock Island, IL........................................... 1,250
        Rockford, IL..............................................    24
        Springfield, IL...........................................    85
        Fort Wayne, IN............................................   175
        Wichita, KS...............................................   200
        Louisville, KY............................................   749
        Bay City, MI..............................................   685
        Flint, MI.................................................   248
        Natchez, MS............................................... 1,000
        Billings, MT..............................................   850
        Raleigh, NC............................................... 2,490
        Santa Fe, NM..............................................   500
        New York, NY (40 Foley)...................................   250
        Rochester, NY.............................................   150
        Akron, OH.................................................   800
        Columbus, OH.............................................. 1,000
        Dayton, OH................................................   150
        Muskogee, OK..............................................   280
        Tulsa, OK................................................. 2,100
        Sioux Falls, SD...........................................   680
        Houston, TX............................................... 2,675
        Cheyenne, WY..............................................   200
                                                                  ______
          Subtotal................................................23,705
                        =================================================================
                        ________________________________________________
    Planning, Design, and Relocation:
        El Dorado, AR.............................................   100
        Fayetteville, AR..........................................   100
        El Centro, CA.............................................    32
        Jacksonville, FL..........................................    44
        Ocala, FL.................................................   475
        London, KY................................................    30
        Billings, MT..............................................   200
        Helena, MT................................................    20
        Wilmington, NC............................................   125
        Cleveland, OH.............................................    70
        Hato Rey, PR..............................................    75
        Columbia, SC..............................................    46
        Casper, WY................................................   100
                                                                  ______
          Subtotal................................................ 1,417
                        =================================================================
                        ________________________________________________
Security Specialists/Construction Engineers.......................   690
                                                                  ______
      Total, USMS Construction....................................25,812

    The Committee considers this an important step in reducing 
the backlog of critical security-related projects. As with 
courthouse security equipment, the Committee expects to be 
consulted prior to any deviation from the above plan for fiscal 
year 2002.

            Justice prisoner and alien transportation system

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $13,470,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      53,050,000

    This account funds prisoner air transportation operations 
and maintenance, aircraft procurement, and facilities.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $53,050,000. 
The recommendation is $53,050,000 above the budget request. The 
funds provided will allow the Marshals to procure two modern, 
fuel efficient, wide body aircraft to replace two first 
generation airliners that have reached the end of their useful 
service lives. A similar approach was taken last year to 
address problems with the Marshals' short haul fleet. The 
Marshals shall report to the Committees on Appropriations on 
its procurement strategy not later than November 15, 2001.
    Detention Trustee.--The Justice Prisoner and Alien 
Transportation System [JPATS] is supposed to be funded by a 
self-financing revolving fund. The self-financing aspects of 
the revolving fund are at best limited to operations and 
maintenance. Aircraft procurement, facilities, and prisoner 
ground transportation require appropriated funds, as evidenced 
by the direct funding of two aircraft last year. Worst of all, 
the use of annual reimbursements from ``customers'' to 
capitalize the revolving fund has led to endless disputes 
between agencies over aircraft operations, distracting managers 
from the complex task of operating an airline in a high 
security environment. Management of JPATS is precisely the sort 
of task that should be undertaken by the new Detention Trustee. 
Therefore, the Committee recommendation centralizes funding for 
prisoner movements under the Detention Trustee. Base funding 
for the Marshals Service, the Bureau of Prisons, and the 
Immigration and Naturalization Service has been adjusted 
accordingly. The Trustee shall be reimbursed by components for 
prisoner movements in excess of those programmed in the budget 
request.

                       Federal prisoner detention

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $596,088,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     724,682,000
Committee recommendation................................     724,682,000

    Under this program, the U.S. Marshals contract with State 
and local jails and private facilities to house unsentenced 
Federal prisoners for short periods of time. This is usually 
before and during trial and while awaiting transfer to Federal 
institutions after conviction.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $724,682,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. The 
amount provided will fund approximately 10,603,381 jail days, 
an 11 percent increase over fiscal year 2001, or an average 
daily detainee population of 29,050.

                     fees and expenses of witnesses

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $125,573,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     156,145,000
Committee recommendation................................     156,145,000

    This account provides for fees and expenses of witnesses 
who appear on behalf of the Government in cases in which the 
United States is a party, including fact and expert witnesses. 
These funds are also used for mental competency examinations as 
well as witness and informant protection.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $156,145,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.

                      community relations service

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $8,456,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       9,269,000
Committee recommendation................................       9,269,000

    The Community Relations Service [CRS] provides assistance 
to communities and persons in the prevention and resolution of 
disagreements relating to perceived discriminatory practices.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $9,269,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.

                         assets forfeiture fund

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $22,949,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      22,949,000
Committee recommendation................................      22,949,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $22,949,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. This 
account provides funds to supplement existing resources to 
cover additional investigative expenses of the FBI, DEA, INS, 
and U.S. Marshals, such as awards for information, purchase of 
evidence, equipping of conveyances, and investigative expenses 
leading to seizure. Funds for these activities are provided 
from receipts deposited in the assets forfeiture fund resulting 
from the forfeiture of assets. Expenses related to the 
management and disposal of assets are also provided from the 
assets forfeiture fund by a permanent indefinite appropriation.

                    Radiation Exposure Compensation


                        administrative expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $1,996,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       1,996,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,996,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,996,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. This 
program was established to permit the payment of claims to 
individuals exposed to radiation as a result of atmospheric 
nuclear tests and uranium mining in accordance with the 
Radiation Exposure Compensation Act of 1990.

       payment to the radiation exposure compensation trust fund

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $10,776,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      10,776,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,776,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $10,776,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. This 
account funds payments to approved claimants under the 
Radiation Exposure Compensation Act of 1990. The Committee 
recommendation does not include additional funding to 
administer or pay claims under the expansion of the Radiation 
Exposure Compensation Act as provided for by Public Law 106-
245. The Committee is concerned that a substantial unfunded 
requirement and a delay in the payment of claims to those 
qualified individuals as provided for by the original statute 
will result.

                      Interagency Law Enforcement


                 Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $325,181,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     338,106,000
Committee recommendation................................     336,966,000

    The Interagency Crime and Drug Enforcement Program, through 
its 9 regional task forces, utilizes the combined resources and 
expertise of its 11 member Federal agencies, in cooperation 
with State and local investigators and prosecutors, to target 
and disband major narcotics trafficking and money laundering 
organizations.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $336,966,000 
as distributed in the following table. The recommendation is 
$1,140,000 below the budget request.

                        REIMBURSEMENTS BY AGENCY
                          [Amounts in dollars]
------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                FTE           Amount
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Drug Enforcement Administration.........  ..............        $110,909
Federal Bureau of Investigation.........  ..............         115,335
Immigration and Naturalization Service..  ..............          16,190
U.S. Marshals Service...................  ..............           2,049
U.S. Attorneys..........................  ..............          88,552
Criminal Division.......................  ..............           1,086
Tax Division............................  ..............           1,120
Administrative Office...................  ..............           1,725
                                         -------------------------------
      Total.............................  ..............         336,966
------------------------------------------------------------------------

    The Committee notes that the Immigration and Naturalization 
Service [INS] has the largest budget of the Justice Department 
components. Also, the General Accounting Office found that INS 
agents were not doing task force work but claiming reimbursable 
funds in Los Angeles from this account. The INS is directed to 
match at least 25 percent of each reimbursable dollar from 
their direct appropriation on Organized Crime and Drug 
Enforcement Task Force cases before they can be reimbursed from 
this account.

                    Federal Bureau of Investigation


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $3,228,482,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   3,505,859,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,425,041,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$3,425,041,000. The recommendation is $80,818,000 below the 
budget request. The recommendation fully funds adjustments to 
base.
    Budget structure.--For the past several years, the 
Committee has remarked on the Justice Department's inability to 
respond swiftly to changing patterns of crime. In the case of 
the FBI, the very structure of its budget hinders the Bureau's 
ability to react to emerging criminal trends. Current decision 
units also do little to protect the Director's strategic 
priorities, ease management of high risk programs, or provide 
the transparency necessary for effective Congressional 
oversight. Therefore, the Committee recommendation restructures 
the FBI budget.
    The new structure focuses FBI resources on Tier 1 missions 
by creating three new decision units: ``National Security'', 
``Counterterrorism'', and ``Cyber-Investigations and 
Infrastructure Protection''. These activities will define the 
FBI in the 21st century. In particular, the proposed ``Cyber-
Investigations and Infrastructure Protection'' decision unit, 
with base funding of $101,429,000, consolidates the funding of 
a number of mutually-supportive initiatives that had been 
scattered across existing decision units, such as the National 
Infrastructure Protection Center, including the Special 
Applications and Technology Unit, computer intrusion squads, 
Computer Analysis Response Teams, Internet fraud squads, the 
Internet Fraud Complaint and Intellectual Property Rights 
Centers, ``Innocent Images'', and the new Cyber Technology 
Section of the Engineering Research Facility.
    Conversely, two current decision units, ``Training, 
Recruitment, and Applicant'' and ``Management and 
Administration'', have been abolished or severely 
circumscribed. These decision units cross-cut all others, 
creating an artificial separation between these functions and 
the activities of which they were ultimately a part. This 
unduly complicated management's ability to rapidly transfer 
resources within and between decision units in response to 
changing circumstances.
    Similarly, the current ``Organized Criminal Enterprises'', 
``White Collar Crime'', and ``Violent Crime'' decision units 
have been collapsed into one, ``Criminal Enterprises and 
Federal Crimes'', to allow the Bureau to rapidly shift 
resources between Tier 1, 2, and 3 priorities as circumstances 
warrant.
    Finally, ``Law Enforcement Support'' has been reorganized 
into three decision units, ``Forensic, Training, and 
Investigative Assistance'', with base funding of $318,090,000, 
``Investigative and Information Technology'', with base funding 
of $247,053,000, and ``Criminal Justice Services'', with base 
funding of $212,366,000, to sharpen mission focus, improve 
support to the field, and maintain technical superiority.
    The Committee believes that the new budget structure will 
significantly enhance FBI performance.
    Re-engineering the workforce.--The FBI is steadily moving 
from a manpower-intensive to an information-intensive approach 
to crime fighting, a trend the Committee applauds. This year, 
for example, the FBI hopes to add 33 specialists to its rolls, 
including technically-trained agents and support staff and 
electronics engineers and technicians. Though resource and 
manpower constraints will force this shift in the skill sets of 
Bureau employees to move at an evolutionary rather than 
revolutionary pace, a necessarily measured approach will allow 
the Committee to provide the training and equipment required to 
support an increasingly sophisticated workforce. The FBI may 
convert up to 33 special agent and general support positions 
into the technical positions described above using attrition to 
affect the desired change in staff mix. In particular, the 
Committee recommends culling slots opened by retirements at 
Resident Agent offices, the least focused of the FBI's 
operations. The Committee recommendation includes an increase 
of $2,000,000 to expand and improve training for Technically 
Trained Agents and Electronic Technicians. The funds provided 
include up to 4 training personnel. This amount should be 
treated as a permanent increase to the base.
    Training.--Presently, Computer Analysis Response Team 
[CART] examiners participate in every aspect of cybercrime 
investigations, including evidence seizure, imaging and 
duplication, examination and evidence review. This is a poor 
use of a precious asset. CART examiners, special skills are 
best applied to examinations, the probing of hard drives for 
evidence, and more complex seizures, imaging, and duplication. 
The Committee is aware of a training initiative that would 
broaden the skills and responsibilities of FBI technicians and 
case agents to include computer seizures, imaging and 
duplication, and evidence review. This training would 
significantly enhance the efficiency and effectiveness of 
examiners, technicians, and agents. The training has the added 
benefit of establishing the outlines of a cybercrime career 
track for computer proficient agents and technicians. The 
Committee recommendation includes $769,000 for this initiative.
    Evidence Response Teams.--The Committee is aware that 
Evidence Response Teams [ERTs] are badly in need of basic 
evidence gathering supplies such as ``lift kits'' for 
fingerprinting, non-static bags for seized electronics, and 
special photographic equipment for documenting crime scenes. 
ERTs also lack the most rudimentary training aids. The 
Committee recommendation includes a total of $1,392,000 for ERT 
evidence collection and training supplies. This amount should 
be treated as a permanent increase to the base.
    Improving intercept capabilities.--The FBI is proposing a 
multi-pronged approach to improving intercept capabilities. 
Initiatives include: (1) enhancing the transmission, 
monitoring, and minimization of intercepted data, (2) 
developing broadband capabilities, and (3) procuring prototypes 
capable of intercepting transmissions outside of the FBI's 
technical reach. The Committee recommendation includes 
$6,800,000 to improve intercept capabilities.
    Counter-encryption.--The increasing sophistication and 
availability of encrypted software is allowing criminals to 
establish secure communications networks impervious to law 
enforcement penetration. As with interception capabilities, the 
FBI is proposing a multi-pronged approach to counter-
encryption. Initiatives include: (1) analysis/exploitation of 
systems to allow access to data pre-encryption, (2) 
recognition/decryption of data hidden in plain sight, and (3) 
decryption of encrypted data. The Committee recommendation 
includes an increase of $7,000,000 for counter-encryption.
    Counterintelligence.--The FBI has been deeply traumatized 
by Robert Hanssen's treachery. However, Hanssen's long success 
as a spy seems to have had more to do with a peculiar, and 
hopefully unique, personality and less to do with a lack of 
diligence on the part of the Bureau in keeping tabs on known or 
suspected foreign agents. Still, the FBI is seeking to increase 
counterintelligence staffing by almost 200 personnel in fiscal 
year 2002. This request may have more to do with the natural 
desire to appear to be reacting to a disaster than with a sober 
assessment of the strengths and weaknesses of the current 
counterintelligence program. While it is not clear what 
benefits will accrue from a sharp increase in manning, the 
Committee is prepared, for the moment, to defer to the 
judgement of the Bureau. Within existing resource and manpower 
ceilings, the FBI may transfer up to 182 special agents and 
support staff from ``tier 3'' duties to counterintelligence 
operations. As with the shift to technically proficient staff, 
the Committee recommends culling manpower from Resident Agent 
offices.
    Surveillance.--The FBI uses small planes for the discreet 
surveillance of individuals or locations of interest. Pilots 
flying in support of Washington Field Office [WFO] operations 
are having difficulty deconflicting their flight plans from the 
increasingly busy air traffic pattern around Washington due to 
the ceiling limitations of the aircraft currently available to 
the WFO. A similar problem in New York City was solved by the 
acquisition of aircraft capable of operating up to 10,000 feet. 
The Committee recommendation includes $4,000,000 for an 
aircraft of the same class as purchased for New York with the 
appropriate surveillance and communications packages.
    Jewelry and gem program.--The Committee is aware of the 
FBI's highly successful efforts through the ``Criminal 
Enterprises and Federal Crimes''-run Jewelry and Gem Program to 
combat robberies of jewelry vendors, committed largely by 
violent gangs from South America. Major arrests have been made, 
several gangs have been interdicted, and the number of these 
serious crimes has been reduced. The Committee encourages the 
FBI to continue to devote the necessary resources to disrupting 
these criminal enterprises.
    2002 Winter Olympic Games.--The Committee is aware that the 
Secret Service has requested the assistance of the FBI in 
support of the Salt Lake City Olympics. The Committee 
recommendation includes $12,302,000 for travel, per diem, 
overtime, lease of vehicles, telecommunications, and utilities 
in support of the 2002 Games. The entire amount is to be 
derived from the Working Capital Fund.
    Regional computer forensic labs.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $7,202,000 under the Office of Justice 
Programs to maintain or establish 4 regional computer forensic 
labs in affiliation with the FBI Laboratory. The labs will 
analyze the hard drives of seized computers for evidentiary 
material. Affiliation with the FBI Laboratory ensures that 
uniform standards and procedures are maintained by all of the 
participating computer forensic laboratories.
    National Infrastructure Protection Center.--The Committee 
is aware that the FBI is under intense pressure from the 
business community to police the Internet. Yet, at the same 
time that businesses are demanding action, they appear to be 
doing little to protect themselves. The Committee notes that 
the National Infrastructure Protection Center [NIPC] has issued 
two public warnings encouraging industry to implement no- or 
low-cost ``patches'' to fix long-documented vulnerabilities in 
popular business software. Failure to take basic steps to 
ensure their own security resulted in a large number of Web 
sites being victimized by Russian and Eastern European hackers 
who stole credit card numbers as part of an extortion scheme. 
An FBI agent likened the computer attacks to a rash of 
burglaries in a neighborhood where no one locks their doors. 
Federal resolve and resources will be difficult to muster and 
sustain if the simplest precautions are left undone by private 
industry. The Committee also questions the motives of computer 
security experts whose complaints about NIPC warnings would 
turn a virtue into a vice.
    Internet fraud/copyright enforcement.--The squads 
responsible for Internet fraud, copyright enforcement, and 
other cybercrimes in the former White Collar Crime decision 
unit have been living on hand me downs since National 
Infrastructure Protection Center computer intrusion squads were 
spun off as a separate activity. The financial losses 
attributable to consumer swindles and the pirating of software 
are such that the proper funding of Internet fraud and 
copyright enforcement squads is imperative. The Committee 
recommendation includes $4,000,000 for computers and associated 
equipment for these squads. This increase should be annualized 
to ensure a technology refreshment cycle in keeping with 
industry advances.
    The Committee is aware that the FBI has launched an 
initiative to investigate violations of Federal copyright laws 
protecting certain marketed software applications. The 
Committee supports FBI efforts to vigorously pursue violations 
of Federal copyright law. The FBI shall report to the Committee 
not later than June 30, 2002 on the number of copyright law 
investigations that led to prosecutions in the preceding year, 
including those under Public Law 105-147, by type and location.
    Trilogy.--Trilogy is the FBI's current computer 
modernization program. After two false starts, a new management 
team was specifically recruited to save the FBI's computer 
modernization effort from total disaster. The result, Trilogy, 
appears to address cost and capability concerns raised in the 
past by the Committee. In particular, the Committee is pleased 
to note that analytical tools are being provided to agents far 
earlier than would have been the case in the failed ISI and 
eFBI proposals. The Committee recommendation includes a total 
of $142,390,000 for Trilogy, including $67,660,000 derived from 
the Working Capital Fund.
    Serial rapists.--The Violent Criminal Apprehension Program 
[ViCAP] has proven valuable in pursuing serial killers by 
fusing evidence across cases and jurisdictions. The Committee 
believes that expanding ViCAP to include sexual assault cases 
would greatly improve the ability of law enforcement at all 
levels to identify, capture, and prosecute serial rapists. 
Therefore, the Committee recommendation includes $1,005,000 
under the Office of Justice Programs to expand ViCAP to include 
rape cases.
    Laboratory activation.--The FBI laboratory will be ready 
for occupation in June 2002. The new facility will allow the 
Lab to meet American Society of Crime Laboratory Directors 
[ASCLD] and International Standards Organization [ISO] 9000 
quality control/quality assurance standards. Unfortunately, 
after investing $130,000,000 in the new building, the FBI lacks 
the funds to fully outfit the Lab with essential equipment. The 
Committee sees little sense in opening an ill-equipped 
facility. Therefore, the Committee recommendation includes 
$50,737,000 for lab activation, including $24,837,000 for 
critical equipment, and $11,765,000 for moving costs, fit out, 
and building services personnel. The remaining $14,135,000 is 
provided to decommission and renovate former Lab space in the 
Hoover building.
    Forensic research.--The Committee is aware that the FBI 
Laboratory has a long list of unfunded research projects, 
including proposals for new techniques to detect: (1) date rape 
drugs or metabolites in the bloodstream, (2) latent 
fingerprints left by children, and (3) gunshot residues on 
shooters' hands and other surfaces. The Committee 
recommendation includes $12,200,000 to fund the highest 
priority forensic research proposals submitted to the Committee 
on April 30, 2001. The FBI shall report back to the Committees 
on Appropriations on its final spending plan for these 
resources not later than February 1, 2002.
    Forensic audio/video program.--The explosion of digital 
audio and video recording formats has taxed the FBI's forensic 
capabilities to the extreme. At the same time, the FBI must 
maintain its capability to analyze recordings from older analog 
devices. The Committee recommendation includes an increase of 
$608,000 over fiscal year 2001 for forensic audio/video 
specialists and equipment. The increase should be treated as a 
permanent increase to the base.
    National Instant Criminal Background Check System.--The 
National Instant Criminal Background Check System [NICS] is the 
immediate source of information for Federal firearms licensees 
seeking to determine whether a given individual's purchase of a 
firearm would violate Federal or State law. The Committee 
recommendation provides $67,735,000, the full amount required 
for NICS, from within available resources and manpower 
ceilings.
    Mitochondrial DNA.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$4,000,000 under the Office of Justice Programs to maintain or 
establish 4 regional mitochondrial DNA [mtDNA] forensic labs in 
affiliation with the FBI Laboratory. The labs will analyze 
mtDNA from human remains or other evidence to assist law 
enforcement in the identification of missing persons or 
perpetrators. Affiliation with the FBI Laboratory ensures that 
uniform standards and procedures are maintained by all of the 
participating laboratories doing mtDNA analysis. The 
recommendation also includes $484,000 in this account for the 
biologists and other highly specialized personnel required by 
the lab to oversee regional mtDNA labs.
    Crimes against children.--The Committee recommendation 
includes not less than $5,204,000 to maintain the FBI's 
capabilities to combat child abductions and serial killings. 
Within this amount, at least $3,439,000 is for: (1) the child 
abduction and serial killer unit, (2) a police fellows program 
for training local investigators, and (3) training for State 
and local law enforcement. Additionally, at least $1,765,000 is 
recommended to enhance the staffing of the Violent Criminal 
Apprehension Program to provide more timely assistance to State 
and local law enforcement requesting case analysis services.
    Jurisdiction.--Statistics collected by Syracuse University 
indicate that FBI drug convictions climbed sharply--69 
percent--between 1992 and 1998. In 1998, FBI drug convictions 
represented 25.6 percent of total Bureau convictions. Narcotics 
are a ``tier 2'' priority in the FBI's strategic plan. Also, 
drugs are a classic example of overlapping jurisdictions, 
involving the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration [DEA], 
and State and local police forces. The Committee is concerned 
that narcotics investigations are draining resources from 
higher priority counter-espionage and counter-terrorism 
missions. Therefore, the FBI is directed to report on: (1) its 
role in the nation's current overall strategy for combating 
drug trafficking, (2) opportunities for shifting the narcotics 
burden to the DEA and others, and (3) priority investigative 
initiatives that would benefit from resources freed up by the 
diminishment of the Bureau's role in drug cases. The report 
shall be delivered not later than April 1, 2002.
    End strength.--The Committee notes that the fiscal year 
2002 budget request imposed on the FBI includes a substantial 
number of ``hollow'' work years. The FBI has endured 2 very 
disruptive years attempting to reconcile its actual budget with 
artificial manpower levels. The Committee directs the Bureau to 
strike all of the hollow work years from its books to avoid 
another year of budget shortfalls. The FBI shall report back to 
the Committees on Appropriations on its adjusted end strength 
not later than November 1, 2001.

                              Construction

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $16,650,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       1,250,000
Committee recommendation................................      44,074,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $44,074,000. 
The recommendation is $42,824,000 above the budget request.
    Engineering Research Facility.--Well-heeled criminals, 
foreign agents, and terrorists have been quick to exploit 
technological innovations, complicating Bureau investigations. 
The Engineering Research Facility [ERF] develops and fields 
cutting edge technology in support of case agents. The rapid 
pace of progress has necessitated an equally rapid expansion of 
ERF programs simply to keep current with industry advances. The 
resultant cramped conditions at the facility have forced 
employees into leased space and is slowing critical projects 
due to a lack of room for new equipment. For several years, the 
FBI has been pursuing funds for the construction of an ERF 
annex. The annex would: (1) allow the FBI to consolidate far-
flung cybercrime assets at the ERF, (2) accommodate planned 
growth, and (3) improve security by allowing programs of 
differing sensitivities to be physically separated. Therefore, 
the Committee recommendation provides $32,541,000 for planning, 
site preparation, design, and construction of the ERF annex. 
The FBI may use prior year recoveries or unobligated balances 
to pay for short-term leased space in order to alleviate 
overcrowding at the ERF until the new annex opens. In addition, 
the recommendation includes $10,283,000 to refurbish the 
existing ERF facility.

                    Drug Enforcement Administration


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $1,360,126,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   1,480,929,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,489,779,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$1,489,779,000. The recommendation is $8,850,000 above the 
budget request.
    The Committee is very concerned that our efforts in the 
drug war, while producing periodic headlines, are not 
effectively ebbing the flow of a growing supply of illicit 
drugs into the United States. The major drug targets the DEA is 
able to bring to justice in the United States are quickly 
replaced by others who continue their criminal enterprises 
using increasingly sophisticated clandestine methods.
    There appears to be an inexhaustible number of people who 
are willing to take the risk of participating in the drug trade 
because of the enormously high monetary rewards. With that, 
small victories appear the best we can hope for in this war 
funded by U.S. taxpayers at a collective cost of over 
$40,000,000,000 annually.
    While total victory in the drug war is unattainable at this 
time, the Committee is aware that many DEA programs have been 
very effective in stopping some of the drug supply. The 
recommendation attempts to focus resources on activities that 
have been the most successful and cost effective.
    Special Operations Division [SOD]/Communications 
Intercept.--The SOD's mission is to establish strategies and 
operations between law enforcement agencies aimed at 
dismantling national and international drug trafficking 
organizations by attacking their communications systems. The 
Committee is pleased that the SOD assigned agents are actively 
working to coordinate and share information with other Federal 
law enforcement agencies. The Committee recommends: an 
additional three positions and $6,428,000 to fund contract and 
in-house language translation/transcription services; 
$4,382,000 for communications and data intercept equipment, and 
46 support positions; and $3,196,000 associated with SOD and 
the field. These additional resources will directly benefit 
investigations targeting organizations bringing drugs into the 
United States through the Southwest Border from Europe, Asia, 
Latin America and the Caribbean.
    Computer Forensics.--The DEA's computer forensic's 
capability is wholly inadequate measured against the number of 
computers seized by agents from criminals involved in drug 
related crime. The number of computers needing analysis is 
increasing 30 percent per year and backlogs in this area 
currently run from 10 to 12 work-years. To address this problem 
the Committee provides an additional $1,700,000 (20 FTE's). 
This funding should be used to hire computer forensic examiners 
and purchase related equipment for the Office of Investigative 
Technology.
    Computer Training.--The Committee commends the DEA for 
working cooperatively with other Justice components and 
providing needed computer and computer forensic training at the 
DEA Office of Investigative Technology.
    Joint Automated Booking System [JABS].--The Committee 
supports the leadership role DEA has taken with the JABS 
program. When fully operational the Committee believes that 
JABS will be a tremendous resource to all Federal law 
enforcement agencies. The Committee encourages DEA to continue 
to work with the other Justice and non-justice law enforcement 
agencies to train individuals on its use and to facilitate its 
expansion.
    Methamphetamine Initiative.--The recommendation includes 
$32,854,000, a $5,395,000 increase over fiscal year 2001, to 
continue DEA's efforts of targeting and investigating 
methamphetamine trafficking, production, and abuse across the 
United States. The funding will allow DEA to continue 
investigations and stop methamphetamine traffickers; maintain 
the national clandestine laboratory data base; reduce the 
availability of precursor chemicals being diverted to 
clandestine laboratories in the United States and abroad; 
clean-up the hazardous waste generated by seized clandestine 
laboratories; and coordinate with the agency's Special 
Operation's Division. The Committee directs DEA to submit 
quarterly spending reports on methamphetamine initiatives to 
the Committees on Appropriations beginning January 1, 2002.
    The Committee notes that $20,000,000 is provided through 
the COPS Methamphetamine/Drug ``Hot Spots'' Program to 
reimburse the DEA for the costs associated with assisting State 
and local law enforcement remove and dispose of the hazardous 
materials at clandestine methamphetamine labs.
    Heroin Enforcement Operations.--In hearings before the 
Committee, the DEA Administrator testified in detail about the 
flood of heroin entering the country as close to the Capitol as 
the Port of Baltimore. The re-emergence of the use of heroin by 
teenagers parallels the dramatic increase in the purity of 
heroin at very low prices. To address this challenge, the 
Committee encourages DEA to continue its heroin enforcement 
efforts within available resources and staffing levels.
    Oxycontin and MDMA.--Two drugs that have recently 
emerged as a growing concern to the Committee are 
Oxycontin and 3, 4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine 
[MDMA]. Oxycontin, a legally-prescribed controlled 
substance, is being diverted from the legal market into illegal 
use. MDMA, a drug with no legally-authorized use, is fast 
becoming a drug of choice at rave parties and other youth 
venues. Both drugs have managed to avoid much of the stigma 
that they deserve, and too many young people are under the 
false impression that these drugs may be used without harmful 
effects. The Committee strongly supports DEA's efforts to 
control the illegal diversion of Oxycontin, and to 
dismantle the organizations that import and distribute MDMA to 
the nation's young people.
    Regional Drug Enforcement Teams [RET].--The Committee 
recommends a total of $19,100,000 for DEA RET teams. RET team 
deployments have proven to be very successful at dismantling 
drug trafficking organizations in targeted areas at a very low 
cost per operation. RET teams are currently stationed in 
selected regions in the United States and have been given the 
flexibility to deploy agent resources and assets to meet 
emerging drug trends, specifically in our Nation's smaller 
cities. The teams direct their efforts toward combating 
specific drug problems as identified by intelligence sources 
and leads provided by DEA's Special Operations Division.
    Mobile Enforcement Teams [MET].--The Committee recommends 
$9,200,000 to continue the DEA MET team program. MET teams 
operate in communities at the request of local officials and 
since 1995 have targeted and dismantled drug trafficking 
organizations across the United States. The Committee believes 
that the DEA should increasingly focus personnel and resources 
on operations which target drug related crime and drug 
trafficking organizations within the United States.
    Firebird/Merlin.--An additional $30,000,000 and three 
positions is provided for the deployment, network security, and 
the technology renewal of DEA's Firebird computer system. The 
recommendation includes a total of $2,500,000 for Firebird 
Deployment, and $1,900,000 for network security. Finally, for 
technology renewal $25,600,000 and three positions is provided 
to modernize and replace systems and system components as they 
become obsolete. With this funding, Firebird will be fully 
deployed and Firebird will provide all DEA domestic and 
international offices with an integrated information sharing 
and communications computer network.
    Laboratory Operations.--Timely and effective laboratory 
support is critical to law enforcement. DEA's laboratory 
program is currently suffering from a backlog of evidence where 
processing time averages almost 50 days, potentially 
jeopardizing the investigation and prosecution of critical drug 
cases. To address this backlog, the Committee recommendation 
provides an increase of $13,104,000 over fiscal year 2001 for 
DEA laboratory operations, to manage the agency's increased 
laboratory workload, address deficient areas in the agency's 
laboratory system, and to institute a 5-year laboratory 
equipment replacement cycle.
    Sensitive Investigative Units [SIU].--The Committee 
recommends a total of $20,000,000 for the SIU program. The 
Committee is encouraged by the successes of the SIU program in 
participating countries. Last year, the Committee noted 
concerns that the endemic corruption within the Mexican 
Government would make the implementation of the SIU program 
there unattainable. The Committee is encouraged by recent 
changes brought on by Mexico's new President, Vicente Fox, who 
has pledged to combat drug traffickers and end corruption 
within the Mexican Government. The Committee therefore 
recommends DEA deploy its SIU's in Mexico as planned. The DEA 
is reminded that the Committees on Appropriations are to be 
notified before this program is expanded to include additional 
countries.
    Helicopters and other equipment.--The committee 
recommendation includes $5,250,000 for three single engine 
light enforcement helicopters to be stationed in Seattle, WA, 
Chicago, IL, and St. Louis, MO, and $5,000,000 for one twin 
engine medium lift helicopter to meet the needs of enforcement 
efforts in Hawaii. In addition, the DEA shall provide $500,000 
to equip and maintain the Federal gun range in Rocky Flats, 
Colorado for use by Federal, State, and local law enforcement.
    Management and Administration.--The Committee is encouraged 
by changes made in the personnel and authority of DEA's 
Financial Management Division. DEA's expertise in financial 
management has improved drastically, as demonstrated through 
the quality and timeliness of budget justifications, follow-up 
information, and the ability of DEA financial managers to 
provide detailed accounting of reprogramming actions and other 
basic financial information.
    ``Drug Diversion Control Fee'' Account.--The Committee has 
provided $86,021,000 for DEA's Drug Diversion Control Program. 
This is the full amount requested, and assumes that the level 
of balances in the Fee Account are sufficient to fully support 
diversion control programs in fiscal year 2002. As was the case 
in fiscal year 2001, no funds are provided in the DEA 
``Salaries and expenses'' appropriation for the ``Diversion 
control fee account'' in fiscal year 2002.
    End strength.--The Committee notes that the fiscal year 
2002 budget request includes a substantial number of ``hollow'' 
work years. The Committee is disappointed that the DEA forwent 
two opportunities to correct this problem during the 
development of the fiscal year 2002 budget submission in the 
hopes that additional funds might miraculously be made 
available. No such funds have been, or will be, made available. 
The Committee directs the DEA to strike all of the hollow work 
years from its books to avoid another year of budget 
shortfalls. The DEA shall report back to the Committees on 
Appropriations on its adjusted work years not later than 
November 1, 2001.

                 Immigration and Naturalization Service


                 (INCLUDING OFFSETTING FEE COLLECTIONS)

                         Salaries and Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $3,118,999,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   3,388,001,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,176,037,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$3,176,037,000. The recommendation is $211,964,000 below the 
budget request.
    Land border inspectors.--Long lines and the most cursory of 
inspections describe the current situation at land border ports 
of entry [POEs]. The reason for this is that for years all 
available resources have been diverted to the Border Patrol to 
increase the number of agents deployed. The result is that from 
fiscal year 1997 to 2001 the number of Border Patrol agents 
increased 40 percent from 6,828 to 9,545. At the same time, the 
number of land border inspectors decreased slightly from 1,770 
to 1,767. Today, of 104 POEs, 85, or 82 percent, are manned at 
50 percent or less of workload requirements. The most 
understaffed, Beebe Plain, VT, is manned at 10 percent of 
requirements. The following chart highlights current staff 
shortfalls:

                                LAND BORDER PORTS OF ENTRY STAFFING REQUIREMENTS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Workload     Current
                                                            requirement    staffing   Understaffing  Staffing as
                         Location                               (No.      (on-board        (No.       percentage
                                                             personnel)   12/28/00)     personnel)   of workload
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Beebe Plain, VT, POE......................................           10            1             9          10.0
Raymond, MT POE...........................................            8            1             7          12.5
Detroit Bridge/Tunnel, MI POE.............................          174           23           151          13.2
Warroad, MN/Dunseith, ND POEs.............................            7            1             6          14.3
Fortuna, Northgate, and Sherwood, ND POEs.................            6            1             5          16.7
Alcan and Poker Creek, AK POEs............................           12            2            10          16.7
Coburn Gore, ME POE.......................................           12            2            10          16.7
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Trade and tourism are suffering on both borders as a result 
of inadequate staffing at land POEs. The handful of inspectors 
the Committee was able to fund last year will have no 
appreciable effect on current shortfalls. Therefore, the 
Committee recommendation includes $25,408,000 for 348 land 
border inspectors to begin the long process of aligning manning 
with workload requirements. New inspectors shall be deployed to 
the most understaffed POEs.
    Border control.--As a recent INS report makes clear, 
overcrowding at Border Patrol facilities on the Southwest 
border has reached crisis proportions. Of 85 outposts across 9 
sectors, 63 are overcrowded. The worst, a station in Mercedes, 
Texas, was designed for 13 agents but currently houses 142, 
almost 1,100 percent its rated capacity.
    The chart below highlights the current situation:

                                       BORDER PATROL FACILITY REQUIREMENTS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                              Facility     Current                  Overstaffing
                                                              capacity     staffing   Overstaffing       as
                         Location                               (No.     (on-board 2/     (No.       percentage
                                                             personnel)     10/01)     personnel)    of capacity
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mercedes, TX STN..........................................           13          142           129         1,092
Laredo del Mar, TX STN....................................           36          357           321           992
Kingsville, TX STN........................................            9           97            88           978
Tucson, AZ STN............................................           17          161           144           947
Falfurrias, TX STN........................................           11           92            81           836
Laredo South, TX STN......................................           29          234           205           807
Hebbronville, TX STN......................................           11           86            75           782
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    This situation will only worsen as new Border Patrol agents 
funded in fiscal year 2001 arrive at their duty stations on the 
Southwest border. From San Diego to Brownsville, detention, 
processing, interview, and evidence and equipment storage space 
fall far short of requirements. The risks to the safety of 
agents are stark, and appalling work conditions exacerbate the 
Border Patrol's soaring attrition rate. The Committee 
recommendation addresses this problem in the INS 
``Construction'' account.
    In addition, the Committee recommendation provides 
$75,000,000 for 570 new Border Patrol agents.
    Border Patrol equipment.--The effectiveness of the Border 
Patrol has been threatened by crippling shortfalls in basic 
equipment inventories. More importantly, agent safety has been 
at risk. The chart below summarizes the current situation after 
several years of Committee intervention to ensure that Border 
Patrol agents are properly equipped:

                                      BORDER PATROL EQUIPMENT REQUIREMENTS
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                    Projected              Percentage
         Ratio per agent/sector                     Item              total     Present        of      Inventory
                                                                       need    inventory  requirement   required
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
1 per Agent............................  Pocket scopes............      9,000      6,138          68       2,862
2 per 3 Agents.........................  Night vision goggles.....      6,000      4,037          67       1,963
2 per Sector...........................  Fiber optic scopes.......        350        200          57         150
100 per Sector.........................  Hand-held searchlights...      2,100        415          20       1,685
100 per Sector.........................  IR scopes................      2,000        755          38       1,245
1 per Agent............................  GPS......................      9,000      1,200          13       7,800
1 per 10 Agents........................  Vehicle IR scopes........        900        144          16         756
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    To preserve the benefits of several years of massive 
investments to expand the Border Patrol, the Committee 
recommendation provides a total of $22,598,000 for high 
priority equipment, including $1,020,000 for fiber optic 
scopes, $799,000 for hand-held searchlights, $708,000 for 
vehicle infrared scopes, $2,091,000 for Global Positioning 
Systems, $9,120,000 for infrared scopes, $2,606,000 for night 
vision goggles, and $6,254,000 for pocket scopes.
    Integrated Surveillance Intelligence System [ISIS].--In its 
haste to deploy ISIS, the INS has failed to develop the body of 
system engineering documentation associated with the 
development, procurement, and operation of new equipment. 
Lacking such documentation, such basic questions as system 
performance versus requirements and lifecycle costs versus 
outyear budgets remain unanswered. Prior to further expansion 
of the program, the Committee directs the INS to ensure that 
documents addressing customer requirements and system 
functionality, design, test, performance, and cost are 
completed and available for review. The Committee 
recommendation includes $4,000,000 to fully fund the system 
engineering process for ISIS.
    The Committee recommendation also includes the following:
  --$14,000,000 for Law Enforcement Support Center [LESC]; and
  --Full funding for the first year of the INS vehicle 
        replacement master plan.
    IDENT/IAFIS.--Shortcomings in the INS' Automated Biometric 
Identification System [``IDENT''] database were blamed for the 
release of suspected serial killer Rafael Resendez Ramirez. In 
the wake of Resendez Ramirez's later surrender, Justice 
Management Division [JMD] took over development and integration 
of IDENT and the FBI's Integrated Automated Fingerprint 
Identification System [IAFIS]. That effort has been expanded to 
integrate the INS' Enforcement Case Tracking System 
[``ENFORCE''] with IDENT/IAFIS. Within existing automation base 
funding, the Committee recommendation includes $27,000,000 for 
continued development and piloting of IDENT/IAFIS by Justice 
Management Division [JMD]. The JMD is directed to provide the 
Committees on Appropriations with an automation spending plan 
not later than November 15, 2001.
    Pacific Northwest.--There are currently 300 Border Patrol 
Agents assigned to patrol the entire 4,000 miles of the 
northern border. In contrast, the Southwest border has nearly 
8,000 agents for 2,000 miles. This is four agents for every 
mile in the south compared to one agent for every 13 miles in 
the north. Consequently, agents on the northern border are 
fourteen times more likely to encounter aliens involved with 
smuggling weapons and nine times more likely to encounter 
aliens involved with smuggling drugs when compared to agents 
along the Southwest border. Furthermore, the lack of INS 
inspectors at the northern border is directly attributable to 
the greatly increased congestion seen at many border crossings. 
Therefore, of the 570 additional Border Patrol agents, not less 
than 25 percent of those new agents shall be deployed to the 
northern border. Inspection staff at the northern border must 
also be increased substantially. Selections for the northern 
tier shall be by the competitive transfer of experienced agents 
by means of the existing merit promotion and reassignment 
system.
    Quick Response Teams.--The Committee is aware that the 
initial deployment of Quick Response Teams [QRTs] has taken far 
longer than anticipated, and that costs have greatly exceeded 
preliminary estimates. Until the program has stablized, and its 
true costs and benefits are known, the Committee will not 
entertain requests for the expansion of QRTs outside of the 
initial deployment area.
    Legal Orientation Programs.--The Committee recommends 
$2,800,000 for non-governmental agencies to provide ``live 
presentations'' to persons in INS detention prior to their 
first hearing before an immigration judge. These presentations 
will provide immigration detainees with essential information 
about immigration court procedures and the availability of 
legal remedies to assist detainees in distinguishing between 
meritorious cases and frivolous cases.
    Alternatives to Detention.--The Committee recommends 
$7,300,000 for community-based organizations to screen asylum 
seekers and other INS detainees for community ties, provide 
them with necessary services, and help to assure their 
appearance at court hearings.
    Benefits.--Trend analysis of the most recent benefits 
processing data from the INS indicates that steady progress 
continues to be made in eliminating the backlog sparked by the 
``Citizenship USA'' debacle. Since its peak in fiscal year 
1998, the backlog of pending naturalization (N-400) 
applications has dropped 68 percent in the last 2 fiscal years. 
During the same period, processing times dropped from more than 
45 months to just under 7 months. Even greater progress is 
expected this year. These improvements have not come cheaply, 
however. During the last 5 years, the Committee has provided 
$4,169,400,000 for benefits processing. Manpower increased by 
1,196 between fiscal years 1997 and 2000 with more to come in 
fiscal year 2001. Hopefully, the tide has turned and benefits 
processing performance measures will return to historical 
norms, but continued pressure to expand the number of potential 
beneficiaries and the scope of potential benefits could erase 
these gains.
    Conversely, no area of operations will be more severely 
disrupted by the imminent reorganization of the INS than 
benefits processing. Just in the last few months, the INS has 
had to deal with the revamping of the H-1B program and the 
continuing extension of Temporary Protected Status to El 
Salvadorans, Hondurans, and Nicaraguans. This turmoil has 
typified immigration policy for many years. Now, an 
organization ruled by a bewildering set of laws, regulations, 
and decrees and known for poor service and endless backlogs 
will be spun off and established as a separate agency. The 
resultant confusion might be more tolerable were it not for the 
fact that ultimate control of the new immigration benefits 
service will be retained by Justice, an agency with little 
experience or expertise in providing benefits. Rather than 
contribute to the coming chaos by pouring additional new 
employees into the mix, the Committee recommendation is limited 
to fully funding current services. The Committee will be 
closely monitoring monthly benefits processing reports to 
ensure that current standards are met or exceeded after the 
reorganization.
    Staffing levels.--The INS has failed to provide a required 
assessment of staffing needs nationwide. The Committee has no 
recourse but to direct the reallocation of staff to offices 
where caseload merits personnel increases. The INS is directed 
to provide an increase of $118,750 over fiscal year 2001 to the 
district office in Omaha, NE, to upgrade Nashville, TN, to a 
full service office, and to upgrade its presence in Las Vegas, 
NV to a district office not later than June 15, 2002. Finally, 
of the total amount provided for naturalization and other 
benefits, such sums as are necessary shall be made available to 
open a 1-man office in Roanoke, VA.
    In addition, the recommendation includes a total of 
$4,506,000 for the Debt Management Center [DMC].
    End strength.--The Committee notes that the fiscal year 
2002 budget request includes a substantial number of ``hollow'' 
work years. The INS has endured several very disruptive years 
attempting to reconcile its actual budget with artificial 
levels of work years. The Committee directs the INS to strike 
all of the hollow work years from its books to avoid another 
year of budget shortfalls. The INS shall report back to the 
Committees on Appropriations on its adjusted work years not 
later than November 1, 2001.
    Fees.--The recommendation transfers a total of $147,602,000 
in base activities, including data processing, legal 
proceedings, detention and deportation, and information and 
records management, from this account to the ``User Fee'', 
``Examinations Fee'', and ``Breached Bond/Detention Fund'' 
accounts. This transfer better aligns available resources with 
actual activities and is allowable under the statutory 
authorities for each of these accounts.

                       Offsetting fee collections

    Fees are paid by persons who are either traveling 
internationally or are applying for immigration benefits. The 
Committee recommends a total spending level of $2,058,723,000. 
The recommendation is $64,782,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee has included language expanding the inspection fee 
pilot program at land border ports of entry [POEs]. Proceeds 
will contribute to buying down the almost $1,000,000,000 
construction backlog at these POEs. The Committee 
recommendations, by major account, are provided below:

                          Immigration user fee

    The Committee recommends a spending level of $656,648,000. 
This is the full amount of receipts estimated to be available 
and fully funds base requirements. The recommendation is 
$64,782,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation provides an increase of 
$67,500,000 over fiscal year 2001 for additional inspectors and 
support staff, including those associated with detention and 
removals and legal proceedings, and for airline carrier 
training.
    Inspection technology.--The Committee is aware of 
commercial off-the-shelf technology that could significantly 
improve the inspection process. Document and biometric scanners 
linked to computers could sharply reduce both waiting times and 
fraudulent entries as well as allowing inspectors to focus on 
problem cases. The recommendation provides a total increase of 
$40,500,000 to implement a thorough modernization of inspection 
technology and to upgrade the National Automated Information 
Lockout System ($3,200,000) and to procure additional live scan 
fingerprint devices ($425,000).
    Inspection processing.--As noted above, the recommendation 
transfers $33,273,000 in data processing, legal proceedings, 
detention, and information and records management base 
activities from ``Salaries and Expenses'' to this account. User 
fees may be used for inspection processing expenses.

