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108th Congress                                            Rept. 108-105
                        HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
 1st Session                                                     Part 1
======================================================================
 
    FOREIGN RELATIONS AUTHORIZATION ACT, FISCAL YEARS 2004 AND 2005

                                _______
                                

                  May 16, 2003.--Ordered to be printed

                                _______
                                

Mr. Hyde, from the Committee on International Relations, submitted the 
                               following

                              R E P O R T

                             together with

                            ADDITIONAL VIEWS

                        [To accompany H.R. 1950]

                   [Includes committee cost estimate]

  The Committee on International Relations, to whom was 
referred the bill (H.R. 1950) to authorize appropriations for 
the Department of State for the fiscal years 2004 and 2005, to 
authorize appropriations under the Arms Export Control Act and 
the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 for security assistance for 
fiscal years 2004 and 2005, and for other purposes, having 
considered the same, report favorably thereon with an amendment 
and recommend that the bill as amended do pass.

                                CONTENTS

                                                                   Page
The Amendment....................................................     5
Purpose and Summary..............................................    83
Background and Need for the Legislation..........................    84
Hearings.........................................................    85
Committee Consideration..........................................    85
Votes of the Committee...........................................    88
Committee Oversight Findings.....................................    89
New Budget Authority and Tax Expenditures........................    89
Committee Cost Estimate..........................................    89
Performance Goals and Objectives.................................    89
Constitutional Authority Statement...............................    89
New Advisory Committees..........................................    90
Congressional Accountability Act.................................    90
Federal Mandates.................................................    90
Changes in Existing Law..........................................    90
Sectional Analyses...............................................    90
Additional Views.................................................   154

  The amendment is as follows:
  Strike all after the enacting clause and insert the 
following:

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

  This Act may be cited as the ``Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005''.

SEC. 2. ORGANIZATION OF ACT INTO DIVISIONS; TABLE OF CONTENTS.

  (a) Organization of Act Into Divisions.--This Act is organized into 
two divisions as follows:
          (1) Division a.--Department of State Authorization Act, 
        Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005.
          (2) Division b.--Defense Trade and Security Assistance Reform 
        Act of 2003.
  (b) Table of Contents.--The table of contents for this Act is as 
follows:

Sec. 1. Short title.
Sec. 2. Organization of act into divisions; table of contents.
Sec. 3. Definitions.

 DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORIZATION ACT, FISCAL YEARS 2004 
                                AND 2005

Sec. 101. Short title.

               TITLE I--AUTHORIZATIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS

                    Subtitle A--Department of State

Sec. 111. Administration of foreign affairs.
Sec. 112. United States educational and cultural programs.
Sec. 113. Contributions to international organizations.
Sec. 114. International commissions.
Sec. 115. Migration and refugee assistance.
Sec. 116. Voluntary contributions to international organizations.
Sec. 117. Voluntary contributions for international peacekeeping 
activities.
Sec. 118. Grants to the Asia Foundation.

    Subtitle B--United States International Broadcasting Activities

Sec. 121. Authorizations of appropriations.

        TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

               Subtitle A--United States Public Diplomacy

Sec. 201. Findings and purposes.
Sec. 202. Public diplomacy responsibilities of the Department of State.
Sec. 203. Annual plan on public diplomacy strategy.
Sec. 204. Public diplomacy training.
Sec. 205. United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy.
Sec. 206. Library program.
Sec. 207. Sense of Congress concerning public diplomacy efforts in sub-
Saharan Africa.

              Subtitle B--Basic Authorities and Activities

Sec. 221. United States policy with respect to Jerusalem as the capital 
of Israel.
Sec. 222. Modification of reporting requirements.
Sec. 223. Report concerning efforts to promote Israel's diplomatic 
relations with other countries.
Sec. 224. Reimbursement rate for airlift services provided to the 
Department of State.
Sec. 225. Sense of Congress regarding additional United States consular 
posts.
Sec. 226. Validity of United States passports for travel to countries 
receiving United States foreign assistance.
Sec. 227. Security capital cost sharing.
Sec. 228. Authority to issue administrative subpoenas.
Sec. 229. Enhancing refugee resettlement and maintaining the United 
States commitment to refugees.
Sec. 230. The Colin Powell Center for American Diplomacy.

            Subtitle C--Educational and Cultural Authorities

Sec. 251. Establishment of initiatives for predominantly Muslim 
countries.
Sec. 252. Database of American and foreign participants in exchange 
programs.
Sec. 253. Report on inclusion of freedom and democracy advocates in 
educational and cultural exchange programs.
Sec. 254. Sense of the Congress concerning educational and cultural 
exchange program for foreign journalists.
Sec. 255. Sense of Congress regarding Korean Fulbright programs.
Sec. 256. Authorizing East Timorese scholarships for graduate study.
Sec. 257. Public safety awareness in study abroad programs.

                    Subtitle D--Consular Authorities

Sec. 271. Machine readable visas.
Sec. 272. Processing of visa applications.
Sec. 273. Staffing at diplomatic missions.

    TITLE III--ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE

Sec. 301. Fellowship of Hope Program.
Sec. 302. Claims for lost pay.
Sec. 303. Ombudsman for the Department of State.
Sec. 304. Repeal of recertification requirement for senior foreign 
service.
Sec. 305. Report concerning status of employees of State Department.
Sec. 306. Home leave.
Sec. 307. Increased limits applicable to post differentials and danger 
pay allowances.
Sec. 308. Regulations regarding retirement credit for government 
service performed abroad.
Sec. 309. Minority recruitment.
Sec. 310. Meritorious step increases.

                 TITLE IV--INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

              Subtitle A--Basic Authorities and Activities

Sec. 401. Raising the cap on peacekeeping contributions.
Sec. 402. Regarding the reentry of the United States in UNESCO.
Sec. 403. UNESCO national commission.
Sec. 404. Organization of American States (OAS) emergency fund.
Sec. 405. United States efforts regarding the status of Israel in the 
Western European and Others Group at the United Nations.

           Subtitle B--United States International Leadership

Sec. 431. Short title.
Sec. 432. Findings.
Sec. 433. Establishment of a democracy caucus.
Sec. 434. Annual diplomatic missions on multilateral issues.
Sec. 435. Leadership and membership of international organizations.
Sec. 436. Increased training in multilateral diplomacy.
Sec. 437. Promoting assignments to international organizations.
Sec. 438. Implementation and establishment of office on multilateral 
negotiations.
Sec. 439. Synchronization of United States contributions to 
international organizations.

      TITLE V--UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING ACTIVITIES

              Subtitle A--Basic Authorities and Activities

Sec. 501. Mideast Radio and Television Network, Inc.
Sec. 502. Improving signal delivery to Cuba.
Sec. 503. Report concerning efforts to counter jamming of broadcasts of 
Radio Marti and TV Marti.
Sec. 504. Pilot program for the promotion of travel and tourism in the 
United States through United States international broadcasting.
Sec. 505. Radio Free Asia broadcasts into North Korea.
Sec. 506. Prohibition on elimination of international broadcasting in 
Eastern Europe.

                  Subtitle B--Global Internet Freedom

Sec. 521. Short title.
Sec. 522. Findings.
Sec. 523. Purposes.
Sec. 524. Development and deployment of technologies to defeat Internet 
jamming and censorship.

 Subtitle C--Reorganization of United States International Broadcasting

Sec. 531. Establishment of United States International Broadcasting 
Agency.
Sec. 532. Authorities and functions of the agency.
Sec. 533. Role of the Secretary of State.
Sec. 534. Administrative provisions.
Sec. 535. Broadcasting Board of Governors and International 
Broadcasting Bureau.
Sec. 536. Transition.
Sec. 537. Conforming amendments.
Sec. 538. References.
Sec. 539. Broadcasting standards.
Sec. 540. Effective date.

             TITLE VI--INTERNATIONAL FREE MEDIA ACT OF 2003

Sec. 601. Short title.
Sec. 602. Definitions.
Sec. 603. Findings.
Sec. 604. Statements of policy.
Sec. 605. Coordinator for International Free Media.
Sec. 606. United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy and 
International Media.
Sec. 607. International Free Media Fund.
Sec. 608. Free media promotion activity of the Broadcasting Board of 
Governors.

                  TITLE VII--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

                   Subtitle A--Reporting Requirements

Sec. 701. Reports on benchmarks for Bosnia.
Sec. 702. Reports to Committee on International Relations.
Sec. 703. Reports concerning the capture and prosecution of 
paramilitary and other terrorist leaders in Colombia.
Sec. 704. Reports relating to Magen David Adom Society.
Sec. 705. Report concerning the return of portraits of Holocaust 
victims to the artist Dina Babbitt.
Sec. 706. Report to Congress on use of vested assets.
Sec. 707. Report concerning the conflict in Uganda.
Sec. 708. Requirement for report on United States policy toward Haiti.
Sec. 709. Report on the effects of Plan Columbia on Ecuador.
Sec. 710. Report on actions taken by Pakistan.
Sec. 711. Report on democracy in the Western Hemisphere.
Sec. 712. Report concerning internal and intra-regional conflicts in 
the Great Lakes region of Africa.

                       Subtitle B--Other Matters

Sec. 721. Sense of Congress relating to East Timor, justice, and 
rehabilitation.
Sec. 722. Sense of Congress concerning human rights and justice in 
Indonesia.
Sec. 723. Amendment to the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998.
Sec. 724. Sense of Congress with respect to human rights in Central 
Asia.
Sec. 725. Technical correction to authorization of appropriations for 
fiscal year 2003 for Center for Cultural and Technical Interchange 
Between East and West.
Sec. 726. Under Secretary of Commerce for Industry and Security.
Sec. 727. Concerning the spread of weapons of mass destruction.
Sec. 728. International agriculture biotechnology information program.
Sec. 729. Refugee resettlement burdensharing.
Sec. 730. Sense of Congress on climate change.
Sec. 731. Sense of Congress regarding migration issues between the 
United States and Mexico.
Sec. 732. Sense of Congress concerning United States assistance to 
Palestinian refugees.
Sec. 733. United States policy on World Bank Group loans to Iran.
Sec. 734. Sense of Congress relating to Soviet nuclear tests in 
Kazakhstan.
Sec. 735. Sense of Congress relating to violence against women.

  DIVISION B--DEFENSE TRADE AND SECURITY ASSISTANCE REFORM ACT OF 2003

                      TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS

Sec. 1001. Short title.
Sec. 1002. Definitions.
Sec. 1003. References to Arms Export Control Act.

   TITLE XI--TERRORIST-RELATED PROHIBITIONS AND ENFORCEMENT MEASURES

Sec. 1101. Eligibility provisions.
Sec. 1102. Weapons transfers to foreign persons in the United States.
Sec. 1103. Coordination of license exemptions with United States law 
enforcement agencies.
Sec. 1104. Mechanisms to identify persons in violation of certain 
provisions of law.
Sec. 1105. Comprehensive nature of United States arms embargoes.
Sec. 1106. Transactions with countries supporting acts of international 
terrorism.
Sec. 1107. Amendments to control of arms exports and imports.
Sec. 1108. High risk exports and end use verification.
Sec. 1109. Concurrent jurisdiction of the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation.
Sec. 1110. Report on foreign-supplied defense articles, defense 
services, and dual use goods and technology discovered in Iraq.

           TITLE XII--STRENGTHENING MUNITIONS EXPORT CONTROLS

Sec. 1201. Control of items on Missile Technology Control Regime Annex.
Sec. 1202. Certifications relating to export of certain defense 
articles and services.
Sec. 1203. Notification requirements for technical assistance and 
manufacturing licensing agreements with NATO member countries, 
Australia, New Zealand, and Japan.
Sec. 1204. Strengthening defense cooperation with Australia and the 
United Kingdom.
Sec. 1205. Training and liaison for small businesses.
Sec. 1206. Study and report relating to co-locating munitions control 
functions of the Departments of State, Defense, and Homeland Security.

         TITLE XIII--SECURITY ASSISTANCE AND RELATED PROVISIONS

      Subtitle A--Foreign Military Sales and Financing Authorities

Sec. 1301. Authorization of appropriations.
Sec. 1302. Provision of cataloging data and services.
Sec. 1303. Annual estimate and justification for sales program.
Sec. 1304. Adjustment to advance notification requirement for transfer 
of certain excess defense articles.

       Subtitle B--International Military Education and Training

Sec. 1311. Authorization of appropriations.
Sec. 1312. Annual foreign military training reporting.

              Subtitle C--Assistance for Select Countries

Sec. 1321. Assistance for Israel.
Sec. 1322. Assistance for Egypt.

                  Subtitle D--Miscellaneous Provisions

Sec. 1331. United States War Reserve Stockpiles for Allies.
Sec. 1332. Transfer to Israel of certain defense articles in the United 
States War Reserve Stockpiles for Allies.
Sec. 1333. Expansion of authorities for loan of material, supplies, and 
equipment for research and development purposes.
Sec. 1334. Assistance for demining and related activities.
Sec. 1335. Reports relating to Treaty Between the United States and the 
Russian Federation on Strategic Offensive Reductions.
Sec. 1336. Statement of House of Representatives regarding the Treaty 
Between the United States and the Russian Federation on Strategic 
Offensive Reductions.
Sec. 1337. Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund.
Sec. 1338. Maritime interdiction patrol boats for Mozambique.
Sec. 1339. Report on missile defense cooperation.
Sec. 1340. Iran's program to develop a nuclear explosive device.

            TITLE XIV--MISSILE THREAT REDUCTION ACT OF 2003

Sec. 1401. Short title.

  Subtitle A--Strengthening International Missile Nonproliferation Law

Sec. 1411. Findings.
Sec. 1412. Policy of the United States.
Sec. 1413. Sense of Congress.

  Subtitle B--Strengthening United States Missile Nonproliferation Law

Sec. 1421. Probationary period for foreign persons.
Sec. 1422. Strengthening United States missile proliferation sanctions 
on foreign persons.
Sec. 1423. Comprehensive United States missile proliferation sanctions 
on all responsible persons.

          Subtitle C--Incentives for Missile Threat Reduction

Sec. 1431. Foreign assistance.
Sec. 1432. Authorization of appropriations.
Sec. 1433. Authorization of technical assistance in missile 
disarmament.

                    TITLE XV--EXPORTS OF SATELLITES

Sec. 1501. Export controls on satellites and related items.
Sec. 1502. Mandatory review by Department of State.
Sec. 1503. Export restrictions not affected.
Sec. 1504. Definitions.

  TITLE XVI--PROMOTION OF DEMOCRACY, HUMAN RIGHTS, AND RULE OF LAW IN 
                                BELARUS

Sec. 1601. Assistance to promote democracy and civil society in 
Belarus.
Sec. 1602. Radio broadcasting to Belarus.
Sec. 1603. Sense of Congress relating to sanctions against the 
Government of Belarus.
Sec. 1604. Multilateral cooperation.
Sec. 1605. Report.
Sec. 1606. Definitions.

     TITLE XVII--ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN PEACE ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2003

Sec. 1701. Short title.
Sec. 1702. Findings.
Sec. 1703. Purposes.
Sec. 1704. Sense of Congress.
Sec. 1705. Recognition of a Palestinian state.
Sec. 1706. Limitation on assistance to a Palestinian state.
Sec. 1707. Authorization of assistance to a Palestinian state.

        TITLE XVIII--MISCELLANEOUS FOREIGN ASSISTANCE PROVISIONS

Sec. 1801. Additional authorities relating to international narcotics 
control assistance.
Sec. 1802. United States opium eradication program in Colombia.
Sec. 1803. Cooperative Development Program.
Sec. 1804. West Bank and Gaza Program.
Sec. 1805. Annual human rights country reports on incitement to acts of 
discrimination.
Sec. 1806. Assistance to East Timor.
Sec. 1807. Support for democracy-building efforts for Cuba.
Sec. 1808. Amendment to the Afghanistan Freedom Support Act of 2002.
Sec. 1809. Congo Basin Forest Partnership.
Sec. 1810. Combatting the piracy of United States copyrighted 
materials.
Sec. 1811. Assistance for law enforcement forces in certain foreign 
countries.
Sec. 1812. Human Rights and Democracy Fund.
Sec. 1813. Enhanced police training.
Sec. 1814. Promoting a secure and democratic Afghanistan.
Sec. 1815. Grants to the Africa Society.

SEC. 3. DEFINITIONS.

  In this Act:
          (1) Appropriate congressional committees.--The term 
        ``appropriate congressional committees'' means the Committee on 
        Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on 
        International Relations of the House of Representatives.
          (2) Department.--The term ``Department'' means the Department 
        of State.
          (3) Secretary.--Except as otherwise provided, the term 
        ``Secretary'' means the Secretary of State.

 DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORIZATION ACT, FISCAL YEARS 2004 
                                AND 2005

SEC. 101. SHORT TITLE.

  This division may be cited as the ``Department of State Authorization 
Act, Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005''.

               TITLE I--AUTHORIZATIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS

                    Subtitle A--Department of State

SEC. 111. ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

  (a) In General.--The following amounts are authorized to be 
appropriated for the Department under ``Administration of Foreign 
Affairs'' to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and 
responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United 
States, and for other purposes authorized by law, including public 
diplomacy activities and the diplomatic security program:
          (1) Diplomatic and consular programs.--
                  (A) Authorization of appropriations.--For 
                ``Diplomatic and Consular Programs'', $4,187,544,000 
                for the fiscal year 2004 and $4,438,796,000 for the 
                fiscal year 2005.
                  (B) Public diplomacy.--
                          (i) In general.--Of the amounts authorized to 
                        be appropriated by subparagraph (A), 
                        $320,930,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and 
                        $329,838,000 for the fiscal year 2005 is 
                        authorized to be appropriated for public 
                        diplomacy.
                          (ii) Improvements in public diplomacy 
                        programs.--Of the amounts authorized to be 
                        appropriated under clause (i) $20,000,000 for 
                        the fiscal year 2004 and $20,000,000 for the 
                        fiscal year 2005 is authorized to be available 
                        for improvements and modernization of public 
                        diplomacy programs and activities of the 
                        Department of State.
                          (iii) Translation services.--Of the amounts 
                        authorized to be appropriated under clause (i), 
                        $4,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and 
                        $4,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005 is 
                        authorized to be available for translation 
                        services available to public affairs officers 
                        in overseas posts.
                  (C) Worldwide security upgrades.--Of the amounts 
                authorized to be appropriated by subparagraph (A), 
                $646,701,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $679,036,000 
                for the fiscal year 2005 is authorized to be 
                appropriated for worldwide security upgrades.
                  (D) Bureau of democracy, human rights, and labor.--Of 
                the amounts authorized to be appropriated by 
                subparagraph (A), $20,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 
                and $20,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005 is authorized 
                to be appropriated for salaries and expenses of the 
                Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor.
                  (E) Recruitment of minority groups.--Of the amount 
                authorized to be appropriated by subparagraph (A), 
                $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $2,000,000 for 
                the fiscal year 2005 is authorized to be appropriated 
                for the recruitment of members of minority groups for 
                careers in the Foreign Service and international 
                affairs.
          (2) Capital investment fund.--For ``Capital Investment 
        Fund'', $157,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $161,710,000 
        for the fiscal year 2005.
          (3) Embassy security, construction and maintenance.--
                  (A) In general.--For ``Embassy Security, Construction 
                and Maintenance'', $653,000,000 for the fiscal year 
                2004 and $784,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005, in 
                addition to amounts otherwise authorized to be 
                appropriated for such purpose by section 604 of the 
                Admiral James W. Nance and Meg Donovan Foreign 
                Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2000 and 2001 
                (as enacted into law by section 1000(a)(7) of Public 
                Law 106-113 and contained in appendix G of that Act; 
                113 Stat. 1501A-470).
                  (B) Amendment of the nance-donovan foreign relations 
                authorization act.--Section 604(a) of the Admiral James 
                W. Nance and Meg Donovan Foreign Relations 
                Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2000 and 2001 (113 
                Stat. 1501A-453) is amended--
                          (i) at the end of paragraph (4) by striking 
                        ``and'';
                          (ii) in paragraph (5) by striking 
                        ``$900,000,000.'' and inserting 
                        ``$1,000,000,000; and''; and
                          (iii) by inserting after paragraph (5) the 
                        following:
                  ``(6) for fiscal year 2005, $1,000,000,000.''.
          (4) Representation allowances.--For ``Representation 
        Allowances'', $9,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and 
        $9,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005.
          (5) Protection of foreign missions and officials.--For 
        ``Protection of Foreign Missions and Officials'', $10,000,000 
        for the fiscal year 2004 and $10,000,000 for the fiscal year 
        2005.
          (6) Emergencies in the diplomatic and consular service.--For 
        ``Emergencies in the Diplomatic and Consular Service'', 
        $1,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and such sums as may be 
        necessary for the fiscal year 2005.
          (7) Repatriation loans.--For ``Repatriation Loans'', 
        $1,219,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $1,219,000 for the 
        fiscal year 2005.
          (8) Payment to the american institute in taiwan.--For 
        ``Payment to the American Institute in Taiwan'', $19,773,000 
        for the fiscal year 2004 and $20,761,000 for the fiscal year 
        2005.
          (9) Office of the inspector general.--For ``Office of the 
        Inspector General'', $31,703,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and 
        $32,654,000 for the fiscal year 2005.
  (b) Availability of Funds for Protection of Foreign Missions and 
Officials.--The amount appropriated pursuant to subsection (a)(5) is 
authorized to remain available through September 30, 2006.

SEC. 112. UNITED STATES EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL PROGRAMS.

  (a) In General.--Amounts in this section are authorized to be 
appropriated for the Department of State to carry out educational and 
cultural programs of the Department of State under the United States 
Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948, the Mutual 
Educational and Cultural Exchange Act of 1961, Reorganization Plan 
Number 2 of 1977, the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 
1998, the Center for Cultural and Technical Interchange Between East 
and West Act of 1960, the Dante B. Fascell North-South Center Act of 
1991, and the National Endowment for Democracy Act, and to carry out 
other authorities in law consistent with such purposes.
  (b) Educational and Cultural Exchange Programs.--
          (1) Authorization of appropriations.--For ``Educational and 
        Cultural Exchange Programs'', $393,000,000 for the fiscal year 
        2004 and $405,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005.
          (2) Programs in eastern europe and former soviet union.--Of 
        the amounts authorized to be appropriated under paragraph (1), 
        $150,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $150,000,000 for the 
        fiscal year 2005 is authorized to be available for programs in 
        Eastern Europe and countries of the former Soviet Union.
          (3) Academic exchange programs.--
                  (A) In general.--Of the amounts authorized to be 
                appropriated under paragraph (1), $142,000,000 for the 
                fiscal year 2004 and $142,000,000 for the fiscal year 
                2005 is authorized to be available for the ``Academic 
                Exchange Programs'' (other than programs described in 
                paragraph (4)).
                  (B) Hiv/aids initiative.--Of the amounts authorized 
                to be available under subparagraph (A), $1,000,000 for 
                the fiscal year 2004 and $1,000,000 for the fiscal year 
                2005 is authorized to be available for HIV/AIDS 
                research and mitigation strategies.
                  (C) Fulbright english teaching assistant program in 
                korea.--Of the amounts authorized to be available by 
                subparagraph (A), $750,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and 
                $750,000 for the fiscal year 2005 is authorized to be 
                available for the Fulbright English Teaching Assistant 
                Program in Korea, which sends United States citizen 
                students to serve as English language teaching 
                assistants at Korean colleges and high schools.
                  (D) Dante b. fascell north-south center.--Of the 
                amounts authorized to be available by subparagraph (A), 
                $1,025,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $1,025,000 for 
                the fiscal year 2005 is authorized to be available for 
                the ``Dante B. Fascell North-South Center''.
                  (E) George j. mitchell scholarship program.--Of the 
                amounts authorized to be available under subparagraph 
                (A), $500,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $500,000 for 
                the fiscal year 2005 is authorized to be available for 
                the ``George J. Mitchell Scholarship Program'' which 
                provides for one year of postgraduate study for 
                American scholars at institutions of higher education 
                in Ireland and Northern Ireland.
          (4) Other educational and cultural exchange programs.--
                  (A) In general.--Of the amounts authorized to be 
                appropriated under paragraph (1), $110,000,000 for the 
                fiscal year 2004 and $110,000,000 for the fiscal year 
                2005 is authorized to be available for other 
                educational and cultural exchange programs authorized 
                by law.
                  (B) Initiatives for predominantly muslim countries.--
                Of the amounts authorized to be available under 
                subparagraph (A), $35,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 
                and $35,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005 is authorized 
                to be available for initiatives for predominantly 
                Muslim countries established under section 251.
                  (C) Tibetan exchanges.--Of the amounts authorized to 
                be available under subparagraph (A), $500,000 for the 
                fiscal year 2004 and $500,000 for the fiscal year 2005 
                is authorized to be available for ``Ngawang Choephel 
                Exchange Programs'' (formerly known as ``programs of 
                educational and cultural exchange between the United 
                States and the people of Tibet'') under section 103(a) 
                of the Human Rights, Refugee, and Other Foreign 
                Relations Provisions Act of 1996 (Public Law 104-319).
                  (D) East timorese scholarships.--Of the amounts 
                authorized to be available under subparagraph (A), 
                $1,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $1,000,000 for 
                the fiscal year 2005 is authorized to be available for 
                ``East Timorese Scholarships''.
                  (E) South pacific exchanges.--Of the amounts 
                authorized to be available under subparagraph (A), 
                $750,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $750,000 for the 
                fiscal year 2005 is authorized to be available for 
                ``South Pacific Exchanges''.
                  (F) Sudanese scholarships.--Of the amounts authorized 
                to be available under subparagraph (A), $500,000 for 
                the fiscal year 2004 and $500,000 for the fiscal year 
                2005 is authorized to be available for scholarships for 
                students from southern Sudan for secondary or 
                postsecondary education in the United States, to be 
                known as ``Sudanese Scholarships''.
                  (G) Summer institutes for korean students.--Of the 
                amounts authorized to be available under subparagraph 
                (A), $750,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $750,000 for 
                the fiscal year 2005 is authorized to be available for 
                summer academic study programs in the United States 
                (focusing on United States political systems, 
                government institutions, society, and democratic 
                culture) for college and university students from the 
                Republic of Korea, to be known as the ``United States 
                Summer Institutes for Korean Student Leaders''.
                  (H) Scholarships for indigenous peoples of mexico and 
                central and south america.--Of the amounts authorized 
                to be available under subparagraph (A), $400,000 for 
                the fiscal year 2004 and $400,000 for the fiscal year 
                2005 is authorized to be available for scholarships for 
                postsecondary education in the United States for 
                students from Mexico and the countries of Central and 
                South America who are from the indigenous peoples of 
                the region.
  (c) National Endowment for Democracy.--
          (1) In general.--For the ``National Endowment for 
        Democracy'', $45,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and 
        $47,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005.
          (2) Initiatives for predominantly muslim countries.--Of the 
        amounts authorized to be appropriated under paragraph (1), 
        $3,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $3,000,000 for the 
        fiscal year 2005 is authorized to be available for the National 
        Endowment for Democracy to fund programs that promote 
        democracy, good governance, the rule of law, independent media, 
        religious tolerance, the rights of women, and strengthening of 
        civil society in countries of predominantly Muslim population 
        within the jurisdiction of the Bureau of Near Eastern Affairs 
        of the Department of State.
  (d) Center for Cultural and Technical Interchange Between East and 
West.--For the ``Center for Cultural and Technical Interchange between 
East and West'', $14,280,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $14,280,000 
for the fiscal year 2005.
  (e) Reagan-fascell democracy fellows.--For the ``Reagan-Fascell 
Democracy Fellows'', for fellowships for democracy activists and 
scholars from around the world at the International Forum for 
Democratic Studies in Washington, D.C., to study, write, and exchange 
views with other activists and scholars and with Americans, $1,000,000 
for the fiscal year 2004 and $1,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005.
  (f) Benjamin gilman international scholarship program.--Section 305 
of the Microenterprise for Self-Reliance and International Anti-
Corruption Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 2462 note) is amended by striking 
``$1,500,000'' and inserting ``$2,500,000''.

SEC. 113. CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

  (a) Assessed Contributions to International Organizations.--There is 
authorized to be appropriated under the heading ``Contributions to 
International Organizations'' $1,010,463,000 for the fiscal year 2004 
and $1,040,776,000 for the fiscal year 2005 for the Department to carry 
out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the 
conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States with respect to 
international organizations and to carry out other authorities in law 
consistent with such purposes.
  (b) Contributions for International Peacekeeping Activities.--There 
is authorized to be appropriated under the heading ``Contributions for 
International Peacekeeping Activities'' $550,200,000 for the fiscal 
year 2004 and such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2005 
for the Department to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and 
responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United 
States with respect to international peacekeeping activities and to 
carry out other authorities in law consistent with such purposes.
  (c) Foreign Currency Exchange Rates.--
          (1) Authorization of appropriations.--In addition to the 
        amounts authorized to be appropriated by subsection (a), there 
        is authorized to be appropriated such sums as may be necessary 
        for the fiscal years 2004 and 2005 to offset adverse 
        fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates.
          (2) Availability of funds.--Amounts appropriated under this 
        subsection may be available for obligation and expenditure only 
        to the extent that the Director of the Office of Management and 
        Budget determines and certifies to the appropriate 
        congressional committees that such amounts are necessary due to 
        such fluctuations.
  (d) Refund of Excess Contributions.--The United States shall continue 
to insist that the United Nations and its specialized and affiliated 
agencies shall credit or refund to each member of the organization or 
agency concerned its proportionate share of the amount by which the 
total contributions to the organization or agency exceed the 
expenditures of the regular assessed budget of the organization or 
agency.

SEC. 114. INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS.

  The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated under 
``International Commissions'' for the Department to carry out the 
authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of 
the foreign affairs of the United States with respect to international 
commissions, and for other purposes authorized by law:
          (1) International boundary and water commission, united 
        states and mexico.--For ``International Boundary and Water 
        Commission, United States and Mexico''--
                  (A) for ``Salaries and Expenses'', $31,562,000 for 
                the fiscal year 2004 and $31,562,000 for the fiscal 
                year 2005; and
                  (B) for ``Construction'', $8,901,000 for the fiscal 
                year 2004 and $8,901,000 for the fiscal year 2005.
          (2) International boundary commission, united states and 
        canada.--For ``International Boundary Commission, United States 
        and Canada'', $1,261,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and 
        $1,261,000 for the fiscal year 2005.
          (3) International joint commission.--For ``International 
        Joint Commission'', $7,810,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and 
        $7,810,000 for the fiscal year 2005.
          (4) International fisheries commissions.--For ``International 
        Fisheries Commissions'', $20,043,000 for the fiscal year 2004 
        and $20,043,000 for the fiscal year 2005.

SEC. 115. MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE.

  (a) In General.--There is authorized to be appropriated for the 
Department for ``Migration and Refugee Assistance'' for authorized 
activities, $927,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $957,000,000 for 
the fiscal year 2005.
  (b) Refugees Resettling in Israel.--Of the amount authorized to be 
appropriated by subsection (a), $50,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 
and $50,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005 is authorized to be available 
for the resettlement of refugees in Israel.
  (c) Tibetan Refugees in India and Nepal.--Of the amount authorized to 
be appropriated by subsection (a), $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 
and $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005 is authorized to be available 
for humanitarian assistance, including food, medicine, clothing, and 
medical and vocational training, to Tibetan refugees in India and Nepal 
who have fled Chinese-occupied Tibet.
  (d) Humanitarian Assistance for Displaced Burmese.--Of the amount 
authorized to be appropriated by subsection (a), $2,000,000 for the 
fiscal year 2004 and $2,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005 is authorized 
to be available for humanitarian assistance (including food, medicine, 
clothing, and medical and vocational training) to persons displaced as 
a result of civil conflict in Burma, including persons still within 
Burma.
  (e) Availability of Funds.--Funds appropriated pursuant to this 
section are authorized to remain available until expended.

SEC. 116. VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

  (a) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated for the Department of State for ``Voluntary Contributions 
to International Organizations'', $342,555,000 for the fiscal year 2004 
and $345,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005.
  (b) United Nations Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture.--Of the 
amounts authorized to be appropriated under subsection (a), $6,000,000 
for the fiscal year 2004 and $7,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005 is 
authorized to be available for a United States voluntary contribution 
to the United Nations Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture.
  (c) Organization of American States.--Of the amounts authorized to be 
appropriated under subsection (a) $2,000,000 for fiscal years 2004 and 
2005 is authorized to be available for a United States voluntary 
contribution to the Organization of American States for the Inter-
American Committee Against Terrorism (CICTE) to identify and develop a 
port in the Latin American and Caribbean region into a model of best 
security practices and appropriate technologies for improving port 
security in the Western Hemisphere. Amounts authorized to be available 
by the preceding sentence are authorized to remain available until 
expended and are in addition to amounts otherwise available to carry 
out section 301 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2221).
  (d) Restrictions on United States Contributions to United Nations 
Development Program.--
          (1) Limitation.--Of the amounts made available under 
        subsection (a) for each of the fiscal years 2004 and 2005 for 
        United States contributions to the United Nations Development 
        Program an amount equal to the amount the United Nations 
        Development Program will spend in Burma during each fiscal year 
        shall be withheld unless during such fiscal year the Secretary 
        of State submits to the appropriate congressional committees 
        the certification described in paragraph (2).
          (2) Certification.--The certification referred to in 
        paragraph (1) is a certification by the Secretary of State that 
        all programs and activities of the United Nations Development 
        Program (including United Nations Development Program--
        Administered Funds) in Burma--
                  (A) are focused on eliminating human suffering and 
                addressing the needs of the poor;
                  (B) are undertaken only through international or 
                private voluntary organizations that have been deemed 
                independent of the State Peace and Development Council 
                (SPDC) (formerly known as the State Law and Order 
                Restoration Council (SLORC)), after consultation with 
                the leadership of the National League for Democracy and 
                the leadership of the National Coalition Government of 
                the Union of Burma;
                  (C) provide no financial, political, or military 
                benefit to the SPDC; and
                  (D) are carried out only after consultation with the 
                leadership of the National League for Democracy and the 
                leadership of the National Coalition Government of the 
                Union of Burma.
  (e) United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).--
          (1) Authorization of appropriations.--Of the amounts 
        authorized to be appropriated under subsection (a), $50,000,000 
        for each of the fiscal years 2004 and 2005 is authorized only 
        to be available for a United States voluntary contribution to 
        the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA).
          (2) Permanent guidelines for voluntary contributions to 
        unfpa.--Section 301 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 
        U.S.C. 2221) is amended by inserting after subsection (a) the 
        following new subsection:
  ``(b)(1) For fiscal year fiscal year 2004 and each subsequent fiscal 
year, funds appropriated to the President or the Department of State 
under any law for a voluntary contribution to the United Nations 
Population Fund (UNFPA) may be obligated and expended for such purpose 
beginning 30 days after such funds become available and only if the 
President certifies to the Congress that the United Nations Population 
Fund (UNFPA) does not directly support or participate in coercive 
abortion or involuntary sterilization. The certification authority of 
the President under the preceding sentence may not be delegated.
  ``(2) In paragraph (1), the term `directly supports or participates 
in coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization' means knowingly and 
intentionally working with a purpose to continue, advance, or expand 
the practice of coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization, or 
playing a primary and essential role in a coercive or involuntary 
aspect of a country's family planning program.''.

SEC. 117. VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING 
                    ACTIVITIES.

  (a) Authorization of Appropriations.--There is authorized to be 
appropriated for the Department of State for ``Voluntary Contributions 
for International Peacekeeping'', $110,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 
and $110,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005.
  (b) Peacekeeping in Africa.--Of the amounts authorized to be 
appropriated under subsection (a), $40,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 
and such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2005 is 
authorized to be appropriated for peacekeeping activities in Africa.

SEC. 118. GRANTS TO THE ASIA FOUNDATION.

  Section 404 of The Asia Foundation Act (title IV of Public Law 98-
164; 22 U.S.C. 4403) is amended to read as follows:
  ``Sec. 404. There is authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary 
of State $18,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $18,000,000 for the 
fiscal year 2005 for grants to The Asia Foundation pursuant to this 
title.''.

    Subtitle B--United States International Broadcasting Activities

SEC. 121. AUTHORIZATIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated to carry out 
United States Government broadcasting activities under the United 
States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948, the United 
States International Broadcasting Act of 1994, the Radio Broadcasting 
to Cuba Act, the Television Broadcasting to Cuba Act, and the Foreign 
Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act of 1998, and to carry out other 
authorities in law consistent with such purposes:
          (1) International broadcasting operations.--
                  (A) In general.--For ``International Broadcasting 
                Operations'', $600,354,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and 
                $612,146,000 for the fiscal year 2005.
                  (B) Allocation of funds.--Of the amounts authorized 
                to be appropriated by subparagraph (A), there is 
                authorized to be available for Radio Free Asia 
                $30,000,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $30,000,000 
                for the fiscal year 2005.
                  (C) Office of global internet freedom.--Of the 
                amounts authorized to be appropriated by subparagraph 
                (A), there is authorized to be available for the 
                Broadcasting Board of Governors for the establishment 
                and operations of the Office of Global Internet Freedom 
                under section 524(a) $8,000,000 for the fiscal year 
                2004 and $8,000,000 for the fiscal year 2005.
          (2) Broadcasting capital improvements.--For ``Broadcasting 
        Capital Improvements'', $29,895,000 for the fiscal year 2004 
        and $11,395,000 for the fiscal year 2005.
          (3) Broadcasting to cuba.--For ``Broadcasting to Cuba'', 
        $26,901,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $27,439,000 for the 
        fiscal year 2005.

        TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES

               Subtitle A--United States Public Diplomacy

SEC. 201. FINDINGS AND PURPOSES.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) The United States possesses strong and deep connections 
        with the peoples of the world separate from its relations with 
        their governments. These connections can be a major asset in 
        the promotion of United States interests and foreign policy.
          (2) Misinformation and hostile propaganda in these countries 
        regarding the United States and its foreign policy endanger the 
        interests of the United States. Existing efforts to counter 
        such misinformation and propaganda are inadequate and must be 
        greatly enhanced in both scope and substance.
          (3) United States foreign policy has been hampered by an 
        insufficient consideration of the importance of public 
        diplomacy in the formulation and implementation of that policy 
        and by the underuse of modern communication techniques.
          (4) The United States should have an operational strategy and 
        a coordinated effort regarding the utilization of its public 
        diplomacy resources.
          (5) The development of an operational strategy and a 
        coordinated effort by United States agencies regarding public 
        diplomacy would greatly enhance United States foreign policy.
          (6) The Secretary of State has undertaken efforts to ensure 
        that of the new positions established at the Department of 
        State after September 30, 2002, a significant proportion are 
        for public diplomacy.
  (b) Purposes.--It is the purpose of this subtitle to enhance in scope 
and substance, redirect, redefine, and reorganize United States public 
diplomacy.

SEC. 202. PUBLIC DIPLOMACY RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

  (a) In General.--The State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 
(22 U.S.C. 265 et seq.) is amended by inserting after section 58 the 
following new section:

``SEC. 59. PUBLIC DIPLOMACY RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF 
                    STATE.

  ``(a) In General.--The Secretary of State shall make public diplomacy 
an integral component in the planning and execution of United States 
foreign policy. The Department of State, in coordination with the 
United States International Broadcasting Agency, shall develop a 
comprehensive strategy for the use of public diplomacy resources and 
assume a prominent role in coordinating the efforts of all Federal 
agencies involved in public diplomacy. Public diplomacy efforts shall 
be addressed to developed and developing countries, to select and 
general audiences, and shall utilize all available media to ensure that 
the foreign policy of the United States is properly explained and 
understood not only by the governments of countries but also by their 
peoples, with the objective of enhancing support for United States 
foreign policy. The Secretary shall ensure that the public diplomacy 
strategy of the United States is cohesive and coherent and shall 
aggressively and through the most effective mechanisms counter 
misinformation and propaganda concerning the United States. The 
Secretary shall endeavor to articulate the importance in American 
foreign policy of the guiding principles and doctrines of the United 
States, particularly freedom and democracy. The Secretary, in 
coordination with the Board of Governors of the United States 
International Broadcasting Agency, shall develop and articulate long-
term measurable objectives for United States public diplomacy. The 
Secretary is authorized to produce and distribute public diplomacy 
programming for distribution abroad in order to achieve public 
diplomacy objectives, including through satellite communication, the 
Internet, and other established and emerging communications 
technologies.
  ``(b) Information Concerning United States Assistance.--
          ``(1) Identification of assistance.--In cooperation with the 
        United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and 
        other public and private assistance organizations and agencies, 
        the Secretary shall ensure that information concerning foreign 
        assistance provided by the United States Government, United 
        States nongovernmental organizations and private entities, and 
        the American people is disseminated widely and prominently, 
        particularly, to the extent practicable, within countries and 
        regions that receive such assistance. The Secretary shall 
        ensure that, to the extent practicable, projects funded by the 
        United States Agency for International Development (USAID) that 
        do not involve commodities, including projects implemented by 
        private voluntary organizations, are identified as being 
        supported by the United States of America, as American Aid or 
        provided by the American people.
          ``(2) Report to congress.--Not later than 120 days after the 
        end of each fiscal year, the Secretary shall submit a report to 
        the Committee on International Relations of the House of 
        Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the 
        Senate on efforts to disseminate information concerning 
        assistance described in paragraph (1) during the preceding 
        fiscal year. Each such report shall include specific 
        information concerning all instances in which the United States 
        Agency for International Development has not identified 
        projects in the manner prescribed in paragraph (1) because such 
        identification was not practicable. Any such report shall be 
        submitted in unclassified form, but may include a classified 
        appendix.
  ``(c) Authority.-- Subject to the availability of appropriations, the 
Secretary may contract with and compensate government and private 
agencies or persons for property and services to carry out this 
section.''.
  (b) Establishment of Public Diplomacy Reserve Corps.--
          (1) The Secretary of State shall establish a public diplomacy 
        reserve corps to augment the public diplomacy capacity and 
        capabilities of the Department in emergency and critical 
        circumstances worldwide. The Secretary shall develop a 
        contingency plan for the use of the corps to bolster public 
        diplomacy resources and expertise. To the extent necessary and 
        appropriate, the Secretary may recruit experts in public 
        diplomacy and related fields from the private sector.
          (2) While actively serving with the reserve corps, 
        individuals are prohibited from engaging in activities directly 
        or indirectly intended to influence public opinion within the 
        United States to the same degree that employees of the 
        Department engaged in public diplomacy are so prohibited.
  (c) Functions of the Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy.--
          (1) Section 1(b)(3) of the State Department Basic Authorities 
        Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a(b)(3)) is amended by striking 
        ``formation'' and all that follows through the period at the 
        end and inserting ``formation, supervision, and implementation 
        of United States public diplomacy policies, programs, and 
        activities, including the provision of guidance to Department 
        personnel in the United States and overseas who conduct or 
        implement such policies, programs, and activities. The Under 
        Secretary for Public Diplomacy shall assist the United States 
        Agency for International Broadcasting in presenting the 
        policies of the United States clearly and effectively, shall 
        submit statements of United States policy and editorial 
        material to the Agency for broadcast consideration in addition 
        to material prepared by the Agency, and shall ensure that 
        editorial material created by the Agency for broadcast is 
        reviewed expeditiously by the Department.''.
          (2) The Under Secretary for Public Diplomacy, in carrying out 
        the functions under the last sentence of section 1(b)(3) of the 
        State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (as added by 
        paragraph (1), shall consult with public diplomacy officers 
        operating at United States overseas posts and in the regional 
        bureaus of the Department of State.

SEC. 203. ANNUAL PLAN ON PUBLIC DIPLOMACY STRATEGY.

  The Secretary of State, in coordination with all appropriate Federal 
agencies, shall prepare an annual review and analysis of the impact of 
public diplomacy efforts on target audiences. Each review shall assess 
the United States public diplomacy strategy worldwide and by region, 
including the allocation of resources and an evaluation and assessment 
of the progress in, and barriers to, achieving the goals set forth 
under previous plans submitted under this section. On the basis of such 
review, the Secretary of State, in coordination with all appropriate 
Federal agencies shall develop and submit, as part of the annual budget 
submission, a public diplomacy strategy which specifies goals, agency 
responsibilities, and necessary resources and mechanisms for achieving 
such goals during the next fiscal year. The plan may be submitted in 
classified form.

SEC. 204. PUBLIC DIPLOMACY TRAINING.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) The Foreign Service should recruit individuals with 
        expertise and professional experience in public diplomacy.
          (2) Ambassadors should have a prominent role in the 
        formulation of public diplomacy strategies for the countries 
        and regions to which they are assigned and be accountable for 
        the operation and success of public diplomacy efforts at their 
        posts.
          (3) Initial and subsequent training of Foreign Service 
        officers should be enhanced to include information and training 
        on public diplomacy and the tools and technology of mass 
        communication.
  (b) Personnel.--
          (1) In the recruitment, training, and assignment of members 
        of the Foreign Service, the Secretary shall emphasize the 
        importance of public diplomacy and of applicable skills and 
        techniques. The Secretary shall consider the priority 
        recruitment into the Foreign Service, at middle-level entry, of 
        individuals with expertise and professional experience in 
        public diplomacy, mass communications, or journalism, 
        especially individuals with language facility and experience in 
        particular countries and regions.
          (2) The Secretary of State shall seek to increase the number 
        of Foreign Service officers proficient in languages spoken in 
        predominantly Muslim countries. Such increase shall be 
        accomplished through the recruitment of new officers and 
        incentives for officers in service.

SEC. 205. UNITED STATES ADVISORY COMMISSION ON PUBLIC DIPLOMACY.

  (a) Study and Report by United States Advisory Commission on Public 
Diplomacy.--Section 604(c)(2) of the United States Information and 
Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1469(c)(2)) is amended to 
read as follows:
  ``(2)(A) Not less often than every two years, the Commission shall 
undertake an in-depth review of United States public diplomacy 
programs, policies, and activities. Each study shall assess the 
effectiveness of the various mechanisms of United States public 
diplomacy, in light of factors including public and media attitudes 
around the world toward the United States, Americans, United States 
foreign policy, and the role of the American private-sector community 
abroad, and make appropriate recommendations.
  ``(B) A comprehensive report of each study under subparagraph (A) 
shall be submitted to the Secretary of State and the appropriate 
congressional committees. At the discretion of the Commission, any 
report under this subsection may be submitted in classified or 
unclassified form, as appropriate.''.
  (b) Information and Support From Other Agencies.--Upon request of the 
United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy, the Secretary of 
State, the Director of the United States International Broadcasting 
Agency, and the head of any other Federal agency that conducts public 
diplomacy programs and activities shall provide information to the 
Advisory Commission to assist in carrying out the responsibilities 
under section 604(c)(2) of the United States Information and 
Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (as amended by subsection (a)).
  (c) Enhancing the Expertise of United States Advisory Commission on 
Public Diplomacy.--
          (1) Qualifications of members.--Section 604(a)(2) of the 
        United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 
        (22 U.S.C. 1469(a)(2)) is amended by adding at the end the 
        following: ``At least 4 members shall have substantial 
        experience in the conduct of public diplomacy or comparable 
        activities in the private sector. At least 1 member shall be an 
        American residing abroad. No member may be an officer or 
        employee of the United States.''.
          (2) Application of amendment.--The amendments made by 
        paragraph (1) shall not apply to individuals who are members of 
        the United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy on 
        the date of the enactment of this Act.

SEC. 206. LIBRARY PROGRAM.

  The Secretary of State shall develop and implement a demonstration 
program to assist foreign governments to establish or upgrade their 
public library systems to improve literacy and support public 
education. The program should provide training in the library sciences. 
The purpose of the program shall be to advance American values and 
society, particularly the importance of freedom and democracy.

SEC. 207. SENSE OF CONGRESS CONCERNING PUBLIC DIPLOMACY EFFORTS IN SUB-
                    SAHARAN AFRICA.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) A significant number of sub-Saharan African countries 
        have predominantly Muslim populations, including such key 
        countries as Nigeria, Senegal, Djibouti, Mauritania, and 
        Guinea.
          (2) In several of these countries, groups with links to 
        militant religious organizations are active among the youth, 
        primarily young men, promoting a philosophy and practice of 
        intolerance and radical clerics are effectively mobilizing 
        public sentiment against the United States.
  (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of the Congress that the 
Secretary should include countries in sub-Saharan Africa with 
predominantly Muslim populations in the public diplomacy activities 
authorized by this Act and the amendments made by this Act.

 SEC. 208. THE COLIN POWELL CENTER FOR AMERICAN DIPLOMACY.

  Title I of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 is 
amended by adding after section 59 (22 U.S.C. 2730) the following new 
section:

``SEC. 60. COLIN POWELL CENTER FOR AMERICAN DIPLOMACY.

  ``(a) Designation.--The diplomacy center of the Department of State, 
located in the Harry S Truman building, is hereby designated as the 
`Colin Powell Center for American Diplomacy' (hereinafter in this 
section referred to as the `Center').
  ``(b) Activities.--
          ``(1) Support authorized.--The Secretary of State is 
        authorized to provide by contract, grant, or otherwise, for the 
        performance of appropriate museum visitor and educational 
        outreach services, including organizing conference activities, 
        museum shop services, and food services, in the public exhibit 
        and related space utilized by the Center.
          ``(2) Payment of expenses.--The Secretary may pay all 
        reasonable expenses of conference activities conducted by the 
        Center, including refreshments and reimbursement of travel 
        expenses incurred by participants.
          ``(3) Recovery of costs.--Any revenues generated under the 
        authority of paragraph (1) for visitor services may be 
        retained, as a recovery of the costs of operating the Center, 
        and credited to any Department of State appropriation.
  ``(c) Disposition of Center Artifacts and Materials.--
          ``(1) Property of secretary.--All historic documents, 
        artifacts, or other articles permanently acquired by the 
        Department of State and determined by the Secretary to be 
        suitable for display in the Center shall be considered to be 
        the property of the Secretary in the Secretary's official 
        capacity and shall be subject to disposition solely in 
        accordance with this subsection.
          ``(2) Sale or trade.--Whenever the Secretary makes the 
        determination under paragraph (3) with respect to an item, the 
        Secretary may sell at fair market value, trade, or transfer the 
        item, without regard to the requirements of subtitle I of title 
        40, United States Code. The proceeds of any such sale may be 
        used solely for the advancement of the Center's mission and may 
        not be used for any purpose other than the acquisition and 
        direct care of collections.
          ``(3) Determinations prior to sale or trade.--The 
        determination referred to in paragraph (2), with respect to an 
        item, is a determination that--
                  ``(A) the item no longer serves to further the 
                purposes of the Center established in the collections 
                management policy of the Center; or
                  ``(B) in order to maintain the standards of the 
                collections of the Center, the sale or exchange of the 
                item would be a better use of the item.
          ``(4) Loans.--The Secretary may also lend items covered by 
        paragraph (1), when not needed for use or display in the 
        Center, to the Smithsonian Institution or a similar institution 
        for repair, study, or exhibition.''.

              Subtitle B--Basic Authorities and Activities

SEC. 221. UNITED STATES POLICY WITH RESPECT TO JERUSALEM AS THE CAPITAL 
                    OF ISRAEL.

  (a) Limitation on Use of Funds for Consulate in Jerusalem.--None of 
the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act may be expended for 
the operation of a United States consulate or diplomatic facility in 
Jerusalem unless such consulate or diplomatic facility is under the 
supervision of the United States Ambassador to Israel.
  (b) Limitation on Use of Funds for Publications.--None of the funds 
authorized to be appropriated by this Act may be available for the 
publication of any official government document which lists countries 
and their capital cities unless the publication identifies Jerusalem as 
the capital of Israel.
  (c) Record of Place of Birth as Israel for Passport Purposes.--The 
first section of ``An Act to regulate the issue and validity of 
passports, and for other purposes'', approved July 3, 1926 (22 U.S.C. 
211a; 44 Stat. 887) is amended by inserting after the first sentence 
the following: ``For purposes of the issuance of a passport of a United 
States citizen born in the city of Jerusalem, the Secretary shall, upon 
the request of the citizen or the citizen's legal guardian, record the 
place of birth as Israel.''.

SEC. 222. MODIFICATION OF REPORTING REQUIREMENTS.

  (a) Repeal.--Section 805 of the Admiral James W. Nance and Meg 
Donovan Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2000 and 2001 
(section 805(a) of division A of H.R. 3427, as enacted into law by 
section 1000(a)(7) of Public Law 106-113; appendix G; 113 Stat. 1501A-
470) (relating to reports on terrorist activity in which United States 
citizens were killed and related matters) is hereby repealed.
  (b) Annual Country Reports on Terrorism.--Section 140(b)(2) of the 
Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (Public 
Law 100-204; 22 U.S.C. 2656f(b)(2)) is amended--
          (1) in subparagraph (D), by striking ``and'' at the end;
          (2) in subparagraph (E), by striking the period at the end 
        and inserting ``; and''; and
          (3) by adding at the end the following:
                  ``(F) for the reports due through May 1, 2005, 
                information concerning terrorist attacks in Israel, 
                territory administered by Israel, and territory 
                administered by the Palestinian Authority, including--
                          ``(i) a list of all citizens of the United 
                        States killed or injured in such attacks during 
                        the previous year;
                          ``(ii) the date of each attack and the total 
                        number of people killed or injured in each 
                        attack;
                          ``(iii) the person or group claiming 
                        responsibility for the attack and where such 
                        person or group has found refuge or support;
                          ``(iv) to the extent possible, a list of 
                        suspects implicated in each attack and the 
                        nationality of each suspect, including 
                        information on their whereabouts (or suspected 
                        whereabouts);
                          ``(v) a list of any terrorist suspects in 
                        these cases who are members of Palestinian 
                        police or security forces, the Palestine 
                        Liberation Organization, or any Palestinian 
                        governing body;
                          ``(vi) the status of each case pending 
                        against a suspect, including information on 
                        whether the suspect has been arrested, 
                        detained, indicted, prosecuted, or convicted by 
                        the Palestinian Authority or Israel, and if 
                        detained and then released, the date of such 
                        release, and whether any released suspect was 
                        implicated in subsequent acts of terrorism;
                          ``(vii) available information on convictions, 
                        releases or changes in the situation of 
                        suspects involved in attacks committed prior to 
                        December 31, 2003, and not covered in previous 
                        reports submitted under section 805(a) of the 
                        Admiral James W. Nance and Meg Donovan Foreign 
                        Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2000 
                        and 2001; and
                          ``(viii) the policy of the Department of 
                        State with respect to offering rewards for 
                        information on terrorist suspects, including 
                        any information on whether a reward has been 
                        posted for suspects involved in terrorist 
                        attacks listed in the report.''.
  (c) Consultation.--The Secretary of State shall, in preparing the 
portion of the annual country reports on terrorism required by 
subparagraph (F) of section 140(b)(2) of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (Public Law 100-204; 22 
U.S.C. 2656f(b)(2)), as added by subsection (b), consult and coordinate 
with all other Government officials who have information necessary to 
complete that portion of the report. Nothing contained in this 
subsection shall require the disclosure, on a classified or 
unclassified basis, of information that would jeopardize sensitive 
sources and methods or other vital national security interests or 
jeopardize ongoing criminal investigations or proceedings.

SEC. 223. REPORT CONCERNING EFFORTS TO PROMOTE ISRAEL'S DIPLOMATIC 
                    RELATIONS WITH OTHER COUNTRIES.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) Israel is a friend and ally of the United States whose 
        security is vital to regional stability and United States 
        interests.
          (2) Israel currently maintains diplomatic relations with 
        approximately 160 countries. Approximately 30 countries do not 
        have any diplomatic relations with Israel.
          (3) The State of Israel has been actively seeking to 
        establish formal relations with a number of countries.
          (4) The United States should assist its ally, Israel, in its 
        efforts to establish diplomatic relations.
          (5) After more than 50 years of existence, Israel deserves to 
        be treated as an equal nation by its neighbors and the world 
        community.
  (b) Report Concerning United States Efforts to Promote Israel's 
Diplomatic Relations with Other Countries.--Not later than 60 days 
after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit 
a report to the appropriate congressional committees that includes the 
following information (in classified or unclassified form, as 
appropriate):
          (1) Actions taken by the United States to encourage other 
        countries to establish full diplomatic relations with Israel.
          (2) Specific responses solicited and received by the 
        Secretary from countries that do not maintain full diplomatic 
        relations with Israel with respect to the status of 
        negotiations to enter into diplomatic relations with Israel.
          (3) Other measures being undertaken, and measures that will 
        be undertaken, by the United States to ensure and promote 
        Israel's full participation in the world diplomatic community.

SEC. 224. REIMBURSEMENT RATE FOR AIRLIFT SERVICES PROVIDED TO THE 
                    DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

  Section 2642 of title 10, United States Code, is amended--
          (1) in the heading by inserting ``and Department of State'' 
        after ``Central Intelligence Agency''; and
          (2) in subsection (a) by striking ``Agency,'' and inserting 
        ``Agency or the Department of State,''.

SEC. 225. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING ADDITIONAL UNITED STATES CONSULAR 
                    POSTS.

  It is the sense of the Congress that to help advance United States 
economic, political, and public diplomacy interests, the Secretary of 
State should make best efforts to establish consulates or other 
appropriate diplomatic presence in: Pusan, South Korea; Medan, 
Indonesia; and Hat Yai, Thailand.

SEC. 226. VALIDITY OF UNITED STATES PASSPORTS FOR TRAVEL TO COUNTRIES 
                    RECEIVING UNITED STATES FOREIGN ASSISTANCE.

  The first section of the Act entitled ``An Act to regulate the issue 
and validity of passports, and for other purposes'', approved July 3, 
1926 (22 U.S.C. 211a) is amended by striking ``travellers.'' and 
inserting ``travellers, and no such restriction may apply to a country 
in which the United States is providing assistance authorized by the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961.''.

SEC. 227. SECURITY CAPITAL COST SHARING.

  (a) Authorization.--The first section of the Foreign Service 
Buildings Act, 1926 (22 U.S.C. 292) is amended by adding at the end the 
following new subsection:
  ``(c) Security Capital Cost-Sharing Program.--(1) The Secretary of 
State, as the single manager of all buildings and grounds acquired 
under this Act or otherwise acquired or authorized for the use of the 
diplomatic and consular establishments in foreign countries, is 
authorized to establish and implement a Security Capital Cost-Sharing 
Program to collect funds from each agency on the basis of its total 
overseas presence in a manner that encourages rightsizing of its 
overseas presence, and expend those funds to accelerate the provision 
of safe, secure, functional buildings for United States Government 
personnel overseas.
  ``(2) The Secretary is authorized to determine annually and charge 
each Federal agency the amount to be collected under paragraph (1) from 
the agency. To determine such amount, the Secretary may prescribe and 
use a formula that takes into account the number of authorized 
positions of each agency, including contractors and locally hired 
personnel, who are assigned to United States diplomatic facilities and 
are under the authority of a chief of mission pursuant to section 207 
of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3927).
  ``(3) The head of an agency charged a fee under this section shall 
remit the amount of the fee to the Secretary of State through the 
Intra-Governmental Payment and Collection System or other appropriate 
means.
  ``(4) There shall be established on the books of the Treasury an 
account to be known as the `Security Capital Cost-Sharing Program 
Fund', which shall be administered by the Secretary. There shall be 
deposited into the account all amounts collected by the Secretary 
pursuant to the authority under paragraph (1), and such funds shall 
remain available until expended. Such funds shall be used solely for 
the provision of new safe, secure, functional diplomatic facilities 
that comply with all applicable legal standards, including those 
standards established under the authority of the Secure Embassy 
Construction and Counterterrorism Act of 1999. The Secretary shall 
include in the Department of State's Congressional Presentation 
Document an accounting of the sources and uses of the amounts deposited 
into the account.
  ``(5) The Secretary shall not collect a fee for an authorized 
position of an agency of the Federal Government that has been or would 
be granted a waiver pursuant to section 606(a)(2)(B)(i) of the Secure 
Embassy Construction and Counterterrorism Act of 1999 (22 U.S.C. 
4865(a)(2)(B)(i)).
  ``(6) In this subsection--
          ``(A) the term `agency of the Federal Government'--
                  ``(i) includes the Interagency Cooperative 
                Administrative Support Service; and
                  ``(ii) does not include the Marine Security Guard; 
                and
          ``(B) the term `United States diplomatic facility' has the 
        meaning given that term in section 603 of the Secure Embassy 
        Construction and Counterterrorism Act of 1999 (22 U.S.C. 4865 
        note).''.
  (b) Effective Date.--The amendment made by subsection (a) shall take 
effect on October 1, 2004.

SEC. 228. AUTHORITY TO ISSUE ADMINISTRATIVE SUBPOENAS.

  Section 37 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 
U.S.C. 2709) is amended by adding at the end the following new 
subsection:
  ``(d) Administrative Subpoenas.--
          ``(1) In general.--If the Secretary determines that there is 
        an imminent threat against a person, foreign mission, or 
        international organization protected under the authority of 
        subsection (a)(3), the Secretary may issue in writing, and 
        cause to be served, a subpoena requiring--
                  ``(A) the production of any records or other items 
                relevant to the threat; and
                  ``(B) testimony by the custodian of the items 
                required to be produced concerning the production and 
                authenticity of those items.
          ``(2) Requirements.--
                  ``(A) Return date.--A subpoena under this subsection 
                shall describe the items required to be produced and 
                shall specify a return date within a reasonable period 
                of time within which the requested items may be 
                assembled and made available. The return date specified 
                may not be less than 24 hours after service of the 
                subpoena.
                  ``(B) Notification to attorney general.--As soon as 
                practicable following the issuance of a subpoena under 
                this subsection, the Secretary shall notify the 
                Attorney General of its issuance.
                  ``(C) Other requirements.--The following provisions 
                of section 3486 of title 18, United States Code, shall 
                apply to the exercise of the authority of paragraph 
                (1):
                          ``(i) Paragraphs (4) through (8) of 
                        subsection (a).
                          ``(ii) Subsections (b), (c), and (d).
          ``(3) Delegation of authority.--The authority under this 
        subsection may be delegated only to the Deputy Secretary of 
        State.
          ``(4) Annual report.--Not later than February 1 of each year, 
        the Secretary shall submit to the Committee on Foreign 
        Relations of the Senate and the Committee on International 
        Relations of the House of Representatives a report regarding 
        the exercise of the authority under this subsection during the 
        previous calendar year.''.

SEC. 229. ENHANCING REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT AND MAINTAINING THE UNITED 
                    STATES COMMITMENT TO REFUGEES.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) The United States has a longstanding tradition of 
        providing refugee assistance and relief through the Department 
        of State's migration and refugee assistance account for 
        refugees throughout the world who have been subjected to 
        religious and other forms of persecution.
          (2) A strong refugee resettlement and assistance program is a 
        critical component of the United States' strong commitment to 
        freedom.
          (3) The United States refugee admissions program has been in 
        decline for much of the last five years, resulting in a chronic 
        inability of the United States to meet the ceiling on refugee 
        admissions that has been set by the President each year.
          (4) Refugee applicants have always undergone rigorous 
        security screenings. The September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks 
        on the United States has rightfully increased the awareness of 
        the need to ensure that all aliens seeking admission to the 
        United States would not endanger the United States.
          (5) Private voluntary organizations and nongovernmental 
        organizations (NGOs) have and continue to provide valuable 
        information to State Department officials for refugee 
        processing, and along with Embassy personnel, can be utilized 
        to assist in the preliminary screening of refugees so that 
        State Department officials can focus to a greater extent on 
        security.
          (6) Currently there are 15 million refugees worldwide. In 
        order to meet the ceiling set by the Administration, which has 
        been 70,000 in recent years, a broader cross-section could be 
        considered for resettlement in the United States if the 
        Department of State were to expand existing refugee processing 
        priority categories in a reasonable and responsible manner. 
        Expansion of refugee selection should include the expanded use 
        of both the existing category reserved for refugees of special 
        interest to the United States as well as the existing 
        categories reserved for family reunification.
  (b) Purpose.--It is the purpose of this section to provide the 
Department of State with tools to enable it to carry out its 
responsibilities with greater efficiency with respect to the 
identification and processing of refugee applicants.
  (c) Enhancement of Refugee Identification and Processing.--
          (1) In addition to traditional agencies currently used in the 
        processing of refugees for admission to the United States, 
        where applicable, the Secretary shall develop and utilize 
        partnerships with voluntary resettlement organizations that 
        permit such organizations to assist in the identification and 
        referral of refugees.
          (2) In addition to traditional agencies currently used in the 
        processing of refugees for admission to the United States, 
        where applicable, the Secretary shall utilize private voluntary 
        organizations with ties to domestic constituencies in the 
        overseas processing of refugees.
          (3) In addition to traditional agencies currently used in the 
        processing of refugees for admission to the United States, 
        where applicable, the Secretary shall establish refugee 
        response teams.
                  (A) Establishment of Refugee Response Teams.--In 
                order to make the processing of refugees more efficient 
                and effective, enhance the quality of refugee 
                resettlement programs, and to augment the capacity of 
                the United States government to identify, process, 
                assist, and counsel individuals for eventual 
                adjudication by the Department of Homeland Security as 
                refugees, where applicable, the Secretary shall 
                establish and utilize the services of Refugee Response 
                Teams, (in this section referred to as ``RRTs''). RRTs 
                shall be coordinated by the Assistant Secretary of 
                State for Population, Refugees, and Migration, or the 
                Assistant Secretary's designee.
                  (B) Composition of the rrts.--RRTs shall be comprised 
                of representatives of nongovernmental organizations and 
                private voluntary organizations that have experience in 
                refugee law, policy and programs.
                  (C) Responsibilities of the rrts.--RRTs shall be 
                responsible for--
                          (i) monitoring refugee situations, with a 
                        view toward identifying those refugees whose 
                        best durable solution is third country 
                        resettlement;
                          (ii) preparing profiles and documentation for 
                        resettlement consideration by the United States 
                        Government;
                          (iii) augmenting or establishing an overseas 
                        operation, especially in response to urgent 
                        developments requiring quick responses or more 
                        staff resources than are available in the 
                        existing processing entities;
                          (iv) assisting with training and technical 
                        assistance to existing international 
                        organizations and other processing entities; 
                        and
                          (v) such other responsibilities as may be 
                        determined by the Secretary of State.
                  (D) Responsibilities of the Secretary.--The Secretary 
                shall establish appropriate training seminars for RRT 
                personnel and make use of RRTs in situations where 
                existing mechanisms are unable to identify and process 
                refugees in a timely manner.
  (d) Performance Standards.--In consultation with private voluntary 
organizations and NGOs, the Secretary shall establish performance 
standards to ensure accountability and effectiveness in the tasks 
carried out in subsection (c).
  (e) Consideration of Various Groups.--To ensure that there is 
adequate planning across fiscal years and that both the Department of 
State's planning and processing operations result in adequate numbers 
of travel-ready refugees to fulfill the admissions goals set forth in 
the determinations on refugee admissions required by sections 207(a) 
and 207(b) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1157(a) and 
(b)), the Secretary of State shall work to ensure that--
          (1) those refugees in special need, including long-stayers in 
        first countries of asylum, unaccompanied refugee minors, urban 
        refugees, and refugees in women-headed households be given 
        special attention for resettlement processing;
          (2) attempts are made to expand processing of those refugees 
        of all nationalities who have close family ties to citizens and 
        residents in the United States, including spouses, unmarried 
        children, or parents of persons lawfully admitted to the United 
        States, regardless of their country of nationality, country of 
        habitual residence, or first country of asylum, as well as 
        grandparents, grandchildren, married sons or daughters, or 
        siblings of United States citizens or other persons lawfully 
        admitted to the United States;
          (3) attempts are made to expand the number of refugees 
        considered who are of special concern to the United States; and
          (4) expanded access is provided to broader categories of 
        refugees seeking admission to the United States, thus reducing 
        instances of relationship-based misrepresentation by persons 
        who are bona fide refugees but who resort to such 
        misrepresentation merely as a way to be interviewed for refugee 
        status.
  (f) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit a report to Congress 
that includes information concerning the following:
          (1) Efforts of the Secretary to utilize NGO's in refugee 
        identification, utilize private voluntary organizations in 
        processing refugees, establish and utilize RRTs, and an 
        explanation of the rationale for not using such organizations 
        and agencies in situations where the Secretary has made such a 
        determination, as described in subsection (c).
          (2) Efforts of the Secretary to implement performance 
        standards and measures as described in subsection (d) and the 
        success of NGO's and private voluntary organizations in meeting 
        such standards.
          (3) Efforts of the Secretary to expand consideration of 
        various groups for refugee processing as described in 
        subsection (e).
          (4) Efforts to ensure that there is planning across fiscal 
        years so as to fulfill the refugee admissions goals set forth 
        by the President in his annual presidential determinations on 
        refugee admissions.

 SEC. 230. THE COLIN POWELL CENTER FOR AMERICAN DIPLOMACY.

  Title I of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 is 
amended by adding after section 59 (22 U.S.C. 2730) the following new 
section:

``SEC. 60. COLIN POWELL CENTER FOR AMERICAN DIPLOMACY.

  ``(a) Designation.--The diplomacy center of the Department of State, 
located in the Harry S Truman building, is hereby designated as the 
`Colin Powell Center for American Diplomacy' (hereinafter in this 
section referred to as the `Center').
  ``(b) Activities.--
          ``(1) Support authorized.--The Secretary of State is 
        authorized to provide by contract, grant, or otherwise, for the 
        performance of appropriate museum visitor and educational 
        outreach services, including organizing conference activities, 
        museum shop services, and food services, in the public exhibit 
        and related space utilized by the Center.
          ``(2) Payment of expenses.--The Secretary may pay all 
        reasonable expenses of conference activities conducted by the 
        Center, including refreshments and reimbursement of travel 
        expenses incurred by participants.
          ``(3) Recovery of costs.--Any revenues generated under the 
        authority of paragraph (1) for visitor services may be 
        retained, as a recovery of the costs of operating the Center, 
        and credited to any Department of State appropriation.
  ``(c) Disposition of Center Artifacts and Materials.--
          ``(1) Property of secretary.--All historic documents, 
        artifacts, or other articles permanently acquired by the 
        Department of State and determined by the Secretary to be 
        suitable for display in the Center shall be considered to be 
        the property of the Secretary in the Secretary's official 
        capacity and shall be subject to disposition solely in 
        accordance with this subsection.
          ``(2) Sale or trade.--Whenever the Secretary makes the 
        determination under paragraph (3) with respect to an item, the 
        Secretary may sell at fair market value, trade, or transfer the 
        item, without regard to the requirements of subtitle I of title 
        40, United States Code. The proceeds of any such sale may be 
        used solely for the advancement of the Center's mission and may 
        not be used for any purpose other than the acquisition and 
        direct care of collections.
          ``(3) Determinations prior to sale or trade.--The 
        determination referred to in paragraph (2), with respect to an 
        item, is a determination that--
                  ``(A) the item no longer serves to further the 
                purposes of the Center established in the collections 
                management policy of the Center; or
                  ``(B) in order to maintain the standards of the 
                collections of the Center, the sale or exchange of the 
                item would be a better use of the item.
          ``(4) Loans.--The Secretary may also lend items covered by 
        paragraph (1), when not needed for use or display in the 
        Center, to the Smithsonian Institution or a similar institution 
        for repair, study, or exhibition.''.

            Subtitle C--Educational and Cultural Authorities

SEC. 251. ESTABLISHMENT OF INITIATIVES FOR PREDOMINANTLY MUSLIM 
                    COUNTRIES.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) Surveys indicate that, in countries of predominantly 
        Muslim population, opinions of the United States and American 
        foreign policy among the general public and select audiences 
        are significantly distorted by highly negative and hostile 
        beliefs and images and that many of these beliefs and images 
        are the result of misinformation and propaganda by individuals 
        and organizations hostile to the United States.
          (2) These negative opinions and images are highly prejudicial 
        to the interests of the United States and to its foreign 
        policy.
          (3) As part of a broad and long-term effort to enhance a 
        positive image of the United States in the Muslim world, a key 
        element should be the establishment of programs to promote a 
        greater familiarity with American society and values among the 
        general public and select audiences in countries of 
        predominantly Muslim population.
  (b) Establishment of Initiatives.--The Secretary of State shall 
establish the following programs with countries with predominantly 
Muslim populations as part of the educational and cultural exchange 
programs of the Department of State for the fiscal years 2004 and 2005:
          (1) Journalism program.--A program for foreign journalists, 
        editors, media managers, and postsecondary students of 
        journalism which, in cooperation with private sector sponsors 
        to include universities, shall sponsor workshops and 
        professional training in techniques, standards, and practices 
        in the field of journalism to assist the participants to 
        achieve the highest standards of professionalism.
          (2) English language teaching.--The Secretary shall provide 
        grants to United States citizens to work in middle and 
        secondary schools as English language teaching assistants for 
        not less than an academic year. If feasible, the host 
        government or local educational agency shall share the salary 
        costs of the assistants.
          (3) Sister city partnerships.--The Secretary shall expand and 
        enhance sister-city partnerships between United States and 
        international municipalities in an effort to increase global 
        cooperation at the community level. Such partnerships shall 
        encourage economic development, municipal cooperation, health 
        care initiatives, youth and educational programs, disability 
        advocacy, emergency preparedness, and humanitarian assistance.
          (4) Civics education.--The Secretary shall establish a civics 
        education program which shall develop civics education teaching 
        curricula and materials, provide training for teachers of 
        civics, and provide English language teaching materials that 
        are designed to promote civics education. Civics education 
        programs under this paragraph shall place particular emphasis 
        on the on-site training of educators and the function of the 
        mass media within that society.
          (5) Youth ambassadors.--The Secretary shall establish a 
        program for visits by middle school students (to the extent 
        feasible) and secondary school students to the United States 
        during school holidays in their home country for periods not to 
        exceed 4 weeks and a program for academic year study in the 
        United States for secondary school students. Participating 
        students shall reflect the economic, geographic, and ethnic 
        diversity of their countries. Activities shall include cultural 
        and educational activities designed to familiarize 
        participating students with American society and values. To the 
        extent practicable, the program involving school holiday visits 
        shall be coordinated with middle and secondary schools in the 
        United States to provide for school-based activities and 
        interactions. The Secretary shall encourage the establishment 
        of direct school-to-school linkages under the programs.
          (6) Fulbright exchange program.--The Secretary shall seek to 
        substantially increase the number of awards under the J. 
        William Fulbright Educational Exchange Program to graduate 
        students, scholars, professionals, teachers, and administrators 
        from the United States who are applying for such awards to 
        study, teach, conduct research, or pursue scholarship in 
        predominantly Muslim countries. Part of such increase shall 
        include awards for scholars and teachers who plan to teach 
        subjects relating to American studies.
          (7) Hubert h. humphrey fellowships.--The Secretary shall seek 
        to substantially increase the number of Hubert H. Humphrey 
        Fellowships awarded to candidates from predominantly Muslim 
        countries.
          (8) Library training exchange program.--The Secretary shall 
        develop an exchange program for postgradute students seeking 
        additional training in the library sciences and related fields.
  (c) General Provision.--Programs established under this section shall 
be carried out under the provisions of the United States Information 
and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 and the Mutual Educational and 
Cultural Exchange Act of 1961.

SEC. 252. DATABASE OF AMERICAN AND FOREIGN PARTICIPANTS IN EXCHANGE 
                    PROGRAMS.

  To the extent practicable, the Secretary of State, in coordination 
with the heads of other agencies that conduct international exchange 
and training programs, shall establish and maintain a database listing 
all American and foreign alumni of such programs in order to encourage 
networking, interaction, and communication with alumni.

SEC. 253. REPORT ON INCLUSION OF FREEDOM AND DEMOCRACY ADVOCATES IN 
                    EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS.

  Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
the Secretary of State shall submit to the Congress a report concerning 
the implementation of section 102 of the Human Rights, Refugee, and 
Other Foreign Relations Provisions Act of 1996. The report shall 
include information concerning the number of grants to conduct exchange 
programs to countries described in such section that have been 
submitted for competitive bidding, what measures have been taken to 
ensure that willingness to include supporters of freedom and democracy 
in such programs is given appropriate weight in the selection of 
grantees, and an evaluation of whether United States exchange programs 
in the countries described in such section are fully open to supporters 
of freedom and democracy, and, if not, what obstacles remain and what 
measures are being taken to implement such policy.

SEC. 254. SENSE OF THE CONGRESS CONCERNING EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL 
                    EXCHANGE PROGRAM FOR FOREIGN JOURNALISTS.

  It is the sense of the Congress that the Secretary of State should 
work toward the establishment of a program for foreign journalists from 
regions of conflict that will provide professional training in 
techniques, standards, and practices in the field of journalism.

SEC. 255. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING KOREAN FULBRIGHT PROGRAMS.

  It is the sense of the Congress that Fulbright program activities for 
Korea should--
          (1) include participation by students from throughout South 
        Korea, including proportional representation from areas outside 
        of Seoul;
          (2) attempt to include Korean students from a broad range of 
        educational institutions, including schools other than elite 
        universities;
          (3) broaden the Korean student emphasis beyond degree-seeking 
        graduate students, to include opportunities for one-year 
        nondegree study at United States campuses by pre-doctoral 
        Korean students; and
          (4) include a significant number of Korean students planning 
        to move into areas other than advanced research and university 
        teaching, such as those heading towards careers in government 
        service, media, law, and business.

SEC. 256. AUTHORIZING EAST TIMORESE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR GRADUATE STUDY.

  Section 237 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 
1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103-236) is amended by inserting ``graduate 
or'' after ``at the''.

SEC. 257. PUBLIC SAFETY AWARENESS IN STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS.

  With respect to the Department of State's support for study abroad 
programs, Congress--
          (1) encourages the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs 
        to support public safety awareness activities as part of such 
        programs; and
          (2) encourages the Bureau to continue supporting such 
        activities and urges special attention to public safety issues, 
        including road safety.

                    Subtitle D--Consular Authorities

SEC. 271. MACHINE READABLE VISAS.

  Section 140(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal 
Years 1994 and 1995 (8 U.S.C. 1351 note) is amended by adding at the 
end the following:
          ``(4) For each of the fiscal years 2004 and 2005, any amount 
        that exceeds $700,000,000 may be made available only if a 
        notification is submitted to Congress in accordance with the 
        procedures applicable to reprogramming notifications under 
        section 34 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 
        1956.''.

SEC. 272. PROCESSING OF VISA APPLICATIONS.

  (a) In General.--It shall be the policy of the Department of State to 
process each visa application from an alien classified as an immediate 
relative or as a K-1 nonimmigrant within 30 days of the receipt of all 
necessary documents from the applicant and the Department of Homeland 
Security. In the case of an immigrant visa application where the 
petitioner is a relative other than an immediate relative, it should be 
the policy of the Department to process such an application within 60 
days of the receipt of all necessary documents from the applicant and 
the Department of Homeland Security.
  (b) Definitions.--In this section:
          (1) Immediate relative.--The term ``immediate relative'' has 
        the meaning given the term in section 201(b)(2)(A)(i) of the 
        Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1151(b)(2)(A)(i)).
          (2) K-1 nonimmigrant.--The term ``K-1 nonimmigrant'' means a 
        nonimmigrant alien described in section 101(a)(15)(K)(i) of the 
        Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1101(a)(15)(K)(i)).

SEC. 273. STAFFING AT DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS.

  At least once every five years and pursuant to a process determined 
by the President for staffing at diplomatic missions and overseas 
constituent posts, the Secretary of State shall require each chief of 
mission to review every staff element under chief of mission authority, 
including staff from other executive agencies, and recommend approval 
or disapproval of each staff element. The Secretary of State shall 
submit an annual report concerning such reviews together with the 
Secretary's recommendations to the heads of all affected agencies and 
the Inspector General of the Department of State.

    TITLE III--ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE

SEC. 301. FELLOWSHIP OF HOPE PROGRAM.

  The Secretary of State is authorized to establish in the Department 
of State an exchange program to be designated the ``Fellowship of Hope 
Program''. The program shall provide for the exchange and assignment of 
government employees of designated countries to fellowship positions at 
the Department of State and reciprocal assignment of civil service and 
foreign service employees of the Department as fellows within the 
governments of foreign countries.

SEC. 302. CLAIMS FOR LOST PAY.

  Section 2 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act (22 U.S.C. 
2669) is amended--
          (1) at the end of subsection (o) by striking the period and 
        inserting ``; and''; and
          (2) by inserting after subsection (o) the following new 
        subsection:
  ``(p) make administrative corrections or adjustments to an employee's 
pay, allowances, or differentials, resulting from mistakes or 
retroactive personnel actions, and to provide back pay and other 
categories of payments under the Back Pay Act as part of the settlement 
of administrative claims or grievances filed against the Department.''.

SEC. 303. OMBUDSMAN FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

  (a) Establishment.--There is established in the Office of the 
Secretary of State the position of Ombudsman. The position of Ombudsman 
shall be a career position within the Senior Executive Service. The 
Ombudsman shall report directly to the Secretary of State.
  (b) Duties.--At the discretion of the Secretary of State, the 
Ombudsman shall participate in meetings regarding the management of the 
Department in order to assure that all employees may contribute to the 
achievement of the Department's responsibilities and to promote the 
career interests of all employees.
  (c) Conforming Amendment.--Section 172 of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (22 U.S.C. 2664a) is 
amended--
          (1) by striking subsection (c); and
          (2) by redesignating subsection (d) as subsection (c).

SEC. 304. REPEAL OF RECERTIFICATION REQUIREMENT FOR SENIOR FOREIGN 
                    SERVICE.

  Section 305 of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3945) is 
amended by striking subsection (d).

SEC. 305. REPORT CONCERNING STATUS OF EMPLOYEES OF STATE DEPARTMENT.

  Not later than one year after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
the Secretary of State shall prepare and submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a report that analyzes and evaluates the 
merits of the conversion of employees of the Department of State to 
excepted service under chapter 21 of title 5, United States Code.

SEC. 306. HOME LEAVE.

  (a) Rest and Recuperation Travel.--Section 901(6) of the Foreign 
Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4081(6)) is amended by striking 
``unbroken by home leave'' both places it appears.
  (b) Required Leave in the United States.--Section 903(a) of the 
Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4083(a)) is amended by striking 
``18 months'' and inserting ``12 months''.

SEC. 307. INCREASED LIMITS APPLICABLE TO POST DIFFERENTIALS AND DANGER 
                    PAY ALLOWANCES.

  (a) Post Differentials.--Section 5925(a) of title 5, United States 
Code, is amended by striking ``25 percent'' in the third sentence and 
inserting ``35 percent''.
  (b) Danger Pay Allowances.--Section 5928 of title 5, United States 
Code, is amended by striking ``25 percent'' both places it appears and 
inserting ``35 percent''.
  (c) Criteria.--The Secretary shall inform the appropriate 
congressional committees of the criteria to be used in determinations 
of appropriate adjustments in post differentials under section 5925 of 
title 5, United States Code, and danger pay allowances under section 
5928 of title 5, United States Code.
  (d) Study and Report.--Two years after the date of the enactment of 
this Act, the Secretary of State shall conduct a study assessing the 
effect of the increases in post differentials and danger pay allowances 
made by the amendments in subsections (a) and (b) in filling ``hard-to-
fill'' positions. The Secretary shall submit a report of such study to 
the appropriate congressional committees.

SEC. 308. REGULATIONS REGARDING RETIREMENT CREDIT FOR GOVERNMENT 
                    SERVICE PERFORMED ABROAD.

  Section 321(f) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal 
Year 2003 (5 U.S.C. 8411 note; Public Law 107-228) is amended by 
striking ``regulations'' and inserting ``regulations, not later than 60 
days after the date of the enactment of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005,''.

SEC. 309. MINORITY RECRUITMENT.

  (a) Reporting Requirement.--Section 324 of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228) is amended by 
striking ``and April 1, 2004'' and inserting ``April 1, 2004, and April 
1, 2005''.
  (b) Use of Funds.--The provisions of section 325 of such Act shall 
apply to funds authorized by section 111(a)(1)(E) of this Act.
  (c) Conforming Amendment.--Section 325(c) of such Act is amended in 
the second sentence by striking ``two'' and inserting ``three''.

SEC. 310. MERITORIOUS STEP INCREASES.

  Section 406(b) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 3966(b)) 
is amended by striking ``receiving an increase in salary under 
subsection (a),''.

                 TITLE IV--INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

              Subtitle A--Basic Authorities and Activities

SEC. 401. RAISING THE CAP ON PEACEKEEPING CONTRIBUTIONS.

  Section 404(b)(2)(B) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 is amended by inserting after clause (iv) 
the following:
                          ``(v) For assessments made during calendar 
                        year 2005 and calendar year 2006, 27.10 
                        percent.''.

SEC. 402. REGARDING THE REENTRY OF THE UNITED STATES IN UNESCO.

  (a) Sense of Congress.--As the United States resumes membership in 
the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization 
(UNESCO), the President should--
          (1) appoint a United States Representative to the 
        Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) 
        who shall also serve as the United States Representative to 
        UNESCO;
          (2) take steps to ensure that more Americans are employed by 
        UNESCO, particularly for senior level positions;
          (3) request that the Secretary General of UNESCO create a 
        Deputy Director General position for Management or a comparable 
        position with high level managerial and administrative 
        responsibilities to be filled by an American;
          (4) insist that any increases in UNESCO's budget beyond the 
        level of zero nominal growth for the 2004-2005 biennium focus 
        primarily on the adoption of management and administrative 
        reforms; and
          (5) request that the Secretary General of UNESCO spend the 
        United States contribution to UNESCO for the last quarter of 
        calendar year 2003 on key education and science priorities of 
        the organization that will directly benefit United States 
        national interests.
  (b) Annual Assessment for United States Participation in UNESCO.--Of 
the amounts authorized to be appropriated by section 113(a), such sums 
as may be necessary for each of the fiscal years 2004 and 2005 are 
authorized to be available for the annual assessment for United States 
contributions to the regular budget of the United Nations Educational, 
Scientific, and Cultural Organization.

SEC. 403. UNESCO NATIONAL COMMISSION.

  (a) In General.--Section 3 of the Act of July 30, 1946, ``Providing 
for membership and participation by the United States in the United 
Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, and 
authorizing an appropriation therefor.'' (22 U.S.C. 287o) is amended to 
read as follows:
  ``Sec. 3. (a) In fulfillment of article VII of the constitution of 
the Organization, the Secretary of State shall establish a National 
Commission on Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Cooperation.
  ``(b) The National Commission shall be composed of not more than 35 
members appointed by the Secretary of State in consultation with the 
National Academy of Sciences, the National Science Foundation, the 
Secretary of Education, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, and 
the Secretary of the Interior. Members of the National Commission shall 
be representatives of nongovernmental organizations, academic 
institutions, and associations interested in education, scientific, and 
cultural matters. Periodically, the Secretary shall review and revise 
the entities represented on the National Commission in order to achieve 
a desirable rotation in representation. Except as otherwise provided, 
each member of the National Commission shall be appointed to a term of 
3 years. As designated by the Secretary of State at the time of 
appointment, of the members first appointed one-third shall be 
appointed for a term of 1 year, one-third shall be appointed for a term 
of 2 years, and one-third shall be appointed for a term of 3 years. Any 
member appointed to fill a vacancy occurring before the expiration of 
the term for which the member's predecessor was appointed shall be 
appointed only for the remainder of that term. A member may serve after 
the expiration of that member's term until a successor has taken 
office. No member may serve more than 2 consecutive terms. The 
Secretary of State shall designate a chair of the National Commission.
  ``(c) Members of the National Commission shall serve without pay. For 
attendance at the annual meeting, each member shall receive travel 
expenses in accordance with section 5703 of title 5, United States 
Code.
  ``(d) The National Commission shall meet at the call of the chair at 
least annually and such meetings may be through video conferencing or 
other electronic means. The National Commission shall designate an 
executive committee from among the members of the commission and may 
designate such other committees as may be necessary to carry out its 
duties under this Act.
  ``(e) Upon request of the National Commission, the Secretary of State 
may detail any of the personnel of the Department of State to the 
National Commission to assist it in carrying out its duties under this 
Act.''.
  (b) Conforming Changes.--Section 2 of the Act of July 30, 1946, 
``Providing for membership and participation by the United States in 
the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, 
and authorizing an appropriation therefor.'' (22 U.S.C. 287o) is 
amended by striking ``One of the representatives'' and all that follows 
through the end of such section.

SEC. 404. ORGANIZATION OF AMERICAN STATES (OAS) EMERGENCY FUND.

  Section 109(b)(3) of Public Law 104-114 (22 U.S.C. 6039(b)(3)) is 
amended by striking ``should provide not less than $5,000,000'' and 
inserting ``shall provide for each of the fiscal years 2004 and 2005 
not less than $500,000''.

SEC. 405. UNITED STATES EFFORTS REGARDING THE STATUS OF ISRAEL IN THE 
                    WESTERN EUROPEAN AND OTHERS GROUP AT THE UNITED 
                    NATIONS.

  (a) United States Efforts.--The Secretary of State and other 
appropriate officials of the United States Government should pursue an 
aggressive diplomatic effort and should take all necessary steps to 
ensure the extension and upgrade of Israel's membership in the Western 
European and Others Group at the United Nations.
  (b) Report.--Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act and semiannually thereafter through September 30, 2005, the 
Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate congressional 
committees a report on the steps taken by the United States pursuant to 
subsection (a) and progress in achieving the objectives of subsection 
(a).

           Subtitle B--United States International Leadership

SEC. 431. SHORT TITLE.

  This subtitle may be cited as the ``United States International 
Leadership Act of 2003''.

SEC. 432. FINDINGS.

  The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) International organizations and other multilateral 
        institutions play a key role in United States foreign policy 
        and serve key United States foreign policy objectives, such as 
        obligating all countries to freeze assets of terrorist groups, 
        preventing the proliferation of chemical, biological, and 
        nuclear weapons, and spearheading the fight to combat the 
        ravages of HIV/AIDS and other infectious diseases.
          (2) Decisions at many international organizations, including 
        membership and key positions, remain subject to determinations 
        made by regional groups where democratic states are often in 
        the minority and where there is intensive cooperation among 
        repressive regimes. As a result, the United States has often 
        been blocked in its attempts to take action in these 
        institutions to advance its goals and objectives, including at 
        the United Nations Human Rights Commission (where a 
        representative of Libya was elected as chairman and the United 
        States temporarily lost a seat).
          (3) In order to address these shortcomings, the United States 
        must actively work to improve the workings of international 
        organizations and multilateral institutions, particularly by 
        creating a caucus of democratic countries that will advance 
        United States interests. In the Second Ministerial Conference 
        of the Community of Democracies in Seoul, Korea, on November 
        10-20, 2002, numerous countries recommended working together as 
        a democracy caucus in international organizations such as the 
        United Nations and ensuring that international and regional 
        institutions develop and apply democratic standards for member 
        states.
          (4) In addition, the United States has shortchanged its 
        ability to influence these organizations by failing to obtain 
        enough support for positions that are congruent to or 
        consistent with United States objectives and has not done 
        enough to build expertise in the United States Government in 
        the area of multilateral diplomacy.

SEC. 433. ESTABLISHMENT OF A DEMOCRACY CAUCUS.

  (a) In General.--The President of the United States, acting through 
the Secretary of State and the relevant United States chiefs of 
mission, shall seek to establish a democracy caucus at the United 
Nations, the United Nations Human Rights Commission, the United Nations 
Conference on Disarmament, and at other broad-based international 
organizations.
  (b) Purposes of the Caucus.--A democracy caucus at an international 
organization should--
          (1) forge common positions, including, as appropriate, at the 
        ministerial level, on matters of concern before the 
        organization and work within and across regional lines to 
        promote agreed positions;
          (2) work to revise an increasingly outmoded system of 
        regional voting and decision making; and
          (3) set up a rotational leadership scheme to provide member 
        states an opportunity, for a set period of time, to serve as 
        the designated president of the caucus, responsible for serving 
        as its voice in each organization.

SEC. 434. ANNUAL DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS ON MULTILATERAL ISSUES.

  The Secretary of State, acting through the principal officers 
responsible for advising the Secretary on international organizations, 
shall ensure that a high-level delegation from the United States 
Government, on an annual basis, is sent to consult with key foreign 
governments in every region in order to promote the United States 
agenda at key international fora, such as the United Nations General 
Assembly, United Nations Human Rights Commission, the United Nations 
Education, Science, and Cultural Organization, and the International 
Whaling Commission.

SEC. 435. LEADERSHIP AND MEMBERSHIP OF INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

  (a) United States Policy.--The President, acting through the 
Secretary of State and the relevant United States chiefs of mission, 
shall use the voice, vote, and influence of the United States to--
          (1) where appropriate, reform the criteria for leadership 
        and, in appropriate cases for membership, at all United Nations 
        bodies and at other international organizations and 
        multilateral institutions to which the United States is a 
        member so as to exclude nations that violate the principles of 
        the specific organization;
          (2) make it a policy of the United Nations and other 
        international organizations and multilateral institutions, of 
        which the United States is a member, that a member state may 
        not stand in nomination or be in rotation for a leadership 
        position in such bodies if the member state is subject to 
        sanctions imposed by the United Nations Security Council; and
          (3) work to ensure that no member state stand in nomination 
        or be in rotation for a leadership position in such 
        organizations, or for membership of the United Nations Security 
        Council, if the member state is subject to a determination 
        under section 620A of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, 
        section 40 of the Arms Export Control Act, or section 6(j) of 
        the Export Administration Act.
  (b) Report to Congress.--Not later than 15 days after a country 
subject to to a determination under section 620A of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961, section 40 of the Arms Export Control Act, or 
section 6(j) of the Export Administration Act is selected for a 
leadership post in an international organization of which the United 
States is a member or a membership of the United Nations Security 
Council, the Secretary of State shall submit a report to the 
appropriate congressional committees on any steps taken pursuant to 
subsection (a)(3).

SEC. 436. INCREASED TRAINING IN MULTILATERAL DIPLOMACY.

  (a) Training Programs.--Section 708 of the Foreign Service Act of 
1980 (22 U.S.C. 4028) is amended by adding after subsection (b) the 
following new subsection:
  ``(c) Training in Multilateral Diplomacy.--
          ``(1) In general.--The Secretary shall establish a series of 
        training courses for officers of the Service, including 
        appropriate chiefs of mission, on the conduct of diplomacy at 
        international organizations and other multilateral institutions 
        and at broad-based multilateral negotiations of international 
        instruments.
          ``(2) Particular programs.--The Secretary shall ensure that 
        the training described in paragraph (1) is provided at various 
        stages of the career of members of the Service. In particular, 
        the Secretary shall ensure that after January 1, 2004--
                  ``(A) officers of the Service receive training on the 
                conduct of diplomacy at international organizations and 
                other multilateral institutions and at broad-based 
                multilateral negotiations of international instruments 
                as part of their training upon entry of the Service; 
                and
                  ``(B) officers of the Service, including chiefs of 
                mission, who are assigned to United States missions 
                representing the United States to international 
                organizations and other multilateral institutions or 
                who are assigned in Washington, D.C. to positions that 
                have as their primary responsibility formulation of 
                policy towards such organizations and institutions or 
                towards participation in broad-based multilateral 
                negotiations of international instruments receive 
                specialized training in the areas described in 
                paragraph (1) prior to beginning of service for such 
                assignment or, if receiving such training at that time 
                is not practical, within the first year of beginning 
                such assignment.''.
  (b) Training for Civil Service Employees.--The Secretary shall ensure 
that employees of the Department of State that are members of the civil 
service and that are assigned to positions described in section 708(c) 
of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (as amended by this subtitle) have 
training described in such section.
  (c) Conforming Amendments.--Section 708 of such Act is further 
amended--
          (1) in subsection (a) by striking ``(a) The'' and inserting 
        ``(a) Training on Human Rights.--The''; and
          (2) in subsection (b) by striking ``(b) The'' and inserting 
        ``(b) Training on Refugee Law and Religious Persecution.--
        The''.

SEC. 437. PROMOTING ASSIGNMENTS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

  (a) Promotions.--
          (1) In general.--Section 603(b) of the Foreign Service Act of 
        1980 (22 U.S.C. 4003) is amended by striking the period at the 
        end and inserting: ``, and shall consider whether the member of 
        the Service has served in a position whose primary 
        responsibility is to formulate policy towards or represent the 
        United States at an international organization, a multilateral 
        institution, or a broad-based multilateral negotiation of an 
        international instrument.''.
          (2) Effective date.--The amendment made by paragraph (1) 
        shall take effect January 1, 2010.
  (b) Establishment of a Multilateral Diplomacy Cone in the Foreign 
Service.--
          (1) Findings.--
                  (A) The Department of State maintains a number of 
                United States missions both within the United States 
                and abroad that are dedicated to representing the 
                United States to international organizations and 
                multilateral institutions, including missions in New 
                York, Brussels, Geneva, Rome, Montreal, Nairobi, 
                Vienna, and Paris, which will soon be responsible for 
                United States representation to UNESCO and OECD.
                  (B) In offices at the Harry S. Truman Building, the 
                Department maintains a significant number of positions 
                in bureaus that are either dedicated, or whose primary 
                responsibility is, to represent the United States to 
                such organizations and institutions or at multilateral 
                negotiations.
                  (C) Given the large number of positions in the United 
                States and abroad that are dedicated to multilateral 
                diplomacy, the Department of State may be well served 
                in developing persons with specialized skills necessary 
                to become experts in this unique form of diplomacy.
          (2) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
        enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the 
        appropriate congressional committees a report--
                  (A) evaluating whether a new cone should be 
                established for the Foreign Service that concentrates 
                on members of the Service that serve at international 
                organizations and multilateral institutions or are 
                primarily responsible for participation in broad-based 
                multilateral negotiations of international instruments; 
                and
                  (B) provides alternative mechanisms for achieving the 
                objective of developing a core group of United States 
                diplomats and other government employees who have 
                expertise and broad experience in conducting 
                multilateral diplomacy.

SEC. 438. IMPLEMENTATION AND ESTABLISHMENT OF OFFICE ON MULTILATERAL 
                    NEGOTIATIONS.

  (a) Establishment of Office.--The Secretary of State is authorized to 
establish, within the Bureau of International Organizational Affairs, 
an Office on Multilateral Negotiations to be headed by a Special 
Representative for Multilateral Negotiations (in this section referred 
to as the ``special representative'').
  (b) Appointment.--The special representative shall be appointed by 
the President with the advice and consent of the Senate and shall have 
the rank of Ambassador-at-Large. At the discretion of the President 
another official at the Department may serve as the special 
representative. The President may direct that the special 
representative report to the Assistant Secretary for International 
Organizations.
  (c) Staffing.--The special representative shall have a staff of 
foreign service and civil service officers skilled in multilateral 
diplomacy.
  (d) Duties.--The special representative shall have the following 
responsibilities:
          (1) In general.--The primary responsibility of the special 
        representative shall be to assist in the organization of, and 
        preparation for, United States participation in multilateral 
        negotiations, including the advocacy efforts undertaken by the 
        Department of State and other United States agencies.
          (2) Advisory role.--The special representative shall advise 
        the President and the Secretary of State, as appropriate, 
        regarding advocacy at international organizations and 
        multilateral institutions and negotiations and, in coordination 
        with the Assistant Secretary of State for International 
        Organizational Affairs, shall make recommendations regarding--
                  (A) effective strategies (and tactics) to achieve 
                United States policy objectives at multilateral 
                negotiations;
                  (B) the need for and timing of high level 
                intervention by the President, the Secretary of State, 
                the Deputy Secretary of State, and other United States 
                officials to secure support from key foreign government 
                officials for the United States position at such 
                organizations, institutions, and negotiations;
                  (C) the composition of United States delegations to 
                multilateral negotiations; and
                  (D) liaison with Congress, international 
                organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and the 
                private sector on matters affecting multilateral 
                negotiations.
          (3) Democracy caucus.--The special representative, in 
        coordination with the Assistant Secretary for International 
        Organizational Affairs, shall ensure the establishment of a 
        democracy caucus.
          (4) Annual diplomatic missions of multilateral issues.--The 
        special representative, in coordination with the Assistant 
        Secretary for International Organizational Affairs, shall 
        organize annual consultations between the principal officers 
        responsible for advising the Secretary of State on 
        international organizations and foreign governments to promote 
        the United States agenda at the United Nations General Assembly 
        and other key international fora (such as the United Nations 
        Human Rights Commission).
          (5) Leadership and membership of international 
        organizations.--The special representative, in coordination 
        with the Assistant Secretary of International Organizational 
        Affairs, shall direct the efforts of the United States 
        Government to reform the criteria for leadership and membership 
        of international organizations as described in section 435.
          (6) Participation in multilateral negotiations.--The special 
        representative, or members of the special representative's 
        staff, may, as required by the President or the Secretary of 
        State, serve on a United States delegation to any multilateral 
        negotiation.
  (e) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit a plan to establish a 
democracy caucus to the appropriate congressional committees. The 
report required by section 437(c) may be submitted together with the 
report under this subsection.

SEC. 439. SYNCHRONIZATION OF UNITED STATES CONTRIBUTIONS TO 
                    INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

  Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
the President shall submit a plan to the appropriate congressional 
committees on the implementation of section 404 of the Foreign 
Relations Authorization Act of 2003 (Public Law 107-228), (relating to 
a resumption by the United State of the payment of its full 
contribution to certain international organizations at the beginning of 
each calendar year).

      TITLE V--UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING ACTIVITIES

              Subtitle A--Basic Authorities and Activities

SEC. 501. MIDEAST RADIO AND TELEVISION NETWORK, INC.

  (a) The United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 
U.S.C. 6201 et seq.) is amended by adding after section 309 the 
following new section:

``SEC. 310. MIDEAST RADIO AND TELEVISION NETWORK, INC.

  ``(a) Authority.--Grants authorized under section 305 shall be 
available to make annual grants to Mideast Radio and Television 
Network, Inc. (hereinafter in this title also referred to as `Mideast 
Network') for the purpose of carrying out radio and television 
broadcasting to the Middle East region.
  ``(b) Function.--Mideast Network shall provide radio and television 
programming to the Middle East region consistent with the broadcasting 
standards and broadcasting principles set forth in section 303 of this 
Act.
  ``(c) Grant Agreement.--Any grant agreement or grants under this 
section shall be subject to the following limitations and restrictions:
          ``(1) The Board may not make any grant to the nonprofit 
        corporation, Mideast Network unless its certificate of 
        incorporation provides that--
                  ``(A) the Board of Directors of Mideast Radio and 
                Television Network, Inc. (hereinafter referred to as 
                `the Board') shall consist of the members of the 
                Broadcasting Board of Governors established under 
                section 304 and of no other members; and
                  ``(B) the Board shall make all major policy 
                determinations governing the operation of Mideast 
                Network and shall appoint and fix the compensation of 
                such managerial officers and employees of Mideast 
                Network as it considers necessary to carry out the 
                purposes of the grant provided under this title, except 
                that no officer or employee may be paid a salary or 
                other compensation in excess of the rate of pay payable 
                for Level IV of the Executive Schedule under section 
                5315 of title 5, United States Code.
          ``(2) Any grant agreement under this section shall require 
        that any contract entered into by Mideast Network shall specify 
        that obligations are assumed by Mideast Network and not the 
        United States Government.
          ``(3) Any grant agreement shall require that any lease 
        agreement entered into by Mideast Network shall be, to the 
        maximum extent possible, assignable to the United States 
        Government.
          ``(4) Grants awarded under this section shall be made 
        pursuant to a grant agreement which requires that grant funds 
        be used only for activities consistent with this section, and 
        that failure to comply with such requirements shall permit the 
        grant to be terminated without fiscal obligation to the United 
        States.
          ``(5) Duplication of language services and technical 
        operations between the Mideast Radio and Television Network, 
        Inc., (including Radio Sawa), RFE/RL, and the International 
        Broadcasting Bureau will be reduced to the extent appropriate, 
        as determined by the Board.
  ``(d) Not a Federal Agency or Instrumentality.--Nothing in this title 
may be construed to establish Mideast Network as a Federal agency or 
instrumentality, nor shall the officers or employees of Mideast Network 
be considered to be officers or employees of the United States 
Government.
  ``(e) Audit Authority.--
          ``(1) Such financial transactions of Mideast Network, as 
        relate to functions carried out under this section may be 
        audited by the General Accounting Office in accordance with 
        such principles and procedures and under such rules and 
        regulations as may be prescribed by the Comptroller General of 
        the United States. Any such audit shall be conducted at the 
        place or places where accounts of Mideast Network are normally 
        kept.
          ``(2) Representatives of the General Accounting Office shall 
        have access to all books, accounts, records, reports, files, 
        papers, and property belonging to or in use by Mideast Network 
        pertaining to such financial transactions as necessary to 
        facilitate an audit. Such representatives shall be afforded 
        full facilities for verifying transactions with any assets held 
        by depositories, fiscal agents, and custodians. All such books, 
        accounts, records, reports, files, papers, and property of 
        Mideast Network shall remain in the custody of Mideast Network.
          ``(3) Notwithstanding any other provisions of law, the 
        Inspector General of the Department of State is authorized to 
        exercise the authorities of the Inspector General Act with 
        respect to the Mideast Network.''.
  (b) Conforming Amendments.--
          (1) Section 305 of the United States International 
        Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6204) is amended--
                  (A) in subsection (a)(5) by striking ``308 and 309'' 
                and inserting ``308, 309, and 310'';
                  (B) in subsection (a)(6) by striking ``308 and 309'' 
                and inserting ``308, 309, and 310''; and
                  (C) in subsection (c) by striking ``308 and 309'' and 
                inserting ``308, 309, and 310''.
          (2) Section 307 of the United States International 
        Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6206) is amended--
                  (A) in subsection (a) by striking ``308 and 309'' and 
                inserting ``308, 309, and 310''; and
                  (B) in subsection (c) by adding ``Mideast Radio and 
                Television Network, Inc.,'' after ``Asia''.
          (3) Section 304(g) of the United States International 
        Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6203(g)) is amended by 
        striking ``and Radio Free Asia'' and inserting ``, Radio Free 
        Asia, and Mideast Radio and Television Network, Inc.''.
          (4) Section 8332(b)(11) of title 5, United States Code, is 
        amended by adding ``Mideast Radio and Television Network, 
        Inc.;'' after ``the Asia Foundation;''.

SEC. 502. IMPROVING SIGNAL DELIVERY TO CUBA.

  Section 3 of the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act (22 U.S.C. 1465a) is 
amended--
          (1) in subsection (c) by striking the second sentence and 
        inserting ``The Board is authorized to simultaneously utilize 
        other broadcasting transmission facilities, and other 
        frequencies, including the Amplitude Modulation (AM) Band (535 
        kHz to 1705 kHz), the Frequency Modulation (FM) Band, and the 
        Shortwave (SW) Band.'';
          (2) in subsection (c) in the third sentence by striking 
        ``Provided, That'' and all that follows before the period at 
        the end;
          (3) in subsection (d) by striking the last sentence;
          (4) by amending subsection (e) to read as follows:
  ``(e) Any program of United States Government radio broadcasts to 
Cuba authorized by this section shall be designated `Radio Marti 
program'.''; and
          (5) in subsection (f) by striking ``Voice of America''.

SEC. 503. REPORT CONCERNING EFFORTS TO COUNTER JAMMING OF BROADCASTS OF 
                    RADIO MARTI AND TV MARTI.

  Not later than 30 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
the Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate congressional 
committees a report providing the following information:
          (1) Specific steps taken to increase the capabilities of 
        Radio Marti and TV Marti to ensure that broadcasts overcome 
        jamming by the Government of Cuba.
          (2) An evaluation and analysis of not less than 10 alternate 
        methods to counter jamming of radio and television broadcasts 
        including the following:
                  (A) Methods used to broadcast into Iraq involving a 
                C-130.
                  (B) Methods previously used to transmit into the 
                former Soviet Union and other Soviet bloc countries.
                  (C) Successful methods employed by non-United States 
                Government entities, such as those used by the Falun 
                Gong to overcome Chinese Government jamming and those 
                recently used by a Cuban exile group to transmit 
                television broadcasts into Cuba.

SEC. 504. PILOT PROGRAM FOR THE PROMOTION OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM IN THE 
                    UNITED STATES THROUGH UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL 
                    BROADCASTING.

  (a) Pilot Program.--The Broadcasting Board of Governors, in 
consultation with the Department of Commerce and other appropriate 
Federal, State, and local agencies, shall conduct a pilot program for 
the promotion of travel and tourism in the United States through United 
States international broadcasting, particularly to regional economies 
that have been affected by the decrease in tourism following the events 
of September 11, 2001.
  (b) Programming.--The pilot program shall devote regular programming 
to broadcasting information on localities of the United States with the 
purpose of promoting travel and tourism to regional economies heavily 
reliant on such tourism.
  (c) Report to Congress.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act, the Broadcasting Board of Governors shall 
submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report detailing 
the actions taken by the Board in carrying out this section.

SEC. 505. RADIO FREE ASIA BROADCASTS INTO NORTH KOREA.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) North Korea's development of nuclear weapons and missile 
        delivery systems poses one of the gravest security threats to 
        the United States in the world.
          (2) The Kim Jong Il regime in North Korea has one of the 
        worst human rights records in the world. On April 16, 2003, the 
        United Nations Commission on Human Rights passed a resolution, 
        ``expressing its deep concern about reports of systemic, 
        widespread and grave violations of human rights'' in North 
        Korea.
          (3) In order to ensure its survival, the Kim Jong Il regime 
        makes extensive efforts to control the flow of information in 
        North Korea.
          (4) In 2002, a survey found that five of twelve ``elite'' 
        defectors from North Korea had listened to Radio Free Asia.
          (5) Radio Free Asia broadcasts only 4 hours each day into 
        North Korea.
          (6) Many North Korean citizens lack radios capable of 
        receiving Radio Free Asia broadcasts.
  (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of the Congress that the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors should ensure that Radio Free Asia 
increases its broadcasting with respect to North Korea to 24 hours each 
day.
  (c) Report to Congress.--Not later than 90 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State, after consulting with 
other agencies of the United States Government, shall submit a report, 
in classified form, on specific measures currently being undertaken and 
measures necessary, including the provision of adequate radios, to 
maximize North Korean citizen access to Radio Free Asia and other 
foreign broadcasts to the Committee on International Relations and the 
Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of 
Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Select 
Committee on Intelligence of the Senate.

SEC. 506. PROHIBITION ON ELIMINATION OF INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING IN 
                    EASTERN EUROPE.

  During the 2 year period beginning on the date of the enactment of 
this Act, the Broadcasting Board of Governors may not eliminate foreign 
language broadcasting in any of the following languages: Bulgarian, 
Czech, Estonian, Hungarian, Latvian, Lithuanian, Georgian, Polish, 
Slovene, Slovak, Romanian, Croatian, Armenian, and Ukrainian.

                  Subtitle B--Global Internet Freedom

SEC. 521. SHORT TITLE.

   This subtitle may be cited as the ``Global Internet Freedom Act of 
2003''.

SEC. 522. FINDINGS.

  The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) Freedom of speech, freedom of the press, and freedom of 
        association are fundamental characteristics of a free society. 
        The first amendment to the Constitution of the United States 
        guarantees that ``Congress shall make no law . . . abridging 
        the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the 
        people peaceably to assemble.'' These constitutional provisions 
        guarantee the rights of Americans to communicate and associate 
        with one another without restriction, including unfettered 
        communication and association via the Internet. Article 19 of 
        the United Nation's Universal Declaration of Human Rights 
        explicitly guarantees the freedom to ``receive and impart 
        information and ideas through any media and regardless of 
        frontiers''.
          (2) All people have the right to communicate freely with 
        others, and to have unrestricted access to news and 
        information, on the Internet.
          (3) With nearly 10 percent of the world's population now 
        online, and more gaining access each day, the Internet stands 
        to become the most powerful engine for democratization and the 
        free exchange of ideas ever invented.
          (4) The governments of Burma, Cuba, Laos, North Korea, the 
        People's Republic of China, Saudi Arabia, Syria, and Vietnam, 
        among others, are taking active measures to keep their citizens 
        from freely accessing the Internet and obtaining international 
        political, religious, and economic news and information.
          (5) The Voice of America and Radio Free Asia, as well as 
        hundreds of news sources with an Internet presence, are 
        routinely being jammed by repressive governments.
          (6) Since the 1940s, the United States has deployed anti-
        jamming technologies to make Voice of America and other United 
        States Government sponsored broadcasting available to people in 
        nations with governments that seek to block news and 
        information.
          (7) The United States Government has thus far commenced only 
        modest steps to fund and deploy technologies to defeat Internet 
        censorship.
          (8) The success of United States policy in support of freedom 
        of speech, press, and association requires continued efforts to 
        defeat totalitarian and authoritarian controls on news and 
        information over the Internet.

SEC. 523. PURPOSES.

   The purposes of this subtitle are--
          (1) to adopt an effective and robust global Internet freedom 
        policy;
          (2) to establish an office within the Broadcasting Board of 
        Governors with the sole mission of countering Internet jamming 
        and blocking by utilizing available anti-jamming technology;
          (3) to expedite the development and deployment of technology 
        to protect Internet freedom around the world; and
          (4) to bring to bear the pressure of the free world on 
        repressive governments guilty of Internet censorship and the 
        intimidation and persecution of their citizens who use the 
        Internet.

SEC. 524. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES TO DEFEAT INTERNET 
                    JAMMING AND CENSORSHIP.

  (a) Establishment of Office of Global Internet Freedom.--The 
Broadcasting Board of Governors shall establish an Office of Global 
Internet Freedom (hereinafter in this subtitle referred to as the 
``Office''). The Office shall develop and implement a comprehensive 
global strategy to combat state-sponsored and state-directed Internet 
jamming and persecution of those who use the Internet.
  (b) Cooperation of Other Federal Departments and Agencies.--Each 
department and agency of the United States Government shall cooperate 
fully with, and assist in the implementation of, the strategy developed 
by the Office and shall make such resources and information available 
to the Office as is necessary to the achievement of the purposes of 
this subtitle.
  (c) Cooperation with Department of State.--The Office shall assist 
the Secretary of State in preparing portions of the country reports on 
human rights practices that address Internet accessibility.
  (d) Report to Congress.--Nine months after the date of the enactment 
of this Act, the Broadcasting Board of Governors shall submit to the 
Congress a report on the status of foreign government interference with 
Internet use and of efforts by the United States to counter such 
interference. The report shall list the countries that pursue policies 
of Internet censorship, blocking, and other abuses; provide information 
concerning the government agencies or quasi-governmental organizations 
that implement Internet censorship; and describe with the greatest 
particularity practicable the technological means by which such 
blocking and other abuses are accomplished. In the discretion of the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors, such report may be submitted in both a 
classified and nonclassified version. One year after the date of 
submission of such report, the Office shall submit a second report.
  (e) Limitation on Authority.--Nothing in this subtitle shall be 
interpreted to authorize any action by the United States to interfere 
with foreign national censorship in furtherance of legitimate law 
enforcement aims consistent with the Universal Declaration of Human 
Rights.

 Subtitle C--Reorganization of United States International Broadcasting

SEC. 531. ESTABLISHMENT OF UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING 
                    AGENCY.

  (a) In General.--Section 304 of the United States International 
Broadcasting Act of 1994 (22 U.S.C. 6203) is amended to read as 
follows:

``SEC. 304. ESTABLISHMENT OF UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING 
                    AGENCY.

  ``(a) Establishment.--There is established as an independent agency 
in the executive branch the United States International Broadcasting 
Agency (hereinafter in this Act referred to as the `Agency').
  ``(b) Board of Governors of the Agency.--
          ``(1) Head of agency.--The Agency shall be headed by the 
        Board of Governors of the United States International 
        Broadcasting Agency (hereinafter in this Act referred to as the 
        `Board of Governors').
          ``(2) Authorities and functions.--The Board of Goverors 
        shall--
                  ``(A) carry out the authorities and functions of the 
                Agency under section 305; and
                  ``(B) be responsible for the exercise of all 
                authorities and powers and the discharge of all duties 
                and functions of the Agency.
          ``(3) Composition of the board of governors.--
                  ``(A) The Board of Governors shall consist of 9 
                members, as follows:
                          ``(i) Eight voting members who shall be 
                        appointed by the President, by and with the 
                        advice and consent of the Senate.
                          ``(ii) The Secretary of State who shall also 
                        be a voting member.
                  ``(B) The President shall appoint one member (other 
                than the Secretary of State) as Chair of the Board of 
                Governors, subject to the advice and consent of the 
                Senate.
                  ``(C) Exclusive of the Secretary of State, not more 
                than 4 of the members of the Board of Governors 
                appointed by the President shall be of the same 
                political party.
          ``(4) Term of office.--The term of office of each member of 
        the Board of Governors shall be three years, except that the 
        Secretary of State shall remain a member of the Board of 
        Governors during the Secretary's term of service. The President 
        shall appoint, by and with the advice and consent of the 
        Senate, board members to fill vacancies occurring prior to the 
        expiration of a term, in which case the members so appointed 
        shall serve for the remainder of such term. Any member whose 
        term has expired may serve until a successor has been appointed 
        and qualified. When there is no Secretary of State, the Acting 
        Secretary of State shall serve as a member of the board until a 
        Secretary is appointed.
          ``(5) Selection of board of governors.--Members of the Board 
        of Governors appointed by the President shall be citizens of 
        the United States who are not regular full-time employees of 
        the United States Government. Such members shall be selected by 
        the President from among Americans distinguished in the fields 
        of mass communications, print, broadcast media, or foreign 
        affairs.
          ``(6) Compensation.--Members of the Board of Governors, while 
        attending meetings of the board or while engaged in duties 
        relating to such meetings or in other activities of the board 
        pursuant to this section (including travel time) shall be 
        entitled to receive compensation equal to the daily equivalent 
        of the compensation prescribed for level IV of the Executive 
        Schedule under section 5315 of title 5, United States Code. 
        While away from their homes or regular places of business, 
        members of the board may be allowed travel expenses, including 
        per diem in lieu of subsistence, as authorized by law for 
        persons in the Government service employed intermittently. The 
        Secretary of State shall not be entitled to any compensation 
        under this title, but may be allowed travel expenses as 
        provided under this subsection.
          ``(7) Decisions.--Decisions of the Board of Governors shall 
        be made by majority vote, a quorum being present. A quorum 
        shall consist of 5 members.
          ``(8) Immunity from civil liability.--Notwithstanding any 
        other provision of law, any and all limitations on liability 
        that apply to the members of the Board of Governors also shall 
        apply to such members when acting in their capacities as 
        members of the boards of directors of RFE/RL, Incorporated and 
        Radio Free Asia.
  ``(c) Director.--
          ``(1) Appointment.--The Board of Governors shall appoint a 
        Director of the Agency. The Director shall receive basic pay at 
        the rate payable for level III of the Executive Schedule under 
        section 5314 of title 5, United States Code. The Director may 
        be removed through a majority vote of the Board.
          ``(2) Functions and duties.--The Director shall have the 
        following functions and duties:
                  ``(A) To exercise the authorities delegated by the 
                Board of Governors pursuant to section 305(b).
                  ``(B) To carry out all broadcasting activities 
                conducted pursuant to this title, the Radio 
                Broadcasting to Cuba Act, and the Television 
                Broadcasting to Cuba Act.
                  ``(C) To examine and make recommendations to the 
                Board of Governors on long-term strategies for the 
                future of international broadcasting, including the use 
                of new technologies.
                  ``(D) To review engineering activities to ensure that 
                all broadcasting elements receive the highest quality 
                and cost-effective delivery services.
                  ``(E) To procure supplies, services, and other 
                personal property to carry out the functions of the 
                Agency.
                  ``(F) To obligate and expend, for official reception 
                and representation expenses, such amounts as may be 
                made available through appropriations.
                  ``(G) To provide for the use of United States 
                Government transmitter capacity for relay of 
                broadcasting by grantees.
                  ``(H) To procure temporary and intermittent personal 
                services to the same extent as is authorized by section 
                3109 of title 5, United States Code, at rates not to 
                exceed the daily equivalent of the rate provided for 
                positions classified above grade GS-15 of the General 
                Schedule under section 5108 of title 5, United States 
                Code.
                  ``(I) To procure for the Agency, pursuant to section 
                1535 of title 31, United States Code goods and services 
                from other departments or agencies.
                  ``(J) To the extent funds are available, to lease 
                space and acquire personal property for the Agency.
  ``(d) Inspector General Authorities.--
          ``(1) In general.--The Inspector General of the Department of 
        State shall exercise the same authorities with respect to the 
        Agency as the Inspector General exercises under the Inspector 
        General Act of 1978 and section 209 of the Foreign Service Act 
        of 1980 with respect to the Department of State.
          ``(2) Respect for journalistic integrity of broadcasters.--
        The Inspector General of the Department of State and the 
        Foreign Service shall respect the journalistic integrity of all 
        the broadcasters covered by this title and may not evaluate the 
        philosophical or political perspectives reflected in the 
        content of broadcasts.''.
  (b) Retention of Existing Board Members.--The members of the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors appointed by the President pursuant to 
section 304 of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 
on the day before the effective date of this title and holding office 
as of that date may serve the remainder of their terms of office as 
members of the Board of Governors established under section 304(b) of 
the United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994, as amended by 
subsection (a) of this section, without reappointment, or if their term 
has expired may serve until a successor is appointed and qualified.

SEC. 532. AUTHORITIES AND FUNCTIONS OF THE AGENCY.

  Section 305 of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 
1994 (22 U.S.C. 6204) is amended to read as follows:

``SEC. 305. AUTHORITIES AND FUNCTIONS OF THE AGENCY.

  ``(a) The Agency shall have the following authorities and functions:
          ``(1) To supervise all broadcasting activities conducted 
        pursuant to this title, the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act, and 
        the Television Broadcasting to Cuba Act.
          ``(2) To review and evaluate the mission and operation of, 
        and to assess the quality, effectiveness, and professional 
        integrity of, all such activities within the context of the 
        broad foreign policy objectives of the United States and the 
        guiding principles and doctrines of the United States, 
        particularly freedom and democracy.
          ``(3) To develop strategic goals after reviewing human rights 
        reporting and other reliable assessments to assist in 
        determining programming and resource allocation.
          ``(4) To ensure that United States international broadcasting 
        is conducted in accordance with the standards and principles 
        contained in section 303.
          ``(5) To review, evaluate, and determine, at least annually, 
        after consultation with the Secretary of State, the addition or 
        deletion of language services.
          ``(6) To make and supervise grants for broadcasting and 
        related activities in accordance with sections 308 and 309.
          ``(7) To allocate funds appropriated for international 
        broadcasting activities among the various elements of the 
        Agency and grantees, subject to the limitations in sections 308 
        and 309 and subject to reprogramming notification requirements 
        in law for the reallocation of funds.
          ``(8) To undertake such studies as may be necessary to 
        identify areas in which broadcasting activities under its 
        authority could be made more efficient and economical.
          ``(9) To submit to the President and the Congress an annual 
        report which summarizes and evaluates activities under this 
        title, the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act, and the Television 
        Broadcasting to Cuba Act, placing special emphasis on the 
        assessment described in paragraph (2).
          ``(10) To make available in the annual report required by 
        paragraph (9) information on funds expended on administrative 
        and managerial services by the Agency and by grantees and the 
        steps the Agency has taken to reduce unnecessary overhead costs 
        for each of the broadcasting services.
          ``(11) To utilize the provisions of titles III, IV, V, VII, 
        VIII, IX, and X of the United States Information and 
        Educational Exchange Act of 1948, and section 6 of 
        Reorganization Plan Number 2 of 1977, as in effect on the day 
        before the effective date of title XIII of the Foreign Affairs 
        Agencies Consolidation Act of 1998, to the extent the Director 
        considers necessary in carrying out the provisions and purposes 
        of this title.
          ``(12) To utilize the authorities of any other statute, 
        reorganization plan, Executive order, regulation, agreement, 
        determination, or other official document or proceeding that 
        had been available to the Director of the United States 
        Information Agency, the Bureau, or the Board before the 
        effective date of title XIII of the Foreign Affairs 
        Consolidation Act of 1998 for carrying out the broadcasting 
        activities covered by this title.
  ``(b) Delegation of Authority.--The Board of Governors may delegate 
to the Director of the Agency, or any other officer or employee of the 
United States, the authorities provided in this section, except those 
authorities provided in paragraph (1), (2), (4), (5), (6), (7), or (9) 
of subsection (a).
  ``(c) Broadcasting Budgets.--The Director and the grantees identified 
in sections 308 and 309 shall submit proposed budgets to the Board. The 
Board shall forward its recommendations concerning the proposed budget 
for the Board and broadcasting activities under this title, the Radio 
Broadcasting to Cuba Act, and the Television Broadcasting to Cuba Act 
to the Office of Management and Budget.''.