                      Immigration examinations fee

    The Committee recommends a spending level of 
$1,258,088,000. This is the full amount of receipts estimated 
to be available. The recommendation is identical to the budget 
request.
    Benefits Processing.--As mentioned above, the turmoil 
engendered by recent legislation and policy decisions threatens 
the steady progress the INS has been making in reducing the 
naturalization backlog. The Committee recommendation provides 
an increase of $67,095,000 over fiscal year 2001 to accelerate 
the pace of efforts to reduce the time required to adjudicate 
immigration benefit applications.
    Transfer to Executive Office for Immigration Review 
[EOIR].--The recommendation assumes that $127,834,000 from this 
account will be made available for EOIR operations, including 
$1,200,000 for contract court interpreter services for 
immigration court proceedings. Exam fees may be used for 
expenses in providing immigration adjudication.
    Benefits processing.--As noted above, the recommendation 
transfers $74,329,000 in data processing, legal proceedings, 
and information and records management base activities from 
``Salaries and Expenses'' to this account. Exam fees may be 
used for immigration adjudication expenses.

                      Breached Bond/Detention Fund

    The Committee recommends a spending level of $120,763,000. 
This is the full amount of receipts estimated to be available 
to support detention of criminal and illegal aliens. The 
recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    Detention expenses.--As noted above, the recommendation 
transfers $40,000,000 in detention and deportation base 
activities from ``Salaries and Expenses'' to this account. 
Breached bond/detention funds may be used for expenses 
associated with the detention and deportation of illegal 
aliens.

                              Construction

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $133,009,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     128,410,000
Committee recommendation................................     205,015,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $205,015,000. 
The recommendation is $76,605,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee is concerned by the lack, or condition, of 
facilities INS-wide, described as the ``worst'' in the Federal 
Government in a recent assessment. The backlog of projects has 
reached unacceptable levels, and is growing larger with each 
passing year. For the Border Patrol alone, the shortfall in 
adequate facilities now exceeds 63 percent of requirements. Use 
of trailers or temporary or makeshift facilities is common, and 
even these expedients leave many new agents without a place to 
process arrestees. Not surprisingly, the result is agent 
attrition rates that are high and climbing. The funding 
proposed is intended to begin the long process of eliminating 
construction and maintenance backlogs.
    The Committee recommendations, by project, are displayed in 
the following table:

                            INS construction

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
Border Patrol:                                            Recommendation
    New Construction:
        Douglas, AZ--Border Patrol Station....................    1,993 
        El Centro, CA--Border Patrol Station..................    2,000 
        Falfurrias, TX--Border Patrol Station.................    2,055 
        Hebbronville, TX--Border Patrol Station...............    1,733 
        Rio Grande City, TX--Border Patrol Station............      583 
        Brownsville, TX--Border Patrol Station................    2,104 
        Sierra Blanca, TX--Border Patrol Station..............    1,541 
        Campo, CA--Border Patrol Station......................    6,800 
        Del Rio, TX--Checkpoints..............................    7,566 
        Santa Teresa, TX--Border Patrol Station...............    1,063 
        Yuma, AZ--Border Patrol Station.......................    4,000 
        El Paso, TX--Border Patrol Station....................   10,893 
        McAllen, TX--Border Patrol Station....................    9,664 
        Tucson, AZ--Sector Headquarters.......................   18,257 
        Piegan, MT--POE Housing...............................    2,315 
        San Clemente, CA--Checkpoint..........................    3,400 
        El Cajon, CA--Border Patrol Station...................   14,273 
        Eagle Pass, TX--Border Patrol Station.................   12,854 
        Port Isabel, TX--Border Patrol Station................    8,468 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal............................................  111,562 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Detention:
    New Construction: \1\
        El Centro, CA--Service Processing Center..............   [3,000]
        Florence, AZ--Service Processing Center...............   [2,800]
        El Paso, TX--Service Processing Center................   [7,000]
        Krome, FL--Service Processing Center..................  [14,890]
        Buffalo, NY--Service Processing Center................   [5,900]
        Port Isabel, TX--Service Processing Center............  [25,910]
        San Pedro, CA--Service Processing Center..............   [3,864]
        Stockton, CA--Service Processing Center...............   [3,160]
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal............................................  [66,524]
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Servicewide One-Time Build Out:
    Arlington, VA--District Office............................    2,783 
    Atlanta, GA--District Office..............................    3,254 
    Birmingham, AL--Satellite Office..........................      202 
    Blaine, WA--Border Patrol Station.........................    1,714 
    Boston, MA--District Office...............................       61 
    Buffalo, NY--Border Patrol Station/Sector HQ..............       32 
    Burlington, VT--Eastern Regional Office...................    1,455 
    Champlain, NY--Port of Entry..............................      489 
    Cherry Hill, NJ--Satellite Office.........................      461 
    Chicago, IL--District Office/Port of Entry................    5,242 
    Cleveland, OH--District Office............................      681 
    Coos Bay, OR--Port of Entry...............................       33 
    Crane Lake, MN--Port of Entry.............................       65 
    Denver, CO--District Office...............................    3,233 
    Detroit, MI--District Office/BPS/Port of Entry............    1,361 
    Dover, DE--Field Office...................................      143 
    Dutch Harbor, AK--Port of Entry...........................    2,473 
    Fargo, ND--Satellite Office...............................        4 
    Fort Fairfield, ME--Port of Entry.........................      310 
    Grand Forks, ND--Border Patrol Sector HQ..................      409 
    Grand Rapids, MI--Border Patrol Station...................       11 
    Harlingen, TX--District Office............................      199 
    Hartford, CT--Satellite Office............................      416 
    Havre, MT--Border Patrol Sector HQ/BPS....................      406 
    Helena, MT--District Office...............................    1,181 
    Indianapolis, IN--Satellite Office........................      244 
    Idaho Falls, ID--Satellite Office.........................      417 
    Jackman, ME--Port of Entry................................      231 
    Jackson, MS--Field Office.................................       90 
    Jacksonville, FL--Border Patrol Station...................        2 
    Las Vegas, NV--Satellite Office...........................      513 
    Lewiston, ME--Port of Entry...............................       50 
    Lincoln, NE--Service Center...............................    7,320 
    Marathon Key, FL--Border Patrol Station...................      382 
    Miami, FL--District Office/BPSH/BPS.......................      545 
    New Orleans, LA--District Office..........................    2,463 
    Newark, NJ--District Office...............................      626 
    Newburgh, NY--Satellite Office............................      502 
    Omaha, NE--District Office................................    1,116 
    Oroville, WA--Port of Entry...............................      175 
    Philadelphia, PA--District Office.........................      597 
    Pittsburgh, PA--Satellite Office..........................        4 
    Poker Creek, AK--Port of Entry............................    1,100 
    Portal, ND--Port of Entry/Border Patrol Station...........       16 
    Port Huron, MI--Port of Entry.............................      338 
    Portland, OR--District Office.............................        2 
    Raymond, MT--Port of Entry................................        2 
    Roosville, MT--Port of Entry..............................      423 
    Sault Ste. Marie, MI--Port of Entry.......................      474 
    Seattle, WA--District Office..............................    3,013 
    St. Paul, MN--District Office.............................    3,841 
    Sweetgrass, MT--Port of Entry.............................      851 
    Tampa, FL--Satellite Office...............................      148 
    Thousand Islands, NY--Port of Entry.......................       51 
    Twin Falls, ID--Border Patrol Station.....................       11 
    West Palm Beach, FL--BPS/Inspections......................    1,175 
    Yakima, WA--Satellite Office..............................    1,194 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal................................................   54,534 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Servicewide Maintenance, Repair, & Alteration:
    Eastern Region............................................    1,132 
    Central Region............................................    7,112 
    Western Region............................................    2,113 
    Minor Projects............................................   19,250 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal................................................   29,627 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Construction Vehicles.........................................    2,499 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
OSHA Compliance...............................................    3,000 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Program Execution.............................................    9,292 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Total, INS Construction...................................  205,015 

\1\ Funding provided elsewhere in the bill.

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan for fiscal year 2002.

                         Federal Prison System

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $4,300,415,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   4,666,139,000
Committee recommendation................................   4,689,454,000

    The Committee recommends total budgetary resources of 
$4,689,454,000 for the Federal prison system for fiscal year 
2002. The recommendation is $23,315,000 above the budget 
request.

                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $3,469,172,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   3,829,437,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,786,228,000

    The Committee recommends total budgetary resources of 
$3,786,228,000 for the salaries and expenses of the Federal 
prison system for fiscal year 2002. The recommendation is 
$43,209,000 below the budget request.
    Activation of new prisons.--The Committee recommendation 
includes funding for activation of two new facilities (2,240 
beds): a medium security facility in Petersburg, Virginia and a 
high security in Lee County, Virginia. The Committee also 
recommends the purchase of equipment for FCI Glenville, West 
Virginia and USP Canaan, Pennsylvania which are preparing for 
activation.
    The Committee recommendation includes funding to begin and 
or complete activation of the following facilities:

Pollack, LA.............................................        $405,000
Atwater, CA.............................................       1,554,000
Coleman, FL.............................................      22,430,000
Edgefield, SC...........................................         396,000
Low Security Capacity Expansions (Ft. Dix, NJ; Elkton, 
    OH; Jesup, GA; Yazoo City, MS; Seagoville, TX and 
    Lompoc, CA).........................................      10,824,000
Honolulu, HI............................................       3,323,000
Petersburg, VA..........................................      36,933,000
Lee, VA.................................................      35,819,000
Equipment Funding.......................................       9,100,000

    The Committee recommendation includes funding for: 1,500 
beds for short-term criminal aliens to be housed in contract 
facilities; and a contract population increase of 1,449 beds.
    The Committee supports the base funding adjustment of 
$71,991,000 for 6,000 beds for short term criminal aliens.
    Justice Prisoner and Alien Transportation System.--The 
Committee recommends a reduction of $8,266,000 for 
centralization of prisoner air movements under the Detention 
Trustee, in lieu of reimbursement.
    Internship Pilot.--The Committee recommendation continues 
to provide funding of up to $100,000 for of a pilot program 
that offers temporary internship positions for college students 
at the Federal Correctional Institution in Yazoo City, 
Mississippi, to provide the students work experience in a law 
enforcement setting and a heightened interest in a career with 
the Federal Bureau of Prisons.
    Female inmates.--Of the amounts provided, up to $1,000,000 
shall be for the National Institute of Corrections to continue 
to work with correctional systems (State and Federal) to 
address the issue of staff sexual misconduct involving female 
inmates in correctional institutions through the provision of 
technical assistance, education and training, and other 
monitoring activities pursuant to the recommendations of the 
General Accounting Office.
    Yazoo City, MS.--The Committee directs the Bureau to 
continue assessing the feasibility and anticipated need for the 
construction of a high security prison facility in Yazoo City, 
MS.
    Transfer of District of Columbia Sentenced Felons.--The 
Committee recognizes the herculean efforts of the Bureau of 
Prisons to meet requirements of the DC Revitalization Act and 
transfer of DC felons into custody by December 31, 2001. The 
Bureau of Prisons, in cooperation with other agencies, has 
already transferred over half of the population and is 
currently accepting the remaining medium and high security 
inmates. To date, the Committee has provided $850,000,000 for 
construction of new facilities to absorb this population. One 
will be fully activated in 2001, one in 2002, and the remaining 
five facilities in 2003 and 2004. The timely and safe 
transition of inmates into the Federal system will afford 
appropriate inmate education and vocational programs, close 
supervision and closure of the troubled Lorton facilities.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous Appropriations Acts, which allows: 
(1) for the purchase of motor vehicles for police-type use and 
the purchase of uniforms; (2) for the provision of technical 
advice to foreign governments; (3) for transfer of funds to the 
Health Resources and Services Administration; (4) for the 
Director to enter into contracts to furnish health care; (5) up 
to $6,000 for reception and representation expenses; (6) up to 
$50,000,000 for necessary prison operations to remain available 
until September 30, 2003; (7) up to $20,000,000 for contract 
confinement expenses for the care and security of Cuban and 
Haitian entrants; and (8) for continuation of the donated 
greeting card program.

                        Buildings And Facilities

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $833,822,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     833,273,000
Committee recommendation................................     899,797,000

    The Committee recommends a total of $899,797,000 for fiscal 
year 2002 for the construction, modernization, maintenance, and 
repair of prison and detention facilities housing Federal 
prisoners. This amount is $66,524,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee continues to strongly support the BOP's 
construction program, designed to provide sufficient inmate 
beds to manage overcrowding in facilities and maintain them in 
a safe and secure manner for staff, inmates and surrounding 
communities. The Committee understands that the BOP needs the 
11 facilities requested in the 2002 budget and even with these 
facilities, overcrowding is projected to be 32 percent in 2006. 
Thus, the Committee is providing $669,972,000 for the new 
construction program. Further, the Committee directs the BOP to 
request the funds necessary to complete these facilities in the 
2003 budget. The funding provided for facilities includes:

Sentenced Capacity Projects

Facilities with prior funding:ousands of dollars)
    USP Western (California with Work Camp)...................  $147,000
    USP Coleman, FL...........................................   133,000
    FCI South Carolina with Work Camp.........................   106,000
    FCI Mid-Atlantic with Work Camp...........................    91,047
INS Long Term Detainee Capacity:
    USP Western...............................................    11,500
    FCI Butner, NC Medium.....................................    11,500
    USP Terre Haute, IN.......................................   130,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal................................................   630,047
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Facilities with no prior funding:
    Secure Female Facility Northern Florida with Work Camp....    10,000
    Secure Female Facility North Central......................    10,000
    FCI South Central with Work Camp and Protective Custody 
      Unit....................................................     9,963
    USP Northeast/Northern Mid-Atlantic with Work Camp and 
      Protective Custody Unit.................................     9,962
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

        Subtotal..............................................    39,935
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
INS Detention Facilities......................................    66,524
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total New Construction Program Increases................   736,496

    The Committee commends the BOP for working diligently to 
increase inmate housing capacity by expanding existing 
facilities within available funds. The Committee fully supports 
these cost effective efforts and expects the BOP to continue 
its reprogrammings and funds transfer requests in a timely 
manner to expedite these construction projects.
    Inmate Telephone Use.--The Committee notes the Bureau of 
Prison's recent changes in policy limiting inmate telephone 
use. The Committee expects that these changes will further 
reduce potential inmate abuse of telephone privileges while 
continuing to allow positive contact with family members.
    The Committee recommends bill language, similar to that 
included in previous Appropriation Acts, which allows: (1) for 
planning of facilities, acquisition of sites, and construction 
of facilities; (2) for acquisition, remodeling, and equipping 
facilities by contract or force account; (3) for up to 
$14,000,000 to construct inmate work areas; (4) for use of 
prison labor; and (5) for up to 10 percent of this 
appropriation to be transferred to the ``Salaries and 
expenses'' account in accordance with section 605.

                    Federal Prison Industries, Inc.


                (Limitation On Administrative Expenses)

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $3,421,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       3,429,000
Committee recommendation................................       3,429,000

    This Committee recommends a limitation on administrative 
expenses of $3,429,000 for the Federal Prison Industries, Inc. 
This amount is equal to the amount requested.
    The Committee continues to strongly support Federal Prison 
Industries [UNICOR] and recognizes its importance in the 
efficient and safe management of Federal prisons. UNICOR 
provides prison inmates with the opportunity to learn important 
work habits, participate in meaningful employment which keeps 
them productively occupied during work hours, and develop 
improved job skills which reduce recidivism. The Committee also 
recognizes the necessity for UNICOR to grow as the inmate 
population increases. Finally, UNICOR is a self-supporting 
revolving fund the resources of which are derived from sales of 
its products. In the future, the BOP is directed to submit only 
UNICOR's appropriations language exhibit.

                       Office of Justice Programs


                           Justice Assistance

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $417,299,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     407,677,000
Committee recommendation................................     564,738,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $564,738,000. 
The recommendation is the same as the budget request.
    The funding provided for justice assistance includes funds 
to States for research, evaluation, statistics, information 
sharing, emergency assistance, missing children assistance, 
counterterrorism programs, and the management and 
administration of grants provided through the Office of Justice 
Programs.

                          Justice Assistance

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation

National Institute of Justice...........................    $54,879,000 
    Defense/law enforcement technology transfer.........    [12,277,000]
Bureau of Justice Statistics............................     32,335,000 
Missing children........................................     22,997,000 
Regional information sharing system.....................     38,500,000 
White Collar Crime Center...............................      9,230,000 
Total Activities to Combat Terrorism:
    Management and Administration.......................      8,000,000 
    For Consortium Members..............................     58,000,000 
        Center for Domestic Preparedness, Fort 
          McClellan, AL.................................    [30,000,000]
        National Energetic Materials Research and 
          Testing Center, New Mexico Institute of Mining 
          and Technology................................     [7,000,000]
        National Emergency Response and Rescue Training 
          Center, Texas A&M; University..................     [7,000,000]
        National Center for Bio-Med Research and 
          Training, Louisiana State University..........     [7,000,000]
        National Exercise, Test, and Training Center, 
          Nevada Test Site..............................     [7,000,000]
    Domestic Preparedness Equipment Grants..............    175,000,000 
        Equipment Standards.............................    [17,000,000]
    Dartmouth Institute for Security and Technology 
      Studies...........................................     18,000,000 
    Oklahoma City National Memorial Institute for the 
      Prevention of Terrorism...........................     18,000,000 
    Virtual Medical Campus..............................      2,000,000 
    Domestic Preparedness Exercise Grants and Exercise 
      Support Funds.....................................     20,000,000 
    TOPOFF II...........................................      4,000,000 
    Annual Exercise Program.............................      5,000,000 
    Improved Response Program (IRP).....................      3,000,000 
    Other Training......................................     35,000,000 
    Technical Assistance................................      8,000,000 
    Prepositioned Equipment.............................      8,000,000 
    Web Site Pilot......................................      2,000,000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
          Subtotal......................................    364,000,000 
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Management and administration...........................     42,797,000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total justice assistance..........................    564,738,000 

    National Institute of Justice (NIJ).--The Committee 
recommends an appropriation of $54,879,000. The recommendation 
is equal to the budget request. In addition, $19,956,000 will 
be provided to NIJ in fiscal year 2002, as was provided in 
fiscal year 2001, from the local law enforcement block grant 
for assisting local units to identify, select, develop, 
modernize, and purchase new technologies for use by law 
enforcement. NIJ is the Nation's primary source of research and 
development in the field of criminal justice. Within total 
funding for the NIJ, the Committee directs that increased 
amounts over fiscal year 2001 be made available for 
computerized identification systems and the DNA Technology 
Research and Development Program.
    The Committee is very concerned about the administration of 
some NIJ grants. Grant administrators are to work with grantees 
in a cooperative but supervisory manner. NIJ is directed to re-
familiarize its grant administrators with the requirements of 
their positions. In addition, NIJ is directed to ensure that 
grant recipients are in complete compliance with the agreements 
they sign.
    Defense/law enforcement technology transfer.--Within the 
amounts provided for NIJ, $12,277,000 is provided for NIJ 
management and operation of this program to support joint 
efforts by the Justice Department and the Department of Defense 
to adapt defense technologies to law enforcement use, to field 
prototype systems for evaluation, to develop standards and test 
products, and to develop technologies that will minimize the 
risk of death or injury to law enforcers, corrections officers, 
and citizens.
    In addition to the above activities, within the amounts 
provided, NIJ is to provide grants for the following projects:
  --$500,000 for a grant for Lane County, Oregon Breaking the 
        Cycle;
  --$800,000 for the Richmond, Virginia Secures Program;
    Drug Detection.--The Committee is pleased with the progress 
the NIJ has made in the evaluation of a non-toxic and non-
carcinogenic reagent-based detection and identification aerosol 
designed to detect trace amounts of illegal drugs in school 
environments. Based on this progress the Committee directs that 
from within the amounts provided to NIJ, $450,000 shall be made 
available for an expanded evaluation of the aerosol's 
application in educational environments, a second independent 
evaluation assessing the technology, and the exploration of new 
methods of applying the aerosol detection technology in the 
criminal justice system.
  --$2,145,000 to the University of Connecticut to fund 
        research on non-traditional DNA typing to improve law 
        enforcement investigation techniques;
  --$3,000,000 to the University of Connecticut to fund the 
        Prison Health Research Project; and
  --$1,500,000 for the Less Than Lethal Technology for Law 
        Enforcement program.
    Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS).--The Committee 
recommends an appropriation of $32,335,000. The recommendation 
is equal to the budget request. The BJS is responsible for the 
collection, analysis, and publication of statistical 
information on crime, criminal offenders, victims of crime, and 
the operations of the Nation's justice systems.
    Office of Victims of Crime.--The Committee urges the Office 
of Victims of Crime (OVC) to continue its Victim Assistance to 
Indian Country (VAIC), and Children's Justice Act (CJA) 
programs. The VAIC and CJA programs have been critical in 
ensuring that resources are available to help victims of crime 
in under-served tribal areas and to prosecute offenders in 
child abuse and neglect cases.
    Missing children.--The Committee recommendation provides 
$22,997,000 for the Missing Children Program to combat crimes 
against children, particularly kidnaping and sexual 
exploitation.
    Within the amounts provided the Committee has included:
    (1) $9,277,544 for the Missing Children Program within the 
Office of Justice Programs, Justice Assistance, including the 
following: $5,986,800 for State and local law enforcement to 
continue specialized cyberunits and for units to investigate 
and prevent child sexual exploitation which are based on the 
protocols for conducting investigations involving the Internet 
and online service providers that have been established by the 
Department of Justice and the National Center for Missing and 
Exploited Children.
    (2) $11,450,000 for the National Center for Missing and 
Exploited Children [NCMEC], of which $2,245,050 is provided for 
the operation of the CyberTipline and the Exploited Child Unit. 
The Committee expects the NCMEC to continue to consult with 
participating law enforcement agencies to ensure the 
curriculum, training, and programs provided are consistent with 
the protocols for conducting investigations involving the 
Internet and online service providers that have been 
established by the Department of Justice. The CyberTipline was 
created by this Committee in the fiscal year 1999 appropriation 
for the Center. In addition, the Committee recommends that 
NCMEC consult with I-Safe America to provide Internet Safety 
Training in grades K-12 nationwide.
    (3) $2,700,000 for the Jimmy Ryce Law Enforcement Training 
Center for training of State and local law enforcement 
officials investigating missing and exploited children cases.
    Regional Information Sharing System (RISS).--The Committee 
recommends an appropriation of $38,500,000. The recommendation 
is equal to the budget request. The RISS program provides funds 
to maintain six regionally-based information sharing centers 
which allow for information and intelligence services to be 
disseminated nationwide addressing major, multi-jurisdictional 
crimes.
    Domestic Preparedness Assistance to State and Local 
Jurisdictions.--The Committee supports the work of the Office 
for State and Local Domestic Preparedness Support (OSLDPS) the 
mission of which is to enhance the capabilities of State and 
local jurisdictions to better prepare for and respond to 
incidents of domestic terrorism involving weapons of mass 
destruction. OSLDPS' activities include training and 
educational instruction, specialized equipment grants, 
technical assistance, and support for situational exercises. 
OSLDPS provides assistance in these areas to States and 
localities and their emergency response agencies. OSLDPS' 
successful stewardship of the critical TOPOFF exercise program 
last year prompted this Committee, as well as the exercise's 
participants, to request a second national exercise, TOPOFF II. 
The Committee commends OSLDPS on its efforts to work with the 
States and the District of Columbia to develop individual 
comprehensive plans and strategies that assess the threats and 
risks they face and identify their requirements in the areas of 
equipment, training, exercises, and technical assistance. The 
linkage of equipment grants to States' completion of their 
plans has provided States with the incentive to move forward 
quickly with this important process. These plans will provide 
critical guidance to Federal agencies and the Congress on 
States' and localities' resource requirements.
    For the continuation of the programs and activities of 
OSLDPS, a total of $364,000,000 is recommended, of which 
$8,000,000 may be used for associated management and 
administrative expenses, including support for up to 63 full 
time equivalent (FTE) positions. This level of support is 
necessary due to the requirement that OSLDPS work directly with 
the States and the District of Columbia to respond to the needs 
identified in the comprehensive plans they are currently 
developing, and to coordinate a comprehensive exercise program.
    National Domestic Preparedness Consortium.--A total of 
$58,000,000 is recommended for the continued training efforts 
under OSLDPS' National Domestic Preparedness Consortium. This 
funding will enable OSLDPS to address the requirements as 
determined by the Statewide Domestic Preparedness Strategic 
Plans. Of the $58,000,000 recommended, funds shall be allocated 
among the Consortium's members as follows: (1) $7,000,000 to 
the Texas Engineering Extension Service of the Texas A&M; 
University, (2) $7,000,000 to the Energetic Materials Research 
and Test Center of the New Mexico Institute of Mining and 
Technology, (3) $7,000,000 to the Academy of Counterterrorist 
Education at the Louisiana State University, (4) $7,000,000 to 
the U.S. Department of Energy's National Exercise, Test, and 
Training Center, Nevada Test Site, and (5) $30,000,000 for 
OSLDPS' Center For Domestic Preparedness at Ft. McClellan, AL.
    Exercises are a critical element in preparing State and 
local public safety personnel to respond to incidents of 
domestic terrorism involving weapons of mass destruction (WMD). 
The Committee supports the work of the Center for Exercise 
Excellence at the Department of Energy's Nevada Test Site 
(NTS). NTS trains jurisdictions in the planning and conduct of 
exercises, tailored to the unique threats they face as 
determined by the Statewide Domestic Preparedness Strategic 
Plans. The Center represents a component of OSLDPS' overall 
training program by meeting special exercise needs as defined 
by the States themselves.
    Domestic Preparedness Equipment Grants.--A total of 
$175,000,000 is provided for equipment block grants to the 
States and District of Columbia to enable these jurisdictions 
to purchase specialized equipment required to respond to 
terrorist incidents involving chemical, biological, 
radiological, and explosive weapons. The availability of the 
necessary protective equipment, detection technology, 
decontamination equipment, and specialized communications 
equipment for the first response personnel in our cities and 
towns is a critical priority. Domestic Preparedness Equipment 
Grants will allow States and localities to acquire state-of-
the-art equipment as investments in technology development 
bring new and improved technologies to the market. With the 
guidance of OSLDPS, States are expected to plan strategically 
in order to meet their equipment needs, taking into account the 
necessity of the equipment but also their ability to maintain 
and operate it correctly and safely. As in the past, States are 
required to complete their Statewide Domestic Preparedness 
Strategic Plans before they are eligible for these grants. 
States receiving domestic preparedness equipment grant funds 
are expected to disperse those funds based on the comprehensive 
plans currently being developed. OSLDPS is directed to review 
the States' decisions regarding the disbursement of grant funds 
to ensure that communities with the greatest need receive 
priority.
    Equipment Standards.--Within funds available for equipment 
grants, $17,000,000 is recommended for OSLDPS to oversee the 
development of standards for equipment for responding to 
terrorist incidents involving weapons of mass destruction. This 
effort shall take place under the direction of the DAG-CT and 
should include equipment testing and certification. In 
developing these standards, OSLDPS shall work closely with the 
Dartmouth Institute for Security Technology Studies (ISTS) and 
the Oklahoma City National Memorial Institute for the 
Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT). The Committee recognizes the 
important role that ISTS and MIPT play in this critical area. 
OSLDPS is also directed to consult with first responders, 
manufacturers, the Interagency Board (IAB) for Equipment 
Standardization and Interoperability, the Technical Support 
Working Group, the National Institute of Justice, the National 
Institute of Standards and Technology, the Occupational Safety 
and Health Administration, and the National Institute for 
Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) as necessary.
    Of those funds available for Domestic Preparedness 
Equipment Grants, up to $5,000,000 shall be made available for 
the continued support of the Domestic Preparedness Equipment 
Technical Assistance Program--a partnership between OSLDPS and 
the Pine Bluff Arsenal. This program provides jurisdictions 
with training and technical assistance on the use, maintenance, 
repair, and calibration of equipment acquired under the 
Equipment Grant Program. Also of the funds available for the 
Domestic Preparedness Equipment Grants, $8,000,000 shall be 
made available to the States, Territories, and the District of 
Columbia to support their activities related to the 
implementation of the State Equipment Grants Program and to 
develop an annual update of the status of the plan 
implementation.
    The Committee believes that it is critical that the medical 
community be fully engaged in this nation's domestic 
preparedness efforts. Public health sector professionals do not 
typically receive training in the medical aspects of disaster 
management and medical incident command. These are two areas of 
major importance in dealing with an attack involving weapons of 
mass destruction, particularly biological. Efforts in this area 
have, until now, been largely pro-bono. The Committee therefore 
provides $2,000,000 for the Virtual Medical Campus which will 
provide education, training, and certification for medical 
professionals for disaster-related events and facilitate the 
coordination of Federal, State, and local planners and decision 
makers for disaster event management.
    State and Local Domestic Preparedness Exercise Grant 
Program.--Situational exercises play a critical role in our 
efforts to better prepare State and local jurisdictions and 
their emergency response agencies to respond to incidents of 
domestic terrorism. Such exercises provide participants an 
opportunity to test their training and response plans, 
integrate their response constraints, and to extract valuable 
lessons for future action. A total of $12,000,000 is provided 
to enable OSLDPS to provide grants to State and local 
jurisdictions for the planning and conduct of exercises to 
enhance their response capabilities and to test their response 
constructs. Grants will only be provided to States with an 
approved Statewide Strategic Domestic Preparedness Plan. 
Priority will be given to those jurisdictions identified by the 
States' plans as most in need of an exercise. Based on lessons 
learned from TOPOFF and the development of the Domestic 
Preparedness Strategic Plans and the integration of the Nunn-
Lugar-Domenici Domestic Preparedness Program, OSLDPS requires a 
more robust exercise program. OSLDPS must be able to plan and 
conduct a variety of exercise types, from tabletop to full 
scale exercises, to meet the unique requirements of State and 
local jurisdictions. As States complete their Domestic 
Preparedness Strategic Plans, they will expect OSLDPS to assist 
them in addressing the exercise needs identified by them. The 
Committee recommends a total of $8,000,000 for OSLDPS for 
enhanced exercise support. The purpose of these funds is to 
support the planning and conduct of exercises at the State and 
local level.
    TOPOFF II.--The Committee looks forward to TOPOFF II, 
scheduled to take place by July of 2002. The purpose of the 
exercise is to simulate the high pressure conditions under 
which top-level government officials would have to make 
decisions if a terrorist incident occurred on our soil. TOPOFF 
gives participants at all levels of government the opportunity 
to identify their weaknesses and demonstrate and refine their 
strengths. TOPOFF II will be particularly useful to the Co-
Coordinators for Combating Domestic Terrorism--the DAG-CT and 
the Deputy Director of the Federal Emergency Management 
Agency--in that it will allow them to work through a live-
action, national exercise. The Committee recommends $4,000,000 
for TOPOFF II.
    Annual Exercise Program.--Based on the highly successful 
TOPOFF exercises and on input from the State and local 
emergency response community, the Committee directs OSLDPS to 
establish an annual exercise program that will provide, in 
alternating years, a Federal, State and Local (FSL) regional 
exercise and a national-level TOPOFF exercise. The Committee 
recommends a total of $5,000,000 for this purpose. Of these 
funds, $2,000,000 is recommended to support the FSL regional 
exercise program and $3,000,000 for costs associated with the 
biennial TOPOFF exercise. The Committee recommends an 
additional $3,000,000 for OSLDPS for the continuation of the 
Improved Response Program (IRP) formerly under the Nunn-Lugar-
Domenici program. The IRP provides technical evaluations and 
exercises focused on meeting high priority responder needs.
    International Terrorism Exercise.--The Department of State 
has unique expertise in the area of combating international 
terrorism, deriving primarily from its responsibility for the 
safety of Americans abroad. The Committee directs OSLDPS to 
work closely with the Department of State to compare 
contingency plans for terrorist incidents. Further, the 
Committee directs the Department of Justice and Department of 
State to conduct a large-scale exercise on international soil 
by January of 2004. The Departments of Justice and State shall 
jointly prepare a plan for this international exercise, to be 
submitted to the Committees on Appropriations no later than May 
1, 2002. This plan should include a list of objectives to be 
accomplished, a description of potential obstacles, a 
description of sites under construction, a tentative schedule, 
and preliminary cost estimates.
    Other Training.--The Committee recommends a total of 
$35,000,000 for the OSLDPS to meet the ongoing training needs 
of State and local jurisdictions. Due to the completion of the 
transition of the Nunn-Lugar-Domenici Domestic Preparedness 
Program to the Department of Justice, OSLDPS requires enhanced 
training program capability. In the process of developing their 
Statewide Domestic Preparedness Strategic Plans, States have 
identified a number of new requirements and training gaps. 
Among these are WMD tactical training for State and local 
response teams, evidence collection and preservation, and 
advanced training for biological incidents. Funding provided 
under this heading will allow OSLDPS to develop and deliver 
these crucial training programs. Within funds available to 
OSLDPS for training, the Committee recommends $1,000,000 for 
the continuation of the State and Local Antiterrorism Training 
(SLATT) program. The purpose of SLATT is to ensure coordination 
of activities and to minimize the potential for confusion and 
conflicting training.
    Technical Assistance.--A total of $8,000,000 is recommended 
for OSLDPS to provide a continuing program of technical 
assistance to States, the District of Columbia, and local 
jurisdictions in order to enhance their capabilities to better 
plan for and respond to incidents of domestic terrorism. 
Specific priorities should include technical assistance to the 
States to refine their Statewide Domestic Preparedness 
Equipment Strategies and assist State and local jurisdictions 
in the planning and conduct of tailored local and regional 
exercises.
    Research and development.--The Committee is aware of the 
great need for sustained, creative, high-risk research, 
development, testing, and evaluation (RDT&E;) for equipment and 
concepts used in combating terrorism. The Committee directs 
those Federal entities involved in the RDT&E; of combating 
terrorism technologies to explore telephony technology as a 
means of providing early warning and facilitating evacuation in 
the event of a terrorist attack. The Committee directs that 
RDT&E; programs for combating terrorism currently administered 
by the National Institute for Justice be transferred to the 
DAG-CT. The Committee directs the DAG-CT to report to the 
Committees on Appropriations on the status of the Department's 
efforts to develop a research, development, testing, and 
evaluation (RDT&E;) system similar to the Department of Defense 
System, as proposed and funded in the fiscal year 2001 
Conference Report. In producing this report, the DAG-CT shall 
consult with the Oklahoma City National Memorial Institute for 
the Prevention of Terrorism (MIPT), the Dartmouth Institute for 
Security and Technology Studies (ISTS), the Technical Support 
Working Group (TSWG), and other entities responsible for 
research and development of technologies to combat terrorism. 
This new system will be applicable to all RDT&E; for combating 
terrorism and will provide consistency and compatibility to the 
separate RDT&E; systems used by the various research bodies. 
This report should be received by the Committees on 
Appropriations no later than December 30, 2001.
    Prepositioned equipment.--The Committee recognizes that the 
equipment needs of State and local jurisdiction are 
considerable, and that these can never be completely addressed. 
Equipment that is placed in strategic locations throughout the 
country can help provide coverage to jurisdictions that were 
not targeted for equipment grants in the States' comprehensive 
plans. This prepositioned equipment is standardized and 
configured into pods that are transportable by the National 
Guard. The pods are housed in secure National Guard facilities 
but are for the use of first responders only. The Committee 
recommends $8,000,000 for this effort.
    Web Site Pilot Project.--The Committee recognizes the 
enormous potential the world wide web holds for facilitating 
the domestic preparedness efforts of State and local first 
responders. The Committee believes the world wide web could be 
used more effectively for the sharing of information and best 
practices between the State and local jurisdictions and the 
Federal agencies that support them, as well as among first 
responders across the country. Each jurisdiction faces unique 
challenges and has unique equipment and training needs. The 
Committee believes that web technology will help OSLDPS tailor 
its assistance programs to the diverse and changing needs of 
its clients. The Committee therefore recommends $2,000,000 for 
OSLDPS for a pilot project to develop an interactive web site 
to serve and support this nation's State and local first 
responders.
    Management and administration.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $42,797,000 for the management and 
administration [M&A;] of the Office of Justice Programs. In 
addition, funding will be provided from transfers from the 
``Juvenile justice'' account and from the ``State and Local 
Assistance'' account for the administration of grants under 
these activities.

               State And Local Law Enforcement Assistance

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $2,842,660,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   2,017,726,000
Committee recommendation................................   2,089,990,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$2,089,990,000. This recommendation is $169,261,000 below the 
budget request. These funds provide assistance to State and 
local governments in their drug control and other law 
enforcement efforts as follows:

Office of Justice Programs--State and local law enforcement assistance

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation

Local law enforcement block grant.......................   $400,000,000 
    Boys and Girls Clubs................................    (80,000,000)
    Law Enforcement Technology..........................    (19,956,000)
Cooperative agreement program...........................     35,000,000 
Indian Country Prison Grants............................     35,191,000 
State Criminal Alien Assistance Program (SCAAP).........    265,000,000 
Indian tribal courts program............................      7,982,000 
Byrne grants:
    Discretionary.......................................     78,125,000 
    Formula.............................................    500,000,000 
Drug courts.............................................     50,000,000 
Juvenile accountability incentive block grant...........    249,450,000 
Violence Against Women Act programs.....................    390,565,000 
Substance abuse treatment for state prisoners...........     68,000,000 
Safe Return Program.....................................        898,000 
Law enforcement family support programs.................      1,497,000 
Senior citizens against marketing scams.................      1,995,000 
Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention..........................      1,298,000 
Alcohol and Crime Prevention in Indian Country..........      4,989,000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, State and local law enforcement assistance.  2,089,990,000 

    Local law enforcement block grant.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $400,000,000 to continue the local law 
enforcement block grant program which provides grants to 
localities to reduce crime and improve public safety. Of the 
amounts provided, $19,956,000 will be provided to NIJ to assist 
local units to identify, select, develop, modernize, and 
purchase new technologies for use by law enforcement. The 
recommendation for funding for the local law enforcement block 
grant continues the commitment to provide local governments 
with the resources and flexibility to address specific crime 
problems in their communities.
    Boys and Girls Clubs.--Within the amounts provided for the 
local law enforcement block grants, the Committee recommends 
$80,000,000 for the Boys and Girls Clubs. The Committee 
commends Boys and Girls Clubs of America for its effort to 
reach all children who are in need of support and affirmation.
    Indian Country Grants.--The recommendation provides 
$70,191,000 for Indian Country grants, which is equal to the 
budget request. Of this amount, $35,000,000 is for the 
Cooperative Agreement Program, and $35,191,000 for Indian 
Country Prison Construction. Within the amount for prison 
construction, the Committee directs that grants be provided for 
the following projects:
  --$4,200,000 for a grant for NANA 28 bed jail for Kotzebue, 
        Alaska;
  --$620,000 for the construction of a detention facility 
        within the Spirit Lake Nation;
  --$4,000,000 for a grant for construction of the Detention 
        Facility for the Lower Brule Sioux Tribe; and
  --$16,300,000 for the construction of the Mississippi Band of 
        Choctaw Indians Detention Facility.
    State Criminal Alien Assistance Program.--The 
recommendation provides $265,000,000 for the State Criminal 
Alien Assistance Program [SCAAP] for the reimbursement to 
States for the costs of incarceration of criminal aliens. The 
Committee will also entertain a reprogramming request from the 
Department on this important issue addressing funding or 
administration requirements.
    Indian Tribal Courts Program.--The Committee recommendation 
provides $7,982,000 to assist tribal governments in the 
development, enhancement, and continuing operation of tribal 
judicial systems by providing resources for the necessary tools 
to sustain safer and more peaceful communities.
    Edward Byrne Grants to States.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $578,125,000 for the Edward Byrne 
Memorial State and Local Law Enforcement Assistance Program, of 
which $78,125,000 is for discretionary grants and is 
$500,000,000 for formula grants.
    Within the amount provided for formula grants, the 
Committee expects the Bureau of Justice Assistance [BJA] to 
provide:
  --$15,000,000 for Project HomeSafe for safety packets which 
        include a gun locking device and information on how to 
        handle and store guns safely. These safety packets are 
        distributed by the foundation at no charge to any 
        municipality that adopts the program. This year the 
        program will supply nearly 500,000 gunlocks to cities 
        and States around the country. The committee 
        recommendation shall be used to supplement current 
        funding and allow the foundation to provide over 
        8,000,000 gun locks to municipalities in fiscal year 
        2001. The Committee is very concerned about incidents 
        of children gaining access to a handgun, rifle, or 
        shotgun in the home and either harming themselves or 
        someone else. The Committee is aware that at least 80 
        percent of new guns sold in the United States are 
        equipped with gunlocks, however, there are millions of 
        guns already on the streets that are not so equipped 
        and a danger to children. The Committee encourages 
        municipalities to take advantage of this initiative.
    Within the amount provided for BJA discretionary grants, 
the Committee expects the Bureau of Justice Assistance to 
provide:
  --$5,000,000 for the National Crime Prevention Council to 
        continue and expand the National Citizens Crime 
        Prevention Campaign [McGruff];
  --$4,500,000 for the Executive Office of U.S. Attorneys to 
        support the National District Attorneys Association's 
        participation in legal education training at the 
        National Advocacy Center;
  --$2,000,000 for continued support for the expansion of 
        Search Group, Inc. and the National Technical 
        Assistance and Training Program to assist States, such 
        as West Virginia, to accelerate the automation of 
        fingerprint identification processes;
  --$3,500,000 for the Drug Abuse Resistance Education [DARE 
        AMERICA] program. The Committee is concerned that DARE 
        programs effectiveness has been called into question. 
        The Committee encourages DARE to continue the 
        restructuring effort currently underway and to report 
        to the Committee on its progress;
  --$400,000 for the Indianapolis Comprehensive Domestic 
        Violence Response Program;
  --$200,000 for a grant to the Baker County, Oregon Federal 
        Law Enforcement Training Center;
  --$12,700,000 for the 2002 Winter Olympics Games Public 
        Safety Command;
  --$500,000 for the Solano County and Napa County, CA Regional 
        Law Enforcement authority for equipment;
  --$1,300,000 for the California Rural Crime Prevention and 
        Prosecution;
  --$600,000 for the Atlanta, Georgia Homicide Reduction 
        Initiative;
  --$1,000,000 for Alfred University's Coordinating County 
        Services for Families and Youth;
  --$6,000,000 for a grant to the National Center for Justice 
        and the Rule of Law at the University of Mississippi 
        School of Law;
  --$1,500,000 to the Springfield, Missouri Police and Fire 
        Training Center;
  --$350,000 for Turtle Mountain Community College's Department 
        of Justice for ``Project Peacemaker'';
  --$3,000,000 for a grant to the Clearwater, Idaho EDA for the 
        Lewis and Clark Bicentennial Bi-State Public Safety 
        Project;
  --$550,000 for a grant to the Albuquerque, NM DWI Resource 
        Center to fund drunk driving awareness and prevention 
        programs;
  --$950,000 for the Chicago Project for Violence Prevention;
  --$2,000,000 to fund Kristen's Act, which seeks to create a 
        national clearinghouse of missing adults;
  --$1,000,000 to the Nevada National Judicial College;
  --$2,000,000 for the Tools for Tolerance Program;
  --$675,000 for a grant to the University of Northern Iowa for 
        the Domestic Violence Services for Women project;
  ---$5,000,000 to the Eisenhower Foundation for the Youth Safe 
        Haven program;
  --$500,000 for the Littleton Area Learning Center;
  --$300,000 for a grant to Boyle-Mercer County for a Court 
        Appointed Special Advocate;
  --$250,000 for a grant for the Regional Prevention Center in 
        Maysville, Kentucky;
  --$1,500,000 to the New Hampshire Department of Safety to 
        Operation Streetsweeper;
  --$400,000 for the Carroll County District Court's Alternate 
        Sentencing Program in New Hampshire;
  --$1,500,000 for the Center for Task Force Training;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to the University of Nebraska, 
        Department of Criminal Justice for a police 
        professionalism initiative;
  --$350,000 for a grant to the Southwest Arkansas Domestic 
        Violence Center for domestic violence prevention 
        activities to fund programmatic and equipment costs;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to the Southwest Texas State 
        University Law Enforcement Training Center for 
        equipment and program support;
  --$500,000 for a grant to the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics 
        for the necessary equipment to establish a Mobile 
        Command Post;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to the Arizona Criminal Justice 
        Commission;
  --$500,000 to the Iowa Department of Public Health to 
        institute a pilot program to rehabilitate nonviolent 
        drug offenders;
  --$560,000 for a grant to the Ninth West Judicial District in 
        Arkansas for video conference equipment for remote 
        witness testimony;
  --$400,000 for a grant to the National Association of Town 
        Watch's National Night Out crime prevention program;
  --$200,000 for a grant to the Cranston, Rhode Island Police 
        Department's Community Police Division for community 
        policing initiatives;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to Ridge House Treatment Facility in 
        Reno, Nevada to house low intensity, non-sex offender, 
        non violent convicts;
  --$110,000 for a grant to fund a State-wide DARE coordinator 
        in Alaska;
  --$500,000 for a grant to the National Center for Rural Law 
        Enforcement in Little Rock, Arkansas;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant for the Alaska Native Justice Center 
        Restorative Justice programs;
  --$1,100,000 for a grant for rural alcohol interdiction, 
        investigations, and prosecutions in the State of 
        Alaska;
  --$250,000 for a grant to the Partners for Downtown Progress 
        program in Alaska;
  --$2,000,000 for a grant to the Achievable Dream program, in 
        Newport News, Virginia;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to Jefferson County, Alabama for an 
        emergency system;
  --$100,000 for a grant to the Native American Community Board 
        in Lake Andes, South Dakota for programming and 
        equipment related to the Domestic Violence Shelter and 
        Community Prevention Program;
  --$150,000 for a grant to fund Project Safe in Crow Creek, 
        South Dakota;
  --$5,000,000 for grants to States, State courts, local 
        courts, units of local governments, and tribal 
        governments to establish a mental health court 
        initiative to address the growing number of mentally 
        ill persons in jails and prisons;
  --$230,000 for the MUSC Innovative Alternatives for Women 
        program; and
  --$500,000 for a grant to Kansas City, Missouri for the 
        continuation of the Community Security Initiative;
  --$500,000 for a grant to STEP II for the Washoe County 
        Rehabilitation Program.
    Drug courts.--The Committee recommends $50,000,000 for drug 
courts. The Committee notes that localities can also access 
funding for drug courts from the Local Law Enforcement Block 
Grant and Juvenile Accountability Block Grant.
    Juvenile accountability incentive block grant.--The 
Committee recommends $249,450,000 for the Juvenile 
Accountability Incentive Block Grant Program to address the 
growing problem of juvenile crime by encouraging 
accountability-based reforms at the State and local level.
    Violence Against Women Act programs.--The Committee 
recommends $390,565,000 for grants to support the Violence 
Against Women Act. Grants provided under this recommendation 
are for the following programs:

               Violence Against Women Act programs

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation

General formula grants..................................   $184,937,000 
    National Institute of Justice.......................     (5,200,000)
    OJJDP-Safe Start Program............................    (10,000,000)
    BJS Study of domestic violence case processing......     (1,000,000)
Grants to encourage arrest policies.....................     64,925,000 
Rural domestic violence.................................     39,945,000 
Legal Assistance Program................................     40,000,000 
Campus Violence Program.................................     10,000,000 
Elder Abuse, Neglect, and Exploitation..................      5,000,000 
Safe Haven Program......................................     15,000,000 
Education and Training to Assist Disabled Female Victims      7,500,000 
Stalker Database Expansion..............................      3,000,000 
Training programs.......................................      4,989,000 
Victims of child abuse programs:
    Court appointed special advocates (CASA)............     11,975,000 
    Training for judicial personnel.....................      2,296,000 
    Grants for televised testimony......................        998,000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, VAWA programs..............................    390,565,000 

    The fiscal year 2002 funding will be used to develop and 
implement effective arrest and prosecution policies to prevent, 
identify, and respond to violent crimes against women, 
strengthen programs addressing stalking, and provide much 
needed victims services. This includes specialized domestic 
violence court advocates who obtain protection orders. In 
addition, programs should be strengthened to encourage 
reporting of domestic violence by providing assurances that law 
enforcement and attorney support systems would be available. 
This funding is to be distributed to States to significantly 
enhance the availability of services, prosecutors, and law-
enforcement officials to women and children who are subjected 
to domestic violence. The Committee notes that Alaska has the 
highest rate of domestic violence in the nation. As many as 100 
percent of Native women in some State prisons and 80 percent 
Statewide report that they have been raped, beaten, or 
physically or sexually abused. The Committee directs the 
Department to work with the State of Alaska, the Alaska Native 
community, and non-profit organizations involved in prevention 
and treatment of domestic violence to develop a comprehensive 
Statewide plan utilizing best practices in combating this 
epidemic, particularly in rural Native villages. A plan 
including recommendations for further action among various 
Federal agencies on an interdisciplinary basis should be 
submitted to the Committee by May 1, 2002.
    Substance abuse treatment for State prisoners.--The 
Committee recommends $68,000,000, for the Residential Substance 
Abuse Treatment Program for State Prisoners [RSAT]. The RSAT 
Program provides financial and technical assistance to assist 
State and local governments in developing and implementing 
residential treatment programs within State and local 
correctional and detention facilities in which inmates are 
incarcerated for a period of time sufficient to permit 
substance abuse treatment. Consistent with the authorizing 
statute, States must agree to require drug testing of 
individuals enrolled in the treatment program and give 
preference to projects that assist in the placement of program 
participants with community-based aftercare services, such as 
parole supervision, education and job training, and halfway 
houses. These aftercare programs cannot be funded with RSAT 
grant dollars.
    Safe Return Program.--The Committee recommends $898,000 to 
continue and expand training of law enforcement and other 
emergency response personnel to locate missing Alzheimer 
patients.
    Law enforcement family support programs.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $1,497,000 for this program to assist 
Federal, State, and local law enforcement agencies in 
developing and implementing policies and programs to reduce 
stress and provide appropriate support services for law 
enforcement officers and their families.
    Senior citizens against marketing scams.--The 
recommendation provides $1,995,000 for this program to assist 
law enforcement in preventing and stopping marketing scams 
against the elderly. The Committee requests that some program 
sessions be held at the National Advocacy Center. Also, the 
Committee directs that this effort be coordinated with the 
Federal Trade Commission.
    Alcohol and Crime Prevention in Indian Country.--The 
recommendation provides $4,989,000 for demonstration grants to 
address alcohol and crime prevention in Indian Country.
    Motor Vehicle Theft Prevention.--The recommendation 
provides $1,298,000 for grants to combat motor vehicle theft.