SEC. 533. ROLE OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE.

  Section 306 of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 
1994 (22 U.S.C. 6205) is amended to read as follows:

``SEC. 306. ROLE OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE.

  ``To assist the Agency in carrying out its functions, the Secretary 
of State shall provide such information and guidance on foreign policy 
and public diplomacy issues to the Agency as the Secretary considers 
appropriate.''.

SEC. 534. ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS.

  The United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 is amended 
by striking section 307 and inserting the following new section:

``SEC. 307. ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS.

  ``(a) Officers and Employees.--The Board of Governors may appoint and 
fix the compensation of such officers and employees as may be necessary 
to carry out the functions of the Agency. Except as otherwise provided 
by law, such officers and employees shall be appointed in accordance 
with the civil service laws and their compensation shall be fixed in 
accordance with title 5, United States Code.
  ``(b) Experts and Consultants.--The Board of Governors, as may be 
provided in appropriation Acts, may obtain the services of experts and 
consultants in accordance with section 3109 of title 5, United States 
Code, and may compensate such experts and consultants at rates not to 
exceed the daily rate prescribed for level IV of the Executive Schedule 
under section 5315 of title 5, United States Code.
  ``(c) Acceptance of Voluntary Services.--
          ``(1) In general.--Notwithstanding section 1342 of title 31, 
        United States Code, the Board of Governors may accept, subject 
        to regulations issued by the Office of Personnel Management, 
        voluntary services if such services--
                  ``(A) are to be uncompensated; and
                  ``(B) are not used to displace any employee.
          ``(2) Treatment.--Any individual who provides voluntary 
        services under this section shall not be considered a Federal 
        employee for any purpose other than for purposes of chapter 81 
        of title 5, United States Code (relating to compensation for 
        injury) and sections 2671 through 2680 of title 28, United 
        States Code (relating to tort claims).
  ``(d) Delegation.--Except as otherwise provided in this Act, the 
Board of Governors may delegate any function to the Director and such 
other officers and employees of the Agency as the Board of Governors 
may designate, and may authorize such successive redelegations of such 
functions within the Agency as may be necessary or appropriate.
  ``(e) Contracts.--
          ``(1) In general.--Subject to the Federal Property and 
        Administrative Services Act of 1949 and other applicable 
        Federal law, the Board of Governors may make, enter into, and 
        perform such contracts, grants, leases, cooperative agreements, 
        and other similar transactions with Federal or other public 
        agencies (including State and local governments) and private 
        organizations and persons, and to make such payments, by way of 
        advance or reimbursement, as the Board of Governors may 
        determine necessary or appropriate to carry out functions of 
        the Board of Governors or the Agency.
          ``(2) Appropriation authority required.--No authority to 
        enter into contracts or to make payments under this title shall 
        be effective except to such extent or in such amounts as are 
        provided in advance under appropriation Acts.
  ``(f) Regulations.--The Director may prescribe such rules and 
regulations as the Board of Governors considers necessary or 
appropriate to administer and manage the functions of the Agency, in 
accordance with chapter 5 of title 5, United States Code.
  ``(g) Seal.--The Director shall cause a seal of office to be made for 
the Agency of such design as the Board of Governors shall approve. 
Judicial notice shall be taken of such seal.''.

SEC. 535. BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS AND INTERNATIONAL 
                    BROADCASTING BUREAU.

  The Broadcasting Board of Governors and the International 
Broadcasting Bureau are abolished.

SEC. 536. TRANSITION.

  (a) Transfer of Functions.--Except as otherwise provided in this 
subtitle or an amendment made by this subtitle, all functions that on 
the day before the effective date specified in section 540 are 
authorized to be performed by the Broadcasting Board of Governors and 
the International Broadcasting Bureau and any officer, employee, or 
component of such entities, under any statute, reorganization plan, 
Executive order, or other provision of law, are transferred to the 
Agency established under this title effective on that date.
  (b) Determination of Certain Functions.--If necessary, the Office of 
Management and Budget shall make any determination of the functions 
that are transferred under this title.
  (c) Transition Provisions.--
          (1) Exercise of authorities.--Except as otherwise provided by 
        law, the Board of Governors may, for purposes of performing a 
        function that is transferred to the Agency by this title, 
        exercise all authorities under any other provision of law that 
        were available with respect to the performance of that function 
        to the official responsible for the performance of that 
        function on the day before the effective date specified in 
        section 540.
          (2) Authorities to wind up affairs.--
                  (A) The Director of the Office of Management and 
                Budget may take such actions as the Director of the 
                Office of Management and Budget considers necessary to 
                wind up any outstanding affairs of the Broadcasting 
                Board of Governors and the International Broadcasting 
                Bureau associated with the functions that are 
                transferred pursuant to subsection (a).
                  (B) The Director of the Office of Management and 
                Budget may take such actions as the Director of the 
                Office of Management and Budget considers necessary to 
                wind up any outstanding affairs of the Broadcasting 
                Board of Governors and the International Broadcasting 
                Bureau associated with the functions that are 
                transferred pursuant to subsection (a).
          (3) Transfer of assets.--Any property, records, unexpended 
        balances of appropriations, allocations, and other funds 
        employed, used, held, available, or to be made available in 
        connection with a function transferred to the Agency by this 
        Act are transferred on the effective date specified in section 
        540.

SEC. 537. CONFORMING AMENDMENTS.

  (a) United States International Broadcasting Act of 1994.--The United 
States International Broadcasting Act of 1994 is amended as follows:
          (1) Section 308 (22 U.S.C. 6207) is amended--
                  (A) in subsection (a)--
                          (i) by striking ``The Board'' and inserting 
                        ``The Agency''; and
                          (ii) in paragraph (1) by striking 
                        ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'' and 
                        inserting ``Board Governors of the 
                        International Broadcasting Agency'';
                  (B) in subsection (b)--
                          (i) by striking paragraph (2);
                          (ii) by striking ``(1)''; and
                          (iii) by striking ``Board'' both places it 
                        appears and inserting ``Agency'';
                  (C) in subsections (c), (d), (g), (h), and (i) by 
                striking ``Board'' each place it appears and inserting 
                ``Agency'';
                  (D) in subsection (g)(4) by striking ``International 
                Broadcasting Bureau'' and inserting ``Agency''; and
                  (E) in subsections (i) and (j) by striking ``and the 
                Foreign Service'' each place it appears.
          (2) Section 309 (22 U.S.C. 6208) is amended--
                  (A) in subsection (c)(1) by striking ``Board'' both 
                places it appears and inserting ``Agency'';
                  (B) by striking subsection (e);
                  (C) in subsections (f) and (g) by striking ``Board'' 
                each place it appears and inserting ``Agency''; and
                  (D) in subsection (g) by striking ``Chairman of the 
                Board'' and inserting ``Agency''.
          (3) By striking section 311 (22 U.S.C. 6210).
          (4) In section 313 (22 U.S.C. 6212) by striking ``Board'' and 
        inserting ``Agency''.
          (5) In section 314 (22 U.S.C. 6213) by striking paragraph 
        (2).
          (6) By striking section 315.
  (b) Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (LIBERTAD) Act of 1996.--
Section 107 of the Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (LIBERTAD) 
Act of 1996 (22 U.S.C. 6037) is amended in subsections (a) and (b) by 
striking ``International Broadcasting Bureau'' each place it appears 
and inserting ``United States International Broadcasting Agency''.
  (c) Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act.--The Radio Broadcasting to Cuba 
Act (22 U.S.C. 1465 et seq.) is amended as follows:
          (1) In section 3 (22 U.S.C. 1465a) as follows:
                  (A) In the section heading by striking ``BROADCASTING 
                BOARD OF GOVERNORS'' and inserting ``UNITED STATES 
                INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING AGENCY''.
                  (B) In subsection (a) by striking ``the `Board')'' 
                and inserting ``the `Agency')''.
                  (C) In subsections (a), (d), and (f) by striking 
                ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'' and inserting 
                ``United States International Broadcasting Agency''.
          (2) In section 4 (22 U.S.C. 1465b) as follows:
                  (A) In the first sentence by striking ``The'' and all 
                that follows through ``Bureau'' and inserting: ``The 
                Board of Governors of the United States International 
                Broadcasting Agency shall establish within the 
                Agency''.
                  (B) In the third sentence by striking ``Broadcasting 
                Board of Governors'' and inserting ``Board of Governors 
                of the United States International Broadcasting 
                Agency''.
                  (C) In the fourth sentence by striking ``Board of the 
                International Broadcasting Bureau'' and inserting 
                ``Board of Governors of the United States International 
                Broadcasting Agency''.
          (3) In section 5 (22 U.S.C. 1465c) as follows:
                  (A) In subsection (b) by striking ``Broadcasting 
                Board of Governors'' and inserting ``Board of Governors 
                of the United States International Broadcasting 
                Agency''.
                  (B) By striking ``Board'' each place it appears and 
                inserting ``Advisory Board''.
          (4) In section 6 (22 U.S.C. 1465d) as follows:
                  (A) In subsection (a) by striking ``Broadcasting 
                Board of Governors'' and inserting ``United States 
                International Broadcasting Agency'' and by striking 
                ``Board'' and inserting ``Board of Directors of the 
                United States International Broadcasting Agency''.
                  (B) In subsection (b) by striking ``Board'' and 
                inserting ``United States International Broadcasting 
                Agency''.
          (5) In section 7 (22 U.S.C. 1465e) by striking ``Board'' in 
        subsections (b) and (d) and inserting ``United States 
        International Broadcasting Agency''.
          (6) In section 8(a) (22 U.S.C. 1465f(a)), by striking 
        ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'' and inserting ``United 
        States International Broadcasting Agency''.
  (d) Television Broadcasting to Cuba Act.--The Television Broadcasting 
to Cuba Act (22 U.S.C. 1465aa note) is amended as follows:
          (1) Section 243(a) (22 U.S.C. 1465bb) is amended by striking 
        ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'' and inserting ``United 
        States International Broadcasting Agency''.
          (2) Section 244 (22 U.S.C. 1465cc) is amended as follows:
                  (A) In subsection (a) by amending the third sentence 
                to read as follows: ``The Board of Governors of the 
                United States International Broadcasting Agency shall 
                appoint a head of the Service who shall report directly 
                to the Board of Governors.''.
                  (B) In subsection (b) by striking ``Board'' and 
                inserting ``United States International Broadcasting 
                Agency''.
                  (C) In subsection (c) by striking ``The Board'' and 
                inserting ``The Agency'' and by striking ``Board 
                determines'' and inserting ``Board of Governors of the 
                United States International Broadcasting Agency 
                determines''.
          (3) In section 246 (22 U.S.C. 1465dd) by striking ``United 
        States Information Agency'' and inserting ``United States 
        International Broadcasting Agency'' and by striking ``Board'' 
        and inserting ``Board of Governors of the United States 
        International Broadcasting Agency''.
  (e) United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948.--
The United States Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (22 
U.S.C. 1431 et seq.) is amended--
          (1) in section 505 (22 U.S.C. 1464a), by striking 
        ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'' each place it appears and 
        inserting ``United States International Broadcasting Agency''; 
        and
          (2) in section 506(c) (22 U.S.C. 1464b(c))--
                  (A) by striking ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'' 
                and inserting ``United States International 
                Broadcasting Agency''; and
                  (B) by striking ``Board'' and inserting ``Agency''.
  (f) Foreign Service Act of 1980.--The Foreign Service Act of 1980 (22 
U.S.C. 3901 et seq.) is amended--
          (1) in section 202(a)(1) (22 U.S.C. 3922(a)(1)), by striking 
        ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'' and inserting ``United 
        States International Broadcasting Agency'';
          (2) in section 210 (22 U.S.C. 3930), by striking 
        ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'' and inserting ``United 
        States International Broadcasting Agency'';
          (3) in section 1003(a) (22 U.S.C. 4103(a)), by striking 
        ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'' and inserting ``United 
        States International Broadcasting Agency''; and
          (4) in section 1101(c) (22 U.S.C. 4131(c)), by striking 
        ``Broadcasting Board of Governors,'' and inserting ``the United 
        States International Broadcasting Agency,''.
  (g) State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956.--The State 
Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2651a et seq.) is 
amended--
          (1) in section 23(a) (22 U.S.C. 2695(a)), by striking 
        ``Broadcasting Board of Governors,'' and inserting ``United 
        States International Broadcasting Agency,'';
          (2) in section 25(f) (22 U.S.C. 2697(f))--
                  (A) by striking ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'' 
                and inserting ``United States International 
                Broadcasting Agency''; and
                  (B) by striking ``the Board and the Agency'' and 
                inserting ``their respective agencies'';
          (3) in section 26(b) (22 U.S.C. 2698(b))--
                  (A) by striking `Broadcasting Board of Governors,'' 
                and inserting ``United States International 
                Broadcasting Agency''; and
                  (B) by striking ``the Board and the Agency'' and 
                inserting ``their respective agencies''; and
          (4) in section 32 (22 U.S.C. 2704), by striking 
        ``Broadcasting Board of Governors'' and inserting ``United 
        States International Broadcasting Agency''.
  (h) Title 5, United States Code.--
          (1) Section 5314 of title 5, United States Code, is amended 
        by adding at the end the following: ``Director, United States 
        International Broadcasting Agency.''.
          (2) Section 5315 of title 5, United States Code, is amended 
        by striking ``Director of the International Broadcasting 
        Bureau.''.

SEC. 538. REFERENCES.

  Except as otherwise provided in this subtitle or an amendment made by 
this subtitle, any reference in any statute, reorganization plan, 
Executive order, regulation, agreement, determination, or other 
official document or proceeding to the Broadcasting Board of Governors 
and the International Broadcasting Bureau or any other officer or 
employee of the Broadcasting Board of Governors or the International 
Broadcasting Bureau shall be deemed to refer to the United States 
International Broadcasting Agency or the Board of Governors of the 
United States International Broadcasting Agency established under this 
subtitle.

SEC. 539. BROADCASTING STANDARDS.

  Section 303(a) of the United States International Broadcasting Act of 
1994 (22 U.S.C. 6202(a)) is amended--
          (1) in paragraph (6) by striking ``and'';
          (2) in paragraph (8) by striking the period and inserting ``; 
        and''; and
          (3) by adding after paragraph (8) the following new 
        paragraph:
          ``(9) seek to ensure that resources are allocated to 
        broadcasts directed at people whose governments deny freedom of 
        expression or who are otherwise in special need of honest and 
        professional broadcasting, commensurate with the need for such 
        broadcasts.''.

SEC. 540. EFFECTIVE DATE.

  Except as otherwise provided, this subtitle and the amendments made 
by this subtitle shall take effect on the last day of the 6-month 
period beginning on the date of the enactment of this Act.

             TITLE VI--INTERNATIONAL FREE MEDIA ACT OF 2003

SEC. 601. SHORT TITLE.

  This title may be cited as the ``International Free Media Act of 
2003''.

SEC. 602. DEFINITIONS.

  In this title, the term ``free media'' means individuals or 
organizations engaged in the gathering and distribution of news and 
information free of direct or indirect governmental control.

SEC. 603. FINDINGS.

  The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) Freedom of speech and freedom of the press are 
        fundamental human rights enshrined in international law.
          (2) The United States has a national interest in promoting 
        these freedoms by supporting free media abroad, which is 
        essential to the development of free and democratic societies 
        consistent with our own.
          (3) Free media is undermined, endangered, or nonexistent in 
        many repressive and transitional societies around the world, 
        including in Eurasia, Africa, and the Middle East.
          (4) Free media is suppressed by foreign governments by a 
        variety of means, including state censorship, legal 
        restriction, financial pressure, and physical intimidation.
          (5) Unprofessional and unethical media that violate widely 
        accepted standards of professional journalism and editorial 
        practice compromises the ability of a free media to contribute 
        to open, fair, and constructive democratic debate.
          (6) Unprofessional and unethical media includes media that 
        violate the standards set in the International Covenant on 
        Civil and Political Rights, which includes article 20, section 
        2 of the Covenant which states that ``Any advocacy of national, 
        racial, or religious hatred that constitutes incitement to 
        discrimination, hostility, or violence shall be prohibited by 
        law.''.
          (7) Individuals lacking access to a plurality of free media 
        are vulnerable to misinformation and propaganda and are 
        potentially more likely to adopt anti-American views.
          (8) Foreign governments have a responsibility to actively and 
        publicly discourage and rebut unprofessional and unethical 
        media while respecting journalistic integrity and editorial 
        independence.
          (9) Past and continuing United States Government efforts to 
        promote free media through training and technical support have 
        advanced United States national interests by contributing to 
        the promotion of human rights and democracy worldwide.
          (10) Support for free media must be an integral part of 
        United States foreign policy, including public diplomacy and 
        United States international broadcasting, and should be 
        coordinated across government agencies and with international, 
        bilateral, and private donor organizations toward achieving the 
        shared goal of developing professional, ethical, diversified, 
        sustainable, independent, indigenous media worldwide.

SEC. 604. STATEMENTS OF POLICY.

  It shall be the policy of the United States, acting through the 
Secretary of State, to--
          (1) make the promotion of press freedoms and free media 
        worldwide a priority of United States foreign policy and an 
        integral component of United States public diplomacy;
          (2) respect the journalistic integrity and editorial 
        independence of free media worldwide;
          (3) use widely accepted standards for professional and 
        ethical journalistic and editorial practices in assessing 
        international media; and
          (4) discourage incitement to discrimination, hostility, or 
        violence, based on nationality, race, or religion, as described 
        in article 20, section 2, of the International Covenant on 
        Civil and Political Rights, and develop a strategy to respond 
        to it.

SEC. 605. COORDINATOR FOR INTERNATIONAL FREE MEDIA.

  (a) Establishment.--There is established within the Department of 
State a Coordinator for International Free Media (in this section 
referred to as the ``Coordinator''). At the discretion of the President 
another official at the Department of State may serve as the 
Coordinator.
  (b) Appointment of Coordinator.--The Coordinator shall be appointed 
by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate.
  (c) Duties.--The principal duties of the Coordinator shall be the 
promotion of international press freedoms and free media by--
          (1) coordinating United States government policies, programs, 
        and projects concerning international press freedoms and free 
        media;
          (2) in consultation with appropriate agencies of the United 
        States Government and national and international organizations, 
        monitoring and assessing the status of free media and 
        government controlled sources of information, including for 
        incitement of national, racial, or religious hatred that 
        constitutes incitement to discrimination, hostility, or 
        violence, as described in article 20 of the International 
        Covenant on Civil and Political Rights;
          (3) promoting widely accepted standards of professional and 
        ethical journalism and editorial practices;
          (4) discouraging media and government controlled sources of 
        information from advocating national, racial, or religious 
        hatred that constitutes incitement to discrimination, 
        hostility, or violence consistent with article 20, section 2 of 
        the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights;
          (5) reporting foreign media that advocates national, racial, 
        or religious hatred that constitutes incitement to 
        discrimination, hostility, or violence consistent with article 
        20, section 2, of the International Covenant on Civil and 
        Political Rights and making available to the public and to the 
        United States Agency for International Broadcasting 
        translations of such media to the extent practicable;
          (6) promoting the journalistic integrity and editorial 
        independence of free media worldwide;
          (7) advising the President and the Secretary of State 
        regarding matters of international press freedoms and free 
        media;
          (8) representing the United States in matters and cases 
        relevant to international press freedoms and free media;
          (9) assisting the Secretary of State in preparing the 
        portions of the Department of State country reports on human 
        rights that relate to international press freedoms and free 
        media and incitement to acts of discrimination;
          (10) consulting with the Broadcasting Board of Governors and 
        the United States Agency for International Development for the 
        purpose of promoting free media through training of 
        international journalists, producers, editors, and media 
        managers; and
          (11) administering the International Free Media Fund 
        (established in section 607) in consultation with the United 
        States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy and 
        International Media.
  (d) Assessment Factors.--In making an assessment of media within 
individual countries pursuant to subsection (c)(2), the Coordinator 
shall take into account--
          (1) the number and diversity of media;
          (2) access to and consumption of media by populations;
          (3) the extent of direct or indirect government ownership, 
        control, or censorship of media outlets;
          (4) the financial viability and profitability of free media;
          (5) the extent to which journalists, editors, and media 
        managers adhere to widely accepted standards for professional 
        and ethical journalism;
          (6) domestic laws addressing press freedoms;
          (7) instances in which the media and government-controlled 
        sources of information have incited discrimination, hostility, 
        or violence consistent with article 20, section 2 of the 
        International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights;
          (8) physical threats, intimidation or inappropriate pressure 
        by government on free media;
          (9) the number of journalists, editors, producers, and media 
        managers receiving training from programs of the Department of 
        State, the Broadcasting Board of Governors, grantees of the 
        United States Agency for International Development, or other 
        organizations qualified to provide such training; and
          (10) the activity of local and international nongovernmental 
        organizations promoting press freedoms and free media and 
        obstacles to their activity.
  (e) Consultation Requirement.--The Coordinator shall consult with 
United States public affairs officers and other United States foreign 
mission personnel directly engaged in interacting with indigenous media 
in carrying out the duties specified in subsection (c).
  (f) Determination.--The Coordinator shall determine, and annually 
report to the appropriate congressional committees, whether there is a 
pattern of government-controlled information that constitutes 
incitement (as described in article 20 of the International Covenant on 
Civil and Political Rights) and that endangers United States citizens 
or nationals, impairs relations between the United States and the 
foreign government, or constitutes incitement to national, racial, or 
religious discrimination, hostility, or violence. The Coordinator shall 
specify the governments engaged in such practices and examples of such 
incitement and propaganda.
  (g) Funding.--The Secretary of State shall ensure that the 
Coordinator has adequate staff and funding for the conduct of 
investigations, the administration of the International Free Media 
Fund, necessary travel, and others activities necessary to carry out 
the provisions of this section.

SEC. 606. UNITED STATES ADVISORY COMMISSION ON PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND 
                    INTERNATIONAL MEDIA.

  (a) Establishment.--Section 604(a)(1) of the United States 
Information and Educational Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1469) is 
amended to read as follows:
          ``(1) There is established an advisory commission to be known 
        as the United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy 
        and International Media.''.
  (b) Duties and Responsibilities.--Section 604(c) of the United States 
Information and Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1469) is amended by 
adding at the end the following:
          ``(5) The Commission shall--
                  ``(A) advise the Coordinator for International Free 
                Media on issues relating to the promotion of 
                international press freedoms and free media;
                  ``(B) assist the Coordinator for International Free 
                Media in monitoring and assessing the status of free 
                media worldwide;
                  ``(C) consult with the Coordinator on the 
                administration of the International Free Media Fund; 
                and
                  ``(D) make policy recommendations to the President, 
                the Secretary of State, and Congress with respect to 
                matters involving international press freedoms and free 
                media.''.
  (c) References.--Except as otherwise provided in this section or an 
amendment made by this section, any reference in any statute, 
reorganization plan, Executive order, regulation, agreement, 
determination, or other official document or proceeding to the United 
States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy or any other officer or 
employee of the United States Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy 
shall be deemed to refer to the United States Advisory Commission on 
Public Diplomacy and International Media established under this 
section.---

SEC. 607. INTERNATIONAL FREE MEDIA FUND.

  (a) Establishment.--There is established an International Free Media 
Fund (in this section referred to as the ``Fund'') at the Department of 
State.
  (b) Purposes.--The purposes of the Fund shall be--
          (1) to promote the development of free and independent media 
        worldwide which adhere to widely accepted standards of 
        professional and ethical journalism and editorial practice; and
          (2) to complement current efforts by the Department of State, 
        the United States Agency for International Development, the 
        Broadcasting Board of Governors, and other agencies of the 
        United States Government to support free and independent media 
        worldwide.
  (c) Authorization of Appropriations.--In addition to amounts 
otherwise authorized to be appropriated to carry out the purposes 
specified in subsection (b), there is authorized to be appropriated to 
the Fund $15,000,000 for fiscal year 2004. Such amounts are authorized 
to remain available until expended.
  (d) Nonapplicability of Other Laws.--Notwithstanding any other 
provision of law, funds appropriated pursuant to subsection (c) may be 
used for the purposes of this section.
  (e) Administration.--
          (1) The Fund shall be administered by the Coordinator in 
        consultation with the Commission.
          (2) Activities and assistance financed through the Fund may 
        be carried out through grants, contracts, technical assistance, 
        and material support.
  (f) Eligible Organizations, Programs, and Projects.--Amounts in the 
Fund may be used to carry out activities and provide assistance only 
for organizations, programs, and projects consistent with the purposes 
set forth in subsection (b).
  (g) Prohibitions.--Amounts in the Fund shall not be used to carry out 
activities or provide assistance to organizations, programs, or 
projects which advocate national, racial, or religious hatred that 
incites discrimination, hostility, or violence consistent with article 
20, section 2 of the International Covenant on Civil and Political 
Rights.
  (h) Assistance Criteria.--In administering the Fund, the Coordinator 
shall take into account--
          (1) the importance of providing assistance to organizations, 
        programs, and projects based on their proven or potential 
        contribution to the development of a free media environment 
        worldwide;
          (2) the importance of enabling free media to become 
        commercially viable and financially independent in the long 
        term; and
          (3) the importance of providing media personnel whose 
        organizations, programs, or projects receive assistance under 
        this section for training in professional and ethical 
        journalism, editorial practices, and media management by the 
        Department of State, the Broadcasting Board of Governors, 
        United States Agency for International Development grantees, or 
        other organizations qualified to provide such training.
  (i) Annual Reports.--Not later than January 31, of 2005 and in each 
subsequent year, the Coordinator shall publish an annual report on the 
activities of the Fund, which shall include a comprehensive and 
detailed description of the operations, activities, financial 
condition, and accomplishments under this section for the preceding 
fiscal year. The reports shall also include an assessment of whether 
the Fund should also provide loans and guarantees as an additional 
means to carry out the purposes of this title.
  (j) Consultation Requirements.--
          (1) The Coordinator shall consult with the State Department 
        official primarily responsible for developing and implementing 
        United States policy with respect to a country prior to 
        carrying out activities or providing assistance for such 
        country through the Fund.
          (2) Amounts in the Fund shall be used to carry out activities 
        or provide assistance on the basis of consultations among all 
        relevant United States Government agencies operating in the 
        country and with the approval of the chief of mission.

SEC. 608. FREE MEDIA PROMOTION ACTIVITY OF THE BROADCASTING BOARD OF 
                    GOVERNORS.

  (a) In General.--The Broadcasting Board of Governors shall make 
support for indigenous free media an integral part of its mission.
  (b) Affiliates.--The Broadcasting Board of Governors shall submit a 
report to the appropriate congressional committees on the prospects and 
strategy for cultivating affiliate relationships with free media in 
countries targeted for United States international broadcasting.
  (c) Training.--The Broadcasting Board of Governors shall enhance 
foreign journalist training programs in coordination with existing 
training programs administered by the Department of State and the 
United States Agency for International Development.
  (d) Authorization for Appropriations.--In addition to amounts 
otherwise authorized to be appropriated, there is authorized to be 
appropriated $2,500,000 for the fiscal year 2004 and $2,500,000 for the 
fiscal year 2005 to support free media in countries in which the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors is decreasing or discontinuing United 
States international broadcasting activity.

                  TITLE VII--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

                   Subtitle A--Reporting Requirements

SEC. 701. REPORTS ON BENCHMARKS FOR BOSNIA.

  (a) Section 7 of the 1998 Supplemental Appropriations and Rescissions 
Act (Public Law 105-174, 112 Stat. 64) is amended--
          (1) at the end of paragraph (1) by striking ``; and'' and 
        inserting a period;
          (2) by striking ``Congress'' and all that follows through 
        ``not later'' and inserting ``Congress not later''; and
          (3) by striking paragraph (2).
  (b) Section 1203 of the Strom Thurmond National Defense Authorization 
Act for Fiscal Year 1999 (Public Law 105-261) is repealed.

SEC. 702. REPORTS TO COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS.

  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, for the fiscal years 2004 
and 2005, any report required by law or otherwise requested to be 
submitted by the Secretary of State or the Department of State to any 
committee of the Congress shall be submitted also to the Committee on 
International Relations of the House of Representatives.

SEC. 703. REPORTS CONCERNING THE CAPTURE AND PROSECUTION OF 
                    PARAMILITARY AND OTHER TERRORIST LEADERS IN 
                    COLOMBIA.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) As reported in the Department of State report Patterns of 
        Global Terrorism 2001, the United Self-Defense Forces of 
        Colombia (also referred to as ``AUC'' or ``paramilitaries'') 
        have been designated as a foreign terrorist organization by the 
        United States primarily because of their increasing reliance on 
        terrorist methods, such as the use of massacres, to 
        purposefully displace segments of the population as retaliation 
        for allegedly supporting the AUC's rival organizations, the 
        Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and the National 
        Liberation Army (ELN) of Colombia. According to the report, the 
        paramilitaries also use terrorist tactics to compete for 
        narcotics-trafficking corridors and prime coca-growing terrain.
          (2) The Department of State concluded in the 2001 Country 
        Report on Human Rights Practices that despite increased efforts 
        by the Government of Colombia to combat and capture members of 
        paramilitary groups, security forces sometimes illegally 
        collaborate with paramilitaries forces and often fail to take 
        action to prevent paramilitary attacks which lead to serious 
        abuses of human rights.
          (3) In September 2002, Amnesty International, Human Rights 
        Watch, and the Washington Office on Latin America released a 
        report which argued that the Colombian Government had not made 
        substantial progress toward suspending officers implicated in 
        human rights abuses, conducting effective judicial 
        investigations of such abuses, or breaking the persistent links 
        between some units of the Colombian military and paramilitary 
        groups.
          (4) In February 2003, the United Nations High Commissioner 
        for Human Rights in Colombia reported that some units of the 
        Colombian Security Forces continued to collude openly with 
        illegal paramilitary groups in operations which resulted in 
        violations of human rights.
          (5) The Consolidated Appropriations Resolution, 2003 (Public 
        Law 108-7) made available not less than $5,000,000 to support a 
        Colombian Armed Forces unit which is dedicated to apprehending 
        leaders of Colombian paramilitary organizations.
  (b) Reports to Congress.--Not later than 30 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, and every 180 days thereafter, the Secretary of 
State, after consulting with internationally recognized human rights 
organizations pursuant to the procedures required in section 564(b) of 
the Consolidated Appropriations Resolution, 2003, shall submit a 
report, in unclassified form (with a classified annex if necessary), on 
the specific measures that the Colombian authorities are taking to 
apprehend effectively and prosecute aggressively leaders of 
paramilitary organizations, to the Committee on International Relations 
of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations 
of the Senate.
  (c) Contents of Reports.--Each report submitted pursuant to 
subsection (b) shall--
          (1) identify which Colombian Armed Forces units are receiving 
        assistance to apprehend leaders of Colombian paramilitary 
        organizations;
          (2) describe the amount and purposes of such assistance;
          (3) describe operations by Colombian security forces to 
        apprehend and arrest leaders of Colombian paramilitary 
        organizations;
          (4) list the number of detentions, captures, and arrests of 
        leaders of Colombian paramilitary organizations, disaggregating 
        the number according to those detentions, captures, and arrests 
        which were carried out by Colombian security forces identified 
        under paragraph (1);
          (5) briefly describe the status of investigations and 
        prosecutions of cases by the Colombian Attorney General's 
        office involving the arrests of leaders of Colombian 
        paramilitary organizations; and
          (6) estimate the number of hours of use by the Colombian 
        military of helicopters provided by the United States under 
        Plan Colombia and successor programs to apprehend the leaders 
        of Colombian paramilitary organizations, as well as leaders of 
        the FARC and ELN, including those individuals who have United 
        States indictments pending against them.

SEC. 704. REPORTS RELATING TO MAGEN DAVID ADOM SOCIETY.

  (a) Findings.--Section 690(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization 
Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228) is amended by adding at the 
end the following:
          ``(5) Since the founding of the Magen David Adom in 1930, the 
        American Red Cross has regarded it as a sister national society 
        forging close working ties between the two societies and has 
        consistently advocated recognition and membership of the Magen 
        David Adom in the International Red Cross and Red Crescent 
        Movement.
          ``(6) The American Red Cross and Magen David Adom signed an 
        important memorandum of understanding in November 2002, 
        outlining areas for strategic collaboration, and the American 
        Red Cross will encourage other societies to establish similar 
        agreements with Magen David Adom.''.
  (b) Sense of Congress.--Section 690(b) of such Act is amended--
          (1) in paragraph (3) after the semicolon by striking ``and'';
          (2) by redesignating paragraph (4) as paragraph (5); and
          (3) by inserting after paragraph (3) the following new 
        paragraph:
          ``(4) the High Contracting Parties to the Geneva Conventions 
        of August 12, 1949, should adopt the October 12, 2000, draft 
        additional protocol which would accord international 
        recognition to an additional distinctive emblem; and''.
  (c) Report.--Section 690 of such Act is further amended by adding at 
the end the following:
  ``(c) Report.--Not later than 60 days after the date of the enactment 
of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 2004 and 2005 
and annually thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit a report, 
on a classified basis if necessary, to the appropriate congressional 
committees describing--
          ``(1) efforts by the United States to obtain full membership 
        for the Magen David Adom in the International Red Cross 
        Movement;
          ``(2) efforts by the International Committee of the Red Cross 
        to obtain full membership for the Magen David Adom in the 
        International Red Cross Movement;
          ``(3) efforts of the High Contracting Parties to the Geneva 
        Convention of 1949 to adopt the October 12, 2000, draft 
        additional protocol; and
          ``(4) the extent to which the Magen David Adom of Israel is 
        participating in the activities of the International Red Cross 
        and Red Crescent Movement.''.

SEC. 705. REPORT CONCERNING THE RETURN OF PORTRAITS OF HOLOCAUST 
                    VICTIMS TO THE ARTIST DINA BABBITT.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) Dina Babbitt (formerly known as Dinah Gottliebova), a 
        United States citizen, has requested the return of watercolor 
        portraits she painted while suffering a one and one-half year 
        long internment at the Auschwitz death camp during World War 
        II, where she was ordered to paint portraits by the infamous 
        war criminal Dr. Josef Mengele.
          (2) Congress has previously considered the issue, under the 
        Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (Public 
        Law 107-228), and urged the Administration to facilitate the 
        return of the paintings to Dina Babbitt.
          (3) The Administration has not yet reported any progress in 
        furthering this goal, nor has the Secretary reported on the 
        status of any negotiations held with the intent of furthering 
        this goal.
  (b) Sense of Congress.--The Congress--
          (1) continues to recognize the moral right of Dina Babbitt to 
        obtain the artwork she created, and recognizes her courage in 
        the face of the evils perpetrated by the Nazi command of the 
        Auschwitz- Birkenau death camp, including the atrocities 
        committed by Dr. Josef Mengele;
          (2) urges the President of the United States to make all 
        necessary efforts to retrieve the 7 watercolor portraits 
        painted by Dina Babbitt, during her internment at the Auschwitz 
        death camp; and
          (3) urges the Secretary of State to make immediate diplomatic 
        efforts to facilitate the transfer of the 7 original 
        watercolors painted by Dina Babbitt from the Auschwitz-Birkenau 
        State Museum to Dina Babbitt, their rightful owner.
  (c) Reporting Requirement.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit a report 
to the appropriate congressional committees, describing all diplomatic 
efforts the United States has taken to facilitate the return of the 
paintings referred to in this section to Dina Babbitt.

SEC. 706. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON USE OF VESTED ASSETS.

  Section 203(a) of the International Emergency Economic Powers Act (50 
U.S.C. 1702(a)) is amended--
          (1) in subparagraph (C), by inserting ``, subject to 
        paragraph (4),'' after ``such interest or property shall''; and
          (2) by adding at the end the following:
  ``(4) The authority under paragraph (1)(C) to use property that has 
been vested or to use assets that have been liquidated may not be 
exercised until 15 days after the President has notified the Committee 
on International Relations of the House of Representatives and the 
Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate of the purpose for which 
such vested property or liquidated assets will be so used.''.

SEC. 707. REPORT CONCERNING THE CONFLICT IN UGANDA.

  (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of the Congress that the 
United States should--
          (1) exhaust all diplomatic means and pressures, including the 
        creation of a United States role in negotiating humanitarian 
        access to hitherto inaccessible populations which would offer 
        an opportunity to bring the warring parties together to build 
        confidence, to support an immediate peaceful resolution to the 
        16-year old conflict in Northern Uganda that has--
                  (A) killed an estimated 23,000 people, including 
                12,000 civilians,
                  (B) resulted in the forced abduction, sexual 
                servitude, and armed recruitment of between 16,000 to 
                26,000 Ugandan children by the Lord's Resistance Army, 
                a renegade army that has in the past sought refuge in 
                southern Sudan and raided villages in northern Uganda,
                  (C) displaced over 800,000 Ugandan citizens and 
                Sudanese refugees,
                  (D) resulted in the death and abduction of 
                humanitarian aid workers, and
                  (E) gravely inhibited the delivery of emergency 
                assistance and food aid to nearly 1 million northern 
                Ugandan civilians dependent on such assistance for 
                survival;
          (2) urge rebel forces to stop the abduction of children, urge 
        all forces to stop the use of child soldiers, and seek the 
        release of all forcibly-held children;
          (3) make available technical assistance resources to seek, 
        track, and stop funding for the Lord's Resistance Army (LRA) 
        from all sources and condemn all governments and organizations 
        who do assist the LRA;
          (4) monitor and support negotiations conducted by an third-
        party institutions for an immediate cease-fire between the LRA 
        and the Ugandan Government, and to explore the possibility of 
        facilitating the creation of mechanisms for an international 
        monitoring team to enforce this cease-fire as the first step in 
        the process toward a permanent peace;
          (5) continue supporting the Sudan Peace Process and Danforth 
        Initiative, which includes peace talks, donor coordination, 
        regional support, civilian protection and monitoring, and 
        cease-fire verification and consider modeling aspects of this 
        process in northern Uganda;
          (6) make available sufficient resources to meet the immediate 
        relief of the towns and cities supporting large displaced 
        populations, including food, clean water, medicine, shelter, 
        and clothing;
          (7) make available increased resources for assistance to 
        released and returned abducted children and child soldiers and 
        ensure that amnesty is provided when appropriate;
          (8) work with other donors and the Ugandan Government to 
        increase resources and technical support to the Uganda Amnesty 
        Commission for the increased demobilization of rebel 
        combatants;
          (9) examine ways in which development assistance can help 
        those living in protective villages in northern Uganda return 
        to and cultivate farmland; and
          (10) condition military assistance to Uganda on its 
        international compliance with sustained troop withdrawals from 
        the Democratic Republic of Congo where the presence of Ugandan 
        armies has contributed to the violence and instability in the 
        region.
  (b) Reports to Congress.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act, and not later than April 1 of each 
subsequent year, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a report on the comprehensive actions of the 
United States in seeking a peaceful and immediate solution to conflict 
in northern Uganda as well as humanitarian assistance efforts to the 
region, including efforts to advance each area addressed in subsection 
(a).

SEC. 708. REQUIREMENT FOR REPORT ON UNITED STATES POLICY TOWARD HAITI.

  (a) Findings.--Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) The United States has a political and economic interest 
        and a humanitarian and moral responsibility in assisting the 
        Government and people of Haiti in resolving the country's 
        problems and challenges.
          (2) The situation in Haiti is increasingly cause for alarm 
        and concern, and a sustained, coherent, and active approach by 
        the United States Government is needed to make progress toward 
        resolving Haiti's political and economic crises.
  (b) Requirement for Report.--Not later than 60 days after the date of 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary, in consultation with the 
Secretary of the Treasury, shall submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a report that describes United States policy 
toward Haiti. The report shall include the following:
          (1) A description of the activities carried out by the United 
        States Government to resolve Haiti's political crisis and to 
        promote the holding of free and fair elections in Haiti at the 
        earliest possible date.
          (2) A description of the activities that the United States 
        Government anticipates initiating to resolve the political 
        crisis and promote free and fair elections in Haiti.
          (3) An assessment of whether Resolution 822 issued by the 
        Permanent Council of the Organization of American States on 
        September 4, 2002, is an appropriate framework for a 
        multilateral approach to resolving the political and economic 
        crises in Haiti.
          (4) A description of the status of efforts to release the 
        approximately $146,000,000 in loan funds that have been 
        approved by the Inter-American Development Bank to Haiti for 
        the purposes of rehabilitating rural roads, reorganizing the 
        health sector, improving potable water supply and sanitation, 
        and providing basic education, a description of any obstacles 
        that are delaying the release of the loan funds, and 
        recommendations for overcoming such obstacles, including 
        whether any of the following would facilitate the release of 
        such funds:
                  (A) Establishing an International Monetary Fund staff 
                monitoring program in Haiti.
                  (B) Obtaining bridge loans or other sources of 
                funding to pay the cost of any arrears owed by the 
                Government of Haiti to the Inter-American Development 
                Bank.
                  (C) Providing technical assistance to the Government 
                of Haiti to permit the Government to meet international 
                financial transparency and other requirements.

SEC. 709. REPORT ON THE EFFECTS OF PLAN COLOMBIA ON ECUADOR.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) Section 695 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, 
        Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228) required the Secretary of 
        State to submit a report to Congress on the impact of Plan 
        Colombia on Ecuador and the other adjacent countries to 
        Colombia within 150 days after the date of the enactment of 
        that Act.
          (2) The 150 day time period for the submission of such report 
        has lapsed without a report being submitted to the Congress.
          (3) There continues to be growing alarm concerning the 
        spillover effect of Plan Colombia on Ecuador, a frontline 
        state, especially in the northern region of Ecuador which 
        includes the Sucumbios province.
  (b) Report to Congress.--Not later than 30 days after the date of the 
enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit a report to 
the appropriate congressional committees which sets forth--
                  (A) a statement of policy and comprehensive strategy 
                for United States activities in Colombia related to the 
                impact of Plan Colombia on Ecuador and the other 
                adjacent countries to Colombia; and
                  (B) the reasons for the failure of the Department of 
                State to submit the report required by section 695 of 
                Public Law 107-228 within the time period mandated by 
                law.

SEC. 710. REPORT ON ACTIONS TAKEN BY PAKISTAN.

  For each of fiscal years 2004 and 2005, the President shall prepare 
and transmit to the appropriate congressional committees a report that 
contains a description of the extent to which the Government of 
Pakistan--
          (1) has closed all known terrorist training camps operating 
        in Pakistan and Pakistani-held Kashmir;
          (2) has established serious and identifiable measures to 
        prohibit the infiltration of Islamic extremists across the 
        ``Line of Control'' (LoC) into India; and
          (3) has ceased the transfer of weapons of mass destruction, 
        including any associated technologies, to any third country or 
        terrorist organization.

SEC. 711. REPORT ON DEMOCRACY IN THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE.

  (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
          (1) Although 34 out of 35 countries in the Western Hemisphere 
        have held elections for civilian leaders of national, regional, 
        and local governments, many of these countries have failed to 
        successfully develop independent democratic institutions, 
        transparent and accountable governance, and effective means of 
        guaranteeing the rule of law, which are key components of a 
        fully functioning democracy.
          (2) The rule of law, independent democratic institutions, and 
        transparent, accountable governance are essential for 
        guaranteeing human rights, especially civil, political, and 
        labor rights.
          (3) The rule of law, independent democratic institutions, and 
        transparent accountable governance are also necessary for 
        promoting successful economic development and reliable trading 
        and investment mechanisms.
          (4) In part because of the lack of these three factors, 
        progress on human rights and economic development has lagged or 
        been uneven in much of the Western Hemisphere, leading some to 
        question the benefits of democracy itself as a path for 
        improving the lives of individuals in the hemisphere.
          (5) For democracy to continue in many of these countries, for 
        human rights to improve, and for regional economic integration 
        to be successful, the rule of law, independent democratic 
        institutions, and transparent accountable governance must be 
        strengthened.
          (6) As a strong supporter of democracy and human rights and 
        as an advocate of regional economic integration, it is in the 
        interests of the United States to enhance its efforts to 
        promote a deepening of democracy in the Western Hemisphere, 
        particularly through strengthening the rule of law, independent 
        democratic institutions, and transparent accountable 
        governance.
  (b) Report.--Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act, the Secretary, in consultation with the heads of other 
Federal departments and agencies as necessary, shall prepare and submit 
to the appropriate congressional committees a report on the state of 
democracy in each country in the Western Hemisphere (other than the 
United States and Canada). For each such country, the report shall 
provide the following:
          (1) A description of its system of government, including 
        schedule of elections, manner of judicial appointments, and 
        responsibilities of each branch of government.
          (2) An assessment of--
                  (A) the state of the rule of law;
                  (B) the power and independence of each branch of 
                government and institutions;
                  (C) the transparence and accountability in 
                governance; and
                  (D) the effect on human rights, particularly civil 
                and political rights, caused by the presence (or lack 
                thereof) of any of the factors in subparagraphs (A) 
                through (C); and
                  (E) the effect on economic development caused by the 
                presence (or lack thereof) of any of the factors in 
                subparagraphs (A) through (C).
          (3) A description of efforts to strengthen the rule of law, 
        independent institutions, or transparent governance in the 
        country, whether through local efforts or through efforts 
        funded or implemented by the United States, the Organization of 
        American States (OAS), or others.

SEC. 712. REPORT CONCERNING INTERNAL AND INTRA-REGIONAL CONFLICTS IN 
                    THE GREAT LAKES REGION OF AFRICA.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) The Great Lakes region of Central Africa has a history of 
        colonial based ethnic divisions, political violence, and civil 
        wars which have perpetuated conditions conducive to chronic 
        poverty and turmoil over the past decade. The countries of the 
        Great Lakes region are heavily embroiled in the conflicts 
        within their neighbors borders. At different times, the war in 
        the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) has involved more 
        outside countries than any other contemporary war in Africa's 
        history, (including Angola, Rwanda, Uganda, Zimbabwe, Burundi, 
        Sudan, Chad, Namibia, and Central African Republic).
          (2) The region is hallmarked by genocide, the recruitment of 
        child soldiers, war crimes, systematic rape of women and 
        violence directed against children, corruption, and the illegal 
        exploitation of natural resources on a global scale. Civil 
        wars, conflicts over natural resources, and structural violence 
        in the Great Lakes have resulted in--
                  (A) the death of approximately three million people 
                through direct and indirect causes of the war in the 
                DRC since 1998;
                  (B) the deaths of at least 800,000 people during the 
                1994 genocide in Rwanda;
                  (C) the deaths of an estimated 300,000 people through 
                direct and indirect causes of the war in Burundi since 
                1993;
                  (D) the deaths of thousands in Uganda;
                  (E) the forced abduction, sexual servitude, and armed 
                recruitment of thousands of children;
                  (F) the displacement of millions of Ugandan, 
                Burundian, Congolese, Rwandan, and Sudanese refugees;
                  (G) the death and abduction of humanitarian aid 
                workers throughout the region; and
                  (H) grave disruptions in the delivery of emergency 
                assistance and food aid to millions of civilians in 
                northern Uganda, eastern Congo, and Burundi dependent 
                on such assistance for survival.
  (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of the Congress that the 
United States should--
          (1) exhaust all diplomatic means and utilize all foreign 
        policy instruments to help peacefully resolve conflicts in the 
        Great Lakes region by supporting both national and regional 
        political, economic, and social initiatives conducive to 
        fostering African-led peace, reconstruction, and political and 
        economic institutional and structural transformation processes 
        in Uganda, Rwanda, Burundi, and the Democratic Republic of 
        Congo;
          (2) urge all rebel forces to stop the abduction of children, 
        urge all armed forces to stop the use of child soldiers, and 
        seek the release of all forcibly-held children;
          (3) make available technical assistance resources to seek, 
        track, and stop funding for all armed extremist paramilitary 
        and militarist rebel organizations from all sources and condemn 
        all governments and organizations who do assist such groups;
          (4) monitor and support negotiations conducted by third-party 
        institutions for an immediate end of armed actions between: The 
        LRA and the Ugandan Government; the RCD factions and MLC and 
        the government of Democratic Republic of the Congo under the 
        terms of the Lusaka Accords; the FDD and the Burundian 
        Government under the terms of the Arusha Accords;
          (5) explore the possibility of facilitating the creation of 
        mechanisms for an international monitoring team to enforce 
        cease-fires as the first step in the process toward a permanent 
        peace in the region;
          (6) continue supporting the Sudan Peace Process, the Danforth 
        Initiative, the Lusaka Accords, and the Arusha Accords which 
        includes peace talks, donor coordination, regional support, 
        civilian protection and monitoring, and cease-fire 
        verification;
          (7) make available sufficient resources to meet the immediate 
        relief needs of the towns and cities in the Great Lakes region 
        supporting large displaced populations, including food, clean 
        water, medicine, shelter, and clothing;
          ((8) make available increased resources for assistance to 
        released and returned abducted children and child soldiers in 
        the Great Lakes Region and ensure that amnesty is provided when 
        appropriate;
          (9) work with other donors and the Governments of Uganda, 
        Burundi, Rwanda, and the Democratic Republic of Congo to 
        increase resources and technical support to both regional and 
        national combatant demobilization entities such as the Uganda 
        Amnesty Commission in Uganda and equivalent entities in 
        Burundi, Rwanda, and the Democratic Republic of Congo for the 
        increased demobilization of rebel combatants;
          (10) examine ways in which development assistance (DA) can 
        help those living in protective villages in northern Uganda, 
        eastern Congo, and other demilitarized areas in Rwanda and 
        Burundi to return to and cultivate farmland;
          (11) condition military assistance to any nation which acts 
        to destabilize the DRC by violating international agreements 
        regarding sustained troop withdrawals and respect for the 
        territorial integrity of the DRC; and
          (12) direct the Secretary of State to appoint a special envoy 
        to the Great Lakes region to oversee cross-cutting security and 
        economic policies in the region.
  (c) Reports to Congress.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
the enactment of this Act, and not later than April 1 of each 
subsequent year, the Secretary should submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a report on the comprehensive actions taken by 
the United States in promoting peaceful and immediate solutions to the 
internal and intra-regional conflicts in the Great Lakes region, 
including taking steps to bring an end to the illegal exploitation and 
international trade of natural resources from the Democratic Republic 
of Congo; supporting bilateral and multilateral peace keeping 
initiatives; the promotion of regional economic integration; the 
promotion of broad based democratic political processes based on the 
rule of law; the promotion of women and other previously disadvantaged 
communities as equal political and economic stakeholders in societies; 
and humanitarian assistance efforts in the region, including efforts to 
advance each area addressed in subsection (a).

                       Subtitle B--Other Matters

SEC. 721. SENSE OF CONGRESS RELATING TO EAST TIMOR, JUSTICE, AND 
                    REHABILITATION.

  The Congress--
          (1) recalls that the United Nations International Commission 
        of Inquiry concluded in January 2000 that ``the Indonesian Army 
        was responsible for the intimidation, terror, killings and 
        other acts of violence'' during East Timor's vote for 
        independence in 1999;
          (2) reiterates that justice for crimes against humanity and 
        war crimes committed in East Timor during the vote for 
        independence in 1999 is crucial for peace, reconciliation, and 
        the ongoing nation-building process in East Timor and 
        Indonesia;
          (3) finds that the ad hoc Human Rights Court on East Timor 
        established by the Indonesian Government in 2001 has 
        inadequately brought to justice the perpetrators of these 
        crimes as eleven of fourteen defendants have been acquitted as 
        a result of poor indictments and the absence of an adequate 
        witness protection program, and four of the five sentences 
        imposed have been less than the minimum allowed under the 
        Indonesian Human Rights Law;
          (4) supports the work of the Joint United Nations-East Timor 
        Serious Crimes Unit (SCU), which filed indictments against 
        high-ranking Indonesian officers who were allegedly involved in 
        the crimes, including Gen. Wiranto, Maj. Gen. Kiki Syahnakri, 
        Maj. Gen. Zacky Anwar Makarim, Maj. Gen. Adam Damiri, Col. 
        Suratman, Col. Noer Muis, Col. Yayat Sudrajat and former 
        Governor Abilio Soares, and expresses its strong disappointment 
        that the Indonesian Government has stated its intention to 
        ignore the indictments;
          (5) calls on the State Department and the United States 
        Mission to the United Nations to push for a comprehensive 
        United Nations review of the Indonesian ad hoc Human Rights 
        Court on East Timor, including a review of the conduct of 
        trials, the indictment strategy by the prosecutors and its 
        adherence to the international standards, and urges the State 
        Department to consider alternative mechanisms of justice for 
        East Timor, including the establishment of an ad hoc 
        international tribunal; and
          (6) urges the Indonesian Government to fully cooperate with 
        the joint United Nations-East Timor Serious Crimes Unit (SCU) 
        and encourages the United States to urge the Indonesian 
        Government to fully cooperate with the SCU.

SEC. 722. SENSE OF CONGRESS CONCERNING HUMAN RIGHTS AND JUSTICE IN 
                    INDONESIA.

  The Congress--
          (1) notes with grave concern that members of the Indonesian 
        security forces, particularly the Army Special Forces 
        (Kopassus) and the Police Mobile Brigade (Brimob), continue to 
        commit many serious human rights violations, including 
        extrajudicial killings, torture, rape, and arbitrary detention, 
        particularly in areas of conflict such as Aceh, Papua, the 
        Moluccas, and Central Sulawesi;
          (2) notes with grave concern that the Government of Indonesia 
        largely fails to hold soldiers and police accountable for 
        extrajudicial killings and other serious human rights abuses, 
        both past and present;
          (3) condemns the intimidation and harassment of human rights 
        and civil society organizations and activists by members of 
        Indonesian security forces and by military-backed militia 
        groups, particularly in Aceh and Papua;
          (4) notes with concern the Indonesian military's resistance 
        to civilian control and oversight, its lack of budgetary 
        transparency, and its continuing emphasis on internal security 
        within Indonesia;
          (5) urges the Indonesian government and military to provide 
        full, active, and unfettered cooperation with the investigation 
        of the Federal Bureau of Investigation of the United States 
        Department of Justice into the August 31, 2002 attack near 
        Timika, Papua, which killed three people (including two 
        Americans, Rick Spier and Ted Burgon), and injured 12 others, 
        and which appears likely to have been perpetrated at least in 
        part by members of the Indonesian military;
          (6) commends the December 2002 signing of the Framework 
        Agreement on Cessation of Hostilities in Aceh, but condemns the 
        recent outbreaks of violence and militia activity that appear 
        calculated to subvert that cease-fire agreement;
          (7) notes with grave concern the continued detention of 
        Muhammad Nazar, and the fact that those responsible for the 
        murders of other prominent members of civil society in Aceh, 
        such as Jafar Siddiq Hamzah, Sukardi, Sulaiman Ahmad, Tengku 
        Safwan Idris, Nashiruddin Daud, and Zaini Sulaiman, still have 
        not been apprehended, prosecuted, or punished;
          (8) commends the ``Zone of Peace'' initiative in Papua, which 
        has brought together civic, religious, governmental, and police 
        representatives to discuss productive means of avoiding 
        conflict, but expresses concern at the refusal of the 
        Indonesian military to participate in that effort; and
          (9) encourages the Government of Indonesia to expedite the 
        reunification of separated East Timorese children with their 
        families, and to hold legally accountable those individuals and 
        organizations responsible for taking those children and for 
        obstructing reunification efforts.

SEC. 723. AMENDMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL RELIGIOUS FREEDOM ACT OF 1998.

  Section 207(a) of the International Religious Freedom Act of 1998 (22 
U.S.C. 6435(a)) is amended by inserting ``and for each subsequent 
fiscal year'' after ``2003''.

SEC. 724. SENSE OF CONGRESS WITH RESPECT TO HUMAN RIGHTS IN CENTRAL 
                    ASIA.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) The Central Asian nations of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, 
        Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan are providing the 
        United States with assistance in the war in Afghanistan, from 
        military basing and overflight rights to the facilitation of 
        humanitarian relief.
          (2) In turn, the United States victory over the Taliban in 
        Afghanistan provides important benefits to the Central Asian 
        nations by removing a regime that threatened their security and 
        by significantly weakening the Islamic Movement of Uzbekistan, 
        a terrorist organization that had previously staged armed raids 
        from Afghanistan into the region.
          (3) The United States has consistently urged the nations of 
        Central Asia to open their political systems and economies and 
        to respect human rights, both before and since the attacks of 
        September 11, 2001.
          (4) Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and 
        Uzbekistan are members of the United Nations and the 
        Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), 
        both of which confer a range of obligations with respect to 
        human rights on their members.
          (5) While the United States recognizes marked differences 
        among the social structures and commitments to democratic and 
        economic reform of the Central Asian nations, the United States 
        notes nevertheless, according to the State Department Country 
        Reports on Human Rights Practices, that all five governments of 
        such nations, to differing degrees, restrict freedom of speech 
        and association, restrict or ban the activities of human rights 
        organizations and other nongovernmental organizations, harass 
        or prohibit independent media, imprison political opponents, 
        practice arbitrary detention and arrest, and engage in torture 
        and extrajudicial executions.
          (6) By continuing to suppress human rights and to deny 
        citizens peaceful, democratic means of expressing their 
        convictions, the nations of Central Asia risk fueling popular 
        support for violent and extremist movements, thus undermining 
        the goals of the war on terrorism.
          (7) President George W. Bush has made the defense of human 
        dignity, the rule of law, limits on the power of the state, 
        respect for women and private property, free speech, equal 
        justice, religious tolerance strategic goals of United States 
        foreign policy in the Islamic world, arguing that ``a truly 
        strong nation will permit legal avenues of dissent for all 
        groups that pursue their aspirations without violence''.
          (8) Congress has expressed its desire to see deeper reform in 
        Central Asia in past resolutions and other legislation, most 
        recently conditioning assistance to Uzbekistan and Kazakhstan 
        on their progress in meeting commitments to the United States 
        on human rights and democracy.
  (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of the Congress that--
          (1) the governments of Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, 
        Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan should accelerate democratic 
        reforms and fulfill their human rights obligations, including, 
        where appropriate, by--
                  (A) releasing from prison anyone jailed for peaceful 
                political activism or the nonviolent expression of 
                their political or religious beliefs;
                  (B) fully investigating any credible allegations of 
                torture and prosecuting those responsible;
                  (C) permitting the free and unfettered functioning of 
                independent media outlets, independent political 
                parties, and nongovernmental organizations, including 
                by easing registration processes;
                  (D) permitting the free exercise of religious beliefs 
                and ceasing the persecution of members of religious 
                groups and denominations that do not engage in violence 
                or political change through violence;
                  (E) holding free, competitive, and fair elections; 
                and
                  (F) making publicly available documentation of their 
                revenues and punishing those engaged in official 
                corruption;
          (2) the President, the Secretary of State, and the Secretary 
        of Defense should--
                  (A) continue to raise at the highest levels with the 
                governments of the nations of Central Asia specific 
                cases of political and religious persecution, and to 
                urge greater respect for human rights and democratic 
                freedoms at every diplomatic opportunity;
                  (B) take progress in meeting the goals specified in 
                paragraph (1) into account when determining the scope 
                and nature of United States diplomatic and military 
                relations and assistance with each of such governments;
                  (C) ensure that the provisions of foreign operations 
                appropriations Acts are fully implemented to ensure 
                that no United States assistance benefits security 
                forces in Central Asia that are implicated in 
                violations of human rights;
                  (D) press the Government of Turkmenistan to implement 
                the helpful recommendations contained in the 2003 
                resolution on Turkmenistan of the United Nations 
                Commission on Human Rights and the so-called ``Moscow 
                Mechanism'' Report of the Organization for Security and 
                Cooperation in Europe (OSCE), respect the right of all 
                prisoners to due process and a fair trial and release 
                democratic activists and their family members from 
                prison;
                  (E) urge the Government of Russia not to extradite to 
                Turkmenistan members of the political opposition of 
                Turkmenistan;
                  (F) work with the Government of Kazakhstan to create 
                a political climate free of intimidation and 
                harassment, including releasing political prisoners and 
                permitting the return of political exiles, and to 
                reduce official corruption, including by urging the 
                Government of Kazakhstan to cooperate with the ongoing 
                United States Department of Justice investigation;
                  (G) support through United States assistance programs 
                individuals, nongovernmental organizations, and media 
                outlets in Central Asia working to build more open 
                societies, to support the victims of human rights 
                abuses, and to expose official corruption; and
                  (H) press the Government of Uzbekistan to implement 
                fully the recommendations made to the Government of 
                Uzbekistan by the United Nations' Special Rapporteur on 
                Torture; and
          (3) increased levels of United States assistance to the 
        governments of the nations of Central Asia made possible by 
        their cooperation in the war in Afghanistan can be sustained 
        only if there is substantial and continuing progress toward 
        meeting the goals specified in paragraph (1).

SEC. 725. TECHNICAL CORRECTION TO AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR 
                    FISCAL YEAR 2003 FOR CENTER FOR CULTURAL AND 
                    TECHNICAL INTERCHANGE BETWEEN EAST AND WEST.

  Section 112(3) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal 
Year 2003 (116 Stat. 1358; Public Law 107-228) is amended by striking 
``$15,000,000'' and inserting ``$18,000,000''.

SEC. 726. UNDER SECRETARY OF COMMERCE FOR INDUSTRY AND SECURITY.

  (a) Under Secretary.--There shall be in the Department of Commerce an 
Under Secretary of Commerce for Industry and Security who shall serve 
as the head of the Bureau of Industry and Security and perform such 
duties as the Secretary of Commerce shall prescribe. The Under 
Secretary of Commerce for Industry and Security shall be appointed by 
the President by and with the advice and consent of the Senate.
  (b) Incumbent.--The individual serving on the date of the enactment 
of this Act as the Under Secretary of Commerce for Export 
Administration shall serve as the Under Secretary of Commerce for 
Industry and Security until such time as a successor is appointed under 
subsection (a).
  (c) Compensation.--Section 5314 of title 5, United States Code, is 
amended by striking ``Under Secretary of Commerce for Export 
Administration'' and inserting ``Under Secretary of Commerce for 
Industry and Security''.
  (d) Conforming Amendments.--Section 15(a) of the Export 
Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2414(a)) is amended--
          (1) by striking the first sentence; and
          (2) in the second sentence, by striking ``in carrying out 
        such functions'' and inserting ``of Commerce for Industry and 
        Security in carrying out the functions of the Under 
        Secretary''.

SEC. 727. CONCERNING THE SPREAD OF WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) The proliferation of weapons of mass destruction presents 
        a direct threat to the stability, security, and safety of 
        nations around the globe.
          (2) Combatting the spread of such weapons is a responsibility 
        borne by all nations.
          (3) United States efforts to stop the further spread of these 
        weapons can be further enhanced by cooperative efforts between 
        the United States and the European Union.
          (4) There are many different components in this effort that 
        require a comprehensive approach, immediate attention, and 
        vigorous action, including the ``10+10 over 10 Initiative'' 
        agreed to by the United States and many members of the European 
        Union.
          (5) Stopping the spread of weapons of mass destruction is 
        made more difficult when states willingly participate in, or 
        contribute to, their development or their sale or transfer to 
        other nations.
          (6) Stopping the spread of weapons of mass destruction is 
        made more difficult when private companies willingly 
        participate in, or contribute to, their development or their 
        sale or transfer to other nations.
          (7) United States security and safety is undermined when 
        companies engage in such commerce.
  (b) Sense of Congress.--The Congress call on the European Union to--
          (1) develop an aggressive and robust regulatory system 
        designed to--
                  (A) investigate allegations of companies contributing 
                to the development of weapons of mass destruction or 
                their sale or transfer to other nations;
                  (B) isolate and comdemn companies found to 
                participate in, or contribute to, the development of 
                such weapons or their sale or transfer to other 
                nations; and
                  (C) develop a punitive response designed to punish 
                such companies, thereby preventing further actions on 
                their part and discouraging other companies from 
                engaging in such actions;
          (2) condemn, by name, states known to be contributing to the 
        development or spread of weapons of mass destruction; and
          (3) develop appropriate punitive measures designed to 
        discourage further actions.

SEC. 728. INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURAL BIOTECHNOLOGY INFORMATION PROGRAM.

  (a) In General.--The Department of State shall provide to other 
countries, as appropriate, the scientific evidence on the benefits, 
safety, and potential uses of agricultural biotechnology.
  (b) Specific Objectives.--The Secretary of State shall--
          (1) chair an interagency task force comprised of 
        representatives of the Department of Commerce, the Department 
        of Agriculture, and the United States Agency for International 
        Development to develop and disseminate accurate written 
        scientific information on the potential benefits of 
        agricultural biotechnology for human and animal nutrition, the 
        environment, food and feed production, agricultural 
        sustainability, and bioenergy development;
          (2) coordinate the development and dissemination of 
        scientifically-based facts regarding, the safety and regulation 
        of biotechnology-derived food and feed products;
          (3) instruct the United States Agency for International 
        Development (USAID) to develop a program to demonstrate the 
        potential benefits of agricultural biotechnology to develop 
        products that can be grown under local soil and climate 
        conditions and better meet the health and nutritional needs of 
        local populations in the developing world; and
          (4) ensure that personnel undertaking these activities are 
        knowledgeable of, and disseminate information on, the United 
        States regulatory safeguards that assure food and environmental 
        safety.

SEC. 729. REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT BURDENSHARING.

  It is the sense of the Congress that--
          (1) the Secretary of State should actively encourage the 
        international community to accept refugees for resettlement on 
        a more equitable basis;
          (2) the Secretary of State should raise the issue of refugee 
        resettlement burdensharing at the United Nations and other 
        multilateral and bilateral meetings;
          (3) developed countries should be encouraged to increase the 
        percentage of the world's refugees accepted for resettlement; 
        and
          (4) the Secretary of State should encourage developing stable 
        countries in regions with refugee flows to accept for 
        resettlement as many of their neighbors as possible.

SEC. 730. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON CLIMATE CHANGE.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) Evidence continues to build that increases in atmospheric 
        concentrations of manmade greenhouse gases are contributing to 
        global climate change.
          (2) The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (in this 
        section referred to as the ``IPCC'') has concluded that ``there 
        is new and stronger evidence that most of the warming observed 
        over the last 50 years is attributable to human activities'' 
        and that the Earth's average temperature can be expected to 
        rise between 2.5 and 10.4 degrees Fahrenheit in this century.
          (3) The National Academy of Sciences confirmed the findings 
        of the IPCC, stating that ``the IPCC's conclusion that most of 
        the observed warming of the last 50 years is likely to have 
        been due to the increase of greenhouse gas concentrations 
        accurately reflects the current thinking of the scientific 
        community on this issue'' and that ``there is general agreement 
        that the observed warming is real and particularly strong 
        within the past twenty years''. The National Academy of 
        Sciences also noted that ``because there is considerable 
        uncertainty in current understanding of how the climate system 
        varies naturally and reacts to emissions of greenhouse gases 
        and aerosols, current estimates of the magnitude of future 
        warming should be regarded as tentative and subject to future 
        adjustments upward or downward''.
          (4) The IPCC has stated that in the last 40 years, the global 
        average sea level has risen, ocean heat content has increased, 
        and snow cover and ice extent have decreased, which threatens 
        to inundate low-lying island nations and coastal regions 
        throughout the world.
          (5) In October 2000, a report of the United States 
        interagency Global Change Research Program found that global 
        climate change may harm the United States by altering crop 
        yields, accelerating sea-level rise, and increasing the spread 
        of tropical infectious diseases.
          (6) In 1992, the United States ratified the United Nations 
        Framework Convention on Climate Change (in this section 
        referred to as the ``UNFCCC''), the ultimate objective of which 
        is the ``stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the 
        atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous 
        anthropogenic interference with the climate system. Such a 
        level should be achieved within a time-frame sufficient to 
        allow ecosystems to adapt naturally to climate change, to 
        ensure that food production is not threatened and to enable 
        economic development to proceed in a sustainable manner''.
          (7) The UNFCCC stated in part that the Parties to the UNFCCC 
        are to implement policies ``with the aim of returning . . . to 
        their 1990 levels anthropogenic emissions of carbon dioxide and 
        other greenhouse gases'' under the principle that ``policies 
        and measures . . . should be appropriate for the specific 
        conditions of each Party and should be integrated with national 
        development programmes, taking into account that economic 
        development is essential for adopting measures to address 
        climate change''.
          (8) There is a shared international responsibility to address 
        this problem, as industrial nations are the largest historic 
        and current emitters of greenhouse gases and developing 
        nations' emissions will significantly increase in the future.
          (9) The UNFCCC further stated that ``developed country 
        Parties should take the lead in combating climate change and 
        the adverse effects thereof'', as these nations are the largest 
        historic and current emitters of greenhouse gases. The UNFCCC 
        also stated that ``steps required to understand and address 
        climate change will be environmentally, socially and 
        economically most effective if they are based on relevant 
        scientific, technical and economic considerations and 
        continually re-evaluated in the light of new findings in these 
        areas''.
          (10) Any future, binding treaty on climate change must not 
        result in serious harm to the United States economy, and should 
        not cause the United States to abandon its shared 
        responsibility to help reduce the risks of climate change and 
        its impacts. Future international efforts in this regard should 
        focus on recognizing the equitable responsibilities for 
        addressing climate change by all nations, including commitments 
        by the largest developing country emitters in a future, binding 
        climate change treaty.
          (11) While the United States has elected against becoming a 
        party to the Kyoto Protocol to the UNFCCC at this time, it is 
        the position of the United States that it will not interfere 
        with the plans of any nation that chooses to ratify and 
        implement the Kyoto Protocol.
          (12) United States businesses need to know how governments 
        worldwide will address the risks of climate change. By 
        committing themselves to reducing their greenhouse gas 
        emissions, leading companies in the United States and worldwide 
        are doing more than addressing the problem of climate change--
        they are also improving their competitive positioning. More 
        than 30 major corporations, most with operations in the United 
        States, have specifically committed themselves to reducing 
        their greenhouse gas emissions.
          (13) The United States benefits from investments in the 
        research, development, and deployment of a range of clean 
        energy and efficiency technologies that can reduce the risks of 
        climate change and its impacts and that can make the United 
        States economy more productive, bolster energy security, create 
        jobs, and protect the environment.
  (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of the Congress that the 
United States should demonstrate international leadership and 
responsibility in reducing the health, environmental, and economic 
risks posed by climate change by--
          (1) taking responsible action to ensure significant and 
        meaningful reductions in emissions of greenhouse gases from all 
        sectors;
          (2) creating flexible international and domestic mechanisms, 
        including joint implementation, technology deployment, tradable 
        credits for emissions reductions, and carbon sequestration 
        projects that will reduce, avoid, and sequester greenhouse gas 
        emissions;
          (3) participating in international negotiations, including 
        putting forth a proposal to the Conference of the Parties to 
        the UNFCCC, with the objective of securing United States 
        participation in a future binding treaty on climate change in a 
        manner that protects the economic interests of the United 
        States, is consistent with the environmental objectives of the 
        UNFCCC, and recognizes the shared international responsibility 
        for addressing climate change, including developing country 
        participation; and
          (4) establishing a bipartisan observer group of Members of 
        the House of Representatives, designated by the chairman and 
        ranking member of the Committee on International Relations of 
        the House of Representatives, to monitor any international 
        negotiations on climate change.

SEC. 731. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING MIGRATION ISSUES BETWEEN THE 
                    UNITED STATES AND MEXICO.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress finds as follows:
          (1) During President Bush's first meeting with President Fox 
        in Guanajuato, Mexico, the Presidents stated in the Joint 
        Communique of February 16, 2001 that ``we are instructing our 
        Governments to engage, at the earliest opportunity, in formal 
        high level negotiations aimed at achieving short and long-term 
        agreements that will allow us to constructively address 
        migration and labor issues between our two countries.''.
          (2) During President Fox's official visit to Washington, 
        D.C., the Joint Statement of September 6, 2001, summarized the 
        meeting as follows: ``The Presidents reviewed the progress made 
        by our joint working group on migration chaired by Secretaries 
        Powell, CastaZeda, and Creel and Attorney General Ashcroft and 
        noted this represented the most fruitful and frank dialogue we 
        have ever had on a subject so important to both nations. They 
        praised implementation of the border safety initiative, and 
        recognized that migration-related issues are deeply felt by our 
        publics and vital to our prosperity, well-being, and the kind 
        of societies we want to build. They renewed their commitment to 
        forging new and realistic approaches to migration to ensure it 
        is safe, orderly, legal and dignified, and agreed on the 
        framework within which this ongoing effort is based. This 
        includes: matching willing workers with willing employers; 
        serving the social and economic needs of both countries; 
        respecting the human dignity of all migrants, regardless of 
        their status; recognizing the contribution migrants make to 
        enriching both societies; shared responsibility for ensuring 
        migration takes place through safe and legal channels. Both 
        stressed their commitment to continue our discussions, 
        instructing the high-level working group to reach mutually 
        satisfactory results on border safety, a temporary worker 
        program and the status of undocumented Mexicans in the United 
        States. They requested that the working group provide them 
        proposals with respect to these issues as soon as possible. The 
        Presidents recognized that this is an extraordinarily 
        challenging area of public policy, and that it is critical to 
        address the issue in a timely manner and with appropriate 
        thoroughness and depth.''.
          (3) On September 7, 2001, during President Fox's historic 
        State Visit to Washington, the United States and Mexico issued 
        a joint statement instructing our cabinet-level working group 
        to provide us with specific proposals to forge a new and 
        realistic framework that will ensure a safe, legal, orderly, 
        and dignified migration flow between our countries. We have 
        today agreed that our Cabinet level migration group should 
        continue the work we charged it with in Guanajuato and 
        Washington.
          (4) When the Presidents met in Monterrey, Mexico, the 
        Presidents stated in a Joint Statement on March 22, 2002, as 
        follows: ``Slightly more than one year ago, in Guanajuato, we 
        talked about migration as one of the major ties that join our 
        societies. We launched then the frankest and most productive 
        dialogue our countries have ever had on this important and 
        challenging subject. Those talks have continued over the past 
        year, and have yielded a clearer assessment of the scope and 
        nature of this issue. This bond between our nations can render 
        countless benefits to our respective economies and families.
          (5) Over the past year, important progress has been made to 
        enhance migrant safety and particularly in saving lives by 
        discouraging and reducing illegal crossings in dangerous 
        terrain.
          (6) At the conclusion of the Mexico-United States Binational 
        Commission (BNC) meeting in Mexico City in November 2002, 
        Secretary of State Powell's press conference was summarized by 
        the State Department as follows: The BNC's migration working 
        group ``affirmed our strong commitment to advancing our 
        bilateral migration agenda,'' he stressed, adding that ``there 
        should be no doubt in anyone's mind that this is a priority for 
        President Bush, just as it is a priority for [Mexican] 
        President [Vicente] Fox.''
          (7) Secretary Powell said no schedule had been established 
        for a migration accord, but he confirmed that the United States 
        and Mexico want to come up with a series of migration 
        initiatives over the course of the next six months to a year.
          (8) Mexico's state-run oil monopoly, Petroleos Mexicanos 
        (PEMEX), is inefficient, plagued by corruption, and in need of 
        substantial reform and private investment in order to provide 
        sufficient petroleum products to Mexico and the United States 
        to fuel future economic growth which can help curb illegal 
        migration into the United States.
  (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of the Congress that--
          (1) that the United States and Mexico should as soon as is 
        practicable commence negotiations in an attempt to reach a 
        migration accord that is as comprehensive as possible and which 
        addresses the key issues of concern for both nations;
          (2) that any accord on migration issues between the United 
        States and Mexico should also include an accord to open 
        Petroleos Mexicanos (PEMEX) to investment by U.S. oil companies 
        and specific steps to reform PEMEX's operations to make them 
        more transparent and efficient; and
          (3) that as part of any migration agreement between the 
        United States and Mexico, the issues of the extradition of 
        violent criminals and law enforcement cooperation between the 
        two nations be addressed.

SEC. 732. SENSE OF CONGRESS CONCERNING UNITED STATES ASSISTANCE TO 
                    PALESTINIAN REFUGEES.

  The Congress--
          (1) recognizes the importance of United States humanitarian 
        assistance to Palestinian refugees as an essential component to 
        the peace process in the Middle East;
          (2) acknowledges the hardships endured by many innocent 
        Palestinian refugees in the West Bank and Gaza Strip and in 
        other neighboring countries;
          (3) notes that the United Nations High Commission for 
        Refugees (UNHCR) is the international body that seeks to find 
        ``lasting solutions'' to the plight of refugees throughout the 
        world, with the sole exception of the Palestinians, for whose 
        exclusive benefit a special agency, the United Nations Relief 
        and Works Agency (UNRWA), was established in 1950 and which 
        makes no effort to permanently resettle Palestinian refugees, 
        even those who reside under the jurisdiction of the Palestinian 
        Authority, in order to ensure the perpetuation of the problem 
        of Palestinian refugees;
          (4) recognizes that the United States has been the world's 
        leading donor to UNRWA, having provided over $2,500,000,000 to 
        UNRWA since 1950, including the provision of $110,000,000, in 
        fiscal year 2002, and that such organization has provided 
        important humanitarian assistance to the Palestinian people;
          (5) notes that the United States contribution to UNRWA is 
        nearly 10 times that of the entire Arab world, and calls on 
        Arab states to assume a greater share of the burden for 
        financing UNWRA;
          (6) expresses its outrage over credible reports that UNRWA 
        facilities have been used for terrorist training and bases for 
        terrorist operations, with little attempt by the UNRWA to stop 
        or oppose such attacks or alert relevant law enforcement 
        authorities about such terrorist activities;
          (7) expresses deep concern over the textbooks and educational 
        materials used in the UNRWA educational system that promote 
        anti-Semitism, denial of the existence and the right to exist 
        of the state of Israel, and exacerbate stereotypes and tensions 
        between the Palestinians and Israelis;
          (8) strongly urges the Secretary General of the United 
        Nations to immediately take steps to comprehensively reform the 
        UNRWA so that it actively works to oppose terrorist attacks and 
        actively works to promote reconciliation and understanding 
        between the Israelis and Palestinians;
          (9) strongly urges UNRWA to meet the requirements, in letter 
        and spirit, of section 301(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
        1961, including by comprehensively ensuring that no UNRWA 
        assistance is rendered to anyone who has been involved with 
        terrorism at any time and that all UNRWA beneficiaries be 
        informed at the earliest possible time, and at regular 
        intervals thereafter, that anyone involved with terrorism 
        thereafter will be ineligible for UNRWA benefits;
          (10) strongly urges the Secretary of State to make UNRWA 
        reforms a priority at the United Nations by actively 
        campaigning within the United Nations to support such reforms, 
        including comprehensive and independently verifiable audits of 
        UNRWA activities and educational reform that would remove from 
        the curriculum all textbooks and educational materials that 
        promote hatred of Jews and Israel and denial of Israel's right 
        to exist and replace them with teaching materials that promote 
        Israeli-Palestinian reconciliation and mutual understanding; 
        and
          (11) notes the General Accounting Office (GAO) audit required 
        by section 580 of the FY 2003 Foreign Operations Appropriations 
        Act (Public Law 108-7), and strongly encourages the GAO to 
        conduct, as part of this audit, an investigation and inspection 
        of all recent United States assistance to UNRWA to ensure that 
        taxpayer funds are being spent effectively and are not directly 
        or indirectly supporting terrorism, anti-Semitic or anti-Jewish 
        teachings, or the glorification or incitement of violence.

SEC. 733. UNITED STATES POLICY ON WORLD BANK GROUP LOANS TO IRAN.

  (a) United States Policy.--The Secretary of State (or a designee), in 
consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury, shall communicate 
directly with the governments of countries represented on the decision-
making boards and councils of the international financial institutions 
of the World Bank Group and consistently convey the strong opposition 
of the United States Government to any further activity in Iran by the 
international financial institutions of the World Bank Group.
  (b) Reports.--Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act and one year thereafter, the Secretary of State shall 
submit a report on the efforts of the Secretary to carry out subsection 
(a) to the chairman and ranking minority member of the Committee on 
International Relations of the House of Representatives and the 
Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate.
  (c) World Bank Group Defined.--As used in this section, the term 
``World Bank Group'' means the International Bank for Reconstruction 
and Development, the International Development Association, the 
International Financial Corporation, and the Multilateral Investment 
Guaranty Agency.

SEC. 734. SENSE OF CONGRESS RELATING TO SOVIET NUCLEAR TESTS IN 
                    KAZAKHSTAN.

  (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
          (1) In 1991, immediately after achieving independence, 
        Kazakhstan closed and sealed the world's second largest nuclear 
        test site in Semipalatinsk which had been inherited from the 
        former Soviet Union and at which more than 500 nuclear tests 
        had been conducted from 1949 to 1991.
          (2) The cumulative power of explosions from those tests, 
        conducted above ground, on the ground, and underground is 
        believed to be equal to the power of 20,000 explosions of the 
        type of bomb dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945.
          (3) More than 1,500,000 people in Kazakhstan suffered because 
        of decades of Soviet nuclear weapons testing in the region.
          (4) A horrifying array of disease will continue to destroy 
        the lives of hundreds of thousands and their descendants for 
        many generations to come as a result of these tests.
          (5) Since its independence, Kazakhstan has constructed a 
        stable and peaceful state, voluntarily disarmed the world's 
        fourth largest nuclear arsenal, joined the Strategic Arms 
        Reduction Treaty (START), and became an example of responsible 
        nonproliferation of such weapons.
          (6) Kazakhstan is also doing its best to help those who were 
        exposed to the horrific nuclear experiments of the 20th century 
        but it faces daunting challenges.
  (b) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
Secretary of State should work to establish a joint working group with 
the Government of Kazakhstan to assist in assessing the environmental 
damage and health effects caused by Soviet nuclear testing in 
Semipalatinsk.

SEC. 735. SENSE OF CONGRESS RELATING TO VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN.

  The Congress--
          (1) recalls that Article 4 of the United Nations Declaration 
        on the Elimination of Violence Against Women (20 December 1993) 
        outlines that states should condemn violence against women and 
        should not invoke any custom, tradition, or religious 
        consideration to avoid their obligations with respect to its 
        elimination;
          (2) recalls that Chapter 4, Section 125, of the Beijing 
        Declaration and Platform for Action, Fourth World Conference on 
        Women (15 September 1995) states that governments condemn 
        violence against women and refrain from invoking any custom, 
        tradition, or religious consideration to avoid their 
        obligations with respect to its elimination as set out in the 
        Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women;
          (3) recalls that the United States has supported both the 
        United Nations Declaration on the Elimination of Violence and 
        the Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action; and
          (4) reinforces the position of the United States that the 
        United States condemns violence against women and refrains from 
        invoking any custom, tradition, or religious consideration to 
        avoid this nation's obligations with respect to its elimination 
        as set out in the Declaration on the Elimination of Violence 
        against Women.

  DIVISION B--DEFENSE TRADE AND SECURITY ASSISTANCE REFORM ACT OF 2003

                      TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS

SEC. 1001. SHORT TITLE.

  This division may be cited as the ``Defense Trade and Security 
Assistance Reform Act of 2003''.

SEC. 1002. DEFINITIONS.

  Except as otherwise provided, in this division:
          (1) Defense articles.--The term ``defense articles'' has the 
        meaning given the term in section 47(7)(A) of the Arms Export 
        Control Act (as amended by section 1107(d) of this Act).
          (2) Defense services.--The term ``defense services'' has the 
        meaning given the term in section 47(7)(B) of the Arms Export 
        Control Act (as amended by section 1107(d) of this Act).
          (3) Dual use.--The term ``dual use'' means, with respect to 
        goods or technology, those goods or technology that are 
        specifically designed or developed for civil purposes but which 
        also may be used or deployed in a military mode.
          (4) Export administration regulations.--The term ``Export 
        Administration Regulations'' means those regulations contained 
        in sections 730-774 of title 15, Code of Federal Regulations 
        (or successor regulations).
          (5) Good.--The term ``good'' has the meaning given the term 
        in section 16(3) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 
        U.S.C. App. 2415(3)).
          (6) International traffic in arms regulations.--The term 
        ``International Traffic in Arms Regulations'' means those 
        regulations contained in sections 120-130 of title 22, Code of 
        Federal Regulations (or successor regulations).
          (7) Missile technology control regime; mtcr.--The term 
        ``Missile Technology Control Regime'' or ``MTCR'' has the 
        meaning given the term in section 11B(c)(2) of the Export 
        Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2401b(c)(2)).
          (8) Missile technology control regime annex; mtcr annex.--The 
        term ``Missile Technology Control Regime Annex'' or ``MTCR 
        Annex'' has the meaning given the term in section 11B(c)(4) of 
        the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 
        2401b(c)(4)).
          (9) Operation iraqi freedom.--The term ``Operation Iraqi 
        Freedom'' means operations of United States Armed Forces, the 
        armed forces of the United Kingdom, and the armed forces of 
        other coalition member countries initiated on or about March 
        19, 2003--
                  (A) to disarm Iraq of its weapons of mass 
                destruction;
                  (B) to enforce United Nations Security Council 
                Resolution 1441 (November 8, 2002) and other relevant 
                Security Council resolutions with respect to Iraq; and
                  (C) to liberate the people of Iraq from the regime of 
                Saddam Hussein.
          (10) Technology.--The term ``technology'' has the meaning 
        given the term in section 16(4) of the Export Administration 
        Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2415(4)).

SEC. 1003. REFERENCES TO ARMS EXPORT CONTROL ACT.

  Except as otherwise specifically provided, whenever in this division 
an amendment is expressed in terms of an amendment to a section or 
other provision, the reference shall be considered to be made to that 
section or other provision of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 
2751 et seq.).

   TITLE XI--TERRORIST-RELATED PROHIBITIONS AND ENFORCEMENT MEASURES

SEC. 1101. ELIGIBILITY PROVISIONS.

  (a) Ineligibility for Terrorist Related Transactions.--Section 
3(c)(1) (22 U.S.C. 2753(c)(1)) is amended--
          (1) in each of subparagraphs (A) and (B), by striking ``or 
        any predecessor Act,'' and inserting ``, any predecessor Act, 
        or licensed or approved under section 38 of this Act, to carry 
        out a transaction with a country, the government of which the 
        Secretary of State has determined is a state sponsor of 
        international terrorism for purposes of section 6(j)(1) of the 
        Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2405(j)(1)), 
        or otherwise uses such defense articles or defense services''; 
        and
          (2) by adding at the end the following:
  ``(C) In this section, the term `transaction' means the taking of any 
action, directly or indirectly, by a foreign country that would be a 
transaction prohibited by section 40 of this Act with respect to the 
United States Government and United States persons.''.
  (b) Reporting Requirement.--Section 3(e) (22 U.S.C. 2753(e)) is 
amended by inserting after ``the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961,'' the 
following: ``regardless of whether the article or service has been sold 
or otherwise furnished by the United States Government or licensed 
under section 38 of this Act,''.

SEC. 1102. WEAPONS TRANSFERS TO FOREIGN PERSONS IN THE UNITED STATES.

  Section 38(a)(1) (22 U.S.C. 2778(a)(1)) is amended in the first 
sentence by inserting after ``import and the export of defense articles 
and defense services'' the following: ``, or the transfer of such 
articles, other than firearms (or ammunition, components, parts, 
accessories, or attachments for firearms), and services within the 
United States to foreign persons,''.

SEC. 1103. COORDINATION OF LICENSE EXEMPTIONS WITH UNITED STATES LAW 
                    ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES.

  (a) Sense of Congress.--In view of the historic difficulties in the 
enforcement of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2751 et seq.) 
associated with violations involving exports of defense articles and 
defense services that have been exempted by regulation from the 
licensing requirements of section 38 of such Act, it is the sense of 
Congress that the establishment of new exemptions by regulation should 
only be undertaken after careful coordination with the appropriate 
United States law enforcement agencies.
  (b) Amendment.--Section 38(b)(2) (22 U.S.C. 2778(b)(2)) is amended by 
adding at the end the following new sentences: ``In promulgating 
regulations under subsection (a)(1) in accordance with the preceding 
sentence, any provision in such regulations that permits the export of 
defense articles or defense services without a license shall include a 
determination by the Attorney General, in consultation with the 
Secretary of Homeland Security and the Director of the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation, that the compilation and maintenance of sufficient 
documentation relating to the export without a license of the articles 
or services is ensured, notwithstanding the absence of a license, to 
facilitate law enforcement efforts to detect, prevent, and prosecute 
criminal violations of any provision of this section, section 39, or 
section 40 of this Act, including the efforts on the part of countries 
and factions engaged in international terrorism to illicitly acquire 
defense articles and defense services. No defense article or defense 
service designated by the President under subsection (a)(1) may be 
exported without a license pursuant to a regulation under subsection 
(a)(1) that is promulgated on or after January 1, 2003, until 30 days 
after the date on which the President provides notice of the proposed 
regulation to the Committee on International Relations of the House of 
Representatives and to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate 
in accordance with the procedures applicable to reprogramming 
notifications under section 634A(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
1961, including a description of the criteria that would be used to 
permit the export of the article or service and any measures to 
facilitate law enforcement efforts associated with the Attorney 
General's determination required by the preceding sentence.''.

SEC. 1104. MECHANISMS TO IDENTIFY PERSONS IN VIOLATION OF CERTAIN 
                    PROVISIONS OF LAW.

  Section 38(g)(1)(A) (22 U.S.C. 2778(g)(1)(A)) is amended--
          (1) in clause (iii)--
                  (A) by striking ``or section 2339A'' and inserting 
                ``, section 2339A''; and
                  (B) by inserting at the end before the comma the 
                following: ``, or section 2339C of such title (relating 
                to financing terrorism)'';
          (2) in clause (x), by striking ``or'' at the end;
          (3) in clause (xi), by striking the semicolon at the end and 
        inserting a comma; and
          (4) by adding at the end the following:
                  ``(xii) subclause (I) or (II) of section 
                1956(c)(7)(B)(v) of title 18, United States Code;
                  ``(xiii) section 329 of the Uniting and Strengthening 
                America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to 
                Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism (USA PATRIOT ACT) Act 
                of 2001;
                  ``(xiv) section 5332 of title 31, United States Code;
                  ``(xv) section 1960 of title 18, United States Code;
                  ``(xvi) section 175(b), 175b, 1993, 2339 of title 18, 
                United States Code;
                  ``(xvii) section 2332a, 2332b, or 2332f of title 18, 
                United States Code; or
                  ``(xviii) section 175 of title 18, United States 
                Code;''.

SEC. 1105. COMPREHENSIVE NATURE OF UNITED STATES ARMS EMBARGOES.

  (a) Findings; Sense of Congress.--
          (1) Findings.--Congress finds that--
                  (A) governments to which the United States Government 
                prohibits by law or policy the transfer of implements 
                of war, including material, components, parts, and 
                other defense articles and defense services (as defined 
                in paragraphs (3) and (4) of section 47 of the Arms 
                Export Control Act, respectively) continue to seek to 
                evade these embargoes through increasingly 
                sophisticated illegal acquisitions via the 
                ``international gray arms market'' and by seeking to 
                exploit weaknesses in the export control system of the 
                United States and its friends and allies; and
                  (B) the strict and comprehensive application of arms 
                embargoes referred to in subparagraph (A) including 
                those embargoes established by the United Nations 
                Security Council is of fundamental importance to the 
                security and foreign policy interests of the United 
                States.
          (2) Sense of congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
        United States Government should continue to provide a 
        leadership role internationally in ensuring the effectiveness 
        of arms embargoes referred to in paragraph (1).
  (b) Scope of Embargoes.--Section 38 (22 U.S.C. 2778) is amended by 
adding at the end the following:
  ``(k) Whenever the United States maintains an arms embargo pursuant 
to United States law, or through public notice by the President or 
Secretary of State pursuant to the authorities of this Act, no defense 
article or defense service subject to sections 120-130 of title 22, 
Code of Federal Regulations (commonly known as the `International 
Traffic in Arms Regulations') and no dual use good or technology 
subject to sections 730-774 of title 15, Code of Federal Regulations 
(commonly known as the `Export Administration Regulations') shall be 
sold or transferred to the military, police, or intelligence services 
of the embargoed government, including any associated governmental 
agency, subdivision, entity, or other person acting on their behalf, 
unless, at a minimum and without prejudice to any additional 
requirements established in United States law or regulation, the 
Secretary of State and the Secretary of Defense have concurred in the 
sale or transfer through issuance of a license.''.
  (c) Establishment of Controls.--The Secretary shall consult with the 
Secretary of Commerce to ensure the establishment of appropriate 
foreign policy and national security controls and license requirements 
under the Export Administration Regulations in order to ensure the 
effective implementation of section 38(k) of the Arms Export Control 
Act, as added by subsection (b).
  (d) Report.--Not later than 120 days after the date of the enactment 
of this Act, the Secretary shall submit to the appropriate 
congressional committees a report that describes the actions taken to 
implement the requirements of subsection (c).

SEC. 1106. TRANSACTIONS WITH COUNTRIES SUPPORTING ACTS OF INTERNATIONAL 
                    TERRORISM.

  Section 40(l)(1) (22 U.S.C. 2780(l)(1)) is amended by striking ``any 
item enumerated on the United States Munitions List'' and inserting ``a 
defense article or defense service (as defined in subparagraph (A) or 
(B) of section 47(7), respectively), an item enumerated on the United 
States Munitions List (as designated by the President pursuant to 
section 38(a)), or any other activity for which a license or other 
approval is required pursuant to the regulations promulgated under 
subsection (a)(1)''.

SEC. 1107. AMENDMENTS TO CONTROL OF ARMS EXPORTS AND IMPORTS.

  (a) Revision of Standard for Violation; Amount of Penalties.--Section 
38(c) (22 U.S.C. 2778(c)) is amended--
          (1) by striking ``willfully'' each place it appears and 
        inserting ``knowingly'';
          (2) by striking ``this section or section 39'' and inserting 
        ``this section, section 39, or section 40''; and
          (3) by striking ``$1,000,000'' and inserting ``$1,000,000 (in 
        the case of a violation of this section or section 39), 
        $2,000,000 (in the case of a violation involving any country 
        covered by section 40), and $1,500,000 (in the case of a 
        violation involving any country other than a country covered by 
        section 40 that is subject by United States law or policy to an 
        arms embargo)''.
  (b) Civil Penalties.--Section 38(e) (22 U.S.C. 2778(e)) is amended in 
the third sentence by striking ``under this section may not exceed 
$500,000'' and inserting ``or any other activities subject to control 
under this section, section 39, or section 40, may not exceed $500,000 
for each violation of section 38 or section 39, $1,000,000 for each 
violation involving any country covered by section 40, and $750,000 for 
each violation relating to an arms embargo (other than a violation 
covered by section 40)''.
  (c) Revision of Standard for Violation; Criminal Penalty; Civil 
Penalties; Enforcement.--Section 40 (22 U.S.C. 2780) is amended--
          (1) in subsection (j)--
                  (A) by striking ``willfully'' and inserting 
                ``knowingly''; and
                  (B) by striking ``$1,000,000'' and inserting 
                ``$2,000,000''; and
          (2) in subsection (k), by striking ``$500,000'' and inserting 
        ``$1,000,000''.
  (d) Definitions.--Section 47(7) (22 U.S.C. 2794(7)) is amended to 
read as follows:
          ``(7)(A) `defense articles', with respect to exports subject 
        to sections 38, 39, and 40 of this Act, has the meaning given 
        such term in sections 120-130 of title 22, Code of Federal 
        Regulations (commonly known as the `International Traffic in 
        Arms Regulations'), as such regulations were in effect on 
        January 1, 2003, and includes such additional articles as may 
        be designated by the President under section 38(a)(1); and
          ``(B) `defense services', with respect to exports subject to 
        sections 38, 39, and 40 of this Act, has the meaning given such 
        term in sections 120-130 of title 22, Code of Federal 
        Regulations (commonly known as the `International Traffic in 
        Arms Regulations'), as such regulations were in effect on 
        January 1, 2003, and includes--
                  ``(i) the provision of assistance (including aiding, 
                abetting, or training) to foreign persons; and
                  ``(ii) such other activities as may be designated by 
                the President pursuant to section 38(a)(1).''.

SEC. 1108. HIGH RISK EXPORTS AND END USE VERIFICATION.

  Section 38(g)(7) (22 U.S.C. 2778) is amended by adding at the end the 
following new sentence: ``Such standards shall be coordinated 
biennially with the Secretary of Homeland Security, the Attorney 
General, the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, the 
Director of Central Intelligence, and the heads of other Federal 
departments or agencies, as appropriate.''.

SEC. 1109. CONCURRENT JURISDICTION OF THE FEDERAL BUREAU OF 
                    INVESTIGATION.

  (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that, in view of 
the responsibilities of the Federal Bureau of Investigation for 
protecting the United States against terrorist attack, foreign 
intelligence operations, high technology crimes, and transnational 
criminal organizations and enterprises, the Federal Bureau of 
Investigation should be provided authority to investigate and enforce 
violations of the Arms Export Control Act without adversely affecting 
the existing authority of the Bureau of Customs and Border Protection 
of the Department of Homeland Security.
  (b) Copy of Registration.--Section 38(b)(1) (22 U.S.C. 2778(b)) is 
amended--
          (1) by redesignating the second subparagraph (B) as 
        subparagraph (C); and
          (2) in subparagraph (B)--
                  (A) in the first sentence, by inserting ``and the 
                Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation'' after 
                ``Secretary of Treasury''; and
                  (B) in the second sentence, by inserting ``and the 
                Director'' after ``The Secretary''.
  (c) Jurisdiction of FBI and Bureau of Customs.--Section 38(e) (22 
U.S.C. 2778(e)) is amended in the first sentence by adding at the end 
before the period the following: ``, and except further, that the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Bureau of Customs and Border 
Protection of the Department of Homeland Security shall have concurrent 
jurisdiction for criminal violations and enforcement of this Act''.
  (d) Mechanisms To Identify Persons in Violation of Certain Provisions 
of Law.--Section 38(g) (22 U.S.C. 2778(g)) is amended in the second 
sentence of paragraph (3), in paragraph (4), and in paragraph (8) by 
inserting ``and the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation'' 
after ``Secretary of Treasury''.

SEC. 1110. REPORT ON FOREIGN-SUPPLIED DEFENSE ARTICLES, DEFENSE 
                    SERVICES, AND DUAL USE GOODS AND TECHNOLOGY 
                    DISCOVERED IN IRAQ.

  (a) Report.--
          (1) In general.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
        the enactment of this Act, and on annual basis thereafter as 
        appropriate, the President shall prepare and transmit to the 
        congressional committees specified in paragraph (2) a written 
        report on foreign-supplied defense articles, defense services, 
        and dual use goods and technology supplied to Iraq since the 
        adoption of United Nations Security Council Resolution 687 
        (April 3, 1991) and discovered in Iraq since the inception of 
        Operation Iraqi Freedom or identified as having been in Iraq at 
        any time since April 3, 1991, and not destroyed or otherwise 
        accounted for by the United Nations Special Commission (UNSCOM) 
        or the United Nations Monitoring, Verification and Inspection 
        Commission (UNMOVIC).
          (2) Congressional committees specified.--The congressional 
        committees referred to in paragraph (1) are--
                  (A) the Committee on International Relations and the 
                Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
                Representatives; and
                  (B) the Committee on Foreign Relations and the 
                Committee on Armed Services of the Senate.
  (b) Contents.--The report required by subsection (a) shall include 
information on defense articles, defense services, and dual use goods 
and technology discovered in accordance with such subsection, including 
a description of such articles, services, and goods and technology by 
category or type, quantity, country of origin (if known), manufacturer 
(if known), date of acquisition (if known), and, in the case of dual 
use goods and technology, the use or intended use or deployment (if 
known) and whether the goods or technology are covered by any arms 
control agreement or nonproliferation arrangement to which the United 
States is a party.
  (c) Form.--The report required by subsection (a) shall be transmitted 
in unclassified form to the maximum extent practicable, but may contain 
a classified annex if necessary.

           TITLE XII--STRENGTHENING MUNITIONS EXPORT CONTROLS

SEC. 1201. CONTROL OF ITEMS ON MISSILE TECHNOLOGY CONTROL REGIME ANNEX.

  (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that all 
proposals to export or transfer to foreign persons by other means, 
whether in the United States or abroad, and any other activities 
subject to regulation under section 38, 39, or 40 of the Arms Export 
Control Act, relating to items on the Missile Technology Control Regime 
Annex, should be accorded stringent control and scrutiny consistent 
with the purposes of section 71 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 
U.S.C. 2797).
  (b) Control of Items on MTCR Annex.--The Secretary, in coordination 
with the Secretary of Commerce, the Attorney General, and the Secretary 
of Defense, shall ensure that all items on the MTCR Annex are subject 
to stringent control by the United States Government pursuant to the 
International Traffic in Arms Regulations and the Export Administration 
Regulations.
  (c) Certification.--Not later than March 1 of each year, the 
Secretary, in coordination with the Secretary of Commerce, the Attorney 
General and the Secretary of Defense, shall prepare and submit to the 
appropriate congressional committees a report that contains--
          (1) a certification that the requirement of subsection (b) 
        has been met for the prior year, or if the requirement has not 
        been met, the reasons therefor; and
          (2) a description of the updated coverage, if any, of the 
        regulations referred to in subsection (b) with respect to all 
        items on the MTCR Annex and an explanation of any areas of 
        overlap or omissions, if any, among the regulations.

SEC. 1202. CERTIFICATIONS RELATING TO EXPORT OF CERTAIN DEFENSE 
                    ARTICLES AND SERVICES.

  Section 36(c) (22 U.S.C. 2776(c)) is amended--
          (1) in the first sentence of paragraph (1), by inserting 
        after ``$1,000,000 or more'' the following: ``, or, 
        notwithstanding section 27(g) of this Act, for any special 
        comprehensive authorization under sections 120-130 of title 22, 
        Code of Federal Regulations (commonly known as the 
        `International Traffic in Arms Regulations') for the export of 
        defense articles or defense services in an aggregate amount of 
        $100,000,000 or more'';
          (2) in paragraph (2)--
                  (A) by striking subparagraph (B); and
                  (B) by redesignating subparagraph (C) as subparagraph 
                (B); and
          (3) in the matter preceding subparagraph (A) of paragraph 
        (5), by inserting ``or paragraph (2)'' after ``paragraph (1)''.

SEC. 1203. NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND 
                    MANUFACTURING LICENSING AGREEMENTS WITH NATO MEMBER 
                    COUNTRIES, AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, AND JAPAN.

  Section 36(d) (22 U.S.C. 2776(d)) is amended by adding at the end the 
following:
  ``(6) In the case of a commercial technical assistance or 
manufacturing license agreement with a member country of the North 
Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) or Australia, Japan, or New Zealand 
that does not authorize a new sales territory that includes any country 
other than such countries, the requirements contained in paragraphs (2) 
and (4) shall apply only if--
          ``(A) the agreement involves--
                  ``(i) major defense equipment in the amount of 
                $7,000,000 or more; or
                  ``(ii) significant military equipment in the amount 
                of $25,000,000 or more; and
          ``(B) the amount referred to in clause (i) or (ii) of 
        subparagraph (A), as the case may be, includes the estimated 
        value of all defense articles and defense services to be 
        manufactured or transferred throughout the duration of the 
        approval period.''.

SEC. 1204. STRENGTHENING DEFENSE COOPERATION WITH AUSTRALIA AND THE 
                    UNITED KINGDOM.

  (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
expeditious consideration of munitions license applications that meet 
the policy and eligibility criteria established in section 38 of the 
Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778) for export or transfer of 
defense items (as such term is defined in subsection (j)(4)(A) of such 
section) to Australia and the United Kingdom is fully consistent with 
United States security and foreign policy interests and the objectives 
of world peace and security.
  (b) Establishment of Fast Track Munitions Licensing for Australia and 
the United Kingdom.--Section 38(f) (22 U.S.C. 2778(f)) is amended by 
adding at the end the following:
  ``(4) In the absence of a binding bilateral agreement with the 
Government of Australia or the Government of the United Kingdom (as the 
case may be) that meets the requirements of paragraph (2) and 
subsection (j), the Secretary of State shall ensure that any 
application submitted under this section for the export of defense 
items to Australia or the United Kingdom (as the case may be) that 
meets all other requirements of this section (including requirements 
relating to eligibility of parties to the transaction, the absence of 
risk of diversion to unauthorized end use and end users, and 
preservation of United States intelligence and law enforcement 
interests), and which are also transactions involving defense items 
that would be exempt pursuant to sections 120-130 of title 22, Code of 
Federal Regulations (commonly known as the `International Traffic in 
Arms Regulations') from export licensing or other written approvals if 
such items were items to be exported to Canada, are processed by the 
Department of State not later than ten days after the date of receipt 
of the application without referral to any other Federal department or 
agency, except on an extraordinary basis upon receipt of a written 
request from the Attorney General, the Secretary of Homeland Security, 
the Director of Central Intelligence, or the Secretary of Defense.''.

SEC. 1205. TRAINING AND LIAISON FOR SMALL BUSINESSES.

  (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that it is 
increasingly important that the Secretary, in administering the 
licensing, registration, compliance, and other authorities contained in 
section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778), should 
provide up-to-date training and other educational assistance to small 
businesses in the United States aerospace and defense industrial 
sector.
  (b) Small Business Liaison.--Not later than 180 days after the date 
of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall designate, within the 
Office of Defense Trade Controls of the Department of State, a 
coordinator for small business affairs. The coordinator shall serve as 
a liaison for small businesses in the United States aerospace and 
defense industrial sector with respect to licensing and registration 
requirements in order to facilitate the compliance and other forms of 
participation by such small businesses in the United States munitions 
control system, including by providing training, technical assistance, 
and through other efforts as may be appropriate.

SEC. 1206. STUDY AND REPORT RELATING TO CO-LOCATING MUNITIONS CONTROL 
                    FUNCTIONS OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF STATE, DEFENSE, AND 
                    HOMELAND SECURITY.

  (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
administrative, licensing, and compliance-related functions associated 
with the export of defense articles and defense services under section 
38 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778), which are generally 
administered by the Department of State in conjunction with the 
Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Defense, should 
be expedited consistent with United States security, law enforcement, 
and foreign policy requirements by a reduction in the those matters 
necessitating inter-agency referral outside of the Department of State, 
or by co-locating related functions of the Department of Homeland 
Security and the Department of Defense with those functions of the 
Department of State in order to minimize the time and administrative 
tasks to government and industry involved in inter-agency referrals, 
while also providing a convenient, central location for United States 
defense companies, especially small businesses.
  (b) Study and Report.--
          (1) Study.--The Secretary, in consultation with the Secretary 
        of Homeland Security and the Secretary of Defense, and through 
        the Federal advisory committee structure with the public, shall 
        conduct a study to examine the relative advantages and 
        disadvantages to the United States Government, the United 
        States defense industry, including United States small 
        businesses, and to other public constituencies of co-locating 
        relevant functions and personnel of the Department of State, 
        the Department of Homeland Security, and the Department of 
        Defense with the Office of Defense Trade Controls of the 
        Department of State at a central location convenient to the 
        public and United States defense industry, without prejudice to 
        the responsibilities and prerogatives of the Secretary, the 
        Secretary of Homeland Security, and the Secretary of Defense 
        under existing law.
          (2) Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
        enactment of this Act, the Secretary shall prepare and submit 
        to the appropriate congressional committees a report that 
        contains the results of study conducted under paragraph (1).

         TITLE XIII--SECURITY ASSISTANCE AND RELATED PROVISIONS

      Subtitle A--Foreign Military Sales and Financing Authorities

SEC. 1301. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  There are authorized to be appropriated to the President for grant 
assistance under section 23 of the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 
2763) and for the subsidy cost, as defined in section 502(5) of the 
Federal Credit Reform Act of 1990, of direct loans under such section 
$4,414,000,000 for fiscal year 2004.

SEC. 1302. PROVISION OF CATALOGING DATA AND SERVICES.

  Section 21(h)(2) (22 U.S.C. 2761(h)(2)) is amended by striking ``or 
to any member government of that Organization if that Organization or 
member government'' and inserting ``, to any member of that 
Organization, or to the Governments of Australia, New Zealand, or Japan 
if that Organization, member government, or the Governments of 
Australia, New Zealand, or Japan''.

SEC. 1303. ANNUAL ESTIMATE AND JUSTIFICATION FOR SALES PROGRAM.

  Section 25(a)(1) (22 U.S.C. 2765(a)(1)) is amended by inserting after 
``$7,000,000 or more'' the following ``(or, in the case of a member 
country of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO), Australia, 
New Zealand, or Japan, $25,000,000 or more)''.

SEC. 1304. ADJUSTMENT TO ADVANCE NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENT FOR TRANSFER 
                    OF CERTAIN EXCESS DEFENSE ARTICLES.

  Section 516(f)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
2321i) is amended by striking ``significant military equipment (as 
defined in section 47(9) of the Arms Export Control Act)'' and 
inserting ``major defense equipment (as defined in section 47(6) of the 
Arms Export Control Act)''.

       Subtitle B--International Military Education and Training

SEC. 1311. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  There are authorized to be appropriated to the President $91,700,000 
for fiscal year 2004 to carry out chapter 5 of part II of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2347 et seq.).

SEC. 1312. ANNUAL FOREIGN MILITARY TRAINING REPORTING.

  Section 656(a)(1) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
2416(a)(1)) is amended--
          (1) by striking ``January 31'' and inserting ``March 1''; and
          (2) by striking ``and all such training proposed for the 
        current fiscal year''.

              Subtitle C--Assistance for Select Countries

SEC. 1321. ASSISTANCE FOR ISRAEL.

  Section 513 of the Security Assistance Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-
280) is amended--
          (1) in subsection (b)(1), by striking ``2002 and 2003'' and 
        inserting ``2003 through 2005'';
          (2) in subsection (c)(1), by striking ``2002 and 2003'' and 
        inserting ``2003 through 2005'';
          (3) in subsection (c)(3)--
                  (A) by striking ``fiscal years 2002 and 2003'' and 
                inserting ``fiscal years 2004 and 2005'';
                  (B) by striking ``fiscal year 2002'' and inserting 
                ``fiscal year 2004''; and
                  (C) by striking ``fiscal year 2003, or'' and 
                inserting ``fiscal year 2005, or''; and
          (4) in subsection (c)(4)--
                  (A) by striking ``2002 and 2003'' and inserting 
                ``2003 through 2005''; and
                  (B) by striking ``$535,000,000 for fiscal year 2002'' 
                and all that follows through ``fiscal year 2003'' and 
                inserting ``$550,000,000 for fiscal year 2003, not less 
                than $565,000,000 for fiscal year 2004, and not less 
                than $580,000,000 for fiscal year 2005''.

SEC. 1322. ASSISTANCE FOR EGYPT.

  Section 514 of the Security Assistance Act of 2000 (Public Law 106-
280) is amended--
          (1) by striking ``2002 and 2003'' each place it appears and 
        inserting ``2003 through 2005''; and
          (2) in subsection (e)--
                  (A) by striking ``fiscal years 2002 and 2003'' and 
                inserting ``fiscal years 2004 and 2005'';
                  (B) by striking ``fiscal year 2002'' and inserting 
                ``fiscal year 2004''; and
                  (C) by striking ``fiscal year 2003, or'' and 
                inserting ``fiscal year 2005, or''.

                  Subtitle D--Miscellaneous Provisions

SEC. 1331. UNITED STATES WAR RESERVE STOCKPILES FOR ALLIES.

  Section 514(b)(2) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
2321h(b)(2)) is amended--
          (1) in subparagraph (A), by striking ``for fiscal year 2003'' 
        and inserting ``for each of fiscal years 2003 and 2004''; and
          (2) in subparagraph (B), by striking ``for fiscal year 2003'' 
        and inserting ``for each of fiscal years 2003 and 2004''.

SEC. 1332. TRANSFER TO ISRAEL OF CERTAIN DEFENSE ARTICLES IN THE UNITED 
                    STATES WAR RESERVE STOCKPILES FOR ALLIES.

  (a) Authorization.--Notwithstanding section 514 of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2321h), the President is authorized 
to transfer to Israel, in return for concessions to be negotiated by 
the Secretary of Defense, with the concurrence of the Secretary, 
defense articles, including armor, artillery, ammunition for automatic 
weapons, missiles, and other munitions that are--
          (1) obsolete or surplus items;
          (2) in the inventory of the Department of Defense;
          (3) intended for use as reserve stocks in Israel; and
          (4) are located in a stockpile in Israel as of the date of 
        enactment of this Act.
  (b) Concessions.--The value of concessions negotiated pursuant to 
subsection (a) shall be at least equal to the fair market value of the 
items transferred. The concessions may include cash compensation, 
services, waiver of charges otherwise payable by the United States, and 
other items of value.
  (c) Advance Notification of Transfer.--
          (1) In general.--Not less than 30 days before making a 
        transfer under the authority of this section, the President 
        shall transmit a notification describing the items to be 
        transferred to Israel and the concessions to be received by the 
        United States to the congressional committees specified in 
        paragraph (2).
          (2) Congressional committees specified.--The congressional 
        committees referred to in paragraph (1) are--
                  (A) the Committee on International Relations and the 
                Committee on Armed Services of the House of 
                Representatives; and
                  (B) the Committee on Foreign Relations and the 
                Committee on Armed Services of the Senate.
  (d) Expiration of Authority.--No transfer may be made under the 
authority of this section following the expiration of the five-year 
period beginning on the date of enactment of this Act.

SEC. 1333. EXPANSION OF AUTHORITIES FOR LOAN OF MATERIAL, SUPPLIES, AND 
                    EQUIPMENT FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PURPOSES.

  Section 65 (22 U.S.C. 2796d) is amended--
          (1) in subsection (a)(1), by inserting ``or a friendly 
        foreign country'' after ``ally'' each place such term appears; 
        and
          (2) in subsection (d) to read as follows:
  ``(d) For purposes of this section--
          ``(1) the term `NATO ally' means a member country of the 
        North Atlantic Treaty Organization (other than the United 
        States); and
          ``(2) the term `friendly foreign country' means any non-NATO 
        member country determined by the President to be eligible for a 
        cooperative project agreement with the United States pursuant 
        to section 27(j) of this Act.''.

SEC. 1334. ASSISTANCE FOR DEMINING AND RELATED ACTIVITIES.

  (a) Assistance.--The Secretary is authorized to provide grants to, or 
enter into contracts or cooperative agreements with, public-private 
partnerships for the purpose of establishing and carrying out demining, 
clearance of unexploded ordnance, and related activities in foreign 
countries.
  (b) Limitation.--Except as otherwise provided, the total amount 
provided on a grant basis to public-private partnerships under 
subsection (a) for a fiscal year may not exceed $450,000.
  (c) Funding.--Amounts made available to carry out ``Nonproliferation, 
Anti-Terrorism, Demining, and Related Programs'' for fiscal year 2004 
are authorized to be made available to carry out this section.

SEC. 1335. REPORTS RELATING TO TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE 
                    RUSSIAN FEDERATION ON STRATEGIC OFFENSIVE 
                    REDUCTIONS.

  The President shall submit to the Committee on International 
Relations of the House of Representatives all reports submitted to the 
Committee on Foreign Relations pursuant to section 2 of the Senate 
Resolution of Ratification to Accompany Treaty Document 107-8, Treaty 
Between the United States of America and the Russian Federation on 
Strategic Offensive Reductions.

SEC. 1336. STATEMENT OF HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REGARDING THE TREATY 
                    BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE RUSSIAN 
                    FEDERATION ON STRATEGIC OFFENSIVE REDUCTIONS.

  The House of Representatives--
                  (1) concurs with the declarations of the Senate in 
                section 3 of the Resolution of Ratification to 
                Accompany Treaty Document 107-8, Treaty Between the 
                United States of America and the Russian Federation on 
                Strategic Offensive Reductions;
                  (2) encourages the President to continue strategic 
                offensive reductions to the lowest possible levels 
                consistent with national security requirements and 
                alliance obligations of the United States;
                  (3) urges the President to engage the Russian 
                Federation with the objectives of establishing 
                cooperative measures to give each party to the Treaty 
                Between the United States of America and the Russian 
                Federation on Strategic Offensive Reductions improved 
                confidence regarding the accurate accounting and 
                security of nonstrategic nuclear weapons maintained by 
                the other party; and
                  (4) encourages the President to accelerate United 
                States strategic force reductions, to the extent 
                feasible and consistent with the treaty, in order that 
                the reductions required by Article I of the Treaty 
                Between the United States of America and the Russian 
                Federation on Strategic Offensive Reductions may be 
                achieved prior to December 31, 2012.

SEC. 1337. NONPROLIFERATION AND DISARMAMENT FUND.

  (a) Authorization of Appropriations.--
          (1) In general.--There are authorized to be appropriated to 
        the President to carry out section 504 of the Freedom for 
        Russia and Emerging Eurasian Democracies and Open Markets 
        Support Act of 1992 (22 U.S.C. 5854; relating to the 
        ``Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund'') $60,000,000 for each 
        of the fiscal years 2004 and 2005.
          (2) Availability.--Amounts appropriated pursuant to the 
        authorization of appropriations under paragraph (1) are 
        authorized to remain available until expended.
  (b) Nonproliferation of Highly Enriched Uranium.--
          (1) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
                  (A) Highly enriched uranium is the most likely source 
                material for terrorist or other outlaw organizations 
                that seek to acquire a nuclear weapon.
                  (B) Such organizations are not likely to produce this 
                source material on their own, but will instead look to 
                divert highly enriched uranium from some of the many 
                vulnerable stockpiles in numerous facilities around the 
                world.
                  (C) There is a need for a coordinated United States 
                Government initiative to secure and dispose of highly 
                enriched uranium stockpiles in these vulnerable 
                facilities around the world.
                  (D) The Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund (NDF) 
                is a unique and flexible entity that is well-suited to 
                carry out the initiative described in subparagraph (C), 
                in cooperation with other Federal departments and 
                agencies, including the Department of Energy.
          (2) Initiative.--The Secretary of State is authorized to 
        establish and carry out an initiative to secure and dispose of 
        highly enriched uranium stockpiles in foreign countries, 
        including the provision of such assistance as may be required 
        to secure host country cooperation under the initiative.
          (3) Authorization of appropriations.--Of the amounts made 
        available to carry out section 504 of the Freedom for Russia 
        and Emerging Eurasian Democracies and Open Markets Support Act 
        of 1992 (22 U.S.C. 5854) for fiscal years 2004 and 2005, there 
        are authorized to be appropriated to the Secretary to carry out 
        paragraph (2) $25,000,000 for each such fiscal year.

SEC. 1338. MARITIME INTERDICTION PATROL BOATS FOR MOZAMBIQUE.

  (a) In General.--Of the amounts made available to carry out section 
23 of the Arms Export Control Act for fiscal year 2004, there is 
authorized to be appropriated $1,000,000 for refurbishment, delivery, 
operational training, and related costs associated with the provision 
of not more than four excess coastal patrol boats to the Government of 
Mozambique for maritime patrol and interdiction activities.
  (b) Availability.--Amounts appropriated pursuant to the authorization 
of appropriations under subsection (a) are authorized to remain 
available until September 30, 2006.

SEC. 1339. REPORT ON MISSILE DEFENSE COOPERATION.

  Not later than December 31, 2003, and December 31, 2004, the 
Secretary of State shall submit to the appropriate congressional 
committees a report on cooperative efforts that have been undertaken by 
the United States with foreign governments to foster the development 
and deployment of defenses against missile attack. Such report shall 
include a detailed description of such efforts on a country-by-country 
basis, and may be submitted in classified and unclassified form, as 
appropriate.

SEC. 1340. IRAN'S PROGRAM TO DEVELOP A NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE DEVICE.

  (a) Findings.--Congress finds the following:
          (1) Iran, as a party to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation 
        of Nuclear Weapons, has legally forsworn developing or 
        acquiring nuclear weapons.
          (2) Iran has for more than a decade pursued a program aimed 
        at the development of a nuclear explosive device.
          (3) Director of Central Intelligence George Tenet has 
        repeatedly warned of Iran's clandestine efforts to acquire 
        weapons of mass destruction, stating as recently as February 
        11, 2003, in testimony before Congress that ``Iran is 
        continuing to pursue development of a nuclear fuel cycle for 
        civilian and nuclear weapons purposes . . . [and further that] 
        Tehran may be able to indigenously produce enough fissile 
        material for a nuclear weapon'' within this decade.
          (4) On March 17, 2003, Dr. el Baradei, Director General of 
        the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), called on Iran 
        to agree to a more intrusive monitoring regime at its nuclear 
        sites and demanded that Iran, which is a signatory to the 
        Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, agree to an ``additional 
        protocol'' under the IAEA's nuclear inspection rights, which 
        would enable more intrusive monitoring.
          (5) In early 2003 Iran announced plans to mine its own 
        natural uranium and admitted constructing two nuclear 
        facilities, one a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment facility 
        and the other a heavy water production plant.
          (6) A uranium enrichment facility would give Iran the 
        capability to indigenously produce nuclear-weapons grade 
        uranium. Further, heavy water is used in reactors that not only 
        produce weapons-grade plutonium, but also tritium, a key 
        ingredient in boosted-fission weapons.
          (7) At the same time, Iran has been developing long-range 
        missiles that could deliver nuclear explosive devices. Director 
        of Central Intelligence Tenet has warned that Iran could flight 
        test an intercontinental ballistic missile later this decade.
          (8) Iran has received considerable assistance in its nuclear 
        program and in its missile development program from the Russian 
        Federation, the People's Republic of China, and North Korea.
          (9) Congress has long been seized with finding ways to deter 
        or delay Iran's acquisition or development of such deadly 
        weapons, including through the enactment of the Iran-Iraq Arms 
        Non-Proliferation Act of 1992, the Iran Libya Sanctions Act of 
        1996, the Iran Non-Proliferation Act of 2000, and the Iran 
        Nuclear Proliferation Prevention Act of 2002.
          (10) Successive Administrations have similarly sought to 
        deter or delay Iran's acquisition or development of such 
        weapons by such measures as elevating Iran's proliferation 
        behavior in bilateral relations with the Russian Federation and 
        the People's Republic of China, sanctioning entities of the 
        Russian Federation providing technology or expertise to Iran's 
        nuclear and missile programs, and urging multilateral export 
        control regimes to deny sensitive technology to proliferators 
        like Iran.
          (11) President Bush included Iran as one of the countries 
        that comprise the ``axis of evil'' in his January 2002 State of 
        the Union Address because of its efforts to develop weapons of 
        mass destruction and its support of international terrorism. 
        Iran has been the principle supporter and supplier to Hizballah 
        in southern Lebanon, Hamas, and Islamic Jihad. Further, the 
        leaders of Iran have publicly called for the destruction of the 
        State of Israel.
          (12) A nuclear-armed Iran would pose a grave threat to the 
        national security of the United States and to our allies in the 
        region.
  (b) Statement of Policy.--Congress--
          (1) finds that Iran's support of terrorism and its efforts to 
        develop nuclear weapons are a grave threat to the national 
        security of the United States and its allies and to the United 
        States Armed Forces;
          (2) declares that the United States and our friends and 
        allies must make maximum efforts to prevent Iran from 
        developing or acquiring nuclear weapons and the missiles to 
        deliver them;
          (3) urges the President to use all appropriate means to 
        prevent Iran from gaining such capabilities;
          (4) urges the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) to 
        employ the full range of its inspection authorities to ensure 
        that Iran's nuclear program is used for peaceful purposes only;
          (5) encourages Iran to sign and ratify the new nuclear 
        safeguards protocol, the ``Model Additional Protocol (INFCIRC/
        540-Corr)'' to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear 
        Weapons, which would demonstrate Iran's commitment to sharing 
        information about its nuclear program with the IAEA and the 
        international community and to full disclosure and transparency 
        about its nuclear program; and
          (6) urges the United States resident representative to the 
        IAEA to work with the Board of Governors of the IAEA on 
        guidelines for early identification of noncompliance with the 
        Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty.