                         Weed and Seed Program

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $33,925,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      58,925,000
Committee recommendation................................      58,925,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $58,925,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    The Committee also recommends bill language, similar to 
that included in previous fiscal years, making funds available 
for grants or agreements with State agencies or to reimburse 
Federal agencies in order to execute the weed and seed 
strategy, and also allows for the use of other Department of 
Justice funds to support the Weed and Seed Program.
    The Committee's recommendation includes $3,675,000 for 21 
new Weed and Seed sites; $2,550,000 to support gun law 
enforcement, including the placement of gun-shot detection 
devices within Weed and Seed sites; $1,275,000 for anti-drug 
activities; $2,000,000 to enhance data collection and 
performance assessments; and $15,500,000 to replace funding 
received in prior years from the Assets Forfeiture Fund.

                  Community Oriented Policing Services

                    Violent Crime Reduction Programs

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $1,030,054,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     855,109,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,019,874,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$1,019,874,000. The recommendations is $164,765,000 above the 
budget request.
    The funds provided by the Committee for assistance to State 
and local law enforcement agencies are as follows:
    Police Hiring Initiatives.--The Committee recommends 
$447,606,000 for police hiring initiatives as follows: 
$180,000,000 for school resource officers; $190,291,000 from 
direct appropriations for the COPS hiring program; $46,000,000 
from prior year balances to be used for UHP; and $31,315,000 
for Indian Country.
    Safe Schools Initiative (SSI).--The Committee continues to 
be concerned about the level of violence in our children's 
schools. To address this issue, $234,851,000 is provided for 
the continuation of the Safe Schools Initiative (SSI), 
including funds for technology development, prevention, 
community planning, and school safety officers. Within this 
total, $180,000,000 is from the COPS hiring program to provide 
school resource officers who will work in partnership with 
schools and other community-based entities to develop programs 
to improve the safety of elementary and secondary school 
children and educators in and around schools; $15,000,000 is 
from the Juvenile Justice At-Risk Children's Program and 
$22,851,000 is from the COPS program ($37,500,000 total) for 
programs aimed at preventing violence in schools through 
partnerships with schools and community-based organizations; 
$17,000,000 is provided from the Crime Identification 
Technology Program to the NIJ to develop technologies to 
improve school safety.
    Indian Country.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$31,315,000 to be used to improve law enforcement capabilities 
on Indian lands and native villages, both for hiring uniformed 
officers, including village public safety officers, and for the 
purchase of equipment and training for new and existing 
officers.
    Management and Administration.--The Committee 
recommendation includes a provision that provides that not to 
exceed $32,812,000 shall be expended for management and 
administration of the program.
    Non-Hiring Initiatives.--The Committee is aware that the 
COPS program reached its goal of funding 100,000 officers in 
May of 1999. Having reached its original goal, the Committee 
wants to ensure there is adequate infrastructure for the new 
police officers, similar to the focus that has been provided 
Federal law enforcement. The Committee believes this will 
enable police officers to work more efficiently, equipped with 
the protection, tools, and technology they need: to address 
crime in and around schools, to provide law enforcement 
technology for local law enforcement, to combat the emergence 
of methamphetamine in new areas and provide policing of `hot 
spots' of drug market activity, and to provide bullet proof 
vests for local law enforcement officers and correctional 
officers. Specifically, the Committee directs the program to 
use $493,643,000 to fund initiatives that will result in more 
effective policing. The Committee believes that these funds 
should be used to address these critical law enforcement 
requirements and directs the program to continue the following 
non-hiring grant programs:
    1. COPS Technology Program.--The Committee provides 
$155,467,000 to be used for continued development of 
technologies and automated systems to assist State and local 
law enforcement agencies in investigating, responding to, and 
preventing crime. In particular, there is recognition of the 
importance of the sharing of criminal information and 
intelligence between State and local law enforcement to address 
multi-jurisdictional crimes.
    The Committee includes the expectation that the COPS office 
will award grants for the following technology proposals:
  --$5,000,000 to the National Center for Missing and Exploited 
        Children to continue the program created in fiscal year 
        2000 that provides targeted technology to police 
        departments for the specific purpose of child 
        victimization prevention and response. The technology 
        available to our law enforcement to help them find 
        missing children is not at the level it needs to be. 
        Most police departments across the United States do not 
        have personal computers, modems, and scanners. The 
        departments that do, rarely have them in areas focusing 
        on crimes against children;
  --$7,202,000 for not more than 4 regional computer forensic 
        labs;
  --$350,000 for equipment to connect Interpol to the National 
        Law Enforcement Telecommunications System [NLETS];
  --$4,000,000 for not more than 4 regional mitochondrial DNA 
        forensic labs;
  --$250,000 for Criminal Intelligence Unit in Iberia Parish, 
        Louisiana;
  --Up to $3,000,000 for the acquisition or lease and 
        installation of dashboard mounted cameras for State and 
        local law enforcement on patrol. One camera may be used 
        in each vehicle which is used primarily for patrols. 
        These cameras are only to be used by State and local 
        law enforcement on patrol;
  --$5,000,000 for the Utah Communications Agency Network 
        (UCAN) for enhancements and upgrades of security and 
        communications infrastructure to assist with law 
        enforcement needs arising from the 2002 Winter 
        Olympics;
  --$1,600,000 for the Montana Highway Patrol for computer 
        upgrades;
  --$90,000 for the Billings, Montana Police Department for a 
        firearms training system;
  --$500,000 for the South Bend, Indiana Police Department to 
        fund surveillance equipment in patrol cars;
  --$500,000 for a grant to Portland, Oregon Police Department 
        for its Square Car Unit Identification [SQUID] program;
  --$250,000 for technology equipment to create a traffic 
        enforcement unit in the Muncie, Indiana Police 
        Department;
  --$1,000,000 for the Cache Valley, Utah Multi-jurisdictional 
        800 Megahertz Project;
  --$3,000,000 for an Integrated Justice Information System in 
        Ventura County, California;
  --$3,000,000 for Law Enforcement Online (LEO);
  --$500,000 for the Louisiana Interstate 10 Technology Support 
        Project;
  --$1,600,000 for the Montana Highway Patrol Computer Aided 
        Dispatch System;
  --$3,000,000 for a grant to the State of South Dakota for the 
        development of a statewide communications system;
  --$1,200,000 for teleconferencing equipment for the Montana 
        Supreme Court;
  --$950,000 for a criminal justice records management system 
        for the Missoula, Montana Sheriff's Department;
  --$310,000 to fund technology enhancements for the Douglas 
        County, Colorado Sheriff's Office;
  --$1,500,000 for the City of Colorado Springs for its CMS and 
        PASS systems;
  --$2,300,000 for the replacement of the Cowlitz County, 
        Washington Emergency Radio Response System;
  --$3,000,000 for the Washington State Methamphetamine Joint 
        Enforcement Initiative;
  --$7,000,000 for the Missouri State Highway Patrol 
        Integration Technology Program;
  --$7,500,000 for the Harrison County Public Safety Automated 
        Systems project;
  --$500,000 for Simpson County, Mississippi's public safety 
        automated technologies system;
  --$725,000 for the City of Jackson Mississippi's public 
        safety automated technologies system;
  --$1,000,000 for the Jersey City Police Department's Crime 
        Identification System to upgrade communications 
        systems;
  --$975,000 for the Berkeley Township Police Department in New 
        Jersey to upgrade communications technology;
  --$7,200,000 for the Southwest Border Anti-Drug Information 
        System of which $3,600,000 is to go to the State of 
        Idaho;
  --$750,000 to fund the Bonner Sheriff's Department's 
        Emergency Communications Center;
  --$4,700,000 to fund Minnesota's Criminal Justice Enterprise 
        Architecture;
  --$1,500,000 for the Ohio Computer Crime Unit to upgrade 
        technology;
  --$800,000 to the National Center for Victims of Crime 
        INFOLINK Program;
  --$500,000 for a grant to Mountain Village to equip a new 
        communications center to improve emergency dispatch 
        services to the region;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to Montrose Police Department for 
        the purchase of a trunked communications system;
  --$300,000 to Wake County, North Carolina to fund the Wake 
        County Interconnect module; to improve law enforcement 
        and emergency management communications within the 
        county;
  --$3,000,000 to fund the Criminal Justice Information System 
        (CJIS);
  --$350,000 for the Macon County, Illinois Sheriff's 
        Department for law enforcement technologies and to 
        modernize equipment;
  --$1,000,000 for communications upgrades for Portsmouth, New 
        Hampshire Police Department;
  --$3,300,000 for the South Carolina State Law Enforcement 
        Secure Communications Upgrade;
  --$185,000 to fund computer and technology upgrades for the 
        Charleston, South Carolina Sheriff's Department;
  --$150,000 for Emergency 911 System Enhancements for the 
        Hawaii County Police and Fire Department;
  --$350,000 for a grant to the Colchester and South Burlington 
        Police Departments to fund computer upgrades;
  --$1,800,000 for a grant to the Massachusetts Facial 
        Recognition Project;
  --$600,000 for a grant to the New Bedford Police Department 
        for communication upgrades to improve the efficiency 
        and effectiveness of local police efforts;
  --$4,375,000 for a grant to Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for 
        communications infrastructure equipment;
  --$1,500,000 for a grant to the Vermont Department of Public 
        Safety for mobile communications technology upgrades;
  --$2,000,000 for a grant to the Wayne County, Michigan, Wayne 
        Area Justice Information System [WAJIS] for integrated 
        communications systems;
  --$161,000 for a grant to the Muncie, Indiana Police 
        Departments to acquire of mobile data terminals for its 
        police vehicles;
  --$2,000,000 for a grant to the City of Baltimore, Maryland 
        to fund enhanced communications technology;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to the Washington Association of 
        Sheriffs and Police Chiefs to fund the Washington State 
        Booking, Reporting, and Victim Notification System;
  --$3,500,000 for a grant to the Omaha Police Department and 
        the Douglas County Sheriff's Office to fund technology 
        for improved communications capabilities;
  --$1,500,000 for a grant to Clark County, Nevada to upgrade 
        and replace the 911 and Emergency Response System in 
        Clark County;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to the Overland Park Police 
        Department in Kansas for technology enhancements;
  --$275,000 for a grant to the Beaver and Butler County 
        Regional Police Network for communications technology 
        enhancements;
  --$1,500,000 for a grant to Pennsylvania's Allegheny County 
        Regional Police Network for communications technology 
        enhancements;
  --$600,000 for a grant to Columbia, Oregon's Emergency 
        Response Communications Systems for technology 
        enhancements;
  --$500,000 for laptop computers for the Madison Police 
        Department;
  --$125,000 for a grant for the Green Bay Police GangNet 
        Program;
  --$320,000 for a grant to the Nashua Police Department for 
        technology and equipment for training exercises;
  --$550,000 for a grant to Henderson City--County Police 
        Departments for Mobile Data Terminals;
  --$2,000,000 for a grant to the Maine State Police 
        Communications Systems for technology enhancements to 
        improve its communications infrastructure;
  --$1,600,000 for a grant to the Wasilla Regional Dispatch 
        Center in Alaska for technology and communications 
        upgrades;
  --$2,500,000 for a grant to the Alaska Department of Public 
        Safety for technology and communications upgrades;
  --$37,000 for a grant to the Napoleon, Ohio Police Department 
        for technology upgrades;
  --$5,500,000 for the Consolidated Advanced Technologies for 
        Law Enforcement to improve communications between 
        police cruisers;
  --$5,000,000 for the South Carolina Coastal Plain Police 
        Initiative;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to the Boston School Safety 
        Initiative to purchase equipment and technology to 
        reduce school violence;
  --$1,500,000 for a grant to Project Hoosier SAFE T;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to Jefferson County, AL for the 
        acquisition of equipment to improve its communications 
        technology;
  --$3,000,000 for a grant to the Fresno Police Department for 
        technology upgrades;
  --$850,000 for a grant to the South Carolina State Law 
        Enforcement Division for a High Technology Crime 
        Investigative Unit;
  --$130,000 for Red River, New Mexico to improve 911 
        capabilities;
  --$2,000,000 for a grant to the Virginia State Police in-car 
        video systems and racial profiling training; and
  --$600,000 for a grant to fund the St. Louis Regional Justice 
        Information Service.
    2. Crime Identification Technology Program [CITA].--The 
Committee recommends $150,404,000 for the CITA program, to be 
used and distributed pursuant to the Crime Identification 
Technology Act of 1998, Public Law 105-251. Under that Act, 
eligible uses of the funds are (1) upgrading criminal history 
and criminal justice record systems; (2) improvement of 
criminal justice identification, including fingerprint-based 
systems; (3) promoting compatibility and integration of 
national, State, and local systems for criminal justice 
purposes, firearms eligibility determinations, identification 
of sexual offenders, identification of domestic violence 
offenders, and background checks for other authorized purposes; 
(4) capture of information for statistical and research 
purposes; (5) developing multi-jurisdictional, multi-agency 
communications systems; and (6) improvement of capabilities of 
forensic sciences, including DNA. Within the amounts provided, 
the Office of Justice Programs is directed to provide grants to 
the following:
  --$4,000,000 to the State Police of NH, for a VHF trunked 
        digital radio system;
  --$4,000,000 for the GCU Coalition Project for criminal 
        justice data gathering and analysis;
  --$3,000,000 for the Juvenile Justice Information System in 
        Missouri;
  --$1,600,000 for the University of Southern Mississippi to 
        fund crime identification technology training;
  --$1,000,000 for the Center for Criminal Justice Technology;
  --$762,000 for a grant to the State of Alaska to complete the 
        final phase of the criminal justice management 
        information system replacement;
  --$2,000,000 for a grant to the State of Alaska for the 
        training of Village Public Safety Officers and small 
        village police officers, and acquisition of emergency 
        response equipment for rural communities;
  --$2,500,000 for a grant to the Alaska Department of Public 
        Safety for the public safety information network to 
        integrate Federal, State, and local criminal records 
        along with social service and other records. The 
        Committee expects the system design to include the 
        capability to provide background checks on potential 
        child care workers for child care providers and 
        families with the permission of the job applicant. The 
        State should consult with the National Instant Check 
        System for technical expertise;
  --$1,100,000 for Critical Incidence Response Technologies in 
        South Carolina;
  --$4,000,000 to fund the Criminal Justice Communications 
        Upgrade in South Carolina;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to the Miami-Dade County Juvenile 
        Assessment Center Demonstration Project;
  --$300,000 for a grant to the Xenia Police Department to 
        investigate child sexual exploitation on the Internet;
  --$400,000 for a grant to Indiana University/Purdue 
        University at Indianapolis to expand the use and 
        deployment of imaging systems to State and local law 
        enforcement agencies;
  --$300,000 for a grant to the Fifth Judicial Circuit of South 
        Dakota to establish a coordinated juvenile arrest 
        tracking system; and
  --$3,000,000 for a grant to the Alabama Department of Public 
        Safety to implement its SmartCOP initiative.
    Safe Schools Technology.--Within the amounts available for 
crime identification technology, the Committee recommends 
$17,000,000 for Safe Schools technology to continue funding 
NIJ's development of new, more effective safety technologies 
such as less obtrusive weapons detection and surveillance 
equipment and information systems that provide communities 
quick access to information they need to identify potentially 
violent youth.
    Upgrade Criminal History Records (Brady Act).--Within the 
amounts available for crime identification technology, the 
Committee recommends $35,000,000, for States to upgrade 
criminal history records so that these records can interface 
with other data bases holding information on other categories 
of individuals who are prohibited from purchasing firearms 
under Federal or State statute. Additionally, the national 
sexual offender registry [NSOR] component of the Criminal 
History Records Upgrade Program has two principal objectives. 
The registry assists States in developing complete and accurate 
in-State registries. It will also assist States in sharing 
their registry information with the FBI system which identifies 
those offenders for whom special law enforcement interest has 
been noted.
    DNA Backlog Grants/Crime Laboratory Improvement Program 
(CLIP).--Within the amounts available for crime identification 
technology, the Committee recommendation includes $70,000,000 
for CLIP/DNA Program to support State and local units of 
government crime laboratories to develop or improve the 
capability to analyze DNA in a forensic laboratory, as well as 
other general forensic science capabilities. Eliminating the 
DNA convicted offender backlog should be the program's first 
priority. This funding is provided to foster cooperation and 
mutual assistance among forensic DNA laboratories within 
States. Funds should be used for efforts between Sates that are 
seeking to match and exchange DNA identification records for 
law enforcement purposes using the FBI's combined DNA index 
system [CODIS]. Within the amounts provided under CITA, it is 
expected that the Office of Justice Programs will provide 
grants to the following programs:
  --$2,500,000 for the Northeast Regional Forensic Institute;
  --$1,000,000 for the Mississippi Crime Lab to upgrade the 
        lab's capability to analyze DNA in a forensic 
        laboratory;
  --$750,000 to the Northeastern Illinois Public Safety 
        Training Academy for crime lab enhancements;
  --$2,000,000 for the National Forensic Science Institute;
  --$1,000,000 for upgrades to the Iowa Forensic Laboratory;
  --$1,000,000 for the National Academy for Forensic Computing 
        in Central Piedmont, North Carolina;
  --$60,000 to address the DNA backlog in the Arkansas Crime 
        Laboratory;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to the Alabama Department of 
        Forensic Sciences;
  --$733,000 for a grant to Virginia's Electronic Fingerprint 
        Archive System;
  --$4,000,000 to the West Virginia University Forensic 
        Identification Program; and
  --$3,000,000 the South Carolina Law Enforcement Division's 
        Computer Forensic Laboratory.
    3. COPS Methamphetamine/Drug ``Hot Spots'' Program.--The 
Committee directs $48,393,000 to be used for State and local 
law enforcement programs to combat methamphetamine production, 
distribution, and use, and to reimburse the Drug Enforcement 
Administration for assistance to State and local law 
enforcement for proper removal and disposal of hazardous 
materials at clandestine methamphetamine labs. The funding may 
also be used for policing initiatives in ``hot spots'' of drug 
market activity. Within the amounts provided for the 
Methamphetamine/Drug Hot Spots Program, the Committee expects 
grants to be made for the following programs:
  --$20,000,000 for the Drug Enforcement Administration to 
        cover the costs associated with the cleanup and 
        disposal of clandestine methamphetamine laboratories;
  --$3,000,000 for the Washington Methamphetamine Joint 
        Initiative for a comprehensive program to address 
        methamphetamine enforcement, treatment, and cleanup 
        efforts;
  --$250,000 for the Jackson County, Mississippi Sheriff's 
        Department to combat methamphetamines;
  --$1,000,000 for the Mississippi Bureau of Narcotics to 
        combat methamphetamine and to train officers on the 
        proper recognition, collection, removal, and 
        destruction of methamphetamine;
  --$200,000 for the North Dakota Rural Methamphetamine 
        Education Demonstration Project;
  --$750,000 for the Methamphetamine Awareness and Prevention 
        Project of South Dakota to expand prevention efforts to 
        include Native American reservations;
  --$1,000,000 for the Illinois State Police to combat 
        methamphetamine and to train officers in those types of 
        investigations;
  --$200,000 for the Bay County, Florida's methamphetamine 
        program which funds the hiring of additional officers 
        to combat Bay County's growing methamphetamine problem;
  --$1,000,000 for the Iowa Methamphetamine Initiative;
  --$250,000 for the Iowa Tanks-A-Lock Project;
  --$1,000,000 for the Arkansas Methamphetamine/Drug Hot Spots 
        Initiative, of which $155,000 shall be used to retain 
        three chemists at the Arkansas Crime Lab;
  --$1,000,000 for the Oklahoma City Police Department for a 
        Methamphetamine/Drug Hot Spots Initiative;
  --$500,000 for the Wisconsin Ecstacy Awareness Program;
  --$1,000,000 for the Wisconsin Methamphetamine Law 
        Enforcement Initiative;
  --$1,000,000 for the Arizona Methamphetamine Initiative for 
        personnel, training, and equipment;
  --$1,000,000 for the Vermont State Multi Jurisdictional Drug 
        Task Force;
  --$300,000 for methamphetamine training for rural law 
        enforcement officers in Arkansas;
  --$1,000,000 for the Indiana State Police for the 
        continuation of their anti-methamphetamine operations;
  --$3,000,000 for the Methamphetamine Program for Washington 
        State;
  --$385,000 for Marion County, Oregon for the purchase of 
        anti-methamphetamine surveillance equipment for the 
        Methamphetamine Lab Prevention Program;
  --$1,000,000 for the Kansas Bureau of Investigation to combat 
        methamphetamines;
  --$3,000,000 for the Montana Methamphetamine Initiative;
  --$1,000,000 for the Flathead Valley, Montana Methamphetamine 
        Initiative;
  --$1,000,000 for the Indiana State Police to combat 
        methamphetamines;
  --$1,500,000 for the Central Utah Methamphetamine Program;
  --$2,000,000 for the Midwest Methamphetamine Initiative; and
  --$715,000 for the Oklahoma Bureau of Narcotics.
    4. COPS Safe Schools Initiative (SSI)/School Prevention 
Initiatives.--The Committee recommends $22,851,000 be used to 
provide grants to policing agencies and schools to provide 
resources for programs aimed at preventing violence in public 
schools, and to support the assignment of officers to work in 
collaboration with schools and community-based organizations to 
address crime and disorder problems, gangs, and drug 
activities. Within the amounts provided for the Safe Schools 
Initiative, the Committee expects the COPS office to award 
grants for the following programs:
  --$3,000,000 for training by the National Center for Missing 
        and Exploited Children for law enforcement officers 
        selected to be part of the Safe Schools Initiative;
  --$1,300,000 for the Promoting Responsible Behavior and 
        Preventing Violence Program in Montana;
  --$2,000,000 for the New Mexico School Security Technology 
        and Resource Center;
  --$300,000 for the Secure School Program in New Mexico;
  --$1,000,000 for the Safe Schools Initiative in Macon, 
        Georgia;
  --$200,000 for the Youth Watch Initiative in Jackson, 
        Mississippi;
  --$250,000 to fund Project Success in Danville, Illinois;
  --$100,000 for a grant to Watch D.O.G.S. Across America in 
        Springdale, Arkansas to enhance school safety;
  --$3,000,000 for the Safe School Education and Community 
        Awareness Program;
  --$1,701,000 for the School Threat Assessment and Response 
        Team;
  --$3,000,000 for the School Violence Resource Center in 
        Little Rock, Arkansas;
  --$500,000 for a grant to fund the Alaska Community in 
        Schools Mentoring program;
  --$5,000,000 for a grant to the Foundation of School Safety 
        in South Dakota to support the implementation of a 
        school safety initiative aimed at reducing school 
        violence; and
  --$1,500,000 for the Youth Advocates Program.
    5. Bullet-proof Vests Grant Program.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $25,444,000 to continue this program 
for formula grants to States, local governments, and Indian 
tribes to be used for the purchase of armored vests for law 
enforcement officers in the jurisdiction of the grantee.
    6. Police Corps.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$30,000,000 to continue advanced police education and training 
in the Police Corps Program.
    Prosecution Assistance Programs.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $50,000,000 for the Southwest Border 
Prosecutors Initiative, as well as $49,780,000 for the Gun 
Violence Reduction Program.
    Community Crime Prevention Programs.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $16,963,000 for the Police Integrity 
Program, $14,934,000 for an offender re-entry program, and 
$14,967,000 for the Safe Schools Initiative.
    Training and Technical Assistance.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $20,662,000 for training and technical 
assistance.

                       Juvenile Justice Programs

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $298,938,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     297,940,000
Committee recommendation................................     328,507,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $328,507,000. 
The recommendation is $25,015,000 above the budget request.
    Juvenile justice and delinquency prevention.--The Committee 
recommendation includes a total of $320,026,000 for 
administrative expenses and grants to States and localities for 
projects in the areas of education, research, prevention, and 
rehabilitation including:
    1. $6,847,000 for the Office of Juvenile Justice and 
Delinquency Prevention [OJJDP] (Part A).
    2. $88,804,000 for formula grants for assistance to State 
and local programs (Part B).
    3. $55,691,000 for discretionary grants for national 
programs and special emphasis programs (Part C).
    Within the amounts provided for Part C discretionary grants 
and all of the other funds provided under Juvenile Justice 
programs, the Committee directs OJJDP to provide the following 
grants:
  --$3,000,000 for Parents Anonymous, Inc., to develop 
        partnerships with local communities to build and 
        support strong, safe families and to help break the 
        cycle of abuse and delinquency;
  --$1,500,000 for the Achievable Dream Program in Newport 
        News, Virginia;
  --$500,000 for the Jefferson County Youth Service System;
  --$850,000 for a grant to Iowa Big Brothers and Big Sisters 
        Rural Youth Mentoring Program;
  --$800,000 for the New Mexico Police Athletic League;
  --$400,000 to fund the Youth Development Program in Chicago;
  --$1,500,000 to the Las Vegas Family Development Foundation;
  --$1,500,000 to fund the University of New Hampshire's Crimes 
        Against Children Research Center;
  --$3,000,000 for the Partnership for High Risk Youth to 
        improve opportunities for disadvantaged communities and 
        to study social policies and public programs;
  --$1,250,000 for the Teens, Crime, and the Community Program;
  --$1,000,000 for the I Have a Dream Foundation;
  --$390,000 for the Juvenile Fire Setters Program;
  --$300,000 for the Chicota Youth Camp in Louisiana;
  --$250,000 for a grant to the At-Risk Early Intention Program 
        in the 16th Judicial District, Louisiana;
  --$1,500,000 for the Girls and Boys Town USA;
  --$1,000,000 for Utah State University Youth and Families 
        With Promise Program;
  --$100,000 to fund the Na Keika Law Center in Hawaii;
  --$200,000 for a teen program in Kuhio Park, Hawaii; and
  --$1,900,000 to fund the National Coordinated Law-Related 
        Educated Program;
  --$130,000 for a grant to the South Dakota Unified Judicial 
        System to better serve Children in Need of Supervision 
        [CHINS];
  --$300,000 for a grant to the Vermont Coalition of Teen 
        Centers;
  --$3,000,000 for a grant to Wayne County, Michigan's 
        Department of Community Justice's At-Risk Youth 
        program;
  --$500,000 for a grant to Western Kentucky University to 
        develop a Juvenile Delinquency Prevention Project aimed 
        at students who have been removed from school;
  --$762,000 for a grant to the Northeastern South Dakota 
        Children and Family Initiative in Aberdeen, SD;
  --$750,000 for a grant to establish and enhance after-school 
        programs in Fairbanks, Alaska for at-risk youth through 
        LOVE Social Services;
  --$1,500,000 for a grant to the State of Alaska for a child 
        abuse investigation program;
  --A grant, if warranted, to the Alaska Mentoring 
        Demonstration Project for a statewide at-risk youth 
        mentoring program involving schools and non-profit 
        entities, including Boys and Girls Clubs and Big 
        Brothers-Big Sisters;
  --$3,000,000 for a grant to the National Fatherhood 
        Initiative;
  --$500,000 for a grant to the Center for Safe Urban 
        Communities at the University of Louisville for studies 
        on ways to prevent youth violence;
  --$1,500,000 for a grant to the City of Baltimore, Maryland 
        to assist in operating and expanding the Police 
        Athletic Leagues Program;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to the Juvenile Intake and Diversion 
        Program in Clackamas County, Oregon;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to the Johnson County Family 
        Resource Center in Kansas;
  --$350,000 for a grant to the Rock Creek School of 
        Pennsylvania Ballet to continue and expand its in-
        school and after-school youth programs;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to the University of South Alabama 
        for youth violence research;
  --$605,000 for a grant to the Oregon Museum of Science and 
        Industry to improve and expand science clubs and camps 
        for at-risk youths;
  --$3,000,000 for a grant to the National Council for Juvenile 
        Court Judges;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to Elwin Project in Pennsylvania to 
        reduce placement in institutions and recidivism of 
        mentally ill youth;
  --$800,000 for a grant to the Martin Luther King, Jr. Center 
        for Non-Violence to work with at-risk youth;
  --$250,000 for a grant to Macon, Georgia for an At-Risk Youth 
        Program to help solve the underlying problems of at-
        risk youth and first time offenders;
  --$6,000,000 for a grant to Bergen County, New Jersey, to 
        expand its Police Athletic League after-school 
        programs;
  --$200,000 for a grant to fund Deschutes County, Oregon's 
        Juvenile Justice Partnership Program;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to the South Dakota Internet Child 
        Safety Project;
  --$1,000,000 for a grant to fund South Dakota's Rural At-Risk 
        Youth Outreach program;
  --$2,000,000 to expand and replicate the Behind Bars program;
  --$300,000 for the Low Country Children's Center in South 
        Carolina;
  --$2,460,000 to expand the Milwaukee Safe and Sound Program 
        to other Milwaukee neighborhoods and other communities 
        in Wisconsin;
  --$540,000 for a grant for the Milwaukee Summer Stars 
        Program;
  --$100,000 for a grant to fund the Adolescent Behavior 
        Control Program in Rhode Island; and
  --$204,000 for a grant to the Children's Advocacy Center at 
        the Crow Creek Sioux Indian Reservation in Fort 
        Thompson, South Dakota for the Children's Safe Place 
        program.
    4. $11,974,000 for the Youth Gangs (Part D) Program which 
provides grants to public and private nonprofit organizations 
to prevent and reduce the participation of at-risk youth in the 
activities of gangs that commit crimes.
    5. $9,978,000 for discretionary grants for State challenge 
activities (Part E). This program authorizes the OJJDP 
Administrator to award grants which could increase the amount 
of a State's formula grant by up to 10 percent, if that State 
agrees to undertake some or all of the 10 challenge activities 
included in this program. These challenge activities are 
designed to improve various aspects of a State's juvenile 
justice and delinquency prevention program.
    6. $15,965,000 for the Juvenile Mentoring Program [JUMP] 
(Part G). This program seeks to reduce juvenile delinquency, 
improve academic performance, and reduce the dropout rate among 
at-risk youth through the use of mentors. This program has 
proven successful in reaching at-risk youth and has significant 
support at the local level. The program brings together young 
people in high crime areas with law enforcement officers and 
other responsible adults who are willing to serve as long-term 
mentors. The Committee encourages OJP to focus on applications 
submitted by community based organizations with a proven 
history of providing effective and efficient one-on-one 
services. Within the amounts provided, the Committee provides 
$5,000,000 for the Big Brothers/Big Sisters program to expand 
its capacity to serve more at-risk youth.
    7. $130,767,000 for the At Risk Children's Program (Title 
V). Under Title V of juvenile justice programs, the At Risk 
Children's Program provides funding to support comprehensive 
delinquency prevention plans formulated at the community level. 
The program targets truancy and school violence; gangs, guns, 
and drugs; and other influences that lead juveniles to 
delinquency and criminality.
    Safe Schools Initiative [SSI].--The Committee includes 
$15,000,000 within the Title V grants for the Safe Schools 
Initiative. This effort may include training and services such 
as: accountability and responsibility training; violence 
reduction training, including dispute resolution; juvenile 
mentoring; training for teachers and families to recognize 
troubled children; and parent accountability and family 
strengthening education.
    Tribal Youth Program.--The Committee includes $12,472,000 
within Title V grants for programs to reduce, control, and 
prevent crime both by and against tribal and Native youth; for 
interventions for court-involved tribal youth; for improvement 
to tribal and Native juvenile justice systems; and for 
prevention programs focusing on alcohol and drugs, including 
the Alaska Federation of Natives to develop an underage 
drinking prevention program in rural Alaska that includes 
assessment and education and focuses on the children of 
alcoholics. Within this amount, the Committee directs that 
$2,000,000 be provided for a grant to fund the Alaska Illegal 
Drug and Alcohol Use Initiative.
    Enforcing the Underage Drinking Laws Program.--The 
Committee recommends $25,000,000 within Title V grants to 
assist States in enforcing underage drinking laws. Each State 
shall receive $360,000 and $6,640,000 shall be available for 
discretionary grants to States.
    Juvenile justice research, evaluation, training, and 
technical assistance.--The Committee recognizes that high 
quality research, evaluation, and statistical analysis are 
critical to understanding and addressing the causes of youth 
crime, understanding the scope of delinquency and its impact on 
the juvenile justice system, and identifying effective 
approaches to delinquency control that can be replicated at the 
State and local levels. The Committee recommendation allows the 
Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention Programs 
[OJJDP] to set aside 2 percent for training and technical 
assistance and 10 percent for research, evaluation, and 
statistics activities.
    8. Victims of Child Abuse Act.--The Committee recommends 
$8,481,000 for the various programs authorized under the 
Victims of Child Abuse Act [VOCA]. Funds, provided to establish 
regional and local children's advocacy centers, may not be used 
to provide legal aid. The recommendation includes $8,481,000 to 
improve investigations and prosecutions (subtitle A) as 
follows:
  --$1,247,250 to establish regional children's advocacy 
        centers, as authorized by section 213 of VOCA;
  --$4,989,000 to establish local children's advocacy centers, 
        as authorized by section 214 of VOCA;
  --$1,496,700 for a continuation grant to the National Center 
        for Prosecution of Child Abuse for specialized 
        technical assistance and training programs to improve 
        the prosecution of child abuse cases, as authorized by 
        section 214a of VOCA; and
  --$748,050 for a continuation grant to the National Network 
        of Child Advocacy Centers for technical assistance and 
        training, as authorized by section 214a of VOCA.

                    Public Safety Officers Benefits

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $35,619,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      35,619,000
Committee recommendation................................      35,619,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $35,619,000. 
The recommendation is equal to the budget request and provides 
all mandatory funding for death benefits under the Public 
Safety Officers Benefits Program. This program provides a lump-
sum death benefit payment to eligible survivors of Federal, 
State, and local public safety officers whose death was the 
direct and proximate result of a traumatic injury sustained in 
the line of duty. In addition, $2,395,000 is provided to pay 
for disability benefits to public safety officers who are 
permanently disabled in the line of duty. Within the available 
carryover balances, sufficient funding is available for the 
program which provides payments for education purposes to the 
dependents of Federal, State, and local public safety officers 
who are killed or permanently disabled in the line of duty. No 
additional funding is provided to expand the education benefits 
program in fiscal year 2001.

               General Provisions--Department of Justice

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions:
    Section 101 makes up to $45,000 of the funds appropriated 
to the Department of Justice available for reception and 
representation expenses.
    Section 102 eliminates an extraneous provision.
    Section 103 allows the Department of Justice to spend up to 
$10,000,000 for rewards for information regarding acts of 
terrorism against U.S. citizens or property at levels not to 
exceed $2,000,000 per reward.
    Section 104 allows the Department of Justice, subject to 
the Committee's reprogramming procedures, to transfer up to 5 
percent between appropriations, but limits to 10 percent the 
amount that can be transferred into any one appropriation.
    Section 105 expands a land border port of entry pilot 
program.
    Section 106 provides technical assistance funds to improve 
oversight of certain grant programs.
    Section 107 transitions Parole Commission caseload to a 
successor organization.
    Section 108 allows Justice to collect reimbursements from 
manufacturers for warranty work done in-house.
    Section 109 addresses an inequity in the immigration 
inspection process.
    Section 110 improves the efficiency of the immigration 
adjudication process.
    Section 111 allows amounts in the Crime Victims Fund, in 
any fiscal year, to be used to support the operation and 
maintenance of the Victim Notification System (VNS). In order 
to provide victims with information on case events, the 
Department of Justice has developed an automated victim 
notification system. Currently, this effort involves 
coordination among the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the 
United States Attorneys Offices, the Federal Bureau of Prisons, 
and the Office of Victims of Crime. The Committee understands 
that $1,000,000 remains available from funds transferred to the 
Crime Victims Fund from the Administrative Office of the United 
States Courts, National Fine Center in the Department's Fiscal 
Year 1998 Appropriations Act (Section 109, Public Law 105-119). 
The use of these funds to support the operation and maintenance 
of the VNS is consistent with the original intent of the 
transfer to improve services for the benefit of crime victims 
in the Federal criminal justice system. The Committee directs 
that an additional $4,000,000 be provided from the Fund to 
support the $5,000,000 annual estimated cost of the VNS 
program.

         TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND RELATED AGENCIES

    The Committee recommends a total of $5,662,719,000 for the 
U.S. Trade Representative, the International Trade Commission, 
and the Department of Commerce for fiscal year 2002. This 
amount is $491,714,000 above the total request.

                  Trade and Infrastructure Development

    The Committee has included under this section of title II, 
the U.S. Office of the Trade Representative, the International 
Trade Commission, and the Department of Commerce agencies 
responsible for trade promotion and enforcement and economic 
infrastructure development.

                            RELATED AGENCIES

                Office of the U.S. Trade Representative

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $29,452,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      30,097,000
Committee recommendation................................      30,097,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $30,097,000 
for the U.S. Trade Representative. The recommendation is 
identical to the budget request.
    The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative is responsible 
for developing and coordinating U.S. international trade, 
commodity, and direct investment policy, and leading 
negotiations with other countries on such matters. The U.S. 
Trade Representative's areas of responsibility include all 
matters within the World Trade Organization, including 
implementation of the Uruguay Round of multilateral trade 
agreements; trade, commodity, and direct investment matters 
dealt with by international institutions such as the 
Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development and the 
United Nations Conference on Trade Development; industrial, 
agricultural and services trade policy, and trade-related 
intellectual property protection and environmental issues.

                     International Trade Commission


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $47,994,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      51,440,000
Committee recommendation................................      49,386,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $49,386,000. 
The recommendation is $2,054,000 below to the budget request. 
Within available funds, full funding is provided for the 
Information Resources Management projects.
    The International Trade Commission [ITC] is an independent, 
quasi-judicial agency responsible for conducting trade-related 
investigations, providing Congress and the President with 
independent technical advice relating to U.S. international 
trade policy, and performing other statutory responsibilities 
such as quasi-judicial determinations on trade matters filed 
with the Commission.

                         DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE


                   International Trade Administration


                     Operations And Administration

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $333,702,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     329,590,000
Committee recommendation................................     347,090,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $347,090,000. 
The recommendation is $14,500,000 above the budget request. The 
recommendation includes $14,900,000 within Market Access and 
Compliance and the Import Administration for continuation of 
the trade compliance and monitoring intiatives.
    The Committee recommends the Administration's estimate of 
$3,000,000 in fees during fiscal year 2002. As in past years, 
the Committee expects ITA to continue working on efforts to 
structure its programs to enable the agency to increase fees 
for the services it provides.
    The recommended funding levels are reflected in the 
following table:

                               ITA Funding

                        [In thousands of dollars]

Trade development.......................................      66,820,000
Market access and compliance............................      27,441,000
Import Administration...................................      42,859,000
U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service.....................     193,824,000
Administration/executive direction......................      13,146,000
Offsetting Fee Collections..............................       3,000,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      ITA total appropriation...........................     347,090,000

    Trade Development.--The Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $66,820,000. The recommendation is $14,500,000 
above the budget request. The Committee recommends continued 
funding for the enhancement of the agency's export data base, 
funding for the National Textile Center at a level of 
$11,000,000 and the Textile/Clothing Technology Center at a 
level of $3,500,000.
    Market Access and Compliance.--The Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $27,441,000. The recommendation is identical 
to the budget request. Assuring that U.S. companies receive the 
full benefit of our trade agreements is critically important. 
In fiscal year 2001, the Committee approved a large increase 
for compliance and enforcement. The Committee directs the 
Office of Market Access and Compliance (MAC) to continue with 
their compliance effort and recommends $5,700,000 within 
available funds for this purpose. Part of this effort is to 
increase the number of staff working on ensuring foreign 
compliance with trade agreements. The Committee recommends 
augmenting Washington-based staffing to focus on markets where 
U.S. firms face persistent compliance issues and market access 
barriers, in particular Japan, China, and the European Union. 
The Committee encourages MAC to evaluate their staffing to 
assure the success of this important mission
    Many U.S. companies are reluctant to complain about 
problems they are facing in foreign markets. The Committee 
recommends $1,700,000 within available funds for ITA to 
continue to place and maintain support for compliance officers 
in China, Japan, and the European Union, and other key markets 
so that they can detect and swiftly address compliance problems 
U.S. companies face in these markets. In addition, the 
Committee directs the ITA to continue with the Washington-based 
mobile strike force that can nimbly move to address compliance 
problems U.S. companies face in any market. The Committee 
directs that these officers be integrated into the U.S. Foreign 
Commercial Service offices, as U.S. business looks to the 
commercial officers for support and assistance.
    Import Administration.--The Committee recommends an 
appropriation of $42,859,000. The recommendation is identical 
to the budget request. The Committee recommendation includes 
$1,500,000 for the Import Administration to continue to place 
and maintain overseas enforcement officers, including 
monitoring compliance with the World Trade Organization and 
other international commitments on antidumping and subsidies. 
The Committee directed the Import Administration to station a 
senior official in Geneva to work with the U.S. Trade 
Representative (USTR) on issues related to antidumping and 
countervailing duties in fiscal year 2001. The Committee 
intended that this official would participate in the meetings 
of the Antidumping and Subsidies Committees, assist the USTR in 
Dispute Settlement proceedings that are relevant to the 
Antidumping and Subsidies Agreements, monitor developments in 
the Working Party on Trade and Competition Policy, and provide 
policy expertise on matters pertaining to the maintenance of 
strong antidumping and antisubsidy laws in the United States. 
As a cost saving measure, the Committee anticipated that the 
USTR's Geneva office will provide the necessary space within 
its offices for use by the Import Administration. The Committee 
directs USTR to respond to the Committee's fiscal year 2001 
directive in order to ensure Import Administration's complete 
participation in World Trade Organization Antidumping and 
Subsidies proceedings.
    The Committee recommendation provides $3,500,000 for the 
Import Administration to monitor import data and customs flows 
for surges in key markets and sectors, such as steel and 
lumber, and take immediate action when such surges are 
detected. Such action should include using resources to 
expedite unfair trade cases so U.S. companies can receive 
relief at the earliest possible date. In addition, Import 
Administration must vigorously monitor foreign subsidies so 
that action can be taken if the subsidies violate trade 
agreements.
    The Committee recommends $2,500,000 to review and evaluate 
in-depth China and Japanese compliance with antidumping and 
countervailing duty commitments. China and Japan represent the 
majority of unfair trade actions, and the Committee believes 
there is an urgent need for greater attention to both Japanese 
and Chinese trade practices.
    U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service [US&FCS;].--The 
Committee recommends an appropriation of $193,824,000. The 
recommendation is identical to the request.
    The Committee is concerned about the efficiency of the 
agency's domestic operations. In its' fiscal year 2001 report, 
the Committee recommended a consolidation of U.S. Export 
Assistance Centers in metropolitan areas where more than one 
center was present. In response to the Committee's concerns, 
the U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service established the Silicon 
Valley U.S. Export Assistance Center. This resulted in the 
closure of centers in San Jose and Santa Clara, California. The 
Committee commends the U.S. and Foreign Commercial Service on 
this consolidation effort. At the same time, however, new U.S. 
Export Assistance Centers have opened in Las Vegas, Nevada and 
Indio, California. The Committee remains concerned about the 
number of centers in certain metropolitan areas and directs the 
U.S. Foreign and Commercial Service to provide a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations on its consolidation efforts by 
January 15, 2002.
    The Committee supports the Commercial Service's work on the 
Appalachian-Turkish Trade Project, a project to promote 
opportunities to expand trade, encourage business interests, 
stimulate foreign studies, and to build a lasting and mutually 
meaningful relationship between the Appalachian States and the 
Republic of Turkey, as well as the neighboring regions, such as 
Greece. The Committee expects the agency to support the 
project.
    Administration and Executive Direction.--The Committee 
recommends an appropriation of $13,146,000. The recommendation 
is identical to the budget request. Bill language is included 
which prohibits certain offices from taking funds from other 
accounts. If additional funds are needed, a reprogramming 
request should be submitted to the Committee for approval.