            TITLE XIV--MISSILE THREAT REDUCTION ACT OF 2003

SEC. 1401. SHORT TITLE.

  This title may be cited as the ``Missile Threat Reduction Act of 
2003''.

  Subtitle A--Strengthening International Missile Nonproliferation Law

SEC. 1411. FINDINGS.

  Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) The spread of offensive ballistic missiles suitable for 
        launching nuclear, chemical, and biological warheads is 
        accelerating across the globe.
          (2) According to the Carnegie Endowment for International 
        Peace, more than 25 countries possess missiles with ranges in 
        excess of 300 kilometers and capable of delivering a nuclear 
        warhead.
          (3)(A) Many of the countries now possessing such missiles, 
        and engaging in the sale and transfer of such missiles and 
        their production technology to other countries, are directly 
        hostile to the United States, its interests, and its allies.
          (B) Of particular concern in this regard is North Korea, 
        which regularly sells ballistic missiles and technology to 
        countries in regions of instability and concern to the United 
        States.
          (4) The Central Intelligence Agency has stated in its most 
        recent report on the foreign ballistic missile threat the 
        following:
                  ``Emerging ballistic missile states continue to 
                increase the range, reliability, and accuracy of the 
                missile systems in their inventories--posing ever 
                greater risks to U.S. forces, interests, and allies 
                throughout the world. A decade ago, U.S. and allied 
                forces abroad faced threats from SRBM's [Short Range 
                Ballistic Missiles]--primarily the Scud and its 
                variants. Today, countries have deployed or are on the 
                verge of deploying MRBM's [Medium Range Ballistic 
                Missiles], placing greater numbers of targets at risk.
                  ``Proliferation of ballistic missile-related 
                technologies, materials, and expertise--especially by 
                Russian, Chinese, and North Korean entities--has 
                enabled emerging missile states to accelerate the 
                development timelines for their existing programs, 
                acquire turnkey systems to gain previously non-existent 
                capabilities--in the case of the Chinese sale of the M-
                11 SRBM to Pakistan--and lay the groundwork for the 
                expansion of domestic infrastructures to potentially 
                accommodate even more capable and longer range future 
                systems.''.
          (5) The same CIA report also noted the following: ``North 
        Korea has assumed the role as the missile and manufacturing 
        technology source for many programs. North Korean willingness 
        to sell complete systems and components has enabled other 
        states to acquire longer range capabilities earlier than 
        otherwise would have been possible--notably the sale of the No 
        Dong MRBM to Pakistan. The North also has helped countries to 
        acquire technologies to serve as the basis for domestic 
        development efforts--as with Iran's reverse-engineering of the 
        No Dong in the Shahab-3 program. Meanwhile, Iran is expanding 
        its efforts to sell missile technology.''.
          (6) Since 1987, 33 countries have committed to abide by a 
        voluntary set of guidelines known as the Missile Technology 
        Control Regime (MTCR), whereby adherents agreed to refrain from 
        the transfer to nonadherents of certain categories of whole 
        missiles, their constituent parts, and the facilities to 
        manufacture them, especially ``Category I'' missiles, which at 
        a range of 300 kilometers or more and a payload capacity of 500 
        kilograms or more are especially suited for delivering nuclear 
        weapons.
          (7) In October 2002, 93 countries committed to observe a 
        nonbinding code of conduct derived from, but less restrictive 
        than, the nonbinding MTCR. While this is a welcome achievement, 
        it does not provide a legal obligation on its adherents to 
        refrain from the trade in missiles or missile technology.
          (8) On December 10, 2002, the White House released its 
        ``National Strategy to Combat Weapons of Mass Destruction'', 
        wherein it is stated that strengthening international 
        nonproliferation controls on weapons of mass destruction (WMD) 
        and upon the missiles that can deliver them is the second of 
        three principal pillars of the National Strategy. The National 
        Strategy also states that ``effective interdiction is a 
        critical part of the U.S. strategy to combat WMD and their 
        delivery means''.
          (9) On December 11, 2002, the United States took control of 
        an unflagged freighter that was attempting clandestinely to 
        ship, from North Korea to Yemen, SCUD missiles of a type that 
        would be generally prohibited from transfer as Category I 
        missiles.
          (10) Neither North Korea nor Yemen is an adherent to the MTCR 
        guidelines, which in any case are not legally binding, and 
        there is no binding international legal instrument that would 
        prohibit shipments of the missiles referred to in paragraph 
        (9).
          (11) At Yemen's request, the United States released the 
        shipment of North Korean Scud missiles to Yemen.
          (12) Also on December 11, 2002, the White House press 
        spokesman stated that existing international law regarding 
        halting the spread of missile proliferation could be 
        strengthened. The new National Strategy to Combat Weapons of 
        Mass Destruction also commits the United States to support 
        those regimes that are currently in force, and to work to 
        improve the effectiveness of, and compliance with, those 
        regimes, and identifies the MTCR as a regime that the United 
        States will seek to strengthen.
          (13) Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, testifying on 
        February 12, 2003, before the Committee on Armed Services of 
        the Senate, stated the following: ``. . . [I]t's pretty clear 
        that the proliferation regimes that exist in the world worked 
        pretty well before, [but] they're not working very well right 
        now. . . . [U]nless the world wakes up and says this is a 
        dangerous thing and creates a set of regimes that will in fact 
        get cooperation to stop those weapons, we're going to be facing 
        a very serious situation in the next five years.''.
          (14) The MTCR has made an invaluable contribution to 
        restraint in the international trade of offensive ballistic 
        missiles. Strengthening international controls on ballistic 
        missiles, however, will require a dramatic expansion of 
        adherents that rigorously abide by the MTCR's guidelines, and a 
        binding legal basis for the United Nations and countries 
        devoted to nonproliferation to prevent, and when necessary act 
        to prevent, further proliferation of offensive ballistic 
        missiles around the world.
          (15) Therefore, it should be the policy of the United States 
        to promote the creation of new international mechanisms that 
        would, in all future circumstances, allow the peace-loving and 
        law-abiding nations of the world the authority to interdict and 
        prevent the transfer of such missiles.

SEC. 1412. POLICY OF THE UNITED STATES.

  It shall be the policy of the United States to seek a binding 
international instrument or instruments to restrict the trade in 
offensive ballistic missiles with ranges of 300 kilometers or more that 
have a payload capacity of 500 kilograms or more. Such a binding 
international instrument may take the form of a multilateral treaty, a 
United Nations Security Council resolution, or other instrument of 
international law, and should provide for enforcement measures 
including interdiction, seizure, and impoundment of illicit shipments 
of offensive ballistic missiles and related technology, equipment, and 
components.

SEC. 1413. SENSE OF CONGRESS.

  It is the sense of the Congress that the United States should 
immediately introduce a resolution in the United Nations Security 
Council to prohibit all members of the United Nations from purchasing, 
receiving, assisting or allowing the transfer of, and to authorize the 
subsequent interdiction, seizure, and impoundment of, any missile, 
missile-related equipment, means of producing missiles, or missile-
related technology from North Korea.

  Subtitle B--Strengthening United States Missile Nonproliferation Law

SEC. 1421. PROBATIONARY PERIOD FOR FOREIGN PERSONS.

  (a) In General.--Notwithstanding any other provision of law, upon the 
expiration, or the granting of a waiver, on or after January 1, 2003, 
of sanctions against a foreign person imposed under section 73(a) of 
the Arms Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2797b(a)) or under section 
11B(b)(1) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 
2410b(b)(1)), as continued in effect under the International Emergency 
Economic Powers Act, a license shall be required, for a period of not 
less than 3 years, for the export to that foreign person of all items 
controlled for export under section 5 or 6 of the Export Administration 
Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2404, 2405), as continued in effect under 
the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, in accordance with the 
Export Administration Regulations.
  (b) Termination.--Subsection (a) shall not apply to a foreign person 
30 days after the President notifies the Committee on International 
Relations of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Banking, 
Housing, and Urban Affairs and the Committee on Foreign Relations of 
the Senate that he has determined that--
          (1) the foreign person has--
                  (A) ceased all activity related to the original 
                imposition of sanctions under section 73(a) of the Arms 
                Export Control Act or section 11B(b)(A) of the Export 
                Administration Act of 1979, as the case may be; and
                  (B) has instituted a program of transparency measures 
                whereby the United States will be able to verify for at 
                least a period of 3 years that the foreign person is 
                not engaging in prohibited activities under those 
                provisions of law referred to in paragraph (1); and
          (2) there has been an appropriate resolution of the original 
        violation or violations, such as financial penalties, 
        incarceration, destruction of prohibited items, or other 
        appropriate measures taken to prevent a recurrence of the 
        violation or violations.

SEC. 1422. STRENGTHENING UNITED STATES MISSILE PROLIFERATION SANCTIONS 
                    ON FOREIGN PERSONS.

  (a) Arms Export Control Act.--Section 73(a)(2) (22 U.S.C. 
2797b(a)(2)) is amended by striking ``2 years'' each place it appears 
and inserting ``4 years''.
  (b) Public Information.--Section 73(e)(2) (22 U.S.C. 2797b(e)(2)) is 
amended by adding at the end the following new sentence: ``Such report 
may be classified only to the extent necessary to protect intelligence 
sources and methods. If the report is so classified, the President 
shall make every effort to acquire sufficient alternative information 
that would allow a subsequent unclassified version of the report to be 
issued.''.
  (c) Export Administration Act of 1979.--Any sanction imposed on a 
foreign person under section 11B(b)(1) of the Export Administration Act 
of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2410b(b)(1)), as continued in effect under the 
International Emergency Economic Powers Act, shall be in effect for a 
period of 4 years beginning on the date on which the sanction was 
imposed.
  (d) Applicability.--The amendments made by subsections (a) and (b) 
and the provisions of subsection (c) shall apply to all sanctions 
imposed under section 73(a) of the Arms Export Control Act or section 
11B(b)(1) of the Export Administration Act of 1979, as continued in 
effect under the International Emergency Economic Powers Act, by reason 
of acts giving rise to such sanctions that were committed by foreign 
persons on or after January 1, 2003.

SEC. 1423. COMPREHENSIVE UNITED STATES MISSILE PROLIFERATION SANCTIONS 
                    ON ALL RESPONSIBLE PERSONS.

  (a) Arms Export Control Act.--Section 73(a) (22 U.S.C. 2797b(a)) is 
amended by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
  ``(3)(A) Sanctions imposed upon a foreign person under paragraph (2) 
shall also be imposed on any governmental entity that the President 
determines exercises effective control over, benefits from, or directly 
or indirectly facilitates the activities of that foreign person.
  ``(B) When a sanction is imposed on a foreign person under paragraph 
(2), the President may also impose that sanction on any other person or 
entity that the President has reason to believe has or may acquire 
items that may not be exported to that foreign person on account of the 
sanction imposed on that foreign person, with the intent to transfer to 
that foreign person, or provide to that foreign person access to, such 
items.
  ``(C) The President may also prohibit, for such period of time as he 
may determine, any transaction or dealing, by a United States person or 
within the United States, with any foreign person on whom sanctions 
have been imposed under this subsection.
  ``(D) The President shall report on an annual basis to the Committee 
on International Relations of the House of Representatives and the 
Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate the identity of any 
foreign person that engages in any transaction or activity with a 
foreign person on whom sanctions have been imposed under this 
subsection that either--
          ``(i) would be the basis for imposing sanctions under 
        subparagraph (B) but for which sanctions have not been imposed; 
        or
          ``(ii) would be the basis for imposing sanctions under 
        subparagraph (C) if the transaction or activity had been 
        carried out by a United States person or by a person in the 
        United States.
Such report shall be unclassified to the maximum extent feasible, but 
may include a classified annex.''.
  (b) Definition of Person.--Section 74(a)(8)(A) (22 U.S.C. 
2797c(a)(8)(A)) is amended to read as follows:
          ``(8)(A) the term `person' means--
                  ``(i) a natural person;
                  ``(ii) a corporation, business association, 
                partnership, society, trust, transnational corporation, 
                or transnational joint venture, any other 
                nongovernmental entity, organization, or group, and any 
                governmental entity;
                  ``(iii) any subsidiary, subunit, or parent entity of 
                any business enterprise or other organization or entity 
                listed in clause (ii); and
                  ``(iv) any successor of any business enterprise or 
                other organization or entity listed in clause (ii) or 
                (iii); and''.
  (c) Export Administration Act of 1979.--
          (1) Sanctions imposed on government entities.--Any sanction 
        imposed on a foreign person under section 11B(b)(1)(B) of the 
        Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 
        2410b(b)(1)(B)), as continued in effect under the International 
        Emergency Economic Powers Act (in this subsection referred to 
        as a ``dual use sanction''), shall also be imposed on any 
        governmental entity that the President determines exercises 
        effective control over, benefits from, or directly or 
        indirectly facilitates the activities of that foreign person.
          (2) Other entities.--When a dual use sanction is imposed on a 
        foreign person, the President may also impose that sanction on 
        any other person or entity that the President has reason to 
        believe has or may acquire items that may not be exported to 
        that foreign person on account of the dual use sanction imposed 
        on that foreign person, with the intent to transfer to that 
        foreign person, or provide to that foreign person access to, 
        such items.
          (3) Transactions by third parties.--The President may also 
        prohibit, for such period of time as he may determine, any 
        transaction or dealing, by a United States person or within the 
        United States, with any foreign person on whom dual use 
        sanctions have been imposed.
          (4) Report.--The President shall submit on an annual basis to 
        the appropriate congressional committees a report that contains 
        the identity of any foreign person that engages in any 
        transaction or activity with a foreign person on whom dual use 
        sanctions have been imposed that either--
                  (A) would be the basis for imposing dual use 
                sanctions under paragraph (2) but for which such 
                sanctions have not been imposed; or
                  (B) would be the basis for imposing dual use 
                sanctions under paragraph (3) if the transaction or 
                activity had been carried out by a United States person 
                or by a person in the United States.
        Such report shall be unclassified to the maximum extent 
        feasible, but may include a classified annex.
          (5) Definitions.--In this subsection:
                  (A) Person.--The term ``person'' means--
                          (i) a natural person;
                          (ii) a corporation, business association, 
                        partnership, society, trust, transnational 
                        corporation, or transnational joint venture, 
                        any other nongovernmental entity, organization, 
                        or group, and any governmental entity;
                          (iii) any subsidiary, subunit, or parent 
                        entity of any business enterprise or other 
                        organization or entity listed in clause (ii); 
                        and
                          (iv) any successor of any business enterprise 
                        or other organization or entity listed in 
                        clause (ii) or (iii).
                  (B) In the case of countries where it may be 
                impossible to identify a specific governmental entity 
                referred to in subparagraph (A), the term ``person'' 
                means--
                          (i) all activities of that government 
                        relating to the development or production of 
                        any missile equipment or technology; and
                          (ii) all activities of that government 
                        affecting the development or production of 
                        aircraft, electronics, and space systems or 
                        equipment.
                  (C) United states person.--The term ``United States 
                person'' has the meaning given that term in section 
                16(2) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 (50 
                U.S.C. App. 2415(2)).
                  (D) Missile equipment or technology.--The term 
                ``missile equipment or technology'' has the meaning 
                given that term in section 11B(c) of the Export 
                Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2410b(c)).
  (d) Effective Date.--The amendments made by subsections (a) and (b) 
shall apply with respect to sanctions imposed on or after January 1, 
2003, on foreign persons under section 73(a)(2) of the Arms Export 
Control Act, and the provisions of subsection (c) shall apply with 
respect to sanctions imposed on or after January 1, 2003, on foreign 
persons under section 11B(b) of the Export Administration Act of 1979 
(50 U.S.C. App. 2410b(b)), as continued in effect under the 
International Emergency Economic Powers Act.

          Subtitle C--Incentives for Missile Threat Reduction

SEC. 1431. FOREIGN ASSISTANCE.

  (a) Types of Assistance.--The President is authorized to provide, on 
such terms as the President deems appropriate, the following assistance 
to countries that agree to destroy their ballistic missiles, and their 
facilities for producing ballistic missiles, that have a payload 
capacity of 500 kilograms or more over a distance of 300 kilometers or 
more:
          (1) Assistance under section 23 of the Arms Export Control 
        Act (22 U.S.C. 2763).
          (2) Assistance under chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign 
        Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2346 et seq.), 
        notwithstanding section 531(e) or 660(a) of that Act (22 U.S.C. 
        2346(e) or 2420(a)).
          (3) Drawdown of defense articles, defense services, and 
        military education and training under section 506 of the 
        Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2318).
  (b) Congressional Notification.--Assistance authorized under 
subsection (a) may not be provided until 30 days after the date on 
which the President has provided notice thereof to the appropriate 
congressional committees in accordance with the procedures applicable 
to reprogramming notifications under section 634A(a) of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2394-1(a)).
  (c) Limitation.--Any assistance provided to a country under 
subsection (a) may not be provided in more than 3 fiscal years.

SEC. 1432. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

  (a) Authorization.--There is authorized to be appropriated to the 
President to carry out section 1431 the sum of $250,000,000.
  (b) Availability.--Amounts appropriated pursuant to the authorization 
of appropriations under subsection (a) are authorized to remain 
available until expended.

SEC. 1433. AUTHORIZATION OF TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE IN MISSILE 
                    DISARMAMENT.

  The President is authorized to provide technical assistance in the 
destruction of any missile or facility for producing ballistic 
missiles, in any country that requests such assistance.

                    TITLE XV--EXPORTS OF SATELLITES

SEC. 1501. EXPORT CONTROLS ON SATELLITES AND RELATED ITEMS.

  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, in the case of the export 
of commercial communications satellites and related items to a country 
that is a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization or that is a 
major non-NATO ally of the United States, the President may determine 
to what extent, and under which provisions of law, such export may be 
controlled.

SEC. 1502. MANDATORY REVIEW BY DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

  (a) Certain Defense Services.--The provision of defense services by 
United States persons, including services or assistance provided during 
technical interchange meetings, in connection with the launch of a 
satellite from, or by nationals of, the People's Republic of China, are 
subject to section 38 of the Arms Export Control Act.
  (b) Notification to Congress.--At least 30 days before any export 
license or any technical assistance agreement is approved under 
subsection (a), the President shall transmit a certification with 
respect to such export license or technical assistance agreement in the 
manner provided in section 36(d) of the Arms Export Control Act, to the 
Speaker of the House of Representatives and the chairman of the 
Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate. The export license or 
technical assistance agreement shall not be approved if the Congress, 
within that 30-day period, enacts a joint resolution prohibiting such 
approval. The provisions of section 36(d)(5) of that Act shall apply 
with respect to any such joint resolution, and the provisions of 
section 36(f) of that Act shall apply with respect to any certification 
submitted under this subsection.

SEC. 1503. EXPORT RESTRICTIONS NOT AFFECTED.

  Nothing in this title shall be construed to--
          (1) modify any restriction on exports imposed under any other 
        provision of law, including--
                  (A) restrictions on exports to--
                          (i) any country the government of which has 
                        been determined by the Secretary of State to 
                        have repeatedly provided support for acts of 
                        international terrorism;
                          (ii) any country that does not adhere to the 
                        Missile Technology Control Regime; or
                          (iii) any other country of proliferation 
                        concern; and
                  (B) restrictions imposed under title IX of the 
                Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1990 
                and 1991; or
          (2) affect any provision of section 1514 or 1515 of the Strom 
        Thurmond National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 
        1999 (22 U.S.C. 2778 note), or of title XIV of the National 
        Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000 (22 U.S.C. 2778 
        note).

SEC. 1504. DEFINITIONS.

  In this title:
          (1) Defense service.--The term ``defense service'' means--
                  (A) the furnishing of assistance (including training) 
                to foreign persons, whether in the United States or 
                abroad, in the design, development, engineering, 
                manufacture, production, assembly, testing, repair, 
                maintenance, modification, operation, destruction, 
                processing, or use of a satellite or related items; and
                  (B) the furnishing to foreign persons, whether in the 
                United States or abroad, of any technical data in 
                connection with a satellite or related items.
          (2) Related items.--The term ``related items'' means the 
        satellite fuel, ground support equipment, test equipment, 
        payload adapter or interface hardware, replacement parts, and 
        nonembedded solid propellant orbit transfer engines described 
        in the report submitted to Congress by the Department of State 
        on February 6, 1998, pursuant to section 38(f) of the Arms 
        Export Control Act (22 U.S.C. 2778(f)), as well as systems, 
        components, parts, accessories, and associated equipment for 
        satellites, including ground control equipment.
          (3) United states person.--The term ``United States person'' 
        has the meaning given that term in section 16(2) of the Export 
        Administration Act of 1979 (50 U.S.C. 1415(2)).

  TITLE XVI--PROMOTION OF DEMOCRACY, HUMAN RIGHTS, AND RULE OF LAW IN 
                                BELARUS

SEC. 1601. ASSISTANCE TO PROMOTE DEMOCRACY AND CIVIL SOCIETY IN 
                    BELARUS.

  (a) Purposes of Assistance.--The assistance under this section shall 
be available for the following purposes:
          (1) To assist the people of the Republic of Belarus in 
        regaining their freedom and to enable them to join the European 
        community of democracies.
          (2) To encourage free and fair presidential, parliamentary, 
        and local elections in Belarus, conducted in a manner 
        consistent with internationally accepted standards and under 
        the supervision of internationally recognized observers.
          (3) To assist in restoring and strengthening institutions of 
        democratic governance in Belarus.
  (b) Authorization for Assistance.--To carry out the purposes of 
subsection (a), the President is authorized to furnish assistance and 
other support for the activities described in subsection (c), to be 
provided primarily for indigenous Belarusian groups that are committed 
to the support of democratic processes.
  (c) Activities Supported.--Activities that may be supported by 
assistance under subsection (b) include--
          (1) the observation of elections and the promotion of free 
        and fair electoral processes;
          (2) development of democratic political parties;
          (3) radio and television broadcasting to and within Belarus;
          (4) the development of nongovernmental organizations 
        promoting democracy and supporting human rights;
          (5) the development of independent media working within 
        Belarus and from locations outside the country and supported by 
        nonstate-controlled printing facilities;
          (6) international exchanges and advanced professional 
        training programs for leaders and members of the democratic 
        forces in skill areas central to the development of civil 
        society; and
          (7) other activities consistent with the purposes of this 
        title.
  (d) Authorization of Appropriations.--
          (1) In general.--There is authorized to be appropriated to 
        the President to carry out this section such sums as may be 
        necessary for fiscal years 2004 and 2005.
          (2) Availability of funds.--Amounts appropriated pursuant to 
        the authorization of appropriations under paragraph (1) are 
        authorized to remain available until expended.

SEC. 1602. RADIO BROADCASTING TO BELARUS.

  (a) Purpose.--It is the purpose of this section to authorize 
increased support for United States Government and surrogate radio 
broadcasting to the Republic of Belarus that will facilitate the 
unhindered dissemination of information.
  (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--In addition to such sums as are 
otherwise authorized to be appropriated, there is authorized to be 
appropriated such sums as may be necessary for each fiscal year for 
Voice of America and RFE/RL, Incorporated for radio broadcasting to the 
people of Belarus in languages spoken in Belarus.

SEC. 1603. SENSE OF CONGRESS RELATING TO SANCTIONS AGAINST THE 
                    GOVERNMENT OF BELARUS.

  (a) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of Congress that the 
sanctions described in subsections (c) and (d) should apply with 
respect to the Republic of Belarus until the President determines and 
certifies to the appropriate congressional committees that the 
Government of Belarus has made significant progress in meeting the 
conditions described in subsection (b).
  (b) Conditions.--The conditions referred to in subsection (a) are the 
following:
          (1) The release of individuals in Belarus who have been 
        jailed based on political or religious beliefs.
          (2) The withdrawal of politically motivated legal charges 
        against all opposition figures and independent journalists in 
        Belarus.
          (3) A full accounting of the disappearances of opposition 
        leaders and journalists in Belarus, including Victor Gonchar, 
        Anatoly Krasovsky, Yuri Zakharenka, and Dmitry Zavadsky, and 
        the prosecution of those individuals who are responsible for 
        their disappearances.
          (4) The cessation of all forms of harassment and repression 
        against the independent media, independent trade unions, 
        nongovernmental organizations, religious organizations 
        (including their leadership and members), and the political 
        opposition in Belarus.
          (5) The implementation of free and fair presidential and 
        parliamentary elections in Belarus consistent with OSCE 
        standards on democratic elections and in cooperation with 
        relevant OSCE institutions.
  (c) Denial of Entry Into the United States of Belarusian Officials.--
The President should use his authority under section 212(f) of the 
Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1182(f)) to deny the entry 
into the United States of any alien who--
          (1) holds a position in the senior leadership of the 
        Government of Belarus; or
          (2) is a spouse, minor child, or agent of a person 
        inadmissible under paragraph (1).
  (d) Prohibition on Loans and Investment.--
          (1) United states government financing.--No loan, credit 
        guarantee, insurance, financing, or other similar financial 
        assistance should be extended by any agency of the United 
        States Government (including the Export-Import Bank and the 
        Overseas Private Investment Corporation) to the Government of 
        Belarus, except with respect to the provision of humanitarian 
        goods and agricultural or medical products.
          (2) Trade and development agency.--No funds available to the 
        Trade and Development Agency should be available for activities 
        of the Agency in or for Belarus.
  (e) Multilateral Financial Assistance.--It is further the sense of 
Congress that, in addition to the application of the sanctions 
described in subsections (c) and (d) to the Republic of Belarus (until 
the President determines and certifies to the appropriate congressional 
committees that the Government of Belarus has made significant progress 
in meeting the conditions described in subsection (b)), the Secretary 
of the Treasury should instruct the United States Executive Director of 
each international financial institution to which the United States is 
a member to use the voice and vote of the United States to oppose any 
extension by those institutions of any financial assistance (including 
any technical assistance or grant) of any kind to the Government of 
Belarus, except for loans and assistance that serve humanitarian needs.

SEC. 1604. MULTILATERAL COOPERATION.

   It is the sense of Congress that the President should continue to 
seek to coordinate with other countries, particularly European 
countries, a comprehensive, multilateral strategy to further the 
purposes of this title, including, as appropriate, encouraging other 
countries to take measures with respect to the Republic of Belarus that 
are similar to measures described in this title.

SEC. 1605. REPORT.

  (a) Report.--Not later than 90 days after the date of enactment of 
this Act, and every year thereafter, the President shall transmit to 
the appropriate congressional committees a report that describes, with 
respect to the preceding 12-month period, the following:
          (1) The sale or delivery of weapons or weapons-related 
        technologies from the Republic of Belarus to any country, the 
        government of which the Secretary of State has determined, for 
        purposes of section 6(j)(1) of the Export Administration Act of 
        1979 (50 U.S.C. App. 2405(j)(1)), has repeatedly provided 
        support for acts of international terrorism.
          (2) An identification of each country described in paragraph 
        (1) and a detailed description of the weapons or weapons-
        related technologies involved in the sale.
          (3) An identification of the goods, services, credits, or 
        other consideration received by Belarus in exchange for the 
        weapons or weapons-related technologies.
          (4) The personal assets and wealth of Aleksandr Lukashenka 
        and other senior leadership of the Government of Belarus.
  (b) Form.--A report transmitted pursuant to subsection (a) shall be 
in unclassified form but may contain a classified annex.

SEC. 1606. DEFINITIONS.

  In this title:
          (1) Osce.--The term ``OSCE'' means the Organization for 
        Security and Cooperation in Europe.
          (2) Senior leadership of the government of belarus.--The term 
        ``senior leadership of the Government of Belarus'' includes--
                  (A) the President, Prime Minister, Deputy Prime 
                Ministers, government ministers, Chairmen of State 
                Committees, and members of the Presidential 
                Administration of Belarus;
                  (B) any official of the Government of Belarus who is 
                personally and substantially involved in the 
                suppression of freedom in Belarus, including judges and 
                prosecutors; and
                  (C) any other individual determined by the Secretary 
                of State (or the Secretary's designee) to be personally 
                and substantially involved in the formulation or 
                execution of the policies of the Lukashenka regime that 
                are in contradiction of internationally recognized 
                human rights standards.

     TITLE XVII--ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN PEACE ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2003

SEC. 1701. SHORT TITLE.

  This title may be cited as the ``Israeli-Palestinian Peace 
Enhancement Act of 2003''.

SEC. 1702. FINDINGS.

  Congress makes the following findings:
          (1) The security of the State of Israel is a major and 
        enduring national security interest of the United States.
          (2) A lasting peace in the Middle East region can only take 
        root in an atmosphere free of violence and terrorism.
          (3) The Palestinian people have been ill-served by leaders 
        who, by resorting to violence and terrorism to pursue their 
        political objectives, have brought economic and personal 
        hardship to their people and brought a halt to efforts seeking 
        a negotiated settlement of the conflict.
          (4) The United States has an interest in a Middle East in 
        which two states, Israel and Palestine, will live side by side 
        in peace and security.
          (5) In his speech of June 24, 2002, and in other statements, 
        President George W. Bush outlined a comprehensive vision of the 
        possibilities of peace in the Middle East region following a 
        change in Palestinian leadership.
          (6) A stable and peaceful Palestinian state is necessary to 
        achieve the security that Israel longs for, and Israel should 
        take concrete steps to support the emergence of a viable, 
        credible Palestinian state.
          (7) The Palestinian state must be a reformed, peaceful, and 
        democratic state that abandons forever the use of terror.
          (8) On April 29, 2003, the Palestinian Legislative Council 
        confirmed in office, by a vote of 51 yeas, 18 nays, and 3 
        abstentions, the Palestinian Authority's first prime minister, 
        Mahmoud Abbas (Abu Mazen), and his cabinet.
          (9) In his remarks prior to the vote of the Palestinian 
        Legislative Council, Mr. Abbas declared: ``The government will 
        concentrate on the question of security . . . The unauthorized 
        possession of weapons, with its direct threat to the security 
        of the population, is a major concern that will be relentlessly 
        addressed . . . There will be no other decision-making 
        authority except for the Palestinian Authority.''.
          (10) In those remarks, Mr. Abbas further stated: ``We 
        denounce terrorism by any party and in all its forms both 
        because of our religious and moral traditions and because we 
        are convinced that such methods do not lend support to a just 
        cause like ours but rather destroy it.''.
          (11) Israel has repeatedly indicated its willingness to make 
        painful concessions to achieve peace once there is a partner 
        for peace on the Palestinian side.

SEC. 1703. PURPOSES.

  The purposes of this title are--
          (1) to express the sense of Congress with respect to United 
        States recognition of a Palestinian state; and
          (2) to demonstrate United States willingness to provide 
        substantial economic and humanitarian assistance, and to 
        support large-scale multilateral assistance, after the 
        Palestinians have achieved the reforms outlined by President 
        Bush and have achieved peace with the State of Israel.

SEC. 1704. SENSE OF CONGRESS.

  It is the sense of Congress that--
          (1) peace between Israel and the Palestinians cannot be 
        negotiated until the Palestinian system of government has been 
        transformed along the lines outlined in President Bush's June 
        24, 2002, speech;
          (2) substantial United States and international economic 
        assistance will be needed after the Palestinians have achieved 
        the reforms described in section 620K(c)(2) of the Foreign 
        Assistance Act of 1961 (as added by section 1706 of this Act) 
        and have made a lasting and secure peace with Israel;
          (3) the Palestinian people merit commendation on the 
        confirmation of the Palestinian Authority's first prime 
        minister, Mahmoud Abbas (Abu Mazen), and his cabinet;
          (4) the new Palestinian administration urgently should take 
        the necessary security-related steps to allow for 
        implementation of a performance-based road map to resolve the 
        Israeli-Palestinian conflict;
          (5) the United States Administration should work vigorously 
        toward the goal of two states living side-by-side in peace 
        within secure and internationally-recognized boundaries free 
        from threats or acts of force; and
          (6) the United States has a vital national security interest 
        in a permanent, comprehensive, and just resolution of the Arab-
        Israeli conflict, and particularly the Palestinian-Israeli 
        conflict, based on the terms of United Nations Security Council 
        Resolutions 242 and 338.

SEC. 1705. RECOGNITION OF A PALESTINIAN STATE.

   It is the sense of Congress that a Palestinian state should not be 
recognized by the United States until the President determines that--
          (1) a new leadership of a Palestinian governing entity, not 
        compromised by terrorism, has been elected and taken office; 
        and
          (2) the newly-elected Palestinian governing entity--
                  (A) has demonstrated a firm and tangible commitment 
                to peaceful coexistence with the State of Israel and to 
                ending anti-Israel incitement, including the cessation 
                of all officially sanctioned or funded anti-Israel 
                incitement;
                  (B) has taken appropriate measures to counter 
                terrorism and terrorist financing in the West Bank and 
                Gaza, including the dismantling of terrorist 
                infrastructures and the confiscation of unlawful 
                weaponry;
                  (C) has established a new Palestinian security entity 
                that is fully cooperating with the appropriate Israeli 
                security organizations;
                  (D) has achieved exclusive authority and 
                responsibility for governing the national affairs of a 
                Palestinian state, has taken effective steps to ensure 
                democracy, the rule of law, and an independent 
                judiciary, and has adopted other reforms ensuring 
                transparent and accountable governance; and
                  (E) has taken effective steps to ensure that its 
                education system promotes the acceptance of Israel's 
                existence and of peace with Israel and actively 
                discourages anti-Israel incitement.

SEC. 1706. LIMITATION ON ASSISTANCE TO A PALESTINIAN STATE.

  Chapter 1 of part III of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 
U.S.C. 2351 et seq.) is amended--
          (1) by redesignating the second section 620G (as added by 
        section 149 of Public Law 104-164 (110 Stat. 1436)) as section 
        620J; and
          (2) by adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 620K. LIMITATION ON ASSISTANCE TO A PALESTINIAN STATE.

  ``(a) Limitation.--
          ``(1) In general.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
        law, assistance may be provided under this Act or any other 
        provision of law to the government of a Palestinian state only 
        during a period for which a certification described in 
        subsection (c) is in effect. The limitation contained in the 
        preceding sentence shall not apply (A) to humanitarian or 
        development assistance that is provided through nongovernmental 
        organizations for the benefit of the Palestinian people in the 
        West Bank and Gaza, or (B) to assistance that is intended to 
        reform the Palestinian Authority and affiliated institutions, 
        or a newly elected Palestinian governing entity, in order to 
        help meet the requirements contained in subparagraphs (A) 
        through (H) of subsection (c)(2) or to address the matters 
        described in subparagraphs (A) through (E) of section 1705(2) 
        of the Israeli-Palestinian Peace Enhancement Act of 2003.
          ``(2) Waiver.--The President may waive the limitation of the 
        first sentence of paragraph (1) if the President determines and 
        certifies to the Committee on International Relations of the 
        House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations 
        of the Senate that it is vital to the national interest of the 
        United States to do so.
  ``(b) Congressional Notification.--
          ``(1) In general.--Assistance made available under this Act 
        or any other provision of law to a Palestinian state may not be 
        provided until 15 days after the date on which the President 
        has provided notice thereof to the Committee on International 
        Relations and the Committee on Appropriations of the House of 
        Representatives and to the Committee on Foreign Relations and 
        the Committee on Appropriations of the Senate in accordance 
        with the procedures applicable to reprogramming notifications 
        under section 634A(a) of this Act.
          ``(2) Sunset.--Paragraph (1) shall cease to be effective 
        beginning ten years after the date on which notice is first 
        provided under such paragraph.
  ``(c) Certification.--A certification described in this subsection is 
a certification transmitted by the President to Congress that--
          ``(1) a binding international peace agreement exists between 
        Israel and the Palestinians that--
                  ``(A) was freely signed by both parties;
                  ``(B) guarantees both parties' commitment to a border 
                between two states that constitutes a secure and 
                internationally recognized boundary for both states, 
                with no remaining territorial claims;
                  ``(C) provides a permanent resolution for both 
                Palestinian refugees and Jewish refugees from Arab 
                countries; and
                  ``(D) includes a renunciation of all remaining 
                Palestinian claims against Israel through provisions 
                that commit both sides to the ``end of the conflict''; 
                and
          ``(2) the new Palestinian government--
                  ``(A) has been democratically elected through free 
                and fair elections, has exclusive authority and 
                responsibility for governing the national affairs of 
                the Palestinian state, and has achieved the reforms 
                outlined by President Bush in his June 24, 2002, 
                speech;
                  ``(B) has completely renounced the use of violence 
                against the State of Israel and its citizens, is 
                vigorously attempting to prevent any acts of terrorism 
                against Israel and its citizens, and punishes the 
                perpetrators of such acts in a manner commensurate with 
                their actions;
                  ``(C) has dismantled, and terminated the funding of, 
                any group within its territory that conducts terrorism 
                against Israel;
                  ``(D) is engaging in ongoing and extensive security 
                cooperation with the State of Israel;
                  ``(E) refrains from any officially sanctioned or 
                funded statement or act designed to incite Palestinians 
                or others against the State of Israel and its citizens;
                  ``(F) has an elected leadership not compromised by 
                terror;
                  ``(G) is demilitarized; and
                  ``(H) has no alliances or agreements that pose a 
                threat to the security of the State of Israel.
  ``(d) Recertifications.--Not later than 90 days after the date on 
which the President transmits to Congress an initial certification 
under subsection (c), and every 6 months thereafter for the 10-year 
period beginning on the date of transmittal of such certification--
          ``(1) the President shall transmit to Congress a 
        recertification that the requirements contained in subsection 
        (c) are continuing to be met; or
          ``(2) if the President is unable to make such a 
        recertification, the President shall transmit to Congress a 
        report that contains the reasons therefor.
  ``(e) Rule of Construction.--A certification under subsection (c) 
shall be deemed to be in effect beginning on the day after the last day 
of the 10-year period described in subsection (d) unless the President 
subsequently determines that the requirements contained in subsection 
(c) are no longer being met and the President transmits to Congress a 
report that contains the reasons therefor.''.

SEC. 1707. AUTHORIZATION OF ASSISTANCE TO A PALESTINIAN STATE.

  Chapter 1 of part III of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 
U.S.C. 2351 et seq.), as amended by section 1706, is further amended by 
adding at the end the following new section:

``SEC. 620L. AUTHORIZATION OF ASSISTANCE TO A PALESTINIAN STATE.

  ``(a) Assistance.--The President is authorized to provide assistance 
to a Palestinian state in accordance with the requirements of this 
section.
  ``(b) Activities To Be Supported.--Assistance provided under 
subsection (a) shall be used to support activities within a Palestinian 
state to substantially improve the economy and living conditions of the 
Palestinians by, among other things, providing for economic development 
in the West Bank and Gaza, continuing to promote democracy and the rule 
of law, developing water resources, assisting in security cooperation 
between Israelis and Palestinians, and helping with the compensation 
and rehabilitation of Palestinian refugees.
  ``(c) Authorization of Appropriations.--Of the amounts made available 
to carry out chapter 4 of part II of this Act for a fiscal year, there 
are authorized to be appropriated to the President to carry out 
subsections (a) and (b) such sums as may be necessary for each such 
fiscal year.
  ``(d) Coordination of International Assistance.--
          ``(1)  In general.--Beginning on the date on which the 
        President transmits to Congress an initial certification under 
        section 620K(c) of this Act, the Secretary of State shall seek 
        to convene one or more donors conferences to gain commitments 
        from other countries, multilateral institutions, and 
        nongovernmental organizations to provide economic assistance to 
        Palestinians to ensure that such commitments to provide 
        assistance are honored in a timely manner, to ensure that there 
        is coordination of assistance among the United States and such 
        other countries, multilateral institutions, and nongovernmental 
        organizations, to ensure that the assistance provided to 
        Palestinians is used for the purposes for which is was 
        provided, and to ensure that other countries, multilateral 
        institutions, and nongovernmental organizations do not provide 
        assistance to Palestinians through entities that are designated 
        as terrorist organizations under United States law.
          ``(2)  Report.--Not later than 180 days after the date of the 
        enactment of this section, and on an annual basis thereafter, 
        the Secretary of State shall prepare and submit to the 
        Committee on International Relations and the Committee on 
        Appropriations of the House of Representatives and the 
        Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on 
        Appropriations of the Senate a report that describes the 
        activities undertaken to meet the requirements of paragraph 
        (1), including a description of amounts committed, and the 
        amounts provided, to a Palestinian state or Palestinians during 
        the reporting period by each country and organization.''.

        TITLE XVIII--MISCELLANEOUS FOREIGN ASSISTANCE PROVISIONS

SEC. 1801. ADDITIONAL AUTHORITIES RELATING TO INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS 
                    CONTROL ASSISTANCE.

  Notwithstanding any other provision of law, assistance provided by 
the United States Government to support international efforts to combat 
aerial trafficking of illicit narcotics under chapter 8 of part I of 
the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 or under any other provision of law 
shall include the authority to interdict illicit arms in connection 
with the trafficking of illicit narcotics.

SEC. 1802. UNITED STATES OPIUM ERADICATION PROGRAM IN COLOMBIA.

  Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, 
the Secretary of State, acting through the Department of State's 
Narcotics Affairs Section (NAS) in Bogota, Colombia, shall ensure that 
all pilots participating in the United States opium eradication program 
in Colombia are Colombians and are fully trained, qualified, and 
experienced pilots, with preference provided to individuals who are 
members of the Colombian National Police.

SEC. 1803. COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM.

  Of the amounts made available for development assistance under the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, not less than $2,000,000 for each of 
the fiscal years 2004 and 2005 are authorized to be made available to 
finance projects among the United States, Israel, and developing 
countries in Africa under the Cooperative Development Program.

SEC. 1804. WEST BANK AND GAZA PROGRAM.

  (a) Oversight.--For fiscal year 2004, the Secretary of State shall 
certify to the appropriate committees of Congress not later than 30 
days prior to the initial obligation of funds for the West Bank and 
Gaza that procedures have been established to assure the Comptroller 
General will have access to appropriate United States financial 
information in order to review the use of United States assistance for 
the West Bank and Gaza funded under chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 (``Economic Support Fund'').
  (b) Vetting.--Prior to any obligation of funds authorized to be 
appropriated to carry out chapter 4 of part II of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 for assistance for the West Bank and Gaza, the 
Secretary of State shall take all appropriate steps to ensure that such 
assistance is not provided to or through any individual or entity that 
the Secretary knows, or has reason to believe, advocates, plans, 
sponsors, engages in, or has engaged in, terrorist activity. The 
Secretary of State shall, as appropriate, establish procedures 
specifying the steps to be taken in carrying out this subsection.
  (c) Audits.--
          (1) In general.--The Administrator of the United States 
        Agency for International Development shall ensure that 
        independent audits of all contractors and grantees, and 
        significant subcontractors and subgrantees, under the West Bank 
        and Gaza Program, are conducted at least on an annual basis to 
        ensure, among other things, compliance with this section.
          (2) Audits by inspector general of usaid.--Of the funds 
        authorized to be appropriated by this Act to carry out chapter 
        4 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 that are 
        made available for assistance for the West Bank and Gaza, up to 
        $1,000,000 may be used by the Office of the Inspector General 
        of the United States Agency for International Development for 
        audits, inspections, and other activities in furtherance of the 
        requirements of paragraph (1). Such funds are in addition to 
        funds otherwise available for such purposes.

SEC. 1805. ANNUAL HUMAN RIGHTS COUNTRY REPORTS ON INCITEMENT TO ACTS OF 
                    DISCRIMINATION.

  (a) Countries Receiving Economic Assistance.--Section 116(d) of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2151n(d)) is amended--
          (1) in paragraph (9), by striking ``and'' at the end;
          (2) in paragraph (10), by striking the period at the end and 
        inserting ``; and''; and
          (3) by adding at the end the following:
          ``(11)(A) wherever applicable, in a separate section with a 
        separate heading, a description of the nature and extent of--
                  ``(i) propaganda in government and government-
                controlled media and other sources, including 
                government-produced educational materials and 
                textbooks, that attempt to justify or promote racial 
                hatred or incite acts of violence against any race or 
                people; and
                  ``(ii) complicity or involvement in the creation of 
                such propaganda or incitement of acts of violence 
                against any race; and
          ``(B) a description of the actions, if any, taken by the 
        government of the country to eliminate such propaganda or 
        incitement.''.
  (b) Countries Receiving Security Assistance.--Section 502B(b) of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2304(b)) is amended by 
inserting after the eighth sentence the following: ``Each report under 
this section shall also include wherever applicable, in a separate 
section with a separate heading, a description of (i) the nature and 
extent of (I) propaganda in government and government-controlled media 
and other sources, including government-produced educational materials 
and textbooks, that attempt to justify or promote racial hatred or 
incite acts of violence against any race, and (II) complicity or 
involvement in the creation of such propaganda or incitement of acts of 
violence against any race or people, and (ii) a description of the 
actions, if any, taken by the government of the country to eliminate 
such propaganda or incitement.''.

SEC. 1806. ASSISTANCE TO EAST TIMOR.

  Section 632(b)(1) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal 
Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228) is amended by striking ``the fiscal year 
2003'' and inserting ``each of the fiscal years 2003, 2004, and 2005''.

SEC. 1807. SUPPORT FOR DEMOCRACY-BUILDING EFFORTS FOR CUBA.

  (a) Statement of Policy.--It is the policy of the United States to 
support those individuals and groups who struggle for freedom and 
democracy in Cuba, including human rights dissidents, independent 
journalists, independent labor leaders, and other opposition groups.
  (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--
          (1) In general.--There are authorized to be appropriated to 
        the President to carry out section 109(a) of Public Law 104-114 
        (22 U.S.C. 6039(a)) $15,000,000 for each of the fiscal years 
        2004 and 2005.
          (2) Additional authorities.--Amounts appropriated pursuant to 
        the authorization of appropriations under subsection (a)--
                  (A) are authorized to remain available until 
                expended; and
                  (B) are in addition to amounts otherwise available 
                for such purposes.

SEC. 1808. AMENDMENT TO THE AFGHANISTAN FREEDOM SUPPORT ACT OF 2002.

  The Afghanistan Freedom Support Act of 2002 (22 U.S.C. 7501 et seq.) 
is amended--
          (1) in section 103(a) by striking ``section 512 of Public Law 
        107-115 or any similar'' and inserting ``any other''; and
          (1) in section 207(b) by striking ``section 512 of Public Law 
        107-115 or any similar'' and inserting ``any other''.

SEC. 1809. CONGO BASIN FOREST PARTNERSHIP.

  (a) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to the President to carry out the Congo Basin Forest 
Partnership (CBFP) program $18,600,000 for each of the fiscal years 
2004 and 2005. Of the amounts appropriated pursuant to the 
authorization of appropriations under the preceding sentence for a 
fiscal year, $16,000,000 is authorized to be made available to the 
Central Africa Regional Program for the Environment (CARPE) of the 
United States Agency for International Development.
  (b) Availability.--Amounts appropriated pursuant to the authorization 
of appropriations under subsection (a) are authorized to remain 
available until expended.

SEC. 1810. COMBATTING THE PIRACY OF UNITED STATES COPYRIGHTED 
                    MATERIALS.

  (a) Authorization of Appropriations.--In addition to such amounts as 
may otherwise be authorized to be appropriated for such purpose, there 
are authorized to be appropriated for the Department of State, 
$10,000,000 to carry out the following activities in countries that are 
not members of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and 
Development (OECD):
          (1) Provision of equipment and training for foreign law 
        enforcement, including in the interpretation of intellectual 
        property laws.
          (2) Training for judges and prosecutors, including in the 
        interpretation of intellectual property laws.
          (3) Assistance in complying with obligations under 
        appropriate international copyright and intellectual property 
        treaties and agreements.
  (b) Consultation with World Intellectual Property Organization.--In 
carrying out subsection (a), the Department of State should make every 
effort to consult with, and provide appropriate assistance to, the 
World Intellectual Property Organization to promote the integration of 
non-OECD countries into the global intellectual property system.

SEC. 1811. ASSISTANCE FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT FORCES IN CERTAIN FOREIGN 
                    COUNTRIES.

  Notwithstanding section 660 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 
U.S.C. 2420), the Administrator of the United States Agency for 
International Development is authorized to provide assistance for 
fiscal years 2004 and 2005 to--
          (1) law enforcement agencies of the Government of India for 
        the purposes of enhancing their capacity for medical-first-
        response and search-and-rescue operations after a natural 
        disaster, improving the access of women to justice, and 
        combating the trafficking of persons; and
          (2) the new police force of Northern Ireland for the purpose 
        of providing computer-based, human-rights and other 
        professional training, and the law enforcement agencies of the 
        Republic of Ireland (ROI) for the purposes of fostering greater 
        cooperation and communication between the police force of the 
        Republic of Ireland and the new police force of Northern 
        Ireland, as recommended by the Patten Commission.

SEC. 1812. HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY FUND.

  Section 664(c)(1) of the Freedom Investment Act of 2002 (subtitle E 
of title VI of division A of Public Law 107-228; 22 U.S.C. 2151n-
2(c)(1)) is amended--
          (1) by striking ``for fiscal year 2003'' and inserting ``for 
        each of the fiscal years 2003 through 2005''; and
          (2) by striking ``$21,500,000 is'' and inserting 
        ``$21,500,000 for fiscal year 2003, $24,000,000 for fiscal year 
        2004, and such sums as may be necessary for fiscal year 2005 
        are''.

SEC. 1813. ENHANCED POLICE TRAINING.

  Section 660(b) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 
2420(b)) is amended--
          (1) in paragraph (7), by striking the period at the end and 
        inserting ``; or''; and
          (2) by adding at the end the following new paragraph:
          ``(8) with respect to assistance provided to enhance the 
        effectiveness and accountability of civilian police authority 
        through training and technical assistance in internationally 
        recognized human rights, the rule of law, strategic planning, 
        and counter-narcotics, and through the promotion of civilian 
        police roles that support democratic governance, including 
        programs to combat corruption and the trafficking of persons, 
        particularly by organized crime, prevent conflict, and foster 
        improved police relations with the communities in which they 
        serve.''.

SEC. 1814. PROMOTING A SECURE AND DEMOCRATIC AFGHANISTAN.

  (a) Findings.--The Congress finds that--
          (1) the United States has a vital interest in promoting 
        Afghanistan's transition from chaos, civil war, and disorder to 
        an increasingly prosperous democratic state, safe and secure 
        with its neighbors, respecting human rights, particularly the 
        rights of women and girls, dedicated to the liberty, literacy, 
        and enrichment of its citizens, and serving as a model for 
        other countries;
          (2) basic security in the major cities and along key 
        transportation routes is critical to the reconstruction and 
        development of Afghanistan, including fostering implementation 
        of the Bonn Agreement, achieving progress towards a democratic 
        and tolerant government, and encouraging international private 
        investment;
          (3) Afghanistan and its people remain under serious threat 
        from terrorism, insurgency, widespread crime, banditry, 
        intimidation, rape, and suppression of minorities and women, 
        and other grave violations of human rights continue to occur, 
        especially in areas that do not have a routine presence of 
        international security personnel;
          (4) lethal clashes continue between the private armies of 
        warlords, attacks against Afghan civilians and officials and 
        United States and international organization personnel are on 
        the rise, and threats against civilians and whole villages not 
        to cooperate with Americans or the central government are now 
        routine;
          (5) the growth, production, and trafficking of Afghan opium 
        and its derivatives pose a serious threat to international 
        peace and security and efforts toward reconstruction in 
        Afghanistan;
          (6) recruitment and training of the Afghan National Army and 
        the Afghan National Police are seriously behind schedule and 
        will not be at full strength for several years, leaving the 
        central government and Afghan citizens vulnerable to the 
        depredations of terrorists, insurgents, and the private armies 
        of warlords;
          (7) although the 4,500 soldiers of the International Security 
        Assistance Force (ISAF) have provided much-needed security for 
        the citizens of Kabul, it is not within their mandate or power 
        to promote security to other areas, and human rights abuses are 
        continuing in areas in and around Kabul where ISAF is not 
        present;
          (8) vastly disproportionate numbers of refugees returning 
        from neighboring countries have gone to Kabul because of the 
        security provided by ISAF and the insecurity of their home 
        areas, overwhelming Kabul and far exceeding its capacity for 
        shelter, food, and employment;
          (9) NATO has recently decided to take over responsibility for 
        a limited ISAF, a welcome development that will not, 
        unfortunately, provide any additional security in Kabul or 
        elsewhere;
          (10) the United States has stated on numerous occasions that 
        it does not oppose the expansion of ISAF, but that heretofore 
        other countries have not expressed a willingness to participate 
        in an expanded force;
          (11) the United States has not itself demonstrated a 
        commitment to expansion of ISAF or a similar international 
        security or peacekeeping force, a commitment to leadership that 
        other nations may more likely follow;
          (12) the Secretary of Defense has announced that the combat 
        phase of the war in Afghanistan has ended, and that the United 
        States will be focusing its efforts on a reconstruction phase 
        utilizing lightly-armed, platoon-sized Provincial 
        Reconstruction Teams to provide security for reconstruction 
        efforts, rather than an expanded international peacekeeping or 
        patrolling security force;
          (13) the Provincial Reconstruction Teams may prove inadequate 
        to provide a significant level of security to their regions, 
        and are not tasked to secure the major transportation routes 
        which are critical to the economic revival of Afghanistan;
          (14) United States and foreign nongovernmental aid workers 
        and Afghan civilian aid workers are at great risk of being 
        robbed, beaten, and killed in areas of Afghanistan that are not 
        being patrolled by United States forces or Afghan central 
        government forces;
          (15) such acts of theft, intimidation, and murder against 
        foreign aid and Afghan civilian workers are occurring with 
        increasing frequency, and are often deliberately committed by 
        Taliban and other insurgent and rebel forces with the intention 
        of creating sufficient terror to undermine and arrest any 
        efforts to rebuild Afghanistan into a peaceful, democratic, and 
        prosperous nation that prohibits terrorism and tyranny;
          (16) the report of the Inspector General of the United States 
        Agency for International Development (USAID) confirms that 
        USAID workers are virtual captives in their compounds, able to 
        venture out into the countryside for brief periods and only 
        under heavy armed escort, conditions which are 
        counterproductive to their mission of assisting the people of 
        Afghanistan;
          (17) the Taliban and al-Qaeda may believe they only have to 
        create enough terror and uncertainty in the country to 
        undermine the creation of strong representative institutions, 
        and wait until the United States leaves to again create chaos, 
        exploit tribal rivalries, and plunge Afghanistan back into 
        chaos;
          (18) failure to secure a peaceful and democratic Afghanistan 
        will diminish the credibility of efforts by the United States 
        and the international community to promote peace and democracy 
        elsewhere in the Muslim world; and
          (19) unless general security can be provided in the major 
        population areas, strategic highways, and border crossings and 
        chokepoints, the goals for which the war in Afghanistan was 
        fought may be lost and the efforts and lives spent in the 
        attempt to liberate and rebuild Afghanistan may be wasted.
  (b) Security Policy.--
          (1) Security along highways.--The President shall take 
        immediate steps to ensure that there is adequate security along 
        the length of highways connecting major Afghan urban centers in 
        order to terminate and deter acts of banditry, illegal 
        checkpoints, human rights abuses, terrorism, and intimidation 
        against Afghan and foreign civilians and military personnel.
          (2) Disarmament, etc. of afghan militias.--The President 
        shall take immediate steps to support directly the disarmament, 
        demobilization, and reintegration of Afghan militias and 
        irregulars that are not formally part of the Afghan National 
        Army or under the direct control of the central government in 
        Afghanistan.
  (c) Sense of Congress.--It is the sense of the Congress that the 
President should take steps to implement section 206(d) of the 
Afghanistan Freedom Support Act of 2002 (Public Law 107-327) to expand 
significantly the International Security Assistance Force, or take such 
other steps as may be necessary, such as increasing the number and 
force levels of United States Provincial Reconstruction Teams, so as 
to--
          (1) increase the area in which security is provided and 
        undertake vital tasks related to promoting security, such as 
        disarming warlords militias and irregulars;
          (2) deter criminal activity, including rape, robbery, and 
        intimidation of civilians; and
          (3) safeguard highways in order to allow governmental and 
        nongovernmental assistance and reconstruction personnel to move 
        more freely in the countryside to provide humanitarian relief 
        and rebuild Afghanistan.

SEC. 1815. GRANTS TO THE AFRICA SOCIETY.

  (a) Grants to the Africa Society.--For any fiscal year, the Secretary 
of State is authorized to make grants to the Africa Society to carry 
out programs and activities that advance United States interests and 
values in Africa through public and private partnerships that 
facilitate the continent's political transition to more open democratic 
societies, support equitable economic growth through trade and 
investment, support efforts to promote transparency and openness 
through the public and private sectors, encourage civil society growth 
and development, and promote awareness of all Americans about Africa, 
consistent with a grant agreement under such terms as the Secretary of 
State considers necessary and appropriate.
  (b) Authorization of Appropriations.--There are authorized to be 
appropriated to carry out this section $1,000,000 for the fiscal year 
2004 and such sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2005.

                          Purpose and Summary

    The Foreign Relations Authorization Act for Fiscal Years 
2004 and 2005 authorizes funding for the Department of State 
and the United States international broadcasting activities for 
fiscal years 2004 and 2005, security assistance, and other 
foreign affairs programs. H.R. 1950 authorizes the requested 
funding for the Department's Diplomatic Readiness Initiative to 
improve the ability of the United States to represent U.S. 
interests around the globe, authorizes funding for U.S. embassy 
security, which is critical to the protection of the U.S. 
presence in countless countries where the threat of terrorism 
continues, enhances the State Departments public diplomacy 
programs, focuses the U.S. Government on anti-U.S. propaganda 
and incitement in order to better communicate with the world, 
revises the refugee resettlement process, and reorganizes U.S. 
international broadcasting. The legislation also increases our 
capacity at international organizations, where rogue regimes 
and human rights violators are increasingly trying to assert 
their influence and provides needed reforms to U.S. defense 
export and missile non-proliferation policies. The bill also 
addresses important regional and functional foreign policy 
issues.

                Background and Need for the Legislation

    The United States continues to face key challenges around 
the globe and is exerting its influence during a time of 
particular instability. The need to forge coalitions to combat 
international terrorism, the compelling U.S. interest in 
fostering better understanding of this country and its 
policies, the increasing use by rogue states and human rights 
violators of international organizations to advance their 
interests, and the continuing dangers of the proliferation of 
lethal military equipment, weapons of mass destruction and the 
means to deliver them requires a robust and sustained response 
by the United States government. H.R. 1950, the Foreign 
Relations Authorization Act, represents a bipartisan response 
to address these objectives.
    Division A of the legislation authorizes appropriations for 
fiscal years 2004 and 2005 for the Department of State, the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors, which is responsible for non-
military U.S. international broadcasting, and authorizes other 
activities key to U.S. foreign policy objectives. Division A 
contains a number of critical reforms necessary for the 
enhancement of our foreign policy. First, it enhances in scope 
and substance U.S. public diplomacy. Second, it contains a 
reorganization of U.S. international broadcasting building on 
the progress to form a consensus during the 107th Congress. 
Third, it establishes a new Special Coordinator to focus on 
promoting independent media around the world in order to 
enhance press freedoms and provide the possibility for better 
informed publics around the world. Fourth, it reforms the way 
the United States does business at international organizations 
to better advance U.S. interests in critical fora, including 
using our influence to prevent terrorist states from gaining 
leadership positions and preventing their membership in key 
institutions. Finally, in light of the suicide bomb attacks on 
the U.S. consulate in Karachi, Pakistan and on the residential 
compounds in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, H.R. 1950 continues 
Congressional commitment to the security of U.S. personnel 
serving this nation abroad by authorizing significant funding 
for embassy security upgrades and construction, as well as for 
additional investments in security personnel around the world.
    Division B of H.R. 1950 contains amendments to the Arms 
Export Control Act that will strengthen that Act's terrorist-
related prohibitions and the U.S. Government's ability to 
enforce violations, enhances our missile non-proliferation 
policies, and improves the Department of State's administration 
of defense trade and security assistance. It also contains a 
number of foreign assistance measures and reforms that will 
advance U.S. interests around the globe.
    The bill authorizes in Division A $9.3 billion for fiscal 
year 2004 and $10.7 billion for fiscal year 2005 for the 
operations of the State Department and related agencies, and 
$657 million for fiscal year 2004 and $651 million for fiscal 
year 2005 for the Broadcasting Board of Governors. The 
President has requested and the Committee is recommending 
increases in the Department's operating accounts particularly 
with respect to embassy security and personnel. Current world 
events and testimony underscore the necessity of a strong, well 
trained diplomatic core and civil service to carry out the 
ever-increasing international demands.
    The bill authorizes in Division B $4.4 billion for fiscal 
year 2004 for Foreign Military and Financing (which matches the 
Administration request), $91.7 million for fiscal year 2004 for 
International Military Education & Training, (which matches the 
Administration request), and $250 million without fiscal year 
limit for programs to reduce the threat of missile 
proliferation, and lesser amounts for various programs and 
activities. The bill authorizes security assistance for Israel 
and Egypt in 2004 and 2005. Finally, Title XVII, The Israeli-
Palestinian Peace Enhancement Act authorizes such sums to 
promote peace in the Middle East with a promise of substantial 
economic and humanitarian to a Palestinian state once a true 
and verifiable peace agreement has been achieved.

                                HEARINGS

    The Committee and its Subcommittees held several oversight 
hearings prior to the markup of H.R. 1950. The Subcommittee on 
the Western Hemisphere held a hearing on February 27, 2003, 
entitled, ``Overview of U.S. Policy Toward the Western 
Hemisphere.'' Testimony was received from: The Honorable John 
P. Walters, Director, Office of National Drug Control Policy; 
The Honorable Adolfo Franco, Assistant Administrator, Bureau 
for Latin America and the Caribbean, U.S. Agency for 
International Development; and J. Curtis Struble, Acting 
Assistant Secretary, Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs, U.S. 
Department of State. The Subcommittee on Europe held a hearing, 
entitled, ``U.S. Assistance Programs in Europe: An Assessment'' 
on March 27, 2003. Testimony was received from: Thomas Adams, 
Acting Coordinator for U.S. Assistance to Europe and Eurasia, 
Bureau of European and Eurasia Affairs, U.S. Department of 
State; and the Honorable Kent R. Hill, Ph.D., Assistant 
Administrator, Bureau for Europe and Eurasia, U.S. Agency for 
International Development. On April 30, 2003, the Subcommittee 
on International Terrorism, Nonproliferation and Human Rights 
held a hearing entitled, ``A Review of the State Department 
Country Reports on Human Rights Practices.'' Testimony was 
received from: The Honorable Lorne W. Craner, Assistant 
Secretary, Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor, U.S. 
Department of State; Alexandra Arriaga, Director ofGovernment 
Relations, Amnesty International; and Jennifer L. Windsor, Executive 
Director, Freedom House.
    The Committee on International Relations held a hearing on 
the President's fiscal year 2004 International Affairs budget 
request entitled, ``The President's International Affairs 
Budget Request for FY 2004'' was held on February 12, 2003, 
with Secretary of State Colin L. Powell testifying.

                        COMMITTEE CONSIDERATION

    H.R. 1950 was introduced by Chairman Hyde on May 5, 2003 
and was referred to the Committee on International Relations. 
On May 7, 2003, and May 8, 2003, the Committee met in open 
session, pursuant to notice, to consider the bill. A motion 
offered by Chairman Hyde to favorably report H.R. 1950 to the 
House of Representatives, as amended, was agreed to by a record 
vote of 42 ayes to 3 noes, a quorum being present.
    The Committee adopted several amendments. Summary of 
Amendments:

Wednesday, May 7

    1. Hyde--en bloc--which contained the following 21 
amendments:
          --Crowley: George Mitchell Scholarship Program.
          --Faleomavaega: Technical fix to indigenous persons 
        exchange program.
          --Lantos: Change the FY05 voluntary peacekeeping 
        number for Africa from $40 million to ``such sums''.
          --Berman: Technical change to adjust funds in the 
        broadcasting accounts.
          --Hyde: Technical change to the East Timorese 
        scholarship program to allow undergraduates to 
        participate.
          --Hyde: Amendment regarding meritorious step 
        increases for the Foreign Service.
          --Berkley: Pilot program for the promotion of travel 
        and tourism in the U.S. through U.S. international 
        broadcasting.
          --Engel: The use of the voice and vote against a 
        state sponsor of terrorism being appointed to the UN 
        Security Council.
          --Engel: Requires a report by the State Department 
        when efforts fail to keep a state sponsor of terrorism 
        off the UN Security Council.
          --Hyde: Technical change of a position title from 
        Executive Director to Director.
          --Lee: Report on U.S. policy toward Haiti.
          --Crowley: Report on the effects of Plan Colombia on 
        Ecuador.
          --Hyde: Technical change to the title of the Under 
        Secretary of Commerce for Industry and Security.
          --McCotter: Sense of Congress regarding weapons of 
        mass destruction.
          --Smith (MI): Make efforts to communicate and 
        disseminate accurate scientific information on the 
        benefits of agriculture biotechnology.
          --Bereuter: Sense of Congress regarding a more 
        equitable resettlement of refugees.
          --Watson: Strengthening the global intellectual 
        property system.
          --Crowley: Assistance for law enforcement forces in 
        India and N. Ireland.
          --Lantos: Extends the authorization of appropriations 
        for the Human Rights and Democracy Fund.
          --Hyde: Report on Missile Defense Cooperation.
          --Smith (NJ): Promotion of democracy, human rights 
        and rule of law in Belarus.
    This amendment was agreed to by a voice vote.
    2. Leach--Colin Powell Center for American Diplomacy. This 
amendment was agreed to by a voice vote.
    3. Crowley--UNFPA. This amendment was agreed to by a vote 
of 23-22.
    4. Rohrabacher--Exports of Satellites. This amendment was 
agreed to by voice vote.
    5. Lantos--Israeli-Palestinian Peace Enhancement Act of 
2003. This amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    6. Smith (MI)--International Agricultural Biotechnology 
Information Program. This amendment was agreed to by voice 
vote.
    7. Menendez--climate change. This amendment was agreed to 
by a vote of 21-18.
    8. Royce--Radio Free Asia broadcasts to North Korea. This 
amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    9. Smith (NJ) en bloc--Combined two amendments: an increase 
in the migration and refugee assistance account, and a change 
to refugee resettlement. This amendment was agreed to by voice 
vote.
    10. Faleomavaega--Report on Pakistan. This amendment was 
agreed to by voice vote.

May 8:

    11. Smith (NJ)--UNRWA. This amendment was agreed to by 
voice vote.
    12. Smith (NJ)--East Timorese scholarships. This amendment 
was agreed to by voice vote.
    13. Payne--Grants to the Africa society. This amendment was 
agreed to by voice vote.
    14. Delahunt--Democracy in the Western Hemisphere. This 
amendment was agreed to, as amended.
    15. Hyde--en bloc which contained the following 13 
amendments:
          --Engel: Reduction in funding level for NED for 
        programs in primarily Muslim countries.
          --Menendez: Makes a statement of policy expressing 
        concern about Iran's buildup of its nuclear weapons 
        program.
          --Ros-Lehtinen: Incitement amendments to Free Media 
        Provision.
          --Lantos: Police training.
          --Lantos: Sense of Congress relating to the need to 
        enhance security in Afghanistan.
          --Sherman: Iran World Bank sense of Congress.
          --McCollum: Sense of Congress relating to violence 
        against women.
          --Meeks: Africa conflicts.
          --Wexler: Training program on international safety 
        issues for students.
          --Faleomavaega: Sense of Congress expressing concern 
        about the environmental impact of Soviet nuclear 
        weapons testing in Kazakhstan.
          --Ros-Lehtinen: Technical fix to the Secretary of 
        State's reporting requirement on WEOG.
          --Lantos: Prohibit elimination of broadcasting to E. 
        Europe.
          --Hyde: Streamlines a terrorism reporting 
        requirement.
    This amendment was agreed to by voice vote.
    16. Menendez--migration issues between the U.S. and Mexico. 
This amendment was agreed to, as amended by the Ballenger 
substitute, which was amended by a Gallegly amendment regarding 
extradition from Mexico of violent criminals.
    The bill, H.R. 1950, was reported favorably to the House, 
as amended, by a record vote of 42 ayes to 3 noes.

                        Vote(s) of the Committee

    Clause (3)(b) of rule XIII of the Rules of the House of 
Representatives requires that the results of each record vote 
on an amendment or motion to report, together with the names of 
those voting for or against, be printed in the Committee 
Report.
    Vote No. 1 (11:38 a.m., May 7): Crowley amendment regarding 
funds for UNFPA.
    Voting yes: Houghton, Lantos, Berman, Ackerman, 
Faleomavaega, Payne, Menendez, Sherman, Wexler, Engel, 
Delahunt, Meeks, Lee, Crowley, Hoeffel, Blumenauer, Berkley, 
Napolitano, Schiff, Watson, Smith (WA), McCollum, and Bell
    Voting no: Bereuter, Smith (NJ), Burton, Ros-Lehtinen, 
Ballenger, Rohrabacher, Royce, King, McHugh, Tancredo, Paul, 
Smith (MI), Pitts, Flake, Davis, Green, Weller, Pence, 
McCotter, Janklow, Harris and Hyde.
    Ayes 23. Noes 22.
    Vote No. 2 (1:50 p.m., May 7): Menendez amendment regarding 
climate change.
    Voting yes: Leach, Smith (NJ), Lantos, Berman, Ackerman, 
Faleomavaega, Payne, Menendez, Brown, Sherman, Engel, Delahunt, 
Lee, Crowley, Hoeffel, Blumenauer, Berkley, Schiff, Smith (WA), 
McCollum, and Bell
    Voting no: Bereuter, Burton, Ballenger, Rohrabacher, Royce, 
King, Chabot, McHugh, Tancredo, Paul, Pitts, Flake, Green, 
Weller, Pence, McCotter, Janklow, and Hyde.
    Ayes 21. Noes 18.
    Vote No. 3 (11:32 a.m., May 8): Tancredo amendment 
concerning the issuance of alien ID cards.
    Voting yes: Burton, Gallegly, Ballenger, Royce, Chabot, 
Tancredo, Paul, Smith (MI), Pitts, Flake, Davis, Green, Pence, 
McCotter, Janklow, Harris and Hyde.
    Voting no: Leach, Ros-Lehtinen, King, Lantos, Berman, 
Ackerman, Faleomavaega, Payne, Menendez, Brown, Wexler, Engel, 
Delahunt, Lee, Crowley, Hoeffel, Berkley, Napolitano, Schiff, 
Watson, Smith (WA), McCollum and Bell.
    Ayes 17. Noes 23.
    Vote No. 4 (1:10 p.m., May 8): Paul amendment regarding 
UNESCO.
    Voting yes: Burton, Gallegly, Ballenger, Rohrabacher, 
Royce, Chabot, McHugh, Tancredo, Paul, Smith (MI), Flake, 
Davis, McCotter and Hyde.
    Voting no: Leach, King, Houghton, Pitts, Green, Weller, 
Pence, Harris, Lantos, Berman, Ackerman, Payne, Menendez, 
Brown, Sherman, Wexler, Engel, Delahunt, Lee, Crowley, Hoeffel, 
Blumenauer, Napolitano, Smith (WA), McCollum and Bell.
    Ayes 14. Noes 26.
    Vote No. 5 (2:05 p.m., May 8): Ballenger substitute 
amendment to the Menendez amendment regarding migration issues 
between the U.S. and Mexico.
    Voting yes: Leach, Bereuter, Smith (NJ), Gallegly, Ros-
Lehtinen, Ballenger, Rohrabacher,Royce, Chabot, Houghton, 
McHugh, Tancredo, Paul, Smith (MI), Pitts, Flake, Davis, Green, Weller, 
Pence, McCotter, Janklow, Harris and Hyde.
    Voting no: King, Lantos, Berman, Ackerman, Payne, Menendez, 
Brown, Sherman, Wexler, Engel, Delahunt, Meeks, Lee, Hoeffel, 
Blumenauer, Berkley, Napolitano, Schiff, Watson, Smith (WA), 
McCollum and Bell.
    Ayes 24. Noes 22.
    Vote No. 6 (2:10 p.m.): Report H.R. 1950, as amended, 
favorably to the House.
    Voting yes: Leach, Bereuter, Smith (NJ), Gallegly, Ros-
Lehtinen, Ballenger, Rohrabacher, Royce, King, Chabot, 
Houghton, McHugh, Tancredo, Pitts, Green, Weller, Pence, 
McCotter, Janklow, Lantos, Berman, Ackerman, Payne, Menendez, 
Brown, Sherman, Wexler, Engel, Delahunt, Meeks, Lee, Crowley, 
Hoeffel, Blumenauer, Berkley, Napolitano, Schiff, Watson, Smith 
(WA), McCollum, Bell and Hyde.
    Voting no: Paul, Flake and Davis.
    Ayes 42. Noes 3.

                      Committee Oversight Findings

    In compliance with clause 3(c)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee reports that the 
findings and recommendations of the Committee, based on 
oversight activities under clause 2(b)(1) of rule X of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, are incorporated in the 
descriptive portions of this report.

               New Budget Authority and Tax Expenditures

    Clause 3(c)(2) of House Rule XIII is inapplicable because 
this legislation does not provide new budgetary authority or 
increased tax expenditures.

                        Committee Cost Estimate

    A CBO estimate was not available at time of filing of this 
report. In compliance with clause 3(d)(2) of rule XIII of the 
Rules of the House of Representatives, the Committee estimates 
the bill will have a $15 billion cost for fiscal year 2004. For 
fiscal year 2005, the estimate is $15 billion.
    In compliance with clause 3(d)(2) of rule XIII of the Rules 
of the House of Representatives, the Committee estimates that 
implementing the bill will have a $15 billion cost for fiscal 
year 2004 and over $30 billion through the next five years.

                    Performance Goals and Objectives

    The goals and objectives of this legislation are to provide 
authorization for the activities of the State Department and 
related agencies for fiscal years 2004 and 2005.

                   Constitutional Authority Statement

    Pursuant to clause 3(d)(1) of rule XIII of the Rules of the 
House of Representatives, the Committee finds the authority for 
this legislation in Article I, section 8, clause 18 of the 
Constitution.

                        New Advisory Committees

    H.R. 1950 does not establish or authorize any new advisory 
committees.

                    Congressional Accountability Act

    H.R. 1950 does not apply to the legislative branch.

                            Federal Mandates

    H.R. 1950 provides no Federal mandates.

                        Changes in Existing Law

    The changes to existing law will be filed in a supplemental 
report.

                           Sectional Analyses


 DIVISION A--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORIZATION ACT, FISCAL YEARS 2004 
                                AND 2005


                TITLE I--AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS


                    Subtitle A--Department of State


SEC. 111. ADMINISTRATION OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS.

    This section authorizes appropriations under the heading 
``Administration of Foreign Affairs'' for fiscal years 2004 and 
2005. This bill authorizes a total of $4.2 billion in FY 04 and 
$4.4 billion in FY 05 for State Department operations. The 
President's request for FY 04 is $4.2 billion. It includes 
funds for executive direction and policy formulation, conduct 
of diplomatic relations with foreign governments and 
international organizations, effective implementation of 
consular programs and their border security components, the 
acquisition and maintenance of office space and living quarters 
for the United States missions abroad, provision of security 
for those operations, and information resource management.
    In particular, this section provides authorization of 
appropriations for the necessary expenses of theDepartment of 
State and the Foreign Service. These expenses include an authorization 
for worldwide security upgrades. This section also includes 
authorization of appropriations for the conduct of U.S. public 
diplomacy programs, capital investment, representation, protection of 
foreign missions and officials, emergencies in the diplomatic and 
consular service, repatriation loans, and payment to the American 
Institute in Taiwan.
    Specific authorizations of interest are: construction 
security, $1.6 billion for FY 04 and $1.7 billion for FY 05; 
worldwide security upgrades, $647 million for FY 04 and $679 
million in FY 05; $321 million in FY 04 and $330 million in FY 
05 for certain public diplomacy programs; and $2 million in FY 
04 and $2 million in FY 05 for minority recruitment.
    Rightsizing. Rightsizing the U.S. overseas presence is part 
of the President's Management Agenda and a major objective of 
the Congress, and we expect to see progress within the 
Department on these issues. The State Department has asked for 
more money to hire staff but it has not clearly shown a 
willingness to reallocate its existing staff from those posts 
that are relatively generously staffed to those that have the 
greatest shortfalls. We recognize that the Office of Management 
and Budget is taking the lead on the rightsizing initiative. 
However, because the State Department is the lead foreign 
affairs agency, and faces its own resource allocation issues, 
it should continue to advocate for government-wide direction 
on.

SEC. 112. UNITED STATES EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL PROGRAMS.

    This section authorizes a total of $393 million in FY 04 
and $405 million in FY 05 for education and cultural exchange 
programs. The President requested $345 million. Increases in 
this account support enhancements in U.S. public diplomacy 
programs determined to be necessary in this time of global 
terrorism. This section also authorizes a variety of specific 
exchange programs. Several new initiatives in this area are 
included in this legislation:
    Subsection (b)(3)(C) helps address declining opinions of 
the United States among young people in South Korea. This 
subsection increases to $750,000 per year the funding for this 
successful Fulbright program, which places American college 
graduates at schools and colleges across South Korea, where 
they teach English and serve as assistants to explain U.S. 
culture and society. This program, which serves many rural 
schools, has a significant multiplier effect, as each 
participant interacts regularly with numerous Korean students.
    Subsection (b)(3)(E) provides authority for the fiscal year 
2004 and for the fiscal year 2005 to fund the George J. 
Mitchell Scholarship Program at its current fiscal year 2003 
level of funding, $500,000. This program provides one year of 
postgraduate study for American scholars at institutions of 
higher education in Ireland and Northern Ireland.
    To help address declining opinions of the United States 
among young people in our longtime ally, South Korea, 
subsection (b)(4)(E) authorizes $750,000 per year for the 
creation of summer academic study programs in the United States 
for Korean college and university students. The programs will 
focus on political systems, government institutions, society, 
and democratic culture in the United States. It is estimated 
that this modest funding will allow the establishment of three 
summer institutes, each of which can handle between 25 and 30 
students, thus reaching between 75 and 90 Korean student 
leaders per year.
    Subsection (b)(4)(H) provides an authorization of $400,000 
for the fiscal year 2004 and $400,000 for the fiscal year 2005 
for scholarships for postsecondary education in the United 
States for students from Mexico and the countries of Central 
and South America who are from the indigenous peoples of the 
region. Postsecondary means college level and above and the 
Committee expects that the Department will provide scholarships 
to graduate and undergraduate students under this new 
authority.
    Subsection (c)(2) authorizes $3 million to be made 
available in FY04 and $3 million in FY05 for the National 
Endowment for Democracy to promote democracy, good governance, 
rule of law, independent media, religious tolerance, women's 
rights, and the strengthening of civil society in Muslim-
majority countries within the jurisdiction of the Bureau of 
Near Eastern Affairs of the Department of State.
    The Committee notes that one such organization of 
demonstrated effectiveness is the Center for Civic Education 
headquartered in Calabasas, California and recommends that it 
be supported under this authorization.

SEC. 113. CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    This section authorizes $1 billion for FY 04 and $1 billion 
for FY 05. It authorizes the necessary funds for U.S. 
contributions of its assessed share of the expenses of the 
United Nations and other international organizations of which 
the United States is a member. In addition, it authorizes $550 
million for FY04 and such sums as may be necessary for FY05 for 
assessed contributions to international peacekeeping activities 
under United Nations auspices.
    This section also authorizes such sums as may be necessary 
for each of the fiscal years 2004 and 2005 to offset adverse 
fluctuations in foreign currency exchange rates.

SEC. 114. INTERNATIONAL COMMISSIONS.

    This section authorizes $70 million for FY04 and $70 
million for FY05 for international commissions. This is the 
same as the President's request for FY 04. It authorizes funds 
necessary to enable the United States to meet its obligations 
as a participant in international commissions, including those 
dealing with American boundaries and related matters with 
Canada and Mexico, and international fisheries commissions.

SEC. 115. MIGRATION AND REFUGEE ASSISTANCE.

    This section authorizes $927 million for FY04 and $957 
million for FY05 for Migration and Refugee Assistance. This is 
the same as the President's request for FY 04. This program 
authorizes the Secretary of State to provide assistance and 
make contributions for migrants and refugees, including 
contributions to international organizations such as the United 
Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and the International 
Committee for the Red Cross, through private volunteer 
agencies, governments, and bilateral assistance, as authorized 
by law.
    The amount of funding authorized in this section would 
accommodate the admission of 90,000 refugees in fiscal year 
2004 and 100,000 refugees in fiscal year 2005. It also would 
enable the Department to provide urgently needed increases in 
United States overseas refugee assistance.
    Resettlement of refugees in the United States is widely 
regarded as an important tool of refugee protection, not only 
because it serves as a durable solution for individual refugees 
but also because it helps convince countries of ``first 
asylum'' to keep their doors open to persons fleeing 
persecution. All refugees admitted to the United States must 
meet the United States refugee definition, which requires a 
well-founded fear of persecution based on race, religion, 
nationality, membership in a particular social group, or 
political opinion. The United States refugee admissions program 
protects persons who share our values and have suffered because 
of their adherence to those values.
    The Committee believes that increases in refugee assistance 
and protection funding are needed. The refugee account 
continues to be the only major State Department account which 
has not received sufficient annual increases since fiscal year 
1995 to compensate for the effects of inflation. Yet the number 
of refugees and other persons in need of protection, such as 
internally displaced persons and refugees who have repatriated 
but have not yet been fully reintegrated in their home 
countries, is at least as great as it was 7 years ago, and the 
per capita cost of providing such protection has increased 
substantially.
    There currently are severe shortfalls in funding in the 
protection budgets of the United Nations High Commissioner for 
Refugees (UNHCR), which is the primary international relief 
agency that provides protection and assistance to refugees 
worldwide. These shortfalls, which by some estimates are as 
much as $200 million annually, have stricken other 
international and nongovernmental organizations, as well, that 
are devoted to providing food, shelter, and other basic 
necessities to refugees. The shortfalls have contributed to 
increased instability, to involuntary and unsafe repatriation, 
and in some cases to dramatic increases in infant and child 
mortality.
    Refugee protection is a responsibility of all nations. The 
Committee is discouraged that many countries throughout the 
world are not doing enough to assist refugees who subsist in 
first countries of asylum, often in desperate, life-threatening 
circumstances. Accordingly, the Committee urges the Department 
to work with other governments throughout the world to 
encourage them to increase the amount of assistance they 
provide to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees 
and other international relief agencies.
    Following are several examples of the urgent needs that 
will go unmet unless the United States and the international 
community respond with additional assistance for refugee 
protection:
    AFGHANISTAN. Funding levels have failed to keep pace with 
high levels of refugee repatriation, therefore nearly half of 
the 2 million refugees in the process of returning home will 
receive no non-food reintegration supplies from UNHCR. Fewer 
than one in five Afghan refugees repatriating to rural areas 
will receive housing reconstruction/rehabilitation assistance 
from UNHCR because of budget shortfalls. The agency initially 
had planned to assist nearly half of the 1 million Afghans 
returning to rural areas.
    ALGERIA. Funding constraints forced cutbacks in food 
deliveries to 80,000 refugees from Western Sahara living in 
arid camps where farming was impossible. Projects to provide 
cleaner drinking water for 80,000 refugees from Western Sahara 
living in camps in Algeria's Sahara Desert were postponed 
because of inadequate funds.
    ANGOLA. Because of funding shortfalls, reintegration 
programs and protection monitoring for some 40,000 returnees in 
rural areas have barely begun, and preparations to assist 
170,000 Angolan refugees expected to repatriate in 2003 have 
been delayed. Budget problems have slowed pre-positioning of 
blankets, soap, and potable water sites for returnees, creating 
a potential for serious aid gaps when large numbers repatriate.
    ERITREA. Plans to transfer nearly 3,000 Somali refugees to 
a location with improved living conditions have been cancelled 
because of budget problems. The refugee population will remain 
in a transit camp with inadequate latrines, poorly equipped 
schools, and other substandard services.
    ETHIOPIA. Budget constraints impeded the hiring of 
nutritional experts to monitor potential malnutrition in camps 
housing 100,000 refugees from Sudan and Somalia.
    GUINEA. Tens of thousands of Liberian refugees continue to 
live outside of camps without regular assistance in part 
because funding problems have slowed expansion of existing 
camps and much-needed construction of new sites. Some 14,000 
Liberian and Sierra Leonean refugee children are expected to 
lose access to schools and 370 teachers will be dismissed 
because of budget problems. Forty projects to help Senegalese 
refugees support themselves have been canceled because of 
funding shortfalls.
    KENYA. This country has multiple refugee assistance needs. 
Budget problems forced a 25 percent cut in food rations for up 
to 80,000 Sudanese refugees. The UNHCR reports that financial 
constraints may force them to stop supplying firewood to 
thousands of Sudanese refugee women, thereby potentially 
exposing them to rape and robbery while they leave refugee 
camps to collect firewood individually. UNHCR also reports that 
because of budget constraints, health workers are canceling a 
counseling program for Somali and Sudanese refugee women 
victimized by rape and other violence. Sexual violence against 
women and girls amid the nearly quarter-million refugees in 
Kenya has long been a problem.
    SIERRA LEONE. This country has extensive refugee assistance 
needs, and recently relief agencies suspended the repatriation 
of up to 50,000 Sierra Leonean refugees in order to shift 
limited funds to emergency programs for 30,000 new Liberian 
refugees flooding into the country. Thousands of Sierra Leonean 
refugees repatriated to regions of the country that lack 
adequate UNHCR staff and reintegration assistance because of 
budget constraints. Aid workers estimated at mid-year that 90 
percent of essential reintegration needs, such as potable water 
and education, were being ignored in some areas of the country 
because of funding and staffing shortfalls. UNHCR only fielded 
three protection officers to monitor the safety of 150,000 
returned Sierra Leonean refugees and 30,000 Liberian refugees, 
many of them living in potentially insecure border areas.

SEC. 116. VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    This section authorizes $317 million in FY 04 and $320 
million in FY 05 for voluntary contributions to international 
organizations.
    Subsection (b) authorizes $6,000,000 in FY 2004 and 
$7,000,000 in FY 2005 of the total account for the United 
Nations Voluntary Fund for Victims of Torture.
    Subsection (c) establishes an Organization of the American 
States (OAS) model port programin the Latin American and 
Caribbean region.
    Numerous United States Government (USG) agencies, including 
the State Department, Customs, and the Maritime Administration, 
among others, operate programs in Latin America and the 
Caribbean to improve port security. These programs, however, 
are not coordinated to maximize the efficiency, reduce the 
costs, and optimize the performance of the security practices 
and technologies that have been integrated so far.
    In response to this problem, the Committee authorizes 
$2,000,000 to the President only for a voluntary contribution 
to the Organization of American States (OAS) for the purpose of 
improving port security in the Western Hemisphere through the 
development of a model port in a Latin American or Caribbean 
country. The OAS, in collaboration with appropriate United 
States agencies, should seek to develop best security practices 
in and provide appropriate technologies for the model port. The 
Committee expects that the model port will serve as a platform 
on which other port security officials from other countries in 
the region may learn and adopt practices and technologies which 
are best suited for their particular circumstances.
    Subsection (d) requires the withholding from U.S. voluntary 
contributions to the UNDP of an amount equal to the amount UNDP 
intends to spend in Burma in FY 2004 and FY 2005, unless the 
President certifies to Congress that UNDP programs in Burma are 
meeting certain standards.
    Subsection (e) requires that the United States make a $50 
million contribution to the United Nations Population Fund 
(UNFPA) in fiscal years 2004 and 2005. The section also makes 
changes to the existing statutory guidelines for voluntary 
contributions to UNFPA. This subsection states that funds 
appropriated to the President or the State Department for 
voluntary contributions to UNFPA may be obligated and expended 
beginning 30 days after such funds become available, and only 
if the President makes a certification to Congress that UNFPA 
does not directly support or participate in coercive abortion 
or involuntary sterilization. The certification authority of 
the President under this section may not be delegated.
    The section also clarifies the use of the term ``directly 
supports or participates in coercive abortion or involuntary 
sterilization.'' This term means knowingly and intentionally 
working with a purpose to continue, advance, or expand the 
practice of coercive abortion or involuntary sterilization, or 
playing a primary and essential role in a coercive or 
involuntary aspect of a country's family planning program.

SEC. 117. VOLUNTARY CONTRIBUTIONS FOR INTERNATIONAL PEACEKEEPING 
                    ACTIVITIES.

    This section authorizes $110 million for FY 04 and $110 
million for FY 05 for voluntary contributions to international 
peacekeeping. The provision also states that of the total, $40 
million for FY 04 and such sums for FY 05 is authorized for 
peacekeeping activities in Africa.
    Subsection (b) authorizes $40 million for the Africa 
Regional Peacekeeping Account ($16 million over the 
Administration's request) for the fiscal year 2004 and such 
sums as may be necessary for the fiscal year 2005 to bolster 
our peacekeeping training and development initiatives with 
Africa regional organizations. Africa faces major civil 
conflict in West Africa, the Great Lakes Region, and 
insurgencies and states near collapse in West, Central, and 
East Africa. U.S. bilateral peacekeeping assistance will help 
build Africa's capacity to deal with regional and state 
conflicts, and strengthens African support for U.S. interests 
in the region. It is in keeping with our bilateral interests in 
Africa that we keep our commitment to help Africans build and 
keep peace by sustaining our peacekeeping operations.

SEC. 118. GRANTS TO THE ASIA FOUNDATION.

    This section authorizes $18,000,000 for Fiscal Year 2004 
and $18,000,000 for Fiscal Year 2005 for the activities of the 
Asia Foundation.

    Subtitle B--United States International Broadcasting Activities


SEC. 121. AUTHORIZATIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    This section authorizes $657 million in FY 04 and $651 
million in FY 05 for international broadcasting activities, 
including broadcasting to Cuba, the Middle East, and capital 
improvements.
    Consistent with H.R. 3969 from the 107th Congress, this 
section authorizes $130,240,000 above the Administration's 
request--$76,850,000 in FY 04 and $53,390,000 in FY 05--to 
expand television and radio broadcasting to countries with 
predominately Muslim populations and to support audience 
development. This will ensure full funding for the Middle East 
television network and support other important broadcasting 
enhancements in the Middle East, South Asia, and Southeast 
Asia. The increase will also add back funds to continue 
broadcasts to Eastern Europe and provide additional funds for 
the purpose of countering internet jamming. The purpose of 
these efforts is to increase knowledge of America and its 
policies and provide an accurate and objective source of news 
and information.
    The Broadcasting Board of Governors has already created a 
Middle East Radio Network (``Radio Sawa'') to enhance the 
impact of U.S. international broadcasting in the Arab world. By 
targeting young audiences, using new radio formats, and 
transmitting on the AM, FM, and satellite frequencies used by 
listeners in the region, this powerful initiative has delivered 
unprecedented audiences for unbiased news and information. 
However, the committee also recognizes the huge untapped 
television market in the Middle East. Television is 
increasingly the communications medium of choice in the region, 
and the United States message must be present on this medium to 
counterbalance the anti-American coverage of local and regional 
stations.
    This section authorizes $36 million for the Middle East 
Television Network--$6 million above the budget request--to 
ensure that the station has sufficient funds to meet all 
operational requirements as it begins the challenging mission 
to provide journalistically sound and attractive programming to 
the Arab-speaking world.
    The authorization also includes an additional $30.25 
million to expand radio and television in the Farsi and Urdu 
languages. Approximately $8 million of this amount would 
provide for new high-powered medium wave (AM) transmission for 
broadcasting in Urdu to Pakistan, a key partner in the war on 
terrorism. VOA currently broadcasts only 3 hours daily in Urdu 
to that country, all on shortwave. Audience levels have 
historically been low. This increase would fund 12 or more 
hours a day of broadcasting in Urdu using a mode of 
transmission that Pakistanis prefer.
    Approximately $1.5 million would fund an upgrade to the 
Kuwait medium wave transmitter for Farsi language radio 
broadcasting to Iran. In addition, the VOA's popular television 
programming to Iran would increase from two and a half hours a 
week to an hour or more daily. Daily television use and 
satellite dish ownership in Iran are high. VOA's weekly 
satellite TV program, ``Roundtable with You,'' attracts a high 
volume of audience phone calls, indicating a receptive market.
    The authorization also includes $38.5 million to increase 
radio and television programming in Bahasa Indonesian, 
Javanese, Malay, and Tagalog to enable VOA and Radio Free Asia 
to reach sizeable Muslim populations in Indonesia, Malaysia and 
the Philippines in relevant media. Newfunding for broadcasting 
to this region would secure badly needed high-powered medium wave 
transmitters, FM licenses, and satellite equipment and circuits. It 
allows VOA to expand current broadcasts of 3\1/2\ hours a day in Bahasa 
to up to twelve hours daily, and extend the 1\1/2\ weekly hours of 
television programming to up to six hours daily. It would further drive 
the development of new radio service in the appropriate vernacular 
languages for Malaysia and the Philippines.
    Finally, the authorization includes $2.1 million for 
audience development, which will allow the BBG to increase 
awareness of its programs and the channels and/or frequencies 
in which it broadcasts by advertising through a variety of 
media.

        TITLE II--DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORITIES AND ACTIVITIES


               Subtitle A--United States Public Diplomacy


SEC. 201. FINDINGS AND PURPOSES.

    This section sets forth the importance of using public 
diplomacy as a means to reach out to the people of the world. 
It also recognizes that public diplomacy is a significant tool 
for United States foreign policy and requires a coordinated 
strategy for the use of public diplomacy resources.

SEC. 202. PUBLIC DIPLOMACY RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

    This section amends the State Department Basic Authorities 
Act of 1956 to provide a description of the Secretary of 
State's public diplomacy responsibilities. It states that the 
Secretary of State shall develop a comprehensive strategy (in 
coordination with the U.S. International Broadcasting Agency) 
with measurable objectives for the use of public diplomacy 
resources, to assume a prominent role in coordinating the 
efforts of all Federal agencies involved in public diplomacy, 
and to ensure that the public diplomacy strategy of the United 
States is cohesive, and aggressively counters misinformation 
and propaganda about the United States. The Secretary is also 
required each year to analyze the impact of public diplomacy 
efforts and submit a report to Congress.
    This section also requires the Secretary of State to 
establish a Public Diplomacy Reserve Corps that can be called 
upon in times of emergencies when additional personnel and 
expertise are required.
    Finally, this section sets forth the duties of the Under 
Secretary for Public Diplomacy. The Under Secretary is given 
responsibility for formation, supervision, and implementation 
of United States public diplomacy policies, programs, and 
activities and provides guidance to public diplomacy personnel.
    New subsection 57(d)(1) of the State Department Basic 
Authorities Act, as added by this section, provides that the 
Under Secretary of State for Public Diplomacy shall provide the 
U.S. International Broadcasting Agency with statements of 
official United States policy for broadcast by the Agency at 
the Agency's discretion, and directs the Department of State to 
promptly review editorial material prepared for broadcast by 
the Agency when the Agency requests such a review. It is the 
intent of the Committee to ensure that the official policies of 
the United States Government are accurately and persuasively 
communicated through the Agency. The Committee in no way 
intends to compromise the editorial independence of the Agency, 
and therefore leaves all final editorial decisions to the 
Agency.
    Subsection 202(b) requires the Secretary of State in 
cooperation with the United States Agency for International 
Development to ensure that information concerning foreign 
assistance and projects funded by the United States government 
is disseminated widely within countries and regions that 
receive such assistance. The Committee recognizes that there 
may be instances in which such dissemination is not 
practicable, such as in cases where identification of United 
States personnel or resources would present a security risk. 
The Department of State shall report to Congress 120 days after 
the end of each fiscal year on the efforts made to disseminate 
information regarding United States assistance during the 
preceding fiscal year, including specific information 
concerning all instances in which the United States Agency for 
International Development has not identified projects as United 
States assistance because such identification was not 
practicable.
    Although this section is designed to ensure the highest 
level of attention by our foreign policy agencies to public 
diplomacy needs and objectives, it does not provide new 
authority to the Secretary of State over the programs or 
operations of the U.S. International Broadcasting Agency. The 
role of the Board as a firewall against political interference 
in the content of the broadcasts remains unchanged, as is the 
USIBA's independence as a discrete Federal agency with its own 
budget authority. The Secretary of State remains a member of 
the Board of Governors.

SEC. 203. ANNUAL PLAN ON PUBLIC DIPLOMACY STRATEGY.

    This section requires the Secretary of State, in 
coordination with all appropriate Federal agencies, to prepare 
an annual review and analysis of the impact of public diplomacy 
efforts on target audiences. On the basis of this review, the 
Secretary, again in coordination with appropriate Federal 
agencies, shall develop a plan for the implementation of a 
public diplomacy strategy that specifies goals, agency 
responsibilities, and necessary resources for achieving such 
goals. As with section 202, it is not the intent of this 
provision to suggest an expansion of the Secretary of State's 
authority over the budgets, programs, or other authorities and 
responsibilities of other Federal agencies. These reports will 
provide a consolidated picture of the state of United States 
public diplomacy across the variety of agencies that conduct 
such programs. The Committee expects that any plans, reviews, 
and analyses included in these reports shall reflect the 
consensus views of all Federal agencies participating in public 
diplomacy activities.

SEC. 204. PUBLIC DIPLOMACY TRAINING.

    The findings in this section emphasize that the Foreign 
Service should recruit individuals with expertise and 
professional experience in public diplomacy. This section also 
encourages the Secretary of State to seek to increase the 
number of Foreign Service Officers proficient in languages 
spoken in predominantly Muslim countries. It is expected that 
such training will increase the awareness and capacity of more 
Foreign Service Officers and Chiefs of Mission. Thus, the 
quality and scope of public diplomacy programs will be 
enhanced.

SEC. 205. UNITED STATES ADVISORY COMMISSION ON PUBLIC DIPLOMACY.

    This section amends current law to require that at least 
four (4) members of the Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy 
have substantial experience in the conduct of public diplomacy 
or comparable private sector experience, and requires one 
member to be an American living abroad. It also requires the 
Commission to report not less than every two years on public 
diplomacy programs, policies, and activities and the 
effectiveness of such activities. It is expected that the 
Commission will take an active and constructive role to assess 
public diplomacy objectives and provide guidance to increasethe 
success of such programs and activities overseas.

SEC. 206. LIBRARY PROGRAM.

    This section requires the Secretary of State to implement a 
demonstration program to establish or upgrade foreign libraries 
to improve literacy and support public education. The purpose 
of the program is to advance American values and the importance 
of freedom and democracy.

SEC. 207. SENSE OF CONGRESS CONCERNING PUBLIC DIPLOMACY EFFORTS IN SUB-
                    SAHARAN AFRICA.

    This section states that there are a significant number of 
sub-Saharan African countries that have predominantly Muslim 
populations, and it is the sense of Congress that the Secretary 
should include countries in sub-Saharan Africa with 
predominantly Muslim populations in public diplomacy activities 
authorized by this Act and the amendments made by this Act.

SEC. 208. THE COLIN POWELL CENTER FOR AMERICAN DIPLOMACY.

    This section authorizes the establishment of the Colin 
Powell Center for American diplomacy, housing a museum, 
conference center and auditorium to be located in the 
Department of State's headquarters at the Harry S. Truman 
Building. The purpose of the Center is to organize and sponsor 
educational and outreach programs explaining the role of U.S. 
diplomats and American foreign policy in advancing U.S. 
national interests throughout the history of our democracy. The 
Center is being developed in partnership with the non-profit 
Foreign Affairs Museum Council, a 501(c)3 organization. The 
Committee urges the Department to plan carefully and consult 
closely with Congress as it proceeds with this project, 
including on issues relating to security of the Main State 
building as well as administration and governance of the 
Center. The Committee understands that a strategic planning 
exercise is being conducted to, among other things, determine 
whether the necessary operating funds can be raised through 
voluntary contributions. The Committee looks forward to 
reviewing this study and assessing its impact on the 
Department's plans to establish the Center.
    The Committee believes that the Department can make use of 
the expertise of the Smithsonian Institution in embarking on 
this endeavor, including this transfer of funds under the 
Economy Act. In addition, the Committee believes that any funds 
that are not necessary for the construction of a reasonably 
designed Center should be used to establish a endowment for the 
operations of the Center.

              Subtitle B--Basic Authorities and Activities


SEC. 221. UNITED STATES POLICY WITH RESPECT TO JERUSALEM AS THE CAPITAL 
                    OF ISRAEL.

    Subsection(a) states that none of the funds authorized to 
be appropriated by this Act may be expended for the operation 
of a U.S. consulate in Jerusalem unless such a consulate is 
under the supervision of the U.S. Ambassador to Israel. This 
provision was carried in last year's Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act and is repeated so as to apply to spending 
authorized by this Act, as well.
    Subsection(b) states that none of the funds authorized to 
be appropriated by this Act may be available for the 
publication of any official government document which lists 
countries and their capital cities unless it identifies 
Jerusalem as the capital of Israel. This provision was carried 
in last year's Foreign Relations Authorization Act and is 
repeated so as to apply to spending authorized by this Act, as 
well.
    Subsection (c) states that for the purposes of the 
registration of birth, certification of nationality or issuance 
of a passport of a U.S. citizen born in the city of Jerusalem, 
the Secretary shall, upon the request of the citizen, record 
the place of birth as Jerusalem. A similar provision was 
carried in last year's Foreign Relations Act but would now be 
embedded in the provision of law that authorizes the Secretary 
of State to issue passports, and establishes the rules for 
their issuance (``An Act to regulate the issue and validity of 
passports, and for other purposes'', approved July 3, 1926 (22 
U.S.C. 211a; 44 Stat. 887)). The Committee believes that its 
position about language to be inserted in passports is both 
fully justified and is constitutional under the ``necessary and 
proper'' clause of Article I of the Constitution and that the 
President has a duty to see that this provision, if enacted, is 
enforced.

SEC. 222. MODIFICATION OF REPORTING REQUIREMENTS.

    This section repeals an expiring, temporary reporting 
requirement relative to terrorist incidents in which Americans 
are killed and related matters and transfers certain of its 
requirements so that they will appear, through May 1, 2005, in 
the Department of State's widely circulated annual report on 
``Patterns of Global Terrorism.''

SEC. 223. REPORT CONCERNING EFFORTS TO PROMOTE ISRAEL'S DIPLOMATIC 
                    RELATIONS WITH OTHER COUNTRIES.

    This section requires an annual report by the Secretary of 
State regarding actions taken by representatives of the U.S. to 
encourage other countries to establish full diplomatic 
relations with Israel.

SEC. 224. REIMBURSEMENT RATE FOR AIRLIFT SERVICES PROVIDED TO THE 
                    DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

    The Department of Defense provides airlift support to the 
Secretary of State for official overseas travel on a 
reimbursable basis. The Department of Defense has a two-tiered 
rate structure for charging for such support. At present, the 
Department of State is paying the higher rate, which is nearly 
twice as much as the lower. This section would authorize the 
Department of State to pay the Department of Defense for 
airlift services at the Department of Defense rate.

SEC. 225. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING ADDITIONAL UNITED STATES CONSULAR 
                    POSTS.

    This section expresses a sense of Congress that the 
Secretary of State should make best efforts to establish 
consulates or a diplomatic presence in three cities: Pusan, 
South Korea; Medan, Indonesia; and Hat Yai, Thailand.

SEC. 226. VALIDITY OF UNITED STATES PASSPORTS FOR TRAVEL TO COUNTRIES 
                    RECEIVING UNITED STATES FOREIGN ASSISTANCE.

    Current law permits the Secretary of State to order that 
United States passports may not be used for travel in, to, or 
through designated countries. (The only countries so designated 
are Libya and Iraq--including Northern Iraq.) Certain classes 
of persons are exempt pursuant to a decision of the Secretary.) 
Violations of the order are considered to be criminal offenses.
    This section provides that the Secretary's power to limit 
the use of passports does not applywith respect to a country, 
such as Iraq, in which the United States is providing assistance 
authorized by the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, as amended.
    The Committee is concerned that the Department of State has 
been too slow to adjust its policies which now ban the use of 
passports to travel to Iraq. Foreign nationals may travel to 
Iraq, but Americans are currently barred from using their 
passports to do so. This has, among other things, prevented 
American businesses from establishing themselves there without 
dealing with bureaucratic hurdles and non-transparent 
procedures.
    The fact that a country is receiving United States foreign 
assistance should mean that it is sufficiently safe to travel 
to. With respect to no country, other than Iraq and, formerly, 
Lebanon, has the United States continued to ban the use of the 
passport after United States foreign assistance was provided.
    Modern technology allows the United States government to 
provide ample warning of safety issues; Americans should then 
be able to assess the risks for themselves and act accordingly. 
The Committee notes that passports have not been invalidated 
for travel to danger or war zones such as Afghanistan, Liberia, 
the Ivory Coast, and Kosovo, nor to countries where consular 
services could not be provided in the recent past (or at 
present), such as Afghanistan, Kosovo, Tajikistan, and North 
Korea.
    Finally, the Committee notes that the President retains the 
power to effectively ban travel in an emergency by imposing 
economic restrictions enforced by the Office of Foreign Assets 
Control of the Treasury Department.

SEC. 227. SECURITY CAPITAL COST SHARING.

    This section provides the Secretary of State with the 
authority to establish and implement a Security Capital Cost-
Sharing Program which is designed to collect funds from each 
agency to assist in the cost of building new, secure 
facilities. Beginning in fiscal year 2005, the Secretary is 
authorized to determine on an annual basis fees to be collected 
from other government agencies that have personnel assigned 
overseas and to use such fees to construct safe and secure new 
embassy compounds. The assessment of such costs will be based 
on the number of personnel who will be assigned to each 
overseas facility. The funds expected to be generated by this 
new cost-sharing program are intended to expedite the 
construction schedule for this large number of facilities, 
shortening it from twenty six to twelve years. This provision 
will also encourage rightsizing at overseas posts because 
agencies will be assuming more of the actual costs of an 
overseas position.
    The Committee notes that while under the current program, 
furnishings, generators, and certain other items were not 
purchased by the Department of State for the use of other 
agencies. Because all agencies would be continuing the 
appropriate share of the funding, such restrictions will no 
longer be necessary.

SEC. 228. AUTHORITY TO ISSUE ADMINISTRATIVE SUBPOENAS.

    This section provides a narrow administrative subpoena 
authority for Diplomatic Security agents. Such a subpoena may 
be issued in cases of an ``imminent threat'' to persons 
missions or organizations protected by Diplomatic Security 
under the authority of Section 37(a)(3) of the State Department 
Basic Authorities Act. The authority is similar to one provided 
to the Secret Service and the procedural protections of that 
provision will apply here. The committee has provided that the 
power to issue such subpoena could be delegate by the Secretary 
only to the Deputy Secretary, thereby assuring close attention 
to this authority at the highest level of the Department. In 
addition to facilitate oversight of the exercise of this 
authority the Secretary must report annually to the Committee 
on its use.

SEC. 229. ENHANCING REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT AND MAINTAINING THE UNITED 
                    STATES COMMITMENT TO REFUGEES.

    In addition to findings on the United States refugee 
admissions program, this section provides the Department's 
Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration (PRM) with 
additional enabling tools to more effectively and efficiently 
identify, refer, and process refugees seeking admission to the 
United States.
    The Committee is concerned that in recent years the United 
States has failed to approach the refugee admission goals 
established by the President. Though the majority of previous 
delays in processing are attributed to necessary security 
upgrades instituted after the September 11th terrorist attacks 
in 2001, now that upgrades are in place, the Committee is 
concerned that refugee admissions numbers continue to remain 
low. The Committee is confident that the tools provided in this 
section will better enable the Administration to identify, 
refer, and process refugees for admission to the United States.
    Subsection (a) makes a number of findings with respect to 
the United States' refugee admissions program, including those 
that applaud the United States' longstanding tradition of 
providing refugee assistance and relief to the world's refugees 
fleeing religious and other forms of persecution through the 
Department of State's migration and refugee assistance account; 
notes the importance of a strong refugee resettlement and 
assistance program as a component of the United States' 
commitment to freedom; notes the decline in recent years in the 
United States' admission of refugees; notes that refugees 
undergo rigorous security screenings; notes the relationship 
between the United States government, private voluntary 
agencies, and nongovernmental organizations in refugee 
processing and encourages the greater use of such entities in 
processing so that the Administration can focus to a greater 
extent on security; and finds that in order to meet the annual 
70,000 person refugee goals set by the Administration, a 
broader cross-section of the world's 15 million refugees could 
be considered for resettlement if the Department of State were 
to expand existing refugee processing categories reserved for 
refugees of special interest to the United States as well as 
for family reunification.
    Subsection (b) states that the purpose of section 229 is to 
provide the Department with tools to enable it to carry out its 
responsibilities with greater efficiency with respect to the 
identification and processing of refugee applicants.
    Subsection (c) provides enhancement of refugee 
identification and processing though three means. This 
subsection states that in addition to the traditional agencies 
currently being used, where applicable, the Secretary shall: 
(1) develop and utilize partnerships with voluntary 
resettlement organizations that permit such organizations to 
assist in the identification and referral of refugees; (2) 
utilize private voluntary agencies with ties to domestic 
constituencies in the overseas processing of refugees for 
admission to the United States; and (3) establish and utilize 
Refugee Response Teams to augment the ability of the Department 
to identify and process refugees for admission to the United 
States by providing a mobile team of experts who could be 
deployed in developing refugee situations.
    The Committee believes that the establishment of Refugee 
Response Teams, in particular, is expected to enhance the 
quality of refugee resettlement programs, will make the 
processing of refugees more efficient and effective in areas 
where traditional agencies are unable to meet programneeds, and 
will augment the capacity of the United States government to identify, 
process, assist, and counsel individuals for eventual adjudication by 
the Department of Homeland Security.
    Subsection (c)(3)(B) notes that the composition of the 
Refugee Response Teams shall be comprised of representatives of 
NGOs and private voluntary organizations that have experience 
in refugee law, policy and programs. Voluntary resettlement 
organizations and private voluntary organizations with ties to 
domestic constituencies are uniquely qualified to assist the 
Department in successfully identifying a wider-range of 
refugees for admission to the United States. Voluntary 
resettlement and private voluntary organizations with ties to 
domestic constituencies have the knowledge of and experience 
with United States law and policy required to effectively 
identify refugees for admission to the United States. The 
Committee expects that, wherever possible, these organizations 
will be used in lieu of or to augment existing capacity of 
traditional agencies currently used in the processing of 
refugees for admission to the United States.
    Subsection (c)(3)(C) outlines the responsibilities of the 
Refugee Response Teams, which include: monitoring refugee 
situations, with a view toward identifying refugees whose best 
durable solution is third country resettlement; preparing 
profiles and documentation for resettlement consideration; 
augmenting or establishing an overseas operation, particularly 
in response to urgent developments; assisting with training and 
technical assistance to existing international organizations 
and other processing entities; as well as other 
responsibilities to be determined by the Secretary.
    The Committee intends that the Department make liberal use 
of these three tools and expects that in addition to the report 
required by subsection 229(f), the Department will periodically 
report to the International Relations Committee of the House of 
Representatives and the Foreign Relations Committee of the 
Senate its utilization of these tools and/or rationale for non-
use.
    The Committee believes through implementing the directives 
of subsection 229(c), processing will become more effective and 
efficient and that eventually the use of private voluntary 
organizations in refugee processing will reduce program costs.
    Subsection (d) requires the Secretary of State to establish 
performance standards to ensure accountability and 
effectiveness of subsection (c) on refugee identification and 
processing. This section is designed to ensure this efficiency 
through accountability. It requires the Secretary, in 
consultation with private voluntary organizations and NGOs, to 
establish performance standards to ensure that voluntary 
agencies performing the identification, referral, and 
processing responsibilities identified in subsection (c) carry 
out those tasks in an accountable and effective manner.
    Subsection (e) states that the Department work to ensure 
that there is adequate planning across fiscal years to fulfill 
the admission goals that the President establishes each year in 
his Presidential Determination on Refugee Admissions through 
expanded consideration of particularly vulnerable groups of 
refugees and by encouraging the Department to expand its 
processing of refugees to include a broader cross-section of 
the refugee population.
    Among the steps included in subsection 229(e) are those 
requiring the Secretary to work to ensure that the United 
States refugee admissions program give special attention for 
resettlement processing to particularly vulnerable refugees, 
including those refugees who have been long-stayers in refugee 
camps or long-stayers in first countries of asylum, 
unaccompanied refugee minors, urban refugees, and refugees in 
women-headed households. It also notes the importance of the 
family reunification in the United States resettlement program 
by stating that the Department shall work to ensure that 
attempts are made to expand the processing of refugees of all 
nationalities who have close family ties to United States. 
Subsection 229(e) also requires the Department to make attempts 
to expand the number of refugees considered for admission who 
are of special concern to the United States. Finally, it 
addresses the need to expand access to broader categories of 
refugees, thereby reducing the incidences of relationship-based 
misrepresentation on the part of bona fide refugees who meet 
the definition of a refugee but who are not granted interviews 
for refugee status because they do not have close family ties 
to the United States.
    Subsection (f) requires the Secretary to submit a report to 
Congress within 180 days after the date of enactment of this 
Act on the Department's implementation of the provisions in 
this section--specifically subsections (c), (d), and (e). The 
report would concentrate, on the expanded utilization of 
voluntary organizations in refugee identification, refugee 
processing, and refugee response teams, along with an 
explanation of the Department's rationale for not using such 
organizations and agencies; efforts by the Secretary to 
implement performance standards for voluntary organizations 
involved in refugee identification, processing, and response 
teams and the success of NGOs and private voluntary 
organizations in meeting such standards; efforts to expand 
consideration of various groups for refugee processing; and 
efforts to ensure that there is adequate planning across fiscal 
years so as to fulfill the refugee admission goals set forth by 
the President in his annual Presidential Determination on 
Refugee Admissions.

            Subtitle C--Educational and Cultural Authorities


SEC. 251. ESTABLISHMENT OF INITIATIVES FOR PREDOMINANTLY MUSLIM 
                    COUNTRIES.

    This section requires the Secretary to establish public 
diplomacy programs aimed at predominantly Muslim countries 
around the world. The specific programs are: journalism 
training, English language teaching, sister city partnerships, 
civics education, youth ambassadors, Fulbright Exchange 
Program, Humphrey fellowships, and a library sciences exchange 
program. The Committee recommends that English language 
teaching materials should incorporate democratic values. 
Furthermore such materials should be translated into Arabic and 
Mandarin and other languages as needed to enhance English 
language teaching objectives.

SEC. 252. DATABASE OF AMERICAN AND FOREIGN PARTICIPANTS IN EXCHANGE 
                    PROGRAMS.

    This section requires that, to the extent practicable, the 
Secretary of State establish and maintain a database of all 
participants, both American and foreign, in exchange programs. 
The purpose is to encourage networking and continued 
communication with the alumni of United States exchange 
programs.

SEC. 253. REPORT ON INCLUSION OF FREEDOM AND DEMOCRACY ADVOCATES IN 
                    EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS.

    This section requires the Secretary of State to provide a 
report to Congress on the implementation of section 102 of the 
Human Rights, Refugee and Other Foreign Relations Provisions 
Act of 1996. The purpose of the report is to provide 
information concerning the number of grants to conduct exchange 
programs with countries whose governments deny freedom and 
democracy, and the extent to which supporters of freedom and 
democracy within these countries are given opportunities to 
participate in United States-funded programs.

SEC. 254. SENSE OF CONGRESS CONCERNING EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL 
                    EXCHANGE PROGRAMS FOR FOREIGN JOURNALISTS.

    This section expresses a sense of Congress that the 
Secretary should establish a journalism training program for 
foreign journalists from regions of conflict.

SEC. 255. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING KOREAN FULBRIGHT PROGRAMS.

    In order to expand the reach of Fulbright activities in 
Korea to include those among whom the United States faces the 
most difficult public diplomacy challenges, this section 
expresses the sense of Congress that Korean participation in 
Fulbright activities should also include students who are: from 
outside of Seoul; from other than elite universities; other 
than degree-seeking graduate students; and who are preparing 
for non-academic careers, such as government, law, media, and 
business.

SEC. 256. AUTHORIZING EAST TIMORESE SCHOLARSHIPS FOR GRADUATE STUDY.

    This section provides flexibility in the East Timorese 
scholarship program by extending the program to graduate 
students. The current program is designed for undergraduates.

SEC. 257. PUBLIC SAFETY AWARENESS IN STUDY ABROAD PROGRAMS.

    This section addresses public safety awareness activities 
for U.S. nationals participating in the Bureau of Educational 
and Cultural Affairs study abroad programs. The provision 
encourages the Bureau to support such activities as part of 
such programs, and urges special attention to public safety 
issues, including road safety abroad.

                    Subtitle D--Consular Authorities


SEC. 271. MACHINE READABLE VISAS.

    This section sets a cap on the use of funds collected by 
the State Department for machine readable visas for fiscal 
years 2004 and 2005. Funds exceeding $700 million may only be 
used subject to a reprogramming notification of the relevant 
House and Senate committees. This provision is carried and 
updated in each State Department authorization bill.

SEC. 272. PROCESSING OF VISA APPLICATIONS.

    This provision states that it shall be the policy of the 
State Department: (a) to process visa applications of immediate 
relatives and fiances of U.S. citizens within 30 days of 
receiving all necessary documents; and (b) to process 
applications sponsored by someone other than an immediate 
relative within 60 days.

SEC. 273. STAFFING AT DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS.

    This section encourages executive branch agencies to right-
size overseas posts--the process of deploying the right number 
people at the right posts with the right expertise.
    Despite the process outlined in NSDD-38, Staffing at 
Overseas Missions and Their Diplomatic Constituent Posts (June 
2, 1982), in practice chiefs of mission lack practical 
authority to determine the appropriate staffing requirements at 
posts. Moreover, the war on terrorism, increased AIDS funding 
in Africa and the Caribbean, the new Millennium Challenge 
Account program, changes to the U.S. entry-exit rules, and a 
greater emphasis on foreign affairs all promise to increase the 
workloads of overseas missions, and place greater pressure on 
chiefs of mission to right-size staff compliments. This section 
gives chiefs of mission another means to administer their posts 
effectively without usurping the authority of the Secretary of 
State or other executive branch agency heads.
    Under this section, chiefs of mission are required to voice 
their views on the necessity of all executive branch staff 
positions under their authority, whether Department of State or 
other executive branch agencies. This process should occur for 
each staff element at least every five years, though reviews 
may be handled individually, in small groups, or to include an 
entire mission. The Department of State shall collect and 
respond to the reviews received during the year in an annual 
report, and subsequently share the report with affected 
agencies and the Inspector General of the Department of State, 
which includes rightsizing factors in mission inspection 
reports.

    TITLE III--ORGANIZATION AND PERSONNEL OF THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE


SEC. 301. FELLOWSHIP OF HOPE PROGRAM.

    This section clarifies the authority underlying a current 
exchange program between U.S. foreign affairs agencies, the 
European Union, and its member-states, created to promote 
collaboration among its young leaders. Under this program, 
Foreign Service officers are to serve one-year details at the 
European Union (EU) in Brussels and designated European foreign 
ministries. After completion of the details at the EU or in the 
foreign ministries, they are assigned to a position in the U.S. 
embassy in the relevant European capital. Conversely, the State 
Department also will receive members of the diplomatic corps 
from the European Union and designated foreign ministries.

SEC. 302. CLAIMS FOR LOST PAY.

    This section clarifies the Department's authority to make 
technical corrections or enter into settlements of claims or 
grievances brought by its employees involving lost pay, 
allowances, or differentials. These complaints may involve 
simple technical errors in the payment of salary or benefits, 
which need to be corrected. Administrative adjustments also may 
be required.
    The Department is seeking this provision as clarification 
to resolve back pay claims consistent with the spirit of 
conciliation that underlies settlements generally. This 
provision is not intended to question the current authority of 
agencies to settle claims without admitting fault.

SEC. 303. OMBUDSMAN FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

    This section formally establishes the position of Ombudsman 
for both foreign service and civil service. It enhances the 
responsibilities of the current Ombudsman (currently a 
volunteer additional duty) for the civil service. The Ombudsman 
reports directly to the Secretary of State.

SEC. 304. REPEAL OF RECERTIFICATION REQUIREMENT FOR SENIOR FOREIGN 
                    SERVICE.

    This section repeals the provision in the Foreign Service 
Act that requires the Secretary to establish a recertification 
requirement for members of the Senior Foreign Service (SFS) 
that is equivalent to the recertification process for the 
Senior Executive Service (SES).
    Such a process is no longer required for the Senior 
Executive Service as it was repealed in Section 1321 of the 
Homeland Security Act of 2002 (P.L. 107-296).

SEC. 305. REPORT CONCERNING STATUS OF EMPLOYEES OF STATE DEPARTMENT.

    This section requires the Secretary of State to provide a 
report on the merits of the conversion of employees at the 
State Department to the excepted service. The excepted service 
provides greater flexibility in the management of the 
Department's workforce than do present civil service and other 
regulations. The excepted service would provide additional 
career and personal development opportunities for many 
Department employees. The study should address the merits of 
converting all or part of the Department's American citizen 
workforce to the excepted service. Currently the State 
Department maintains separate civil service and foreign service 
employees.

SEC. 306. HOME LEAVE.

    This section provides additional flexibility in the home 
leave program provided under the Foreign Service Act of 1980. 
First, it allows the Foreign Service personnel to schedule 
their home leave after 12 months of service at a post rather 
than after 18 months as required under current law. Second, the 
provision delinks rest and recuperation travel from the timing 
of home leave so that members of the service are allowed more 
flexibility in taking each.