                         Export Administration

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $64,711,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      68,893,000
Committee recommendation................................      68,893,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $68,893,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    The Bureau of Export Administration is the principal agency 
involved in the development, implementation, and enforcement of 
export controls for dual-use technologies and weapons of mass 
destruction. The Export Enforcement Division detects, prevents, 
investigates, and assists in the sanctioning of illegal dual-
use exports. Within available funds, the Committee 
recommendation provides $7,250,000 for Chemical Weapons 
Convention enforcement, $1,600,000 for replacement of the 
Export Control Automated Support System and $496,000 for 
additional export licensing personnel.

                  Economic Development Administration

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $438,911,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     365,557,000
Committee recommendation................................     371,557,000

    The Economic Development Administration [EDA] provides 
grants to local governments and nonprofit agencies for public 
works, planning, and other projects designed to facilitate 
economic development.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $371,557,000. 
The recommendation is $6,000,000 above the budget request. 
Funding amounts for the two appropriations accounts under this 
heading are displayed below.

                Economic Development Assistance Programs

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $410,973,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     335,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     341,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $341,000,000. 
The recommendation is $6,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation provides funding of 
$250,000,000 for public works grants (title I), $24,000,000 for 
planning assistance, $10,500,000 for trade adjustment 
assistance, and $40,900,000 for economic adjustment grants 
(title IX). The Committee recommendation does not include 
funding for defense economic adjustment. Public Law 101-50 
stipulates that all closure and realignments must be completed 
no later than 6 years after recommendation for closure or 
realignment was made. The last round of base closure decisions 
was made in 1995. The Committee notes that Federal facilities 
provide a substantial economic benefit to local communities and 
that when excess infrastructure results in facility closures or 
realignments, local communities can be adversely impacted. 
Currently, Federal Departments and Agencies do not integrate or 
coordinate their facility investments or policies. The 
Committee recommendation provides $6,000,000 for the National 
Infrastructure Institute to establish a center for 
infrastructure expertise at the former Pease Air Force Base in 
Portsmouth, New Hampshire to assist Departments and Agencies in 
the development of facility best business practices and to 
secure improvements in the efficiency of infrastructure owned 
or leased by the Federal Government. The Committee expects this 
pilot project to demonstrate efficiencies in facility 
management and life cycle infrastructure costs and identify 
opportunities for Federal Departments and Agencies to partner 
with each other and with the private sector to better utilize 
the Federal Government's huge infrastructure investment.
    The Committee is aware of several proposals for economic 
development or adjustment assistance and strongly urges EDA to 
consider applications for the following proposals within 
applicable procedures and guidelines and provide a grant, if 
warranted: (1) Randolph Village School Economic Development 
Project, Randolf, VT; (2) infrastructure improvement at 
Discovery Square and Lancaster Square, PA; (3) a proposal for 
wiring the Southwest border in New Mexico; (4) development of 
an industrial park at Sawmill Cove, Sitka, AK; and (5) 
expansion of DePaul University's computer science facilities 
and programs.
    The Committee expects EDA to continue its efforts to assist 
communities impacted by economic dislocations relating to 
industry downswings as well as to assist communities impacted 
by downturns due to environmental concerns. This includes the 
timber and coal industries, United States-Canadian trade-
related issues, communities in New England, the mid-Atlantic, 
Hawaii, and Alaska impacted by fisheries regulations, and 
communities in the Southeast impacted by downturns due to 
NAFTA.

                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $27,938,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      30,557,000
Committee recommendation................................      30,557,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $30,557,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. The 
recommendation provides $1,500,000 for the implementation of 
the Economic Development Communications and Operations 
Management System.

                  Minority Business Development Agency


                     Minority Business Development

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $27,254,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      28,381,000
Committee recommendation................................      28,381,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $28,381,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. Of this 
amount, $750,000 is provided for the Phoenix database. The 
Committee notes that since its inception in 1969, neither the 
Minority Business Development Agency nor its predecessor, the 
Office of Minority Business Enterprise, have ever been 
authorized.

                Economic and Information Infrastructure

    The Committee includes under this section of the bill the 
Department of Commerce agencies responsible for the Nation's 
basic economic and technical information infrastructure, as 
well as the administrative functions which oversee the 
development of telecommunications and information policy.

                   Economic and Statistical Analysis


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2000....................................     $53,627,000
Budget estimate, 2001...................................      62,515,000
Committee recommendation................................      62,515,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $62,515,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request and 
includes funding to continue the necessary task of updating and 
improving statistical measurements of the U.S. economy, 
international transactions, and the effects of e-business. 
Within available funds, the Committee recommends $3,500,000 for 
the gross domestic product initiative and $3,000,000 for the 
information technology initiative.
    The Economic and Statistics Administration is responsible 
for the collection, tabulation, and publication of a wide 
variety of economic, demographic, and social statistics and 
provides support to the Secretary of Commerce and other 
Government officials in interpreting the state of the economy 
and developing economic policy. The Bureau of Economic Analysis 
and the Under Secretary for Economic Affairs are funded in this 
account.

                          Bureau of the Census

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $432,679,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     543,396,000
Committee recommendation................................     517,090,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $517,090,000. 
The recommendation is $26,306,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee's recommendations for the Census Bureau accounts are 
described in more detail below.

                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $156,881,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     168,561,000
Committee recommendation................................     168,561,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $168,561,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. This 
account provides for the salaries and expenses associated with 
the statistical programs of the Bureau of the Census, including 
measurement of the Nation's economy and the demographic 
characteristics of the population. These programs are intended 
to provide a broad base of economic, demographic, and social 
information used for decision-making by governments, private 
organizations, and individuals.
    The Committee has provided the fiscal year 2002 base 
funding for the key programs of the Census Bureau. The 
Committee is particularly concerned that key reports on 
manufacturing, general economic and foreign trade statistics 
are maintained and issued on a timely basis.
    The Committee requests that the Bureau include in its 
budget submission in fiscal year 2003 a report on the 
reimbursements it has received for work requested by other 
Federal agencies or private organizations.

                     Periodic Censuses And Programs

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $275,798,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     374,835,000
Committee recommendation................................     348,529,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $348,529,000. 
The recommendation is $26,306,000 below the budget request. 
This amount, when combined with approximately $27,000,000 in 
carryover, will fully fund periodic censuses and programs.
    This account provides for the constitutionally mandated 
decennial census, quinquennial censuses, and other programs 
which are cyclical in nature. Additionally, individual surveys 
are conducted for other Federal agencies on a reimbursable 
basis. The Committee recommendation includes $694,000 for the 
Census Survey of Women Business. In past years, funding for 
this survey has been provided through the Small Business 
Administration account and the Census Bureau was reimbursed for 
the costs of conducting the survey.
    For other programs under this account, the Committee 
recommends the requested levels of $51,958,000 for economic 
censuses; $5,745,000 for census of governments; $6,048,000 for 
intercensal demographic estimates; $6,254,000 for electronic 
information collection; $37,624,000 for geographic support; and 
$23,254,000 for data processing systems. The Committee also 
recommends $12,397,000 for demographic survey sample redesign 
and $26,246,000 for the continuous measurement program.

       National Telecommunications and Information Administration

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $100,216,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      73,023,000
Committee recommendation................................      73,023,000

    The Committee recommends on appropriation of $73,023,000. 
This recommendation is identical to the budget request.

                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $11,412,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      14,054,000
Committee recommendation................................      14,054,000

    The Committee recommends on appropriation of $14,054,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request, and 
includes $2,100,000 for the Radio Spectrum Measurement System..
    The Committee retains language from previous years allowing 
the Secretary of Commerce to charge Federal agencies for a 
portion of the cost of coordination of spectrum management, 
analysis, and operations.

       Public Broadcasting Facilities, Planning, And Construction

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $43,404,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      43,466,000
Committee recommendation................................      43,466,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $43,466,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. Public 
broadcasters face a significant challenge in making the 
transition from analog to digital broadcasting. The public 
broadcasters, as well as commercial broadcasters, are required 
to make the change from analog to digital broadcasting by 2005. 
This is an expensive task, and is going to be particularly 
challenging for public broadcasters whose networks include 
numerous translator stations.
    These challenges are particularly great for those 
broadcasters who are located in, or who serve, largely rural 
areas. As in past years, the Committee continues to urge the 
agency to place emphasis on the needs of these stations, and to 
support focusing resources on distance learning initiatives 
targeting rural areas.

                    Technology Opportunities Program

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $45,400,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      15,503,000
Committee recommendation................................      15,503,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $15,503,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. The 
Committee expects NTIA to limit eligibility for this program.
    The regional information sharing system [RISS] under the 
Department of Justice provides funding for law enforcement 
entities which have traditionally obtained funding from the TOP 
Program. The Committee recommendation excludes law enforcement 
entities eligible for the RISS Program from applying for TOP 
funds. The Committee expects NTIA to give preference to 
applications from consortia and for purposes such as public 
safety or other uses for which there is no other funding source 
available.
    The Committee is aware of several proposals for information 
infrastructure grants and strongly urges NTIA to consider 
applications for the following proposals within applicable 
procedures and guidelines and provide a grant, if warranted: 
(1) an electronic commerce initiative at the University of 
Missouri-Columbia; (2) a technology training initiative 
proposal by Morgan State University; (3) Vermont Interactive 
Television; (4) Shiloh, PA Community Service; and (5) North 
Dakota State University Technology Park Internships.

                      Patent and Trademark Office


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $1,037,008,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   1,139,001,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,139,001,000

    The Committee recommends total budget resources of 
$1,139,001,000. The recommendation is identical to the budget 
request and is a 9 percent increase over fiscal year 2001.
    The Patent and Trademark Office [PTO] is charged with 
administering the patent and trademark laws of the United 
States. PTO examines patent applications, grants patent 
protection for qualified inventions, and disseminates 
technological information disclosed in patents. PTO also 
examines trademark applications and provides Federal 
registration to owners of qualified trademarks. The PTO is 
subject to the policy direction of the Secretary of Commerce, 
but the agency has independent control of its budget, 
expenditures, personnel, procurement and other administrative 
and management functions.
    The PTO has experienced significant growth in recent years 
due to the increase in applications for patents and trademarks. 
Trademark applications have substantially increased since the 
mid-1990s, and the high technology and biotechnology industries 
have accounted for much of the growth in patent applications.
    While the agency has experienced significant growth in 
recent years as a direct result of workload increases, PTO's 
corporate plan predicts that patent pendency will rise from 
26.2 months to an unacceptable 38.6 months by fiscal year 2006. 
PTO assumes this would occur even if the agency retains all of 
its projected fee collections for the next several years. The 
ability of the administration to formulate an adequate budget 
for the PTO is complicated by two factors. First, the agency 
historically has formulated an incremental budget based on the 
previous year's budget, and does not provide the Committee with 
a thorough business plan that demonstrates how resources will 
be used and what results will obtain. Second, PTO management 
has not been sufficiently innovative. Although patent filings 
have increased dramatically over the past decade, PTO 
management chose to remain wedded to an archaic patent process 
and attempted to hire its way out of its workload problems. In 
the April 2001 presentation to their Public Advisory 
Committees, PTO management proposed hiring an additional 1,100 
patent examiners in fiscal year 2003, but proposed making the 
patent application process fully electronic only in fiscal year 
2006. In addition, PTO management has moved at a glacial pace 
to address the attrition problem among its patent examiners. 
Further, substantial amounts of funds have been expended on 
information technology projects over the last decade, but no 
significant increase in examiner productivity has been noted. 
Finally, the Committee lacks full confidence in the information 
provided to it by PTO management regarding its needs and 
performance.
    The Committee is pleased that the Secretary of Commerce has 
made a commitment to improve PTO operations and initiate an 
internal review to determine what the agency needs to do its 
job. Consistent with that approach, the Committee directs the 
Secretary of Commerce to develop a 5-Year Strategic Plan for 
the PTO with three core objectives: (1) prepare the agency to 
handle the workload associated with the 21st century economy, 
(2) improve patent quality, and (3) reduce patent and trademark 
pendency. The plan should include recommendations to improve 
retention and productivity of the examiner workforce, targeted 
hiring increases to deal with high-growth areas, improved 
training, and E-Government and other capital improvements 
designed to improve productivity. The plan should also include 
benchmarks for measuring progress in achieving each of those 
objectives. The plan shall be submitted to the Committee for 
review by no later than January 15, 2002. In an effort to 
accelerate implementation of time-sensitive elements of the 
Secretary's 5-year Plan, the Committee would be willing to 
consider a reprogramming request from unobligated PTO fee 
balances.
    The Committee further directs that the ``electronic file 
wrapper'' be fully implemented by the end of fiscal year 2004.
    The Committee observes that the PTO received its second 
consecutive financial audit with no reportable conditions, and 
expects that the PTO will make every effort to continue this 
laudable record. However, the Committee observes that PTO 
administrative expenses may be rising unnecessarily. The 
Committee notes that the agency's human resources office has 40 
GS-13s through GS-15s supervising 60 other personnel, but that 
office had to acquire contractors simply to file 3 years of 
personnel actions that the office itself could not. The 
Committee expects that the PTO will take appropriate steps to 
ensure its administrative resources are sufficient but not 
extravagant.

                         Science and Technology

    The Committee has included under this section of Title II 
the Department of Commerce agencies involved in technology 
research and development, scientific assessment and prediction 
of environmental phenomena, and the administrative and policy 
functions providing oversight for these activities.

                       Technology Administration


       Under Secretary for Technology/Office of Technology Policy

                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $8,062,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       8,238,000
Committee recommendation................................       8,238,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $8,238,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request and will 
fully fund the current operations of the Technology 
Administration.

             National Institute of Standards and Technology

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $597,016,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     487,447,000
Committee recommendation................................     696,526,000

    The Committee recommends a total of $696,526,000 for the 
three appropriations accounts under the National Institute of 
Standards and Technology [NIST]. The recommendation is 
$209,079,000 above the budget request. A description of each 
account and the Committee recommendation follows:

             Scientific And Technical Research And Services

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $311,929,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     347,006,000
Committee recommendation................................     343,296,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $343,296,000. 
The recommendation is $3,992,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

Electronics and Electrical Engineering..................     $41,132,000
Manufacturing Engineering...............................      20,352,000
Chemical Science and Technology.........................      38,712,000
Physics.................................................      37,054,000
Material Science and Engineering........................      62,532,000
Building and Fire Research..............................      19,982,000
Computer Science and Applied Mathematics................      56,478,000
Technology Assistance...................................      17,679,000
National Quality Program................................       5,403,000
Research Support Activities.............................      43,972,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, STRS.......................................     343,296,000

    Within the amounts provided, the Committee approves the 
following increases: (1) $1,000,000 in the Manufacturing 
Engineering Program for the development of standards pertaining 
to the exchange of electronic data; (2) $4,000,000 in the 
Physics program to provide measurements, standards, and test 
methods for the development of advanced nanotechnologies; (3) 
$4,000,000 in the Computer Science and Applied Mathematics 
program to develop new measurements, test methods, and 
guidelines for the protection of the Nation's critical 
infrastructures; (4) $2,000,000 in the Chemical Science and 
Technology Program to further develop measurement standards for 
in-vitro diagnostics; and (5) $4,000,000 in the Computer 
Science and Applied Mathematics Program for quantum computing. 
The Committee does not recommend funding for the Critical 
Infrastructure Protection Grants Program. The Advanced 
Technology Program was developed to evaluate these types of 
grant applications. No funding is provided for Commerce 
Department expert review teams. Presidential Decision Directive 
# 63 clearly suggests that every department and agency of the 
Federal Government shall be responsible for protecting its own 
critical infrastructure, especially its cyber-based systems. 
While the program is laudable, it is clearly not the 
responsibility of the Department of Commerce to provide 
computer security to other Federal agencies; and, (4) under the 
Wind Research Program, the Committee recommends $2,000,000 for 
wind engineering and $2,500,000 to continue funding an existing 
cooperative agreement between NIST and Texas Tech University.

                     Industrial Technology Services

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $250,285,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     119,266,000
Committee recommendation................................     309,337,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $309,337,000. 
The recommendation is $190,071,000 above the budget request.
    Manufacturing Extension Partnership Program [MEP].--The 
Committee recommends an appropriation of $105,137,000 to fully 
fund all of the MEP centers. The Committee recommends bill 
language to authorize the Secretary of Commerce to enter into 
agreements with nonprofit organizations to carry out collective 
research and development initiatives through the MEP. In 
addition, this language authorizes the Secretary to seek and 
accept contributions from public and private sources to support 
these efforts.
    Advanced Technology Program [ATP].--The Committee 
recommends an appropriation of $204,200,000. The recommendation 
is $191,208,000 above the budget request. This amount, when 
combined with approximately $11,000,000 in carryover, will 
fully fund ATP awards at current levels. Within the amounts 
made available, $45,200,000 shall be used for administrative 
costs, internal laboratory support, and for Small Business 
Innovation Research Program [SBIR] requirements.
    The Committee notes that the Advanced Technology Program 
has been extensively reviewed. Since the inception of the ATP, 
there have been 52 studies conducted on the efficacy and merits 
of the program. The General Accounting Office has conducted 14 
studies; 10 studies have been completed by the Department of 
Commerce, Office of the Inspector General; former Secretary of 
Commerce William Daley sponsored a 60-day study, and the 
National Research Council published, ``ATP: Challenges and 
Opportunities'' in 1999, and, ``ATP: Assessing Outcomes'' in 
2001. In addition, 25 studies have been done by ATP's economic 
assessment office. These assessments reveal that the ATP does 
not fund projects that otherwise could have been financed in 
the private sector. Rather, the ATP facilitates so called 
``valley of death'' projects that private capital markets are 
unable to fund.
    ATP has put a number of safeguards in place to ensure 
program funding does not replace private, venture capital 
funding. Since the 1998 competition, the ATP application form 
has included asking applicants to describe what efforts were 
made, prior to applying for ATP funding, to secure private 
capital for the project. In addition, this issue is addressed 
in oral reviews of project semifinalists.
    The Committee maintains that the government should play a 
role in choosing promising technologies to fund. From the 
telegraph to the Internet to biomedical research, government 
investment has spurred the development of new technologies and 
new fields which have had great impact on and held enormous 
benefit for the American people. According to the National 
Academy of Sciences' National Research Council, ATP's approach 
is funding new technologies that can contribute to important 
societal goals. For example, ATP supported GE Medical Systems 
in the development of a new method of producing large-area, 
flat-panel amorphous silicon detectors for X-rays. The research 
significantly reduced the number of processing steps required 
to manufacture the panels and increased the yield. The panels 
are the heart of a new digital mammography system which was one 
of the biggest breakthroughs in mammography in 20 years. In the 
sense that it was possible to manufacture these panels before, 
the broad research goal was not unique. However, the innovative 
technology was unique, and its development is making digital 
mammography more affordable and more widely available to women.
    The Committee concurs with the June 2001 National Academy 
of Sciences assessment; the many well-documented individual 
case studies; the Secretary's 1997 review; the February 1998 
Development, Commercialization, and Diffusion Study; and the 
March 1999 review of the Performance of Completed Projects, all 
of which find that the ATP is a valuable and well-managed 
innovation program.
    In the budget request, the administration proposed a 
gradual phasing out of the Advanced Technology Program. The 
Committee does not recommend this approach and is concerned 
that the ATP awarding process could be purposely hindered as a 
result of this difference of opinion. Therefore, the Committee 
directs the Department of Commerce to submit a written plan on 
how it intends on making timely ATP awards in fiscal year 2002. 
This plan should be submitted to the Appropriations 
Subcommittees on Commerce, Justice, State and the Judiciary 
before any funds are obligated for Department of Commerce, 
Departmental Management.

                  Construction of Research Facilities

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $34,802,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      20,893,000
Committee recommendation................................      43,893,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $43,893,000. 
The recommendation is $23,000,000 above the budget request and 
fully funds the highest priority safety, capacity, maintenance, 
and repair projects at NIST. Of the amounts provided, 
$5,000,000 is provided for wiring improvements at the NIST 
research facility in Boulder, CO.

            National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration


                     (including transfers of funds)

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $3,040,789,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   3,063,600,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,349,685,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $3,349,685,000 
for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration [NOAA], of 
which $7,000,000 is mandatory spending. Transfers total 
$71,000,000. This amount provided includes $251,000,000 for 
programs in the conservation spending category. The 
recommendation is $286,085,000 above the budget request. During 
this time of continued budgetary constraint, the Committee 
recommendation continues to make funding for ocean, coastal, 
fisheries, and atmospheric programs a high priority.
    As in past years, the Committee expects NOAA and the 
Department of Commerce to adhere to the direction given in this 
section of the Committee report and to observe the 
reprogramming procedures detailed in section 605 in the general 
provisions of the accompanying bill. Bill language is included 
that authorizes a NOAA Business Management Fund.
    The Committee supports NOAA's efforts to restructure and 
simplify its budgetary request. The Committee commends the five 
line offices and NOAA's budget office for their efforts in 
realigning the various programs funded and for bringing 
transparency to their budget proposals. As a result of these 
efforts, the Committee recommendations by program are reflected 
in a new series of tables. In many cases, these tables replace 
report language carried in previous Committee Reports regarding 
programs, projects, and activities. The Committee considers 
these tables binding. The Committee advises NOAA to seek the 
Committee's guidance if it is unsure on any matter reflected in 
the tables. The Committee directs NOAA to continue its 
restructuring efforts and expects the fiscal year 2003 budget 
request to reflect the changes contained within these tables. 
The Committee continues to support NOAA as one integrated 
agency and in no way intends for this restructuring to create 
separate appropriations for each of NOAA's line offices.

                  Operations Research, and Facilities

    The Committee recommends discretionary appropriations of 
$2,267,705,000 for operations, research, and facilities for 
fiscal year 2002. The recommendation is $87,396,000 above the 
budget request. Of this amount, $33,650,000 is provided for 
conservation.
    Ocean Observing System.--The Committee maintains a strong 
interest in an integrated interagency ocean observing system. 
Such a system would bring together Federal, academic, and state 
institutions, and industry into a coordinated system for 
monitoring U.S. marine waters. A coordinated national approach, 
linked effectively with similar programs in other nations, is 
an essential prerequisite for effective use and management of 
the oceans. The nation cannot realize the economic, social, and 
security benefits of the oceans in a responsible, sustainable 
manner without such a program. A number of agencies including 
the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy, NOAA, 
the National Science Foundation, and the Office of Naval 
Research have varying interests and responsibilities in this 
area. The Committee directs the relevant agencies to work 
through the National Science and Technology Council and the 
National Oceanographic Partnership Program to develop an 
interagency plan for an ocean observing system and submit this 
report to the Committee with the President's fiscal year 2003 
budget request.

     NOAA Operations, Research, and Facilities Fiscal Year 2002

                                                               Committee
                                                          Recommendation
National Ocean Service..................................    $447,240,000
National Marine Fisheries Service.......................     555,775,000
Oceanic and Atmospheric Research........................     367,630,000
National Weather Service................................     668,620,000
National Environmental, Satellite and Information 
    Services............................................     150,515,000
Program Support.........................................     162,925,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total Operations, Research, and Facilities........   2,267,705,000

                         NATIONAL OCEAN SERVICE

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
Navigation Services:                                      recommendation
    Mapping & Charting:
        Base..................................................    37,015
        Electronic Navigational Charts........................     5,455
        Shoreline Mapping.....................................     3,000
        Coastal Storms........................................     1,000
        Joint Hydrographic Center.............................     3,580
        N.C. Floodplain Mapping Pilot.........................     5,000
        Address Survey Backlog/Contracts......................    30,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Mapping & Charting........................    85,050
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Geodesy:
        Base..................................................    21,550
        National Spacial Reference System.....................       500
        Height Modenization Study--NGS Implementation.........       250
        Height Modernization Study--NC........................     1,000
        Height Modernization Study--CA Spatial Reference 
          Center..............................................     1,000
        S. Carolina Geodetic Survey...........................       500
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Geodesy...................................    24,800
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Tide & Current Data:
        Base..................................................    13,250
        PORTS.................................................     3,000
        Coastal Storms........................................     1,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Tide & Current Data.......................    17,250
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, Navigation Services..........................   127,100
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Ocean Resources Conservation & Management:
    Estuarine and Coastal Assessment:
        Ocean Assessment Program:
            Base..............................................    13,610
            American Museum of Natural History Research and 
              Conservation....................................     1,000
            Coastal Observation Technology System.............    12,000
            Coastal Storms....................................     1,000
            Beaufort/Oxford...................................     4,500
            Pfiesteria and HAB Rapid Response.................     3,925
            South Florida Ecosystem...........................       900
            Coastal Services Center...........................    18,000
            Pacific Coastal Services Center...................     2,000
            Coastal Change Analysis...........................     3,000
            Coral Reef Program................................    20,000
            Harmful Algae Blooms..............................     5,000
            Harmful Algal Bloom Research--SC Department of 
              Marine Resources................................       600
            CICEET............................................     7,000
            National Coral Reef Institute--Hawaii.............     1,000
            National Coral Reef Institute--Florida............     1,000
            National Fish and Wildlife Foundation.............     1,000
            JASON Foundation..................................     2,500
            National Ocean Science Education Program..........     2,000
            Narragansett Explore the Bay Program..............     2,500
            Aquaculture Education Program--Cedar Point, MS....     2,000
            May River Ecosystem...............................       100
            New Bedford Oceanarium Research Program...........     3,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

              Subtotal, Ocean Assessment Program..............   107,635
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
        Response and Restoration:
            Base..............................................     1,710
            Estuarine and Coastal Assessment..................     2,670
            Estuary Restoration Program.......................     2,000
            Damage Assessment Program.........................     5,200
            Oil Pollution Act of 1990.........................     1,000
            Coastal Protection and Restoration Project........    31,000
            Spill Response and Restoration Program............     2,000
            Oil Skimmer--NH...................................       250
            Marsh Restoration--NH.............................     1,000
            Coastal Remediation Technology....................     1,000
            Palmyra Atoll Bioremediation......................       750
            Pribilof Island Cleanup...........................    10,200
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

              Subtotal, Response and Restoration..............    58,780
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
        Ocean and Coastal Research:
            Base..............................................     6,000
            Fish Forensics/Enforcement........................     1,300
            MEHRL.............................................     1,950
            Pfiesteria/Toxins Research........................     1,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

              Subtotal, Ocean and Coastal Research............    10,250
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
              Subtotal, Estuarine and Coastal Assessment......   176,665
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
        Coastal Ocean Program:
            Base..............................................    12,890
            ECOHAB............................................     4,200
            Hypoxia...........................................     1,085
            Long-Term Estuary Assessment Consortium...........     1,200
            Mississippi River/Gulf of Mexico Nutrient 
              Watershed.......................................     2,000
            South Carolina Sea Grant..........................     1,200
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

              Subtotal, Coastal Ocean Program.................    22,575
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
              Total, Ocean Resources Conservation & Assessment   199,240
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Ocean and Coastal Management:
    Coastal Management:
        CZM grants............................................    65,500
        Program Administration................................     3,000
        National Estuarine Research Reserve System............    16,400
        Nonpoint Pollution Implementation Grants..............     2,000
        Marine Protected Areas................................     3,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Coastal Management........................    89,900
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Marine Sanctuary Program:
        Base..................................................    30,000
        Northwest Straits Citizens Advisory Commission........     1,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Marine Sanctuary Program..................    31,000
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, Ocean and Coastal Management.................   120,900
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, National Ocean Service.......................   447,240

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table above are described in more detail in the following 
paragraphs.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $447,240,000 
for the National Ocean Service [NOS]. The recommendation is 
$82,754,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee has provided bill language that allows the 
Secretary to proceed as he deems necessary to have NOAA occupy 
and operate its research facilities in Lafayette, Louisiana.
    Navigation.--The Committee recommends $5,455,000 for 
Electronic Navigational Charts. Of this amount, the Committee 
recommends $1,900,000 to create a catalog of electronic 
navigational charts for Alaska. Of the amounts provided for the 
Joint Hydrographic Center, $1,000,000 is for a study to analyze 
the data needs for developing a U.S. claim beyond the 200 
nautical mile Exclusive Economic Zone. This report will be 
submitted to Congress by May 31, 2002, and will identify 
existing data, data gaps, survey costs, and contracting 
opportunities to prepare a U.S. claim.
    Ocean Resources Conservation and Management.--The Committee 
directs the National Ocean Service to establish a Coastal 
Observation Technology System. This program shall provide a 
national framework, technical assistance, and support for 
sustained coastal observation systems. Among the entities with 
which the National Ocean Service is directed to engage are the 
Alliance for Coastal Technologies, Center for Integrated Marine 
Technologies, the University of New Hampshire Sea Grant 
program, and other regional organizations as appropriate. 
Regarding this activity, the Secretary and the National Ocean 
Service have the authority to transfer funds and enter into 
agreements with any entity, including other Federal agencies. 
The Committee recommendation includes $12,000,000 for this 
program, of which $3,000,000 is for the Alliance for Coastal 
Technologies; $3,000,000 is for the Center for Integrated 
Marine Technologies, and $3,000,000 is for the University of 
New Hampshire Sea Grant program. Funding for this activity is 
from the conservation category.
    The Committee recommendation includes an additional 
$1,000,000 for the Oxford laboratory to fill three full-time 
equivalents and purchase new lab equipment. The Committee 
recommendation includes $20,000,000 for the Coral Reef Program. 
Of this amount, the Committee recommendation includes 
$6,000,000 to convert a T-AGS vessel to support the research, 
monitoring, assessment, restoration, and outreach needs of the 
National Ocean Service in waters around the Hawaiian Islands 
and the American Flag Territories, including support for 
sanctuary activities. Under Response and Restoration, 
$1,000,000 is provided for Coastal Remediation Technology to 
develop a cooperative program with the Cooperative Institute 
for Coastal and Estuarine Environmental Technology to evaluate 
innovative environmental technologies for estuary remediation. 
Of the $1,950,000 provided for the Marine Environmental Health 
and Research Laboratory, the Committee recommendation includes 
$450,000 for the Murrells Inlet Special Area Management Plan. 
Under funding for the Coastal Ocean Program, the Committee 
directs the program to work with and continue its current 
levels of support for the Baruch Institute's research and 
monitoring of small, high-salinity estuaries.
    Ocean and Coastal Management.--The Committee is concerned 
that the Federal Coastal Zone Management Program has not 
adequately identified State practices that may contribute to 
coastal hazards. The NOAA is to provide a report to the 
Committees on Appropriations by September 15, 2001, that 
identifies States with Federally approved Coastal Management 
Programs with policies that allow for the readjustment of 
beachfront zoning, building baselines, and setback regulations 
based upon shoreline accretion and erosional characteristics. 
This report will specifically identify those States with 
policies that allow artificial shoreline accretion and beach 
nourishment to be the basis for modifying placement of 
beachfront zoning lines, baselines, and construction setback 
mechanisms.
    The Committee recommendation includes $3,000,000 for marine 
protected areas. The Committee notes that a national discussion 
on the potential of marine protected areas to protect the 
country's marine resources is merited. The Committee is 
concerned, however, that the nature of this discussion could be 
limited only to the input of Federal officials and ignore the 
true stakeholders and users of these resources. The Committee 
strongly recommends that NOAA seek broad input from commercial 
and sport fishermen as well as from scientists, fisheries 
experts, and environmentalists before rendering any decisions 
or making any recommendations to the Secretary of Commerce or 
to the Congress on the matter of creating marine protected 
areas. NOAA will submit a spending plan to the Committees on 
Appropriations on how it intends to engage the above groups 
before any of the funds for marine protected areas are 
obligated. Finally, the Committee notes that NOAA skillfully 
facilitated a broad discussion regarding the Tortugas 
Ecological Reserves in Florida and recommends that similar 
approaches to designating marine protected areas be applied in 
the future.
    The Committee encourages NOAA to continue its work with the 
Mariner's Museum and the Navy on efforts to recover and 
preserve the Monitor. The Committee does not recommend funding 
for the Sustainable Seas Expedition. During this time of 
budgetary constraint, it is critical that NOAA use limited 
staff time and days at sea judiciously in order to fulfill its 
core scientific and research missions. To date, NOAA has 
requested $1,500,000 for the Sustainable Seas Expedition and 
spent over $10,000,000. It appears that NOAA did not adhere to 
section 605 of this bill. Furthermore, the Committee expects 
that no ship time will be allocated to the Sustainable Seas 
Expedition. The Committee has provided $14,000,000 in Oceanic 
and Atmospheric Research for Ocean Exploration. This investment 
will allow for a cross-agency, multi-institution partnership 
with a common goal of discovery and exploration of the last 
major frontier on Earth. This activity should replace the 
Sustainable Seas Expedition as NOAA's investment in undersea 
exploration, research, and technology in both the deep ocean 
and areas of special concern, such as the National Marine 
Sanctuaries.

                   National Marine Fisheries Service


                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
Fisheries Research and Management Services:               recommendation
    Science and Technology:
        Base..................................................    64,725
        AKFIN.................................................     3,500
        Alaska Fisheries Development Foundation...............     1,750
        Alaska Groundfish Monitoring--Base....................     2,090
        Alaska Groundfish Monitoring--Bering Sea Fishermen....       150
        Alaska Groundfish Monitoring--Crab Research...........       850
        Alaska Groundfish Monitoring--Gulf of Alaska Coastal 
          Communities.........................................       175
        Alaska Groundfish Monitoring--NMFS Field Fishery 
          Monitor- 
          ing.................................................       300
        Alaska Groundfish Monitoring--NMFS Rockfish Research..       350
        Alaska Groundfish Monitoring--Rockfish Research/Crab..       240
        Alaska Groundfish Monitoring--State of AK Crab, 
          Scallop License Limitation..........................     1,600
        Alaska Groundfish Monitoring--Winter Pollock Survey...     1,000
        Alaska Groundfish Surveys--Base.......................     1,500
        Alaska Groundfish Surveys--Calibration Studies........       250
        American Fisheries Act--Base..........................     3,525
        Atlantic Herring and Mackerel.........................       200
        Bering Sea Pollock Research...........................       945
        Bluefin Tuna Tagging..................................       850
        Bluefish/Striped Bass--Base...........................       700
        Charleston Bump Billfish Tagging......................       150
        Chinoock Salmon Research at Auke Bay..................       300
        Computer Hardware and Software........................     3,500
        Cooperative Research--National Cooperative Research...     3,000
        Cooperative Research--SE Cooperative Research.........     3,000
        Driftnet Act Implementation--Base.....................     1,800
        Driftnet Act Implementation--Pacific Rim Fisheries....       150
        Driftnet Act Implementation--Science Observer Russian 
          EEZ.................................................       250
        Driftnet Act Implementation--State Participation AK/WA       200
        Expand Stock Assessments--Improve Data Collection.....    15,000
        Fish Statistics--Atlantic Coastal Cooperative 
          Statistics Pro- 
          gram................................................     3,000
        Fish Statistics--Base.................................    13,900
        Fish Statistics--Economics and Social Sciences 
          Research............................................     3,365
        Fish Statistics--National Fisheries Information System     5,000
        Fish Statistics--National Standard 8..................     1,000
        Fisheries Development Program--HI Fisheries 
          Development.........................................     1,000
        Fisheries Development Program--Product Quality and 
          Safety/Seafood Inpsection...........................     8,685
        Fisheries Oceanography................................     1,500
        GULFFIN Data Collection Effort........................     3,500
        Gulf of Maine Groundfish Survey.......................       570
        Gulf of Mexico Consortium.............................     4,000
        Hawaii Stock Management Plan..........................       500
        Highly Migratory Shark Fishery Research Program.......     1,950
        Impact on Ocean Climate Shifts (OAR)..................     6,000
        Information Analysis & Dissemination..................    21,890
        Joint Institute for Marine and Atmospheric Research 
          (JIMAR).............................................     3,000
        Lobster Sampling......................................       150
        Magnuson-Stevens Implementation AK....................     4,350
        MARFIN--Base..........................................     2,500
        MARFIN--NE Activities.................................       250
        MARFIN--Red Snapper...................................       750
        MarMap................................................       850
        NE Cooperative Research...............................     5,000
        NEC Cooperative Marine Education and Research.........       200
        New England Stock Depletion...........................     1,000
        NMFS Cooperative Research Implementation..............     3,500
        NMFS Facilities Maintenance...........................     4,400
        Northeast Consortium Cooperative Research.............     5,000
        Observers/Training--Alaska Marine Mammals.............       100
        Observers/Training--Atlantic Coast Observers..........     3,350
        Observers/Training--California Longline...............       100
        Observers/Training--East Coast Observers..............       350
        Observers/Training--Hawaii Longline Observer Program..     4,000
        Observers/Training--NE Groundfish Trawl...............       150
        Observers/Training--N. Pacific Marine Resources 
          Observers...........................................     1,875
        Observers/Training--N. Pacific Observer Program.......       800
        Observers/Training--SE Shark..........................       125
        Observers/Training--National Special Projects.........        25
        Observers/Training--West Coast Observers..............     4,875
        PACFIN Catch Effort Data..............................     3,000
        Pacific Highly Migratory Species Research.............     1,000
        Predator Prey Relationships (NOS).....................     2,000
        Recreational Fishery Harvest Monitoring...............     3,700
        Red Snapper Monitoring and Research...................     7,500
        SEAMAP................................................     1,400
        Shrimp Pathogens......................................       300
        South Carolina Taxonomic Center.......................       350
        Steller Sea Lion/Pollock Research--N. Pacific Council.     2,000
        West Coast Groundfish.................................     5,070
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Science and Technology....................   260,930
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Conservation and Management:
        Base..................................................     7,710
        Alaska Near Shore Fisheries...........................     1,250
        American Fisheries Act--Base..........................     2,175
        American Fisheries Act--N. Pacific Council............       500
        American Fisheries Act--State of Alaska...............       500
        Anadromous Grants.....................................     2,100
        Anadromous Fish Commission--North Pacific.............     1,000
        Bering Sea Crab.......................................     1,500
        Cooper River Corridor Management......................       250
        Fisheries Management Programs.........................    31,255
        Habitat Conservation..................................        65
        Halibut/Sablefish.....................................     1,200
        Hawaii Community Development..........................       500
        Interjurisdictional Fisheries Grants..................     2,590
        International Fisheries Commissions...................       400
        Interstate Fish Commissions--3 Commissions............       750
        Interstate Fish Commissions--Atlantic Cooperative 
          Management..........................................     7,250
        Kotzebue Sound Test (King Crab & Sea Snail)...........       200
        Magnuson-Stevens Implementation--AK...................     2,050
        Management of George's Bank...........................       480
        National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)..............     5,000
        National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA)--Hawaiian Sea 
          Turtles.............................................     3,000
        Oregon Groundfish Outreach Program....................     2,000
        Regional Councils.....................................    15,650
        Yukon River Chinook Salmon--Base......................     1,000
        Yukon River Drainage Fisheries Association............       500
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Conservation and Management...............    90,875
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, Fisheries Research and Management Services...   351,805
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Protected Resources Research and Management Services:
    Science and Technology:
        Base..................................................    11,985
        Antarctic Research....................................     2,000
        Atlantic Salmon Research..............................       710
        Columbia River--Endangered Species Studies............       300
        Data Collection--HI Sea Turtle Research...............     3,000
        Dolphin Encirclement..................................     3,300
        Dolphin/Yellowfin Tuna Research.......................       250
        Endangered Species Act--Atlantic Salmon...............     3,000
        Endangered Species Act--Marine Mammals................     4,500
        Endangered Species Act--Other Species.................     2,700
        Endangered Species Act--Right Whale Activities........     2,250
        Endangered Species Act--Right Whale Activities NE 
          Consort- 
          ium.................................................     1,000
        Endangered Species Act--Sea Turtles...................     6,340
        Endangered Species Act--Steller Sea Lions.............       850
        Habitat Conservation..................................     4,600
        Hawaiian Monk Seals...................................       800
        Hawaiian Sea Turtles..................................       300
        Marine Mammal Protection--Base........................     2,640
        Marine Mammal Protection--AK Harbor Seal Research.....     1,000
        Marine Mammal Protection--Erysipelas Research.........       250
        Protected Species Management--Base....................     5,275
        Protected Species Management--Bottlenose Dolphin 
          Research............................................     2,000
        Rancho Nuevo Sea Turtles..............................       350
        Steller Sea Lion Recovery Plan--AK Sea Life Center....     8,000
        Steller Sea Lion Recovery Plan--Base..................    12,300
        Steller Sea Lion Recovery Plan--N. Pacific University 
          Marine Mammal Consortium............................     5,000
        Steller Sea Lion Recovery Plan--University of AK Gulf 
          Apex Predator.......................................     1,000
        Steller Sea Lion Recovery Plan--Alaska Fisheries 
          Foundation..........................................       500
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Science and Technology....................    86,200
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Conservation and Management Services:
        Base..................................................     4,985
        Atlantic Salmon Recovery Plan.........................       450
        Chinook Salmon Management.............................       150
        Cook Inlet Beluga.....................................       300
        Endangered Species Act--Atlantic Salmon...............       500
        Endangered Species Act--Right Whale Activities........     2,250
        Endangered Species Act--Right Whale Cooperative State
          Plans...............................................     1,500
        Habitat Conservation..................................     1,760
        Marine Mammal Protection--Base........................     4,585
        Marine Mammal Strandings..............................     4,000
        Marine Mammal Strandings--Charleston Tissue Bank......       800
        Native Marine Mammals--AK Eskimo Whaling Commission...       400
        Native Marine Mammals--Aleut Pacific Marine Resources 
          Observers...........................................       125
        Native Marine Mammals--Beluga Whale Committee.........       225
        Native Marine Mammals--Bristol Bay Native Asso........        50
        Native Marine Mammals--Alaska Native Harbor Seal 
          Commission..........................................       150
        Protected Species Management--Base....................     3,235
        Protected Species Management--California Sea Lions....       750
        Protected Species Management--NFWF Species Management.     1,000
        Protected Species Management--State of Maine Salmon 
          Recovery............................................     5,000
        Southeastern Sea Turtles..............................       300
        State of Maine Recovery Plan..........................       150
        Steller Sea Lion Recovery--State of Alaska Work.......     2,500
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Conservation and Management Services......    35,165
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Subtotal, Protected Resources Research and 
          Management
          ....................................................
            Services..........................................   121,365
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Habitat Conservation:
    Sustainable Habitat Management:
        Base..................................................     2,000
        Blue Crab Research Consortium.........................     2,000
        Charleston Bump.......................................       300
        Chesapeake Bay Multi-Species Management...............       500
        Chesapeake Bay Oyster Research........................       850
        Chesapeake Bay Studies................................     3,000
        Chesapeake Bay Environmental Education Program........     1,200
        Coral Reef............................................    11,000
        Habitat Conservation..................................     2,960
        Magnuson-Stevens Implementation--AK...................       850
        Mobile Bay Oyster Recovery............................     1,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Sustainable Habitat Management............    25,660
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Fisheries Habitat Restoration.............................    12,400
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal, Habitat Conservation..........................    38,060
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Enforcement and Surveillance:
        Enforcement:
            Driftnet Act Implementation/Base..................     1,375
            Enforcement and Surveillance--Base................    20,420
            Enforcement and Surveillance--Cooperative 
              agreements with States..........................     2,500
            Enforcement and Surveillance--Vessel Monitoring 
              System..........................................     5,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

              Subtotal, Enforcement...........................    29,295
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
        Cooperative Enforcement Programs:
            Enforcement and Surveillance--Cooperative 
              agreements with States..........................    15,000
            NH Fish & Game Enforcement Vessel.................       250
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

              Subtotal, Cooperative Enforcement Programs......    15,250
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
              Subtotal, Enforcement and Surveillance..........    44,545
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
              Total, National Marine Fisheries Service........   555,775

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table above are described in more detail in the following 
paragraphs.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $555,775,000 
for the National Marine Fisheries Service [NMFS]. The 
recommendation is $42,261,000 below the budget request. The 
Committee has included bill language directing NMFS to obligate 
$6,000,000 to the NOAA Office of General Counsel. This will 
enable the Under Secretary and Associate Offices to remain 
fully funded. The Committee directs that this realignment will 
only come from NMFS base funds.
    The Committee observes that there are opportunities to 
significantly improve the regulatory processes of the National 
Marine Fisheries Service. Currently, NMFS handles each 
Endangered Species Act or National Environmental Policy Act 
case on an ad hoc basis, causing unnecessary delays, 
unpredictable outcomes, and a lack of accountability. The 
development and application of standardized practices would 
improve the quality and efficiency of regulatory decisions and 
raise the likelihood of success in litigation. The Committee 
instructs NOAA and NMFS to develop and apply throughout NMFS 
standardized practices for regulatory decisions. Furthermore, 
the Committee recommends streamlining the process by reducing 
the layers of review and concentrating the responsibility on 
qualified decision makers. The Committee expects to receive a 
plan for accomplishing these objectives by December 15, 2001, 
followed by quarterly reports of progress against these 
objectives.
    The Committee remains concerned that NMFS has become 
overburdened by lawsuits regarding a variety of issues related 
to fisheries and protected species, including the Steller sea 
lion and the Northern right whale. In order to assist the 
Committee in assessing this trend, NMFS is directed to provide 
a quarterly status report on pending litigation.
    Cooperative activities by Federal and State agencies are a 
vital part of conservation programs for many endangered and 
threatened species under the jurisdiction of the National 
Marine Fisheries Service. Among other things, state agencies 
offer knowledge, personnel, expertise, resources, and the legal 
authority to help carry out urgent research and management 
tasks. The Committee encourages NOAA to examine the existing 
and potential role of state agencies in carrying out recovery 
program tasks for Hawaiian monk seals, right whales, and other 
endangered or threatened marine species under the jurisdiction 
of the Secretary of Commerce. Where appropriate and not already 
in effect, the Committee encourages NOAA to develop cooperative 
agreements with states under section 6 of the Endangered 
Species Act to establish or clarify state agency involvement in 
those recovery programs. The Committee expects NOAA to request 
appropriations in their fiscal year 2003 budget under section 6 
to support cooperative state activities that contribute to the 
recovery of endangered marine species.
    In the past, Congress provided $7,000,000 under Magnuson-
Stevens Act for the Pribilof Islands to address the severe 
economic impact caused by precipitous decline in crab stocks in 
the Bering Sea. The Committee is concerned that the economy of 
the village of St. George was so adversely impacted, it has not 
been able to provide the required local match and has not been 
able to access the economic recovery funds. The Committee has 
included bill language waiving the match consistent with 
Interjurisdictional Fisheries Act.
    Out of base funds budgeted for the Southwest Regional 
Office [SWR], the Committee provides $1,000,000 for the Pacific 
Islands Area Office [PIAO] for administrative costs associated 
with the transition of the PIAO to the Western Pacific Regional 
Office. Within 30 days of date of enactment, SWR shall provide 
a report identifying all funds expended in fiscal years 2000 
and 2001 by the SWR to support programs relating to Western 
Pacific region.
    The Committee recommendation includes $7,000,000 for North 
Atlantic right whale research and management activities. Of the 
amount provided, $1,000,000 is for the Northeast Consortium to 
complete funding of right whale research grants awarded in 
fiscal year 2001; and, $1,500,000 is for Atlantic coastal 
states to implement cooperative federal-state right whale 
recovery plans, such as those concluded under section 6 of the 
Endangered Species Act [ESA]. The Committee strongly encourages 
NMFS to conclude ESA section 6 agreements with coastal states 
of concern prior to fiscal year 2003. The remaining $4,500,000 
is for NMFS to expedite right whale recovery in consultation 
with the Implementation Team and the Take Reduction Team. The 
NMFS is expected to support priority management, enforcement, 
and ship strike prevention activities, including expedited 
development and deployment of innovative fishing gear and whale 
tracking technologies, improved stranding response and 
procedures, a whale-sighting advisory system, and a mandatory 
ship-reporting system. No more than 20 percent of funds 
provided to NMFS may be used for salaries of existing 
personnel. The Committee expects NMFS to submit a status report 
to Congress describing its progress in meeting the priority 
recovery goals established in the 5-year research and 
management plan, as was requested in the fiscal year 2001 
Conference Report. The Committee notes that this report has not 
been submitted for review by the Appropriations subcommittee. 
None of the funds for right whale activities may be obligated 
until this report has been approved.
    The Committee supports NMFS's efforts to address 
international conservation and recovery of sea turtles through 
an international bycatch strategy under Magnuson-Stevens Act 
Section 202(h), which calls for the Secretary of State, in 
cooperation with the Secretary of Commerce, to seek 
international agreements to establish standards and measures 
for bycatch reduction that are comparable to U.S. standards. 
International action is urgently needed in the international 
longline fishery, particularly in the Pacific region. In 
furtherance of this goal, the Committee directs NMFS, in 
cooperation with the Department of State, to work with other 
nations and industry, including the Asia-Pacific Economic 
Cooperation Forum, to develop alternative fishing technologies 
and practices designed to reduce incidental capture mortality 
of sea turtles in the international longline fleet. NMFS is 
urged to convene preparatory meetings on gear development, 
particularly in the Pacific region, prior to the technical 
workshop scheduled for 2002 to ensure that agreement on 
alternative gear research and data sharing, including 
timetables for specific action, can be concluded at this 
workshop. The Department of Commerce and Department of State 
shall report back on the status of these efforts within 90 days 
of enactment of this Act. The Committee recommendation includes 
$500,000 under NOAA ``Executive Direction and Administration'' 
for travel expenses associated with this effort.
    Fisheries Research and Management.--The Committee 
recommendation includes $5,000,000 for the National Fisheries 
Information System. The NMFS will submit a spending plan on the 
capabilities and out-year costs of this system before any funds 
for it may be obligated. The Committee has provided $3,700,000 
for the recreational fishing information network [RecFIN] 
program, and expects that the Pacific, Atlantic, and Gulf 
States shall each receive one-third of these funds with funding 
for inshore recreational species assessment and tagging efforts 
in South Carolina. The Committee expects that $250,000 will be 
used to continue the effort to enhance the annual collection 
and analysis of economic data on marine recreational fishing. 
The Committee recommends that the $750,000 for the Interstate 
Fish Commissions be equally divided among the three 
commissions. As in prior fiscal years, funds appropriated for 
the Hawaii Fisheries Development and Hawaii Stock Management 
Plan programs shall be administered by the Oceanic Institute.
    Protected Resources Research and Management.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $1,000,000 to Marine Mammal 
Protection--Alaska Harbor Seal Research to be split evenly 
between the Alaska Sea Life Center and the Alaska Native Harbor 
Seal Commission.
    Habitat Conservation.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $3,000,000 for Chesapeake Bay Studies. In addition, 
the Committee recommends that NOAA initiate a micro-grant 
program allowing local governments and non-profit organizations 
to perform fisheries and shellfish restoration on the 
Chesapeake Bay.
    Enforcement and Surveillance.--The Committee recommendation 
provides $250,000 for a fisheries enforcement vessel for the 
New Hampshire Department of Fish and Game. This vessel should 
be used equally for biological research and fisheries 
enforcement.