SEC. 307. INCREASED LIMITS APPLICABLE TO POST DIFFERENTIALS AND DANGER 
                    PAY ALLOWANCES.

    This section increases the cap set in Title 5 for hardship 
and danger pay for government officials serving overseas from 
25% of base salary to 35% of base salary. The State Department 
has the authority to determine which countries are eligible for 
such allowances and the percentage rate. The Department and the 
American Foreign Service Association requested this provision 
as a means to encourage people to serve in hardship posts and 
to draw a greater distinction between degrees of danger or 
hardship at overseas posts. The Committee does not believe that 
all posts are deserving of the maximum allowance level. Clear 
criteria should be in place to distinguish hardship or danger 
variables at each post. The Committee notes that GAO studies of 
the personnel assignment system identify various problems that 
the Department faces in meeting staffing needs at overseas 
posts particularly at hardship posts. The GAO concludes that 
the Department needs to create incentives other than monetary 
to entice employees to bid on and accept assignments to 
hardship posts. As a means to guide qualified employees toward 
hardship posts the Committee strongly urges the Department to 
pursue GAO recommendations (GAO-02-626) that include making 
hardship service a criterion in promotion and onward assignment 
decisions, and fully applying the needs of the service standard 
to ensure that hardship assignments are shared equitably.
    The section requires the Secretary to provide the Committee 
with the criteria that will be applied to each percentage level 
of hardship or danger pay.

SEC. 308. REGULATIONS REGARDING RETIREMENT CREDIT FOR GOVERNMENT 
                    SERVICE PERFORMED ABROAD.

    This section establishes a deadline for the issuance of 
regulations to implement Section 321 of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (P.L. 107-228), which 
provides for retirement credit for part-time, intermittent, or 
temporary (PIT) employees who worked for the Department 
overseas as part of the spousal employment program in the 
1990's. Complaints were received from the family members about 
delays at OPM regarding the implementation of this statute and 
it is hoped this deadline will encourage more rapid 
implementation of this law.

SEC. 309. MINORITY RECRUITMENT.

    This provision extends the minority recruitment report 
required by section 324 of the Foreign Relations Authorization 
Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228) for an additional 
year. In addition, it applies the conditions contained in 
section 325 of that Act on funds authorized for minority 
recruitment in section 111(a)(1)(E) in order to ensure that 
such funds are used only for programmatic purposes and not for 
salaries, among other things.

SEC. 310. MERITORIOUS STEP INCREASES.

    This section provides a technical fix to section 406 of the 
Foreign Service Act. Section 406(b) links the award of a MSI to 
whether the person also receives a within class salary step 
increase. This provision allows greater flexibility in the 
award of a MSI notwithstanding an award of a class salary step 
increase.

                 TITLE IV--INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS


              Subtitle A--Basic Authorities and Activities


SEC. 401. RAISING THE CAP ON PEACEKEEPING CONTRIBUTIONS.

    This provision would set the cap on UN peacekeeping 
assessments at 27.1 % for calendar years 2005 and 2006. This 
would allow the United States to pay its peacekeeping 
assessment in full in 2004 and 2005. This provision will allow 
the U.S. to avoid accruing future peacekeeping arrears.

SEC. 402. REGARDING THE REENTRY OF THE UNITED STATES IN UNESCO.

    Subsection (a) makes recommendations to guide the U.S. 
reentry into UNESCO. The Committee is concerned about the pace 
of the planning for the reentry and the number of important 
decisions that need to be made in this regard. Specific 
recommendations contained in this section reflect the concerns 
about security of personnel, cost-containment, and appropriate 
objectives for continuing internal reforms at UNESCO. 
Subsection (b) also contains an authorization for such sums as 
may be necessary for the annual U.S. contribution to UNESCO.

SEC. 403. UNESCO NATIONAL COMMISSION.

    Upon rejoining UNESCO, each country is required to 
establish a ``National Commission.'' This section updates a 
1946 law governing the U.S. National Commission for UNESCO.

SEC. 404. ORGANIZATION OF AMERICAN STATES EMERGENCY FUND.

    This section amends the LIBERTAD Act of 1995 (P.L. 104-114) 
to require the President to work to establish an OAS Emergency 
Fund for Cuba to deploy human rights monitors to the island and 
authorizing the necessary funds to ensure its creation. This is 
in response to the Cuban government's intensified crackdown on 
human rights dissidents, independent journalists, independent 
labor leaders, and other pro-democracy advocates.

SEC. 405. UNITED STATES EFFORTS REGARDING THE STATUS OF ISRAEL IN THE 
                    WESTERN EUROPEAN AND OTHERS GROUP AT THE UNITED 
                    NATIONS.

    This sectionexpresses the Committee's view that the 
Department of State should undertake concerted diplomatic efforts and 
to take all actions necessary to upgrade and extend Israel's membership 
in the Western European and Others Group in UN bodies and UN affiliated 
agencies in New York and throughout the world. It is the Committee's 
understanding that this temporary agreement between Israel and the 
members of this regional Group expires in 2004. It also provides for 
periodic reports to International Relations and to other appropriate 
committees on the steps taken by the Department of State to ensure that 
Israel is more fully represented on all UN bodies.

           Subtitle B--United States International Leadership


SEC. 431. SHORT TITLE.

    ``United States International Leadership Act of 2003.''

SEC. 432. FINDINGS.

    This section lists findings highlighting the increasingly 
important role that international organizations and 
multilateral institutions play in U.S. foreign policy. It also 
provides findings that U.S. efforts to advance goals at these 
institutions are often blocked because of anachronistic 
groupings and structures that leave democratic states at a 
disadvantage, and because the U.S. has not done enough to build 
expertise in multilateral diplomacy. It also finds that the 
U.S. must create a caucus of democratic states if it is to 
overcome the leverage of repressive regimes at these 
institutions.

SEC. 433. ESTABLISHMENT OF A DEMOCRACY CAUCUS.

    This section directs the President, acting through the 
Secretary of State, to establish a Democracy Caucus at all UN 
and broad-based international organizations.

SEC. 434. ANNUAL DIPLOMATIC MISSIONS ON MULTILATERAL ISSUES.

    This section directs the Secretary of State to ensure that 
high-level delegations are dispatched on an annual basis to key 
foreign capitals to promote the U.S. agenda at key 
international fora such as the UN General Assembly and the 
United Nations Human Rights Commission.

SEC. 435. LEADERSHIP AND MEMBERSHIP OF INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    This section directs the President, acting through the 
Secretary of State, to use the voice, vote and influence of the 
United States to reform the criteria for leadership and 
membership at all UN and other international organizations of 
which the U.S. is a member so as to exclude, where appropriate, 
those nations that violate the principles of the specific 
organization. It would also seek to ensure that a member state 
may not assume a leadership position in such bodies if it is 
subject to sanctions imposed by the United Nations Security 
Council. It also directs the President to work to ensure that 
no member state that has been determined to be a state sponsor 
of terrorism stand in nomination or be in rotation for a 
leadership position at any UN or multilateral institution to 
which the United States is a member or for membership of the UN 
Security Council.
    Subsection (b) provides that any time a state sponsor of 
terrorism assumes a leadership position in such an institution 
or becomes a member of the UN Security Council, the Secretary 
of State shall submit a report on the steps it took to prevent 
such an event pursuant to subsection (a).

SEC. 436. INCREASED TRAINING IN MULTILATERAL DIPLOMACY.

    This section amends the Foreign Service Act to require the 
establishment of a series of training courses for officers on 
the conduct of diplomacy at international organizations and 
other multilateral institutions.

SEC. 437. PROMOTING ASSIGNMENTS TO INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    This section amends the Foreign Service Act to ensure when 
considering promotion into the senior levels of the Foreign 
Service, assignments whose primary responsibility is to 
represent the United States to an international negotiation, 
organization, or multilateral institution be considered 
favorably. In addition, it requires the Secretary of State to 
evaluate and report to the Congress on whether a new cone (area 
of speciality) should be established within the Foreign Service 
that concentrates on members of the Service who serve at 
international organizations and multilateral institutions.

SEC. 438. IMPLEMENTATION AND ESTABLISHMENT OF OFFICE ON MULTILATERAL 
                    NEGOTIATIONS.

    This section authorizes the Secretary of State to establish 
within the Department of State an Office on Multilateral 
Negotiations to be headed by a Special Representative, 
appointed by the President, who with the advice and consent of 
the Senate will be designated as Ambassador-at Large. The 
Special Representative's primary responsibility shall be to 
assist in the organization of, and preparation for, United 
States participation in multilateral negotiations. Other duties 
of the Special Representative are to provide advice to the 
President and the Secretary of State on strategies to achieve 
U.S. objectives; to organize a Democracy Caucus; and to 
undertake efforts to reform leadership and membership criteria 
at international organizations.

SEC. 439. SYNCHRONIZATION OF UNITED STATES CONTRIBUTIONS TO 
                    INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS.

    This section requires the President to submit a plan for 
resumption by the United States of the payment of its full 
contribution to international organizations at the beginning of 
each calendar year. Presently, the U.S. makes it payments to 
the UN and other international organizations at the beginning 
of our fiscal year (October). The UN operates on a calendar 
year, making the U.S. payments 10 months late, thereby 
disrupting the UN's budgeting process, and encouraging other 
key donor states to postpone their own assessments.

     TITLE V--UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING ACTIVITIES.


              Subtitle A--Basic Authorities and Activities


SEC. 501. MIDEAST TELEVISION AND RADIO NETWORK, INC.

    This section provides the Board the authority to make 
annual grants for the purpose of carrying out radio and 
television broadcasting to the Middle East in Arabic. It 
provides for the establishment of a Mideast Radio and 
Television Network, Inc. under a corporate structure, similar 
to that of RFE/RL, Inc. and Radio Free Asia. The proposed new 
grantee would incorporate the existing Arabic service to the 
Middle East, Radio Sawa, and adds a new 24-hour-a-day 
television service, with Middle East Television Network, to 
provide radio and television programming consistent with the 
broadcast standards and principles set forth in the 
International Broadcasting Act of 1994.

SEC. 502. IMPROVING SIGNAL DELIVERY TO CUBA.

    This provision would provide greater flexibility to the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors to augment the transmission of 
Radio Marti broadcasts to Cuba. Under existing law, Radio Marti 
is required to utilize the broadcasting facilities at Marathon, 
Florida, and the 1180 AM frequency that was used by the VOA 
prior to the enactment of the Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act. 
The Radio Broadcasting to Cuba Act permits the U.S. Government 
to lease broadcast time on commercial medium wave stations for 
Radio Marti if the transmissions from Marathon are jammed, and 
under other certain limited circumstances. This provision would 
clarify the ability of the Office of Cuba Broadcasting to use 
additional AM frequencies, and eliminate outdated restrictions.
    This section would allow the BBG to explore alternative 
methods of overcoming Cuba's long standing jamming of the 
existing Radio Marti transmitter at Marathon, Florida, in 
accordance with President Bush's direction to the new OCB 
Director on July 13, 2001, ``to use all available means to 
overcome the jamming of Radio and TV Marti'' and his more 
recent call to ``modernize'' the services.

SEC. 503. REPORT CONCERNING EFFORTS TO COUNTER JAMMING OF BROADCASTS OF 
                    RADIO MARTI AND TV MARTI.

    This section requires a report on the efforts by the 
Secretary of State on specific steps taken to overcome jamming, 
an evaluation of alternative methods being used to counter 
jamming, and successful methods used by non- U.S. Government 
entities to counter jamming. In the last two years, the U.S. 
Government has stated that overcoming the Cuban regime's 
jamming of Radio and TV Marti is priority.

SEC. 504. PILOT PROGRAM FOR PROMOTION OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM IN THE 
                    UNITED STATES THROUGH UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL 
                    BROADCASTING.

    This section requires the Broadcasting Board of Governors 
to launch a pilot program for promoting travel and tourism in 
the United States through its international broadcasting. Those 
communities in the United States which have suffered decreased 
revenue from tourism since the terrorist attacks of September 
11, 2001, are to be highlighted in particular. The Department 
of Commerce and other appropriate government agencies are to be 
consulted in developing tourism programming. In mandating 
``regular'' programming, the Committee envisions the BBG 
promoting tourism through its international broadcasting on a 
frequent and sustained basis.
    The Voice of America currently is required to promote 
travel and tourism through its broadcasts, in accordance with 
Sec. 2420 of the Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act 
of 1998. This pilot program would extend such promotional 
activity to the BBG's grantees, including Radio Free Europe/
Radio Liberty, Radio Free Afghanistan, etc.

SEC. 505. RADIO FREE ASIA BROADCASTS INTO NORTH KOREA.

    This section expresses a sense of Congress that the 
Broadcasting Board of Governors should ensure that radio Free 
Asia increases its broadcasts to North Korea from 4 hours a day 
to 24 hours a day. The Kim Jong Il regime makes extensive 
efforts to control the flow of information in North Korea in 
order to ensure the regime's survival. The amendment also 
requires a classified report 90 days after enactment on steps 
being undertaken and measures necessary, including the 
provision of adequate radios, to maximize North Korean citizen 
access to Radio Free Asia and other foreign broadcasts.

SEC. 506. PROHIBITION ON THE ELIMINATION OF INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING 
                    IN EASTERN EUROPE.

    Section 121 increases the Broadcasting Board of Governor's 
operating accounts above the amounts requested by the 
Administration with the intent of preventing the BBG from 
discontinuing international broadcasting to Eastern Europe as 
it had planned. The expected time lapse between the 
authorization of these additional funds and their appropriation 
by Congress may lead the BBG to begin downscaling its 
operations in this region in the interim. The section prohibits 
the BBG from taking such action by requiring broadcasting to 
continue.

                  Subtitle B--Global Internet Freedom


SEC. 521. SHORT TITLE.

    This section provides that this subtitle may be cited as 
``Global Internet Freedom Act of 2003.''

SEC. 522. FINDINGS.

    This section expresses findings that freedom of press and 
speech are fundamental to a free society. Certain countries 
restrict access to the Internet which U.S. international 
broadcasting utilizes as an alternative means to reach people. 
Therefore, efforts should be made to defeat government jamming 
of the Internet.

SEC. 523. PURPOSES.

    This section states that the purpose is to establish an 
office within the Broadcasting Board of Governors to counter 
Internet jamming. The BBG should employ current technologies 
that may be available commercially to defeat jamming by 
repressive governments.

SEC. 524. DEVELOPMENT AND DEPLOYMENT OF TECHNOLOGIES TO DEFEAT INTERNET 
                    JAMMING AND CENSORSHIP.

    This section establishes the office of Global Internet 
Freedom within the Broadcasting Board of Governors to develop 
and implement a comprehensive strategy to combat state-
sponsored and state-directed internet jamming. It also requires 
that the BBG report on the status of foreign governments' 
interference with the Internet.

 Subtitle C--Reorganization of United States International Broadcasting


SEC. 531. ESTABLISHMENT OF UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL BROADCASTING 
                    AGENCY.

    This section amends the United States International 
Broadcasting Act of 1994 and renames the Broadcasting Board of 
Governors the ``U.S. International Broadcasting Agency.'' It is 
an independent agency within the executive branch of 
government. The Agency will continue to be headed by a nine-
member, part-time, bipartisan board, renamed the Board of 
Governors, appointed by the President with the advice and 
consent of the Senate. The Board shall appoint a Director of 
the Agency who will have designated day-to-day operational 
responsibilities for the Agency.
    These changes will improve the lines of authority and 
establish greater accountability in United States international 
broadcasting operations. The new agency retains the current 
design, with the President appointing a member of the Board as 
chair. The main changes clarify day-to-day responsibilities for 
broadcasting operations, establish a full-time director who is 
appointed by the Board and has clear lines of authority, and 
make clear that there is one broadcasting organization that is 
headed by the Board which exists as an independent agency 
within the executive branch.
    This section is designed to strengthen the Board's ability 
to adopt strategic goals and objectives for the agency and to 
work to ensure that these goals and objectives remain 
priorities for the broadcast entities within the agency as well 
as corporate grantees. The Committee is aware that the Board 
has recently adopted a strategic plan designed to maximize the 
impact of U.S. International Broadcasting in regions vital to 
United States strategic interests. The plan envisions a 
worldwide U.S. International Broadcasting System, creating one 
integrated United States programming stream that would be 
intended to fulfil the missions both of VOA and of the 
surrogate broadcasting services. The Committee believes that 
numerous aspects of this plan have merit, but that conditions 
in many countries around the world still call for the 
preservation of the distinct and complementary roles of the 
Voice of America and of the surrogate broadcasting services.
    The proposed reorganization assumes the Board of Governors 
will retain a board staff, through which it conducts oversight 
activities, and its supervision of the corporate grantee 
broadcast entities.

SEC. 532. AUTHORITIES AND FUNCTIONS OF THE AGENCY.

    This section restates current law (Sec. 305 of the United 
States International Broadcasting Act of 1994) with respect to 
the duties and responsibilities of the Agency.

SEC. 533. ROLE OF THE SECRETARY OF STATE.

    This section amends current law (Section 306 of the U.S. 
International Broadcasting Act) by deleting an out-of-date 
reference to WorldNet programming and restating that the 
Secretary of State shall provide such information and guidance 
on foreign policy and public diplomacy issues to the Agency as 
the Secretary considers appropriate.

SEC. 534. ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS.

    This section makes certain technical, administrative and 
personnel changes.

SEC. 535. BROADCASTING BOARD OF GOVERNORS AND INTERNATIONAL 
                    BROADCASTING BUREAU.

    This section abolishes the International Broadcasting 
Bureau. It has been identified as one of the areas that has 
caused confusion in the management of the Agency.
    In 1994, PL 103-236, the Foreign Affairs Authorization Act 
for fiscal years 1994 and 1995, established the International 
Broadcasting Bureau within the United States Information Agency 
(USIA) as part of an overall restructuring of international 
broadcasting. The director of the International Broadcasting 
Bureau (IBB) was required to be appointed by the Chairman of 
the Broadcasting Board of Governors in concurrence with the 
other Board members and in consultation with the Director of 
USIA. The Foreign Affairs Reform and Restructuring Act, Title A 
of the Foreign Affairs Authorization Act for fiscal years 1998 
and 1999, PL 105-277 (signed in October 1998), merged USIA into 
the State Department and made the IBB Director a presidential 
appointee. However, the position remained unfilled until 
December 9, 2002.
    Since its creation in 1994, the Broadcasting Board of 
Governors employed a staff including an executive director in 
addition to the IBB Director. At times this organizational 
structure has created confusion about lines of authority and 
resulted in less than optimal management of the broadcast 
services and the surrogate operations.
    Therefore, this provision eliminates the requirement for 
the International Broadcasting Bureau--whose authorities are 
subsumed by the Agency--and the Director position. Section 301 
allows the Board of Governors to appoint a Director of the 
Agency who will also serve as the executive director for the 
Board. These changes are intended to streamline the 
organization, eliminate lines of authority and improve the 
overall daily management of our international broadcasting 
operations. The proposed reorganization assumes the Board of 
Governors will retain a board staff.

SEC. 536. TRANSITION.

    This is a technical provision that provides for a seamless 
transition from the current structure to the new Agency.

SEC. 537. CONFORMING AMENDMENTS.

    This section provides technical conforming amendments to 
current law.

SEC. 538. REFERENCES.

    This technical provision states that any references to the 
previous Broadcasting Board of Governors will be deemed to mean 
the U.S. International Broadcasting Agency.

SEC. 539. BROADCASTING STANDARDS.

    This provision amends current law by adding that the 
Broadcasting Agency shall seek to ensure that resources are 
allocated to broadcasts directed at people whose governments 
deny freedom of expression or where the provision of objective 
news and information is necessary.

SEC. 540. EFFECTIVE DATE.

    This title becomes effective 6 months after enactment.
    Title VI--International Free Media Act of 2003

SEC. 601. SHORT TITLE.

    This section provides that the title may be cited as the 
``International Free Media Act of 2003.''

SEC. 602. DEFINITIONS.

    This section defines the term ``free media'' as used 
throughout the title.

SEC. 603. FINDINGS.

    This section expresses findings regarding the importance of 
supporting free media to promoting U.S. national interests, 
human rights, and democracy worldwide. It describes the various 
means by which foreign governments suppress free media, and 
explains the negative consequences of unprofessional and 
unethical journalism. Specifically, it cites provisions of the 
International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (to which 
the United States is a party) prohibiting hateful media that 
incites discrimination, hostility or violence. This section 
also describes the dangers of restricting access to free media 
and affirms the responsibility of foreign governments to 
discourage unprofessional and unethical journalism. Finally, 
this section acknowledges the positive contributions past U.S. 
Government efforts have made to the development of free media, 
and stresses the importance of continuing such efforts.

SEC. 604. STATEMENTS OF POLICY.

    This section asserts that it is United States policy to 
promote free media worldwide, respect journalistic integrity 
and editorial independence, and utilize widely-accepted 
standards for professional and ethical journalistic and 
editorial practice.

SEC. 605. COORDINATOR FOR INTERNATIONAL FREE MEDIA.

    This section establishes a Coordinator for International 
Free Media, who is appointed by the President and confirmed by 
the Senate. The President may designate an existing State 
Department employee as the Coordinator, although this would not 
exempt him or her from Senate confirmation.
    The Coordinator is charged with coordinating all activity 
of the U.S. Government designed to promote press freedoms and 
free media, including: training; assessing free media worldwide 
according to widely-accepted standards, including those set in 
the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights; 
promoting professional and ethical journalism; advising the 
President and Secretary of State on press freedom and free 
media policy; and representing the United States onthese 
issues. The Coordinator is also charged with contributing to the annual 
human rights country reports and with administering the International 
Free Media Fund established in Section 607.
    In addition, this section provides the Coordinator with a 
list of factors to consider in assessing free media worldwide. 
These factors include the characteristics of the media market, 
the degree of government censorship, the existing legal 
environment, and the extent to which journalists adhere to 
widely-accepted ethical and professional standards. In 
addition, the Coordinator is required to consult with U.S. 
foreign mission personnel in assessing international media.
    This section also requires the Secretary of State to 
provide the Coordinator with the necessary staff and funding to 
fulfill his or her duties.

SEC. 606. UNITED STATES ADVISORY COMMISSION ON PUBLIC DIPLOMACY AND 
                    INTERNATIONAL MEDIA.

    This section amends the U.S. Information and Educational 
Exchange Act of 1948 (22 U.S.C. 1469) to rename the U.S. 
Advisory Commission on Public Diplomacy and expand its duties 
to include advising the Coordinator for International Free 
Media. The renamed ``U.S. Advisory Commission on Public 
Diplomacy and International Media'' is also charged with 
consulting with the Coordinator on the administration of the 
International Free Media Fund established in Section 607.

SEC. 607. INTERNATIONAL FREE MEDIA FUND.

    This section establishes the International Free Media Fund 
and authorizes $15 million to be appropriated for the Fund. The 
Fund is administered by the Coordinator, in consultation with 
the Commission, for the purpose of promoting press freedoms and 
free media worldwide. The Fund may be used to provide grants, 
contracts, technical assistance or material support to free 
media organizations that adhere to widely-accepted standards of 
ethical and professional journalism. This section prohibits the 
Fund from being used to support hateful media that incite 
discrimination, hostility or violence. It also stresses the 
importance of enabling free media to become financially viable 
and supporting journalists who have received training. An 
annual report detailing the Fund's activity is required, as is 
consultation with appropriate State Department and U.S. foreign 
mission officials.

SEC. 608. FREE MEDIA PROMOTION ACTIVITY OF THE BROADCASTING BOARD OF 
                    GOVERNORS.

    This section requires the Broadcasting Board of Governors 
to promote international free media, and mandates a report on 
cultivating affiliate relationships and enhancements in foreign 
journalist training for this purpose. In addition, there is 
authorized to be appropriated $2.5 million for FY04 and $2.5 
million for FY05 to the Broadcasting Board of Governors for 
supporting free media in countries in which U.S. international 
broadcasting is decreasing.

                  TITLE VII--MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS


                   Subtitle A--Reporting Requirements


SEC. 701. REPORTS ON BENCHMARKS FOR BOSNIA.

    This section would eliminate reporting requirements on 
progress toward achieving the benchmarks for a sustainable 
peace process in Bosnia that must be done as long as U.S. 
ground combat forces continue to participate in the 
Stabilization Force (SFOR). Significant reductions in U.S. and 
allied troops have continued regularly since 1998. Regular 
briefings to congressional staff (and Members, as desired) are 
sufficient to address continuing concerns. This is a very time-
consuming report for the Departments of State and Defense.

SEC. 702. REPORTS TO COMMITTEE ON INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS.

    This section requires the Secretary of State to submit all 
reports required by law, regardless of which Committee requests 
them, to the Committee on International Relations. This will 
ensure that reports required in appropriations acts or other 
laws are forwarded to Committee on International Relations.

SEC. 703. REPORTS CONCERNING THE CAPTURE AND PROSECUTION OF 
                    PARAMILITARY AND OTHER TERRORIST LEADERS IN 
                    COLOMBIA.

    This section makes numerous findings regarding the 
continuing security threat posed by the Self-Defense Forces of 
Colombia (AUC or paramilitaries), the AUC's abysmal human 
rights record, and remaining links between the Colombian 
Security Forces and the paramilitaries. The section also 
requires the Secretary of State to report bi-annually to 
Congress regarding the amount, destination, and effectiveness 
of United States assistance which is dedicated to apprehending 
the leaders of the three Foreign Terrorist Organizations 
operating in Colombia--the AUC, the Revolutionary Armed Forces 
of Colombia (FARC), and the National Liberation Army (ELN) of 
Colombia, and to describe the status of investigations and 
prosecutions by the Colombian Attorney General's office of 
these same individuals.
    The Committee remains concerned about the illegal 
activities of not only the FARC and the ELN but also of 
Colombia's ``self-defense'' or paramilitary groups, one of the 
worst violators of human rights in Colombia's war, responsible 
for at least half of all non-combatant killings, torture, and 
disappearances. Because of their record of abuse, the 
paramilitaries' main umbrella organization, the AUC, has been 
on the State Department's list of foreign terrorist 
organizations since 2001. The Committee believes that 
Colombia's government, as of yet, has not committed at every 
level to confronting the paramilitaries and protecting 
civilians from paramilitary abuses. While conditions on U.S. 
assistance have contributed to significant improvements in the 
Colombian security forces' will to challenge and attack 
paramilitary groups, the State Department's March 31, 2003 
report on human rights practices in Colombia finds that some 
collusion with the AUC continued in 2002. Therefore, the report 
required by this section is intended to help ensure that U.S. 
assistance to apprehend paramilitary and guerrilla leaders does 
not suffer the fate of earlier Colombian government initiatives 
which produced few lasting results.
    The Committee makes two additional cautionary notes. 
Efforts to gather intelligence on the location of paramilitary 
and guerrilla leaders as well as to detain and prosecute them 
should continue so as to ensure that these individuals, 
particularly those individuals who have U.S. indictments 
pending against them, can be pursued, captured, and brought to 
justice at the appropriate time. This is the primary reason 
that the Committee is requesting the data identified in this 
section. Second, the record of the office of the Colombian 
Attorney General should be scrutinized carefully to distinguish 
between apparent action, e.g., the opening of cases, and 
effective measures that lead to the successful prosecutions of 
paramilitary and guerrilla leaders.

SEC. 704. REPORTS RELATING TO MAGEN DAVID ADOM SOCIETY.

    Section 704 amends section 690 of the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 2003 (Public Law 107-228) to 
require the Secretary of State to report to the Committees on 
International Relations in the House and Foreign Relations in 
the Senate, describing the efforts by the United States to 
obtain fullmembership for the Magen David Adom in the 
International Red Cross Movement; efforts by the International 
Committee of the Red Cross to obtain full membership for the Magen 
David Adom in the International Red Cross Movement; efforts of the High 
Contracting Parties to the Geneva Convention of 1949 to adopt the 
October 12, 2000, draft additional protocol; and the extent to which 
the Magen David Adom is participating in the activities of the 
International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement. The first report is 
due 60 days after date of enactment and annually thereafter, and may be 
classified if necessary.

SEC. 705. REPORT CONCERNING THE RETURN OF PORTRAITS OF HOLOCAUST 
                    VICTIMS TO THE ARTIST DINA BABBIT.

    This section requires a report within 6 months of enactment 
describing the diplomatic efforts the U.S. has taken to 
facilitate the return of the paintings that have been requested 
by Dina Babbit.

SEC. 706. REPORT TO CONGRESS ON USE OF VESTED ASSETS.

    This provision amends the International Emergency Economic 
Powers Act to provide that any foreign assets frozen and vested 
pursuant to the authority of that Act may not be used until the 
President notifies the Committee and the Foreign Relations 
Committee of the Senate of the purpose for which such vested 
funds shall be used.

SEC. 707. REPORT CONCERNING THE CONFLICT IN UGANDA.

    This section expresses a sense of Congress that the U.S. 
should exhaust all diplomatic means to support an immediate 
peaceful resolution to the 16-year old conflict in Northern 
Uganda. It also requires a report by the Secretary of State on 
actions taken to seek a solution to the conflict and on 
humanitarian assistance efforts in northern Uganda.
    The Committee recognizes and supports the strong role of 
the Acholi religious leaders and other non-governmental actors 
in helping facilitate a peaceful resolution to the conflict and 
calls on the US to be supportive of these initiatives.
    The Committee applauds the significant success the Ugandan 
government has had in addressing the HIV/AIDs crisis through 
implementing the ABC approach--abstinence, be faithful, and if 
necessary use condoms, but expresses serious concern for the 
grave humanitarian and development needs in Northern Uganda.
    The Committee believes that the Secretary should work with 
the Administrator for the United States Agency of International 
Development to ensure that sufficient funds are spent on food, 
medicine, medical and vocational training, and reintegration 
programs for formerly-abducted children for persons displaced 
as a result of civil conflict in Northern Uganda.

SEC. 708. REQUIREMENT FOR REPORT ON UNITED STATES POLICY TOWARD HAITI.

    This section makes findings concerning the moral imperative 
of the United States to alleviate the humanitarian crisis in 
Haiti and the need for the United States Government (USG) to 
help develop a concerted approach to resolving Haiti's long-
standing political and economic crisis. The section also 
requires that the Secretary of State, in consultation with the 
Secretary of Treasury, submit to Congress within 60 days a 
report which describes USG activities to promote elections in 
Haiti, assesses the appropriateness of Resolution 822 of the 
Organization of American States as the framework for resolving 
the political and economic crisis in that country, and 
recommends methods for facilitating the release of loans by the 
Inter-American Development Bank.

SEC. 709. REPORT ON THE EFFECTS OF PLAN COLOMBIA ON ECUADOR.

    This section finds that the Secretary of State has not 
submitted to Congress, as required by the Foreign Relations 
Authorization Act for fiscal year 2003, a report on the impact 
of Plan Colombia on Ecuador and the other adjacent countries to 
Colombia. The section requires, among other things, that the 
Secretary of State submit within 30 days a report to Congress 
which sets forth a statement of policy and comprehensive 
strategy for the United States for addressing the spillover 
effects of Plan Colombia on these countries.
    The Committee notes that in the seven-page report dated 
March 4, 2003, the Department of State included only four short 
paragraphs on the spill-over effects of Plan Colombia on 
Ecuador and the other countries. Recognizing that the 
Department must have a more elaborated statement of policy and 
comprehensive strategy for addressing this problem, the 
Committee again requires that the Secretary of State submit a 
report to Congress on this issue. It is the Committee's 
expectation that such a report will address in detail not only 
the counter-drug repercussions of Plan Colombia and its 
successor programs on Ecuador and the other adjacent countries, 
but also the humanitarian and economic development implications 
of increased eradication efforts for these countries.

SEC. 710. REPORT ON ACTIONS TAKEN BY PAKISTAN.

    This section requires the President to submit a report that 
contains a description of the extent to which the Government of 
Pakistan has closed terrorist training camps, established 
measures to prohibit infiltration over the Line of Control, and 
ceased the transfer of weapons of mass destruction to any third 
country or terrorist organization.

SEC. 711. REPORT ON DEMOCRACY IN THE WESTERN HEMISPHERE.

    This section makes several findings regarding the 
prerequisites for consolidating democracy in any country, the 
apparent dearth of these factors in the hemisphere, the 
resulting potential effect on the future of democracy, and the 
subsequent need for the United States to enhance its democracy-
promotion efforts in the region. The section requires the 
Secretary of State, in coordination with relevant agencies, to 
submit a one-time report to Congress on the state of democracy 
in the hemisphere. The report shall address key elements of 
democracy in almost all the countries of the western hemisphere 
and provide an assessment of the presence--or lack thereof--of 
each element on certain aspects of democracy. The report also 
shall describe and assess current democracy-promotion programs 
in each country.
    The Committee notes that a long-standing goal of the United 
States has been to foster democratic forms of government in the 
western hemisphere. However, the goal of a hemisphere comprised 
of robust democracies has not yet been achieved. The Committee 
increasingly is concerned that the failure of many countries to 
safeguard the civil, political, and human rights of their 
peoples as well as provide them with economic opportunities may 
encourage these societies to retreat from a sustained 
commitment to democracy. Recently, a Government Accounting 
Office report on U.S. democracy-promotion efforts in six 
specific countries in the hemisphere found that these efforts 
have ``had a modest impact to date'' because of poor 
coordination among U.S. agencies and a lack of sustainability 
and resources, particularly from host countries.
    Now is the time to refocus on efforts to promote democracy 
in the hemisphere. The report that this section mandates will 
provide, in a single reference source, a factual basis for that 
revitalization. The report will also provide a basis for 
exploring new avenues of democracy-promotion, including 
thecreation of a permanent learning center for democratic leaders of 
the hemisphere. The Committee expects the report to be a balanced, 
detailed analysis of this subject and not simply a listing of facts or 
assertions.

SEC. 712. REPORT CONCERNING INTERNAL AND INTRA-REGIONAL CONFLICTS IN 
                    THE GREAT LAKES REGION OF AFRICA.

    This section details the costs, the causes, and the 
magnitude of the ongoing conflicts in the Great Lakes region of 
Central Africa. It expresses the sense of Congress that the 
United States should: undertake a full scale diplomatic effort 
to help resolve these conflicts peacefully; urge all rebel 
forces to stop the abduction of children; make technical 
assistance available to combat armed extremist paramilitary and 
militarist rebel organizations; monitor and support 
negotiations conducted by other third-party institutions; 
provide relief to municipalities supporting displaced 
populations; provide resources to demobilization efforts; 
condition military assistance to any nation which acts to 
destabilized the Democratic Republic of Congo; and appoint a 
special envoy to the Great Lakes region. This section also 
directs the Secretary of State to report to Congress not later 
than 180 days after enactment of this Act, and not later than 
April 1 of each subsequent year on the comprehensive actions 
taken by the United States in promoting peaceful and immediate 
solutions to conflicts in the Great Lakes region.

                       Subtitle B--Other Matters


SEC. 721. SENSE OF CONGRESS RELATING TO EAST TIMOR, JUSTICE, AND 
                    REHABILITATION.

    This provision expresses a the sense of Congress regarding 
the ongoing need for justice related to crimes committed by the 
Indonesian military and Indonesian supported militias in East 
Timor.
    The Committee supports efforts by East Timor's Commission 
for Reception, Truth and Reconciliation to consolidate peace 
and reconciliation and encourages the President to 
expeditiously assist in the provision of information requested 
in the January 24, 2003 letter from the Commission.
    The Committee supports the extension of the mandate of the 
joint UN-East Timor Serious Crimes Investigation Unit and the 
Special Panel for Serious Crimes beyond May 2004 to pursue 
justice and avoid a backlog of cases lacking investigation and 
trials.
    The Committee encourages the UN and Indonesian authorities 
to continue to resolve the situation of the approximately 
28,000 East Timorese remaining in Indonesia. In light of the 
recent resumption of killings and other crimes in East Timor by 
militia members based in Indonesia it is particularly urgent 
that the remnants of militia organizations be quickly removed 
from the border area. It is also important to provide decent 
humanitarian conditions and to ensure freedom of choice in 
repatriation and resettlement, particularly for those who may 
still be subject to intimidation by militia organizations.

SEC. 722. SENSE OF CONGRESS CONCERNING HUMAN RIGHTS AND JUSTICE IN 
                    INDONESIA.

    This section expresses concern that members of the 
Indonesian security forces continue to commit many serious 
human rights violations, particularly in areas of conflict such 
as Aceh, Papua, the Moluccas, and Central Sulawesi. It also 
expresses other concerns in the region.
    The Committee urges every effort be made to salvage the 
Framework Agreement on Cessation of Hostilities in Aceh (COHA). 
The Administration should strongly urge the Indonesian 
Government and military to halt the present build-up of troops 
and military equipment in Aceh and to abandon plans for 
intensified military operations in Aceh, and press the 
Indonesian Government and the Free Aceh Movement (GAM) to 
resume talks within the framework of COHA, so as to bring about 
a reduction in the level of armed conflict in Aceh.
    The Committee is deeply concerned by reports of an 
Indonesian military campaign targeting civilians in the Central 
Highlands of Papua, which reportedly includes the burning of 
villages and torture and killing of detainees. The Committee 
notes the lack of justice in the trial for the murder of Papuan 
civic leader Theys Eluay, which was treated as an ordinary 
crime rather than a political killing, and which has resulted 
only in very lenient sentences for low-ranking Special Forces 
(Kopassus) officers. The Committee also has concerns regarding 
the Presidential Decree of January 2003, which, over objections 
from people within Papua, would divide Papua into three 
provinces, in violation of the government's own Special 
Autonomy Law for Papua.
    The Committee expresses concern over assistance for the 
Indonesian military, including the provision of International 
Military Education and Training, because of human rights abuses 
linked to the military and especially because the case 
involving the killing of two U.S. citizens and one Indonesian 
citizen and the wounding of others in the Timika area of Papua 
on August 31, 2002 remains unresolved. The Committee contests 
that military assistance, if given, should be contingent on a 
the release of a transparent budget audit of the Indonesian 
military, an end of resistance to the principle of civilian 
control, an improved record with respect to human rights abuses 
carried out by the military as noted in the State Department's 
Human Rights Report, and the ability of the government to hold 
security forces accountable for crimes against humanity in East 
Timor and serious crimes elsewhere in Indonesia.

SEC. 723. AMENDMENT TO THE INTERNATIONAL RELIGIOUS FREEDOM ACT OF 1998.

    This section extends for two additional years the 
authorization of appropriations of for the U.S. International 
Commission on Religious Freedom for each of the fiscal years 
2004 and 2005. The funding level is straight lined at $3 
million.

SEC. 724. SENSE OF CONGRESS WITH RESPECT TO HUMAN RIGHTS IN CENTRAL 
                    ASIA.

    This section discusses the countries of Kazakhstan, 
Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan, referred 
here as ``Central Asia.'' The section directs the 
Administration to take progress achieved by Central Asia in the 
areas of democratic reforms, human rights, independent media, 
and non-violent religious groups into account when determining 
the levels of engagement and assistance for each nation of 
Central Asia. The Administration should also ensure that no 
U.S. assistance benefits security forces in Central Asia 
implicated in violations of human rights. This provision calls 
on the governments of the nations of Central Asia to make 
documentation of their revenues publicly available and to 
punish individuals engaged in official corruption. It states 
that the Central Asian governments risk undermining the goals 
of the war on terrorism by continuing to suppress their 
citizens, and that the increased level of U.S. assistance to 
these nations can be sustained only if there is substantial and 
continuing progress towards democratization.

SEC. 725. TECHNICAL CORRECTION TO AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS FOR 
                    FISCAL YEAR 2003 FOR CENTER FOR CULTURAL AND 
                    TECHNICAL INTERCHANGE BETWEEN EAST AND WEST.

    This section makes an adjustment to align theauthorized and 
appropriated levels for the East West Center. This change increases the 
authorized level for the East West Center for FY 03 from $15 million to 
$18 million. This change was requested by the State Department because 
the FY 03 appropriated level for the East West Center is $18 million.

SEC. 726. UNDERSECRETARY OF COMMERCE FOR INDUSTRY AND SECURITY.

    This section is a technical change to ensure that the title 
of the current Under Secretary of Commerce for Industry and 
Security conforms with the name of the Commerce Department 
bureau overseen by that officer.

SEC. 727. CONCERNING THE SPREAD OF WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION.

    This section expresses a sense of Congress calling upon the 
European Union to develop an aggressive regulatory system to 
investigate allegations of companies contributing to the 
development of weapons of mass destruction or their sale or 
transfer to other nations.

SEC. 728. INTERNATIONAL AGRICULTURE BIOTECHNOLOGY INFORMATION PROGRAM.

    This section directs the State Department to provide other 
countries with the scientific evidence on the benefits, safety, 
and potential uses of agricultural biotechnology. Specific 
objectives for the Secretary of State include chairing an 
interagency task force to develop and disseminate accurate 
information on the potential benefits of agricultural 
biotechnology for human and animal nutritional needs and for 
other purposes.

SEC. 729. REFUGEE RESETTLEMENT BURDENSHARING.

    This provision expresses a sense of Congress that the 
Secretary of State should encourage the international community 
to accept refugees for resettlement on a more equitable basis.

SEC. 730. SENSE OF CONGRESS ON CLIMATE CHANGE.

    This section cites scientific evidence that confirms global 
climate change is occuring and is attributable to human 
activities, and restates U.S. international treaty obligations 
pursuant to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate 
Change (UNFCCC). The section also asserts the shared 
international responsibility to address the problem of climate 
change, and re-affirms the principle found in the UNFCCC that 
developed countries, as the largest historic and current 
emitters of greenhouse gases, should take the lead in combating 
climate change. This section states that a future binding 
treaty must not result in serious harm to the U.S. economy, but 
also should not cause the U.S. to abandon its shared 
responsibility in reducing the risks of climate change and its 
impacts. The section restates the U.S. position that although 
the U.S. has elected against becoming a party to the Kyoto 
Protocol to the UNFCCC, our government will not interfere with 
the plans of any nation that chooses to ratify and implement 
the Protocol. It also makes clear that U.S. business interests 
are best served by knowing how other governments are addressing 
the risks of climate change, and that U.S. investments in 
research, development, and deployment of clean energy 
technologies can reduce the risks of climate change and its 
impacts, while benefitting the U.S. economy.
    The section also states the sense of Congress that the U.S. 
should demonstrate international leadership and responsibility 
by reducing health, environmental, and economic risks posed by 
climate change by: (1) taking actions to ensure ``significant 
and meaningful'' reductions of greenhouse gasses ``from all 
sectors,'' (2) creating mechanisms, including tradable credits 
to reduce, avoid, and sequester greenhouse gas emissions, (3) 
participating in international negotiations with the objective 
of gaining U.S. participation in a future binding climate 
change treaty that will protect U.S. economic interests and be 
consistent with UNFCCC environmental objectives, and (4) 
establish a bipartisan observer group of members of the U.S. 
House of Representatives to monitor international negotiations 
on climate change.
    This provision narrowly passed the Committee by a vote of 
21-18.

SEC. 731. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING MIGRATION ISSUES BETWEEN THE 
                    UNITED STATES AND MEXICO.

    This section recalls President Bush's first meeting with 
President Fox of Mexico which resulted in the Joint Communique 
of February 16, 2001 that stated, ``we are instructing our 
Governments to engage, at the earliest possible opportunity, in 
formal, high level negotiations aimed at achieving short and 
long term agreements that will allow us to constructively 
address migration and labor issues between our two countries.'' 
The section also recalls President Fox's first official visit 
to Washington, D.C. and the Joint Statement of September 6, 
2001 that resulted from that meeting, stressing a ``commitment 
to forging new and realistic approaches to migration to ensure 
it is safe, orderly, legal and dignified. * * *'' The section 
further recalls that the same Statement also called for 
``respecting the human dignity of all migrants, regardless of 
their status.
    In furtherance of U.S. national interests, and in 
recognition of the significant time that has elapsed since the 
agreements cited above were reached by the governments of the 
United States and Mexico, this section also contains a sense of 
Congress resolution directing that as soon as practicable, the 
United States and Mexico should commence negotiations to reach 
a migration accord satisfactory to both nations. In addition, 
it provides that such an accord should be accompanied by an 
accord to open Mexico's petroleum sector to foreign investment.

SEC. 732. SENSE OF CONGRESS CONCERNING UNITED STATES ASSISTANCE TO 
                    PALESTINIAN REFUGEES.

    This section expresses the sense of the Congress with 
regard to the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA), 
which provides services to Palestinian refugees. The provision 
acknowledges the hardships endured by Palestinian refugees; 
recognizes the importance of United States humanitarian 
assistance to those refugees, which is channeled through the 
UNRWA; notes that the United States has contributed more than 
$2.5 billion to UNRWA since its founding in 1950, making the 
United States UNRWA's leading donor; calls attention to the 
fact that the United States contribution is nearly ten times 
the amount contributed by the entire Arab world; and calls on 
Arab states to assume a greater share of the burden for 
financing UNRWA.
    It also expresses many of the Committee's ongoing concerns 
about UNRWA. Those concerns relate to, among other things, 
credible reports that UNRWA's facilities have been used for 
terrorist training and as bases for terrorist operations, with 
little attempt by the UNRWA to stop or oppose such activities 
or alert relevant law enforcement authorities about such 
terrorist activities. The Committee is also concerned about the 
use or availability in UNRWA's schools of textbooks and other 
materials, such as posters, that promote anti-Semitism or the 
denial of Israel's right to exist, that promote stereotypes and 
exacerbate tensions between Palestinians and Israelis, or that 
constitute forms of incitement to violence.
    The Committee is particularly dismayed that UNRWA schools 
still use, in many grades, old textbooks that contain 
virulently anti-Jewish and anti-Israel messages. UNRWA should 
ensure theimmediate replacement of all such textbooks and 
assume a greater degree of responsibility over the curriculum. 
Palestinian children should not have to wait years to attend schools 
that do not indoctrinate them in hatred; action is needed immediately. 
The Committee notes criticisms that even the newer textbooks 
inadequately prepare Palestinian children for peace with Israel; those 
criticisms need to be responded to swiftly, with appropriate changes.
    This section also strongly urges (a) the U.N. Secretary-
General to take immediate steps toward comprehensive reform of 
UNRWA, so that it actively works to oppose terrorism and to 
promote Israeli-Palestinian reconciliation and understanding; 
(b) UNRWA to meet the requirements, in letter and spirit, of 
section 301(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, including 
by comprehensively ensuring that no UNRWA assistance is 
rendered to anyone who has been involved with terrorism at any 
time and that all UNRWA beneficiaries be informed at the 
earliest possible time, and at regular intervals thereafter, 
that anyone involved with terrorism will be permanently 
ineligible for UNRWA benefits; and (c) the Secretary of State 
to make reform of UNRWA a priority at the U.N., with such 
reform including the implementation of comprehensive and 
independently verifiable audits of UNRWA activities.
    Among the concerns that the Committee would like to see 
raised by the U.S. Secretary of State are indications that 
UNRWA may be complying with aspects of the ``Arab boycott,'' at 
least in its operations in Syria. According to paragraph 174 of 
the most recent UNRWA annual report (U.N. General Assembly, 
Official Records, Fifty-seventh Session, Supplement No. 13 (A/
57/13), covering the period July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2002), 
UNRWA states that ``(i)n the Syrian Arab Republic, the Agency 
[i.e., UNRWA] is required to submit its customs declaration 
forms with commercial invoices for endorsement by the Boycott 
Office.'' The report adds, without further elaboration, that 
UNRWA has ``taken the matter up with the Syrian authorities on 
the grounds that UNRWA should not be subjected to this 
requirement.'' The Committee agrees that UNRWA should not be 
subject to the requirement and, further, considers all forms of 
cooperation with the boycott by UNRWA--or any other arm of the 
United Nations--unacceptable. The Committee calls on the 
Secretary of State to raise the issue of such cooperation at 
the highest levels of both the United Nations and the Syrian 
government.
    Lastly, this section notes that there is an ongoing 
Congressionally mandated General Accounting Office (GAO) 
investigation on the extent to which the Department of State is 
complying with section 301(c) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 
1961, and on the implementation of procedures that have been 
established to meet the standards of the Department of State 
regarding compliance with the requirements of that section. In 
this section, the Committee strongly encourages the GAO to 
expand the scope of its investigation to examine all recent 
United States assistance to UNRWA to ensure that taxpayer funds 
are being spent effectively and are not directly or indirectly 
supporting terrorism, anti-Semitic or anti-Israeli teachings, 
or the glorification or incitement of violence.
    The Committee commends and encourages ongoing efforts by 
UNRWA to implement reforms to meet some of the Committee's 
concerns and by the State Department to encourage reform of 
UNRWA. As reported to Congress by the State Department, these 
reforms include an increase in the numbers of personnel engaged 
in inspecting UNRWA facilities ``to minimize the possibility of 
improper meetings being held there, to see that the facilities 
were not being used to store weapons or other inappropriate 
material, to see that any political materials be removed and 
that any other activities that violated the neutrality of UNRWA 
installations or programming be brought to an end.'' According 
to the State Department, UNRWA also issued a circular to 
employees in June 2002 reminding them that UNRWA facilities are 
to be used only for activities within UNRWA's mandate and that 
UNRWA staff must not engage in any activity incompatible with 
their status as independent and impartial civil servants.
    Such steps are positive but inadequate. The Committee would 
like to be assured that UNRWA's actions regarding the issues 
discussed in the preceding paragraph will not be limited to the 
one-time distribution of a circular and an increase in the 
numbers of monitors.

SEC. 733. UNITED STATES POLICY ON WORLD BANK GROUP LOANS TO IRAN.

    This Section requires the Secretary of State, in 
consultation with the Secretary of the Treasury, to convey 
directly to the governments of countries represented on the 
decision-making boards and councils of the international 
financial institutions of the World Bank Group that the U.S. 
Government opposes any further activity in Iran by those 
institutions. Within 90 days of enactment of this act and again 
one year thereafter, the Secretary of State shall submit a 
report on his efforts in this regard to the chairman and 
ranking minority member of the House International Relations 
Committee and of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee.

SEC. 734. SENSE OF CONGRESS RELATING TO SOVIET NUCLEAR TESTS IN 
                    KAZAKHSTAN.

    This section describes the positive non-proliferation 
activities undertaken by the Government of Kazakhstan, 
including voluntarily giving up its nuclear arsenal, sealing 
the nuclear test sites, and joining the START treaty, since its 
independence in 1991. The section also describes the negative 
environmental and health impact from the decades of the Soviet-
era nuclear weapon testing on the citizens of Kazakhstan. The 
section instructs the Secretary of State to work to establish a 
joint working group with the Government of Kazakhstan to assist 
in assessing the environmental damage and health effects caused 
by Soviet nuclear testing in the city of Semipalatinsk.

SEC. 735. SENSE OF CONGRESS RELATING TO VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN.

    This section recalls that the United Nations Declaration on 
the Elimination of Violence Against Women outlines that states 
should condemn violence against women. It also recalls that the 
Beijing Declaration and Platform for Action of the Fourth World 
Conference on Women states that governments should condemn 
violence against women and should refrain from invoking custom, 
tradition or religion to avoid their obligations. It recalls 
that the United States supported both of these Declarations and 
reinforces the position of the United States to condemn 
violence against women.

  DIVISION B--DEFENSE TRADE AND SECURITY ASSISTANCE REFORM ACT OF 2003


                      TITLE X--GENERAL PROVISIONS


SEC. 1001. SHORT TITLE.

    This section provides that Division B may be cited as the 
``Defense Trade and Security Assistance Reform Act of 2003.''

SEC. 1002. DEFINITIONS.

    This section sets forth certain definitions of terms 
commonly used in Division B.

SEC. 1003. REFERENCES TO ARMS EXPORT CONTROL ACT.

    References to an amendment or repeal of a section or other 
provision in Division B are considered to be made to the Arms 
Export Control Act, unless otherwise expressly noted.

   TITLE XI--TERRORIST-RELATED PROHIBITIONS AND ENFORCEMENT MEASURES


SEC. 1101. ELIGIBILITY PROVISIONS.

    This section amends section 3 of the Arms Export Control 
Act (AECA) to ensure that a basis exists for ineligibility for 
assistance under the AECA for foreign countries that use U.S. 
defense articles to carry out a transaction with a terrorist 
state. A transaction is defined to cover acts prohibited by 
section 40 of the AECA with regard to the United States 
Government and U.S. persons. Section 3 would also be amended to 
require a report to Congress when defense articles and defense 
services licensed under section 38 are transferred to a third 
person (including a third country) without U.S. Government 
approval, in addition to the longstanding requirement for such 
reports in the case of retransfers involving U.S. Government 
furnished defense articles and defense services.

SEC. 1102. WEAPONS TRANSFERS TO FOREIGN PERSONS IN THE UNITED STATES.

    This section amends section 38 of the AECA to authorize the 
President to control (in addition to exports and imports) 
transfers in the United States of defense articles and defense 
services to foreign persons, except for firearms and firearms 
ammunition and accessories and attachments (whose sale to 
foreign persons in the United States is already controlled 
pursuant to the Gun Control Act and related legislation). The 
Department of State, which generally administers the 
President's authority under section 38, has long controlled 
through its implementing regulations for section 38 transfers 
to foreign persons in the United States of certain defense 
articles (e.g., aircraft, naval vessels, satellites and 
technical data), as well as all defense services and all 
defense articles, including firearms and firearms ammunition, 
for transfer to an embassy or other foreign government 
subdivision in the United States; in such cases the United 
States person proposing to transfer defense articles or defense 
services must first obtain approval (e.g., a license) from the 
Department of State. This provision would provide a firm 
statutory basis for the Department's regulatory practice in 
these areas and permit expansion of this form of control in 
light of the changed security environment since the attacks of 
September 11, 2001, where threats to U.S. interests may arise 
from unauthorized access by foreign persons (other than foreign 
government subdivisions) to munitions and other defense 
articles in the United States without ever involving a classic 
``export'' (e.g., taking or sending defense articles out of the 
United States). The Committee expects that any expanded use of 
this authority will be exercised in close coordination with the 
Attorney General and the heads of other departments and 
agencies having related authority.

SEC. 1103. COORDINATION OF LICENSE EXEMPTIONS WITH UNITED STATES LAW 
                    ENFORCEMENT AGENCIES.

    This section expresses the sense of Congress that new 
exemptions from the licensing requirements of section 38 of the 
AECA should only be undertaken after careful coordination with 
U.S. law enforcement agencies in view of historic difficulties 
in enforcing violations where no license was required 
(successful enforcement actions in such circumstances have been 
rare, if at all), and would amend section 38 to require that 
this be done for any regulation promulgated on or after January 
1, 2003. This section also requires that, before such 
regulations take effect, the Committee be notified in 
accordance with the reprogramming procedures under section 
634A(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act.

SEC. 1104. MECHANISMS TO IDENTIFY PERSONS IN VIOLATION OF CERTAIN 
                    PROVISIONS OF LAW.

    This section amends (by updating) section 38(g) of the AECA 
(relating to U.S. laws that, when violated, generally prompt 
denial of export license privileges) in order to include 
relevant legislation enacted into law related to the attacks of 
September 11, 2001.

SEC. 1105. COMPREHENSIVE NATURE OF UNITED STATES ARMS EMBARGOES.

    This section contains certain findings by the Congress and 
amends section 38 of the AECA to require that no defense 
article or defense service subject to the State Department's 
International Traffic in Arms Regulations, and no dual use good 
or technology subject to the Commerce Department's Export 
Administration Regulation be exported without a license to the 
military, police or intelligence services of a U.S. arms-
embargoed government unless the Secretaries of State and 
Defense concur in the proposed export. This provision would not 
bar the export of any such item, but merely requires that a 
license be submitted. Considerable flexibility is provided to 
the agencies to determine the type of license (e.g., 
individual, general, etc.) provided the Secretaries have 
concurred in the outcome. According to the State Department's 
International Traffic in Arms Regulations, as of March 1, 2003 
(22 CFR 126.1), this requirement would apply to the military, 
police and intelligence services of the following countries 
(but would change as new embargoes are imposed and existing 
embargoes rescinded): Belarus, Cuba, Iran, Iraq, Libya, North 
Korea, Syria, Vietnam, Burma, People's Republic of China, 
Haiti, Liberia, Rwanda, Somalia, Sudan, and Democratic Republic 
of the Congo (formerly Zaire); in the case of Angola, an arms 
embargo exists with respect to UNITA; in the case of 
Afghanistan, an arms embargo exists with respect to all areas 
of the country other than to the Government of Afghanistan 
(currently Afghan Interim Authority) and to the International 
Security Assistance Force (ISAF).

SEC. 1106. TRANSACTIONS WITH COUNTRIES SUPPORTING ACTS OF INTERNATIONAL 
                    TERRORISM.

    This section expands the prohibitions of section 40 of the 
Arms Export Control Act relating to state sponsors of 
international terrorism by amending subsection (l)(1) to 
include defense articles and defense services (in lieu of ``any 
item enumerated on the United States Munitions List'') and all 
other activities requiring a license or approval (e.g., 
brokering, sales proposals, etc.) under the regulations 
promulgated pursuant to the President's authority in section 
38(a)(1) of that Act.

SEC. 1107. AMENDMENTS TO CONTROL OF ARMS EXPORTS AND IMPORTS.

    This section facilitates enforcement of criminal violations 
of the Arms Export Control Act and enhances the deterrent 
effect of the penalty provisions in several ways. The standard 
for criminal culpability of sections 38, 39, and 40 would be 
changed from ``willfully'' to ``knowingly'', consistent with 
the ``knowing'' standard long established in sections 72, 73, 
and 81 of the AECA relating to the proliferation of missiles, 
missile equipment and technology, and chemical or biological 
weapons. The amount of the fine for each criminal violation of 
sections 38, 39 and 40 would rise from $1 million to $2 million 
when the violation involves a state sponsor of international 
terrorism, and from $1 million to $1.5 million when the 
violation involves a country, other than a state sponsor, that 
is subject to an arms embargo. Civil penalties would be 
similarly raised for these two categories of violations from 
$500,000 to $1 million and $750,000, respectively. Fines for 
violations that do not involve terrorist or other embargoed 
countries would remain unchanged.
    Further, this section provides a firm statutory basis in 
section 47 of the Arms Export Control Act for the definition of 
``defense articles'' by incorporating the long-standing 
definition contained in the International Traffic in Arms 
Regulations (ITAR) as of January 1, 2003, as may be 
supplemented by the President pursuant to the authority 
contained in subsection (a) of section 38 of that Act. A 
similar approach would be taken in the case of defense services 
(incorporating the definition of those services as defined in 
the ITAR as of the same date), except that the term defense 
services is also phrased to include specifically the terms 
``aiding'' and ``abetting'' within the meaning of 
``assistance,'' reflecting longstanding reliance on those 
commonly-used terms in the ITAR and in Title 18.

SEC. 1108. HIGH RISK EXPORTS AND END USE VERIFICATION.

    This section amends section 38 of the AECA to mandate that 
the standards for high-risk exports and end-use verification 
already required in subsection (g)(7) of that Act be kept up-
to-date and coordinated biennially with the Secretary of 
Homeland Security, the Attorney General, the Director of the 
Federal Bureau of Investigation, and the Director of Central 
Intelligence.

SEC. 1109. CONCURRENT JURISDICTION OF THE FEDERAL BUREAU OF 
                    INVESTIGATION.

    This section strengthens the U.S. Government's enforcement 
of the Arms Export Control Act by providing the Federal Bureau 
of Investigation with authority in this area, in addition to 
the long-standing authority provided to Customs, which would 
continue. The section contains a sense of Congress that the FBI 
should be provided with authority to investigate and enforce 
violations of the Arms Export Control Act in view of that 
Bureau's responsibilities for protecting the United States 
against terrorist attack, foreign intelligence operations, high 
technology crimes and transnational criminal organizations--and 
the frequent relationship of illegal arms exports and 
international arms trafficking to those responsibilities. This 
should be without any adverse affect on the existing authority 
of the Bureau of Customs and Border Patrol, which would 
continue to play a leading role in enforcement of the AECA. The 
Committee expects that any operational details between the FBI 
and Customs associated with this authorization will be resolved 
by or with the assistance of the Attorney General.

SEC. 1110. REPORT ON FOREIGN-SUPPLIED DEFENSE ARTICLES, DEFENSE 
                    SERVICES, AND DUAL USE GOODS AND TECHNOLOGY 
                    DISCOVERED IN IRAQ.

    This section requires the President to submit a report to 
the Committee within six months of enactment, describing the 
nature and origin of foreign-supplied items discovered by 
coalition forces in Iraq--conventional arms and equipment, as 
well as WMD--that have not been previously accounted for by 
UNSCOM or UNMOVIC to the satisfaction of the United States. The 
Committee recognizes that the Department of Defense, including 
U.S. armed forces, and other agencies involved in Operation 
Iraqi Freedom have many pressing tasks in Iraq. This provision 
is not intended to add to those tasks. but to obtain a report 
on the results of activities planned or already underway 
regarding sensitive technologies and munitions. The Committee 
considers this report very important not only to its oversight 
and policy responsibilities for non-proliferation and export 
control, but to possible improvements to international 
arrangements in this area in light of the factual record 
discovered in Iraq.

           TITLE XII--STRENGTHENING MUNITIONS EXPORT CONTROLS


SEC. 1201. CONTROL OF ITEMS ON MISSILE TECHNOLOGY CONTROL REGIME ANNEX.

    In order to ensure U.S. missile technology export controls 
are clearly established and kept up-to-date, this provision 
would require the Secretary of State, in consultation with the 
Secretary of Commerce, the Attorney General and the Secretary 
of Defense, to provide an annual certification and report to 
Congress. This provision addresses a problem identified by the 
General Accounting Office (GAO) in its October 9, 2001, report 
entitled, ``Export Controls: Clarification of Jurisdiction for 
Missile Technology Items Needed'' (GAO-02-120), wherein GAO 
concluded that approximately 25 percent of the items controlled 
by the Missile Technology Control Regime (MTCR) arrangement 
were the subject of apparent overlap or ambiguity in the export 
control regulations administered by the Departments of Commerce 
and State (i.e., Export Administration Regulations and 
International Traffic in Arms Regulations). The Department of 
Commerce subsequently published a regulation to clarify its 
jurisdiction over certain of these items, while a long-term 
solution for all items was to emerge in the context of ongoing 
review by the concerned agencies of the U.S. Munitions List. 
However, this solution has not emerged from the inter-agency 
review. The provision would reflect the Committee's view that 
priority should be accorded to ensure clear and comprehensive 
U.S. export control coverage of MTCR Annex items in view of the 
special threat to U.S. security interests presented by the 
unauthorized export and proliferation of missile technologies. 
The Committee expects the Department of State to take prompt 
and definitive action to address this matter without further 
delay.

SEC. 1202. CERTIFICATIONS RELATING TO EXPORT OF CERTAIN DEFENSE 
                    ARTICLES AND SERVICES.

    This section amends section 36(c) of the AECA to require 
advance certification to Congress of any comprehensive export 
authorization in the amount of $100 million or more, regardless 
of whether a signed contract exists. Comprehensive export 
authorizations are a new type of export license announced by 
the Department of State at a NATO Ministerial meeting in May 
2000 as one of several export control initiatives. This 
provision also repeals clause (B) of paragraph 2 of section 
36(c) relating to a reduced period of time for satellite 
launches by Russia, Kazakhstan and Ukraine; henceforth, the 
waiting period would be 30 days-- on a par with all other 
notifications not involving exports to NATO members, Australia, 
New Zealand or Japan.

SEC. 1203. NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE AND 
                    MANUFACTURING LICENSING AGREEMENTS WITH NATO MEMBER 
                    COUNTRIES, AUSTRALIA, NEW ZEALAND, AND JAPAN.

    This provision amends section 36(d) of the AECA to no 
longer require advance notification of agreements involving the 
manufacture abroad of significant military equipment that is 
valued at less than $7 million in the case of major defense 
equipment, or $25 million in the case of all other significant 
military equipment. This amendment marks the second year in a 
row that the Committee has taken action to adjust the 
thresholds for arms sales requiring advance notification to 
Congress. The amendment to section 36(c) enacted in section 
1405 of Public Law 107-228 is projected to result in a 30-40 
percent reduction in the number of cases requiring advance 
notification to Congress. Section 1203 of this bill should 
produce a similar reduction in technical assistance and 
manufacturing license agreements. The Committee directs the 
Department of State and other agencies involved in the 
preparation of Congressional notifications to now review their 
own procedures in order to expedite, and where appropriate 
streamline, inter-agency review procedures of proposed 
notifications in order to avoid undue delay or other 
unjustified impacts on U.S. defense firms, particularly where 
the benefit of extensive inter-agency review proposed 
notifications seems in doubt. This would appear to be the case 
for arms sales that fall below the higher thresholds the State 
Department has recommended be put in place.

SEC. 1204. STRENGTHENING DEFENSE COOPERATION WITH AUSTRALIA AND THE 
                    UNITED KINGDOM.

    This section amends section 38 of the AECA to establish an 
accelerated and streamlined munitions license approval 
procedure of ten days for Australia and the United Kingdom, in 
view of the special relationships that exist between the U.S. 
and these countries. The procedure would be applicable to those 
defense articles, services and technology that are currently 
exempt by regulation (i.e., the International Traffic in Arms 
Regulations at section 126.5) from prior U.S. Government review 
and licensing requirements when they are to be exported or 
transferred to Canada.
    As the level of defense technology available to Canada 
through a license exemption procedure would rarely, if ever, 
require a national security review for release to Australia or 
the United Kingdom, the provision requires generally that such 
license applications not be subjected to inter-agency review, 
except in those few instances where the Secretary of Defense or 
the heads of other specified agencies may so request referral. 
Since the State Department's median processing times for all 
munitions license applications not referred to other agencies 
(which comprises more than two-thirds of all applications 
submitted) have been consistently better than 10 days in recent 
years, the establishment of this procedure would impose no 
additional burden necessitating more resources.
    This provision would be without prejudice to the 
establishment of arrangements that would permit the President 
to establish a license exemption for Australia and/or the 
United Kingdom that is similar to that already established for 
Canada, as provided for in subsections (f)(2) and (j) of 
section 38 or through other means.

SEC. 1205. TRAINING AND LIAISON FOR SMALL BUSINESSES.

    This provision requires the Secretary of State to 
establish, within the level of funding provided, a coordinator 
for small business affairs in the Office of Defense Trade 
Controls, who would serve as a point of contact for United 
States small businesses on export licensing, registration and 
other matters.

SEC. 1206. STUDY AND REPORT RELATING TO CO-LOCATING MUNITIONS CONTROL 
                    FUNCTIONS OF THE DEPARTMENTS OF STATE, DEFENSE, AND 
                    HOMELAND SECURITY.

    This provision contains a sense of Congress that the 
administrative, licensing and compliance-related functions 
associated with arms exports under section 38 of the Arms 
Export Control Act, which are generally administered by the 
Department of State in conjunction with the Departments of 
Homeland Security and Defense, could be expedited consistent 
with U.S. security, law enforcement and foreign policy 
requirements by a reduction in the those matters necessitating 
inter-agency referral outside of the Department of State, and/
or by co-locating related functions of the Departments of 
Homeland Security and Defense with those of the Department of 
State in order to minimize the time and administrative tasks to 
government and industry involved in inter-agency referrals, 
while also providing a convenient, central location for U.S. 
defense companies, especially small businesses.
    The need to keep inter-agency staffing of applications at a 
level necessary to safeguard critical security, law enforcement 
and foreign policy interests was an important purpose behind 
the requirement established long ago in section 38 of the Arms 
Export Control Act (see, paragraph (8) of subsection (g)) that 
the Secretaries of Treasury and Defense detail expert personnel 
to the responsible State Department office to assist in license 
application screening. Notwithstanding recent increases in the 
number of Department of Defense employees so detailed, there 
continues to be a high number of cases (ranging from 30-33 
percent) that are still referred for Department of Defense 
review. This suggests the need for additional action by the 
agencies to ensure prompt decision-making on what is apparently 
a high quotient of complex cases, of which co-location of 
parallel and complementary responsibilities is a promising 
candidate, and one that is likely to carry additional benefits 
to the public and the defense industry by providing a 
centralized location. In further consideration of this 
possibility, the Secretary of State would be required to 
consult with the Secretary of Homeland Security and the 
Secretary of Defense, and through the State Department's 
federal advisory committee structure, with the public, to 
examine the relative advantages and disadvantages of co-
location. The Secretary would be required to submit a report on 
this matter to the Committee within 180 days of enactment of 
this provision.

         TITLE XIII--SECURITY ASSISTANCE AND RELATED PROVISIONS


      Subtitle A--Foreign Military Sales and Financing Authorities


SEC. 1301. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    This section authorizes assistance under section 23 of the 
AECA at $4,414,000,000 for fiscal year 2004.

SEC. 1302. PROVISION OF CATALOGING DATA AND SERVICES.

    This section amends section 21(h)(2) to permit cataloging 
of data and services on a reciprocal (non-reimbursable) basis 
for Australia, New Zealand and Japan, in addition to NATO-
member countries, as is currently provided for in section 
21(h).

SEC. 1303. ANNUAL ESTIMATE AND JUSTIFICATION FOR SALES PROGRAM.

    This section amends section 25(a)(1) to reduce the burden 
of the reporting requirement (i.e., the ``Javits Report'') for 
NATO member countries, Australia, New Zealand and Japan by 
increasing the value of the sale from $7 million to 25 million.

SEC. 1304. ADJUSTMENT TO ADVANCE NOTIFICATION REQUIREMENT FOR TRANSFER 
                    OF CERTAIN EXCESS DEFENSE ARTICLES.

    This section amends section 516(f)(1) of the Foreign 
Assistance Act to limit those transfers of excess defense 
equipment requiring advance notification to all major defense 
equipment (currently all significant military equipment) and 
(as is currently provided for) all other items valued at $7 
million or more.

       Subtitle B--International Military Education and Training.


SEC. 1311. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    This section authorizes $91,700,000 for fiscal year 2004 to 
carry out chapter 5 of part II of the Foreign Assistance Act.

SEC. 1312. ANNUAL FOREIGN MILITARY TRAINING REPORTING.

    This section amends section 656(a) of the Foreign 
Assistance Act to change the due date of the required annual 
report to March 1 (currently January 31), and to eliminate the 
requirement to report on training proposed for the current 
fiscal year.

              Subtitle C--Assistance for Select Countries


SEC. 1321. ASSISTANCE FOR ISRAEL.

    This section authorizes assistance for Israel for fiscal 
years 2004 and 2005 based on Committee authorizations in recent 
years, including provision for early payout following 
enactment.

SEC. 1322. ASSISTANCE FOR EGYPT.

    This section authorizes assistance for Egypt for fiscal 
years 2004 and 2005 based on Committee authorizations in recent 
years, including provision for early deposit of funds following 
enactment.

                  Subtitle D--Miscellaneous Provisions


SEC. 1331. UNITED STATES WAR RESERVE STOCKPILES FOR ALLIES.

    This section amends section 514(b)(2) of the Foreign 
Assistance Act to authorize additions to stockpiles in foreign 
countries, and Israel in particular, at the same level for 
fiscal year 2004 as was authorized for fiscal year 2003.

SEC. 1332. TRANSFER TO ISRAEL OF CERTAIN DEFENSE ARTICLES IN THE UNITED 
                    STATES WAR RESERVE STOCKPILES FOR ALLIES.

    This section provides a five-year authorization for the 
Secretary of Defense to transfer to Israel certain obsolete or 
surplus items in the inventory of the Department of Defense on 
the basis of negotiated concessions and advance notification to 
the Committee describing the items to be transferred and the 
concessions that have been negotiated.

SEC. 1333. EXPANSION OF AUTHORITIES FOR LOAN OF MATERIAL, SUPPLIES, AND 
                    EQUIPMENT FOR RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT PURPOSES.

    This section amends section 65 of the Arms Export Control 
Act to permit the loan of equipment for R&D; purposes to 
friendly foreign countries (as determined by the President 
pursuant to section 27(j) of that Act) in addition to NATO 
allies, as is currently provided for in section 65.

SEC. 1334. ASSISTANCE FOR DEMINING AND RELATED ACTIVITIES.

    The Secretary of State would be authorized to provide 
grants to public-private partnerships for fiscal year 2004 for 
demining, clearance of unexploded ordnance and related 
activities, provided the total amount does not exceed $450,000.

SEC. 1335. REPORTS RELATING TO TREATY BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE 
                    RUSSIAN FEDERATION ON STRATEGIC OFFENSIVE 
                    REDUCTIONS.

    This section requires the Administration to provide all 
reports required to be provided to the Senate Foreign Relations 
Committee pursuant to the Resolution of Ratification of the 
Moscow Treaty to also be provided to the House International 
Relations Committee.

SEC. 1336. STATEMENT OF HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES REGARDING THE TREATY 
                    BETWEEN THE UNITED STATES AND THE RUSSIAN 
                    FEDERATION ON STRATEGIC OFFENSIVE REDUCTIONS.

    This section declares several statements of the House of 
Representatives regarding the Moscow Treaty. Specifically, the 
House concurs with the declarations in the Resolution of 
Ratification, encourages the President to continue strategic 
offensive reductions to the lowest possible levels consistent 
with national security and alliance obligations, urges the 
President to engage Russia to establish cooperative accounting 
and security measures for non-strategic nuclear weapons, and 
encourages the President to accelerate U.S. strategic force 
reductions to the extent feasible and consistent with the 
Treaty.

SEC. 1337. NONPROLIFERATION AND DISARMAMENT FUND.

    This section responds to the direct and very real threat 
posed by stockpiles of highly enriched uranium (HEU). This 
material is a component of nuclear weapons and is the fuel for 
over 100 research reactors worldwide in more than 40 nations, 
including Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus, Latvia, and 
Uzbekistan. Because this material poses a grave threat as a 
terrorist weapon, there is an urgent need to deal with the 
small, insecure stocks of HEU used as fuel in research 
reactors. Operators of these reactors often do not have 
adequate financial resources to protect this vulnerable fuel, 
and there is grave danger that it could fall into the wrong 
hands.
    The Nonproliferation and Disarmament Fund (NDF) within the 
United States Department of State, Bureau of Nonproliferation, 
is a unique, flexible entity that is well-suited to take on the 
challenge of a global HEU clean-out. This fund's objective is 
to permit rapid response to unanticipated or unusually 
difficult, high priority opportunities to halt the 
proliferation of nuclear, biological, and chemical weapons; to 
destroy or neutralize existing weapons of mass destruction and 
related materials; and to limit the spread of advanced 
conventional weapons.
    Subsection (a) of this section authorizes $60,000,000 for 
each of the fiscal years 2004 and 2005 to carry out section 504 
of the Freedom for Russia and Emerging Democracies and Open 
Markets Support Act of 1992 (the ``Nonproliferation and 
Disarmament Fund''), to remain available until expended.
    Subsection (b) of this section contains findings with 
respect to the nonproliferation of highly enriched uranium: 
that it is the most likely source material for terrorist or 
other outlaw organizations that seek to acquire a nuclear 
weapon; that such organizations are not likely to produce this 
source material on their own, but will seek to divert highly 
enriched uranium from some of the many vulnerable stockpiles in 
numerous facilities around the world; that there is a need for 
a coordinated United States Government initiative to secure and 
dispose of highly enriched uranium stockpiles in these 
vulnerable facilities; and that the Nonproliferation and 
Disarmament Fund is a unique, flexible entity that is well-
suited to carry out such a coordinated initiative, in 
cooperation with other Federal agencies. Subsection (b) 
authorizes the Secretary of State to establish and carry out an 
initiative to secure and dispose of highly enriched uranium 
stockpiles in foreign countries, including the provision of 
such assistance as may be required to secure host country 
cooperation under the initiative. Subsection (b) authorizes 
appropriations of $25,000,000 for each fiscal year for this 
initiative to secure and dispose of highly enriched uranium, 
out of the funds available to the Nonproliferation and 
Disarmament Fund.

SEC. 1338. MARITIME INTERDICTION PATROL BOATS FOR MOZAMBIQUE.

    This section would authorize $1,000,000 for FY04, to remain 
available until September 30, 2006, for related costs 
associated with the provision of up to four excess U.S. coastal 
patrol boats to Mozambique for maritime patrol and interdiction 
activities.

SEC. 1339. REPORT ON MISSILE DEFENSE COOPERATION.

    This section requires a report by the Secretary of State on 
cooperative efforts that have been undertaken by the U.S. with 
foreign governments to foster the development and deployment of 
defenses against missile attacks.

SEC. 1340. IRAN'S PROGRAM TO DEVELOP A NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE DEVICE.

     In subsection (a), ``Findings'', finds that Iran has 
pursued a nuclear weapons program for more than a decade, 
despite being a party to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of 
Nuclear Weapons (NPT); that CIA director George Tenet has 
repeatedly warned of this danger, including as recently as 
February 11, 2003; that on March 17, 2003, Director General of 
the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) el Baradei 
demanded that Iran agree to an ``additional protocol'' under 
the IAEA's nuclear inspection rights, which would enable the 
IAEA to conduct more intrusive monitoring; that in early 2003 
Iran announced plans to mine its own natural uranium and 
admitted constructing two nuclear facilities, a heavy water 
production plant and a gas centrifuge uranium enrichment 
facility, which would give Iran the capability of indigenously 
producing nuclear-weapons grade uranium; that Iran has been 
developing long-range missiles capable of delivering nuclear 
weapons and, according to Tenet, may test an inter-continental 
ballistic missile within this decade; that Iran has received 
considerable assistance in its nuclear-weapons and missile-
development programs from Russia, China, and North Korea; that 
Congress and successive Administrations have sought to deter or 
delay Iran's acquisition or development of such deadly weapons 
through legislation and diplomacy and that this legislation 
includes the Iran-Iraq Arms Non-Proliferation Act of 1992, the 
Iran Libya Sanctions Act of 1996, the Iran Non-Proliferation 
Act of 2000, and the Iran Nuclear Proliferation Prevention Act 
of 2002; that President Bush in January 2002 labeled Iran as 
one of the countries that constitutes an ``axis of evil'' 
because of its efforts to develop WMD and its support of 
international terrorism; that Iran is the principal supporter 
and supplier to terrorist groups Hizballah, Hamas, and Islamic 
Jihad; that the leaders of Iran have publicly called for the 
destruction of the State of Israel; and that a nuclear-armed 
Iran would pose a grave threat to the national security of the 
U.S. and to its allies in the region.
    In subsection (b), ``Statement of Policy'', Congress finds 
that Iranian support of terrorism and efforts to develop 
nuclear weapons are a grave threat to the national security of 
the U.S. and its allies and to the U.S. Armed Forces; declares 
that the U.S. and its friends and allies must make maximum 
efforts to prevent Iran from developing or acquiring nuclear 
weapons and the missiles to deliver them; urges the President 
to use all appropriate means to prevent Iran from gaining such 
capabilities; urges the IAEA to employ the full range of its 
inspection authorities to ensure that Iran's nuclear program is 
used only for peaceful purposes; encourages Iran to sign and 
ratify the new nuclear safeguards protocol to the NPT, the 
``Model Additional Protocol (INFCIRC/540-Corr)'', and thereby 
demonstrate its commitment to full disclosure and transparency 
about its nuclear program; and urges the U.S. resident 
representative to the IAEA to work with the IAEA Board of 
Governors on guidelines for early identification of 
noncompliance with the NPT.

            TITLE XIV--MISSILE THREAT REDUCTION ACT OF 2003


SEC. 1401. SHORT TITLE.

    This section provides that Title XIV may be cited as the 
``Missile Threat Reduction Act of 2003.''

  Subtitle A--Strengthening International Missile Nonproliferation Law


SEC. 1411. FINDINGS.

    This section declares the findings of Congress with regard 
to the increasing threat to the U.S. from the spread of 
ballistic missiles worldwide, especially those of 300 km and 
500 kg payload capacity (equivalent to ``Category 1'' 
thresholds for nuclear-capable missile systems under the 
Missile Technology Control Regime, or ``MTCR''); finds that 
North Korea is a significant source of missile proliferation; 
notes the lack of binding international law that would permit 
active interdiction of such missile shipments; and notes the 
value of the MTCR, as well as the need to create new 
international mechanisms to interdict and prevent the transfers 
of such missiles.

SEC. 1412. POLICY OF THE UNITED STATES.

    This section declares that it shall be the policy of the 
United States to seek a binding international instrument to 
restrict the trade in offensive ballistic missiles with ranges 
of 300 km or greater that have a payload capacity of 500 kg or 
greater. Such a binding international instrument may take the 
form of a multilateral treaty, a United Nations Security 
Council resolution, or other form of international law, and 
should provide for enforcement measures to include 
interdiction, seizure and impoundment of illicit shipments of 
offensive ballistic missiles and related technology, equipments 
and components.

SEC. 1413. SENSE OF CONGRESS.

    This section declares the sense of Congress that the United 
States should immediately introduce a resolution in the United 
Nations Security Council to prohibit all UN Members from 
purchasing, receiving, assisting or allowing the transfer of 
any missile, missile-related equipment, means of production, or 
technology from North Korea.

  Subtitle B--Strengthening United States Missile Nonproliferation Law


SEC. 1421. PROBATIONARY PERIOD FOR FOREIGN PERSONS.

    Subsection (a) of this section requires that any foreign 
person, entity or government that has been sanctioned under 
U.S. law for missile transfer violations, after the period of 
formal sanctions expire or have been waived, will be subject to 
a probationary period of special monitoring for granting dual 
use licenses to that foreign person, entity or government for a 
period of 3 years, unless the President informs Congress that 
the person, entity or government has verifiably ceased all such 
activity and instituted a program of transparency to verify 
that fact.
    Subsection (b) allows the termination of the probationary 
period if the President notifies the House International 
Relations Committee and the Foreign Relations, and Banking, 
Housing and Urban Affairs Committees of the Senate that the 
sanctioned foreign person has ceased all activity related to 
the original violation, has instituted a program of 
transparency measures to verify for 3 years that sanctioned 
activities have not resumed, and that there has been an 
appropriate resolution of the original violation(s).

SEC. 1422. STRENGTHENING UNITED STATES MISSILE PROLIFERATION SANCTIONS 
                    ON FOREIGN PERSONS.

    Subsection (a) of this section increases the period of U.S. 
missile sanctions under the Arms Export Control Act from 2 to 4 
years. Subsection (b) requires that any report explaining a 
waiver of sanctions can only be classified for intelligence-
source protection reasons, and in that instance the President 
must attempt to acquire sufficient alternative information to 
allow a subsequent unclassified waiver report.
    Subsection (c) increases the period of U.S. dual use 
missile-related sanctions as contained in the Export 
Administration Act of 1979 (the authority of which is continued 
by Executive order) from 2 to 4 years.
    Subsection (d) applies the provisions of this section to 
any sanctions imposed since January 1, 2003.

SEC. 1423. COMPREHENSIVE UNITED STATES MISSILE PROLIFERATION SANCTIONS 
                    ON ALL RESPONSIBLE PERSONS.

    Subsection (a) amends section 73(a) of the Arms Export 
Control Act by expanding the applicability of U.S. missile 
sanctions to all responsible foreign persons, including 
responsible governmental entities that exercise effective 
control over, or benefits from, or directly or indirectly 
facilitates the activities of a sanctioned foreign person or 
persons. This subsection also grants the President the 
authority to impose similar sanctions upon any other foreign 
entity that seeks to undercut U.S. sanctions by providing items 
to the sanctioned foreign person that would be illegal to 
provide under U.S. sanctions. This subsection also is 
authorized to prohibit any U.S. transaction or dealing with a 
sanctioned foreign person. Finally, this subsection requires 
the President to annually report to Congress on the activities 
of foreign persons on missile transfers that would be illegal 
under U.S. law.
    Subsection (b) amends section 74(a)(8)(A) of the Arms 
Export Control Act to amend the definition of the term 
``person,'' adding that any government entity (regardless of 
whether it is operating as ``business enterprise,'' as in the 
current definition), as well as any subsidiary, subunit, or 
parent entity, or transnational corporation or transnational 
joint venture, can be defined as a ``person'' and therefore 
subject to U.S. missile sanctions.
    Subsection (c) makes similar changes and grants similar 
authorities under subsections (a) and (b) with regard to the 
Export Administration Act.

          Subtitle C--Incentives for Missile Threat Reduction


SEC. 1431. FOREIGN ASSISTANCE.

    Subsection (a) of this section authorizes the President to 
provide Foreign Military Financing, Economic Support Funds, and 
Department of Defense drawdown assistance to countries that 
agree to destroy their existing Category I missile systems. 
Subsection (b) requires Congressional notification for 30 days 
before assistance can be provided. Subsection (c) limits any 
assistance for 3 fiscal years per country.

SEC. 1432. AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS.

    This section authorizes $250 million for assistance 
authorized in Section 1431, to be available until expended. The 
Committee expects that this assistance will be made available 
over a five-year period in $50 million increments per fiscal 
year beginning in fiscal year 2004, and will be drawn 
principally from the NADR account and unexpended funds related 
to KEDO and CTBT.

SEC. 1433. AUTHORIZATION OF TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE IN MISSILE 
                    DISARMAMENT.

    This section authorizes the President to provide U.S. 
technical assistance for destruction of missiles or production 
facility at the request of any country.
    This bill responds to the increasing threat of the spread 
of ballistic missiles to the United States from the 
proliferation of WMD-capable ballistic missiles by 
strengthening U.S. sanctions laws; seeks a legally-binding 
international instrument against the trade in such missiles; 
and establishes a new program of assistance to encourage states 
to destroy existing missile programs.
    The accelerating spread of missiles capable of delivering 
weapons of mass destruction is a matter of grave concern to the 
Committee. The Committee is troubled by recent incidents 
involving the transfer of such missiles, especially by North 
Korea, which the CIA has appropriately identified as a major 
source of global missile proliferation. The Committee also 
agrees with the Administration that existing international 
missile non-proliferation mechanisms are not sufficient to meet 
this increasing threat. Therefore, the Committee has set the 
U.S. policy goal of creating new international missile 
nonproliferation mechanisms to better deal with missile 
proliferation, including enforcement measures, such as the 
ability to interdict and seize shipments of destabilizing 
ballistic missiles around the world.
    The Committee believes that existing missile sanctions laws 
are too riddled with loopholes to effectively deter foreign 
governments from engaging in the destabilizing trade in 
offensive ballistic missiles. A non-MTCR-adherent foreign 
government that engages a non-governmental entity or 
corporation to acquire missiles or missile technology on its 
behalf would not be subject to U.S. sanctions, as there is no 
requirement in law to sanction any entity other than the 
specific entity conducting the prohibited missile-related 
transaction. Indeed, current law does not allow foreign 
governments to be sanctioned at all, unless the government is 
``operating as a business enterprise.'' The result is an absurd 
situation in which a non-governmental entity or corporation 
could be sanctioned, but not the government that receives, 
possesses and operates the missiles themselves.
    The value of missile sanctions in U.S. laws lies with their 
ability to call public attention to destabilizing ballistic 
missile proliferation activity and to institute a cost for 
engaging in such proliferation. Loopholes in current law, 
however, rob U.S. missile sanctions of much of their power to 
raise the cost of proliferation behavior. It is for this reason 
that the Committee has acted to close these loopholes, and to 
hold all foreign persons connected to and benefitting from the 
proliferation of ballistic missiles to account for their 
actions.
    The Committee believes the increasing spread of ballistic 
missiles requires increasing the costs to countries and foreign 
entities in engaging in prohibited missile trade. First, the 
Committee increases the sanctions period from 2 to 4 years. 
Second, when existing sanctions expire, the foreign person is 
again eligible for U.S. contracts without any need to 
demonstrate changed behavior. Placing such formerly-sanctioned 
persons essentially on a ``watch list'' (the Entity List of the 
EAR) for 3 years, in addition to increasing the duration of 
formal sanctions, places foreign persons and governments on 
notice that there is a continuing cost to missile trade through 
increased scrutiny of U.S. exports, as well as the continuing 
stigma of having trafficked in ballistic missiles.

                    TITLE XV--EXPORTS OF SATELLITES


SECTION 1501. EXPORT CONTROLS ON SATELLITES AND RELATED ITEMS.

    This section would generally leave to the President's 
discretion whether the export of commercial communications 
satellites and related items to NATO member countries or major 
non-NATO allies, should be subject to the export licensing 
jurisdiction of the Department of Commerce or the Department of 
State. Currently, section 1513 of Public Law 105-261 requires 
that satellites and related items be controlled on the United 
States Munitions List by the Department of State (under section 
38 of the Arms Export Control Act). In the case of exports of 
these items to these specific countries, the President would 
also be provided with authority to determine the extent to 
which the underlying laws should apply, as qualified by 
sections 1602-1604. The export of satellites and related items 
to all other destinations would remain subject to Department of 
State jurisdiction pursuant to section 1513 of Public Law 105-
261 (Strom Thurmond National Defense Authorization Act for 
Fiscal Year 1999).

SECTION 1502. MANDATORY REVIEW BY DEPARTMENT OF STATE.

    This section requires in subsection (a) that, in the case 
of a satellite launch by or from nationals of the People's 
Republic of China (PRC), section 38 of the Arms Export Control 
Act would always apply to the regulation of certain defense 
services (including technical assistance) provided in the 
course of technical interchange meetings. This requirement 
means that these defense services would remain subject to the 
export licensing jurisdiction of the Department of State. In 
subsection (b), the President is required to provide advance 
certification to Congress prior to the issuance of a license or 
technical assistance agreement involving a launch of a 
satellite or related item from the PRC, in the manner provided 
for in section 36(d) of the Arms Export Control Act, pursuant 
to which Congress may enact a resolution of disapproval within 
a thirty day period following receipt of the certification, in 
which case the license or technical assistance agreement may 
not be issued.

SECTION 1503. EXPORT RESTRICTIONS NOT AFFECTED.

    This section provides that nothing in sections 1601-1604 
may be construed to modify any restriction on exports imposed 
under any other provision of law. The discretionary authority 
provided to the President relating to licensing jurisdiction 
for satellites and related items when exported to NATO members 
and major non-NATO allies is limited to the sole matter of 
export licensing jurisdiction (i.e., section 1513 of Public Law 
105-261); it does not imply any superceding authority with 
regard to any other restrictions or prohibitions in United 
States law that may be applicable, including the mandatory 
national security controls and other requirements set forth in 
Public Law 105-261.

SECTION 1504. DEFINITIONS.

    This section sets forth definitions for several terms used 
in this title, including ``defense services,'' ``related 
items,'' and ``United States person.'' Notably, the traditional 
definition of ``defense services'' found in the Department of 
State's International Traffic in Arms Regulations at section 
120.9 (22 CFR 120.9), is generally (except with respect to 
matters associated with demilitarization and military training) 
applied to ``a satellite or related items'' for purposes of 
this title. For all other articles, the definition of ``defense 
services'' contained in section 47(7)(B) of the Arms Export 
Control Act, as amended by section 1107(d) of this act, remains 
unaffected, including defense services related to articles such 
as rockets, space launch vehicles and missiles that may be 
associated with the launch of a satellite or related item 
pursuant to this title.

  TITLE XVI--PROMOTION OF DEMOCRACY, HUMAN RIGHTS, AND RULE OF LAW IN 
                                BELARUS


SEC. 1601. ASSISTANCE TO PROMOTE DEMOCRACY AND CIVIL SOCIETY IN 
                    BELARUS.

    Section 1501 authorizes assistance to bolster democracy-
building activities such as support for non-governmental 
organizations, the promotion of free and fair electoral 
processes, independent media, and international exchanges.

SEC. 1602. RADIO BROADCASTING TO BELARUS.

    This section authorizes additional funds for VOA and RFE/RL 
to augment radio broadcasting to the people of Belarus. The 
United States strongly supports those struggling to promote 
democracy and respect for human rights in Belarus despite the 
formidable pressures they face from the anti-democratic regime 
of Aleksandr Lukashenka.

SEC. 1603. SENSE OF CONGRESS RELATING TO SANCTIONS AGAINST THE 
                    GOVERNMENT OF BELARUS.

    This section recommends the expansion of sanctions against 
the Lukashenka regime, denying high-ranking officials of the 
regime entry into the United States; prohibiting U.S. 
government financing to the Government of Belarus, except 
humanitarian goods and agricultural or medical products. The 
Committee also recommends that U.S. executive directors of 
international financial institutions vote against financial 
assistance to the Government of Belarus except for loans and 
assistance for humanitarian needs.

SEC. 1604. MULTILATERAL COOPERATION.

    This section expresses a sense of Congress that the 
President should continue to seek to coordinate with other 
countries in the furtherance of the objectives of this title 
with regard to the Republic of Belarus.

SEC. 1605. REPORT.

    This section requires the President to transmit to 
appropriate congressional committees a report concerning the 
sale or delivery of weapons or weapons-related technologies 
from Belarus to countries that have repeatedly provided support 
for acts of international terrorism, including the 
identification of the goods, services, credits, or other 
consideration received by Belarus in exchange for the weapons 
or weapons-related technologies. The report shall also include 
a detailed estimate of the personal assets of Aleksandr 
Lukashenka and other high-ranking Belarusian officials.

SEC. 1606. DEFINITIONS.

    This section provides definitions for terms used in the 
title.
    The Committee fully endorses United States support for the 
promotion of democracy, respect for human rights, and the rule 
of law in the Republic of Belarus consistent with its 
commitments as a participating State of the Organization for 
Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE). The United States 
has a strong interest in the independence and sovereignty of 
the Republic of Belarus and its integration into the European 
community of democracies. Unfortunately the last parliamentary 
election in Belarus deemed to be free and fair by the 
international community was conducted in 1995. Since that time, 
though, the authorities and powers of the 13th Supreme Soviet 
have been usurped by the regime of Lukashenka. The November 
1996 referendum, considered illegal and unconstitutional by the 
OSCE, the international community and by pro-democracy 
activities in Belarus, led Lukashenda to impose a new 
constitution, abolish the duly-elected parliament, the 13th 
Supreme Soviet, install a largely powerless National Assembly, 
and extend his term of office to 2001. Theparliamentary 
elections of October 15, 2000, conducted in the absence of a democratic 
election law, were illegitimate, unconstitutional, plagued by violent 
human rights abuses committed by the Lukashenka regime, and determined 
to be non-democratic by the OSCE. The presidential election of 
September 9, 2001, was determined by the OSCE and other observers to be 
fundamentally unfair and failed to meet the OSCE commitments for 
democratic elections formulated in the 1990 Copenhagen Document and 
featured significant and abusive misconduct by the regime.
    The Committee is quite concerned that Victor Gonchar, 
Anatoly Krasovsky, and Yuri Zakharenka, who have been leaders 
and supporters of the democratic forces, and Dmitry Zavadsky, a 
journalist known for his critical reporting, have disappeared 
and are presumed dead, and former Belarus Government officials 
have come forward with credible allegations and evidence that 
top officials of the Lukashenka regime were involved in the 
disappearances. The regime systematically harasses and 
represses members of the democratic opposition, peaceful 
demonstrators, the independent media and independent trade 
unions, imprisons independent journalists, and actively 
suppresses freedom of speech and expression. The Law on 
Religious Freedom and Religious Organizations, passed by the 
National Assembly and signed by Lukashenka on October 31, 2002, 
establishes one of the most repressive legal regimes in the 
OSCE region, severely limiting religious freedom and placing 
excessively burdensome government controls on religious 
practice.

     TITLE XVII ISRAELI--PALESTINIAN PEACE ENHANCEMENT ACT OF 2003


SECTION 1701. SHORT TITLE.

    This section provides that this title may be cited as the 
Israeli-Palestinian Peace Enhancement Act of 2003.

SECTION 1702. FINDINGS.

    This section makes a number of findings, to include stating 
the importance of the security of the state of Israel to the 
national security of the United States and the longstanding 
interest that the United States has in seeing two states living 
side by side in peace and security; noting that peace can only 
be achieved in the Middle East in an atmosphere free of 
violence and terrorism; stating the requirement that a change 
in Palestinian leadership and a renunciation of terror by that 
leadership must precede any other steps towards peace; 
describing the relationship of a stable and peaceful 
Palestinian state to Israel's security and stating that Israel 
should take concrete steps to support the emergence of a viable 
Palestinian state; indicating Israel's repeated willingness to 
make painful concessions to achieve peace once there is a 
partner for peace on the Palestinian side; and citing the 
recent appointment of a new Palestinian government and the 
denunciation of terror by the new Palestinian Prime Minister.

SECTION 1703. PURPOSES.

    The purposes of this title are to express the sense of 
Congress with respect to recognition of a Palestinian state by 
the United States and to demonstrate that the United States 
will provide substantial economic and humanitarian assistance, 
as well as, support large-scale multilateral assistance, after 
the Palestinians have achieved the reforms outlined by 
President Bush in his June 24, 2002 speech and have achieved 
peace with Israel.

SECTION 1704. SENSE OF CONGRESS.

    This section expresses the sense of Congress that peace 
between Israel and the Palestinians cannot be negotiated until 
after the Palestinian government has been transformed along the 
lines of President Bush's June 24, 2002, speech; after the 
Palestinians achieve certain reforms described in the Act and 
have made a secure and lasting peace with Israel, substantial 
U.S. and international assistance will be needed; the 
Palestinian people deserve commendation on the confirmation of 
a new Prime Minister and Cabinet; the new Palestinian 
administration should urgently take the security-related steps 
necessary to allow for implementation of a performance-based 
roadmap to resolve the conflict; the U.S. Administration should 
work vigorously toward the goal of two states living side-by-
side in peace within secure and internationally-recognized 
borders free from threats or acts of force; and the United 
States has a vital national security interest in a permanent, 
comprehensive, and just resolution of the Arab-Israeli 
conflict, and particularly the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, 
based on the terms of United Nations Security Council 
resolutions 242 and 338.

SECTION 1705. RECOGNITION OF A PALESTINIAN STATE.

    This section expresses the sense of Congress that the 
President should not recognize a Palestinian state until he 
determines that a new Palestinian governing entity, not 
compromised by terror, has been elected and taken office. In 
addition the President should determine that: the newly-elected 
governing entity has demonstrated a firm and tangible 
commitment to peaceful coexistence with Israel and to ending 
anti-Israel incitement; has taken appropriate measures to 
counter terrorism and terrorist financing in the West Bank and 
Gaza; has established a new security entity that is fully 
cooperating with Israeli security organizations; has achieved 
exclusive authority and responsibility for governing the 
national affairs of a Palestinian state, has taken effective 
steps to ensure democracy, the rule of law, and an independent 
judiciary, and has adopted other reforms ensuring transparent 
and accountable governance; and has taken effective steps to 
ensure that its education system promotes the acceptance of 
Israel's existence and of peace with Israel and actively 
discourages anti-Israel incitement.

SECTION 1706. LIMITATION ON ASSISTANCE TO A PALESTINIAN STATE.

    This section amends Chapter 1 of part III of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 by adding a new section 620K.
    Section 620K(a) prohibits the provision of assistance to 
the government of a Palestinian state unless the President 
makes a certification to Congress specified in Section 
620K(c)(1) and (2).
    According to paragraph (c)(1) the President must certify 
that a binding international peace agreement exists between 
Israel and the Palestinians that was freely signed by both 
parties, guarantees both parties' commitment to a border 
between two states that constitutes a secure and 
internationally recognized boundary for both states with no 
remaining territorial claims, provides a permanent resolution 
for both Palestinian refugees and Jewish refugees from Arab 
countries, and includes a renunciation of all remaining 
Palestinian claims against Israel through provisions that 
commit both sides to the ``end of the conflict''.
    According to paragraph (c)(2), the President must also 
certify that the new Palestinian government has been 
democratically elected through free and fair elections, has 
exclusive authority and responsibility for governing the 
national affairs of the Palestinian state, and has achieved the 
reforms outlined by President Bush in his June 24, 2002, 
speech; has completely renounced the use of violence against 
Israel and its citizens, is vigorously attempting to prevent 
any acts of terrorism against Israel and its citizens, and 
punishes the perpetrators of such acts in a manner commensurate 
with their actions; has dismantled, and terminated the funding 
of, any group within its territory that conductsterrorism 
against Israel; is engaging in ongoing and extensive security 
cooperation with Israel; refrains from any officially sanctioned or 
funded statement or act designed to incite Palestinians or others 
against Israel and its citizens; has an elected leadership not 
compromised by terror; is demilitarized; and has no alliances or 
agreements that pose a threat to the security of Israel.
    After the initial certification described above, the 
President must, 90 days later, re-certify that the conditions 
under which he made an initial certification still exist. After 
the 90 day re-certification, the President must re-certify 
those conditions every 6 months for the ten-year period 
beginning on the date of the transmittal of the initial 
certification. After the ten-year period has expired, a 
certification shall be deemed to be in effect unless the 
President subsequently determines that the conditions that 
allowed previous certifications are no longer being met and 
transmits to Congress a report that contains the reasons that 
those conditions no longer exist.
    The President may waive the limitation on assistance, that 
is, the requirement of a certification under section 620K(a), 
if he determines and certifies to the Committee on 
International Relations in the House and the Committee on 
Foreign Relations in the Senate that it is vital to the 
national interest to do so.
    In addition, the limitation on assistance does not apply 
(a) to humanitarian or development assistance that is provided 
through non-governmental organizations for the benefit of the 
people of the West Bank and Gaza or (b) to assistance that is 
intended to reform the Palestinian Authority and affiliated 
institutions, or a newly elected Palestinian governing entity, 
in order to help meet the requirements of the certification 
discussed above (with respect to paragraph (c)(2) thereof) or 
to meet the requirements set out in subparagraphs (A) through 
(H) of section 1705(2) of the Israeli-Palestinian Peace 
Enhancement Act of 2003. The provisions of those subparagraphs 
are summarized in the second sentence of the description of 
Section 1705, above.
    Assistance provided under this Act or any other provision 
of law to a Palestinian state may not be provided until 15 days 
after the date on which the President has provided notice 
thereof to the Committees on International Relations and 
Appropriations in the House and the Committees on Foreign 
Relations and Appropriations in the Senate in accordance with 
the procedures applicable to reprogramming notifications under 
section 634(a) of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961. This 
notification requirement shall cease to be effective ten years 
after the date on which notice is first provided in accordance 
with this section.

SECTION 1707. AUTHORIZATION OF ASSISTANCE TO A PALESTINIAN STATE.

    This section amends Chapter 1 of part III of the Foreign 
Assistance Act of 1961 by adding a new section 620L.
    Section 620L authorizes the President to provide assistance 
to a Palestinian state. Such assistance shall be used to 
support activities within a Palestinian state to substantially 
improve the economy and living conditions of the Palestinians 
by, among other things, providing for economic development in 
the West Bank and Gaza, continuing to promote democracy and the 
rule of law, developing water resources, assisting in security 
cooperation between Israelis and Palestinians, and helping with 
the compensation and rehabilitation of Palestinian refugees. 
There are authorized to be appropriated to the President such 
sums as may be necessary for each fiscal year to carry out 
these activities.
    Section 620L also requires the Secretary of State, after 
the President makes the certification in section 620K(c), to 
seek: to convene one or more donors conferences to gain 
commitments from other countries, multi-lateral institutions, 
and non-governmental organizations to provide economic 
assistance to Palestinians; to ensure that such commitments are 
honored in a timely manner; to ensure that there is 
coordination of assistance among the United States and such 
other countries, multi-lateral institutions and non-
governmental organizations; to ensure that the assistance 
provided to Palestinians is used for the purposes for which it 
was provided; and to ensure that other countries, multi-lateral 
institutions and non-governmental organizations do not provide 
assistance to Palestinians through entities that are designated 
as terrorist organizations under United States law.
    The Secretary is required to prepare and submit to the 
Committees on International Relations and Appropriations of the 
House and the Committees on Foreign Relations and 
Appropriations in the Senate, a report that describes the 
activities undertaken to meet the requirements set out above, 
including a description of amounts committed, and the amounts 
provided, to a Palestinian state or Palestinians during the 
reporting period by each country and organization. The first 
report is due 180 days after enactment of this section, and 
annually thereafter.

        TITLE XVIII--MISCELLANEOUS FOREIGN ASSISTANCE PROVISIONS


SEC. 1801. ADDITIONAL AUTHORITIES RELATING TO INTERNATIONAL NARCOTICS 
                    CONTROL ASSISTANCE.

    This provision ensures that any and all illegal arms 
brought into Colombia by aerial means that are in any way 
trafficked in connection with the illicit drug trade, are also 
clearly eligible for U.S. assistance in interdicting.

SEC. 1802. UNITED STATES OPIUM ERADICATION PROGRAM IN COLOMBIA.

    This provision helps ensure the eradication of the very 
small but potent opium crop in Colombia (less than 6,000 
hectares, versus 150,000 hectares of coca) by requiring the 
State Department to train qualified and experienced Colombian 
pilots, who are preferably members of the Colombian National 
Police (CNP). The State Department should encourage the CNP to 
ensure that the police pilots are entitled to career 
enhancement for this difficult service.
    The local Colombian police anti-drug pilots, versus the 
current American provided contractor spray pilots, are more 
familiar with the terrain and can help to avoid the reported 
problems in the eradication program including problems with the 
weather, terrain and failure to locate crops. The Colombian 
opium crop must be eliminated at the source, as interdiction is 
not sufficient to end the growing heroin crisis in America. New 
and revised data show Colombian heroin makes up nearly two-
thirds of the U.S. use, where it previously was erroneously 
underestimated at just one-third of the U.S. market. This 
provision supports the further Colombianization of the U.S. aid 
program.
    Nothing in this section shall prohibit the eradication of 
opium if these Colombian pilots, preferably members of the 
Colombian National Police, are not available after 180 days.

SEC. 1803. COOPERATIVE DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM.

    This provision authorizes the continuation of a U.S.-Israel 
joint development program by which Israel works in African 
countries in conjunction with the U.S. Agency for International 
Development. This program furthers U.S. development goals by 
providing Israeli development expertise to African countries in 
need of such assistance, and enhances Israeli relations with 
certain African countries.

SEC. 1804. WEST BANK AND GAZA PROGRAM.

    This section requires that prior to obligation of funds to 
the West Bank and Gaza, procedures are in place so that the 
Comptroller General will have access to financial information 
in order to review U.S. assistance to the West Bank and Gaza. 
It also requires the Secretary of State to take appropriate 
steps to ensure that such assistance is not provided to or 
through any individual or entity that the Secretary has reason 
to believe has engaged in terrorist activity. It also requires 
an annual independent audit of the contractors and grantees. 
Language similar to this provision is now carried in the 
relevant Appropriations Act.

SEC. 1805. ANNUAL HUMAN RIGHTS COUNTRY REPORTS ON INCITEMENT TO ACTS OF 
                    DISCRIMINATION.

    This section amends the Foreign Assistance Act to require 
the Department of State to add a separate section with separate 
heading to the annual Country Reports on Human Rights 
Practices. This newly-required section will describe the nature 
and extent of propaganda in government-controlled media and 
other sources including educational materials and textbooks 
that attempt to justify or promote racial hatred or violence 
against any race or people.

SEC. 1806. ASSISTANCE TO EAST TIMOR.

    This section authorizes $25 million for each of the fiscal 
years 2003, 2004, and 2005 for the United States Agency for 
International Development in East Timor. The Committee notes 
that East Timor has a maternal mortality rate ten times higher 
than any other country in Southeast Asia or the Pacific region 
and less than one-quarter of Timorese women are able to access 
health services or midwives according to the World Health 
Organization. The literacy rate is only 43% according to the 
2002 UNDP National Human Development Report. While noting 
USAID's important work in democratic development, the Committee 
encourages greater emphasis in the area of economic assistance 
for East Timor that addresses basic services, in particular, 
the Committee supports significant assistance to be directed 
toward public education at primary and secondary school levels 
and vocational education; a national health care system that 
ensures access to basic health care services for East Timor's 
population regardless of income; job training and creation; 
poverty eradication; agricultural sector development aimed at 
food security; and development of local water sources. The 
Committee further encourages judicial sector development, 
including provision and training of court reporters, 
interpreters and translators, as well as training, support 
services, and resources for judges and defense counsel, and 
other assistance aimed at capacity building.

SEC. 1807. SUPPORT FOR DEMOCRACY BUILDING EFFORTS FOR CUBA.

    This section authorizes $15 million for each of the fiscal 
years 2004 and 2005 to support democracy programs in Cuba. 
Support for the Cuban people is a pillar of the U.S. 
Government's two-prong strategy toward the Cuban dictatorship. 
This provision authorizes an increase in funding of programs 
aimed to promote and assist the pro-democracy efforts of Cuba's 
dissidents and internal opposition. These funds are designated 
solely for Cuba-related programs and should not be diverted.

SEC. 1808. AMENDMENT TO THE AFGHANISTAN FREEDOM SUPPORT ACT OF 2002.

    This provision amends the Afghanistan Freedom Support Act 
of 2002 to provide that assistance to Afghanistan pursuant to 
that Act may be provided notwithstanding any provision of law. 
Although most restrictions are no longer applicable because of 
the change of government in Kabul, certain restrictions 
generally applicable continue to apply that are inhibiting U.S. 
assistance efforts, and this amendment will enhance U.S. 
efforts in that country in transition.

SEC. 1809. CONGO BASIN FOREST PARTNERSHIP.

    This section authorizes $18.6 million for each of the 
fiscal years 2004 and 2005 for the Congo Basin Forest 
Partnership (CBFP) program. The Subcommittee on Africa 
conducted an oversight hearing (March 11, 2003) to review the 
CBFP, which Secretary of State Colin Powell unveiled in 
September 2002 in Gabon. The tropical forests of the Congo 
Basin are vital to the economic livelihood of the people of 
this Central Africa region. Congo Basin forests play a crucial 
role in sustaining the environment--absorbing carbon dioxide, 
cleansing water, and retaining soil. They are also rapidly 
depleting. This program will help protect 25,000,000 key acres 
of landscape against poorly managed and non-managed logging. 
This will relieve hunting pressure that is threatening the 
existence of several species. The U.S. has a direct interest in 
the environmental health of this region, reversing current 
deforestation and wildlife depletion rates. Of the total for 
each year, $16,000,000 is authorized for the Central Africa 
Regional Program for the Environment, administered through the 
United States Agency for International Development. The 
Committee recognizes with approval that the CBFP is an 
international effort, receiving financial support from non-
African governments, the European Commission, the International 
Bank for Reconstruction and Development, and non-governmental 
organizations. The CBFP is an impressive and innovative 
approach to conservation in this environmentally at risk 
region.

SEC. 1810. COMBATING THE PIRACY OF UNITED STATES COPYRIGHTED MATERIALS.

    This section authorizes $10 million for the Department of 
State for purposes of providing direct assistance to non-OECD 
countries to combat piracy of U.S. copyrighted works. 
Specifically, it authorizes the Department to provide equipment 
and training to foreign law enforcement, judges and prosecutors 
and assistance in complying with its obligations under 
appropriate international copyright and intellectual property 
treaties and agreements such as the Berne Convention and the 
World Trade Organization's Agreement on Trade Related Aspects 
of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPs).
    The Committee is concerned about the increasing global 
problem of piracy and counterfeiting of intellectual property 
and the need to take additional measures to combat the 
misappropriation of the single largest sector of the American 
economy. The value of our intellectual property exports now 
exceeds five (5) percent of the gross domestic product. 
Intellectual property crimes cost hundreds of billions of 
dollars globally each year.
    The Chief of the Intellectual Property and Competition 
Policy Division, in consultation with the Chief of the Office 
of Anti-Crime Programs, Organized Crime Division, Bureau for 
International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, Department 
of State, shall determine the expenditure of funds authorized 
under this section.
    The Department shall develop a process and timetable by 
which the principal diplomatic officer to a country identified 
under the United States Trade Representative's ``Priority Watch 
List'' shall prepare a comprehensive plan recommending steps 
that the United States should take to address the intellectual 
property enforcement-related deficiencies noted in the United 
States Trade Representative's ``Special 301 Report.'' Countries 
not identified on the ``Priority Watch List'' may also submit 
plans and request funds as outlined in this section, but 
requests in connection with countries identified on the 
``Priority Watch List'' shall take precedence.
    The Department should make every effort to consult with, 
and provide assistance to, the WorldIntellectual Property 
Organization for the purpose of promoting the integration of non-OECD 
countries into the global intellectual property system.

SEC. 1811. ASSISTANCE FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT FORCES IN CERTAIN FOREIGN 
                    COUNTRIES.

    This section authorizes the Administrator of the United 
States Agency for International Development (USAID) to provide 
assistance to law enforcement agencies in the Government of 
India, Northern Ireland, and the Republic of Ireland. USAID 
will be able to assist India in disaster management and 
response, access to justice for women, and trafficking of 
persons.
    The Committee believes that the authorities granted to 
USAID through this section are necessary for the following 
reasons. First, India is one of the most disaster-prone 
countries in South Asia. Virtually every year, large segments 
of the population suffer from losses related to recurring 
events such as heavy rains, landslides, flooding, and drought. 
To enhance its disaster management and response ability, the 
Government of India (GOI) has requested USAID assistance to 
develop local capacity for medical-first-response and search-
and-rescue battalions of the Central Industrial Security Force 
(CISF) and the Indo-Tibetan Border Police (ITBP), which are the 
GOI's key service providers in the event of a natural disaster. 
However, because both CISF and ITBP are law enforcement 
agencies, USAID is unable to help them without the 
authorization provided by this section.
    Second, despite extensive constitutional and statutory 
safeguards, large sections of the Indian polity remain 
disadvantaged in their quest for equitable treatment under the 
civil and criminal judicial systems. Discrimination against 
women remains entrenched in India. Women face serious obstacles 
in protecting their rights. To address these critical problems, 
USAID should provide assistance to improve Indian women's 
access to justice. Assistance in this area cannot be fully 
successful without working with law enforcement entities.
    Finally, India is a significant source for internally 
trafficked women and children. The criminal nature of 
trafficking makes it essential to work with law enforcement 
agencies. This section extends the authority provided in the 
Omnibus Appropriations Act for fiscal year 2003 to fiscal years 
2004 and 2005.
    The provision relating to the Republic of Ireland and 
Northern Ireland police force will allow AID to provide 
computer-based, human rights and other professional training to 
the Police Service of Northern Ireland and also to provide 
training to the Garda Siochana for the purposes of fostering 
greater cooperation and communication between the two police 
forces as recommended by the Patten Commission.
    The provision regarding police training in Northern Ireland 
shall be administered where practicable consistent with the 
established vetting procedures for provision of training by US 
law enforcement entities as established in Section 504 of P.L. 
106-113, ``Admiral James W. Nance and Meg Donovan Foreign 
Relations Authorization Act'' which stipulated that certain 
minimum human rights standards must be met before US support is 
provided to any entity working with policing in Northern 
Ireland.
    In particular section 405(c)(1)(C) of that Act established 
a vetting procedure to exclude from training Northern Ireland 
police officers ``who there are substantial grounds for 
believing have committed or condoned violations of 
internationally recognized human rights, including any role in 
the murder of Patrick Finucane or Rosemary Nelson or other 
violence or serious threat of violence against defense 
attorneys in Northern Ireland.''

SEC. 1812. HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY FUND.

    This section extends the authorization for the Human Rights 
and Democracy Fund, which is administered by the Bureau ofHuman 
Rights, Democracy and Labor at the United States Department of State, 
for each of the fiscal years 2003 through 2005. It grants authority to 
provide $21,500,000 in fiscal year 2003; $24,000,000 in fiscal year 
2004 and such sums as may be necessary in fiscal year 2005 to the Fund.

SEC. 1813. ENHANCED POLICE TRAINING.

    The section provides for a limited, ``democratic policing'' 
exception to the general prohibition under section 660 of the 
Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 regarding police assistance to 
foreign countries. The section authorizes the United States to 
assist foreign law enforcement agencies for the purposes of 
improving their performance on such things as human rights, the 
rule of law, anti-corruption, combating the trafficking of 
persons, particularly by organized crime, counter-narcotics, 
and community relations.
    To the extent that assistance is provided for the purpose 
of strategic planning, it should be provided only for the 
purpose of reforming, restructuring, and building the 
institutional capacity of law enforcement agencies so that they 
are better able to safeguard human rights, promote the rule of 
law, and combat corruption and the trafficking of persons in 
their respective countries. Assistance provided to prevent 
conflict should be provided only for the purpose of mitigating 
violence associated with common crime, such as gang violence 
associated with narcotics trafficking.
    The provision is a natural outgrowth of the existing 
exemption that permits police assistance for most of these 
purposes in post-conflict situations (section 660(b)(6)), 
reflects language adopted in appropriations bills from previous 
fiscal years, and responds to a recent GAO study that found 
that the current section 660 restrictions were constraining the 
USG's ability, working through NGOs, to consolidate democracy 
not only in Central America and the Andean region but also 
worldwide.
    The Committee believes that assistance under this section 
should be provided to countries with democratically elected 
governments under civilian control with a commitment to 
preventing human rights abuses by their police forces and as 
part of a broader development strategy to enhance democratic 
governance, maximize the involvement of civil society in 
decision-making at the national, regional, and local levels, 
strengthen human rights, and increase the accountability and 
transparency of government agencies, including law enforcement 
entities, to the communities which they serve. Assistance 
provided under this section should be fully transparent and 
include mechanisms to encourage continued, cooperative contact 
with recipients of training.

SEC. 1814. PROMOTING A SECURE AND DEMOCRATIC AFGHANISTAN.

    The Congress made it clear in the Afghanistan Freedom 
Support Act of 2002, that the United States is committed to a 
free, educated, and developed Afghanistan that serves as a 
model for democracy and participation for other countries, 
especially those in the Muslim world. Unfortunately, 
Afghanistan today still balances on the precipice between, on 
the one hand, security and reconstruction and, on the other, a 
return to unrest and chaos.
    The United States has declared that ``major combat 
operations'' in Afghanistan are over, and its attention will 
now shift to reconstruction and stability operations. However, 
the Committee believes that the current security situation 
prevents many important reconstruction efforts from gaining 
traction. The entire Bonn Process and its hope for democratic 
and peaceful representative institutions is seriously 
threatened by a deteriorating security environment, and current 
efforts by the United States and others in the world community 
to promote greater security are inadequate.
    Basic security is still lacking in cities and towns, and 
along the key highways that are critical to the development of 
Afghanistan. Afghans remain under serious threat from 
terrorism, insurgency, widespread crime, banditry, 
intimidation, rape, suppression of minorities and women, and 
other grave violations of human rights that continue to occur, 
especially in areas that do not have a routine presence of 
United States or international security personnel. In March and 
April of this year, there have been approximately twenty 
attacks on United States and Afghan military forces and 
civilians and on international relief workers. According to 
USAID's Inspector General, AID staff are nearly captives in 
their own compounds, able to venture out into the countryside 
for brief periods and only under heavy armed escort. Non-
governmental organization aid workers have no such protection. 
Taliban and al-Qaeda terrorists are deliberately targeting US 
and foreign civilian aid workers to drive them from the country 
and reverse Afghanistan's transformation.
    The Committee notes that the training of an Afghan National 
Army is seriously behind schedule and that it will not be fully 
capable for years. Disarmament and reintegration of militias 
and irregulars has not begun. Police training, which will be 
carried on by Germany, has not yet had a serious impact; in 
many areas militia or police (although not the police who have 
been trained by the Germans) have been implicated in home 
invasions and other serious crimes.
    There has been no indication that the International 
Security Assistance Force, soon to be taken over by NATO, will 
increase in size or capability, or operate outside of Kabul. 
Even in Kabul, security has been reported to be shaky, and 
intimidation of Afghani politicians and journalists, including 
in Kabul, has been reported. The establishment of Provincial 
Reconstruction Teams, as presently constituted, in and of 
themselves, will not substitute for more vigorous efforts.
    The Committee firmly believes that unless we address these 
security gaps promptly, Afghanistan could slide back into chaos 
and again become a haven for global terrorists.
    Subsection (b) directs the President (1) to take immediate 
steps to ensure that there is more security for reconstruction, 
including along major highways, to stop banditry, illegal 
checkpoints, human rights abuses, and intimidation, and (2) to 
take immediate steps to support the disarmament of Afghan 
militias and irregulars.
    Subsection (c) states the sense of Congress that the 
President should significantly expand the International 
Security Assistance Force, as was endorsed a ``sense of 
Congress'' provision in the Afghanistan Freedom Support Act, or 
should take such other steps, such as increasing the number and 
force levels of U.S. Provincial Reconstruction Teams, to 
promote security across wider areas.

SEC. 1815. GRANTS TO THE AFRICA SOCIETY.

    The section authorizes $1 million to the Africa Society to 
carry out programs and activities that advance United States 
core values and interests in Africa through public and private 
partnerships to facilitate the continent's political transition 
to democratic societies, support economic development through 
trade and investment, encourage the development of African 
civil society, and promote awareness of all Americans about 
Africa.

             ADDITIONAL VIEWS OF REPRESENTATIVE TOM LANTOS

    The Committee and the Congress spoke loudly and clearly in 
the Afghanistan Freedom Support Act of 2002 that the United 
States is committed to an Afghanistan that is dedicated to the 
liberty, literacy, and enrichment of its citizens, and serves 
as a model for democracy and participation for other countries, 
especially those in the Muslim world. Unfortunately, 
Afghanistan today still balances on the precipice between 
security and reconstruction, and a return to unrest and chaos.
    The United States has declared that the ``combat phase'' of 
the war in Afghanistan is over, and its attention will now 
shift to reconstruction and stability operations. However, the 
security situation does not permit any significant 
reconstruction efforts to gain traction. The entire Bonn 
Process and its hope for democratic and peaceful representative 
institutions is seriously threatened by a deteriorating 
security environment, and current U.S. efforts to promote 
greater security are inadequate.
    Basic security is still lacking in the major cities and 
along key highways that are critical to the development of 
Afghanistan. Afghans remain under serious threat from 
terrorism, insurgency, widespread crime, banditry, 
intimidation, rape, suppression of minorities and women, and 
other grave violations of human rights that continue to occur, 
especially in areas that do not have a routine presence of U.S. 
or international security personnel. In March and April of this 
year, there have been approximately twenty attacks on US and 
Afghan military forces and civilians as well as on 
international relief workers. According to USAID's Inspector 
General, AID staff are nearly captives in their own compounds, 
able to venture out into the countryside for brief periods and 
only under heavy armed escort. NGO aid workers have no such 
protection. Taliban and al-Qaeda terrorists are deliberately 
targeting US and foreign civilian aid workers to drive them 
from the country and stop Afghanistan's transformation.
    Training of an Afghan National Army is seriously behind 
schedule and will not be at full strength for several years. 
Police training is almost non-existent. Disarmament and 
reintegration of militias and irregulars has not even begun. 
The International Security Assistance Force, soon to be taken 
over by NATO, will not increase in size or capability, nor 
operate outside of Kabul.
    The Administration's response to this security vacuum has 
been to tout its lightly-armed, platoon-sized ``Provincial 
Reconstruction Teams'' to bring order to small areas in major 
cities, and to promise to pursue terrorists and bandits. This 
is well-intentioned but completely inadequate. Pursuit of 
terrorists after they have terrorized does little to encourage 
aid workers and investors to risk their personal and financial 
safety to rebuild Afghanistan: ``we will avenge you'' is not so 
reassuring as ``we will protect you.''
    Unless we address these security gaps immediately, 
Afghanistan could slide back into chaos and again become a 
haven for global terrorists.
                                                        Tom Lantos.