                    Oceanic and Atmospheric Research

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
Climate Research:                                         recommendation
    Laboratories & Joint Institutes:
        Aeronomy Laboratory (Colorado)........................     8,090
        Atlantic Oceanographic and Meterological Laboratory 
          (Florida)...........................................     5,675
        Air Resources Laboratory (CO, ID, NC, NV, TN).........     3,440
        Climate Diagnostic Center (Colorado)..................     2,550
        Climate Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory 
          (Colorado)..........................................     5,935
        Environmental Technology Laboratory (Colorado)........       240
        Forecast Systems Laboratory (Colorado)................       155
        Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (New Jersey)....    14,190
        Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (Washington)..     8,345
        Space Environmental Center (Colorado).................       235
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Laboratories & Joint Institutions.........    48,855
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Climate & Global Change Program:
        Climate and Global Change (Base)......................    67,855
        Variability beyond ENSO...............................     1,000
        Climate Forcing Agents................................     1,000
        Accelerating Climate Models--IRI......................     2,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Climate & Global Change Program...........    71,855
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Climate Observations & Services:
        Climate Reference Network.............................     3,000
        Climate Data & Info and CLASS in PAC..................     1,000
        Baseline Observatories................................     3,000
        Ocean Observations/Ocean Systems......................     4,350
        Argo Floats...........................................     7,950
        Regional Assessments, Education and Outreach..........     1,850
        Climate Change Assessments............................       650
        Weather-Climate Connection............................       900
        Carbon Cycle..........................................     2,300
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Climate Observations & Services...........    25,000
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Other Partnership Programs:
        Central California Ozone Study........................       500
        East Tennessee ozone study............................       300
        AIRMAP................................................     4,500
        International Pacific Research Center (U of HI).......       500
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Other Partnership Programs................     5,800
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, Climate Research.............................   151,510
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Weather & Air Quality Research:
    Laboratories & Joint Institutes:
        Aeronomy Laboratory (Colorado)........................     2,050
        Atlantic Oceanographic and Meterological Laboratory 
          (Florida)...........................................     3,910
        Air Resources Laboratory (CO, ID, NC, NV, TN).........     2,070
        Climate Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory 
          (Colorado)..........................................       165
        Environmental Technology Laboratory (Colorado)........     6,845
        Forecast Systems Laboratory (Colorado)................    10,615
        Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (New Jersey)....     3,070
        National Severe Storms Labroratory (Oklahoma).........     7,530
        Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (Washington)..       260
        Space Environmental Center (Colorado).................     7,220
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Laboratories & Joint Institutes...........    43,735
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    U.S. Weather Research Program:
        U.S. Weather Research Program Base (USWRP)............     3,730
        Space-Based Wind Profile Lidar Technology.............     1,000
        Air Quality Forecasting Pilot Program.................     4,000
        High Resolution Temperature Forecasting Pilot Program.     5,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, U.S. Weather Research Program.............    13,730
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Other Partnership Programs:
        New England Air Quality Study.........................     2,000
        New England Airshed Pollution Analysis................       200
        STORM (U. of N. Iowa).................................     1,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Other Partnership Programs................     3,200
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, Weather & Air Quality Research...............    60,665
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Ocean, Coastal, and Great Lakes Research:
    Laboratories & Joint Institutes:
        Atlantic Oceanographic and Meterological Laboratory 
          (Florida)...........................................     2,720
        AOML Coral Reef Watch.................................       500
        Environmental Technology Laboratory (Colorado)........       445
        Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory 
          (Michigan)..........................................     8,700
        Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (Washington)..     7,390
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Laboratories & Joint Institutes...........    19,755
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    National Sea Grant College Program:
        National Sea Grant College Program Base...............    56,400
        Aquatic Nuisance Species/Zebra Mussel Research........     3,000
        Gulf of Mexico Oyster Initiative......................     1,000
        Oyster Disease Research...............................     2,000
        Sea Grant Fisheries Extension.........................     3,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, National Sea Grant College Program........    65,400
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    National Undersea Research Program (NURP):
        National Undersea Research Program (NURP) Base........    13,850
        National Institute for Undersea Science and Technology     5,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, National Undersea Research Program........    18,850
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Ocean Exploration.........................................    14,000
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Other Partnership Programs:
        Arctic Research.......................................     3,650
        Cultured Cobia Demonstration (VIMS)...................       500
        Carolina Coastal Ocean Observing and Prediction System     2,800
        Gulf of Maine Council.................................       750
        Lake Champlain Research Consortium....................       300
        NISA/Ballast Water Demonstrations.....................       850
        NISA/Prevent & Control Invasive Species...............       800
        NOAA Marine Aquaculture Program.......................     3,600
        Cooperative Institute for New England Mariculture & 
          Fisheries (UNH).....................................     4,000
        Pacific Tropical Ornamental Fish......................       500
        Aquaculture Management Plan--RICRMC...................     1,600
        SE Atlantic Marine Monitoring & Pred. Center (UNC)....     1,500
        Tsunami Hazard Mitigation (incl. TWEAK)...............     3,800
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Other Partnership Programs................    24,650
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, Ocean, Coastal, & Great Lakes Research.......   142,655
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    High Performance Computing & Communications (HPCC)........    12,800
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Total, NOAA Research................................   367,630

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table above are described in more detail in the following 
paragraphs.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $367,630,000 
for Oceanic and Atmospheric Research. The recommendation is 
$37,442,000 above the budget request.
    Climate Observations and Services.--Of the amounts 
appropriated for Argo, no less than 275 floats shall be 
deployed. The Committee recommends that with the funds provided 
for the Carbon Cycle line, at least one sampling site be 
established in New Hampshire.
    Weather and Air Quality Research.--Of the $3,730,000 
provided for the Weather Research Program base, the Committee 
recommends $500,000 for continued development of the 3-D 
ceilometer in Hawaii. In addition, the Committee recommendation 
includes $4,000,000 for a pilot air quality forecasting system 
to increase the operational efficiency of power plants while 
minimizing their impact on air quality. The Committee 
recommendation also includes $5,000,000 to operate a model and 
deploy meteorological sensors to improve the daily temperature 
forecasts in a specific region. This will foster greater energy 
efficiency and more accurate electrical load forecasting.
    Ocean, Coastal, and Great Lakes Research.--Within the 
amount provided for the Great Lakes Environmental Research Lab 
(GLERL), the Committee recommends that NOAA support research 
programs on aquatic invasive species mitigation and reduction 
in the Lake Champlain Basin. In addition, the Committee 
recommends $500,000 for a study on the construction of an 
interagency facility owned by NOAA which would replace a 
leasing arrangement. The Committee recommends $13,850,000 for 
the National Undersea Research Program (NURP). Of the amount 
provided, $6,925,000 is for research conducted through the east 
coast NURP centers and $6,925,000 is for the west coast NURP 
centers, including the Hawaiian and Pacific Center and the West 
Coast and Polar Regions Center. The Committee expects level 
funding will be available for Aquarius, ALVIN, and program 
administration.

                        National Weather Service

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation

Local Warnings and Forecasts:
    Local Warnings and Forecasts Base.........................   480,000
    Alaska Data Buoys.........................................     1,700
    New England Data Buoys....................................       750
    Sustain Cooperative Observer Network......................     2,300
    Mt. Washington Observatory................................       500
    Susquehanna River Basin Flood System......................     1,500
    Aviation Forecasts........................................    35,600
    Kentucky Mesonet..........................................     2,000
    Texas Mesonet.............................................     2,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal, Local Warnings and Forecasts..................   526,350
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Advanced Hydrological Prediction Service......................     1,500
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
WFO Maintenance...............................................     4,550
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Weather Radio Transmitters:
    Weather Radio Transmitters Base...........................     2,320
    NOAA Weather Radio Transmitters--ME.......................       350
    NOAA Weather Radio Transmitters--NH.......................       230
    NOAA Weather Radio Transmitters--SD.......................       400
    NOAA Weather Radio Transmitters--WY.......................       500
    North Dakota Ag Weather Network...........................       270
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal, Weather Radio Transmitters....................     4,070
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Central Forecast Guidance.....................................    43,000
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Systems Operation & Maintenance (O&M;):
    NEXRAD....................................................    40,000
    ASOS......................................................    12,650
    AWIPS.....................................................    36,500
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Total, Systems Operation & Maintenance..................    89,150
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, National Weather Service.........................   668,620

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table above are described in more detail in the following 
paragraphs.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $668,620,000 
for the National Weather Service [NWS] for operations, 
acquisitions, and research. The recommendation is $10,164,000 
above the request.
    Local Warnings and Forecasts.--The ``1995 Secretary's 
Report to Congress on Adequacy of NEXRAD Coverage and 
Degradation of Weather Services'' requested further studies of 
several sites, including Williston, ND and Erie, PA. The 
Committee provided funds to begin mitigation in fiscal year 
1999 at these sites. The Committee has provided $4,790,000 to 
continue current operations at these sites. In addition, the 
Committee directs the NWS to make appropriate arrangements to 
maintain a local presence for the maintenance of the NOAA 
weather radio antenna in Erie, PA and develop a strategy to 
adequately address the prediction of lake-effect snow in the 
area. The Committee recommendation includes funding for three 
data buoys off New England in accordance with the National 
Research Council report of 1998.
    Advanced Hydrological Prediction Service.--The Committee 
recommendation provides $1,500,000 for the Advanced 
Hydrological Prediction Service, an increase of $500,000. The 
Committee expects that this increase will cover the development 
of this service for New Hampshire.
    Systems Operation and Maintenance.--The Committee notes 
that Alaska has the highest pilot death rate in the nation. No 
weather forecasting facilities exist in dozens of remote Native 
Alaskan villages. Accidents are often caused by rapidly 
changing weather conditions for which no forecasting 
information is available. The Committee recommendation provides 
$12,650,000 for Automated Surface Observing System [ASOS], of 
which $5,000,000 is for the installation of forecasting 
equipment in remote Alaskan villages.

    National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service


                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation

Environmental Satellite Observing Systems:
    Satellite Command and Control.............................    32,790
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Product Processing and Distribution.......................    28,700
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Product Development, Readiness & Application:
        Product Development, Readiness & Application..........    22,720
        Coral Reef Monitoring.................................       750
        Global Wind Demonstration.............................     3,500
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Product Development, Readiness & 
          Application.........................................    26,970
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Commercial Remote Sensing Licensing & Enforcement.........     1,200
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, Environmental Satellite Observing Systems........    89,660
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
NOAA's Data Centers & Information Services:
    Archive, Access & Assessment:
            Archive, Access & Assessment......................    32,190
            Climate Database Modernization....................     6,215
            GOES Data Archive Project.........................     2,000
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

              Subtotal, Archive, Access & Assessment..........    40,405
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    National Coastal Ocean Data Development and Management 
      Center--MS..............................................     4,515
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Regional Climate Centers..................................     3,600
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Environmental Data Systems Modernization..................    12,335
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, NOAA's Data Centers & Information Services.......    58,855
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, NESDIS...........................................   150,515

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $150,515,000 
for the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information 
Service [NESDIS]. The recommendation is $18,853,000 above the 
request.

                            Program Support

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
Corporate Services:                                       recommendation
    Under Secretary and Associate Offices Base................    17,890
    Policy Formulation and Direction Base.....................    36,365
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Total, Corporate Services...............................    54,255
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Office of Marine and Aviation Operations (OMAO):
    Aviation Operations: Aircraft Services....................    15,185
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal, Aviation Operations...........................    15,185
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Marine Operations:
        Marine Services.......................................    63,830
        Fleet Planning and Maintenance........................    19,020
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Total, Marine Operations............................    82,850
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, OMAO.........................................    98,035
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Facilities:
    NOAA Maintenance, Repairs and Safety......................     3,635
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Environmental Compliance..................................     2,000
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Project Planning and Execution: Boulder Facilities 
      Operations..............................................     5,000
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, Facilities.......................................    10,635
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, Program Support..................................   162,925

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $162,925,000 
for the NOAA program support functions. The recommendation is 
$1,555,000 below the request.
    Corporate Services.--The Committee does not recommend 
funding for a $15,000,000 initiative to provide funding to 
historically black colleges and universities to train 
scientists. While the Committee believes that more women and 
minorities should be encouraged to seek careers in mathematics 
and sciences, funding for this purpose should be provided by 
the Department of Education, the National Academy of Sciences, 
or the National Science Foundation.
    Office of Marine and Aviation Operations.--The Committee 
recommends that $62,000,000 for Acquisition of Data be 
transferred from the National Ocean Service, National Marine 
Fisheries Service, and Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric 
Research to NOAA's Office of Marine and Aviation Operations 
under the Marine Services line. The Committee recognizes this 
transfer of funds is necessary to enable further efficiencies 
in the use of both contracted and NOAA ships. Further, the 
Committee expects that this transfer of responsibility will 
result in no fewer days at sea for any NOAA program. Of the 
$15,185,000 provided in Aircraft Services, the Committee 
recommends that an additional $1,000,000 be used to support the 
necessary overhaul of the P-3 aircraft. Prior to the obligation 
of funds, NOAA is directed to provide to the Committees on 
Appropriations an assessment of the condition of the aircraft, 
especially as it relates to corrosion, and the anticipated 
benefits from spending $1,500,000 as it relates to aircraft 
performance and service life.
    The R/V RONALD H. BROWN, commissioned in 1997, is NOAA's 
premier deep ocean research vessel and the largest vessel in 
the NOAA fleet. Equipped with highly advanced instruments and 
sensors, the NOAA R/V RONALD H. BROWN is unique in the world 
research fleet, built to support scientific studies worldwide 
that will increase our understanding of oceans and climate. The 
Committee notes that at a time that global warming and study of 
the role of the oceans in climate change has taken on 
increasing urgency, a substantial portion of the vessel's days 
at sea have been used to deploy and retrieve buoys in the 
Pacific rather than to support important atmospheric and 
oceanographic research in the Atlantic and elsewhere. While the 
Committee acknowledges the importance of maintaining these 
oceanographic buoys, other NOAA vessels or smaller charter 
vessels are more suitable to that mission. The Committee 
directs NOAA to plan for the R/V RONALD H. BROWN to spend no 
less than 139 days at sea in the Atlantic Ocean during fiscal 
year 2002 for oceanographic research opportunities lost in 
prior years.
    The Committee recommendation provides $19,020,000 for Fleet 
Planning and Maintenance. Of this amount, the Committee 
recommends $7,200,000 for equipment to support NOAA's mapping 
and charting missions. Funds for this purpose are authorized 
under the Hydrographic Services Improvement Act of 1998, the 
National Marine Sanctuaries Amendments of 2000, and the Coral 
Reef Conservation Act of 2000.

               PROCUREMENT, ACQUISITION, AND CONSTRUCTION

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
NOS:                                                      recommendation
    Construction and Acquisition:
        Beaufort Laboratory...................................    5,000 
        Coastal Service Center (Wing).........................    4,000 
        Coastal and Estuarine Land Conservation Program.......   60,000 
        Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary................    6,500 
        Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary..............    2,200 
        Kachemak Bay Service Facility.........................      800 
        Kasitsna Bay Laboratory...............................    5,500 
        Marine Environmental Health Research Laboratory 
          Enhancement & Equipment.............................   14,000 
        Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary................    3,000 
        NERRS Acquisition.....................................    9,910 
        Stellwagen Bank National Marine Sanctuary.............     1000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, NOS Construction..........................  111,910 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total NOS...........................................  111,910 
NMFS:
    Construction:
        Alaska Facilities Fisheries Center Juneau.............   21,100 
        Honolulu..............................................    3,000 
        Kodiak Pier...........................................    4,000 
        Ketchikan Facilities..................................    1,500 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, NMFS Construction.........................   29,600 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Fleet Replacement:
        Fisheries Research Vessel Replacement.................   54,000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, NMFS Fleet Replacement....................   54,000 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, NMFS.........................................   83,600 
OAR:
    Systems Acquisition:
        Comprehensive Large Array Data Stewardship System.....    3,600 
        Research Supercomputing...............................    6,500 
        Stone Laboratory......................................    1,000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, OAR Systems Acquisition...................   11,100 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Construction: Norman Consolidation Project................   15,000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal, OAR Construction..............................   15,000 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, OAR..............................................   26,100 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
NWS:
    Systems Acquisition:
        ASOS..................................................    5,125 
        AWIPS.................................................   16,265 
        NEXRAD................................................    8,260 
        NWSTG Backup--CIP.....................................    7,000 
        Radiosonde Network Replacement........................    5,000 
        Weather and Climate Supercomputing....................   15,000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, NWS Systems Acquisition...................   56,650 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Construction: WFO Construction............................   12,000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal, NWS Construction..............................   12,000 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, NWS..............................................   68,650 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
NESDIS:
    Systems Acquisition:
        Geostationary Systems.................................  290,000 
        Polar Orbiting Systems................................  296,000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, NESDIS Systems Acquisition................  586,000 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Construction: Continuity of Critical Facilities...........    4,550 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal, NESDIS Construction...........................    4,550 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, NESDIS...........................................  590,550 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Program Support:
    CAMS......................................................   15,000 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    OMAO/Fleet Replacement:
        ADVENTUROUS Refurbishment.............................    4,200 
        ALBATROSS IV Repairs..................................    4,000 
        FAIRWEATHER Refurbishment.............................   12,500 
        GORDON GUNTER.........................................    1,800 
        Naval Surplus Vessels for Coastal Research (YTT)......    4,500 
        Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull Vessel................   14,000 
        T-AGS Vessel Conversion...............................    6,000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, OMAO......................................   47,000 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, Program Support..............................   62,000 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, Procurement, Acquisition, and Construction--
          Conser- 
          ....................................................
            vation............................................  [83,410]
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, Procurement, Acquisition, and Construction...  939,610 

    The Committee recommendation provides $939,610,000 for 
Procurement, Acquisition, and Construction. This amount 
includes $3,200,000 in recoveries from prior years. The 
recommendation is $174,749,000 above the request. The amount 
provided includes $83,410,000 for programs in the conservation 
spending category.
    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table above are described in more detail in the following 
paragraphs.
    National Ocean Service.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $5,000,000 for the Beaufort Laboratory for necessary 
repairs to existing facilities and to construct a joint 
laboratory, dock, and other facilities in collaboration with 
the Rachel Carson National Estuarine Research Reserve. The 
Committee recommends $60,000,000 for the coastal and estuarine 
land conservation program. This program is funded under the 
conservation spending category. This new program will provide 
funds for matching grants to States, communities, and groups 
engaged in land conservation efforts that benefit coastal and 
estuarine areas. These funds will be used expressly to acquire 
lands or interests in lands that include significant 
conservation, recreation, ecological, historical or aesthetic 
values to further the goals of a federally approved Coastal 
Zone Management Program or a National Estuarine Research 
Reserve. Of the amount provided for this program in fiscal year 
2002, the Committee recommends the following projects: 
$10,000,000 for ACE Basin; $6,000,000 for the Great Bay 
Partnership; $1,250,000 for Mill River Harbor, CT; $3,000,000 
for Morris Island, SC; $10,000,000 for Long Island, SC; 
$370,000 for Old Woman Creek, OH; $3,000,000 for Elkhorn 
Slough, CA; $325,000 for Taskinas Creek, VA; $1,000,000 for 
Hempstead Harbor, NY; $1,100,000 for Tilamook Bay, OR; $800,000 
for Kitsap County, WA; $370,000 is for Massachusetts Bay, 
Manchester, MA; $875,000 for Lake Ontario, Parma, NY; 
$2,000,000 for Maryland Coastal Bays, MD; $3,000,000 for Hawaii 
Coastal Conservation; $3,000,000 for Los Cerritos Wetlands, 
Long Beach, CA; $350,000 for Carnes acquisition, Juneau Public 
Parks, Juneau, AK; and $4,000,000 for Tongass National Forest 
coastal land acquisition.
    Program Support.--The Committee notes that the NOAA R/V 
FAIRWEATHER will conduct the vast majority of its research off 
the coast of Alaska, and has provided bill language to homeport 
the vessel in Ketchikan, Alaska. The Committee recommendation 
provides $14,000,000 for a Small Waterplane Area Twin Hull 
vessel to be homeported in New Castle, NH. In addition, the 
Committee recommends $6,000,000 to convert a T-AGS vessel to be 
homeported in Charleston, SC.

                                 Other

                       [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
Operations, Research, and Facilities:                     recommendation
    Direct Obligations........................................2,340,255 
    De-Obligations............................................  -17,000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal, Discretionary ORF Budget Authority............2,323,255 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Transfers:
        Promote & Develop American Fisheries..................  -68,000 
        Coastal Zone Management Fund..........................   -3,000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, ORF Transfers.............................  -71,000 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, CJS ORF Appropriation........................2,252,255 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Procurement, Acquisition, and Construction:
    Direct Obligations........................................  942,810 
    De-Obligations............................................   -3,200 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal, Discretionary PAC Budget Authority............  939,610 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, CJS PAC Appropriation............................  939,610 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Other Discretionary Appropriations:
    Coastal Zone Management Fund..............................    3,000 
    Fishermen's Contingency Fund..............................      952 
    Foreign Fishing Observer Fund.............................      191 
    Fisheries Financing Program...............................      287 
    Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery:
        Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund..................   70,000 
        Endangered Species Act--Pacific Salmon Recovery.......   38,000 
        Columbia River Hatcheries--Operations.................   11,430 
        Columbia River Hatcheries--Monitor, Evaluation and 
          Reform..............................................    1,700 
        Columbia River Facilities.............................    3,365 
        Pacific Salmon Treaty Implementation--Base............    5,600 
        Pacific Salmon Treaty Implementation--Chinook Salmon 
          Agreement...........................................    1,845 
        Pacific Salmon Treaty Implementation--Pacific Salmon 
          Commission..........................................    2,000 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

              Subtotal, Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery.......  133,940 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
              Total, Other Discretionary Appropriations--
              Conserva- 
              ................................................
                tion.......................................... [133,940]
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
              Total, Other Discretionary Appropriations.......  138,370 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      NOAA GRAND TOTAL DISCRETIONARY APPROPRIATIONS...........3,349,685 

                  Pacific Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $73,837,000 
Budget estimate, 2002...................................    110,000,000 
Committee recommendation................................    133,940,000 

    The Committee recommends $133,940,000 for Pacific Coastal 
Salmon conservation to be funded under the conservation 
category. Of this amount, $70,000,000 is for the Pacific 
Coastal Salmon Recovery Fund. Of this amount, the Committee 
recommends $20,600,000 for the State of Alaska, $20,150,000 for 
the State of Washington, $10,075,000 for the State of Oregon, 
$10,075,000 for the State of California, and $9,100,000 for the 
Tribes. Of the funds provided for the State of Alaska, $500,000 
is provided to study parasitic infection of chum salmon; 
$2,000,000 is provided to restore the Chester Creek salmon run; 
$5,000,000 is provided for an interagency, multi-disciplinary 
research effort to determine the causes of the decline of 
salmon species in Alaska; $800,000 is provided for hatchery 
operations; $200,000 is provided to restore the King Salmon 
runs in Craig, Alaska; $250,000 is provided to enable the State 
of Alaska to participate in discussions regarding the Columbia 
River hydrosystem management; and $750,000 is provided to the 
Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission to prevent the 
escapement of Atlantic salmon from Alaska streams and address 
other invasive species issues. Of the amounts provided for the 
State of Washington, $1,000,000 is for Washington State 
University and the University of Idaho for the Salmon 
Restoration Partnership, and $4,000,000 is for the Washington 
State Department of Natural Resources and other State and 
Federal agencies for purposes of implementing the State of 
Washington's Forest and Fish Report. The monies shall be spent 
in accordance with the terms and conditions of the Forest and 
Fish Report and consistent with the requirements of the 
Endangered Species Act and Clean Water Act. Of the amount 
provided to the State of Oregon, $1,000,000 is for culvert 
replacement and rehabilitation in Clakamas County, Oregon to 
help meet Federal Endangered Species Act mandates, and 
$1,000,000 is to address natural threats to the southern 
Oregon/northern California coho salmon in the Klamath River.

                      Coastal Zone Management Fund

    This fund consists of loan repayments arising from the 
former Coastal Energy Impact Program which are transferred to 
the ``Operations, research, and facilities'' account for 
program grants.
    The Committee recommendation includes $3,000,000 from the 
coastal zone management [CZM] fund for CZM program management 
and other purposes authorized by section 308 of the Coastal 
Zone Management Act.

                      Fishermen's Contingency Fund

Appropriations, 2001....................................        $950,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................         952,000
Committee recommendation................................         952,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $952,000 for 
the fishermen's contingency fund.
    The fishermen's contingency fund provides compensation to 
U.S. fishermen for damage or loss of fishing gear and any 
resulting loss because of natural or man-made obstructions 
related to oil and gas exploration, development, and production 
on the Outer Continental Shelf. The Secretary of Commerce is 
authorized to establish an area account within the fund for any 
area within the Outer Continental Shelf. A holder of a lease, 
permit, easement, or right-of-way in such area is required to 
pay a fee into the appropriate area account in the fund. Each 
area account, if depleted, will be replenished by assessment. 
The authorization stipulates that amounts available in each 
area account can be disbursed only to the extent provided by 
appropriations acts. Since receipts collected may not be 
sufficient for this appropriation, the Committee has included 
language which provides that the sums necessary to eliminate 
the insufficiency may be derived from the general fund of the 
Treasury.

                     Foreign Fishing Observer Fund

Appropriations, 2001....................................        $191,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................         191,000
Committee recommendation................................         191,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $191,000 for 
the foreign fishing observer fund.
    Fees paid into the fund are collected from owners and 
operators of certain foreign fishing vessels that fish within 
the U.S. fishery conservation zone. The fund supports salaries 
of U.S. observers and program support personnel, other 
administrative costs, and the cost of data management and 
analysis.

                   fisheries finance program account

Appropriations, 2001....................................        $287,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................         287,000
Committee recommendation................................         287,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $287,000 for 
the fisheries finance program account. Of the funds provided, 
$100,000 is for entry level and small vessel individual fishery 
quota (IFQ) obligation guarantees in the halibut and sablefish 
fisheries off Alaska pursuant to section 1104A(a)(7) of the 
Merchant Marine Act of 1936. These funds are provided for IFQ 
loans in accordance with section 303(d)(4) of the Magnuson-
Stevens Act and section 108(g) of the Sustainable Fisheries 
Act.

                         Department Management


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $35,841,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      37,652,000
Committee recommendation................................      42,062,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $42,062,000 
for Departmental Management. The recommendation is $4,410,000 
above the budget request. The Committee recommendation provides 
$750,000 for the National Academy of Sciences to conduct a 
study on the nature of global intellectual property 
counterfeiting and piracy. The purpose of the study is to 
develop effective, long-term strategies for addressing these 
threats to U.S. economic strength. The Department of Commerce 
will, in conjunction with the Department of Justice and not 
later than 1 month after enactment of this Act, grant this 
award to the National Academy of Sciences. The study will be 
completed by September 30, 2002. The Department of Commerce, 
the Department of Justice and other agencies shall fully 
cooperate with and provide necessary information to assess the 
current situation related to Intellectual Property theft.
    The Committee is concerned by the uncontrolled growth and 
lack of Congressional oversight of the Working Capital Fund 
[``the Fund'']. The Committee believes that the Department's 
use of bureau program funds which are appropriated for program 
purposes should be scrutinized through reprogramming 
procedures. In addition, the Committee is concerned by the 
Department's use of appropriated bureau program funds to 
finance new Departmental initiatives. It is the Committee's 
intent that all programs and activities financed through the 
Fund and all changes and increases to the Fund shall require 
the advance approval of the Committee under the provisions of 
Section 605. Consequently the Department will submit a request 
for reprogramming before any funds may be obligated to or from 
the Fund.
    The Committee has, over the past 6 months, engaged in 
discussions with Department of Commerce officials regarding the 
need for Departmental Fund reforms. As an outcome of these 
discussions and the information provided by the Department of 
Commerce at the Committee's request, the Committee has 
developed directives which should be included in the 
Department's request for reprogramming. They are outlined in 
the following paragraphs.
    The Committee has included bill language that caps the Fund 
at a level of $117,000,000 and 700 Full-Time Equivalents [FTE]. 
Included is language capping funding for the Commerce 
Administrative Management Systems [CAMS] or CAMS-related 
products at $40,000,000. No more than $15,000,000 for CAMS will 
be assessed to NOAA. Any reductions necessary to be taken to 
operate the Fund at the fiscal year 2002 authorized level of 
$117,000,000 will be based upon the numbers of FTE of the Fund 
service providers, beginning with those service providers which 
operate with the largest number of FTEs and funds. At a 
minimum, reductions will be taken from the three largest Fund 
accounts and service providers as reported in the fiscal year 
2002 Congressional Budget submission for Departmental 
Management. These service providers are the Office of 
Administrative Services, the Office of General Counsel and the 
Office of Security. The Office of Human Resources Management, 
Human Resources Services project and or its equivalent(s) will 
be reduced by at least $1,386,000.
    The Office of Management and Organization Support, Office 
of Budget Forms and Tracking System, Office of Human Resources 
Management Payroll Demonstration Project, Office of Human 
Resources Management Employee Diversity and Classification or 
their equivalents will be eliminated from the Fund.
    The Office of Human Resources Decennial Census and the 
Office of Civil Rights Census 2000 and or their equivalents 
will be eliminated from the Fund and may be billed through the 
Advances and Reimbursements Account [``A and R'' account].
    Further, the Committee notes that certain A and R projects 
have become permanent activities carried out by the Office of 
the Secretary, and, therefore, should be funded through, and 
subject to the scrutiny of the Appropriations process. As such, 
External Affairs, White House Liaison, Executive Support, 
Cultural Awareness, and Commerce, Government Performance and 
Results Act project, will be eliminated from the A and R 
account and the activities funded by these projects shall not 
be charged or billed to the Department's bureaus The Committee 
has recommended a total amount of $3,660,000 in the 
Departmental Management appropriation to fund these activities. 
This amount is commensurate with the level of funding planned 
for payment by the bureaus to these activities.
    Electronic Commerce, Regional Economic Growth, Class Action 
Suit, Diversity Employment Plan, MSI Financial Assistance and 
Grant Promotion Activities, MSI Conferences, Executive 
Assistance Management Information Technology Activities, 
Pioneer Fund, COMMITS, Executive Direction Support, Celebrate 
Department of Commerce, and Telecommuting will not be funded 
out of the A and R account.
    The USA Trade Center, Ronald Reagan Building and 
International Trade Center project will be eliminated from the 
Departmental A and R account and responsibility for 
administering the project activities shall be transferred to 
the International Trade Administration.
    In future budget submissions, the Department will submit 
and display the A and R project listing and the Fund project 
listings and associated dollar and FTE requests as part of the 
Congressional budget request. The Committee directs that the 
Department ensure that WCF budget estimates for upcoming fiscal 
year be provided to bureau clients no later than October 1 each 
fiscal year.

                    Office of the Inspector General

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $19,956,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      21,176,000
Committee recommendation................................      21,176,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $21,176,000 
for the Commerce Department's Office of the Inspector General. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.

               General Provisions--Department of Commerce

    The Committee includes the following general provisions for 
the Department of Commerce that were included in the fiscal 
year 2001 appropriations act. Sections 201 through 208 are 
continuations of language included in previous appropriations 
acts.
    Section 201 makes Commerce Department funds available for 
advanced payments only upon certification of officials 
designated by the Secretary that such payments are considered 
to be in the public interest.
    Section 202 makes appropriations for salaries and expenses 
available for the hire of passenger motor vehicles, and for 
services, uniforms, and allowances as authorized by law.
    Section 203 prohibits any funds to be used to support 
hurricane reconnaissance aircraft and activities that are under 
the control of the U.S. Air Force or the U.S. Air Force 
Reserve.
    Section 204 provides the authority to transfer funds 
between Department of Commerce accounts. The language provides 
that no account may be decreased by more than 5 percent or 
increased by more than 10 percent. The language also makes the 
transfers subject to the Committee's standard reprogramming 
procedures.
    Section 205 allows the Secretary to award contracts for 
certain mapping and charting activities in accordance with the 
Federal Property and Administrative Services Act.
    Section 206 allows the Department of Commerce franchise 
fund to retain a percentage of earnings from services provided 
for capital investments.
    Section 207 permits the Department of Commerce franchise 
fund to retain a percentage of earnings from services provided 
for capital investments.
    Section 208 provides funding for three grants and a 
cooperative agreement.
    Section 209 makes administrative changes to the Department 
of Commerce, Working Capital Fund and Advances and 
Reimbursements account.

                        TITLE III--THE JUDICIARY

    The funds provided in title III of the accompanying bill 
are for the operation and maintenance of the U.S. courts and 
include the salaries of judges, magistrates, supporting 
personnel, and other expenses of the Federal judiciary.
    The Committee recommends a total appropriation of 
$4,491,578,000 for the judiciary. The recommendation is 
$381,135,000 below the budget request. The Committee is aware 
that a total of $235,365,000 in fees, reimbursables, and 
carryover is available in various accounts across the title.
    Steady growth in costs associated with Defender Services, 
court security, GSA rental payments, and pay and benefits at a 
time of declining resources is putting serious pressure on the 
judiciary budget. The Committee urges the judiciary to make 
every effort to contain mandatory costs.

                   Supreme Court of the United States

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $45,121,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     159,856,000
Committee recommendation................................      47,518,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $47,518,000. 
The total amount is provided in two separate appropriation 
accounts as follows:

                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $37,512,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      42,114,000
Committee recommendation................................      39,988,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $39,988,000 
for the Justices, their supporting personnel, and the costs of 
operating the Supreme Court, excluding the care of the building 
and grounds. The recommendation is $2,126,000 below the budget 
request and fully funds current services.
    Various offices, a theatre, a gift shop, and mail handling 
have all been built out into the hallways of the Court in 
direct violation of fire codes. The expected renovation of the 
Court will only exacerbate space problems for the foreseeable 
future. Therefore, the Committee recommendation defers staffing 
increases until it is clear that there is room for additional 
personnel. To the degree that the positions sought are needed 
immediately, including the assistant food preparation 
specialist, forklift operator, warehousemen, and mail services 
clerks, the Court may, within existing manpower ceilings, use 
attrition to alter the skill mix of its workforce.

                    Care of the building and grounds

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $7,513,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     117,742,000
Committee recommendation................................       7,530,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $7,530,000 for 
personnel and other services relating to the Supreme Court 
building and grounds, which is supervised by the Architect of 
the Capitol. The recommendation is $110,212,000 below the 
budget request.
    Building renovations.--While entirely supportive of the 
proposal to replace building systems that have been maintained 
long past the end of their useful service lives, the Committee 
is very concerned by the linchpin of the Court's construction 
approach: the digging out of an underground annex as swing 
space for displaced staff. Better utilization of existing Court 
space, particularly the conversion of ceremonial or public 
areas into working offices, presents a far less risky and 
costly alternative to burrowing under the north wall. 
Furthermore, space can be made available in the Thurgood 
Marshall Building. The Committee directs the Architect of the 
Capitol to develop a plan for installing the necessary building 
services without recourse to an underground annex. The low-
risk, low-cost approach to swing space used for the renovation 
of the Dirksen Senate Office Building should serve as a model. 
The plan should be delivered not later than January 1, 2002. 
The recommendation funds the routine maintenance of existing 
building systems in anticipation of a construction start in 
2003 under the revised plan.

             U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $17,895,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      20,446,000
Committee recommendation................................      19,372,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $19,372,000. 
The recommendation is $1,094,000 below the budget request. 
Certain mandatory increases for judicial officers are provided. 
The recommendation includes requested funding by the Court to 
renovate and modernize one of the Federal Circuit's courtrooms. 
To accommodate this request no funding is provided for other 
requested increases.

                   U.S. Court of International Trade


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $12,432,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      13,112,000
Committee recommendation................................      13,054,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $13,054,000. 
The recommendation is $58,000 below the budget request. Certain 
mandatory increases for judicial officers are provided. The 
recommendation includes $75,000 for an architectural analysis 
requested by the court.

    Courts of Appeals, District Courts, and Other Judicial Services


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $3,352,879,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   3,735,864,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,559,012,000

    This account provides for the salaries of judges, 
magistrates, and all other officers and employees of the 
Federal judiciary not otherwise provided for, and for all 
necessary expenses, including charges for space and facilities.
    The Committee recommends a total appropriation of 
$3,559,012,000 for salaries and expenses of the Courts of 
Appeals, District Courts, and Other Judicial Services. The 
recommendation is $176,852,000 below the budget request. The 
recommendation reflects a refinement of anticipated funding 
requirements which is $176,852,000 below the budget request. In 
addition, as noted at the beginning of the title, the Committee 
understands that up to $70,000,000 in carryover, reimbursables, 
and fees will be available to apply to this account, if 
necessary. Certain mandatory increases for judicial officers 
are provided.
    The Committee recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

Courts of appeals, district courts, and other judicial services

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation

Appeals court:
    Judicial officers:
        Article III judges:
            Active............................................    24,386
            Senior............................................    18,492
        Court staff:
            Article III judges' staff.........................    60,458
            Circuit executives................................    26,013
            Clerks offices....................................    37,223
            Staff and prearguement attorneys..................    42,389
            Librarians........................................    17,020
            Bankruptcy appellate panels.......................     1,472
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

              Subtotal........................................   227,453
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
District courts:
    Judicial officers:
        Article III judges:
            Active............................................    98,355
            Senior............................................    59,260
        Magistrate judges.....................................    80,965
        Court of Federal Claims judges........................     2,315
    Court staff:
        Article III judges' staff.............................   181,652
        Magistrate judges' staff..............................    71,262
        Federal claims judges' staff..........................     4,356
        Clerks offices........................................   407,984
        Court reporters.......................................    50,210
        Court interpreters....................................     6,542
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal............................................   962,901
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Bankruptcy courts:
    Judicial officers: Bankruptcy judges......................    49,941
    Court staff:
        Bankruptcy judges' staff..............................    45,601
        Clerks................................................   285,498
        Bankruptcy administrators.............................     4,167
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal............................................   385,207
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Probation/pretrial services:
    Investigations and supervision............................   654,507
    Drug dependent offenders..................................    35,367
    Mental health.............................................     7,224
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal................................................   697,098
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Services, supplies, and equipment.............................   502,111
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Rental payment to GSA.........................................   784,242
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, courts........................................... 3,559,012

    The Committee recommendations are discussed in more detail 
in the following paragraphs. The Committee notes that in order 
to accommodate rental payments, the Committee recommendation 
necessitates a downward adjustment for support staff.
    Southwest Border.--In Fiscal Year 2001 the Committee 
devoted resources to help the hard-hit judicial districts on 
the Southwest Border. These Federal districts continue to 
handle over one quarter of all criminal court filings in the 
United States. While court staffing problems appear to be 
abating, the number of unfilled judgeships and need for new 
judgeships remains a persistent concern. To address this issue 
the Committee has provided $5,000,000 to hire additional 
magistrate judges along the Southwest border. The Committee 
directs that a spending and hiring plan and a list of proposed 
locations be provided to the Committee by no later than 
February 1, 2002.
    Juries.--The Committee is concerned with increased plea 
bargaining, limits on jury awards, and new powers of judges to 
screen evidence presented to jurors. These factors are 
diminishing the traditional role of the jury. The number of 
Federal criminal and civil cases ending in jury verdicts has 
fallen more than 58 and 72 percent respectively over the past 
few decades. Also disturbing is the number of jury verdicts 
that Federal appeals courts have overturned since 1987. Some 
estimates calculate that nearly a 40 percent increase has 
occurred in this area. This trend promises to undermine 
individual confidence in the jury system and in the courts 
themselves. The Committee directs the Administrative Office of 
the U.S. Courts to report to the Committee by no later than 
February 1, 2002, with recommendations delineating what reforms 
the Federal Judiciary can make to ensure that juror and citizen 
confidence are not eroded.
    Relocation report.--Prior to opening new offices, the 
Justice Department is required to seek permission from 
Congress. In the last relocation report, the Marshals Service 
sought to open a new office in Lander, WY. The request was 
denied, because the Marshals were, and are, projected to go 
anti-deficient due to unexpectedly heavy and prolonged costs 
associated with security for the World Trade Center and East 
Africa bombing trials in New York City. The Committee has since 
learned that a magistrate is holding court in Lander, WY, and 
that the Marshals opened an office there at the insistence of 
the magistrate. The Committee acknowledges that court may be 
held in Lander, but, in light of the Committee's decision on 
the relocation report, the Judiciary must pay for Marshals 
support if the magistrate's work requires their presence. 
Therefore, the Committee recommendation transfers $33,000 from 
this account to the Marshals to cover their costs in Lander. 
The Committee understands that similar situations may exist in 
Minnesota, Wisconsin, and North Carolina. As additional 
information becomes available, additional costs may be 
incurred.
    Protective details.--The Committee is aware that a judge 
vacationing in Switzerland with his extended family forced his 
protective detail to babysit his very young grandchildren on 
several occasions. When the detail supervisor objected, the 
judge ``punished'' the detail in various ways. Judges are 
reminded that the taxpayer bears a considerable burden 
providing portal to portal security. The detail has one 
assignment and one assignment only: protection. Details are not 
care givers. In the future, the Committee will not ask the 
taxpayer to shoulder the costs of protective details if those 
details are found to be acting as servants.

               The National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $2,596,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       2,692,000
Committee recommendation................................       2,692,000

    The Committee recommends a reimbursement of $2,692,000 from 
the special fund to cover expenses of the claims court 
associated with processing cases under the National Childhood 
Vaccine Injury Act of 1986. The recommendation is identical to 
the budget request.

                           Defender Services

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $434,043,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     521,517,000
Committee recommendation................................     463,756,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $463,756,000. 
The recommendation is $57,761,000 below the budget request. The 
recommendation reflects a refinement of anticipated funding 
requirements.
    This account funds the operations of the Federal public 
defender and community defender organizations and the 
compensation, reimbursement, and expenses of attorneys 
appointed to represent persons under the Criminal Justice Act, 
as amended.
    The Committee is very concerned with the requested 19.9 
percent increase in funding for this account. While every 
effort has been made to address the needs expressed by the 
Judicial Conference, growth of this magnitude cannot be funded 
within existing Committee resources. Funding is provided to 
maintain current services and additional funding is provided to 
increase panel attorney rates of compensation beyond what was 
provided in fiscal years 2000 and 2001. The new rate is $90 per 
hour in and out of court. A modest amount is also provided for 
heavier panel attorney workload. In addition, as noted at the 
beginning of the title, the Committee understands that up to 
$70,000,000 in carryover, reimbursables, and fees will be 
available to apply to this account, if necessary.
    The impact of multi-defendant litigation needs to be 
reassessed. The Committee directs the Administrative Office of 
the U.S. Courts to commence a study to be provided to the 
Committees on Appropriations by no later than March 1, 2002, 
examining the feasibility of establishing ``firewalls'' in 
existing Federal defender organizations that will allow multi-
defendant cases to be handled out of the same office. If these 
cases can be addressed in this way, concerns about the quality 
of panel attorney representations should decrease, and 
substantial savings would assuredly result.

                    Fees Of Jurors And Commissioners

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $59,436,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      50,131,000
Committee recommendation................................      50,131,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $50,131,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request and is a 
refined estimate of fiscal year 2002 requirements. This account 
provides for the fees and allowances of grand and petit jurors 
and for the compensation of land commissioners and jury 
commissioners.

                             Court Security

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $199,136,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     228,433,000
Committee recommendation................................     209,762,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $209,762,000. 
The recommendation is $18,671,000 below the budget request. The 
recommendation is based on an estimate by the U.S. Marshals 
Service of court security requirements and funds court security 
personnel, equipment, and perimeter enhancements. The Committee 
is unable to fully accommodate the 14.5 percent requested 
increase for this account. The recommendation includes an 
additional $4,000,000 to maintain courthouse security and 
replace obsolete systems and equipment. In addition, as noted 
at the beginning of the title, the Committee understands that 
up to $70,000,000 in carryover, reimbursables, and fees will be 
available to apply to this account, if necessary.
    Radios.--Last year, the Administrative Office of U.S. 
Courts [AO] sought to have its radio program included under the 
narrowband conversion program run by the Justice Department. 
Like Justice, the Judiciary must convert VHF radios by January 
1, 2005. In a letter to Congress, the AO correctly noted the 
cost and interoperability benefits of bringing court security 
radio modernization under the Justice program. Left unsaid was 
the sad fact that radio funds have been used through the years 
to cover salaries and expenses, a problem that would be 
alleviated by shifting control of radio investments to the 
Wireless Management Office within the Department of Justice. 
The Committee recommendation includes a provision that 
transfers $3,580,000 from this account to the ``Narrowband 
Conversion'' account in title I to begin the process of 
converting court security radios.

                Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $58,212,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      63,029,000
Committee recommendation................................      58,212,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $58,212,000. 
The recommendation is $4,817,000 below the budget request.
    The Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts [AO] hosts the 
Judicial Conference, and handles certain administrative tasks 
for the U.S. courts.
    Americans with Disabilities Act.--The Committee supports 
the efforts of the AO to bring modern technology to the Federal 
courts. Pursuant to that effort the Committee directs the AO to 
provide $3,000,000 to the University of Mississippi to support 
real time captioning initiatives for the hearing disabled. This 
funding shall be used both to improve the real-time captioning 
skills of court reporters and to expand the availability of 
captioning equipment to all Federal courthouses.

                        Federal Judicial Center


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $18,736,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      20,323,000
Committee recommendation................................      19,742,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $19,742,000. 
The recommendation is $581,000 below the budget request and 
provides for requested adjustments to base.
    The Federal Judicial Center improves the management of 
Federal judicial dockets and court administration through 
education for judges and staff and research, evaluation, and 
planning assistance for the courts and the judicial conference.

                       Judicial Retirement Funds


                    Payment To Judiciary Trust Funds

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $35,700,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      37,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      37,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $37,000,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    These funds cover the estimated annuity payments to be made 
to retired bankruptcy judges and magistrate judges, claims 
court judges, and spouses and dependent children of deceased 
judicial officers.

                       U.S. Sentencing Commission


                         Salaries and Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $9,909,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      12,400,000
Committee recommendation................................      11,327,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $11,327,000. 
The recommendation is $1,073,000 below the budget request.
    The purpose of the Commission is to establish, review, and 
revise sentencing guidelines, policies, and practices for the 
Federal criminal justice system. The Commission is also 
required to monitor the operation of the guidelines and to 
identify and report necessary changes to the Congress.

                   General Provisions--The Judiciary

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the judiciary, all of which were included in previous 
appropriations acts.
    Section 301 allows the Judiciary to expend funds for 
employment of experts and consultant services.
    Section 302 allows the Judiciary, subject to the 
Committee's reprogramming procedures, to transfer up to 5 
percent between appropriations, but limits to 10 percent the 
amount that can be transferred into any one appropriation.
    Section 303 limits official reception and representation 
expenses incurred by the Judicial Conference of the United 
States to no more than $11,000.
    Section 304 prospectively addresses Employment Cost Index 
adjustments for Justices and judges.
    Section 305 increases funding for distance learning.

            TITLE IV--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCY

                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$7,658,282,000. The recommendation is $318,254,000 below the 
budget request. Security, technology, and infrastructure 
accounts have received the maximum funding deemed prudent.

                   Administration of Foreign Affairs

                    diplomatic and consular programs

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $3,167,174,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   3,705,140,000
Committee recommendation................................   3,498,353,000

    This appropriation account provides for the formulation and 
execution of U.S. foreign policy, including the conduct of 
diplomatic and consular relations with foreign countries, 
diplomatic relations with international organizations, and 
related activities. This account primarily funds the overseas 
programs and operations of the Department of State.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$3,498,353,000. The recommendation is $206,787,000 below the 
budget request. Within the amount provided, the Committee 
recommendation includes $175,000 to support the United States' 
membership in the Arctic Council and $40,000 for the Bering 
Straits Commission. The former includes funds for 
representation expenses and travel for U.S. delegates.
    The Committee recommendations, by bureau or operation, are 
displayed in the following table:

Diplomatic & Consular Programs

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation
Overseas Bureaus:
    African Affairs.....................................        202,263 
    Near Eastern Affairs................................        133,066 
    South Asian Affairs.................................         50,634 
    East Asian & Pacific Affairs........................        227,095 
        East-West Center................................        [14,000]
    European Affairs....................................        484,503 
    Western Hemispheric Affairs.........................        234,571 
    International Organization Affairs..................         46,956 
    International Conferences...........................          6,736 
    FSN Separation Liability Trust Fund.................          7,898 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................      1,393,722 
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Functional Bureaus:
    Consular Affairs....................................         42,787 
    Economic & Business Affairs.........................         26,473 
    Intelligence & Research.............................         39,191 
    International Information Programs..................         40,889 
    Oceans/Int'l Environmental/Scientific Affs..........         20,091 
        Pacific Salmon Treaty...........................         45,419 
    Political-Military Affairs..........................         22,465 
        NonProliferation................................         18,667 
        Arms Control....................................         17,366 
        Verification & Compliance.......................          8,905 
    Diplomatic Security.................................        225,989 
    Information Resource Management.....................         90,522 
    Democracy, Human Rights, & Labor....................         12,145 
    Population, Refugees, & Migration...................            688 
    Legislative Affairs.................................          8,446 
    Finance Management & Policy.........................         62,580 
    Bureau of Public Affairs............................         22,268 
    Counterterrorism Research & Development.............          1,800 
    Office of International Criminal Justice............          1,719 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................        708,410 
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Management Programs.....................................        284,848 
    Diplomatic Telecommunications Service...............        [47,614]
    Continuing Language Training Overseas...............        [10,000]
Administrative Programs.................................        503,768 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................        788,616 
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Initiatives:............................................
    Diplomatic Readiness................................         45,784 
        Personnel.......................................        [37,988]
        Training........................................         [7,796]
    Service Needs Incentives............................         11,555 
    Civil Service Overseas Mobility Initiative..........          1,000 
    Leadership Development Competencies.................          1,500 
    Overseas Infrastructure.............................         20,800 
    Paris Rightsizing...................................         14,857 
    Information Resource Management.....................        102,746 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................        198,242 
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Worldwide Security Upgrades:
    Domestic/Local Guards...............................        139,101 
    Physical Security Equipment.........................         18,395 
    Physical Security Technical Support.................         69,313 
    Armored Vehicles....................................         10,320 
    Personnel/Training..................................         80,901 
    Radio Replacements..................................          2,240 
    Information/Systems Security........................         25,109 
    Chemical/Biological Program.........................          3,944 
    Perimeter Security Enhancements.....................         24,000 
    Global Security and Law Enforcement.................         36,040 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................        409,363 
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, Diplomatic & Consular Programs.............      3,498,353 

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table are described in more detail in the following paragraphs.
    Diplomatic Security.--Explosive growth in Diplomatic 
Security manning has created an imbalance between seasoned and 
unseasoned agents that can only be solved with time because the 
best training available does not compare to the value of 
experience. In another context, the Attorney General testifies 
that ``it is very risky to allow an agency's overall ratio of 
inexperienced to experienced agents to exceed 30 percent.'' 
Today, the percentage of Diplomatic Security agents having 
served 4 years or less is over 30 percent. The Attorney General 
warned that agencies with excessive numbers of rookie agents 
``will find it difficult to maintain performance, 
professionalism and integrity.'' Therefore, the Committee does 
not recommend full funding for an additional 186 Diplomatic 
Security agents.
    Diplomatic Readiness.--Full funding is provided for hiring 
an anticipated 700 replacements for attrition. In addition, 
full funding is provided for all training needs to ensure that 
new hires have the appropriate language, security, leadership, 
management, and professional skills needed to be successful in 
their new assignments.
    Worldwide security upgrades.--The Committee recommendation 
includes $459,363,000 for worldwide security upgrades, of which 
$50,000,000 has been made available from prior year unobligated 
funds available in the ``Embassy Security, Construction and 
Maintenance'' account. Of the funding provided, $349,323,000 is 
for ongoing security activities. In addition, full funding is 
provided for procedural and technical security enhancements as 
well as for training, operational support, and infrastructure. 
None of the funds provided here for security may be obligated 
until a complete and thorough accounting of prior year security 
funds has been forwarded to the Committee.
    The Committee is aware of a 2-year, two-city ``Weapons of 
Mass Destruction [WMD] Terrorism Threat Information and 
Training for First Responders'' pilot project of the Center for 
Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of 
International Security to build effective communication and 
information sharing between Federal and local officials on WMD 
terrorism issues. The Committee urges the Department of State 
to support funding for this project.
    Radios.--The Department installed an extensive worldwide 
radio network with funds provided through the Fiscal Year 1999 
Emergency Security Supplemental and is now seeking additional 
funding for replacement of its domestic wireless networks. By 
law, the existing wireless networks must convert to 12.5 
kilohertz channel spacing by 2005. The Committee recommendation 
provides $6,000,000 for replacement of the domestic wireless 
networks in Washington, DC and elsewhere in the United States, 
used for diplomatic security and law enforcement. Given the 
Department of Justice Wireless Management Office's expertise in 
the area of narrowband conversion for law enforcement and 
addressing issues such as interoperability, the Committee 
recommendation includes a provision that transfers $6,000,000 
from this account to the ``Narrowband Conversion'' account in 
Title I to begin the conversion of the State Department's 
domestic wireless network.
    Influence.--The Committee recommendation includes 
$1,000,000 out of available funds to continue the Ambassador's 
Fund for Cultural Preservation. U.S. Ambassadors from 
underdeveloped countries may submit competitive proposals for 
one-time or recurring projects with awards based on the 
importance of the site, the country's need, and the ability to 
make a meaningful contribution to the preservation of a site, 
object, or form of expression. The Department is directed to 
submit a report to the Committees on winning projects on an 
annual basis.
    Bureau of Consular Affairs.--The Department is directed to 
report to the Committee on the Bureau of Consular Affairs' 
programs to assist Americans who have been the victims of 
violent crimes while traveling or studying overseas. The report 
shall evaluate the current services provided by the Office of 
Overseas Citizens Affairs and the adequacy of resources 
available to it for this purpose. This report shall consider 
whether and what data should be collected on individual 
incidents and made available to victims. The report shall also 
consider whether a database containing information about grants 
available to assist victims with the high costs associated with 
the prosecution of a perpetrator in foreign countries--
particularly remote or judicially unsophisticated foreign 
countries is merited. Finally, the report shall determine how 
best to make this information available to victims. The 
Committee expects that Internet technology will be utilized to 
accomplish this.
    Continuing language education.--Language skills are central 
to the effectiveness of State Department employees abroad, 
irrespective of assignment. As important, language skills 
ensure dependents are not overwhelmed by feelings of isolation 
and alienation, resulting in lowered post morale. The Committee 
applauds Department efforts to revive continuing language 
education programs at posts. Within available funds, the 
Committee recommendation directs that $10,000,000 shall be 
available only for continuing language education programs for 
both employees and dependents at posts worldwide. Language 
classes should also be open to non-State Department (Federal) 
employees on a space available, reimbursable basis.
    International conservation of sea turtles.--The Committee 
is concerned with the increasing threat to sea turtles, 
particularly those listed under the Convention on International 
Trade on Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora [CITES], 
from incidental capture by foreign fleets, particularly in the 
longline fishery. The Secretary of State shall, on an expedited 
basis, negotiate strong, enforceable management, reporting, and 
data collection measures (including economic measures) focused 
on reducing incidental capture of sea turtles in commercial 
fisheries under regional management agreements for living 
marine resources, including the Inter-American Sea Turtle 
Conservation Treaty, the Inter-American Tropical Tuna 
Convention, the International Convention for the Conservation 
of Atlantic Tunas, and the Convention on the Conservation and 
Management of Highly Migratory Fish Stocks in the Western and 
Central Pacific Ocean (the Multilateral High Level Conference). 
In addition, the Committee urges the Secretary to develop a 
trans-Pacific international turtle conservation agreement to 
include Pacific island and Pacific rim nations. In particular, 
the Committee urges the Secretary to work with the Secretary of 
Commerce under Magnuson-Stevens Act Section 202(h), which calls 
for the Secretary of State, in cooperation with the Secretary 
of Commerce, to seek international agreements to establish 
standards and measures for bycatch reduction that are 
comparable to U.S. standards. In fiscal year 2002 these efforts 
should focus on longline fishing. In furtherance of this goal, 
the Secretary of State and Secretary of Commerce, through the 
National Marine Fisheries Service, shall work with other 
nations and industry, including the Asia-Pacific Economic 
Cooperation Forum, to develop alternative fishing technologies 
and practices designed to reduce incidental capture mortality 
of sea turtles, particularly in the international longline 
fleet. The Secretaries are urged to convene preparatory 
meetings on gear development, particularly in the Pacific 
region, prior to the technical workshop scheduled for 2002 to 
ensure that agreement on alternative gear research and data 
sharing, including timetables for specific action, can be 
concluded at this workshop. The State Department and Commerce 
Department shall report back on the status of these efforts 
within 90 days of enactment.
    Pacific salmon treaty implementation.--The Committee has 
provided $45,419,000 to implement the 1999 Pacific Salmon 
Treaty Agreement. Of this amount, $20,000,000 is for further 
capitalizing the Northern Boundary Fund, $20,000,000 is for 
further capitalizing the Southern Boundary Fund, and $5,419,000 
is for the State of Washington for obligations pursuant to the 
1999 Agreement.
    The Committee is concerned that National Marine Fisheries 
Service (NMFS) continues to consider further harvest 
restrictions in Alaska in its efforts to recover some stocks of 
Pacific salmon. The Committee believes Alaska has made 
sufficient harvest reductions under the Treaty, and that any 
further recovery efforts should address other impacts to listed 
stocks.
    Out of funds provided for this purpose, NMFS should 
continue to work with the State of Alaska in monitoring the 
effects of the decline of Pacific Northwest-origin salmon on 
the harvest off Alaska of Alaska-origin salmon.
    Biotechnology.--The Office of Agricultural and Textile 
Trade Affairs [ATTA], Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs, 
is playing a critical role in promoting abroad an understanding 
of the benefits and safety of biotechnology. The Committee is 
aware that the European Union [EU] has launched a 
misinformation campaign aimed at scaring regulators and policy 
makers in the developing world into opposing biotechnology. 
These scare tactics are intended to help protect the EU's 
increasingly uncompetitive agricultural sector. The Bureau is 
directed to provide the support to posts necessary to refute 
the EU's calumnies regarding biotechnology. Furthermore, the 
Department is directed to increase the manpower of the ATTA to 
the level needed both to prepare U.S. negotiators on trade 
related and food safety talks and to thoroughly educate foreign 
governments on the importance of biotechnology. In support of 
the latter, the Committee expects the Department to increase 
funding for the speaker's program promoting plant 
biotechnology. Program enhancements should be targeted 
exclusively at Southeast Asia, Latin America, Africa, and 
India. The Committee directs the Department, in coordination 
with the Foreign Commercial Service, to submit a comprehensive 
plan for supporting biotechnology overseas not later than 
December 31, 2001.
    International Trade.--Every year the State Department 
attempts to pursue international trade activities that are 
clearly within the traditional domain of the Commerce 
Department's International Trade Administration, particularly 
within the area of expertise of the United States and Foreign 
Commercial Service. This continual push by the State Department 
to expand its jurisdiction in this area runs counter to the 
wishes of the Committee which notes the expansive and 
intractable foreign policy issues already confronting the 
Department. No funding is provided for this initiative.

                        Capital Investment Fund

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $96,787,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     210,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     210,000,000

    This account provides resources for information and 
communications systems. The Committee recommends $210,000,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. The 
Committee recommendations, by initiative, are displayed in the 
following table:

Capital investment fund

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation

Diplomatic Telecommunications Service...................          38,969
Mainframe computer centers..............................           3,000
Central management functions............................         139,348
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, infrastructure systems..................         181,317
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Core foreign affairs systems............................           4,000
Financial systems.......................................           5,000
Administrative systems..................................          13,483
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, corporate information systems & services          22,483
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Office automation.......................................             500
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Training................................................           5,700
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, capital investment fund..........................   210,000

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table above are described in more detail in the following 
paragraphs.
    Diplomatic Telecommunications Service.--The Diplomatic 
Telecommunications Service [DTS] was established in 1992 to 
create a global telecommunications network for all agencies 
overseas. A single network was intended to reduce duplication 
in equipment, staffing, training, and operations, as well as 
achieve cost savings through economies of scale. The Committee 
recommendation provides the budget request for DTS to maintain 
program momentum.
    Internet Access at Overseas Posts.--The Committee commends 
the Department on reaching its goal of providing e-mail 
capability to all of its overseas posts through a global 
network called OpenNet. In contrast to its progress in 
delivering e-mail capabilities, the Department has been slow in 
providing Internet access to Department desktops. The Committee 
is aware of the Department's plan to build upon OpenNet with a 
system called OpenNet Plus to provide web browsing 
capabilities. The world wide web has become essential to the 
conduct of foreign policy. The Committee supports the 
Secretary's decision to place Information Technology (IT) among 
the Department's top priorities. Accordingly, the Department's 
fiscal year 2002 request is fully funded, with the 
understanding that the target dates for completion of all IT 
programs will be significantly expedited. The Committee expects 
OpenNet Plus Internet access to be provided to all State 
Department desktops by January of 2003. The Department is 
directed to report to the Committees on Appropriations no later 
than December 1, 2001 on the status of the implementation of 
its overall IT plan. At that time, the Department should also 
be prepared to submit a plan for the overhaul of its classified 
network, to include a time frame and cost estimates.
    Common Technology Platform.--Last year, the Committee 
directed the Department to create a common technology platform 
whereby all agencies operating overseas may communicate and 
coordinate their activities. This common platform, called the 
``Collaboration Zone'' was among the recommendations of the 
Overseas Presence Advisory Panel (OPAP). While important, this 
is not as high a priority as the delivery of Internet 
capabilities or the upgrading of the classified network. The 
Department is directed to report to the Committees on 
Appropriations on the status of this effort by October 1, 2001, 
at which time the Committee will consider releasing in full the 
amount provided for this effort in fiscal year 2001.

                      Office Of Inspector General

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $28,427,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      29,264,000
Committee recommendation................................      28,427,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $28,427,000. 
The recommendation is $837,000 below the budget request.

               Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $231,078,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     242,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     242,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $242,000,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations, by program, are displayed in 
the following table:

Cultural and Educational Exchanges

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation

Academic Programs:
    Fulbright Program:
        Students, Scholars, Teachers..........................   119,495
        Hubert H. Humphrey Fellowship Program.................     6,222
        Regional Scholars Program.............................     2,049
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal............................................   127,766
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Other Academic Programs:
        Educational Advising & Student Services...............     3,500
        English Language Programs.............................     3,000
        Edmund S. Muskie Fellowship Program...................       559
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal............................................     7,059
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Other Special Academic Programs: American Overseas 
      Research Centers........................................     2,321
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

        Subtotal, Academic Programs...........................   137,146
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Professional & Cultural Programs:
    International Visitors Program............................    52,000
    Citizen Exchange Program..................................    17,861
    Cultural Educational, and Workforce Development Exchanges 
      to Africa...............................................       750
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

        Subtotal..............................................    70,611
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Other Professional & Cultural Programs:
    Mike Mansfield Fellowships Programs.......................     2,239
    Irish Institute...........................................       500
    Atlantic Corridor USA.....................................       500
    North/South Center........................................     1,500
    Joiner Fellowships in War.................................       100
    Padnos International Center...............................       100
    UNI-Cedar Falls Russo-American Exchange...................       100
    UNLV Global Business Exchange.............................       100
    UNR International Business Exchange.......................       100
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal................................................     5,239
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, Professional & Cultural.......................    75,850
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Exchanges Support:
    Employee Compensation & Benefits..........................    24,971
    Program Direction & Administration........................     4,033
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal................................................    29,004
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, Cultural & Educational Exchanges.................   242,000

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table above are described in more detail in the following 
paragraphs.
    Overseas educational advising centers.--The Committee 
strongly supports the essential mission of overseas educational 
advising centers [OEACs] in recruiting international students 
to study at U.S. colleges and universities. The Committee notes 
that modest funding for OEACs helped leverage $12,000,000,000 
in spending by international students and their dependents in 
communities and higher education institutions throughout the 
United States in the academic year 1999-2000. In the 
Committee's view, OEACs must receive adequate funding to keep 
pace with increasing competition from other nations to attract 
foreign students.
    Foreign policy priority.--The Committee recognizes that 
international education--imparting global literacy to students 
and other citizens as an integral part of their education--is 
important to ensure our nation's ability to meet key 
challenges, including national security and the management of 
global conflict, competitiveness in the global market, and an 
increasingly multi-cultural society. The Committee suggests the 
Department of State, in cooperation with the Department of 
Education and other agencies with exchange programs, give 
higher priority to international education and raise its level 
of importance on the national agenda. In particular, the 
Committee urges the Department of State, the Department of 
Commerce, and the Department of Justice through the Immigration 
and Naturalization Service to coordinate efforts to promote 
U.S. exchange programs and U.S. higher education abroad and to 
remove unnecessary barriers for exchange visitors and students 
seeking access to the U.S. exchange programs and higher 
education institutions.
    Seed programs.--The Committee has continued a modest 
program begun in fiscal year 2000 that provides one-time 
funding to international exchange startups. These new programs 
are expected, after their first year, to seek funding from 
outside sources. The Committee will track the survival rate of 
new starts. The Bureau of Educational and Cultural Exchanges is 
directed to provide advice and assistance to these new programs 
and to inform the Committee immediately of any change in their 
status.
    Cultural, Educational, and Technical Exchanges to Africa.--
Performances by touring U.S. dance and music troupes have 
afforded our diplomats unusual access to oft-times elusive 
senior policymakers in Africa. At the same time, the lure of 
technological innovation, especially the explosion of the 
Internet, afford American educators and entrepeneurs a rare 
opportunity to develop lasting links with African elites. In 
particular, the potential appears to exist to establish a 
``virtual university'' in Africa that could prove critical to 
literacy and economic development programs continent-wide. The 
Committee recommendation provides $750,000 to revive Federal 
support for touring companies as a means of expanding and 
deepening diplomatic contacts throughout Africa, to establish 
Internet-centric educational and workforce development 
programs, and to explore the feasibility of establishing a 
virtual university in Africa.

                       Representation Allowances

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $6,485,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       9,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       9,000,000

    Representation allowances provide partial reimbursement to 
Foreign Service officers for expenditures incurred in their 
official capacities abroad in establishing and maintaining 
relations with officials of foreign governments and appropriate 
members of local communities.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $9,000,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.

              Protection Of Foreign Missions And Officials

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $15,433,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      10,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      10,000,000

    This account reimburses local governments and communities 
for the extraordinary costs incurred in providing protection 
for international organizations, foreign missions and 
officials, and foreign dignitaries under certain circumstances.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $10,000,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    The Committee directs that local jurisdictions that incur 
such costs submit a certified billing for such costs in 
accordance with program regulations. The Committee also 
recommends that in those circumstances where a local 
jurisdiction will realize a financial benefit from a visit from 
a foreign dignitary through increased tax revenues, that such 
circumstances should be taken into account by the Department in 
assessing the need for reimbursement under this program. The 
Committee expects the Department to treat such submissions 
diligently and provide reimbursement to local jurisdictions on 
a timely basis if claims are fully justified.

            embassy security, construction, and maintenance

Appropriations, 2001....................................  $1,077,600,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................   1,291,006,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,066,951,000

    This account provides the funding that allows the 
Department to manage U.S. Government real property in over 200 
countries worth an estimated $12,500,000,000 and to maintain 
almost 14,000 residential, office, and functional properties, 
not only for the Department of State, but for all U.S. 
employees overseas.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$1,066,951,000. The recommendation $224,055,000 below the 
budget request.
    The Committee recommendations by project or program are 
displayed in the following table:

Security and maintenance of U.S. missions

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
Direct Appropriations:                                    recommendation
    Leasehold Program.........................................  130,941 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

    Functional Programs:
        Buy-out of Uneconomic Leases..........................   35,000 
        Physical Security Upgrade.............................    5,920 
        Safety & Fire Programs................................   10,000 
        Post Communications Support...........................    6,100 
        Maintenance of Buildings..............................   77,400 
        Facility Rehabilitation...............................   39,700 
            Moscow, Russia....................................    5,000 
            Istanbul, Turkey..................................    4,500 
            Improve Post Housing..............................    6,300 
            Improve Marine Housing............................    2,600 
        Main State & Other Domestic Facilities................   24,700 
        Facility Maintenance Assistance.......................   46,000 
        Energy Conservation & Investment......................    3,800 
        Power Support Program.................................    6,700 
        Seismic Program.......................................      730 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Functional Programs.......................  274,450 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Subtotal, Non-Security..............................  405,391 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
    Worldwide Security Upgrades:
        Capital Program:
            Housing:
                Acquisition:
                    Post Housing--worldwide...................   21,010 
                    Marine Housing--worldwide.................    7,450 
            Facilities:
                Planning/Site Acquisition/Design..............   43,000 
                    Annex--Moscow, Russia.....................  [11,400]
                Construction..................................  437,890 
                    Annex--Moscow, Russia.....................  [84,490]
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

                      Subtotal, Capital Projects..............  509,350 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
        Other Security Upgrades/Support Costs.................   14,280 
        Perimeter Security Enhancements.......................  136,680 
        Overseas American Schools.............................    1,250 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Other Security Upgrades...................  152,210 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Subtotal, Security..................................  661,560 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, Direct Appropriations........................1,066,951 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Unobligated Prior Year Balances:
    Worldwide Security Upgrades:
        Perimeter Security--Transfer to D&CP..................;   50,000 
        Program Execution.....................................   37,060 
        Construction Security.................................   25,590 
        Administration........................................   23,396 
        Leasehold Program.....................................   18,009 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal, Unobligated Balances......................  154,055 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Anticipated Savings & Slippages.........................................
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, Security & Maintenance...........................1,221,006 

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table above are described in more detail in the following 
paragraphs.
    Cost savings.--By scrubbing the costs for a number of 
pending construction projects, the leadership of the Office of 
Building Operations [OBO] was able to identify significant 
savings. The Committee commends the work of the OBO and 
believes that similar savings can be achieved with projects 
proposed for fiscal year 2002. The recommendation adjusts the 
funding levels of certain capital projects in anticipation of 
an OBO cost review of these projects. The Committee expects OBO 
to present its results on a project by project basis as part of 
the reprogramming process.
    Unobligated balances.--The Committee is aware that the 
Office of Overseas Building Operations [OBO] is holding large 
unobligated balances. The Department's continued resistance to 
executing certain Congressionally-designated projects, such as 
those in Jerusalem and Taipei, and Congressional denial of a 
number of ill-considered projects, affords the Committee the 
opportunity to apply prior year funds to current year projects, 
thus saving direct appropriations this year.
    Moscow, Russia.--Over 26 agencies currently are using the 
Old Embassy Building in Moscow, Russia. The Old Embassy 
Building is rapidly deteriorating and posing life and health 
concerns for the personnel which are still located in the 
facility. Additionally, the building is within 15 feet of one 
of Moscow's busiest thoroughfares and has been frequently and 
violently attacked during the past 5 years. The United States 
and Russia share numerous vital interests, including preventing 
the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, the long-term 
integration of a democratic Russia into global economic and 
financial institutions, and engaging Russia on a broad range of 
foreign policy issues, including the United Nations and the 
Middle East peace process. Given these shared interests, the 
Committee recommendation provides $95,890,000 for design, site 
preparation, and construction of a new Unclassified Annex.
    Family security.--As part of the overall response to the 
worldwide security threat to U.S. personnel abroad, the 
Committee recommendation includes $6,250,000 to enhance the 
security of post housing and overseas American schools. The 
Committee expects to be consulted prior to the release of these 
funds.
    Buyout of uneconomic leases.--High lease costs deplete 
Department resources. The Committee supports efforts by the 
Department to selectively acquire properties in cities with 
volatile rental markets, thus generating significant out-year 
savings. The Committee recommendation provides $35,000,000 for 
opportunity purchases.
    Marine security guards.--The Committee recommendation does 
not include funding to expand the number of Marine security 
guards at embassies, since the current state of guard housing 
is deplorable. Instead, the Committee recommendation provides 
$10,050,000 to repair and improve existing Marine houses and 
posts or acquire new housing.
    The Department is directed to submit, and receive approval 
for, only those projects or subaccounts funded under this 
account, whether from direct appropriations or proceeds of 
sales, that deviate from the financial plan outlined above. Any 
proposed deviations shall include project-level detail, and 
shall be provided to the Appropriations Committees not later 
than 60 days after the date of enactment of this Act. Any 
deviation from the above plan shall be treated as a 
reprogramming in the case of an addition greater than $500,000 
or as a notification in the case of a deletion, a project cost 
overrun exceeding 25 percent, or a project schedule delay 
exceeding 6 months. Notification requirements also extend to 
the ``rebaselining'' of a given project's cost estimate, 
schedule, or scope of work.

           Emergencies In The Diplomatic And Consular Service

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $5,465,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      15,500,000
Committee recommendation................................       5,465,000

    This account provides resources for the Department of State 
to meet emergency requirements while conducting foreign 
affairs. The Committee recommendation provides funds for: (1) 
travel and subsistence expenses for relocation of Americans, 
U.S. Government employees, and their families from troubled 
areas to the United States and/or safe-haven posts; (2) 
allowances granted to State Department employees and their 
dependents evacuated to the United States for the convenience 
of the Government; (3) payment of rewards for information 
concerning terrorists and war criminals; and (4) representation 
expenses for senior Administration officials.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $5,465,000. 
The recommendation is $10,035,000 below the budget request.

                   Repatriation Loans Program Account

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $1,193,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       1,219,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,219,000

    This account provides emergency loans to assist destitute 
Americans abroad who have no other source of funds to return to 
the United States.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,219,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    Less than 20 percent of repatriation loans are ever repaid. 
The Committee strongly endorses efforts by consular services to 
limit assistance only to victims of unforeseen circumstances or 
travelers whose mental instability presents a risk to 
themselves or others.

              Payment To The American Institute In Taiwan

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $16,309,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      17,044,000
Committee recommendation................................      17,044,000

    The Taiwan Relations Act requires that programs concerning 
Taiwan be carried out by the American Institute in Taiwan 
[AIT]. The Institute administers programs in the areas of 
economic and commercial services, cultural affairs, travel 
services, and logistics. The Department of State contracts with 
the AIT to carry out these activities.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $17,044,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.

     Payment To The Foreign Service Retirement And Disability Fund

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $131,224,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     135,629,000
Committee recommendation................................     135,629,000

    This appropriation is authorized by the Foreign Service Act 
of 1980 which provides for an appropriation to the fund in 30 
equal annual installments of the amount required for the 
unfunded liability created by new benefits, new groups of 
beneficiaries, or increased salaries on which benefits are 
computed.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $135,629,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.

              International Organizations and Conferences


              Contributions To International Organizations

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $868,917,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     878,767,000
Committee recommendation................................   1,091,348,000

    This account funds payment of the obligations of U.S. 
membership in international organizations as authorized by 
treaties or specific acts of Congress.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of 
$1,091,348,000. The recommendation is $212,581,000 above the 
budget request.
    The Committee recommendations, by organization, are 
displayed in the following table:

Contributions to international organizations

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation
United Nations and affiliated agencies:
    Food and Agriculture Organization...................         72,741 
    International Atomic Energy Agency..................         49,112 
    International Civil Aviation Organization...........         12,011 
    International Labor Organization....................         54,873 
    International Maritime Organization.................          1,168 
    International Telecommunications Union..............          5,871 
    United Nations--Regular.............................        266,244 
    United Nations--War Crimes Tribunals................         24,000 
    United Nations--Synchronization of United States and 
      United Nations budget years.......................        266,244 
    Universal Postal Union..............................          1,312 
    World Health Organization...........................        108,109 
    World Intellectual Property Organization............            817 
    World Meteorological Organization...................          8,259 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................        870,761 
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Inter-American organizations:
    Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on 
      Agriculture.......................................         16,560 
    Organization of American States.....................         54,196 
    Pan American Health Organization....................         52,258 
    Pan American Institute of Geography and History.....            324 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................        123,338 
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Regional organizations:
    Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation...................            601 
    Colombo Plan Council for Technical Cooperation......             15 
    North Atlantic Assembly.............................            596 
    North Atlantic Treaty Organization..................         43,975 
    Organization for Economic Cooperation and 
      Development.......................................         52,143 
    South Pacific Commission............................          1,104 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................         98,434 
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Other international organizations:
    Customs Cooperation Council.........................          2,861 
    Hague Conference on Private International Law.......            103 
    International Agency for Research on Cancer.........          1,670 
    International Bureau/Permanent Court of Arbitration.             19 
    International Bureau/Publication of Customs Tariffs.             89 
    International Bureau of Weights and Measures........            810 
    International Copper Study Group....................             55 
    International Cotton Advisory Committee.............            222 
    International Center/Study of Preservation and 
      Restoration of Cultural Property..................            748 
    International Hydrographic Organization.............             82 
    International Institute/Unification of Private Law..            101 
    International Lead & Zinc Study Group...............             56 
    International Office of Epizootics..................             75 
    International Organization of Legal Metrology.......             94 
    International Rubber Study Group....................            117 
    International Seed Testing Association..............              7 
    International Tropical Timber Organization..........            159 
    International Union/Conservation of Nature and 
      Natural Resources.................................            251 
    International Grains Council........................            444 
    International Union/Protection of New Varieties of 
      Plants............................................            163 
    Organization for the Prevention of Chemical Weapons.         12,950 
    World Trade Organization/General Agreement on 
      Tariffs and Trade.................................         12,739 
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
        Subtotal........................................         33,815 
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Spending reductions:
    Exchange rate savings...............................        (20,100)
    U.N. buydown........................................        (14,900)
    Administrative overhead.............................................
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal..........................................        (35,000)
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, international organizations................      1,091,348 

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table above are described in more detail in the following 
paragraphs.
    Synchronization of United States and United Nations budget 
years.--Twenty years ago a decision was made to put the United 
States and United Nations budget years out of alignment. The 
budget year of the United Nations begins in January. Prior to 
this change, Administration requests sought funding for U.N. 
dues in the fiscal year beginning in the October prior to dues 
being due. After this change, funding for U.N. dues have been 
sought in the fiscal year beginning in the October after dues 
are due. This 9 month delay in annual payment of U.N. regular 
dues has caused difficulties for 20 years. The United Nations 
frequently chides the United States for being in ``arrears'' 
for the period between the bill for dues being received and 
being paid. This has had a negative impact on relations between 
Congress and the United Nations. The Committee is aware that 
there are reasons enough for discord between Congress and the 
United Nations without additional bookkeeping challenges adding 
to the list. Therefore, the recommendation provides the funds 
necessary to synchronize the U.S. payment of U.N. regular dues 
with the U.N. budget year.
    Spending decreases.--The recommendation assumes exchange 
rate savings due to the continuing strength of the U.S. dollar. 
The recommendation also anticipates approval of a reprogramming 
involving $14,900,000 in fiscal year 2001 ``Contribution to 
International Organizations'' [CIO] funds that will be used to 
partially prepay U.N. regular budget assessments for calendar 
year 2001 by a like amount.
    International Civil Aviation Organization.--The Committee 
recognizes the need for increased aviation safety and security 
throughout the world and commends the progress that the 
International Civil Aviation Organization [ICAO] has made. In 
view of the importance of ICAO's work to the United States and 
the rapid growth of international civil aviation, the Committee 
recommendation provides the necessary funding for the United 
States to continue to pay its 25 percent assessment. The 
Committee recommendation includes the additional budgetary 
resources necessary for the new and expanded programs in safety 
and security undertaken by the ICAO.

        Contributions For International Peacekeeping Activities

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $844,139,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     844,139,000
Committee recommendation................................     773,182,000

    This account funds U.S. payments for contributions for 
international peacekeeping activities.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $773,182,000. 
The recommendation is $70,957,000 below the budget request.
    Sierra Leone.--The Revolutionary United Front [RUF] has had 
several opportunities, including three cease fire agreements, 
to demonstrate its commitment to peace, and each time it has 
merely used the hiatus in the conflict as an opportunity to 
regroup and redeploy its forces. The Committee is concerned 
that the recent willingness of the RUF to honor the May 2001 
ceasefire is nothing more than the continuation of the same old 
practice and the RUF does not desire peace, but rather fears 
that the Guinean army poses a serious threat to its survival. 
The RUF is effectively using the United Nations Peacekeeping 
mission to Sierra Leone [UNAMSIL] as a shield against the 
Guinean army. Although the Committee supports the deployment of 
U.N. peacekeepers to the areas of Sierra Leone most in need, it 
remains skeptical of the RUF's motives for allowing it to do 
so. The Committee considers the five principles laid out by the 
former U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. to the Committee to form the 
basis of U.S. policy. These five principles are: prevent rebel 
groups from having a role in government; support the British 
military presence; give regional and international forces and 
the Sierra Leonean Army [SLA] the capacity to disrupt RUF 
control of the diamond-producing areas; assist the government 
of Sierra Leone with institution-building; and develop a 
strategy for dealing with the current Liberian government. 
Therefore, concurrent to the submission of a spend plan under 
Section 605, the Department of State is directed to provide the 
Committee written assurance that neither the U.N. nor the 
Government of Sierra Leone has made a promise of a political 
role for current or former members of the RUF or of amnesty to 
the same.
    Twenty-Five Percent Cap.--Funding is provided to meet fully 
U.S. assessments to UN peacekeeping operations at a level that 
is consistent with the current legislative cap of 25 percent 
imposed by section 404 of the Foreign Relations Authorization 
Act, fiscal years 1994 and 1995. When legislation is enacted to 
lift or modify this restriction, the Committee will consider 
through the regular reprogramming process a request by the 
Department to reallocate funding. This reprogramming would 
permit the United States to meet its full assessment 
obligations.
    East Timor.--The Committee is aware that, in anticipation 
of the East Timor's independence vote, scheduled for August 
2001, the Department has requested to open a U.S. post in Dili, 
East Timor. While the Committee recognizes the eventual need 
for a U.S. presence in East Timor, it believes that the process 
should proceed prudently. The situation in East Timor, despite 
the relative success of the U.N. Transitional Administration in 
East Timor [UNTAET], remains highly unstable. East Timor 
continues to be the third largest peacekeeping initiative 
funded in the ``Contributions for International Peacekeeping 
Activities'' account with over 15 percent of the funding in 
this account directed toward the mission. The uncertainty 
surrounding East Timor's path to independence gives this 
Committee pause about sanctioning American people and assets to 
East Timor while it is still unclear how they might be 
received. The Department is therefore directed to report to the 
Committee on the situation in East Timor by January 1, 2002, at 
which time the Committee will reconsider the request.

                       International Commissions


 International Boundary And Water Commission, United States And Mexico

                         Salaries and Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $7,126,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       7,452,000
Committee recommendation................................       7,452,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $7,452,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.

                              Construction

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $22,900,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      25,654,000
Committee recommendation................................      24,154,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $24,154,000. 
The recommendation is $1,500,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations, by project, are displayed in 
the following table:

International Boundary & Water Commission Construction

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation
Boundary-wide construction:
    Facilities renovation construction..................             725
    Heavy equipment replacement.........................             500
    Land mobile radio systems replacement...............             750
    Hydrological data collection system rehabilitation..             750
    Construction Administration.........................             382
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, boundary-wide construction..............           3,107
Rio Grande construction:
    Rio Grande American Canal extension.................             250
    Rio Grande canalization continuation................             800
    Rio Grande flood control system rehabilitation......           1,150
    Safety of dams rehabilitation.......................             754
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, Rio Grande construction.................           2,954
Colorado River construction: Colorado River boundary/
    capacity preservation...............................             340
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, construction............................           6,401
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Operations & maintenance................................          17,753
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total.............................................          24,154

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan for fiscal year 2002.

              American Sections, International Commissions

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $6,726,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      10,311,000
Committee recommendation................................       6,879,000

    This account funds the U.S. share of expenses of the 
International Boundary Commission [IBC], the International 
Joint Commission [IJC], and the Border Environment Cooperation 
Commission [BECC].
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $6,879,000. 
The recommendation is $3,432,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations, by commission, are displayed 
in the following table:

American Sections, International Commissions

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation
International Boundary Commission:
    Commission operations...............................             494
    Maine-Quebec project................................             118
    Washington-British Columbia.........................             234
    Montana-Alberta, British Columbia...................             143
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, IBC.....................................             989
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
International Joint Commission:
    United States Section...............................           3,330
    U.S. Geological Survey..............................             520
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, IJC.....................................           3,850
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Border Environment Cooperation Commission:
    Studies & investigations/solid waste projects.......             320
    All other operations................................           1,720
                    --------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________
      Subtotal, BECC....................................           2,040
                    ========================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
      Total, American sections..........................           6,879

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan for fiscal year 2002.

                  International Fisheries Commissions

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $19,349,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      19,780,000
Committee recommendation................................      20,780,000

    This account funds the U.S. share of the expenses of 
international fisheries commissions; participation in the 
International Council for the Exploration of the Sea; 
participation in the North Pacific Marine Sciences 
Organization; travel expenses of the U.S. commissioners and 
their advisors; and salaries of non-Government employees of the 
Pacific Salmon Commission for days actually worked as 
commissioners and panel members and alternates.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $20,780,000. 
The recommendation is $1,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations, by commission, organization, 
or council, are displayed in the following table:

International Fisheries Commissions

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation
Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission.......................     2,100
Great Lakes Fishery Commission................................    13,248
Pacific Salmon Commission.....................................     2,193
International Pacific Halibut Commission......................     2,200
International Whaling Commission..............................       110
North Pacific Anadromous Fish Commission......................        99
Int'l Commission/Conservation of Atlantic Tunas...............       151
Northwest Atlantic Fisheries Organization.....................       146
Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living 
    Resour- 
    ces.......................................................       100
North Atlantic Salmon Conservation Organization...............        27
Int'l Council for the Exploration of the Seas.................       120
North Pacific Marine Science Organization.....................        66
Inter-American Sea Turtle Convention Commission...............       120
Expenses of the U.S. Commissioners............................       100
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Total...................................................    20,780

    The Committee expects to be consulted prior to any 
deviation from the above plan for fiscal year 2002.
    Of the amount provided for the Great Lakes Fishery 
Commission [GLFC], not less than $300,000 shall be used to 
treat Lake Champlain with lampricide and lampricide 
alternative. The GLFC is directed to give priority to States 
that have provided matching grants when distributing lampricide 
funds.

                                 Other


                     Payment To The Asia Foundation

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $9,230,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       9,250,000
Committee recommendation................................       8,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $8,000,000. 
The recommendation is $1,250,000 less than the budget request.

                 Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program


           Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Program Trust Fund

Appropriations, 2001....................................        $499,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................         500,000
Committee recommendation................................         500,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $500,000 for 
interest and earnings in the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship 
Program Trust Fund, authorized by the Eisenhower Exchange 
Fellowship Act of 1990 (Public Law 101-454). The recommendation 
is equal to the budget request.
    The Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship Act of 1990 authorized a 
permanent endowment for the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship 
Program. The act established the Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship 
Program Trust Fund in the U.S. Treasury for these purposes. A 
total of $7,500,000 has been provided to establish a permanent 
endowment for the program, from which interest and earnings in 
the fund are appropriated to Eisenhower Exchange Fellowships, 
Inc.

                    Israeli-Arab Scholarship Program

Appropriations, 2001....................................        $374,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................         375,000
Committee recommendation................................         375,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of interest and 
earnings for the Israeli-Arab Scholarship Endowment Fund 
estimated to be $375,000. The recommendation is equal to the 
budget request.
    A permanent endowment of $4,978,500 was established in 
fiscal year 1992 with funds made available under section 556(b) 
of the Foreign Operations, Export Financing, and Related 
Programs Appropriations Act, 1990, as amended. The income from 
the endowment is to be used for a program of scholarships for 
Israeli-Arabs to attend institutions of higher education in the 
United States.

                            East-West Center

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $13,470,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      13,500,000
Committee recommendation................................      14,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $14,000,000. 
The recommendation is $500,000 above the request.

                    National Endowment For Democracy

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $30,931,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      31,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      31,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $31,000,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.

                             RELATED AGENCY


                    Broadcasting Board of Governors


                 International Broadcasting Operations

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $398,093,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     428,234,000
Committee recommendation................................     414,752,000

    This account funds the operating and engineering costs of 
Voice of America [VOA], Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty [RFE/
RL], Radio Free Asia [RFA], Worldnet Television, and the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors [BBG].
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $414,752,000. 
The recommendation is $13,482,000 below the budget request.
    The Committee recommendations are displayed in the 
following table:

                        [In thousands of dollars]

                                                               Committee
                                                          recommendation

Broadcasting Board of Governors...............................   13,318 
International Broadcasting Bureau:
    Voice of America..........................................  110,876 
    VOA-TV....................................................   19,508 
    Engineering and technical operations......................  107,617 
    Program support...........................................   20,398 
    Administrative support....................................   47,015 
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

      Subtotal................................................  318,732 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
Independent grantee organizations:
    Radio Free Europe/Radio Liberty...........................   69,527 
    Radio Free Asia...........................................   26,493 
        Uyghur................................................   [1,000]
                    --------------------------------------------------------------
                    ____________________________________________________

          Subtotal............................................   96,020 
                    ==============================================================
                    ____________________________________________________
          Total, international broadcasting operations........  414,752 

    Some of the Committee recommendations displayed in the 
table above are described in more detail in the following 
paragraphs.
    Post-Independence Agreement with the Department of State.--
The Committee is concerned by the lack of progress towards 
reaching an agreement between the BBG and Department of State 
formalizing ``post-independence'' actions and responsibilities 
of the BBG toward the Department. The Committee directs that, 
within 6 months of the date of enactment of this Act, the BBG 
and Department of State shall have signed a memorandum of 
understanding that delineates a formal arrangement for 
providing services to the Department and reimbursement for the 
cost of such services.
    Expansion of Broadcasting Capabilities.--The Committee is 
aware that the Department of State is looking to enhance its 
own broadcasting capabilities, a program decision which carries 
with it the potential for overlap with current BBG services. 
The Department is directed to report to the Committee on its 
reasoning for requesting additional transmission and production 
services.
    Shifting requirements.--The Committee believes an 
opportunity exists to reach important and isolated minorities 
in the Northern Caucasus. RFE/RL has in the past broadcast in 
native languages to this region. The Committee believes that 
doing so today would not be financially prohibitive, and 
further believes that the Chechen crisis has created a genuine 
need in this region for objective, uncensored information. The 
Committee directs RFE/RL to expand broadcasting to the Northern 
Caucasus and to develop programming in Avar, Chechen, and 
Circassian. To the degree desirable, RFE/RL should exploit VOA-
TV assets. RFE/RL shall report back to the Committee on this 
effort not later than February 14, 2002.
    The Committee recommendation includes a $1,000,000 increase 
over the budget request for Radio Free Asia to increase daily 
Uyghur broadcasts. Radio Free Asia's Uyghur broadcasts are 
proving successful in northwest China in spite of top level 
officials efforts to erect ``a steel wall'' against ``hostile 
radio stations from abroad.''
    Africa Broadcasting.--The Committee is concerned with Voice 
of America's proposal to reduce funding for its Africa 
Division. Given the political instability in numerous 
countries, and given the impact AIDS is having on the entire 
continent, funding for Africa Broadcasting should be 
increasing. Within available funds, the Committee 
recommendation includes $10,000,000 for Africa broadcasting. 
VOA shall report back to the Committee on its AIDS education 
related broadcasting activities no later than March 22, 2002.

                          Broadcasting To Cuba

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $22,046,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      24,872,000
Committee recommendation................................      24,872,000

    This account funds the operating and engineering costs of 
Radio and Television Marti.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $24,872,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.

                   broadcasting capital improvements

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $20,313,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      16,900,000
Committee recommendation................................      16,900,000

    This account funds necessary maintenance, improvements, 
replacements, and repairs of broadcasting sites; satellite and 
terrestrial program feeds; and engineering support activities, 
broadcast facility leases, and land rentals.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $16,900,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.

      General Provisions--Department of State and Related Agencies

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions:
    Section 401 permits funds appropriated in this act for the 
Department of State to be available for allowances and 
differentials, services, and hire of passenger transportation.
    Section 402 permits up to 5 percent of any appropriation 
made available in the bill for the Department of State and the 
U.S. Information Agency to be transferred between their 
respective appropriations. The language also provides that no 
appropriation shall be decreased by more than 5 percent or 
increased by more than 10 percent by any such transfer. In 
addition, the language provides that any transfer pursuant to 
this subsection shall be treated as a reprogramming of funds 
under section 605 of the accompanying bill and shall not be 
available for obligation or expenditure except in compliance 
with the procedures set forth in that section.
    Section 403 prohibits the use of Department of State funds 
to support the Palestinian Broadcasting Corp.
    Section 404 limits the fundraising ability of criminal 
groups trafficking in ``conflict'' diamonds.
    Section 405 prohibits the United Nations, or any of its 
specialized agencies, from imposing a tax on the Internet or 
international currency transactions.
    Section 406 requires that a consulate or diplomatic 
facility in Jerusalem be under the supervision of the U.S. 
Ambassador to Israel.
    Section 407 requires government publications to list 
Jerusalem as the capital of Israel.
    Section 408 allows Israel to be recorded as the place of 
birth on registrations of birth, certifications of nationality, 
and passport applications for U.S. citizens born in Jerusalem.

                       TITLE V--RELATED AGENCIES

                      DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

                        Maritime Administration

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $219,114,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     103,032,000
Committee recommendation................................     291,732,000

    The Maritime Administration [MarAd] in the Department of 
Transportation is responsible for administering several 
programs for the maritime industry relating to U.S. foreign and 
domestic commerce and for national defense purposes.
    The Committee recommends a total appropriation of 
$291,732,000, which is $188,700,000 above budget request. The 
Committee's recommendations for specific accounts are described 
below.
    The Committee is concerned about foreign-owned hopper 
dredge vessels, which were grandfathered by the Oceans Act of 
1992 (Public Law 102-587), inappropriately expanding their 
domestic operations and unfairly disadvantaging the domestic 
industry. The Committee directs the Administrator to review 
charters of vessels engaged in dredging in the navigable waters 
of the United States, in particular charterers who are not 
citizens of the United States under section 2 of the Shipping 
Act, 1916, in order to ensure that they are in compliance with 
current law and the intent of Congress.

                       Maritime Security Program

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $98,483,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................................
Committee recommendation................................      98,700,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $98,700,000. 
The recommendation is $98,700,000 above the budget request. The 
Committee notes that the budget request recommended that 
jurisdiction over the Maritime Security Program be shifted to 
the Department of the Navy. The Committee does not recommend 
such a move.
    The Maritime Security program maintains a U.S.-flag 
merchant fleet crewed by U.S. citizens who serve both the 
commercial and national security needs of the United States. 
The Committee's recommendation fully funds the 47 ships 
authorized to participate in this program.

                        Operations And Training

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $86,719,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      89,054,000
Committee recommendation................................      89,054,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $89,054,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request.
    This account funds operations of the Maritime 
Administration [MarAd], the U.S. Merchant Marine Academy, and 
provides grants to State maritime academies.
    The recommendation includes $47,822,000 for the U.S. 
Merchant Marine Academy and $7,457,000 for the State maritime 
schools. Within the amounts provided for the U.S. Merchant 
Marine Academy, $3,000,000 is included to reduce the 
maintenance and repair backlog at the Academy, and to begin to 
make needed capital improvements. Within the amounts for State 
maritime schools, $1,200,000 is for student incentive payments, 
$1,200,000 is for direct scholarship payments, and $5,057,000 
is for schoolship maintanence and repair. The Committee notes 
that MarAd anticipates using $2,000,000 in Ready Reserve funds 
to support the schoolship maintenance and repair program.

                    Maritime Guaranteed Loan Program

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $33,912,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       3,978,000
Committee recommendation................................     103,978,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $103,978,000. 
The recommendation is $100,000,000 above the budget request and 
assumes administrative expenses of $3,978,000.
    The Maritime Guaranteed Loan Program (title XI) provides 
subsidies for guaranteed loans for purchasers of vessels built 
in U.S. shipyards and includes the guarantee for facilities or 
equipment pertaining to marine operations related to any of 
those vessels.
    The Committee is concerned that the Administration did not 
request a title XI subsidy for fiscal year 2002. Projects 
currently under consideration, and many future maritime 
projects would be in jeopardy under this proposal. The 
recommended subsidy amount, when combined with $5,000,000 in 
anticipated carryover balances, should provide sufficient 
funding to cover expected out-year requirements.

                         SHIP DISPOSAL PROGRAM

Appropriations, 2001....................................................
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     $10,000,000
Committee recommendation................................................

    The Committee does not recommend an appropriation for the 
Ship Disposal Program. The recommendation is $10,000,000 below 
the budget request.

      Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................        $489,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................         489,000
Committee recommendation................................         489,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $489,000. This 
amount is equal to the budget request. The recommendation will 
allow the Commission to fund its administrative expenses 
through appropriated funds while relying on privately donated 
funds for the actual purchase and restoration of property.
    The purpose of the Commission is to encourage the 
preservation of cemeteries, monuments, and historic buildings 
associated with the foreign heritage of the American people.
    Revolutionary War heroes.--In recognition of the 225th 
anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence, 
the Commission is directed to develop a plan for the 
preservation and interpretation of sites associated with the 
lives and deeds of foreign-born heroes of the American 
Revolution, including, but not limited to, John Barry, Thaddeus 
Kosciusko, the Comtes d'Estaing, de Grasse, and de Rochambeau, 
Baron Johann De Kalb, Count Casimir Pulaski, Friedrich Wilhelm 
von Steuben, John Paul Jones, and Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de 
Lafayette. The Commission shall deliver a preliminary survey to 
the Committees on Appropriations not later than July 4, 2002.

                       Commission on Civil Rights


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $8,800,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       9,096,000
Committee recommendation................................       9,096,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $9,096,000 for 
the salaries and expenses of the Commission on Civil Rights. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. The 
Committee recommendation includes $100,000 to hold hearings in 
Alaska on recent incidents of racially motivated violence and 
to make recommendations to improve interracial relations.
    The Committee recommends bill language which provides: (1) 
$50,000 to employ consultants; (2) a prohibition against 
reimbursing commissioners for more than 75 billable days; (3) a 
prohibition against reimbursing the chairperson for more than 
125 billable days; and (4) a limitation of four full-time 
positions under schedule C of the Excepted Service exclusive of 
one special assistant for each Commissioner.

             Commission on International Religious Freedom

Appropriation 2001......................................................
Budget estimate.........................................      $3,000,000
Committee recommendation................................................

    The Committee does not recommend an appropriation. The 
recommendation is $3,000,000 below the budget request.

                       Commission on Ocean Policy

Appropriations, 2001....................................        $998,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................................
Committee recommendation................................       2,500,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $2,500,000 for 
the Commission on Ocean Policy. Legislation directing the 
President to establish a Commission on Ocean Policy, as the 
successor to the objective, science-based 1966 Stratton 
Commission passed during the 106th Congress. To date $4,500,000 
has been appropriated for the Commission.

            Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $1,367,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       1,499,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,432,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $1,432,000. 
The recommendation is $67,000 below the budget request.
    The Commission was established in 1976 to ensure compliance 
with the final act of the Conference on Security and 
Cooperation in Europe with particular regard to provisions 
dealing with humanitarian affairs.

  Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of China


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................        $499,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................         500,000
Committee recommendation................................         500,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $500,000. The 
recommendation is identical to the budget request.

                Equal Employment Opportunity Commission


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $303,195,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     310,406,000
Committee recommendation................................     310,406,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $310,406,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. During 
the past 4 years, the EEOC has received increases significantly 
higher than most of the agencies funded under this bill.
    The Committee recommendation includes $33,000,000 to fund 
fair employment practices agencies. This should permit the EEOC 
to increase the contract rate for cases closed to $575. In 
order to ensure the EEOC understands the importance the 
Committee places on the work of State and local fair employment 
practices agencies, bill language is included to direct the 
agency to increase funding for the charge rate paid to these 
agencies.
    The Committee expects the agency to use its anticipated 
fiscal year 2001 carryover funds and the remainder not used for 
the above purposes to modernize its computer systems.

                   Federal Communications Commission


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $229,494,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     248,545,000
Committee recommendation................................     252,545,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $252,545,000 
for the salaries and expenses of the Federal Communications 
Commission [FCC], of which $218,757,000 is to be derived from 
collection of existing fees. The remaining $33,788,000 is 
provided from direct appropriations. The recommendation is 
$4,000,000 above the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation includes $10,997,000 for the FCC's Information 
Technology requirements and initiatives. This funding will 
provide for continued support and critical improvements for 
existing systems, and will ensure compliance with government-
wide standards pertaining to system security, accessibility and 
financial management. The funding will impact on all five key 
FCC activities, which includes licensing, competition, 
enforcement, consumer information, and spectrum management.
    The FCC is an independent agency charged with regulating 
interstate and foreign communications, including radio, 
television, wire, wireless, cable, and satellite. The FCC's 
primary mission is to promote competition, innovation, and 
deregulation in the communications industry. The U.S. 
communications markets will be characterized predominately by 
competition and innovation over the next 5 years that will 
greatly reduce the need for direct regulation and increase the 
need for the FCC to maintain an independent technical 
engineering and economic expertise. The advent of Internet-
based and other new technology-driven communications services 
will continue to erode the traditional regulatory distinctions 
between different sectors of the communications industry.
    Enforcement and Consumer Access.--Vigorous enforcement is a 
fundamental prerequisite for competitive markets and 
expeditious dispute resolution. Enforcement remains vital but 
is most effective when fully and fairly implemented. Similarly, 
effective consumer information programs are essential during 
this period. Consumers must become familiar with the myriad new 
communications options and providers available, as well as the 
new demands which emerge from the advent of increased 
competition. Where competition does not ensure access for all 
Americans to communications services, the FCC will continue to 
promote universal service and other public interest policies to 
further the goal of ensuring all Americans have access to 
telecommunications tools.
    Excellence in Engineering.--The Committee recommends 
$4,000,000 for the Excellence in Engineering program. The 
purpose of the program is to reestablish the engineering 
preeminence of the Commission so that it is more fluent in 
technology than the entities it regulates.
    Broadcast television standards.--The Committee is concerned 
about the declining standards of broadcast television and the 
impact this decline is having on America's children. An 
analysis of all prime-time programming has found that overall 
sexual content, foul language and violence have tripled over 
the past decade. In December 1999, the FCC issued a notice of 
inquiry regarding the public interest obligations of 
broadcasters during and after the transition to digital 
transmission. The Committee directs the FCC to continue to 
report to Congress on the issues associated with resurrecting a 
broadcast industry code of conduct for content of programming 
that, if adhered to by the broadcast industry, would protect 
against the further erosion of broadcasting standards.

                      Federal Maritime Commission


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $15,466,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      16,450,000
Committee recommendation................................      17,450,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $17,450,000. 
The recommendation is $1,000,000 above the budget request.
    The Federal Maritime Commission is an independent 
regulatory agency charged with administering several laws 
relating to the waterborne domestic and foreign offshore 
commerce of the United States.

                        Federal Trade Commission


                         Salaries and Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $146,830,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     156,270,000
Committee recommendation................................     156,270,000

    The Federal Trade Commission [FTC] administers a variety of 
Federal antitrust and consumer protection laws. Activities in 
the antitrust area include detection and elimination of illegal 
collusion, anticompetitive mergers, unlawful single-firm 
conduct, and injurious vertical agreements. The FTC regulates 
advertising practices, service industry practices, marketing 
practices, and credit practices as it addresses fraud and other 
consumer concerns.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $156,270,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. The 
Committee recommendation for fiscal year 2002 provides funding 
for a total of 1,080 full time equivalents. The requested 
program level will be fully funded by fees assessed on Hart-
Scott-Rodino Act premerger notification filings as authorized 
by section 605 of Public Law 101-162.
    Child Protection.--The FTC released a report last year that 
was very critical of the entertainment industry and their 
persistent and calculated marketing of violent games, movies, 
and music to children. In response to this report the 
entertainment industry has promised to place tougher 
regulations on itself and voluntarily comply with the report's 
recommendations. The Committee believes that the FTC should 
continue and expand its efforts in this area and directs the 
Commission to engage in the following three initiatives in 
fiscal year 2002.
    (1) Consumer Research and Workshops.--The Committee directs 
that $500,000 be provided to conduct focus group and survey 
research involving parents, retailers, and others involved in 
children's entertainment activities. From these sessions it is 
hoped that the FTC will be able to determine how best to 
deliver messages to consumers through retail outlets in the 
most efficient way.
    (2) Underage Shopper-Retail Compliance Survey.--The 
Committee directs that $275,000 be provided for the FTC to 
contract with an outside firm to conduct an additional 
``mystery shopper'' survey. The study should be expanded to 
include the children's purchase and rental of R-rated movie 
videos.
    (3) Marketing Data Collection.--The Committee directs that 
$135,000 be provided to ensure that the entertainment industry 
is living up to its promises. The FTC is directed to contract 
with a video monitoring, news clipping, and movie trailer 
service to record television shows, family hour programing, 
movies, and to clip magazines and newspapers to check for 
inappropriate ad placements and disclosure of rating 
information. In addition, actual products should be purchased 
to ensure that rating, label, and lyric information is properly 
and adequately disclosed.
    Competition.--The FTC's Maintaining Competition Mission is 
aimed at fostering and preserving our competitive market. The 
goal of the competition mission is to prevent anticompetitive 
business practices in the marketplace. The mission works to 
accomplish this goal by identifying and stopping 
anticompetitive mergers, and by preventing consumer injury 
through education. Mergers that are anticompetitive can drive 
up consumer prices by millions of dollars every year and can 
significantly diminish output, product quality, innovation, and 
consumer choice. To identify anticompetitive mergers, the FTC 
relies primarily on the premerger notification required by the 
Hart-Scott-Rodino Act. To distinguish between mergers that 
threaten free markets and those likely to promote them, the FTC 
uses sophisticated economic analysis and thorough factual 
investigation.
    Consumer Protection.--The FTC is charged with eliminating 
unfair or deceptive acts or practices affecting commerce. The 
goal of the consumer protection mission is to prevent fraud, 
deception, and unfair business practices in the marketplace. 
The mission works to accomplish this goal by identifying fraud, 
deception and unfair practices that cause the greatest consumer 
injury, by stopping these actions through law enforcement, and 
by preventing consumer injury through education. Staff in the 
FTC's eight regions support the consumer protection mission by 
bringing a wide variety of consumer protection cases in various 
programs and acting as contacts for State Attorneys General and 
other State and local consumer protection officials.
    Internet.--The FTC is charged with monitoring compliance 
with the Children's Online Privacy Protection Act. The 
Committee's recommendation ensures the agency is adequately 
prepared to meet the challenges of increased fraud on the 
Internet and the agency's recognition that Internet fraud is an 
international phenomenon since the Internet has no borders.

                       Legal Services Corporation


               payment to the legal services corporation

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $329,274,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     329,300,000
Committee recommendation................................     329,300,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $329,300,000. 
This is identical to the budget request. The Committee 
recommendation includes $310,000,000 for basic field programs, 
to be used for competitively awarded grants and contracts, 
$12,400,000 for management and administration, $4,400,000 is 
for client self-help and information technology, and $2,500,000 
for the Office of the Inspector General [OIG].

                       administrative provisions

    The Committee recommendation continues the administrative 
provisions contained in the fiscal year 1998 appropriations act 
(Public Law 105-119) regarding operation of this program to 
provide basic legal services to poor individuals and the 
restrictions on the use of Legal Services Corporation funds.
    Grantees must agree not to engage in litigation and related 
activities with respect to a variety of matters including (1) 
redistricting; (2) class action suits; (3) representation of 
illegal aliens; (4) political activities; (5) collection of 
attorney fees; (6) abortion; (7) prisoner litigation; (8) 
welfare reform; (9) representation of charged drug dealers 
during eviction proceedings; and (10) solicitation of clients. 
The exception to the restrictions in a case where there is 
imminent threat of physical harm to the client or prospective 
client remains in place.
    The manner in which LSC grantees are audited through 
contracts with certified public accountants for financial and 
compliance audits are continued along with the provisions on 
recompetition and debarment.

                        Marine Mammal Commission


                         salaries and expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $1,696,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       1,732,000
Committee recommendation................................       1,957,000

    The recommendation provides $1,957,000 for the Marine 
Mammal Commission in fiscal year 2002. The recommendation is 
$225,000 above the budget request.
    The Committee recommendation provides $225,000 for the 
workshop described in a proposal submitted to Congress on April 
20, 2001.

          National Veterans' Business Development Corporation

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $4,000,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................       4,000,000
Committee recommendation................................       4,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $4,000,000. 
The recommendation is identical to the budget request. The 
National Veterans' Business Development Corporation was 
authorized by Public Law 106-50.

                   Securities and Exchange Commission


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $421,870,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     437,900,000
Committee recommendation................................     514,047,000

    The Securities and Exchange Commission [SEC] is an 
independent agency responsible for administering many of the 
Nation's laws regulating the areas of securities and finance.
    The Committee recommendation provides total budget 
(obligational) authority of $514,047,000. The recommended 
amount of budget authority is $76,147,000 above the budget 
request.
    The recommendation assumes passage of the fee reduction 
provisions of S. 143. This legislation will result in 
significant reductions in SEC transaction, registration, and 
merger and tender offering fee rates. In fiscal year 2002, the 
Section 31 transaction fee rate will decline from roughly $33 
per million (1/300th of 1 percent) to $15 per million, more 
than a 50 percent reduction. In addition, the Section 6(b) 
registration fee rate will decline from $250 per million (1/
40th of 1 percent) to $92 per million, a reduction of nearly 63 
percent. The fees associated with merger and tender offerings 
also will decline to $92 per million. Fees collected from all 
three of these sources will be made available to this 
appropriation as offsetting collections. The Committee's 
recommendation assumes that $404,547,300 in fees collected in 
fiscal year 2001 and $109,500,000 in fees collected in fiscal 
year 2002 will be available as offsetting collections.
    For fiscal year 2002 the Committee continues to emphasize 
the importance of the Office of Economic Analysis within the 
Commission and expects adequate funds be provided in order to 
carry out these functions. The Committee recommends bill 
language, similar to that included in previous appropriations 
acts, which: (1) allows for the rental of space; (2) makes up 
to $3,000 available for official reception and representation 
expenses; (3) makes up to $10,000 available for a permanent 
secretariat for the International Organization of Securities 
Commissions; and (4) makes up to $100,000 available for 
governmental and regulatory officials.
    Internet Fraud.--The Commission's Internet enforcement 
program has proven extremely successful. Internet fraud cases 
represent a growing proportion of the SEC's caseload, 
increasing from four percent in 1998 to sixteen percent in 
2000. There have been 220 cases involving Internet fraud 
against 760 persons and entities. The Committee encourages the 
SEC to continue to aggressively carry out the multifaceted 
program of enforcement actions, Internet surveillance of 
publicly accessible areas of the Internet only, staff training 
in Internet investigative techniques, maintenance of the online 
Enforcement Complaint Center, and joint education and training 
sessions on Internet investigations for other Federal, State 
SRO and international regulators. The Committee also encourages 
the SEC to continue to cooperate with the Federal Trade 
Commission, the Department of Justice, and other Federal 
agencies to maximize coordination and the efficiency of all 
Federal programs targeted at Internet fraud.

                     Small Business Administration

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $857,601,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     546,000,000
Committee recommendation................................     773,457,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $773,457,000. 
The recommendation is $231,457,000 above the budget request. 
The total funding is distributed among the five SBA 
appropriation accounts as described below.

                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $367,824,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     321,219,000
Committee recommendation................................     333,233,000

    The Committee recommends a direct appropriation of 
$333,233,000 for the salaries and expenses of the Small 
Business Administration. The recommendation is $12,014,000 
above the budget request. The Committee does not recommend 
funding for the SBA's systems modernization initiative. The 
Committee has, in past years, provided $32,000,000 for this 
purpose, of which $8,000,000 remains unobligated. The Committee 
is aware that SBA has used funding appropriated for the Systems 
Modernization Initiative for other purposes. Further, the SBA 
moved funds out of the Systems Modernization Initiative without 
a reprogramming request as is required under Section 605 of 
this Act. The SBA has obligated $8,000,000 from prior year 
appropriations in the Federal System Integration and Management 
Center account (FEDSIM) to be held until projects are ready for 
acquisition. The Committee recommendation reduces the SBA 
Salaries and Expenses account by $8,000,000. The Committee 
recommends that SBA submit a reprogramming request to move 
funds from the FEDSIM account to the Salaries and Expenses 
account if it wishes to make up the difference in funding. 
Also, the Committee does not recommend funding for the 
workforce transition.
    The Committee recommendation includes requested language 
authorizing $3,500 for official reception and representation 
expenses and language authorizing SBA to charge fees to cover 
the cost of publications and certain loan servicing activities.

                Non-Credit Business Assistance Programs

    For SBA's non-credit business assistance programs, the 
Committee recommends an appropriation of $183,914,000. The 
Committee recommends the following amounts for these programs:

Small Business Development Centers......................     $88,000,000
USEAC Program...........................................       3,100,000
Business LINC...........................................       7,000,000
New Freedom Initiative..................................       5,000,000
Drug-free Workplace Grants..............................       3,500,000
Asset Sales Program Financial Officer...................       1,500,000
Regulatory Fairness Bonds...............................         500,000
SCORE...................................................       5,000,000
BICs....................................................         500,000
Women's Business Centers................................      12,000,000
Women's Council.........................................         750,000
Women's Procurement Assistance..........................         500,000
7(j) Technical Assistance...............................       3,600,000
Advocacy Research/Database..............................       1,100,000
Microloan Technical Assistance..........................      20,000,000
Veteran's Business Development Assistance...............         750,000
PRO-Net.................................................         500,000
Ombudsman and Regulatory Fairness Board.................         500,000
SBIR Technical Assistance...............................       1,500,000
Federal and State Technology Partnership Program........       3,500,000
HubZone Progam..........................................       2,000,000
PRIME Technical Assistance..............................      15,000,000

    The Committee believes the Small Business Development 
Centers (SBDCs) provide useful services to small businesses 
nationwide. Federal funding of the SBDC program constitutes the 
seed funding for the program, which is leveraged one or two 
times by State, local, and private funds. In the fiscal year 
2002 budget request, the administration is proposing that the 
SBDCs be required to collect fees from small business owners 
and entrepreneurs to reduce the annual appropriation by 
$12,207,000. Section 502(d) of the Small Business 
Reauthorization Act of 1997 prohibits the SBDCs from imposing 
or collecting fees in connection with the small business 
counseling services provided by the program. The Committee 
recommends that this prohibition should not be rescinded or 
modified, and further recommends that $88,000,000 be provided 
for this program.
    The Committee has in the past provided funding to the SBA 
to reimburse the Census Bureau for costs of conducting the 
regular Census Survey of Women Business. Data from this survey 
is critical to implementing the set-aside authority through the 
SBA Office of Federal Contract Assistance for Women. The 
Committee recommendation provides no funding for this survey 
through the SBA account, but instead provides the requested 
level of $694,000 through the Bureau of Census account. The 
Committee directs the Census Bureau to provide the SBA with the 
data that it collects in conducting this survey.
    The Committee is aware that there are instances in several 
cities where Business Information Centers and U.S. Export 
Assistance Centers are located in separate sites within blocks 
of each other, rather than in a single location. The Committee 
recommends that these centers be collocated whenever and 
wherever possible with the Small Business Development Centers. 
To this effect, the Committee directs the SBA to provide a plan 
no later than January 15, 2002 on how it plans collocations.
    The Committee notes that information regarding the use, 
services and merits of One Stop Capital Shops [OSCS] is 
limited. SBA reports that the OSCS counseled 43,000 people last 
year and yet this resulted in only 430 loans. One percent is 
not an impressive return for a program designed to provide 
access to capital. The Committee observes that the efforts of 
OSCS are duplicative of other more established SBA programs and 
recommends no funding for this program for fiscal year 2002.
    The Committee recommendation provides funding of 
$20,000,000 for the Microloan Technical Assistance Program and 
$15,000,000 for the PRIME technical assistance program. The 
Committee believes the PRIME program has great promise for 
providing assistance to the entrepreneurs who have no access to 
capital and has a training component for assisting these small 
businesses which is missing in some of the other SBA assistance 
programs.
    The Committee recommendation includes $7,000,000 for 
BusinessLINC and $3,500,000 for Drug-Free Workplace Grants.
    The Committee recommends $1,500,000 for Small Business 
Innovation Research (SBIR) technical assistance and $3,500,000 
for the Federal and State Technology Partnership Program 
(FAST). The FAST program encourages organizations in States to 
assist in the development of small high-technology businesses. 
The Committee believes that increasing the overall 
participation in the SBIR program by high-technology small 
businesses will ultimately lead to an overall increase in the 
quality of SBIR proposals and completed projects.
    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $4,000,000 for 
the National Veterans' Business Development Corporation, as 
authorized by Public Law 106-50. The Committee has, for the 
first time, recommended this amount as a separate appropriation 
found elsewhere in the bill. The Committee recommends the 
request of $750,000 for Veteran's Business Development 
Assistance.

                      Office Of Inspector General

Appropriations, 2001....................................     $11,927,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      11,927,000
Committee recommendation................................      11,000,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $11,000,000 
for the Office of Inspector General of the Small Business 
Administration. The recommendation is $927,000 below the budget 
request. The Committee directs the Inspector General's office 
to continue the activities outlined in the fiscal year 2001 
Senate report, and expects the office to report on its progress 
in reviewing and auditing the agency's financial management 
systems. The bill contains language making $500,000 available 
to the Inspector General's office from funds made available to 
the disaster loan program for its activities.

                     Business Loans Program Account

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $293,762,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................     130,500,000
Committee recommendation................................     224,360,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $224,360,000 
for the business loans program account. The recommendation is 
$93,860,000 above the budget request. Of the amount provided, 
$129,000,000 is for administrative expenses related to this 
account. The administrative expenses may be transferred to and 
merged with SBA salaries and expenses to cover the common 
overhead expenses associated with the business loan programs.
    The Committee recommendation includes an appropriation of 
$93,500,000 to support a $10,700,000,000 7(a) loan program. 
This assumes a subsidy rate of 1.07 percent and a carryover 
balance of $21,000,000. The small business community is 
dependent on the SBA 7(a) program to obtain long-term financing 
at a competitive interest rate. Each year, 40,000 or more small 
business concerns, who cannot obtain comparable credit 
elsewhere, turn to the 7(a) program for critical financing. 
Currently, both the borrowers and the lenders pay significant 
fees to the SBA to help offset the credit subsidy cost 
necessary to underwrite the program. The budget request seeks 
to increase the fees paid by borrowers and lenders to offset 
the need for an annual appropriation. The net result of the 
Administration's budget request would be to drive both the 
small business borrowers and lenders from the program. 
Furthermore, the Committee believes the SBA should achieve a 
goal of a zero subsidy rate for the 7(a) loan program. However, 
the same result can be achieved by a comprehensive review of 
subsidy cost estimates for the 7(a) program. Previous reports 
from the GAO indicate that subsidy costs have been inflated. 
OMB estimates of the subsidy cost of the 7(a) program 
consistently show execution rates are inflated. This could lead 
to the overcharging of small business owners. The Committee 
believes that the 7(a) program is already operating near a zero 
subsidy rate and that the budget request should contain a one-
time accurate accounting change to reflect that reality. The 
Committee recommends that this one-time accounting change be 
reflected in future budget requests. The Senate includes bill 
language requiring the SBA to submit a reprogramming under 
section 605 if the agency wishes to exceed a program level of 
$10,000,000,000. The recommendation includes $1,860,000 in 
subsidy budget authority for the Microloan program, which will 
support a program level of approximately $25,500,000 in fiscal 
year 2002, assuming a subsidy rate of 6.78 percent. The 
Committee recommendation provides no funding for funds 
guaranteed by the SBA under the SBIC programs. The SBIC 
programs are a unique partnership of public and private funds 
in which SBA-guaranteed funds supplement the capital of private 
venture capital investment firms. The budget request recommends 
increasing fees paid by the SBICs to offset the annual 
appropriation needed to fund the debentures guaranteed under 
the SBIC Participating Security program. This change would 
require an increase from 1.0 percent to 1.37 percent to the 
annual interest surcharge paid by the SBICs to the SBA on their 
outstanding balances of the SBA-guaranteed investment funds. 
The Committee concurs with the budget request on this matter. 
This will allow for a $3,500,000,000 program level, as 
authorized.

                     Disaster Loans Program Account

Appropriations, 2001....................................    $184,088,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      78,354,000
Committee recommendation................................     204,864,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $204,864,000 
for the disaster loan program. The recommendation is 
$126,510,000 above the budget request. Of the amount provided, 
$79,510,000 is for direct loan subsidies. This amount, combined 
with carryover and recoveries of $37,850,000 will provide for a 
program level of $800,000,000. The remaining $125,354,000 is 
made available for administrative expenses for the program, and 
can be merged with the agency's salaries and expenses account.

                       Administrative Provisions

    The Committee wishes to underscore the reprogramming 
requirements outlined in section 605. This recommendation 
includes an administrative provision in the bill language, as 
in last year's bill, providing the authority to transfer funds 
between the Small Business Administration's appropriations 
accounts. The language provides that no account may be 
decreased by more than 5 percent or increased by more than 10 
percent. The language also makes the transfers subject to the 
Committee's standard reprogramming procedures under section 
605. In addition, a reprogramming notification is required in 
any proposed organization, whether or not funding transfers 
will be associated with the proposed reorganization.

                        State Justice Institute


                         Salaries And Expenses

Appropriations, 2001....................................      $6,835,000
Budget estimate, 2002...................................      15,000,000
Committee recommendation................................      14,850,000

    The Committee recommends an appropriation of $14,850,000. 
The recommendation is $150,000 below the budget request.
    The Institute was created in 1984 to further the 
development and adoption of improved judicial administration in 
State courts. This goal is reached through grants which (1) 
create a national program of assistance to assure a fair and 
effective system of justice, (2) foster coordination with the 
Federal Judiciary in areas of mutual concern, (3) promote 
recognition of the separation of powers, or (4) provide 
education to judges and support personnel through national 
organizations.

              United States-Canada Alaska Rail Commission


                         SALARIES AND EXPENSES

Appropriations, 2001....................................              $0
Budget estimate, 2002...................................               0
Committee recommendation................................       4,000,000

    The United States-Canada Alaska Rail Commission is 
chartered to explore the feasibility of connecting continental 
railway systems to the Alaska railway.
    The Committee recommendation provides $4,000,000. The 
recommendation is $4,000,000 above the budget request.

                      TITLE VI--GENERAL PROVISIONS

    The Committee recommends the following general provisions 
for the departments and agencies funded in the accompanying 
bill.
    Section 601 prohibits any appropriation act from being used 
for publicity or propaganda purposes not authorized by law.
    Section 602 prohibits any appropriation contained in the 
act from remaining available for obligation beyond the current 
year unless expressly so provided.
    Section 603 provides that the expenditure for any 
appropriation contained in the act for any consulting service 
through procurement contracts shall be limited to those 
contracts where such expenditures are a matter of public record 
and available for public inspection except where otherwise 
provided under existing law or under existing Executive order 
issued pursuant to existing law.
    Section 604 establishes a Deputy Attorney General for 
combatting terrorism.
    Section 605 stipulates Committee policy concerning the 
reprogramming of funds. Section 605(a) prohibits the 
reprogramming of funds which: (1) create new programs; (2) 
eliminates a program, project, or activity; (3) increases funds 
or personnel by any means for any project or activity for which 
funds have been denied or restricted; (4) relocates offices or 
employees; (5) reorganizes offices, programs, or activities; 
(6) contracts out or privatizes any function or activity 
presently performed by Federal employees--unless the 
Appropriations Committees of the House and Senate are notified 
15 days in advance.
    Section 605(b) prohibits a reprogramming of funds in excess 
of $500,000 or 10 percent, whichever is more, that (1) augments 
existing programs, projects, or activities; (2) reduces by 10 
percent funding for any existing program, project, or activity, 
or numbers of personnel by 10 percent as approved by Congress; 
or (3) results from any general savings due to a reduction in 
personnel which would result in a change in existing programs, 
activities, or projects as approved by Congress unless the 
Appropriations Committees of the House and Senate are notified 
15 days in advance.
    Section 606 increase the amount of funds available to 
improve the immigration inspection process at air ports of 
entry.
    Section 607 prohibits construction, repair, overhaul, 
conversion, or modernization of NOAA ships outside of the 
United States.
    Section 608 makes permanent Section 140 of Public Law 97-
92.
    Section 609 prohibits funds in the bill from being used to 
implement, administer, or enforce any guidelines of the Equal 
Employment Opportunity Commission covering harassment based on 
religion similar to proposed guidelines published by the EEOC 
in October 1993.
    Section 610 establishes notification requirements for new 
peacekeeping missions.
    Section 611 limits the use of funds for diplomatic 
facilities in Vietnam unless certain conditions are met.
    Section 612 prohibits the use of funds to provide certain 
amenities and personal comforts in the Federal prison system.
    Section 613 provides that any closing or downsizing costs 
incurred by a Department or agency funded under this act 
resulting from funding reductions in the act shall be absorbed 
within the budgetary resources available to the Department or 
agency. The language also provides transfer of authority 
between appropriation accounts to carry out the provision 
subject to the reprogramming procedures outlined in section 605 
of this act.
    Section 614 limits the availability of pornography to 
Federal prisoners.
    Section 615 prohibits funds from being used to issue a visa 
to any alien involved in extrajudicial and political killings 
in Haiti.
    Section 616 prohibits a user fee from being charged for 
background checks conducted pursuant to the Brady Handgun 
Control Act of 1993 and prohibits implementation of a 
background check system that does not require and result in the 
immediate destruction of certain information.
    Section 617 delays obligation of some receipts deposited 
into the Crime Victim Fund.
    Section 618 ties visa issuance to cooperation on so-called 
``non-returnables''.
    Section 619 limits the placement of maximum or high 
security prisoners to appropriately secure facilities.
    Section 620 redefines the terms of service for certain 
Government financed attorneys.
    Section 621 makes technical corrections to Public Law 106-
246.
    Section 622 extends current law for an additional 5 years. 
The Pacific Coast States will be allowed to manage Dungeness 
crab out to 200 nautical miles until a Fisheries Management 
Plan is in place.

                         TITLE VII--RESCISSIONS

                DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCIES


                          DEPARTMENT OF STATE


        Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities


                              (rescission)

    The Committee recommends a rescission of $126,620,000 from 
the unobligated balances available in the ``Contributions for 
International Peacekeeping Activities'' account.

  COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7, RULE XVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Rule XVI, paragraph 7 requires that every report on a 
general appropriation bill filed by the Committee must identify 
items of appropriation not made to carry out the provisions of 
an existing law, a treaty stipulation, or an act or resolution 
previously passed by the Senate during that session.
    The following appropriations have not been authorized 
either in whole or in part and fall under this rule:
    Title I--Department of Justice: General administration, 
salaries and expenses; administrative review and appeals, 
Office of the Inspector General; United States Parole 
Commission, salaries and expenses; general legal activities, 
salaries and expenses; National Childhood Vaccine Injury Act; 
Antitrust Division, salaries and expenses; U.S. attorneys, 
salaries and expenses; Foreign Claims Settlement Commission; 
fees and expenses of witnesses; Federal Bureau of 
Investigation, salaries and expenses; Drug Enforcement 
Administration, salaries and expenses; Drug Enforcement 
Administration, construction; Immigration and Naturalization 
Service, salaries and expenses; Federal Prison System, salaries 
and expenses; Federal Prison System, building and facilities; 
Federal Prison Industries, Inc.; limitation on administrative 
expenses; Federal Prison Industries Inc.; juvenile justice 
programs; juvenile justice delinquency prevention; State and 
local law enforcement assistance block grants; Weed and Seed 
Program; Missing Children's Program; and Victims of Child Abuse 
Act Program.
    Title II--Department of Commerce and related agencies: 
Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, salaries and expenses; 
International Trade Commission, salaries and expenses; Export 
Administration, operations and administration; International 
Trade Administration, operations and administration; economic 
development assistance programs; Patent and Trademark Office; 
National Institute of Standards and Technology, scientific and 
technical research and services; NIST industrial technology 
services; NIST construction of research facilities; National 
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration operations, research, 
and facilities; NOAA construction; and Minority Business 
Development Agency.
    Title V--Related agencies: Department of Transportation; 
Maritime Administration, operations and training; Commission on 
Civil Rights; Federal Communications Commission (except 
offsetting fee collections); Legal Services Corporation; and 
Securities and Exchange Commission.

COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 7(C), RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Pursuant to paragraph 7(c) of rule XXVI, the Committee 
ordered reported, en bloc, an original fiscal year 2002 
Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and 
related agencies appropriations bill, S. 1215, and an original 
fiscal year 2002 Departments of Veterans Affairs and Housing 
and Urban Development, and Independent Agencies appropriations 
bill, S. 1216, each subject to amendment and each subject to 
its budget allocations, by a recorded vote of 29-0, a quorum 
being present. The vote was as follows:
        Yeas                          Nays
Chairman Byrd
Mr. Inouye
Mr. Hollings
Mr. Leahy
Mr. Harkin
Ms. Mikulski
Mr. Reid
Mr. Kohl
Mrs. Murray
Mr. Dorgan
Mrs. Feinstein
Mr. Durbin
Mr. Johnson
Mrs. Landrieu
Mr. Reed
Mr. Stevens
Mr. Cochran
Mr. Specter
Mr. Domenici
Mr. Bond
Mr. McConnell
Mr. Burns
Mr. Shelby
Mr. Gregg
Mr. Bennett
Mr. Campbell
Mr. Craig
Mrs. Hutchison
Mr. DeWine

 COMPLIANCE WITH PARAGRAPH 12, RULE XXVI OF THE STANDING RULES OF THE 
                                 SENATE

    Paragraph 12 of the rule XXVI requires that Committee 
reports on a bill or joint resolution repealing or amending any 
statute or part of any statute include ``(a) the text of the 
statute or part thereof which is proposed to be repealed; and 
(b) a comparative print of that part of the bill or joint 
resolution making the amendment and of the statute or part 
thereof proposed to be amended, showing by stricken-through 
type and italics, parallel columns, or other appropriate 
typographical devices the omissions and insertions which would 
be made by the bill or joint resolution if enacted in the form 
recommended by the committee.''
    In compliance with this rule, the following changes in 
existing law proposed to be made by this bill are shown as 
follows: existing law to be omitted is enclosed in black 
brackets; new matter is printed in italic; and existing law in 
which no change is proposed is shown in roman.

             TITLE 5--GOVERNMENT ORGANIZATION AND EMPLOYEES

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                           PART III--EMPLOYEES

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                  Subpart B--Employment and Retention

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                  CHAPTER 31--AUTHORITY FOR EMPLOYMENT

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



              SUBCHAPTER II--THE SENIOR EXECUTIVE SERVICE


Sec. 3132. Definitions and exclusions

    (a) For the purpose of this subchapter--
            (1) * * *
                    (A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

                    (C) the Federal Election Commission; [or]
                    (D) the Office of the Comptroller of the 
                Currency, the Office of Thrift Supervision, the 
                Federal Housing Finance Board, the Resolution 
                Trust Corporation, the Farm Credit 
                Administration, the Office of Federal Housing 
                Enterprise Oversight of the Department of 
                Housing and Urban Development, and the National 
                Credit Union Administration; or
                    (E) the Securities and Exchange Commission.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                     Subpart D--Pay and Allowances

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                   CHAPTER 53--PAY RATES AND SYSTEMS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                SUBCHAPTER VII--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS


Sec. 5373. Limitation on pay fixed by administrative action

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (1) * * *
            (2) section 831b of title 16; [or]
            (3) sections 403a-403c, 403e-403h, and 403j of 
        title 50[.]; or
            (4) section 4(b) of the Securities Exchange Act of 
        1934.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                     TITLE 8--ALIENS AND NATIONALITY

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                 CHAPTER 12--IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                       SUBCHAPTER II--IMMIGRATION

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                         Part IX--Miscellaneous


Sec. 1356. Disposition of moneys collected under the provisions of this 
                    subchapter

(a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


(e) Limitations on fees

    [(1) No fee shall be charged under subsection (d) of this 
section for immigration inspection or preinspection provided in 
connection with the arrival of any passenger, other than 
aircraft passengers, whose journey originated in the following:
            [(a) Canada,
            [(b) Mexico,
            [(c) a State, territory or possession of the United 
        States, or
    [(d) any adjacent island (within the meaning of section 
1101(b)(5) of this title).]
    (1)(A) Except as provided in subparagraph (B), the Attorney 
General is authorized to charge and collect a fee in the amount 
of $3 for each individual with respect to whom immigration 
inspection services or preinspection services are provided in 
connection with the arrival in the United States of the 
individual as a passenger on a commercial vessel, if the 
passenger's journey originated in any of the following:
            (i) Mexico.
            (ii) Canada.
            (iii) A State, territory, or possession of the 
        United States.
            (iv) Any adjacent island (within the meaning of 
        section 101(b)(5)).
    (B) The authority of subparagraph (A) does not apply to 
immigration inspection services or preinspection services 
provided at a designated port of entry in connection with the 
arrival of a passenger by means of a Great Lakes international 
ferry, or by means of any vessel that transits the Great Lakes 
or its connecting waterways, if the ferry or other vessel 
operates on a regular schedule.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


              TITLE 28--JUDICIARY AND JUDICIAL PROCEDURE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                     PART II--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                   CHAPTER 31--THE ATTORNEY GENERAL

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Sec. 504. Deputy [Attorney] Attorneys

    The President may appoint, by and with the advice and 
consent of the Senate, a Deputy Attorney General and a Deputy 
Attorney General for Combating Domestic Terrorism.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                TITLE 42--THE PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



            CHAPTER 112--VICTIM COMPENSATION AND ASSISTANCE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Sec. 10601. CRIME VICTIMS FUND

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (d) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

          (3) Of the sums remaining in the Fund in any 
        particular fiscal year after compliance with paragraph 
        (2), such sums as may be necessary shall be available 
        for the United States Attorneys Offices and the Federal 
        Bureau of Investigation to improve services for the 
        benefit of crime victims in the Federal criminal 
        justice system[.] , and for a Victim Notification 
        System.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                    IMMIGRATION AND NATIONALITY ACT

    Sec. 245. (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (i)(1) [Notwithstanding the provisions of subsections (a) 
and (c) of this section, an alien physically present in the 
United States--
            [(A) who--
                    [(i) entered the United States without 
                inspection; or
                    [(ii) is within one of the classes 
                enumerated in subsection (c) of this section; 
                and
            [(B) who is the beneficiary (including a spouse or 
        child of the principal alien, if eligible to receive a 
        visa under section 203(d)) of--
                    [(i) a petition for classification under 
                section 204 that was filed with the Attorney 
                General on or before January 14, 1998; or
                    [(ii) an application for a labor 
                certification under section 212(a)(5)(A) that 
                was filed pursuant to the regulations of the 
                Secretary of Labor on or before such date;
[may apply to the Attorney General for the adjustment of his or 
her status to that of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent 
residence. The Attorney General may accept such application 
only if the alien remits with such application a sum equalling 
$1,000 as of the date of receipt of the application, but such 
sum shall not be required from a child under the age of 
seventeen, or an alien who is the spouse or unmarried child of 
an individual who obtained temporary or permanent resident 
status under section 210 or 245A of the Immigration and 
Nationality Act or section 202 of the Immigration Reform and 
Control Act of 1986 at any date, who--
            [(i) as of May 5, 1988, was the unmarried child or 
        spouse of the individual who obtained temporary or 
        permanent resident status under section 210 or 245A of 
        the Immigration and Nationality Act or section 202 of 
        the Immigration Reform and Control Act of 1986;
            [(ii) entered the United States before May 5, 1988, 
        resided in the United States on May 5, 1988, and is not 
        a lawful permanent resident; and
            [(iii) applied for benefits under section 301(a) of 
        the Immigration Act of 1990. The sum specified herein 
        shall be in addition to the fee normally required for 
        the processing of an application under this section.]
Notwithstanding the provisions of subsections (a) and (c) of 
this section, an alien physically present in the United States 
who--
                    (A) entered the United States without 
                inspection; or
                    (B) is within one of the classes enumerated 
                in subsection (c) of this section, may apply to 
                the Attorney General for the adjustment of his 
                or her status to that of an alien lawfully 
                admitted for permanent residence.
    (2) Upon receipt of such an application and the sum hereby 
required, the Attorney General may adjust the status of the 
alien to that of an alien lawfully admitted for permanent 
residence if--
            (A) the alien is eligible to receive an immigrant 
        visa and is admissible to the United States for 
        permanent residence; and
            (B) an immigrant visa is immediately available to 
        the alien at the time the application is filed.
    (3)(A) The portion of each application fee (not to exceed 
$200) that the Attorney General determines is required to 
process an application under this section and is remitted to 
the Attorney General pursuant to paragraphs (1) and (2) of this 
subsection shall be disposed of by the Attorney General as 
provided in subsections (m), (n), and (o) of section 286.
    [(B) Any remaining portion of such fees remitted under such 
paragraphs shall be deposited by the Attorney General into the 
Breached Bond/Detention Fund established under section 286(r).]
    (B) One-half of any remaining portion of such fees remitted 
under such paragraphs shall be deposited by the Attorney 
General into the Immigration Examination Fee Account 
established under section 286(m), and one-half of any remaining 
portion of such fees shall be deposited by the Attorney General 
into the Breached Bond/Detention Fund established under section 
286(r).

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


                      Chapter 1--Selection System

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



 Chapter 2--Qualifications for Admission of Aliens; Travel Control of 
                         Citizens and Aliens

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



   disposition of moneys collected under the provisions of this title

    Sec. 286. (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (d) Schedule of Fees.--In addition to any other fee 
authorized by law, the Attorney General shall charge and 
collect [$6] $7 per individual for the immigration inspection 
of each passenger arriving at a port of entry in the United 
States, or for the preinspection of a passenger in a place 
outside of the United States prior to such arrival, aboard a 
commercial aircraft or commercial vessel.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (h) Disposition of Receipts.--(1)(A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (2)(A) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (B) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (3) Not less than nine percent of the total amounts 
        deposited under this subsection in a fiscal year shall 
        be available only to automate or otherwise improve the 
        speed, accuracy, or security of the inspection process.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (q) Land Border Inspection Fee Account.--(1)(A)(i) 
Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the Attorney 
General is authorized to establish, by regulation, not more 
than [6] 96 projects under which a fee may be charged and 
collected for inspection services provided at one or more land 
border points of entry. Such projects may include the 
establishment of commuter lanes to be made available to 
qualified United States citizens and aliens, as determined by 
the Attorney General.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  SECOND FURTHER CONTINUING APPROPRIATIONS, 1982, PUBLIC LAW 97-92

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                                TITLE IV


                             The Judiciary

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


    Sec. 140. Notwithstanding any other provision of law or of 
this joint resolution, none of the funds appropriated by this 
joint resolution or by any other Act shall be obligated or 
expended to increase, after the date of enactment of this joint 
resolution, any salary of any Federal judge or Justice of the 
Supreme Court, except as may be specifically authorized by Act 
of Congress hereafter enacted: Provided, That nothing in this 
limitation shall be construed to reduce any salary which may be 
in effect at the time of enactment of this joint resolution nor 
shall this limitation be construed in any manner to reduce the 
salary of any Federal judge or of any Justice of the Supreme 
Court. This section shall apply to fiscal year 1981 and each 
fiscal year thereafter.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


DEPARTMENTS OF COMMERCE, JUSTICE, AND STATE, THE JUDICIARY, AND RELATED 
        AGENCIES APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 1996 (PUBLIC LAW 104-134)

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                       TITLE V--RELATED AGENCIES

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                       Legal Services Corporation

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



         ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS--LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


    Sec. 504. (a)* * *
            (1) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

            (16) that initiates legal representation or 
        participates in any other way, in litigation, lobbying, 
        or rulemaking, involving an effort to reform a Federal 
        or State welfare system[, except that this paragraph 
        shall not be construed to preclude a recipient from 
        representing an individual eligible client who is 
        seeking specific relief from a welfare agency if such 
        relief does not involve an effort to amend or otherwise 
        challenge existing law in effect on the date of the 
        initiation of the representation];

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


 AN ACT TO APPROVE A GOVERNING INTERNATIONAL FISHERY AGREEMENT BETWEEN 
  THE UNITED STATES AND THE REPUBLIC OF POLAND, AND FOR OTHER PURPOSES

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



             TITLE II--MISCELLANEOUS FISHERIES PROVISIONS

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



SEC. 203. AUTHORITY OF STATES OF WASHINGTON, OREGON, AND CALIFORNIA TO 
                    MANAGE DUNGENESS CRAB FISHERY.

    (a) * * *

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *

    (i) Sunset.--This section shall have no force or effect on 
and after September 30, [2001] 2006.
    (j) Not later than December 31, 2001, and every 2 years 
thereafter, the Pacific State Marine Fisheries Commission shall 
submit to the Committee on Commerce, Science, and 
Transportation of the Senate and the Committee on Resources of 
the House of Representatives a report on the health and 
management of the Dungeness Crab fishery located off the coasts 
of the States of Washington, Oregon, and California.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


NATIONAL CAPITAL REVITALIZATION AND SELF-GOVERNMENT IMPROVEMENT ACT OF 
                        1977, PUBLIC LAW 105-33


               CHAPTER 3--OFFENDER SUPERVISION AND PAROLE


SEC. 11231. PAROLE.

    (a) Paroling Jurisdiction.--
            (1) Jurisdiction [of parole commission] to grant or 
        deny parole and to impose conditions.--Not later than 
        [one year after date of the enactment of this Act] 
        September 30, 2002, the [United States Parole 
        Commission] agency established under section 11233 
        shall assume the jurisdiction and authority of the 
        [Board of Parole of the District of Columbia] United 
        States Parole Commission to grant and deny parole, and 
        to impose conditions upon an order of parole, in the 
        case of any imprisoned felon who is eligible for parole 
        or reparole under the District of Columbia Code. The 
        [Parole Commission] agency established under section 
        11233 shall have [exclusive] authority to amend or 
        supplement any regulation interpreting or implementing 
        the parole laws of the District of Columbia with 
        respect to [felons, provided that the Commission 
        adheres to the rulemaking procedures set forth in 
        section 4218 of title 18, United States Code.] felons.
            (2) Jurisdiction [of parole commission] to revoke 
        parole or modify conditions.--[On the date in which the 
        District of Columbia Offender Supervision, Defender, 
        and Courts Services Agency is established under section 
        11233, the United States Parole Commission shall assume 
        any remaining powers, duties, and jurisdiction of the 
        Board of Parole of the District of Columbia, including 
        jurisdiction to revoke parole and to modify the 
        conditions of parole, with respect to felons.] Not 
        later than September 30, 2002, the agency established 
        under section 11233 shall assume all powers, duties, 
        and jurisdiction transferred to the United States 
        Parole Commission by this paragraph as in effect on 
        January 1, 2001.
            (3) Jurisdiction of superior court.--On the date on 
        which the District of Columbia Offender Supervision, 
        Defender, and Courts Services Agency is established 
        under section 11233, the Superior Court of the District 
        of Columbia shall assume the jurisdiction and authority 
        of the Board of Parole of the District of Columbia to 
        grant, deny, and revoke parole, and to impose and 
        modify conditions of parole, with respect to 
        misdemeanants.
    (b) Abolition of the Board of Parole.--On the date on which 
the District of Columbia Offender Supervision, Defender, and 
Courts Services Agency is established under section 11233, the 
Board of Parole established in the District of Columbia Board 
of Parole Amendment Act of 1987 shall be abolished.
    (c) Rulemaking and Legislative Responsibility for Parole 
Matters.--The [Parole Commission] agency established under 
section 11233 shall exercise the authority vested in it by this 
section pursuant to the parole laws and regulations of the 
District of [Columbia, except that the Council of the District 
of Columbia and the Board of Parole of the District of Columbia 
may not revise any such laws or regulations (as in effect on 
the date of the enactment of this Act) without the concurrence 
of the Attorney General.] Columbia.
    (d) Increase in the Authorized Number of United States 
Parole Commissioners.--Section 2(c) of the Parole Commission 
Phaseout Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-232) is amended to read as 
follows:
    ``(c) The United States Parole Commission shall have no 
more than five members.''.

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  OMNIBUS CONSOLIDATED AND EMERGENCY SUPPLEMENTAL APPROPRIATIONS ACT, 
                        1999 (PUBLIC LAW 105-277)

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



Departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary, and Related 
                   Agencies Appropriations Act, 1999


                    TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *



                General Provisions--Department of Justice

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


    [Sec. 124. (a)(1) A nursing facility or home health care 
agency may submit a request to the Attorney General to conduct 
a search and exchange of records described in subsection (b) 
regarding an applicant for employment if the employment 
position is involved in direct patient care.
      [(2) A nursing facility or home health care agency 
requesting a search and exchange of records under this section 
shall submit to the Attorney General through the appropriate 
State agency or agency designated by the Attorney General a 
copy of an employment applicant's fingerprints, a statement 
signed by the applicant authorizing the nursing facility or 
home health care agency to request the search and exchange of 
records, and any other identification information not more than 
7 days (excluding Saturdays, Sundays, and legal public holidays 
under section 6103(a) of title 5, United States Code) after 
acquiring the fingerprints, signed statement, and information.
    [(b) Pursuant to any submission that complies with the 
requirements of subsection (a), the Attorney General shall 
search the records of the Criminal Justice Information Services 
Division of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for any 
criminal history records corresponding to the fingerprints or 
other identification information submitted. The Attorney 
General shall provide any corresponding information resulting 
from the search to the appropriate State agency or agency 
designated by the Attorney General to receive such information.
    [(c) Information regarding an applicant for employment in a 
nursing facility or home health care agency obtained pursuant 
to this section may be used only by the facility or agency 
requesting the information and only for the purpose of 
determining the suitability of the applicant for employment by 
the facility or agency in a position involved in direct patient 
care.
    [(d) The Attorney General may charge a reasonable fee, not 
to exceed $50 per request, to any nursing facility or home 
health care agency requesting a search and exchange of records 
pursuant to this section.
    [(e) Not later than 2 years after the date of enactment of 
this Act, the Attorney General shall submit a report to 
Congress on the number of requests for searches and exchanges 
of records made under this section by nursing facilities and 
home health care agencies and the disposition of such requests.
    [(f) Whoever knowingly uses any information obtained 
pursuant to this section for a purpose other than as authorized 
under subsection (c) shall be fined in accordance with title 
18, United States Code, imprisoned for not more than 2 years, 
or both.
    [(g) A nursing facility or home health care agency that, in 
denying employment for an applicant, reasonably relies upon 
information provided by the Attorney General pursuant to this 
section shall not be liable in any action brought by the 
applicant based on the employment determination resulting from 
the incompleteness or inaccuracy of the information.
    [(h) The Attorney General may promulgate such regulations 
as are necessary to carry out this section, including 
regulations regarding the security, confidentiality, accuracy, 
use, destruction, and dissemination of information, audits and 
recordkeeping, the imposition of fees, and any necessary 
modifications to the definitions contained in subsection (i).
    [(i) In this section:
            [(1) The term ``home health care agency'' means an 
        agency that provides home health care or personal care 
        services on a visiting basis in a place of residence.
            [(2) The term ``nursing facility'' means a facility 
        or institution (or a distinct part of an institution) 
        that is primarily engaged in providing to residents of 
        the facility or institution nursing care, including 
        skilled nursing care, and related services for 
        individuals who require medical or nursing care.
    [(j) This section shall apply without fiscal year 
limitation.]

           *       *       *       *       *       *       *


  COMPARATIVE STATEMENT OF NEW BUDGET (OBLIGATIONAL) AUTHORITY FOR FISCAL YEAR 2001 AND BUDGET ESTIMATES AND AMOUNTS RECOMMENDED IN THE BILL FOR FISCAL
                                                                        YEAR 2002
                                                                [In thousands of dollars]
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
                                                                                                                         Senate Committee recommendation
                                                                                                                             compared with (+ or -)
                                Item                                       2001       Budget estimate     Committee    ---------------------------------
                                                                      appropriation                     recommendation        2001
                                                                                                                         appropriation   Budget estimate
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                   TITLE I--DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

                       General Administration

Salaries and expenses..............................................          88,518           93,433           93,433           +4,915   ...............
Joint automated booking system.....................................          15,880           15,957           22,500           +6,620           +6,543
Legal activities office automation.................................  ...............  ...............          34,600          +34,600          +34,600
Narrowband communications..........................................         204,549          104,606          204,549   ...............         +99,943
    (By transfer)..................................................  ...............  ...............          (9,580)         (+9,580)         (+9,580)
Deputy Attorney General for Combatting Terrorism...................  ...............  ...............          23,000          +23,000          +23,000
Counterterrorism fund..............................................           4,989            4,989   ...............          -4,989           -4,989
Telecommunications carrier compliance fund.........................         100,488   ...............  ...............        -100,488   ...............
    Defense function...............................................         100,488   ...............  ...............        -100,488   ...............
Port Security......................................................  ...............  ...............          39,950          +39,950          +39,950
Administrative review and appeals: Direct appropriation............         160,708          178,499           45,813         -114,895         -132,686

Detention trustee..................................................             998            1,718           88,884          +87,886          +87,166
Office of Inspector General........................................          41,484           45,495           46,006           +4,522             +511
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, General administration................................         718,102          444,697          598,735         -119,367         +154,038
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  United States Parole Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................           8,836           10,862            8,836   ...............          -2,026
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                          Legal Activities

General legal activities:
    Direct appropriation...........................................         534,592          566,822          527,543           -7,049          -39,279
    (By transfer)..................................................  ...............  ...............            (350)           (+350)           (+350)

Vaccine injury compensation trust fund (permanent).................           4,019            4,028            4,028               +9   ...............

Antitrust Division.................................................         120,572          140,973          130,791          +10,219          -10,182
    Offsetting fee collections--carryover..........................         -25,000          -51,550   ...............         +25,000          +51,550
    Offsetting fee collections--current year.......................         -95,838          -89,423         -130,791          -34,953          -41,368
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................            -266   ...............  ...............            +266   ...............

United States Attorneys: Direct appropriation......................       1,247,631        1,346,289        1,260,353          +12,722          -85,936

United States Trustee System Fund..................................         125,720          154,044          154,044          +28,324   ...............
    Offsetting fee collections.....................................        -119,997         -147,044         -147,044          -27,047   ...............
    Interest on U.S. securities....................................          -6,000           -7,000           -7,000           -1,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................            -277   ...............  ...............            +277   ...............

Foreign Claims Settlement Commission...............................           1,105            1,130            1,130              +25   ...............

United States Marshals Service:
    Direct appropriation...........................................         571,435          619,818   ...............        -571,435         -619,818
    Salaries and expenses (non-CSE)................................  ...............  ...............         644,746         +644,746         +644,746
    Courthouse security equipment..................................  ...............  ...............          18,145          +18,145          +18,145
    Construction...................................................          18,088            6,621           25,812           +7,724          +19,191
    Justice prisoner and alien transportation system fund..........          13,470   ...............          53,050          +39,580          +53,050
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, United States Marshals Service........................         602,993          626,439          741,753         +138,760         +115,314

Federal prisoner detention.........................................         596,088          724,682          724,682         +128,594   ...............
Fees and expenses of witnesses.....................................         125,573          156,145          156,145          +30,572   ...............
Community Relations Service........................................           8,456            9,269            9,269             +813   ...............
Assets forfeiture fund.............................................          22,949           22,949           22,949   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Legal activities......................................       3,142,863        3,457,753        3,447,852         +304,989           -9,901
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  Radiation Exposure Compensation

Administrative expenses............................................           1,996            1,996            1,996   ...............  ...............
Payment to radiation exposure compensation trust fund..............          10,776           10,776           10,776   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Radiation Exposure Compensation.......................          12,772           12,772           12,772   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                    Interagency Law Enforcement

Interagency crime and drug enforcement.............................         325,181          338,106          336,966          +11,785           -1,140
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  Federal Bureau of Investigation

Salaries and expenses..............................................       2,791,795        3,050,472        2,939,763         +147,968         -110,709
    (By transfer)..................................................  ...............  ...............         (12,557)        (+12,557)        (+12,557)
Counterintelligence and national security..........................         436,687          455,387          485,278          +48,591          +29,891
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................       3,228,482        3,505,859        3,425,041         +196,559          -80,818

Construction.......................................................          16,650            1,250           44,074          +27,424          +42,824
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Bureau of Investigation.......................       3,245,132        3,507,109        3,469,115         +223,983          -37,994
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                  Drug Enforcement Administration

Salaries and expenses..............................................       1,443,669        1,547,929        1,556,779         +113,110           +8,850
    Diversion control fund.........................................         -83,543          -67,000          -67,000          +16,543   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Drug Enforcement Administration.......................       1,360,126        1,480,929        1,489,779         +129,653           +8,850
                                                                    ====================================================================================
               Immigration and Naturalization Service

Salaries and expenses..............................................       3,118,999        3,388,001        3,176,037          +57,038         -211,964
    Enforcement and border affairs.................................      (2,547,057)      (2,737,341)  ...............     (-2,547,057)     (-2,737,341)
    Citizenship and benefits, immigration support and program              (578,819)        (650,660)  ...............       (-578,819)       (-650,660)
     direction.....................................................

    Fee accounts:
        Immigration user fee.......................................        (494,384)        (591,866)        (656,648)       (+162,264)        (+64,782)
        Land border inspection fund................................          (1,670)          (1,714)          (1,714)            (+44)  ...............
        Immigration examinations fund..............................        (969,851)      (1,258,088)      (1,258,088)       (+288,237)  ...............
        Breached bond fund.........................................         (80,600)        (120,763)        (120,763)        (+40,163)  ...............
        Immigration enforcement fines..............................          (1,850)          (5,510)          (5,510)         (+3,660)  ...............
        H-1b Visa fees.............................................          (1,125)         (16,000)         (16,000)        (+14,875)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Subtotal, Fee accounts...................................      (1,549,480)      (1,993,941)      (2,058,723)       (+509,243)        (+64,782)

Construction.......................................................         133,009          128,410          205,015          +72,006          +76,605
    (By transfer)..................................................  ...............  ...............         (66,524)        (+66,524)        (+66,524)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Immigration and Naturalization Service................      (4,801,488)      (5,510,352)      (5,506,299)       (+704,811)         (-4,053)
          Appropriations...........................................      (3,252,008)      (3,516,411)      (3,381,052)       (+129,044)       (-135,359)
          (Fee accounts)...........................................      (1,549,480)      (1,993,941)      (2,058,723)       (+509,243)        (+64,782)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                       Federal Prison System

Salaries and expenses..............................................       3,500,172        3,829,437        3,786,228         +286,056          -43,209
    Prior year carryover...........................................         -31,000   ...............  ...............         +31,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................       3,469,172        3,829,437        3,786,228         +317,056          -43,209

Buildings and facilities...........................................         833,822          833,273          899,797          +65,975          +66,524
    (Transfer out).................................................  ...............  ...............        (-66,524)        (-66,524)        (-66,524)
Federal Prison Industries, Incorporated (limitation on                        3,421            3,429            3,429               +8   ...............
 administrative expenses)..........................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Federal Prison System.................................       4,306,415        4,666,139        4,689,454         +383,039          +23,315
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                     Office of Justice Programs

Justice assistance.................................................         417,299          407,677          564,738         +147,439         +157,061
    (By transfer)..................................................          (6,985)          (7,000)          (6,647)           (-338)           (-353)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
State and local law enforcement assistance:
    Direct appropriations:
        Local law enforcement block grant..........................         521,849          400,000          400,000         -121,849   ...............
            Boys and Girls clubs (earmark).........................         (60,000)  ...............         (80,000)        (+20,000)        (+80,000)
            Grants, contracts, and other assistance (earmark)......  ...............         (19,956)         (19,956)        (+19,956)  ...............
        State prison grants........................................         684,990   ...............  ...............        -684,990   ...............
        Tribal prison construction.................................  ...............          35,191           35,191          +35,191   ...............
        State criminal alien assistance program....................         399,120          265,000          265,000         -134,120   ...............
        Cooperative agreement program..............................  ...............          35,000           35,000          +35,000   ...............
        Indian tribal courts program...............................           7,982            7,982            7,982   ...............  ...............
        Indian grants..............................................           4,989            4,989            4,989   ...............  ...............
        Byrne grants (formula).....................................         498,900          500,000          500,000           +1,100   ...............
        Byrne grants (discretionary)...............................          68,898   ...............          78,125           +9,227          +78,125
        Juvenile crime block grant.................................         249,450          249,450          249,450   ...............  ...............
        Drug courts................................................          49,890           50,000           50,000             +110   ...............
        Violence Against Women grants..............................         288,044          309,665          310,065          +22,021             +400
        State prison drug treatment................................          62,861           73,861           68,000           +5,139           -5,861
        Stalking and domestic violence grants program..............  ...............           3,000            3,000           +3,000   ...............
        Violent Crimes Against Women on Campus.....................  ...............          10,000           10,000          +10,000   ...............
        Legal assistance for victims...............................  ...............          40,000           40,000          +40,000   ...............
        Protection for older and disabled women....................  ...............           5,000            5,000           +5,000   ...............
        Safe Havens for Children pilot program.....................  ...............          15,000           15,000          +15,000   ...............
        Parental kidnapping laws report............................  ...............             200   ...............  ...............            -200
        Forensic exams of domestic violence study..................  ...............             200   ...............  ...............            -200
        Education and training to end violence against and abuse of  ...............           7,500            7,500           +7,500   ...............
         women with disabilities...................................
        Other crime control programs...............................           5,687            5,688            5,688               +1   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
          Total, State and local law enforcement...................       2,842,660        2,017,726        2,089,990         -752,670          +72,264
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Weed and seed program fund.........................................          33,925           58,925           58,925          +25,000   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Community oriented policing services:
    Direct appropriations:
        Public safety and community policing grants................         533,823          271,856          477,712          -56,111         +205,856
        Management administration..................................          31,755           32,812           32,812           +1,057   ...............
        Crime identification technology............................         129,714          255,404          150,962          +21,248         -104,442
            Safe schools initiative................................         (17,500)  ...............         (17,000)           (-500)        (+17,000)
            Upgrade criminal history records.......................         (35,000)         (35,000)         (35,000)  ...............  ...............
            DNA identification/crime lab...........................         (30,000)         (70,000)         (70,000)        (+40,000)  ...............
        Methamphetamine............................................          48,393           48,393           48,393   ...............  ...............
        Community prosecutors......................................          99,780           99,780           99,780   ...............  ...............
        Crime prevention...........................................          46,897           46,864           54,748           +7,851           +7,884
        COPS technology............................................         139,692          100,000          155,467          +15,775          +55,467
            (Transfer out).........................................  ...............  ...............        (-12,557)        (-12,557)        (-12,557)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
              Total, Community oriented policing services..........       1,030,054          855,109        1,019,874          -10,180         +164,765
                                                                    ====================================================================================
Juvenile justice programs..........................................         297,940          297,940          328,507          +30,567          +30,567
    (Transfer out).................................................         (-7,000)         (-7,000)         (-6,647)           (+353)           (+353)

Public safety officers benefits program:
    Death benefits.................................................          33,224           33,224           33,224   ...............  ...............
    Disability benefits............................................           2,395            2,395            2,395   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Public safety officers benefits program...............          35,619           35,619           35,619   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Office of Justice Programs............................       4,657,497        3,672,996        4,097,653         -559,844         +424,657
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title I, Department of Justice........................      21,028,932       21,107,774       21,532,214         +503,282         +424,440
          (Transfer out)...........................................         (-7,000)         (-7,000)        (-85,728)        (-78,728)        (-78,728)
          (By transfer)............................................          (6,985)          (7,000)         (95,658)        (+88,673)        (+88,658)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
       TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AND RELATED AGENCIES

                TRADE AND INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT

          Office of the United States Trade Representative

Salaries and expenses..............................................          29,452           30,097           30,097             +645   ...............

                   International Trade Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................          47,994           51,440           49,386           +1,392           -2,054
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Related agencies......................................          77,446           81,537           79,483           +2,037           -2,054
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                       DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

                 International Trade Administration

Operations and administration......................................         336,702          332,590          347,090          +10,388          +14,500
    Offsetting fee collections.....................................          -3,000           -3,000           -3,000   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................         333,702          329,590          344,090          +10,388          +14,500
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                       Export Administration

Operations and administration......................................          57,477           61,643           61,643           +4,166   ...............
    CWC enforcement................................................           7,234            7,250            7,250              +16   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Export Administration.................................          64,711           68,893           68,893           +4,182   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                Economic Development Administration

Economic development assistance programs...........................         410,973          335,000          341,000          -69,973           +6,000
Salaries and expenses..............................................          27,938           30,557           30,557           +2,619   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Economic Development Administration...................         438,911          365,557          371,557          -67,354           +6,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                Minority Business Development Agency

Minority business development......................................          27,254           28,381           28,381           +1,127   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Trade and Infrastructure Development..................         942,024          873,958          892,404          -49,620          +18,446
                                                                    ====================================================================================
              ECONOMIC AND INFORMATION INFRASTRUCTURE

                 Economic and Statistical Analysis

Salaries and expenses..............................................          53,627           62,515           62,515           +8,888   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                        Bureau of the Census

Salaries and expenses..............................................         156,881          168,561          168,561          +11,680   ...............
Periodic censuses and programs.....................................         275,798          374,835          348,529          +72,731          -26,306
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Bureau of the Census..................................         432,679          543,396          517,090          +84,411          -26,306
                                                                    ====================================================================================
     National Telecommunications and Information Administration

Salaries and expenses..............................................          11,412           14,054           14,054           +2,642   ...............
Public telecommunications facilities, planning and construction....          43,404           43,466           43,466              +62   ...............
Information infrastructure grants..................................          45,400           15,503           15,503          -29,897   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Telecommunications and Information                    100,216           73,023           73,023          -27,193   ...............
       Administration..............................................
                                                                    ====================================================================================
             United States Patent and Trademark Office

Current year fee funding...........................................         782,119          856,701          856,701          +74,582   ...............
(Prior year carryover).............................................        (254,889)        (282,300)        (282,300)        (+27,411)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Patent and Trademark Office...........................      (1,037,008)      (1,139,001)      (1,139,001)       (+101,993)  ...............

      Offsetting fee collections...................................        -783,843         -856,701         -856,701          -72,858   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Economic and Information Infrastructure...............         584,798          678,934          652,628          +67,830          -26,306
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                       SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

                     Technology Administration

     Under Secretary for Technology/Office of Technology Policy

Salaries and expenses..............................................           8,062            8,238            8,238             +176   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
           National Institute of Standards and Technology

Scientific and technical research and services.....................         311,929          347,288          343,296          +31,367           -3,992
Industrial technology services.....................................         250,285          119,266          309,337          +59,052         +190,071
Construction of research facilities................................          34,802           20,893           43,893           +9,091          +23,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Institute of Standards and Technology........         597,016          487,447          696,526          +99,510         +209,079
                                                                    ====================================================================================
          National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Operations, research, and facilities...............................       1,865,058        2,009,309        2,231,055         +365,997         +221,746
    Conservation...................................................  ...............         168,000           33,650          +33,650         -134,350
    (By transfer from Promote and Develop Fund)....................         (67,850)         (68,000)         (68,000)           (+150)  ...............
    (By transfer from Coastal zone management).....................           3,193            3,000            3,000             -193   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Operations, research and facilities...................       1,868,251        2,180,309        2,267,705         +399,454          +87,396

Procurement, acquisition and construction..........................         681,397          738,861          856,200         +174,803         +117,339
    Conservation...................................................  ...............          26,000           83,410          +83,410          +57,410
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Procurement, acquisition and construction.............         681,397          764,861          939,610         +258,213         +174,749

Coastal and ocean activities.......................................         419,076   ...............  ...............        -419,076   ...............
Pacific coastal salmon recovery....................................          73,837           20,000   ...............         -73,837          -20,000
    Conservation...................................................  ...............          90,000          133,940         +133,940          +43,940
Coastal zone management fund.......................................          -3,200           -3,000           -3,000             +200   ...............
Fishermen's contingency fund.......................................             950              952              952               +2   ...............
Foreign fishing observer fund......................................             191              191              191   ...............  ...............
Fisheries finance program account..................................             287              287              287   ...............  ...............
Environmental improvement and restoration fund.....................  ...............          10,000           10,000          +10,000   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.......       3,040,789        3,063,600        3,349,685         +308,896         +286,085
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Science and Technology................................       3,645,867        3,559,285        4,054,449         +408,582         +495,164
          Appropriations...........................................      (3,645,867)      (3,275,285)      (3,803,449)       (+157,582)       (+528,164)
          Conservation.............................................  ...............        (284,000)        (251,000)       (+251,000)        (-33,000)
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                      Departmental Management

Salaries and expenses..............................................          35,841           37,652           42,062           +6,221           +4,410
Office of Inspector General........................................          19,956           21,176           21,176           +1,220   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Departmental management...............................          55,797           58,828           63,238           +7,441           +4,410
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Department of Commerce................................       5,151,040        5,089,468        5,583,236         +432,196         +493,768
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title II, Department of Commerce and related agencies.       5,228,486        5,171,005        5,662,719         +434,233         +491,714
          Appropriations...........................................      (5,228,486)      (4,887,005)      (5,411,719)       (+183,233)       (+524,714)
          Conservation.............................................  ...............        (284,000)        (251,000)       (+251,000)        (-33,000)
          (By transfer)............................................         (67,850)         (68,000)         (68,000)           (+150)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                      TITLE III--THE JUDICIARY

                 Supreme Court of the United States

Salaries and expenses:
    Salaries of justices...........................................           1,698            1,698            1,698   ...............  ...............
    Other salaries and expenses....................................          35,814           40,416           38,290           +2,476           -2,126
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and expenses.................................          37,512           42,114           39,988           +2,476           -2,126

Care of the building and grounds...................................           7,513          117,742            7,530              +17         -110,212
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Supreme Court of the United States....................          45,025          159,856           47,518           +2,493         -112,338
                                                                    ====================================================================================
       United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit

Salaries and expenses:
    Salaries of judges.............................................           2,021            2,021            2,021   ...............  ...............
    Other salaries and expenses....................................          15,874           18,425           17,351           +1,477           -1,074
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and expenses.................................          17,895           20,446           19,372           +1,477           -1,074
                                                                    ====================================================================================
             United States Court of International Trade

Salaries and expenses:
    Salaries of judges.............................................           1,525            1,525            1,525   ...............  ...............
    Other salaries and expenses....................................          10,907           11,587           11,529             +622              -58
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Salaries and expenses.................................          12,432           13,112           13,054             +622              -58
                                                                    ====================================================================================
  Courts of Appeals, District Courts, and Other Judicial Services

Salaries and expenses:
    Salaries of judges and bankruptcy judges.......................         248,000          250,000          250,000           +2,000   ...............
    Other salaries and expenses....................................       3,104,879        3,485,774        3,309,012         +204,133         -176,762
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................       3,352,879        3,735,774        3,559,012         +206,133         -176,762

Vaccine Injury Compensation Trust Fund.............................           2,596            2,692            2,692              +96   ...............
Defender services..................................................         434,043          521,517          463,756          +29,713          -57,761
Fees of jurors and commissioners...................................          59,436           50,131           50,131           -9,305   ...............
Court security.....................................................         199,136          228,433          209,762          +10,626          -18,671
    (Transfer out).................................................  ...............  ...............         (-3,580)         (-3,580)         (-3,580)
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Courts of Appeals, District Courts, and Other Judicial       4,048,090        4,538,547        4,285,353         +237,263         -253,194
       Services....................................................
                                                                    ====================================================================================
         Administrative Office of the United States Courts

Salaries and expenses..............................................          58,212           63,029           58,212   ...............          -4,817

                      Federal Judicial Center

Salaries and expenses..............................................          18,736           20,323           19,742           +1,006             -581

                     Judicial Retirement Funds

Payment to Judiciary Trust Funds...................................          35,700           37,000           37,000           +1,300   ...............

                United States Sentencing Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................           9,909           12,400           11,327           +1,418           -1,073

                         General Provisions

Judges pay raise (sec. 304)........................................           8,782            8,000   ...............          -8,782           -8,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title III, the Judiciary..............................       4,254,781        4,872,713        4,491,578         +236,797         -381,135
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                   TITLE IV--DEPARTMENT OF STATE

                 Administration of Foreign Affairs

Diplomatic and consular programs...................................       2,758,076        3,217,405        3,088,990         +330,914         -128,415
    (Transfer out).................................................         (-1,400)  ...............  ...............         (+1,400)  ...............
    (Transfer out).................................................         (-4,000)         (-4,000)         (-4,000)  ...............  ...............
    (Transfer out).................................................  ...............  ...............         (-6,000)         (-6,000)         (-6,000)
    Worldwide security upgrade.....................................         409,098          487,735          409,363             +265          -78,372
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Diplomatic and consular programs......................       3,167,174        3,705,140        3,498,353         +331,179         -206,787

Capital investment fund............................................          96,787          210,000          210,000         +113,213   ...............
Office of Inspector General........................................          28,427           29,264           28,427   ...............            -837
Educational and cultural exchange programs.........................         231,078          242,000          242,000          +10,922   ...............
Representation allowances..........................................           6,485            9,000            9,000           +2,515   ...............
Protection of foreign missions and officials.......................          15,433           10,000           10,000           -5,433   ...............
Embassy security, construction and maintenance.....................         416,059          475,046          405,391          -10,668          -69,655
    Worldwide security upgrade.....................................         661,541          815,960          661,560              +19         -154,400
Emergencies in the diplomatic and consular service.................           5,465           15,500            5,465   ...............         -10,035
    (By transfer)..................................................          (3,991)          (4,000)          (4,000)             (+9)  ...............
    (Transfer out).................................................         (-1,000)         (-1,000)         (-1,000)  ...............  ...............
Commission on Holocaust Assets in U.S. (by transfer)...............          (1,397)  ...............  ...............         (-1,397)  ...............

Repatriation Loans Program Account:
    Direct loans subsidy...........................................             590              612              612              +22   ...............
    Administrative expenses........................................             603              607              607               +4   ...............
    (By transfer)..................................................            (998)          (1,000)          (1,000)             (+2)  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Repatriation loans program account....................           1,193            1,219            1,219              +26   ...............

Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan........................          16,309           17,044           17,044             +735   ...............
Payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund......         131,224          135,629          135,629           +4,405   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Administration of Foreign Affairs.....................       4,777,175        5,665,802        5,224,088         +446,913         -441,714
                                                                    ====================================================================================
            International Organizations and Conferences

Contributions to international organizations, current year                  868,917          878,767        1,091,348         +222,431         +212,581
 assessment........................................................
Contributions for international peacekeeping activities, current            844,139          844,139          773,182          -70,957          -70,957
 year..............................................................
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, International Organizations and Conferences...........       1,713,056        1,722,906        1,864,530         +151,474         +141,624
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                     International Commissions

International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and
 Mexico:
    Salaries and expenses..........................................           7,126            7,452            7,452             +326   ...............
    Construction...................................................          22,900           25,654           24,154           +1,254           -1,500
American sections, international commissions.......................           6,726           10,311            6,879             +153           -3,432
International fisheries commissions................................          19,349           19,780           20,780           +1,431           +1,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, International commissions.............................          56,101           63,197           59,265           +3,164           -3,932
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                               Other                                 ...............
Payment to the Asia Foundation.....................................           9,230            9,250            8,000           -1,230           -1,250
Eisenhower Exchange Fellowship program trust fund..................             499              500              500               +1   ...............
Israeli Arab scholarship program...................................             374              375              375               +1   ...............
East-West Center...................................................          13,470           13,500           14,000             +530             +500
National Endowment for Democracy...................................          30,931           31,000           31,000              +69   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Department of State...................................       6,600,836        7,506,530        7,201,758         +600,922         -304,772
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                           RELATED AGENCY

                  Broadcasting Board of Governors

International Broadcasting Operations..............................         398,093          428,234          414,752          +16,659          -13,482
Broadcasting to Cuba...............................................          22,046           24,872           24,872           +2,826   ...............
Broadcasting capital improvements..................................          20,313           16,900           16,900           -3,413   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Broadcasting Board of Governors.......................         440,452          470,006          456,524          +16,072          -13,482
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title IV, Department of State.........................       7,041,288        7,976,536        7,658,282         +616,994         -318,254
          (Transfer out)...........................................         (-6,400)         (-5,000)        (-11,000)         (-4,600)         (-6,000)
          (By transfer)............................................          (6,386)          (5,000)          (5,000)         (-1,386)  ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                     TITLE V--RELATED AGENCIES

                    DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

                      Maritime Administration

Maritime security program..........................................          98,483   ...............          98,700             +217          +98,700
Operations and training............................................          86,719           89,054           89,054           +2,335   ...............
Ship disposal......................................................  ...............          10,000   ...............  ...............         -10,000

Maritime Guaranteed Loan (Title XI) Program Account:
    Guaranteed loans subsidy.......................................          29,934   ...............         100,000          +70,066         +100,000
    Administrative expenses........................................           3,978            3,978            3,978   ...............  ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Maritime guaranteed loan program account..............          33,912            3,978          103,978          +70,066         +100,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Maritime Administration...............................         219,114          103,032          291,732          +72,618         +188,700
                                                                    ====================================================================================
    Commission for the Preservation of America's Heritage Abroad

Salaries and expenses..............................................             489              489              489   ...............  ...............

                     Commission on Civil Rights

Salaries and expenses..............................................           8,880            9,096            9,096             +216   ...............

           Commission on International Religious Freedom

Salaries and expenses..............................................  ...............           3,000   ...............  ...............          -3,000

                     Commission on Ocean Policy

Salaries and expenses..............................................             998   ...............           2,500           +1,502           +2,500

          Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe

Salaries and expenses..............................................           1,367            1,499            1,432              +65              -67

   Congressional-Executive Commission on the People's Republic of
                               China

Salaries and expenses..............................................             499              500              500               +1   ...............

              Equal Employment Opportunity Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................         303,195          310,406          310,406           +7,211   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                 Federal Communications Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................         229,494          248,545          252,545          +23,051           +4,000
    Offsetting fee collections--current year.......................        -200,146         -218,757         -218,757          -18,611   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................          29,348           29,788           33,788           +4,440           +4,000

                    Federal Maritime Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................          15,466           16,450           17,450           +1,984           +1,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                      Federal Trade Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................         146,830          156,270          156,270           +9,440   ...............
    Offsetting fee collections--carryover..........................          -1,900   ...............  ...............          +1,900   ...............
    Offsetting fee collections--current year.......................        -145,254         -156,270         -156,270          -11,016   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................            -324   ...............  ...............            +324   ...............

                     Legal Services Corporation

Payment to the Legal Services Corporation..........................         329,274          329,300          329,300              +26   ...............

                      Marine Mammal Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................           1,696            1,732            1,957             +261             +225

                     Pacific Charter Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............

         National Veterans Business Development Corporation

Salaries and expenses..............................................  ...............           4,000            4,000           +4,000   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                 Securities and Exchange Commission

Current year fees..................................................         127,519          109,500          109,500          -18,019   ...............
2000 fees..........................................................         294,351          328,400          404,547         +110,196          +76,147
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Direct appropriation.........................................         421,870          437,900          514,047          +92,177          +76,147
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                   Small Business Administration

Salaries and expenses..............................................         367,824          321,219          333,233          -34,591          +12,014
Office of Inspector General........................................          11,927           11,927           11,000             -927             -927

Business Loans Program Account:
    Direct loans subsidy...........................................           2,245            1,500            1,860             -385             +360
    Guaranteed loans subsidy.......................................         162,801   ...............          93,500          -69,301          +93,500
    Administrative expenses........................................         128,716          129,000          129,000             +284   ...............
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Business loans program account........................         293,762          130,500          224,360          -69,402          +93,860

Disaster Loans Program Account:
    Direct loans subsidy...........................................          75,972   ...............          79,510           +3,538          +79,510
    Administrative expenses........................................         108,116           75,354          125,354          +17,238          +50,000
    Gainsharing....................................................  ...............           3,000   ...............  ...............          -3,000
                                                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
      Total, Disaster loans program account........................         184,088           78,354          204,864          +20,776         +126,510
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, Small Business Administration.........................         857,601          542,000          773,457          -84,144         +231,457
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                      State Justice Institute

Salaries and expenses \1\..........................................           6,835           15,000           14,850           +8,015             -150

            United States-Canada Alaska Rail Commission

Salaries and expenses..............................................  ...............  ...............           4,000           +4,000           +4,000
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title V, Related agencies.............................       2,196,308        1,804,192        2,309,004         +112,696         +504,812
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                       TITLE VII--RESCISSIONS

                       DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE

                  Drug Enforcement Administration

Drug diversion fund (rescission)...................................          -8,000   ...............  ...............          +8,000   ...............

                       DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE

                      Departmental Management

Emergency oil and gas guaranteed loan program account (rescission).  ...............        -115,000   ...............  ...............        +115,000
Emergency steel guaranteed loan program account (rescission).......  ...............         -10,000   ...............  ...............         +10,000

              DEPARTMENT OF STATE AND RELATED AGENCIES

                        DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Contributions for International Peacekeeping activities              ...............  ...............        -126,620         -126,620         -126,620
 (rescission)......................................................

                          RELATED AGENCIES

                    DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

                      Maritime Administration

Maritime Guaranteed Loan (Title XI) Program Account: Guaranteed              -7,644   ...............  ...............          +7,644   ...............
 loans subsidy (rescission)........................................
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Total, title VII, Rescissions................................         -15,644         -125,000         -126,620         -110,976           -1,620
                                                                    ====================================================================================
                              TITLE IX

Wildlife conservation and restoration planning.....................          49,890   ...............  ...............         -49,890   ...............
                                                                    ====================================================================================
      Grand total:
          New budget (obligational) authority......................      39,784,041       40,807,220       41,527,177       +1,743,136         +719,957
              Appropriations.......................................     (39,799,685)     (40,648,220)     (41,402,797)     (+1,603,112)       (+754,577)
              Conservation.........................................  ...............        (284,000)        (251,000)       (+251,000)        (-33,000)
              Rescissions..........................................        (-15,644)       (-125,000)       (-126,620)       (-110,976)         (-1,620)
              Contingent emergency appropriations..................  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............  ...............
          (Transfer out)...........................................        (-13,400)        (-12,000)       (-100,308)        (-86,908)        (-88,308)
          (By transfer)............................................         (81,221)         (80,000)        (168,658)        (+87,437)        (+88,658)
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
\1\ The President's budget proposed $6.85 million for State Justice Institute.